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Issue 4

United Kingdom

A D V A N C E S

I N

H E A L T H

T E C H N O L O G Y

INDUSTRY

h t l a e h e h T n o i t c e n n o c

alth e h le e t d n a e r a c s of tele it f e n e b e h t g in r Explo

ABHI and Medilink UK fly the flag for ethical behaviour Medilink UK Awards 2012 Life science events calendar April-Sept 2012


Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Innovation, health and wealth According to the recent ‘Innovation, Health and Wealth’ report, the Government is throwing its weight behind the diffusion of innovation in the NHS and investment in R&D, potentially providing huge commercial opportunities for industry. With this in mind, Medilink UK has signed a formal Concordat with the Department of Health to work together to accelerate adoption of telehealth and telecare by the NHS. As a leading partner in the ‘3 Million Lives’ initiative, we will be looking at ways to address the challenges to wholescale adoption of these technologies while positioning our members to take commercial advantage of the opportunities as they become available. We’re already working with NHS procurement to better position SMEs and improve their opportunity to respond to public sector contracts, as well as discussing supply chain challenges with the Department of Health’s Procurement, Investment and Commercial Division (PICD). Medilink UK is also working directly with the cabinet office, to address the red tape challenges that are damaging the prosperity of SMEs.

Design for Life Brand-led design and marketing for Life Sciences • Branding • Graphic design • Web and digital design • Technical web development • Social media • Events • Publications

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As well as driving changes through Government, we’re promoting the Code of Business Practice with the ABHI to raise standards across industry and enhance the credibility and integrity of our sector, and a memorandum of understanding has been signed with One Nucleus, an international biotechnology network, which will give our members much more opportunity to collaborate with innovative, global biotech firms. I urge all our members to look at the work we’re doing, and see how you can capitalise on the in-roads we’ve been making on your behalf.

Tony Davis Chairman, Medilink UK

PUBLISHED BY

www.medilinkuk.com


CON T E N TS

Issue 4

PRODUCTS

FEATURES

Connect and deliver

The health connection

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16-17

Alliance strikes a cord

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Virtual visiting

25

PROJECTS

Flying the flag for ethical behaviour

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Diagnostics at the heart of the community

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7 Schooner Way, Atlantic Wharf, Cardiff CF10 4DZ Tel: 029 2047 3456 Web: www.mediwales.com The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent the opinions of individual Medilink UK members unless explicitly stated. © MediWales Ltd. 2011

View an interactive version of this edition at www.medilinkuk.com

In brief

26-30

Produced by MediWales for Medilink UK Designed by Teamworks Design & Marketing Contact: Editor: Jess Fisher jess@uklifescienceindustry.com Advertising & Coordination: Ruth Campbell ruth@uklifescienceindustry.com

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Editor

Telecom to telecare

PRODUCTS

Jess Fisher

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FEATURES

From technologies allowing patients to monitor their conditions at home, to collaborations improving stem cell research, the ‘project’, ‘product’ and ‘in brief ’ sections highlight current innovations influencing British clinical pathways.

Life science event calendar

Intuitive imaging

12-15

CALENDAR

Our lead feature focuses on the 3 Million Lives Campaign – a collaborative effort between government, the English NHS, patients and industry to roll out telehealth and telecare technologies and services into the NHS. Specifically we focus on the role of companies in this delivery and explore what they have to gain.

2012 Medilink UK Awards

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The new financial year begins with the announcement of a new Health and Social Care Bill. Placing clinicians as commissioners and increased healthcare delivery on the open market, patient care is evolving. Forming part of this reform is the provision of telehealth and telecare. These monitors and sensors aid the movement of healthcare delivery from hospital to home; geared to give dignity and independence to patients as cost effectively as possible.

Through thick and thin

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The health connection The business case for adopting telehealth technologies has finally been made. Talking to active stakeholders of the resultant 3 Million Lives Campaign, Jess Fisher explores industry’s involvement.

We’re living longer. Babies born in the UK today are almost eight times more likely to reach 100 than those born in 19311 - but a longer life is not necessarily a healthy one. The Office for National Statistics reports that 40% of people aged 65+ in the UK have a limiting longstanding illness. This is the context that’s seen an increased use of telehealth technology to support the care of people with chronic conditions. It is part of a shift from hospital to home that improves a patient’s quality of life, whilst reducing the costs for a stretched NHS.

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With health technologies evolving over the past 20 years, two complementary technology groups have been distinguished - telehealth and telecare. Telehealth focuses on electronic

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equipment that monitors people’s vital signs, such as blood pressure, remotely or in transit, with the results automatically sent to an appropriate healthcare professional. Telecare involves electronic sensors and aids that make the home environment safer so that people can live at home, independently, for longer. Despite the array of these technologies currently on the market, clinical data proving their benefits has been lacking; the up-front cost to buy the technologies is too high; and there is as yet no universally shared communications platform. This has all contributed to the somewhat unsystematic and half-hearted adoption of telehealth by the UK’s healthcare professionals.


FE AT U R E S

Aiming to provide some much needed evidence, in 2006 The Department of Health (DoH) set up the world’s largest randomised control trial of telehealth technology – The Whole Systems Demonstrator Programme (WSD). Testing telehealth against conventional care, 3030 people with diabetes, heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were given access to telehealth.

Key to this whole-scale NHS adoption is an understanding among all stakeholders that this is not about buying technology – this is about the service redesign of healthcare.

The WSD Headlines

The results reported that telehealth can deliver:

The four lead partners are all industry associations representing their members – the designers, engineers, IT specialists, scientists, and manufacturers behind the technologies. Working together they will need to create the right market and business offering that’s attractive to the NHS one that could potentially have zero up front capital costs operating in a pay per use environment. This would ensure any risks are shared between industry and the NHS.

15% 14% 45% 20% 14% 8%

In December 2011, the DoH published the headline results, which provide a solid evidence base to support the whole-scale adoption of telehealth throughout the UK’s healthcare system.

reduction in mortality rates

From the WSD results, the DoH approximates that at least three million people with long term conditions (LTCs) and/or social care needs could benefit from the roll-out of telehealth and telecare in the NHS and social care. This will in turn reduce the burden on acute hospital inpatient use and increase the cost effectiveness of care.

reduction in A&E visits

reduction in elective admissions

reduction in bed days

reduction in tariff costs

Angela Single, Chair of the 3 Million Lives industry group, has a vision for how this will be done: “A detailed work plan is being developed by industry

reduction in emergency admissions

in partnership with the DoH, and other key stakeholders. This work plan will address the key areas needed to reduce barriers to large scale adoption, and will include: the building of market capacity; commissioning; and engagement and communication across industry, stakeholders, primary and secondary care practitioners and commissioners, and the patients and individuals who can benefit from telehealth and telecare.”

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To achieve this level of change, the DoH has committed to work with industry, the NHS, and social care and professional partners in the 3 Million Lives Campaign (3ML). The DoH has signed a concordat with the following partners to develop the initiative: the Telecare Services Association, the Association of British Healthcare Industries, Intellect and Medilink UK.

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A concern raised by some stakeholders, largely laid out in the white paper, is how the soon-to-be clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) and patients themselves will know what characterises a good service and how to navigate the telehealth/telecare landscape.

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Fresh from the first industry working group meeting on February 28th 2012, Angela told UK Lifescience Industry that a communication plan is being formulated to address this: “The plan will include working closely with the DoH to ensure the full WSD results are accurately disseminated and regular updates and briefings will be published to support this positive messaging. In addition, other information such as how-to guides and exemplar case studies will be posted on the 3ML website. Industry will be able to use all the information in their interactions with the CCGs and the NHS.”

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“3ML is also aiming to undertake an ongoing awareness raising campaign by speaking at and hosting events, and writing in publications to continue getting the positive messages out.”

Muxworthy from ACH commented, “The results from the Whole Systems Demonstrator have removed the last clinical barrier to the whole scale adoption of telehealth services.”

Finerday – a company using social networking to make staying in touch with elderly relatives easier - talked to UK Lifescience Industry about how their services can help build positive awareness of this campaign.

Aware of how important interoperability between differing systems and technologies is to managing a patient’s needs, ACH deliver customised clinical managed service packages for Trusts, utilising different telehealth elements as appropriate. They consider factors such as the patient referrals, desired outcomes, liaison with Trust staff and the most appropriate technology for the patient’s condition - whether that’s theirs or another supplier’s that the client is already using.

“Finerday, working with 3 Million Lives, aims to reach one million members in the next twelve months”, comments Howard Bashford from Finerday. Howard believes they can assist the campaign by using consumerorientated free social media to build awareness and help people make the best decisions for their loved ones. “Care decisions for the elderly more often than not involve their children, grandchildren, nieces, neighbours – these one million members will not just be those receiving care, but also their loves ones using the technology. “The use of secure social networking will increase communication between citizens and care providers and allow easy access to patient records and monitoring devices.” Alere Connected Health (ACH), through delivering its own clinical telehealth programmes over four years, has collected positive outcome data on more than 1000 patients. Having eagerly waited for government backed data to support their findings, David

The evidence is now there to support the business case and the companies are ready to implement these changes, but how will 3ML be funded? The expectation from the DoH is that they, alongside industry and the NHS, will resource this campaign, both in terms of capital and manpower. With the health technology market in the UK largely comprising SMEs, some industry stakeholders are dubious as to how they can benefit from the campaign without providing cash injections. Tony Davis, Chairman of Medilink UK, the national health technology


FE AT U R E S

“Industry will be providing both financial and in kind contributions to support the development of the campaign. The industry associations have made financial and resource contributions in order to represent the smaller organisations who can’t afford the time or the resource - this ensures their voice is included. “Industry will help the DoH and the NHS cost a ‘whole year of care’ in order to incentivise the use of technology across primary, acute and community settings, putting patients’ needs first. “Currently, the commissioning of services is done in isolation, without considering other potential care needs. However, in any one year the patient’s journey can be made up of four or five commissioning episodes. The developing tariff will look at technology use across several healthcare settings and produce joined-up models of care – this will reduce the incidence of silo budgeting and its associated problems with procurement.” David Muxworthy of ACH explains further how this service redesign will benefit the different parties involved: “The focus of the 3 Million Lives Campaign is not so much on the technology used but on developing services to manage a patient’s care over time. Trusts don’t have the capital to buy telehealth technology up front; by focusing on service provision the costs can be spread across the lifetime of the contract. ACH operates across the UK on a per patient per day fee – this is affordable for the NHS who recognise savings quickly and results in us, the supplier, receiving regular recurring revenue without delaying patients’ access to better proactively managed care.”

Where companies have already been offering telehealth as part of a service or care package, their case studies will be represented to CCGs and patients through the 3ML website. This will help instil positive messages and understanding of just how patients and budgets can benefit.

Changing how healthcare is delivered across the NHS will always encounter challenges. Adoption of innovation into the NHS causes contention regardless of the technology in question. Nishan Sunthares, from one of the lead 3ML partners - the Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI) – elaborates on the challenges industry will face with this campaign:

“ ”

Industry will be providing both financial and in kind contributions to support the development of the campaign.

“The issues and hurdles of adoption are not unique to telehealth - innovation adoption of any sort is recognised as poor in the NHS. These issues are well known, from the silo nature of clinical activity to ensuring the right incentives and payment mechanisms exist. The central premise is that deploying telehealth is not about the technology, but the changes required in care delivery. There is a greater need for closer alignment between primary and secondary care across the entire patient pathway in order to deploy healthcare more effectively. This is a significant strategic issue for the NHS. “It is why we welcome the NHS report Innovation Health and Wealth. Successful delivery of 3ML is contingent on solid engagement between industry and the NHS – both providers and commissioners – to work to a common goal: improving patient outcomes and quality.” Elaborating on this necessity for providers and commissioners to work collaboratively, Tony Davis from Medilink UK touches on a potential challenge: “The timescales that the

1 Differences in life expectancy between those aged 20,50 and 80 – in 2011 and at birth, James Evans, DWP ad hoc research series http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/adhoc_analysis/2011/diffs_life_expectancy_20_50_80.pdf

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association, explains how the funding mechanism will work:

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

varying partners see as realistic to produce this change in healthcare delivery are different. Industry, as commercial bodies, will expect change to happen quicker than the NHS or the DoH is used to. Patience will be crucial to the successful delivery of this change.” Progress on the campaign is underway, and to date there have been two stakeholder meetings, one with professionals in the NHS and one with industry to discuss how the patient pathway will be improved within a sustainable business model. Stephen Johnson, Deputy Director, Head of Long Term Conditions in the DoH, talked to UK Lifescience Industry about the NHS meeting:

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“We have embarked on the first step of a long term programme of engagement with key stakeholders from the health and social care family. The event held on February 23rd 2012 with representatives from Royal Colleges, the voluntary sector and primary care was a huge success and marked the first of many opportunities to engage in the work. The group discussed how to turn the 3 Million Lives vision into a reality, with a common understanding on the day of the barriers to large scale adoption supported by views and ideas on what was needed to support change across NHS and social care. There were offers of support and endorsement from the many organisations represented on the day, with some committing to utilising their communication channels to get the positive messages of 3 Million Lives out to their members and representatives. Anyone wishing to engage in the work can register their interest via www.3millionlives.co.uk.”

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The passing of the health and social care bill on March 20th 2012, after much correction and contention, has left a proportion of the general public jaundiced as to the future of a fair, patient orientated NHS. There are concerns that GPs do not have the know-how to be commissioners, and

From the left: Jon Lindberg, Head of Healthcare at Intellect; Tony Davis, Medilink UK Chairman; Paul Burstow MP; Peter Ellingworth, Chief Executive of ABHI; and Trevor Single, Chief Executive of Telecare Services Association.

with such pressures for austerity from the government, the NHS will become a vehicle driven by the cheapest deal. Can a privatised NHS be a just one? One argument is that initiatives such as 3ML can build a bridge between commercial benefit and patient benefit. Delivered in collaboration between industry, the NHS, and patients, telehealth and telecare will give patients what they desire – the ability to be cared for in their homes where possible - and if that can boost the economy and/or make savings for the NHS then that’s a win-win for all concerned. Many sceptics’ concerns are actively being addressed by the 3ML campaign. Stakeholders at the industry working group meeting held on February 27th 2012 voted stakeholder engagement; empowering commissioning; and enabling implementation as the most pressing issues to work on. Key deliverables include gaining endorsement and support from stakeholders such as patient groups and developing cohesion with other initiatives such as DALLAS, and the Quality, Innovation, Production and Prevention (QIPP) Long Term Conditions (LTC) programme. To empower commissioning, 3ML will promote ‘do once and share’ commissioner guidance, based on

existing best practice that’s relevant to key patient cohorts, for example, toolkits and template contract specifications. Accrediting services by established bodies such as NICE will be pursued to guide patients and commissioners to the best services. Education and workforce training received the highest percentage of votes, evidencing industry’s understanding of the need to empower patients and commissioners to make informed decisions about patient care in these new clinical pathways. The group will also develop NHS guidance regarding funding and understanding what qualifies as a high impact innovation under the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) payment framework. This will maximise levers to drive the uptake of telehealth and telecare. Over the next six months the industry representatives of 3ML aim to develop the initiatives outlined above with monthly meetings to check progress. The proof is in the pudding and UK Lifescience Industry will be following this campaign through its developments, undoubted stumbling blocks, and hopefully to its whole-scale successes.


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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Knowledge Transfer Network HealthTech and Medicines

Building a Healthy Nation through Business Innovation

Members of HealthTech and Medicines KTN get an Innovation Boost An inclusive national network incorporating the business, clinical and academic base, the HealthTech and Medicines Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) is dedicated to accelerating innovation and technology exploitation in the broad health industry sector. The KTN provides its extensive membership base with support for business innovation through partnerships, funding and knowledge transfer.

By joining the KTN, members gain access to a dynamic, UK-wide knowledge transfer network covering all aspects of medical devices, diagnostics and medicines, with a focus on the priority areas of:

l Assisted Living l Biopharmaceutical and Bioprocessing l Detection and Identification of Infectious

Agents

l First idea l Finding academic and industrial partners for product design, development and manufacturing scale-up l Proof of concept l Developing prototypes l Connecting with clinical and market need l Getting access to finance

Facilitating Collaborations & Partnerships A key aspect of the HealthTech and Medicines KTN’s role is facilitating collaboration between businesses and researchers. The KTN brings different parts of the community together, putting members in touch with the right partners in order to develop new areas of collaboration or speed up current developments, through: l An annual programme of events l Clusters of like-minded people through KTN’s specialist groups l Building supply and value chains

l Medical Devices and Diagnostics

l Suggesting possible partnerships

l Regenerative Medicines

l Personal introductions

l Stratified Medicines

l Disseminating members’ capabilities or needs

The KTN supports its members by facilitating knowledge of technologies and relationships with experts, while also providing a breadth of contacts, knowledge of the UK innovation landscape and advice on funding opportunities.

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KTN members are able to benefit from meeting with their peers supported by one-on-one consultations on their specific needs, receiving impartial advice from the KTN team to enable them to find all the support and expertise they need at any stage across the innovation chain:

An example of the KTN’s efforts to foster collaboration is its joint activity with regeNer8 and the University of Manchester Incubation Company (UMIC), which aims to create and connect the regenerative medicine supply chain. “Multidisciplinary meetings of this kind can only help to speed progress in the range of development areas that will be needed to bring Regenerative Medicine to the clinic,” says Dr John Dodgson (President, RoBio Systems).

For more information and details on how to engage with the HealthTech and Medicines KTN community,

visit www.innovateuk.org/healthktn


Helping members access £millions of funding The HealthTech and Medicines KTN team’s experience and expertise in the health industries enable it to support the sector in leveraging investment and building critical mass, by offering expert knowledge and advice on: l Public funding opportunities including Technology Strategy Board (TSB), Department of Health/National Institute for Health Research, and Research Councils l EC Framework Programme and forthcoming Horizon 2020 l Other funding routes that can fill the funding gap, e.g. charities, regional and national proof of concept funds l Contacts into private venture

The KTN has helped its members access significant amounts of funding: l Over £4.5m was awarded through the TSB to over 40 UK companies, to support R&D in regenerative medicine. Over 70% of these companies had direct KTN contact and support in the lead up to these awards. l With the KTN’s help in forming collaborations through workshops and official group meetings, UK bioprocessing companies have secured around £20m over the past five years via the TSB Collaborative R&D programme. Dr Aidan Courtney (CEO, Roslin Cells) recognises the value of KTN support in securing finance: “Technology Strategy Board funding, and the support of the HealthTech and Medicines KTN has been critical for the establishment of the UK Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine industry.”

Opening doors to UK & global networks The HealthTech and Medicines KTN provides a single port of call for knowledge transfer between companies, universities, investors, healthcare professionals and technology organisations. Together with an annual programme of networking opportunities and events, the KTN’s specialist groups in strategic clinical or technology areas enable members to interact with a ready-made, dynamic community, in order to: l Home in on resources to address issues specific to their work l Foster new partnerships l Identify opportunities l Flag up potential issues or roadblocks l Share best practice Complementing the networking programme, the KTN’s active web portal keeps members connected, enabling them to: l Exchange information and knowledge with an expert community

l Use online tools to explore projects and issues with partners

Foreign and Commonwealth Office Science and Innovation Network, while KTN international events and missions help members to make contacts with a view to forging collaborations, as well as gaining insights into overseas markets.

l Stay up to date with relevant funding and technology partnering opportunities and events The KTN’s work in opening doors to wider networks is not confined to the UK, however. It provides technology and market knowledge in a global context and is involved in developing international networks, supporting business engagement in the US, China, Japan and Europe. KTN members have access to overseas networks including the

As Tom Buckland (VP Research and Development, ApaTech) has found, “Without the KTN we would never have interacted with such a large and disparate range of companies and individuals.”

Technology Strategy Board Driving Innovation

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

2012 Medilink UK Awards

Pioneering life science technologies were given their due recognition this March at the 2012 National Medilink UK Awards.

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This year the Medilink UK Awards partnered with the 10th anniversary celebration of the international BioWales conference. Hosted as part of BioWales’ gala dinner, the Awards took place at the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff on March 13th.

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The Awards celebrate cutting edge healthcare products, outstanding business achievements and international success across the UK’s life sciences sector. Hosted by Sir Christopher Evans OBE, over 400 guests from UK government, research institutes and overseas organisations attended this vibrant evening of networking, celebration and entertainment.

Nominees had already been through a tough selection process: every year the Medilink UK organisations hold their own regional competitions, judged by panels of specialists. The winners are then entered into the national Medilink UK Awards, competing for prizes in five categories: Start up, Innovation, Outstanding

Achievement, Partnership with the NHS, and Export Achievement. The headline sponsor for the Medilink UK Awards 2012 was Eversheds LLP. Through membership of organisations such as Medilink UK and ABPI, Eversheds is familiar with the developments in legislation that might affect


F E AT U R E S

The Innovation Award

Sponsored by the HealthTech & Medicines KTN

Sir Christopher Evans OBE

Able to produce atomic-level images of virus and protein structures to better understand deadly diseases, XCAM picked up the Innovation Award. XCAM’s advanced camera systems produce these images by employing highly sophisticated x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). These generate high-intensity electromagnetic radiation by accelerating electrons to rapid speeds and directing them through special magnetic structures. Using the X-ray flashes of the XFEL, scientists are able to map the atomic details of cells before the sample itself is destroyed by the process. Such detailed imagery is generating a greater worldwide understanding of how potentially deadly viruses might be better managed. The company, a spin out from the world class X-ray and Observational Astronomy Group at the University of Leicester, now supplies into major science applications globally, delivering technically challenging custom and prototype systems. CEO Karen Holland says, ”Using camera technology which can capture images during the momentary XFEL flashes is crucial to this research and we are now working closely with leading laboratories in the field who recognise our capability in this area. ”Notably we have supplied cameras to the XFEL experiment at Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Germany where they were used to take world-leading images of the giant mimivirus, and we were involved in developing the specification for a unique detector that is now used at the Japanese XFEL facility at Spring8 for similar applications. Better understanding of the mimivirus structure will result in a leap forward in the development of future antivirus products and subsequent healthcare.” For more information: www.xcam.co.uk

Visit www.eversheds.com for more information.

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businesses in life sciences. With offices across the UK, Eversheds provides a comprehensive service through specialist departments, including intellectual property; corporate finance; venture/ development capital; competition; and environment.

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F E AT U R E S

Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

The Start-up Award

Export Achievement Award

Winner of the Start-up Award, Preventx, is making patient diagnosis easier using popular online platforms.

The Export Achievement Award was won by Wiltshire based NanoSight.

Sponsored by Surgical Innovations

Preventx Ltd has realised a market opportunity in sexual health, providing the NHS with Chlamydia tests online via www.freetest.me. Today’s tech-savvy youth use the internet regularly, and research from Facebook highlights young people’s preference to order a free Chlamydia test online, avoiding a potentially embarrassing visit to a sexual health clinic or chemist. Chlamydia is characteristically asymptomatic and with a suspected one in ten of under 25 year olds infected (www. healthprotectionagency.com), the potential for the disease to be left untreated is high. To carry out the test, young people visit www.freetest.me.uk, request a Chlamydia test and choose how they would like to receive their results – by SMS text, email or online results tracking - all in complete confidence. The tests are paid for by participating NHS trusts, and are completely free to young people. The test is sent to the recipient and requires urine or a swab to be returned to their lab. For the NHS, this service is extremely cost-effective and saves valuable time. Preventx’s integrated diagnostic platform is being used by 50 Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), with circa 50,000 tests being completed per annum. 93% of PCT feedback has been highly positive. Their success is also evident by the company’s third year turnover, which is almost five times that of its first year. Neil Cooper, Managing Director of Preventx, commented: “We believe our comprehensive online service is a world first - only last week The Kings Fund think tank explained how the NHS is ‘failing to use everyday technologies such as email and the internet’, precisely the vision we have already implemented. For freetest.me, this felt like a ‘Blue Peter’ moment!” Looking forward, the Preventx lab is set up and awaiting accreditation in 2012, with plans to expand its integrated diagnostics platform and freetest.me for other health screening.

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For more information: www.preventx.com

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Sponsored by HSBC

Nanotechnology, increasingly used in health applications and research, has proven results enhancing imaging for medical diagnostics and therapeutics. Recognising the growing needs and potential of this market has led to the success of NanoSight, whose outstanding export figures have been rewarded at the Medilink UK Awards 2012. NanoSight’s unique nanoparticle tracking analysis systems have enabled more than 400 research teams worldwide to better understand the behaviour of materials on the submicron scale. Using a single instrument, their technology can visualise, measure and characterise virtually all nanoparticles. NanoSight provides real time monitoring of the subtle changes in the characteristics of particle populations with all of these analyses uniquely confirmed by visual validation. Nanosight’s unique systems and research are playing a major role in advancing biodiagnostics. The NanoSight devices detect and count bio-nanoparticles (exosomes). This helps detect the early onset of several disorders, such as Parkinson’s, diabetes, and pre-eclampsia, as raised levels of exosomes are present in those diseases. Testament to their growing success, NanoSight was ranked in the Deloitte 2011 UK Technology Fast 50 and named as a winner in the Technology Fast 500 EMEA 2011. Export sales to 24 countries, across five continents, increased by a fantastic 73.4% between 2010 and 2011. For more information: www.nanosight.com


FE AT U R E S

Outstanding Achievement Award Sponsored by MedilinkUK.com

With almost three decades working in healthcare, multi-award winning Park House Healthcare picked up the Outstanding Achievement Award. The company specialise in the supply of pressure relieving and reducing equipment, hospital beds, and moving and handling solutions to the NHS, communities and nursing homes. Their product portfolio is fully supported by dedicated clinical training, professional product audit and complete maintenance and decontamination services, all aimed at reducing the ongoing costs of care. Park House Healthcare has had a fantastic start to the year: from the fourth annual Certificate Presentation on February 7th 2012 where 24 members of staff gained qualifications across a variety of disciplines, to the high profile invitation to join Lord Darzi for a networking lunch at Arab Health 2012 in Dubai. Despite the unstable economy, the company’s mantra “getting patients better quicker” and its commitment to develop innovative products and services has enabled stabilised growth, sustaining sales and profits. This steady growth has resulted in their expansion, with a 27% increase in staff. With this employment influx, training and standards remain important with 87% of employees holding NVQ level 2-3 qualifications and an introduction of an apprenticeship scheme. A key player in life sciences, the company has established links with governing bodies such as the British Healthcare Trades Association, leading key steering groups and developing ‘best practice’ models. Working partnerships with a number of NHS Trusts are helping Park House Healthcare develop key initiatives in many areas including reducing infection rates and improving training standards.

Partnership with the NHS Award

Sponsored by the National Institute for Social Care and Health Research (NISCHR)

Maverick TV has been awarded the Medilink UK ‘Partnership with the NHS Award’ for its range of media products that give patients better access to healthcare services. From a mobile clinic to live video feeds, Maverick TV is bridging the gap between healthcare and new media. Their projects so far, including Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies: Live from the Clinic, and the online My VideoDoctor and My Healthchecker, both available at www. channel4embarressingillness.com, have demonstrated the public’s positive reaction to media facilitated healthcare. The online and text ‘Symptom Checker’ give personalised feedback, provided by NHS Direct, and Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies: Live from the Clinic demonstrates the public’s interest in health and diagnosis but also encourages viewers to take online tests on My Healthchecker. More than 2.5 million tests were taken over the first series. In these times of austerity, industry partnerships with the NHS have never been more important as UK Lifescience Industry explored in Edition 3 pages 4-9. This Medilink UK Award recognises Maverick TV’s advances in eHealth, opening lines of consumer communication to help improve patients’ proactivity with their healthcare and connect more easily with the NHS. In addition to these services, My Healthchecker and My VideoDoctor are developing a fantastic information resource for researchers. Some online tests have been developed in partnership with specialist organisations such as Cambridge Autism Research Centre to ensure reliability. The anonymous data can be shared with others, formulating evidence for use in future research. For more information: www.mavericktv.co.uk

2012 ISSUE 4

For more information: www.parkhouse-hc.com

15


Sunday

Monday

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Saturday

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2

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July

April

Life science event calendar Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2

3

4 One Nucleus: BioWednesday,

5

6

7

11

12

13

14

Partnering with Astra Zeneca making the process more transparent, London

14

10th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Germany

15

16

17 Design & Innovation Masterclass,

18 KTN: Biomaterials, Particles,

Bubbles, Capsules & Fibres for Healthcare, London

Birmingham

19 3 Million Lives - get involved! Birmingham

20 KTN: Mind the Gap - linking

innovation to application in healthcare technologies, London

8

21

22

23

One Nucleus: Network Meeting, Cambridge

24 Online & Digital Marketing for

25 Scottish Enterprise: Diagnostics Partnering, Edinburgh

Non-Marketeers, Birmingham

Healthcare FP7 funding calls for 2013, Nottingham

29

15

Essential Lab Techniques, Nottingham

26

27

28

30 ERA-IB: Industrial Biotechnology for

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 BIA: The New NHS Reforms and the

2 One Nucleus: BioWednesday -

3 The Legal Implications of the Cloud,

4

5

9

10

11

12

Impact on Industry, London

6

7

13

14

Making your IP Investable, London

8

Nottingham

UKTI: UK-In4matics - Healthcare Informatics Expo, Birmingham

C-TRIC: 4th Annual Translational Medicine Conference, Derry, N.Ireland

World of Health IT Conference 2012, Copenhagen

15

16

17 One Nucleus: Life Science Leadership 18

ABHI: MedTech Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia

Wellcome Trust: Health Innovation Challenge Fund (round 6), funding deadline

22

23

One Nucleus: CNS and Ageing Networking Seminar, London

28

Hospitalar, Sao Paulo

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Medtec UK Conference & Exhibition 2012, Birmingham

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30 Scottish Enterprise: Telehealth and

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27 UKTI: Advamed US Mission,

28

29

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31 30

31

26

NIHR: Surgery Research, funding deadline

1 (June)

registration deadline

EuroMedtech 2012, France

MIE: 24th European Medical Informatics Conference, Italy

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

3

4

5

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2 2012 World Biomaterials Congress, China

10

4 11

5

6

2012 World Biomaterials Congress, China

Technology, Birmingham

12 KTN: Economic Evaluations &

Economic Evidence in Healthcare, York

Scottish Enterprise: Scottish Technology Showcase, Glasgow

17

18

7 MDU: Simulation and Medical

in Therapeutic Protein Production Event, London

i4i: Product Development Awards (4th Call), funding deadline

20

9

Discovery, funding deadline

13 One Nucleus: BioWednesday, London 14 KTN: 3rd Annual Modern Challenges 15 UKTI: Nano and Biotechnology for

Have You Got a Patent For That? Birmingham

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8 Wellcome Trust: Seeding Drug

16

September

June

11th Annual BioDundee International Conference, Dundee

3

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Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

2

3 Wellcome Trust: Health Innovation

4

5 One Nucleus: BioWednesday,

6

7

8

14

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Challenge Fund (round 7), funding deadline

London

NET: 23rd International Networking for Healthcare Education, Cambridge

9

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11 MATCH: Med-Tech Innovation

Healthcare, Spain

12

13 Clinical Trials for Non-scientists, Birmingham

Conference and Exhibition, London

BIO India International Conference, Mumbai

ABHI: Export Seminar a focus on Russia

21 KTN: Getting the Best Out of Search 22

23

16

17

18

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VPH: Integrative Approaches to Computational Biomedicine, London

Filters, York

Building the Future Paradigm in Drug Discovery and Development - East Midlands

EPUAP: 15th Annual European Pressure Ulcer Meeting, Cardiff

Scottish Enterprise: NHS Scotland event BIO International Convention (Biotechnology & Pharmaceuticals), USA

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24

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26 One Nucleus: Life Science

ABHI: Delivering the NHS Procurement Strategy Conference, London

25

26 ABHI: Government Affairs Conference 27 One Nucleus: Network Meeting, 2012, London

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Leadership Series - Healthcare Technologies, Cambridge

ACHEMA International Exhibition (Life Sciences), Germany

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funding deadline

International Mission to FIME 2012, Florida, USA

25

Telecare Learning Network Event, Edinburgh

Sunday

20 Wellcome Trust: Translation Awards, 21

UKTI: Hospitalar, registration deadline

Scottish Development International, ChinaBio 2012, China

27

19

19

Innovation Day 2012, Nottingham

UKTI: ACHEMA International Exhibition, Germany, registration deadline

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18 One Nucleus: Network Meeting,

Series - Infectious Diseases & Vaccines, Cambridge

UKTI: BIO International Convention, USA, registration deadline

20

August

May

Monday

17

i4i: Challenge Awards (1st Call), funding deadline

Europe - an integrated approach, funding deadline

Sunday

16

Cambridge

ABPI: Annual Conference and Dinner 2012 – can we afford innovation in medicine? London

TSB: Sustainable Manufacturing for the Process Industry - feasibility and R&D, funding deadline

10

STTI: European Conference - Diversity Across Europe, Implications for Nursing, Cardiff

UKTI: Medical Technologies Trade Mission to China (including CMEF) KTN: Nano4Life 2012, Stevenage

9

29

30

Cambridge

Consumer Led Healthcare - a business opportunity for the service sector, Birmingham

*Please note, this information was provided by third parties, and although correct to the best of our knowledge, we cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies. For more information about these events and funding calls contact the event organisers, or speak to your local Medilink (contact details are on the back cover of this publication).

KEY UK Lifescience Industry Partners’ Events

Medilink UK Events

International Events

Funding and Registration Deadlines

Other


Sunday

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Life science event calendar Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1 Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

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Saturday

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4 One Nucleus: BioWednesday,

5

6

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Partnering with Astra Zeneca making the process more transparent, London

14

10th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Germany

15

16

17 Design & Innovation Masterclass,

18 KTN: Biomaterials, Particles,

Bubbles, Capsules & Fibres for Healthcare, London

Birmingham

19 3 Million Lives - get involved! Birmingham

20 KTN: Mind the Gap - linking

innovation to application in healthcare technologies, London

8

21

22

23

One Nucleus: Network Meeting, Cambridge

24 Online & Digital Marketing for

25 Scottish Enterprise: Diagnostics Partnering, Edinburgh

Non-Marketeers, Birmingham

Healthcare FP7 funding calls for 2013, Nottingham

29

15

Essential Lab Techniques, Nottingham

26

27

28

30 ERA-IB: Industrial Biotechnology for

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1 BIA: The New NHS Reforms and the

2 One Nucleus: BioWednesday -

3 The Legal Implications of the Cloud,

4

5

9

10

11

12

Impact on Industry, London

6

7

13

14

Making your IP Investable, London

8

Nottingham

UKTI: UK-In4matics - Healthcare Informatics Expo, Birmingham

C-TRIC: 4th Annual Translational Medicine Conference, Derry, N.Ireland

World of Health IT Conference 2012, Copenhagen

15

16

17 One Nucleus: Life Science Leadership 18

ABHI: MedTech Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia

Wellcome Trust: Health Innovation Challenge Fund (round 6), funding deadline

22

23

One Nucleus: CNS and Ageing Networking Seminar, London

28

Hospitalar, Sao Paulo

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NIHR: Surgery Research, funding deadline

1 (June)

registration deadline

EuroMedtech 2012, France

MIE: 24th European Medical Informatics Conference, Italy

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

3

4

5

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2 2012 World Biomaterials Congress, China

10

4 11

5

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2012 World Biomaterials Congress, China

Technology, Birmingham

12 KTN: Economic Evaluations &

Economic Evidence in Healthcare, York

Scottish Enterprise: Scottish Technology Showcase, Glasgow

17

18

7 MDU: Simulation and Medical

in Therapeutic Protein Production Event, London

i4i: Product Development Awards (4th Call), funding deadline

20

9

Discovery, funding deadline

13 One Nucleus: BioWednesday, London 14 KTN: 3rd Annual Modern Challenges 15 UKTI: Nano and Biotechnology for

Have You Got a Patent For That? Birmingham

19

8 Wellcome Trust: Seeding Drug

16

September

June

11th Annual BioDundee International Conference, Dundee

3

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

2

3 Wellcome Trust: Health Innovation

4

5 One Nucleus: BioWednesday,

6

7

8

14

15

21

22

Challenge Fund (round 7), funding deadline

London

NET: 23rd International Networking for Healthcare Education, Cambridge

9

10

11 MATCH: Med-Tech Innovation

Healthcare, Spain

12

13 Clinical Trials for Non-scientists, Birmingham

Conference and Exhibition, London

BIO India International Conference, Mumbai

ABHI: Export Seminar a focus on Russia

21 KTN: Getting the Best Out of Search 22

23

16

17

18

19

20

VPH: Integrative Approaches to Computational Biomedicine, London

Filters, York

Building the Future Paradigm in Drug Discovery and Development - East Midlands

EPUAP: 15th Annual European Pressure Ulcer Meeting, Cardiff

Scottish Enterprise: NHS Scotland event BIO International Convention (Biotechnology & Pharmaceuticals), USA

23

24

25

26 One Nucleus: Life Science

ABHI: Delivering the NHS Procurement Strategy Conference, London

25

26 ABHI: Government Affairs Conference 27 One Nucleus: Network Meeting, 2012, London

28

27

28

29

Leadership Series - Healthcare Technologies, Cambridge

ACHEMA International Exhibition (Life Sciences), Germany

24

funding deadline

International Mission to FIME 2012, Florida, USA

25

Telecare Learning Network Event, Edinburgh

Sunday

20 Wellcome Trust: Translation Awards, 21

UKTI: Hospitalar, registration deadline

Scottish Development International, ChinaBio 2012, China

27

19

19

Innovation Day 2012, Nottingham

UKTI: ACHEMA International Exhibition, Germany, registration deadline

21

18 One Nucleus: Network Meeting,

Series - Infectious Diseases & Vaccines, Cambridge

UKTI: BIO International Convention, USA, registration deadline

20

August

May

Monday

17

i4i: Challenge Awards (1st Call), funding deadline

Europe - an integrated approach, funding deadline

Sunday

16

Cambridge

ABPI: Annual Conference and Dinner 2012 – can we afford innovation in medicine? London

TSB: Sustainable Manufacturing for the Process Industry - feasibility and R&D, funding deadline

10

STTI: European Conference - Diversity Across Europe, Implications for Nursing, Cardiff

UKTI: Medical Technologies Trade Mission to China (including CMEF) KTN: Nano4Life 2012, Stevenage

9

29

30

Cambridge

Consumer Led Healthcare - a business opportunity for the service sector, Birmingham

*Please note, this information was provided by third parties, and although correct to the best of our knowledge, we cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies. For more information about these events and funding calls contact the event organisers, or speak to your local Medilink (contact details are on the back cover of this publication).

KEY UK Lifescience Industry Partners’ Events

Medilink UK Events

International Events

Funding and Registration Deadlines

Other


Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Our research.Your business. The perfect MATCH MATCH aims to transform the medical devices sector by researching, testing and making methods available to cut the time and cost from concept to continuous improvement in the market, in support of device users, the medical device industry, regulators and reimbursement agencies, and healthcare providers such as the NHS. MATCH is a collaboration of four universities (Birmingham, Brunel, Nottingham & Ulster), jointly researching, training and engaging towards this end.

MATCH Courses Sold to the NHS: making business decisions for new medical devices The medical sector is different from other sectors in at least two ways. Firstly, because statistics of illness are kept, giving a clear indication of the size of potential markets for technologies that address a given illness. Second, healthcare providers are increasingly seeking to understand the value-for-money proposition that the technology they purchase represents. The course focuses on accessible methods to identify the commercial potential of medical devices. The methods and analysis presented will be suitable in the following situations. ● Application at the conceptual stage when a

company must decide whether to pursue an idea. ● Application to the stage when the product is

about to be placed on the market. ● Accounting for uncertainty can help to decide

when to invest further in a product.

Not all forms of risk are covered by this theory, but it does link the uncertainty a business carries forward to the strength of the statistics from clinical and other trials that the product may have undergone.

Understanding Device Users: from traditional methods to social media User involvement in medical device development is vital to help ensure the quality and safety of devices. This workshop will provide insights into the barriers to this as well as an overview of strategies to overcoming these, an accessible overview of tried and tested approaches to user involvement in the context of relevant human factors regulations and standards and guidance about determining the number of users needed for device evaluation. Increasingly social media provides a way of accessing user views that may be relevant at all stages of the device development process. An introduction to this area will be followed by a demonstration of MATCH resources in this area: ● MATCH Campaign tool; and ● MATCH Tweetcatcher.

For medical device companies in search of user requirements the advent of social media offers opportunities to reach individuals and specialist communities, and to gather business intelligence on the competition.

Who should attend: ● Industry and investors seeking informed product development

decisions based on health technology assessment. ● R&D Managers wishing to integrate health economic

considerations into New Product Development Systems. ● Marketing Managers seeking to differentiate products based

on cost-effectiveness. ● Sales Managers seeking to articulate the value proposition of

innovative products.

Dates and Venues: Business Decisions for New Medical Devices The Headroom Approach 16th April Birmingham Austin Court 11th May London Hilton Paddington 8th June Nottingham Crowne Plaza 6th July London Hilton Paddington 20th Sept Birmingham Austin Court 26th Oct London Hilton Paddington

Registration and Sponsorship Standard price £499.00 + VAT Early bird non-member price £300.00 + VAT (The early bird discount will be closing on the 7th of each month the course is running)

MATCH Affiliates price £200.00 + VAT

Understanding Device Users: from traditional methods to social media 22nd March Nottingham Crowne Plaza 26th April London Hilton Paddington 24th May Nottingham Crowne Plaza 21st June London Hilton Paddington 27th Sept London Hilton Paddington 25th Oct Nottingham Crowne Plaza

®

For information on MATCH courses please contact Elizabeth Deadman at match@brunel.ac.uk 01895 266050 or check the MATCH website: www.match.ac.uk/courses.php


Course 1: Reachi FE AT U The R Eadvent S of social – in business as we search of user requi reach individuals an business intelligenc

Business Decisions for New Medical Devices -

ABHI and Medilink UK fly the MATCH Courses flag for ethical behaviour The Headroom Approach

16th April Birmingham Austin Court

11th May London Hilton Paddington

8th June Nottingham Crowne Plaza 6th July London Hilton Paddington

20th Sept Birmingham Austin Court

Oct ofLondon HiltonPractice, Paddington The ABHI26th Code Business introduced as a requirement for ABHI members in April 2008, is soon to Understanding Device Users: be available to other members of the from traditional methods to socialamedia medical technology sector through

pricing and investment in a Coursethe 3: Medical Although NHS has adevices: reputation as a slow adopter of new technology, it has to be said that medical device companies cost-sensitive environment: rarely make the best case foroftheir Tacitly or overtly, anacademics increasingly foris staff. Similarly to the Code, the aim In line with the Code, theevidence ABHI isvalue-for-money inoffering. MATCH andpilot researchers have worked sales, with even industry and healthcare is for the logo scheme to be rolled out a yearlong phase toinintroduce important factor making in countries where explicit procurement agencies for many Paradoxically, years – inwider medical technology sector to the an Ethicaltechnology Compliance Logo Scheme. cost-effectiveness analysis is not required. research, assessment and consultancy and from this course offers September Limited to ABHI’s and their companies operating inpartner the UK have a–global edge because NICE 2012. Eucomed’s members, the logo will to support the device vendors. a distillation of their experience has been promoting cost-effectiveness for more than a decade.

Course 2: Five rea NHS and how to m Although the NHS h technology, it has to rarely make the bes and researchers hav technology procure assessment and con distillation of their e

collaborative with Medilink 22ndpartnership March Nottingham Crowne Plazabe awarded upon meeting certain In order to maximise the impact of MATCH, we havesystems focused on the accessibility of suchit must be adopted by the In Under trying to sell products or services, many companies: requirements, such as having a UK. this Code 26th April London Hilton Paddington methods – developing simple tools and workbooks, foralready instance – up of 3000 medical structured documented ethical made 1. and Fail to make appropriate comparisons withentire what issector Developed24th to May avoid corruption scandals Nottingham Crowne Plaza also in extending its use beyond the primary case in complianceand training programme in place technology companies. out there (thus losing credibility) due to previous of ethical regulation, 21st Junelack London Hilton Paddington convincing the customer. and to safeguard the invaluable 2. Mishandle the literature (thus making claims that are 27th Sept London Hilton Paddington relationships between industry and readily refuted by any expert) We encourage a ‘hands on’ approach at the workshops, with 25th Oct Nottingham Crowne Plaza health-care professionals (HCPs), the 3.everyone Mistakefor marketing (thus making a pitch Reasons adopting the code: working on for theiranalysis own laptop. Questions are encouraged Code provides ABHI members with a instead of a case) protective tool. and time is made available afterwards for a fruitful group 1. Creating ethical platform forespecially relationships 4.discussion. Fail toan make an appropriate case, in addressing A wide range of participants from the NHS,with the end users will increase Company interactions with HCPs companies’ opportunities for product development areas with little or no evidence medical device industry and innovation service providers haveand innovation with are addressed by guidelines covering clinicians. 5.resulted Fail to address the full context of introducing a technology in cross-sector networking opportunities. The sponsorship of product training and into the service education, support of third party overall feedback from the workshops has been very positive, with 2. The Code provides guidelines to ensure dialogue between suppliers and education conferences, sales and participants leaving with a workshop specific delegate pack. HCPs is comprehensive, focused on technical and business matters and not promotional meetings, arrangements contaminated by bad practice. with consultants, provision of gifts, reimbursement, donations for charitable 3. The Code ensures that high professional standards are maintained without purposes, and educational grants. In any need for restrictive government intervention addition there is an extensive Q&A section, revised regularly, addressing 4. The Code sets a standard for best practice in sales and marketing, helping specific issues companies are likely to to establish customer trust face in their day-to-day interactions with HCPs. 5. The propagation of the Code’s message plays a part in strengthening the

The Code also provides a complaints and enforcement mechanism whereby allegations of non-compliance will be dealt with by a Complaints Panel comprising industry experts, laypersons and HCPs. To date there have been no cases for the Panel as they have been resolved through mediation, which is always the first step when a complaint arises and a prima facie case exists.

reputation of the medical technology industry. By using this Code the medical technology sector is responding to the need to formalise and spread standards of practice, developing a system that prevents industry being held in disrepute.

Associaon of Brish Healthcare Industries

Further information on ABHI and its Code of Business Practice can be found at www.abhi.org.uk.

2012 ISSUE 4

Competition law is covered in the Code, outlining general provisions on quality and regulatory compliance, unlawful payments and practices, export controls and sanctions, data privacy, and environmental issues. Shortly, a new section will be introduced dealing with advertising and promotional activities aimed at HCPs. Currently this is not covered by legislation and the ABHI Code will fill this regulatory gap.

19


Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Diagnostics at the heart of the community Helping shift care from hospital to homes, a simple testing kit is set to improve the risk management of cardiovascular disease. Current treatments aimed at reducing the risk of heart attack, stroke and sudden death involve dietary changes and the use of drugs. Two of the most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents aimed to prevent such incidents are aspirin and clopidogrel, with Pera indicating a market for such agents of $600M (UK) and $15B (global). It is estimated that 40% of these drug recipients are not treated optimally because they are unable to make the required trips to hospital for specialist monitoring of their condition. Aiming to alleviate this problem, Platelet Solutions’ portable kit allows for a patient’s blood platelet function to be tested in a convenient location, such as a doctor’s surgery or a patient’s home, rather than requiring costly and inconvenient hospital appointments.

Portable, easy-to-use monitoring systems such as this kit support the efforts being made by many companies, clinicians and patients to redesign clinical pathways and keep healthcare in the community, with patients in the comfort of their homes. Platelet Solutions was created to commercialise the kits that Professor Heptinstall and his team at Nottingham University have been developing in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine in the School of Clinical Sciences. Early results from on-going clinical trials in coronary disease and stroke are encouraging and comparative studies are being performed against four established platelet function testing procedures. As well as helping prevent the development

of heart disease, the kit aims to lead to the early diagnosis of abnormal bleeding, providing significant patient benefit. The trial funding is provided through a prestigious DPFS grant from the Medical Research Council as well as various grants from the university. The equivalent of £40,000 business start-up funding has come from the UK Award in the BioPharm 2020: UK - India Biotechnology Business Challenge. Yet to start trading, the outlook for Platelet Solutions’ kit is promising with the Nottingham University research behind the portable kit being cited in the Research Councils UK/ Universities UK Report as one of the “Big Ideas for the Future”.

2012 ISSUE 4

Platelet Solutions’ CEO, Professor Stan Heptinstall says, “Using a simple portable platelet testing kit provides timely and effective monitoring and allows doctors to check that the patient is taking the most effective medication. This leads to improved and lower cost healthcare and significant cost savings in terms of drug expenditure and treatment for avoidable recurrent thrombotic events.

20

“The combination of better patient care at lower cost and greater convenience makes a very compelling business argument for both private and public health providers. The kits also provide a means of reducing healthcare costs by identifying patients who are adequately treated and do not need newer, expensive and more potent drugs.”

For more information visit www.plateletsolutions.co.uk


P ROD U CTS

Through thick and thin A company has developed the world’s first diagnostic smart strip to help monitor blood clotting in patients. Microvisk’s CoagMax® and CoagLite®, a point-of-care and a home-use test respectively, can be used by clinicians and patients to establish the correct dosage of blood thinning medication, such as Warfarin, to help monitor treatment. There are circa seven million people worldwide using Warfarin. Easily affected by food intake and exercise, patients’ need regular blood tests to ensure they’re receiving the right dose. Too little Warfarin can lead to blood clots possibly resulting in a stroke or a heart attack; too much can lead to a life threatening bleed.

Secondly, because the technology makes dosage testing so simple – results are clearly displayed on a handheld reader - this procedure can also be used outside of the traditional primary and secondary care settings, giving patients more control of their health. SmartStrip® is the world’s first medical diagnostic strip based on a MicroElectro-Mechanical System (MEMS) sensor, used in applications such as the iPhone. The clotting speed of the patient is measured by a tiny multilayered paddle on the surface of the

strip and a memory chip ensures the device is calibrated to provide the highest levels of accuracy. The MEMS technology allows for high volume production of the device at a low cost. Clinical trials of the two devices are progressing in the UK, Germany and the US, with product launches imminent. Feedback from the pilot trials has been extremely positive, with 90% of patients expressing a preference for the Microvisk devices. John Curtis, CEO at Microvisk commented, “We have a huge market opportunity in the US and Germany, where payments have been introduced for all at-risk Warfarin users to do weekly home blood tests, rather than having to go to the doctor or hospital clinic.” Dr Richard Deed, Innovation Unit Manager at TrusTECH who’s been involved getting the device trialled at the Roald Dahl Haemostatis and

Thrombosis Centre at The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, said: “The Microvisk devices are a superb example of the development of better products through collaboration between companies and the NHS.” For more information visit www.microvisk.com

2012 ISSUE 4

Microvisk’s technology has two major advantages over alternative diagnostic technologies: the SmartStrip® only needs a pin prick of a patient’s blood to activate the embedded sensor that measures the blood clotting speed. Whereas optical analysis, for example, requires larger blood samples, which are more painful and produce less accurate results.

21


Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Intuitive imaging The proven sensitivity of DySISmedical’s imaging systems can facilitate better detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions during cervical cancer screening. The product DySIS (Dynamic Spectral Imaging System) measures the intensity and duration of the aceto-whitening phenomenon during cervical cancer screening (colposcopy). A challenging procedure, DySIS differs from traditional colposcopes by measuring the acetowhitening automatically, producing an intuitive map (DySISmap) to assist with diagnosis, biopsy and treatment if needed. DySIS supersedes alternatives as it assesses the aceto-whitening dynamics over the entire tissue in the cervix after the standardised application of dilute acetic acid solution. The information displayed on the pseudo-colour DySISmap can be easily combined

with other clinical observations to assist in the selection of biopsy sites and patient management. DySIS includes a comprehensive on-board patient database allowing for all preexaminations, exam results, treatment plans and post-exam follow-up notes. Alastair Atkinson, Chief Executive Officer of DySISmedical told UK Lifescience Industry “Traditionally, because the analysis is subjective, if there is any question regarding the acetowhitening levels, the patient is recalled. This is costly for the NHS but also produces delays in required treatment and increases the stress for the patient. DySISmap’s proven sensitivity takes the patient out of the recall loop for the NHS.” Two international multi-centre clinical trials have been carried out to assess the clinical effectiveness of DySIS. The latest trial in 2011 was carried out in three

Released on March 28th 2012, a study on DySIS, commissioned by NIHR HTA programme on behalf of NICE, has found that DySIS colposcopy had higher sensitivity and was less costly than conventional colposcopy. These results were robust to the numerous sensitivity analyses that were undertaken. This study’s report, combined with successful clinical trials and positive feedback, highlights DySIS’ potential to better this clinical pathway and impact the lives of women globally. “The clear, reliable quantification of aceto-whitening ensures women can move forward quickly in any treatment to avoid costly, intrusive operations such as a hysterectomy,” says Alastair. “From our own projections, over a five-year adoption

2012 ISSUE 4

period, the DySIS could save the NHS £320 million.”

22

For more information visit www.dysismedical.com

colposcopy clinics in the Netherlands, using the first commercially available version of DySIS. Confirming the first trial’s results, the DySISmap was again significantly more sensitive than conventional colposcopy, aiding clinicians to increase their identification of high-grade patients.


P ROD U CTS

Telecom to telecare Like many telecom providers, Maidstone-based Icom has entered the telecare market, inspired by the potential health applications when fusing CCTV, electronics and security. “One of my colleagues had been on an assisted living course and enthusiastically reported back on his experiences,” recalls Kevin Godfrey, Group Sales Director of Icom. “He described some of the services that were being made available, and I said, ‘we can do that!’” Five years on, Icom has a dedicated telecare division called Telesupport - a monitoring and response service to help people at home – that can provide equipment and expertise for homes or communal schemes. Customers include Kent County Council, MCCH Care Society, British Transport Police, Raven Housing Trust and Ability Housing Association.

Adding to their Telesupport service, Icom has developed a range of monitoring products including the Telesupport Enuresis Sensor. Unlike traditional incontinence mats where plastic exteriors encourage sweating that can give off false alarms, Icom’s sensor is incorporated into a washable cotton mat avoiding sweating and any consequent disturbance to patients and carers. Adding the their portfolio, Icom’s electric profiling bed is designed to help reduce hospital intake and aid early discharge for patients with a huge

range of conditions, including epilepsy, COPD, sleep apnea and diabetes. The bed integrates features such as built-in Bluetooth thermometers, non-invasive blood glucose readings and, if required, a broadband camera that can aid remote diagnosis, wound dressing, physiotherapy and psychiatric assessments. The bed’s built-in sensors produce data that can be wirelessly transmitted to alert a carer or nurse of a problem. Regarding security, Telesupport’s keyless biometric technology provides monitored access to buildings. Using fingerprint identification on a shielded, weatherproof screen, a door can be locked and unlocked by care staff, clients or family members. It only takes a few seconds to programme a user’s fingerprint, and users can be added or deleted by the nominated person at a residence.

Furthermore, when connected to Icom’s Guardian telehealth control hub, access is recorded, helping to verify carer attendance time and duration of visits. “With biometrics, security systems are more reliable, more convenient and most importantly more secure,” says Kevin. “There is no need for vulnerable key safes, and they are far easier to use than keys for elderly residents or people with dementia.”

To find out more about Telesupport visit www.telesupport.org.uk

2012 ISSUE 4

Telesupport makes use of advanced technologies including wireless, broadband and biometrics to detect accidents such as falls in the home, medical incidents such as strokes or heart attacks, and hazards such as fire, floods and intruders. The service ensures that the right people are alerted to an incident, providing the most appropriate response.

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Alliance strikes a cord Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) and Virgin Health Bank are collaborating to improve the availability of cord blood banking and stem cell therapies for UK patients. The alliance, working together to fight leukaemia, lymphoma, and sickle-cell anaemia, is the first of its kind between a National Health Service Foundation Trust and a private cord blood bank. Cord blood is the blood that remains in the umbilical cord after childbirth and is a rich source of stem cells, which can be used to develop therapies. Under the new alliance, mothers delivering babies at the Rosie Hospital in Cambridge will be able to have the cord blood of their newborns collected and stored rather than it being discarded - as is the current practice. If willing, mothers can donate their babies’ stem cells to Virgin Health Bank, who will allow CUH access, increasing the number of stem cell units available for transplant and improving the number of suitably matched units for patients.

2012 ISSUE 4

CUH will generate additional revenue by supplying Virgin Health Bank with high quality cord blood processing, cryopreservation, storage and testing services.

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Dr Rajan Jethwa, Virgin Health Bank’s Chief Executive, said: “The NHS has already used stem cells from Virgin Health Bank in a successful transplant for a child with sickle-cell anaemia. That child is now cured and we hope that, through this partnership, we will be able to contribute to improving the quality of life for patients and saving more lives in the future.”

Virgin Health Bank is owned by Qatar Foundation, the Excalibur Group and the Virgin Group and has already banked hundreds of cord blood units from hospitals in Qatar at its state-of-the-art facility at QSTP.

Dr Jag Ahluwalia, Medical Director with CUH, said: “This collaboration builds on our reputation as a leading centre for stem cell research, and is a wonderful opportunity to increase the access which patients have to potentially life-saving stem cell therapy. “But the benefits of this partnership are not limited to NHS patients in the UK. Under the agreement, we will also register all of the cord blood units on an international bone marrow registry, hopefully helping to save lives locally and further afield.”

Sir Christopher Evans, Chairman of Excalibur Group commented, “I’m delighted we have formed this ground-breaking partnership with Cambridge University Hospitals. Not only is it a further demonstration of Virgin Health Bank’s position as the leading independent cord blood bank, but more importantly it will make additional stem cell units available for transplantation in the UK free of charge to UK transplant teams.”

For more information visit www.virginhealthbank.com or www.cuh.org.uk


P ROJ E CTS

Virtual visiting Sandwell Telecare Assisting You (STAY) is pioneering this telecare service, which is jointly funded by Sandwell Council and Sandwell Primary Care Trust. Using secure broadband connections so professionals can make visual calls from PCs directly to people’s video sets, patients can be put in contact with doctors, nurses, social workers, and emergency support staff, among others. Sandwell Council’s cabinet member for health and social care, Councillor Ann Jaron said: “This is a real leap into the future. The potential applications for this technology are endless, totally changing the way people work and transforming the lives of those who have been socially isolated or are at risk for any reason. “It will save huge amounts of money while providing a far better level of personal attention

than we can currently imagine. The ‘virtual visiting’ means professionals from health, social care and all kinds of support services can see people and talk to them directly without either of them having to travel. It will allow much more frequent contact, continuous monitoring of those at risk of falls or illness and will help people to live independently and safely in their own homes for longer.” Initial trial and roll-out of the first 40 systems means social care and health professionals, doctors and care agencies can deliver enhanced care and support where it is needed most. The systems are already being used in partnership with Action on Hearing Loss to support the profoundly deaf and plans are in place for use in GPs’ surgeries, and to support people and their carers dealing with dementia, mental health problems or learning disabilities and those facing social isolation.

visiting’ will expand over the coming year, helping to support many more vulnerable people in Sandwell. The widespread adoption of telecare and telehealth technologies has been identified by the Department of Health as a key focus for the NHS over the next five years, following the publication of the findings from the national Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) programme. The WSD, the world’s largest randomised control trial of telehealth and telecare services, found that these technologies can substantially reduce mortality, reduce the need for admissions to hospital, lower the number of bed days spent in hospital and reduce the time spent in A&E. For more information visit www.sandwell.gov.uk

It is hoped that working alongside designer and manufacturer Red Embedded Ltd, ‘virtual

2012 ISSUE 4

Residents in West Midlands will be the first in the UK to benefit from ‘virtual visiting’ - a face-to-face live video call service connecting patients at home with healthcare professionals.

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

The walk to recovery Reducing bed stays and giving independence, a new motorised device will help stroke patients re-learn to stand, balance and walk unaided.

who may be temporarily incapacitated. Its features – small and light – are unique selling points considering the limited physical abilities of its users.

According to The Stroke Association, every year, more than 150,000 people in the UK suffer from a stroke, with 85% requiring professional care after becoming unable to walk or stand without help.

MoRow has received a £50k Pathfinder investment from SPARK Impact, managers of the £25m North West Fund for Biomedical, to further develop the device. The investment will be used to design and build the next generation of pre-production prototypes and software ready for patient trials later this year.

With such large numbers of stroke survivors needing rehabilitation, the strength of MoRow’s device is the autonomy it gives patients, reducing the reliance on carers and intervention from healthcare professionals.

Jonathan Butters, Director of MoRow, said: “The statistic of stroke patients occupying 20-25% of UK hospital beds at any one time means there is great pressure to mobilise patients as soon as possible to reduce the length of stay and health costs. Our product enables early mobilisation and is of great interest to clinicians and managers.”

MoRow’s device combines sit-to-stand, balance and gait training by taking the patient’s limbs and upper body through a natural pathway, helping them re-learn how to do it themselves. The sit-to-stand facility broadens the use of the product to the elderly and disabled market, as well as patients recovering from surgery

For more information visit www.medilinknw.co.uk

Donors put their feet up The NHS Blood and Transplant Service (NHSBT) identified the need for a chair to place blood donors in a supportive recovery position when feeling unwell. The pre-commercial procurement procedure hosted by the NHS National Innovation Centre selected two designers to progress to physical prototypes and initial testing by NHSBT. Renfrew Group International’s design was chosen, and having won the tender to supply, they are currently manufacturing the product.

The chair improves comfort for the patient during long donation sessions and is easier to clean than existing models. NHSBT was commended for its new donation chair by being awarded ‘Procurement Initiative of the Year’ at the Health Service Journal (HSJ) Awards.

2011 ISSUE 3

Jane Pearson, Assistant Director - Nursing and Component Donation Services said:

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“The new chair has been designed with upright and reclining positions, making it easier for donors to get comfortable and then relax into position for the donation. The new chairs together with the trolleys to store and transport them are currently being trialled by donors at sessions in Hertfordshire and Lancashire. The complete roll-out to all teams is expected to take 13 months.”

For more information visit www.rg3.com

The close partnership between the NHSBT and Renfrew Group International is an innovation in the NHS procurement process and a breakthrough in competitive tendering.


I N BR I E F

Military precision aids trauma care The first of its kind in the UK, The Surgical Reconstruction & Microbiology Research Centre (SRMRC) in Birmingham seeks collaboration with the NHS, academics and industry to develop better trauma care and treatment. This world-leading research centre focuses on both military and civilian trauma care and aims to share its perspective and encourage product and therapy development to improve patient care. As a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) facility, the centre is well placed to implement the lessons learnt from the military

and translate them across the wider NHS. The project team, working with Medilink UK, realise that although significant advances in battlefield trauma treatment have been made, more medical research, novel treatments and innovative technologies are needed. The project will begin with a conference bringing together academics, businesses and clinicians. This unique platform will enable stakeholders to share details of the latest advances in medical research and clinical practice, while introducing delegates to the current challenges when treating traumatic injuries.

The aim is for companies to identify the clinical and academic leaders looking for industry collaborators and take forward ground-breaking technologies and services that benefit patients at the early stage of injury, in both military and civilian environments.

For more information contact Medilink West Midlands: www.medilinkwm.co.uk, Tel: +44 (0)121 452 5630

Dignity and independence fuel innovation The collaboration between Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CMFT) and Devices for Dignity (D4D) will focus on patients with long-term conditions, bringing real solutions to areas of clinical and patient need in assistive technologies, urinary continence management, and renal technologies. Announced at the Partners in Care Conference, the CMFT - with the support of their charitable funds - will make available a support grant of £30k to enable the collaboration to quickly address many unmet clinical needs.

Professor Wendy Tindale, Clinical Director for D4D said: “We’re delighted to welcome Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust as a D4D partner. Working in partnership is core to all that we do and our key strength is in drawing together the right expertise at the right time.” Keith Chantler, Director of Innovation at CMFT said: “Collaborating with D4D will ensure we are connected nationally across a broad network of expertise in clinical areas that support dignity and independence for patients, leading to new treatments and technologies.”

For more information visit www.devicesfordignity.org.uk

2012 ISSUE 4

A new collaboration aims to improve patient dignity and independence through new treatments and technologies.

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Sweet fix for diabetics

Chip off the Sony block

A new blood glucose monitor will alert emergency services when a diabetic is becoming hypoglycaemic. Using nanoelectronics and ehealth technology, scientists at Swansea University are collaborating with several Welsh companies to develop the next generation blood glucosemonitoring sensor. The project will involve the expertise and facilities from the Centre for Nanohealth and eHealth Industries Innovation Centre at Swansea University and will be led by Dr Vincent Teng, a nanoelectronics expert from the College of Engineering. Financed by the Welsh Government’s EU funded Academic Expertise for Business (A4B) programme, the £470k research project will develop a low-cost device providing continuous blood glucose measurement using a nanowires biosensor. Unlike the commonly used ‘finger stick’ glucose meter that requires patients to carry out up to ten tests a day, this device is pain free. Wholly non-invasive, the blood sample is collected via an array of micro-needles - measuring less than 1mm from the dermal layer of the skin - which has fewer nerve endings. The device will transmit readings from the sensor to the mobile phones of the clinical teams responsible in the NHS, and the patient’s next of kin. Being developed over the next two years, the device will have a direct and rapid route to market through the collaborative industry partners. In time, the system may enable monitoring of other chronic conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer and asthma.

A versatile and cost effective device enabling the next generation of digital molecular diagnostics

Capitalising on the growing medical market, Sony DADC BioSciences has been partnering with life science companies, offering customers OEM development, mass manufacture services and supplies of polymer-based ‘smart consumables’. “We looked at our skills and capabilities, and it was clear that we should be focusing on the emerging and fastdeveloping world of the ‘lab on a chip’” says Dr Christoph Mauracher, Senior Vice President at Sony DADC BioSciences. “Sony DADC BioSciences offers the entire process, from development to logistics, even cash collection. We industrialise other companies’ ideas and fantasies in polymer. They can simply pick and choose the services they want from us.” One such example is a recent collaboration with Quanterix Corporation. The two companies entered into a joint collaboration for the development and manufacture of smart consumables for use in the life sciences and IVD markets. Production of the Quanterix SiMoA Disc marks the first diagnostic consumable whose assay technology is based on optical disc formats by Sony DADC. The company uses high precision and high volume manufacturing processes, which it has pioneered for CD and DVD disc.

2012 ISSUE 4

Quanterix plans to develop and manufacture a fully automated instrument for its SiMoA technology, which will utilise these smart consumables to support a menu of diagnostic tests. Quanterix expects to launch the life science instrument and consumables in 2013, followed by an IVD platform for commercialisation in 2014.

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For more information contact Swansea University’s Press Office: +44 (0) 1792 29 50 For more information visit: www.biosciences.sonydadc.com


I N BR I E F

Seeing i2eye with the next generation

Stopping the drain on the NHS NICE guidance confirms that the PleurX catheter system could improve patients’ quality of life and save the NHS almost £900k a year. The assessment, carried out through NICE’s Medical Technology Evaluation Program, concluded that UK Medical’s PleurX drainage system should be considered for use in all patients with treatment-resistant recurrent malignant ascites. This build-up of excess fluid between the membranes that line the abdominal wall can be a symptom of ovarian cancer, among other diseases. The PleurX is inserted into a patient’s abdominal space and enables fluid build-up to drain out into a vacuum bottle. Of significant benefit, patients can drain their fluids at home before an uncomfortably large volume builds up, which previously would need removal in hospital.

i2eye Diagnostics Limited will deliver the world’s first visual field analyser for patient groups whose visual field was previously impossible to test. Hoping to launch their product in 2012, the company is being supported by funding from an investment syndicate including Kelvin Capital. Existing visual field testing instruments require the patient to stare at a fixed point for several minutes whilst keeping their head still – a procedure relying on total patient cooperation and understanding. i2eye Diagnostics’ technology, known as SVOP (Saccadic Vector Optokinetic Perimetry), harnesses the patient’s natural reactions to movement and light to analyse their visual field, eradicating the need for such stringent cooperation. Consequently, visual field testing can now be performed on groups such as very young children and some elderly persons who could not previously be tested. The technology behind the i2eye visual field analyser was developed over five years by a clinical research team at the University of Edinburgh. Now close to commercialisation, i2eye Diagnostics’ CEO commented, “Our instrument is a generation ahead of anything else currently on the market and has enormous potential. One of its first applications is in the monitoring and clinical management of children with brain tumours, where it can aid the decision making process potentially leading to a better outcome. The instrument will be on the market from the middle of 2012 and we are already seeing significant interest from leading paediatric medical centres around the world.”

Consultant Radiologist, Dr Laasch, an expert PleurX advisor for the NICE review said: “It has given independence back to patients who might otherwise spend 10-15 days per month in hospital, simply to drain the accumulating fluid. Furthermore it has been an additional bonus to find that - as a new technology - it is cheaper than traditional inpatient drainage and vacates large numbers of inpatient beds for patients awaiting other treatment.”

For more information visit www.i2eyediagnostics.com For more information visit www.ukmedical.com

2012 ISSUE 4

The first of its kind, technology testing patients’ field of vision could improve the monitoring and management of brain tumours.

Evidence from the NICE guidance suggested that using the system could reduce complications for patients and save the NHS around £679 per patient - an annual saving of almost £900k.

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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

Combination therapy for pancreatic cancer Clinical trials show that a combination of two chemotherapy drugs could destroy pancreatic cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the UK, with only 16% of the 8000 people diagnosed each year surviving more than 12 months after initial diagnosis.

Study Author, Professor David Tuveson, the group leader at Cancer Research UK’s Cambridge Research Institute, said: “Previously scientists faced a real conundrum. They knew that one plus one equalled much more than two but they couldn’t fathom out the reasons why these drugs worked so well together.

The Cancer Research UK scientists based in Cambridge combined the chemotherapy treatments ABRAXANE® (nab®paclitaxel) and gemcitabine in mouse pancreatic cells, which increased the amount of active, or ‘switched on’ gemcitabine.

“Understanding that adding nab-paclitaxel to the mix can boost the effects of gemcitabine suggests other drugs might also be used in combination treatments for pancreatic and other cancers.”

As well as killing cancer cells, nab-paclitaxel produces molecules that block an enzyme called cytidine deaminase, (CDA) which normally destroys the drug gemcitabine.

Dr Julie Sharp, Senior Science Information Manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Pancreatic cancer can be difficult to treat successfully because by the time the disease is detected it is very often quite advanced. Survival from this disease is still poor, so new treatment approaches are urgently needed and Cancer Research UK is dedicated to improving the outlook for patients.”

The result is increased levels of gemcitabine in the pancreatic tumours, making this drug more effective at destroying the cancer cells.

For more information visit www.info.cancerresearchuk.org or contact the Cancer Research UK press office on +44 (0) 20 3469 8300

Going global For British life science companies wishing to access international markets, the annual Arab Health Exhibition & Congress in Dubai provides a wellestablished platform to do business.

With the current economic climate in Europe, Arab Health provides an excellent opportunity for companies wanting to go global.

During the four-day exhibition in January 2012, 580 UK companies were supported by UK Trade & Investment (UKTI), Medilink UK, and the Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI) to meet with potential distributors and partners and develop sales leads.

Along with several other government dignitaries, Lord Darzi – a worldleading consultant surgeon and David Cameron’s UK Business Ambassador for healthcare and life sciences visited the event to meet with UK companies and continue his work in promoting the UK life sciences industry and the NHS.

Now in its 37th year, Arab Health 2012 brought together innovators from across the healthcare and medical technology world to showcase new products and discuss the future of global healthcare.

2012 ISSUE 4

It is estimated that the Middle East’s healthcare sector is worth US$80 billion, and is growing at a rate of 16% annually.

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“We have found that the Middle East is very receptive to the services and knowledge offered by the UK life sciences industry,” said Lord Darzi. “We have been able to make a great deal of progress on building up relationships with the Middle East during Arab Health this year.”

Sheffmed Marketing Manager, Akram Al Saroori talks to Lord Darzi (right) about the HD lite headset

For more information about support for life science international trade missions contact Medilink Y&H: www.medilink.co.uk


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Spring/Summer 2010 Issue 1

It pays to pull together

MedilinkUK

working together to raise the profile of the life science industry in the United Kingdom UK Lifescience Industry Magazine Partners Medilink UK Member Organisations Medilink East Midlands BioCity Nottingham Pennyfoot Street Nottingham NG1 1GF Tel: 0115 912 4330 Email: info@medilinkem.com Web: www.medilinkem.com Medilink North West Suite 1, 5th Floor Kingsgate Stockport SK4 1LW Tel: 0161 477 7785 Email: enquiries@medilinknw.co.uk Web: www.medilinknw.co.uk Medilink West Midlands 4 Greenfield Crescent Edgbaston Birmingham B15 3BE Tel: 0121 452 5630 Email: enquiries@medilinkwm.co.uk Web: www.medilinkwm.co.uk MediWales 7 Schooner Way Atlantic Wharf Cardiff CF10 4DZ Tel: 029 2047 3456 Email: info@mediwales.com Web: www.mediwales.com Medilink Yorkshire & Humber 3 Smithy Wood Drive Smithy Wood Business Park Sheffield S35 1QN Tel: 0114 232 9292 Email: connect@medilink.co.uk Web: www.medilink.co.uk

SEHTA Tanglewood Well street Loose Maidstone Kent ME15 0QF Tel: 0845 1308179 Email: Pascale.waschnig@sehta.co.uk Web: www.sehta.co.uk

Partner Organisations One Nucleus The Portway Granta Park Cambridge CB21 6GS Tel: 01223 896450 Fax: 01223 896471 Email: info@onenucleus.com web: www.onenucleus.com iNets South West Biomedical iNet Hub University of the West of England 2P50/51, Coldharbour Lane Bristol BS16 1QY Tel: 0117 3286691 Email: biomedical@inets-sw.co.uk Web: www.inets-sw.co.uk/biomedical

ABHI 111 Westminster Bridge Road London SE1 7HR Tel: 020 7960 4360 Fax: 020 7960 4361 Email: enquiries@abhi.org.uk Web: www.abhi.org.uk Life Sciences Scotland c/o SDI 5 Atlantic Quay, 150 Broomielaw Glasgow G2 8LU United Kingdom Tel: 0141 228 2828 Email: lifesciences@scotent.co.uk Web: www.lifesciencesscotland.com/ www.sdi.co.uk HealthTech and Medicines KTN c/o TWI Ltd Granta Park Great Abington Cambridge CB1 6AL Tel: +44(0)1223 899 000 Email: info@healthktn.org Web: www.innovateuk.org/healthktn

www.medilinkuk.com

UK LifeScience: Edition 4  

Through thick and thinThe health connectionIntuitive imaging2012 Medilink UK Awards Telecom to telecareLife science event calendarFlying the...

UK LifeScience: Edition 4  

Through thick and thinThe health connectionIntuitive imaging2012 Medilink UK Awards Telecom to telecareLife science event calendarFlying the...