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Contents Spreadsheets........................................................................................................................................... 2 Basic Formulae .................................................................................................................................... 2 Naming a range – providing evidence ................................................................................................ 2 Basic Functions.................................................................................................................................... 3 Rounding Numbers ............................................................................................................................. 3 COUNT and COUNTA........................................................................................................................... 3 COUNTIF .............................................................................................................................................. 3 Searching using filters ......................................................................................................................... 4 Searching using wildcards ................................................................................................................... 4


Spreadsheets Printing row and column headers

It is very important that when you print, you include the row and column labels so that the marker can easily see cell references. To do this, click on ‘PAGE LAYOUT, and then tick the relevant boxes in the ‘SHEET OPTIONS’ section.

Showing formulae

You will be asked to print your formulae as well as your results. To view formulae click on the Formulas tab and then on ‘SHOW FORMULAS’ in the ‘FORMULA AUDITING’ section.

Basic Formulae Add B1 to B2 Subtract B2 from B1 Multiply B1 by B2 Divide B1 by B2 Multiply B1 to the power of B2

=B1+B2 =B1-B2 =B1*B2 =B1/B2 =B1^B2

Naming a range – providing evidence To do this, highlight the range you want to name, right click and select ‘DEFINE NAME’. By completing this dialogue box you are showing that you have named the range and also which cell range this name refers to.


Basic Functions SUM: adds a list of three or more numbers AVERAGE: finds the average of a range of numbers MAX: finds the largest number in a range MIN: finds the smallest number in a range

=SUM(B1:B10) =AVERAGE(B1:B10) =MAX(B1:B10) =MIN(B1:B10)

Rounding Numbers INT: ignores all digits after the decimal point (34.756 becomes 34) ROUND: to 2 dp (34.756 becomes 34.76) ROUND: to 1 dp (34.756 becomes 34.77) ROUND: to 0 dp (34.756 becomes 34.8) ROUND: to nearest 10 (34.756 becomes 30) ROUND: to nearest 100 (34.756 becomes 0) ROUND: to nearest 1000 (34.756 becomes 0)

=INT(B1) =ROUND(B1,2) =ROUND(B1,1) =ROUND(B1,0) =ROUND(B1,-1) =ROUND(B1,-2) =ROUND(B1,-3)

COUNT and COUNTA COUNT: Counts how many cells contain numbers COUNTA: Counts all the cells that contain any value (number or text)

=COUNT(B2:B10) =COUNTA(B2:B10)

To calculate how many cells only contain text in a range you need to subtract COUNT from COUNTA =COUNTA(B2:B10)-COUNT(B2:B10)

COUNTIF Whereas COUNT and COUNTA are used to count the general contents of cells, COUNTIF is used to count the number of times something specific appears in a range of cells. It can written many different ways. In the following examples, assume that the content of A24 is “Director” and that the range $B$3:$B$21 has been called “Job”. =COUNTIF($B$3:$B$21,”Director”) =COUNTIF(Job,”Director”) =COUNTIF($B$3:$B$21,A24) =COUNTIF(Job,A24)


Searching using filters If you are asked to search for data, the most accurate way of doing this is to use a Filter. To open the filter dialogue box highlight the range and then click on the filter icon. This will add a drop down arrow to the first line of your range. It is best to use the Filter dialogue box to ensure accuracy. To get this, click on the drop down arrow and then choose text filters. This will give you much greater control over what you are looking for.

Searching using wildcards

An example would be to find all the people with names that have ‘ea’ as the second and third letters. As we do not know the first letter, this can be substituted with a ‘?’.


Data Analysis - Spreadsheets