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OctOber 2013 tex AppeAl


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Features 12

BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE HEALTH — CENTRAL TEXAS • Providing medical care for the 21st century • McLane meets growing needs of children • Pediatric transport team puts children first

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SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS • Six years of healing in Heights • The uncertainty of emergency medicine • Mended hearts

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6EDITOR’S LETTER 8CONTRIBUTORS 10 CALENDAR: September events 23 IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Temple College OctOber 2013 tex AppeAl

ON the COVER Pediatric Transport Nurse Kelli Avant. 16 Photograph by JULIE NABOURS

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SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

METROPLEX HOSPITAL • Keeping their commitment to the community • A new kind of patient experience

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VA MEDICAL CENTER • Volunteers for veterans

CARL R. DARNALL ARMY TEMPLE HEALTH AND MEDICAL CENTER BIOSCIENCE DISTRICT • A medically ready force • Laboratory on the cutting edge

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37 PROFILES 66 ADVERTISER’S INDEX

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FREE CLINICS • Caring for those in need

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS WITH US Email a letter to editor@ texappealmag.com. Please include your name and a phone number for verification.

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Tex Appeal is looking for Central Texas-based photographers and freelance writers with experience working for a newspaper or magazine. Candidates must be detail- and deadline-oriented and good storytellers, and must be familiar with AP style. Interested candidates may send their resumes and three to five recent stories and/or photographs for consideration to editor@texappealmag.com.


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From the Editor

Tex Appeal Life & Style in Central Texas

Dear Readers,

Bell County has become a destination for medical education and care. This month’s medical issue is packed with information about the local hospitals that serve our community. Temple is a city with a small-town feel, but it is also a hub for some of the most innovative technologies in medicine. Hospitals and clinics throughout Bell County, including Seton Medical Center Harker Heights and Metroplex Hospital in Killeen, offers quality care for patients close to home A year after opening its new facility, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center at Fort Hood continues to offer state-of-the art medical care to active military, their families, and retirees, Page 60; and the Olin E. Teague Veterans Center in Temple is undergoing major changes to better serve army veterans. Critical to the care of the veterans is the volunteers who help to make a veteran’s stay a little more comfortable, Page 62. Scott & White Medical Center — Temple continues to grow. Last year it broke ground for a new surgical building that will add 10 or more operating rooms. It is scheduled to open in 2018. The building will offer private areas for preoperative and post operative patients, Page 12. To help meet the needs of a growing pediatric patient population McLane Children’s Medical Center — Temple plans major expansion. They also added a second ambulance to their transport vehicles, Page 14. Kelli Avant, pediatric transport nurse for McLane Children’s Hospital, understands the needs of children in crisis. Whether she and her team are transporting a patient in a mobile ICU ambulance or the hospital emergency helicopter, she gives us a sense of what it means to be a pediatric transport nurse, Page 16. Seton Medical Center Harker Heights recently celebrated six years of serving the community. This year they welcomed Zach Dietze as the new chief executive officer. Seton also entered into a new partnership with Ardent Health Care that merged with its former partner, LHP Hospital Group, Page 31. Kari Shulz, Seton’s director of the emergency department is a career trauma nurse. She is grace under pressure as she keeps patients and staff calm, Page 32. Tami Annable, director of the Temple Health and Bioscience District took the long road to her career in science. She now runs a cutting edge medical research laboratory in Temple, Page 48. Within the building is state-of-the-art medical research equipment including the SiMMo3D, a company that produces human organ replicas from a 3D printer for surgical medical students, Page 46. Have you noticed a difference in the ways your doctor communicates with you? Doctors seem to be more interested in their patients, listening to their needs and coming up with a joint plan of care with input from both sides. Today young doctors are taught patient experience in school. For doctors who have been practicing for 10 years or more, Robin Bodkin, director of marketing, patient experience and community relations for Metroplex Health System, along with Dr. Bindu Raju, a hospitalist at Metroplex Hospital, have teamed up to provide Physician Communications Skills Labs for doctors 10 years or more out of medical school to ensure a better patient experience, Page 56. Metroplex Health System CEO Carlyle Walton said 2017 has been a year of implementation of changes at Metroplex Hospital. Metroplex has had an increase in patient traffic throughout the hospital. This year it was the recipient of numerous awards and certifications, Page 55. If you are new to our community, welcome. If you have lived here awhile, or your entire life, see what new offerings your medical community has for you.

Catherine Hosman

Tex Appeal Editor editor@texappealmag.com | 254-774-5234 6

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Published by FRANK MAYBORN ENTERPRISES, INC. KILLEEN DAILY HERALD 1809 Florence Rd., Killeen, TX 76540

TEMPLE DAILY TELEGRAM 10 S. Third St., Temple, TX 76501

Publisher SUE MAYBORN Editor CATHERINE HOSMAN Photographers/Graphic Designers

M. CLARE HAEFNER JULIE NABOURS Contributors MIKE BARTOSZEK SALLY GRACE HOLTGRIEVE EMILY HILLEY-SIERZCHULA Advertising 254-778-4444 254-501-7500

Tex Appeal Magazine is published monthly by Frank Mayborn Enterprises, Inc. 10 S. Third St., Temple, TX 76501. The cover and content of Tex Appeal Magazine is fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any manner without prior permission. SUBSCRIPTIONS: For the United States, $24 per year, 12 issues. Mail check to P.O. Box 6114, Temple, TX 76503-6114.

Questions about subscriptions, call 254-778-4444.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Tex Appeal Magazine, P.O. Box 6114, Temple, TX 76503-6114. HOW TO CONTACT US: Advertising: Call 254-778-4444 or 254-501-7500. Editorial: Contact Catherine Hosman at 254-774-5234 or email editor@texappealmag.com.


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Contributors MIKE BARTOSZEK was born in Las Vegas, Nev., and traveled to various Army installations, including tours in Germany; his family finally settled in Killeen. Growing up, Mike had a passion for concert production working on such shows as ZZ Top, Korn and Ted Nugent. He pursues a career in video production and photography and has since worked for various entertainment companies such as Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines and KNCT. He enjoys a life of travel, adventure and outdoor photography.

SALLY GRACE HOLTGRIEVE is a full-time freelance writer in Central Texas. A few of her favorite things include traveling, hiking, camping, reading, cats, classic rock music and cheese. As a kid, Sally Grace could never figure out what she wanted to be when she grew up — astronaut, Celtic dancer, entomologist, Egyptologist — everything was interesting and she couldn’t decide on just one world to immerse herself in and study, so she became a journalist. She learns new things every day.

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You can read back issues of Tex Appeal Magazine at texappealmag. com. Log on to find the current issue and older editions. You also can connect with us on Facebook.

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SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

EMILY HILLEY- SIERZCHULA has not changed much since age 6. Whether turning over rocks or peering into bushes, she’s always been looking for something. As an archaeologist for 11 years she dug in the dirt looking for artifacts and learning about human prehistory. As a journalist and photographer she’s still learning about people, and finding the present is just as interesting as the past Emily has a degree in archaeology from the University of Texas at Austin, and a journalism degree from the University of Arkansas. She has a husband and two young sons, all of whom like getting dirty.


Join this family-friendly 5K that celebrates survivors, promotes healthy lifestyles and raises funds for cardiovascular research and educational programs for the American Heart Association.

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TexTalk calendar

Temple Railroad and Heritage Museum Requiem for Steam: The Railroad Photographs of David Plowden Sept. 1 through Dec. 9 “Requiem for Steam: The Railroad Photographs of David Plowden,” on loan from the Center for Railroad Photography and Art in Madison, Wisconsin, features 30 meticulously crafted black and white photographs taken by Plowden, one of America’s great landscape and industrial photographers. “Requiem for Steam” is his tribute to the end of the steam era on American and Canadian railroads. 315 W. Avenue B, Temple Call 254-298-5172 or visit www.rrhm. org for more information. Belton Senior Center Country Western Dance Sept. 7, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Shorty Grisham performs. Sept. 21, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Come to the Sock Hop and bring a snack to share. Larry Burgin performs. Pot Luck Supper Sept. 25, 5:30 p.m. Adam Dubberly performs. 842 Mitchell St., Belton Call 254-939-1170 for information. SOPoly FEST Sept. 9, noon to 9 p.m. A wide array of dance and music groups from around the country will entertain at this free event with craft and food vendors, and a craft table for kids to make Polynesian crowns and leis along with poi ball. Big fire show at sundown. Killeen Amphitheater 2201 E Veterans Memorial Blvd. Email Sopolyent@gmail.com or visit Facebook.com/sivaoripolynesia. Karaoke in the Park Sept. 9, 7 to 9 p.m. Free Lions Sam Farrow Amphitheater 4320 Lions Park Road, Temple Call 254-298-5440 for information. Bell County Museum’s Discovery Day Sept. 16, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free Kids and families are invited to make Native American dream catchers and play a traditional stick dice game. 10

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

201 N. Main, Belton Call 254-933-5243 or visit www. bellcountymuseum.org for information.

Dueling Pianos in the Park Sept. 23, 7 to 9 p.m. Free admission Be a part of a high energy and family friendly sing-a-long comedy experience. Lions Sam Farrow Amphitheater 4320 Lions Park Road, Temple Call 254-298-5440, or visit templeparks.com for more information. Main Street Market and Food Truck Frenzy Sept. 23, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission Enjoy arts and crafts dealers, nursery and greenhouse booths, live music, food and free Yoga on the lawn. 2 N. Main St., downtown Temple behind the Municipal Building. Call 254-298-5378 for information. Unglued Craft Market Sept. 30, 6 to 9 p.m. Harker Heights Community Park 1501 E. FM 2410, Harker Heights Call 254-953-5493 or visit www. ci.harker-heights.tx.us/parks. Bell County Museum’s Journey into the Past: A Native American Celebration Sept. 30, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free Learn about Native American culture. There will be crafts, games and a tepee. 201 N. Main, Belton Call 254-933-5243 or visit www. bellcountymuseum.org for information. Bell County Master Gardener 2017 Fall Plant Sale Sept. 30, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Native perennials, organic vegetables, herbs, succulents, roses, fruit trees, berry plants and free information booths. Master Gardener Building at the Bell County Extension Office 1605 N. Main, Belton Visit http://txmg.org/bell/ or call 254-778-4425 for information. Find more upcoming events in the calendar at texappealmag.com. Email information about events to editor@texappealmag.com.


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SCOTT & WHITE MEDICAL CENTER — TEMPLE

Medical care for the 21st century Story by SALLY GRACE HOLTGRIEVE Contributed photos

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cott & White Medical Center — Temple experienced another year of growth and improvements in technology and specialists. The hospital is in the midst of constructing a new surgical sciences facility that will add 10 to 11 large operating rooms. “We can’t predict exactly what the future (surgery) technology will be,” said Shahin Motakef, president of Scott & White Medical Center. “But we know we’ll need more space. By making the rooms larger than needed now, we know we’ll be set for decades.” The operating room is currently embedded in the middle of the hospital. The new surgery facility will have an external entrance with dedicated parking. Patients and family members will be able to walk directly into the center. The new facility also will have more privacy for preoperative and postoperative patients. “Currently, a lot of our pre-procedure rooms are separated with curtains,” said Motakef. “But nowadays more privacy is appreciated, so we’re creating that.” Construction began last August and the facility is scheduled to open in summer 2018. Transplants, orthopedics, neurosurgery, bariatrics, cardiac surgery, vascular surgery and more will be done in the center. According to Motakef, the project will allow the doctors at Scott & White to do the most modern procedures possible with the latest advanced equipment. “It will allow us to better serve the community and our patients who require surgery, by increasing the number of surgeries we can do,” said Dr. Stephen Sibbitt, chief medical officer. “The new operating rooms are large and will have state-of-the-art equipment, which will allow us to treat very complex cases that would otherwise have to leave the region and go elsewhere.” In 2016, the hospital had a record year for transplant services. More than 96 organs were transplanted and that 12

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Shahin Motakef

Dr. Stephen Sibbitt

number is expected to rise for the 2017 count. The advanced heart failure clinic is improving its various options for patients battling heart disease, including providing heart transplant and mechanical heart assist devices for certain patients. Interventional cardiology’s transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) program is also a new procedure routinely being offered to patients with aortic valve disease. The aortic valve is an essential valve within the heart that helps to direct blood flow within the heart, Sibbitt explained. Age and specific medical conditions cause the valve to become leaky or sticky. When this occurs, patients develop significant symptoms including shortness of breath, chest pain, decreased stamina and difficulty walking. “In severe situations the valve needs to be replaced, and until recently, this involved open heart surgery, which involves opening the heart to replace the valve,” Sibbitt said. “This can result in a long and sometimes difficult postoperative recovery.” Sibbitt said with the TAVR procedure, doctors don’t have to open up the chest anymore and can perform the procedure on patients that couldn’t otherwise tolerate open heart surgery.

The procedure is extending the life, and quality of life, for patients. “It’s less invasive, very innovative and the outcomes are fantastic,” Sibbitt said. “The hospital stay following openheart surgery for aortic valve replacement may be several days, yet with a TAVR procedure patients are discharged as early as twenty-four hours after the procedure.” New strides have been taken in neurosurgery, as well. The hospital purchased a bi-plane angiography system to assist in complex endovascular cases. Introducing such technology allows the doctors to do more complicated procedures, Motakef said. They can work on more complex cranial cases that come from all over Central Texas. As a level one trauma center, the hospital also sees a lot of neurological cases related to trauma and will be able to better serve those patients. The new technology also evolves the care doctors are able to give patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and tremors through the ability to do extremely precise surgery in those areas. “We’re also becoming a comprehensive stroke center,” Sibbitt said. “This designation will signify that we provide advanced acute stroke care, which patients may not be able to receive at


The new Surgical Sciences Building will stand adjacent to Scott & White Medical Center in Temple, increasing the hospital’s number of operating room suites.

“The new operating rooms are large and will have state-of-the-art equipment, which will allow us to treat very complex cases that would otherwise have to leave the region and go elsewhere.”

— Dr. Stephen Sibbitt

other facilities without this designation.” When a person has a stroke, they may be able to receive medicine to break up the blood clot causing the stroke in their brain, Sibbitt said. If the patient does not meet criteria to receive the clot buster, they may be candidates to undergo an advanced neurological surgery technique, which is available at Scott & White Medical Center, to remove the blood clot causing their stroke. Bariatric surgery services also continue to advance for those in need of weight loss solutions. Last summer Dr. David Provost, a well-known surgeon, was recruited by Scott & White, and now people are traveling to Temple to undergo procedures, according to Motakef. This year orthopedic services obtained the Mako robot, a surgical tool used for patients that need hip or knee replacement surgery. The robot allows surgeons to do the procedures they are

currently doing, but in a substantially more precise manner with less pain and less revision. With the Mako robot assisted surgery, orthopedic surgeons can more precisely align the knee implant, allowing patients to have a faster recovery, Sibbitt stated. “Our surgeons believe they’ll get a much better outcome with the robot than without it,” Motakef said. “Early results have been very favorable for patients.” The robot was trialed in December 2016 and arrived at the facility in May. Motakef said he believes Scott & White Medical Center continues to be a leader in model health care. The integration between physicians and the hospital is second to none, he said, adding that a lot of organizations work to copy their model, engaging in telephone conferences and visiting to learn what they can adopt at their own practices.

Scott & White is recognized as being a top institution in the state and the nation, Sibbitt said, with plenty of awards and accolades and more on the horizon. “Another thing that’s special about us is the honor to be training the next generation of physicians,” Sibbitt said. “We are a training institution for almost 500 training physicians, within 39 accredited specialty training programs. These accredited programs provide our training physicians with the opportunity to develop the skill and expertise to be the leading physicians of the future.” In summary of the year, Sibbitt said all the new technology, skill and expertise will allow the medical center to serve more patients in the community, as well as those outside of the community who are looking for expertise they can’t find elsewhere. “Essentially we are focusing on improving our capabilities here so that we can better serve the community,” he said. “People don’t have to go to a large city for routine or advanced medical care, they can find everything they need right here in Temple.”

SCOTT & WHITE MEDICAL CENTER – TEMPLE 2401 S. 31st St, Temple Call 254-724-2111 or go to sw.org. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE MCLANE CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER

Meeting the growing needs of children McLane Children’s Medical Center expands to offer more services to pediatric patients Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Contributed photos

dialysis unit, in partnership with the Temple Dialysis Center. Children awaiting a kidney transplant can now have treatment in Temple. The center serves up to six children a day, Monday through Saturday. During the school year, a Temple ISD teacher visits the clinic to help children keep up with classwork.

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ince it first opened in 2011, Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center–Temple has evolved into a comprehensive pediatric care center for children in Central Texas and beyond. In its first five years of service it has logged 960,000 clinic visits; 111,000 radiology exams; 106,000 emergency department visits; 55,000 physical therapy/ occupational therapy visits, 21,000 surgeries and 28,000 inpatient discharges. The emergency department was built for 24,000 visits per year, but treated more than 27,000 children in 2016. The medical center was certified as a Level II Pediatric Trauma Center in 2013, and offers advanced pediatric trained professionals and state-ofthe-art equipment. (Source: S&W Media) Its pediatric and neonatal transport team is ready to go on a moment’s notice to pick up a child from any facility, traveling as far away as Abilene, Galveston or Houston and all points in between. Critically ill or injured children are transported from a community hospital or clinic, and brought back to MCMC for care in its critical care ambulance that functions as a mobile ICU. The current unit is a quad cab designed to carry families, and it is child friendly. The ambulance was a gift to the medical center from the employees of Sam’s Club and Wal-Mart. However, by 2015, due to the expansive territory the ambulance serves, and the growing call volume, a second unit was needed. The second ambulance, affectionately called Little Brother, was put on their wish list — a wish that became a reality this year due in large part to the philanthropic efforts of The Scott & White Visionaries.

Ellen Hansen

Little Brother is a smaller version of the primary ambulance and is also a mobile ICU. It should arrive to the medical center in the next several weeks. “It is equipped to do everything Big Brother does — any treatment, the equipment is exactly the same. It’s just a little smaller quarters,” said Ellen Hansen, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nursing Officer of MCMC. Little brother will lack a family cab, but it will be able transport one family member and travel as far as its Big Brother. “It won’t have any limitation on its miles,” she said. Hansen said the transport team completes approximately 1,000 emergency calls a year, including helicopter transport. “We miss another 2,000 runs,” she said. “With Little Brother we will be able to bridge that gap and complete more than 2,000 transports a year.” Last year the medical center added a pediatric sleep clinic and a pediatric

COMMUNITY OUTREACH MCMC provides a menu of outreach programs for the community through its trauma and injury prevention department with classes that range from babysitting, teaching teens how to care for younger siblings, and preventative care that covers topics from ATV safety, driving safely, hand washing, how to prevent injuries, bike injuries. There is also a car safety class and how to choose the appropriate baby or toddler car seats for your child. 14

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EXPANDING SERVICES As the community grows, so do the needs of its pediatric patients. “With the increase in patients we have added some new services. We are reaching capacity issues and there is only so much that we can grow,” Hansen said. “We are hitting bed capacity and flattening on growth because we don’t have enough room.” The expansion is a five-year, threestage effort that includes a $14 million dollar, 13,000 square foot, two-story addition to the ED equipped with a new 3T MRI machine. “This will give us five more ED rooms and a new MRI that is faster and more complex and will enable us to do more in-depth studies of the brain and the heart than what we are able to do today,” Hansen said. “We are fully funded by philanthropy and have designed Expansion 1. We’ve been saving our pennies for three years now. All donations that come in that are not specific (like the funds raised by The Visionaries for a new ambulance), if people donated money as a general gift, we saved it and put it aside towards the first expansion.” Expansion 1 breaks ground in October and includes the emergency department, physical and occupational therapy, and the radiology department to house the new MRI. Expansion 2 is currently being planned between Expansion 1 and the specialty clinic. “Expansion 2 will move the pharmacy and lab to the second floor and we will finish the emergency department on the first floor. We will connect the hospital and the clinic through internal hallways. All together Expansion 1 and 2 will add 17 ED rooms and double the size of the physical and occupational therapy,” she said.


A new musical playground is in the final stages in front of the McLane Children’s Medical Center in Temple.

A rendering of the McLane Children’s Medical Center — Temple after its multiphase expansion that will be connected to the hospital and medical building via a walkway.

The medical center is currently constructing a new power plant. A new 192 space parking lot was constructed to replace the lot supplanted by the construction of the new plant. Hansen said the new power plant will replace half of the existing one that is more than 50 years old. Because they have only half the funding for the new plant, the original power plant will still be used as part of the new facility. “We’ve outgrown all of our utilities-heating, air conditioning, water — it is too small to serve what we need to do here so we have to put the infrastructure in place,” she said. The cost for the entire project is $15 million. The first half of the new plant is $7.5 million and is fully funded by Baylor Scott & White Health. “This will give us a brand new building sized to support everything we

do today and what we will need for power in the future,” she said.

BEYOND THE OBVIOUS Not only does the medical center staff focus their attention on the physical needs of a child, they also offer emotional and mental respite for the patient and his or her family, with their colorful hallways, playrooms for children, a meditation garden created by members of the Bell County Master Gardeners Association, and a musical playground. Just outside the main entrance, across the driveway, colorful playground equipment is being installed behind a steel fence. What makes this playground unique are the oversized instruments placed throughout the area. “It’s exciting. We had a donor, a lady who was a music teacher, and when

she passed away she left a portion of her estate to Legacy Scott & White to build a musical playground,” Hansen said. “We found musical elements to go into the playground and built the playground around those elements.” Hansen said they used the teacher’s gift for the musical aspect of the playground, and employees raised an additional $153,000 for the completion. The playground will offer full mobility so any child can play in the area safely. “We will have full-size bells, chimes and drums. With help from the music department at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, a professor designed the layout, directing how the instruments would sound the best. We will be able to do concerts with those instruments; a small ensemble group with percussion, bells, and chimes.” In addition, the playground will include an 11-foot walled amphitheater around the instruments, shade trees and sails. “Our community has a lot of pride in having our own children’s medical center. We are arguably the smallest community in America to have our own children’s medical center,” Hansen said, adding that she had encountered families who have moved to Central Texas because of MCMC. “Children have special needs not available in other parts of the country. They move here for a family friendly medical center in a small town, with big city care.” MCLANE CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER – TEMPLE 1901 SW HK Dodgen Loop, Temple Call 254-724-5437 https://childrens.bswhealth.com TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE MCLANE CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER

Pediatric transport teams put children first Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Photos by JULIE NABOURS

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ediatric Transport Nurse Kelli Avant walks down the hallway of the Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center emergency department looking more like a fighter pilot than a nurse in her fire-resistant flight suit. In some ways she is a warrior because every time she and her team leave the medical center in their specially equipped ambulance, or lift off the ground in the medical center’s transport helicopter, they are on their way to help a child in crisis and transport him or her back to the medical center for treatment. There are 10 to 15 helicopter transports and 100 ambulance runs each month. The team has gone as far south as Corpus Christi and Galveston, to Abilene in the northwest, and nearly every place in between. Avant and her team, which includes a respiratory therapist and a paramedic, put the child’s safety concerns ahead of their own. Their goal is to reach the ill child, give him or her, the best lifesaving medical care they can administer on their medical helicopter, or in the mobile intensive care ambulance, as they transport the child to MCMC. Before McLane Children’s Medical Center opened at its current location in 2011, it was housed at Scott & White Medical Center – Temple. Avant was a pediatric intensive care unit nurse for three years at the children’s hospital within a hospital, where children were hospitalized close to adults. There was no pediatric ambulance, though there was a neonatal transport team. When a call came in, nurses were pulled from their patients to board the Scott & White ambulance to pick up a baby for transport back to the hospital. Performing basic intensive care in an ambulance or helicopter is a much different experience than being in the medical center PICU or neonatal intensive care unit, she said. It takes a person who has the ability to be confident, calm, work under pressure and be able to anticipate a problem before it happens. “Kelli is really confident and self16

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Kelli Avant, pediatric transport team nurse on the back of the mobile intensive care unit.

aware in what she knows and what she doesn’t know, so that makes her able to perform at a really high level,” said Brandon Dudik, manager, McLane

Children’s Transport Team. “You need to have confidence with yourself and the team and be able to do a lot of things independently that you would otherwise


McLane Children’s transport team members Nick Betz, MSN RN CPEN; and John Harris, RCP.

do in a hospital. When the patient is in an aircraft or ambulance, you don’t have the support you would rely on in a hospital.” “In a hospital ICU critical care is administered in a structured environment with full staff, equipment, and doctors on site,” Avant said. “As part of a transport team you don’t have your resources, you don’t have the equipment that you have in an ICU. You ask yourself, ‘How are we going to make this work in a confined space?’” In a confined space where children’s lives are saved, every inch of space is utilized. Machines are strategically placed where they can be accessed by team members. Overhead storage bins hold necessary medical necessities. A refrigerator or cold storage carries critical medicines. “You have to know the patient equipment is behind the seat. You have to know what a patient needs before placing him or her into the ambulance or helicopter,” she said. “I evaluate, observe, prepare and I’m ready to expect the worst.” “You also have to be analytical and really be able to analyze the situation and prioritize what needs to be done,” Dudik

added. “You can’t go and take forever. The clock is running and the hospital expects us to get the kids back in a safe manner. You need to be able to act fast.” Avant has been a pediatric transport nurse and team leader for six years and said she knows she has the ability and confidence to provide critical care to a child en route to the medical center. She is one of 17 specially trained medical professionals on duty 24/7, who work in teams of three on 12-hour shifts. “We are just all appreciative to be able to do this as an extension of our hospital and parents can see the kind of care their children will get at MCMC,” Dudik said. “We have the support of every unit in this hospital, the ED, PICU, NICU — it’s a big collaboration of support and education that we get from them so that we are maintaining the same level of care that they (the hospital) give.” “We’re not just moving from Point A to Point B,” Avant added. “I am taking care of the child and if something happens, I have the ability to take care of that problem. I have advanced skill training. There is no physician so the pediatric nurse needs to be able to intubate, insert a chest tube or catheter,

umbilical lines on neonates, needle decompression, and be able to perform advanced medical procedures.” While Avant and her team are providing critical care in transit to their patient and monitoring vitals, a report is being transferred to the doctors at the medical center waiting for the transport vehicle to arrive and continue the care without missing a heartbeat. Despite all of their efforts to stabilize and save a child’s life, there are times when the outcome is poor. “The weight of being a transport nurse is heavy,” she said. “You feel so responsible. In transport we carry the weight of a bad outcome. It affects you deeply.” Avant graduated from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. She holds certificates in Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advance Life Support, Neonatal Resuscitation, Trauma Nurse, Certification of Nursing Excellence and Certification--Critical Care Registered Nurse. She maintains these certifications through continuing education. “I knew I wanted to do this the whole time I was in school,” Avant said in closing. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE PHYSICIAN FINDER ADOLESCENT MEDICINE Meera S. Beharry, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple ADULT MENTAL HEALTH Jim B. Airhart, MD Phillip Wayne Antunes, MD David Blackburn, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Louis A. Gamino, PhD, ABPP, FT Ilaina Shook, DO Scott & White Mental Health Center - Temple ALLERGY/ASTHMA/ IMMUNOLOGY Mercedes Arroliga, MD John E. Dvoracek, MD Scott & White Center for Diagnostic Medicine ANATOMIC & CLINICAL PATHOLOGY Robert S. Beissner, MD, PhD Kathleen A. Jones, MD William Koss, MD Lisa M. Lopez, MD Lubna Sayage-Rabie, MD, FCAP V.O. Speights, Jr, DO Scott & White Clinic - Temple Felix A. Olobatuyi, MD Riyam T. Zreik, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple ANESTHESIOLOGY Jolene D. Bean Lijewski, MD, PhD Dair T. Chevalier, MD Paul L. Dillon, MD Jana L. Rivera, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Adam C. Bossen, MD Don J. Daniels, MD Joshua A. Good, MD Michael G. Parisi, DO Metroplex Health System Killeen Lisa Baggett, MD Tim M. Bittenbinder, MD Laura L. Brinkley, MD John C. Cargile, MD David P. Ciceri, MD Julie Xindaris Colvin, MD David A. Cross, MD William C. Culp, Jr., MD Kent F. Elliott, MD Jeff Ray Gibson, Jr, MD David F. Gloyna, MD Michael Hofkamp, MD Larry R. Hutson, Jr, MD William E. Johnston, MD Gary W. Latson, MD Navin Lavu, DO Jack F. Lay, MD, MBA 18

Vanessa L. Martin, MD Taylor L. Pohler, MD Barbara L. Pollock, MD Catherine Scholl, MD J. Clint Tippett, MD Kenneth Tobler, MD Frank J. Villamaria, MD, MPH Scott & White Clinic - Temple Christopher J. Burnett, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Pavilion Brent T. Bartz, MD David M. Cousineau, MD Xiaobo Eric Dong, MD Stavroula IkonomakouNikolaidis, MD Russell K. McAllister, MD David V. Paolino, MD Rick Roberson, MD Bryan J. Rondeau, MD Benjamin B. Vacula, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple ANESTHESIOLOGY/PAIN MANAGEMENT Kelsey R. Pohler, MD Hiep Tran, MD Killeen Pain Clinic at Hemingway Emily Garmon, MD Rodney R. Lange, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Keller Matthews, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple AUDIOLOGY Esther McCormick, AuD Brett Shonebarger, AuD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Alanna Birdwell, AuD Tressa M. Mann, AuD Elizabeth Pasichnyk, AuD George Whitaker, AuD, CCC-A Scott & White Clinic - Temple Aimee L. Woolard, AuD Scott & White Specialty Clinic - Killeen Hemingway BARIATRIC SURGERY Robert O. Carpenter, MD, MPH Scott & White Clinic - Temple David A. Provost, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple BREAST IMAGING Rashad Daker, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY AND PACING James N. Black, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Peter Cheung, MD, FACC, FHRS Scott & White Clinic - Temple CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY - ADULT CARDIAC Emmanuel A. Amulraj, MD Daniel Lee, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Chittoor Bhaskar SaiSudhakar, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY - GENERAL THORACIC Ugo C. Ogwudu, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Prashant C. Shah, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Umad Ahmad, MD, MBA Jason K. Lange, MD Jonathan D. Mock, MD Sunil S. Naik, MD Killeen Cardiology at Hemingway Allan L. Anderson, MD, FACC, FAHA Javier E. Banchs, MD, FACC, FHRS Christopher D. Chiles, MD, FACC Steven M. Costa, MD, FACC Gregory J. Dehmer, MD, MACC, MSCAI, FAHA, FACP Elizabeth Ebert, MD, FACC, FASE John P. Erwin, III, MD, FACC D. Scott Gantt, DO, FACC, FSCAI Dan W. Giebel, MD, FACC, FASE Margaret Happel, MD Evan L. Hardegree, MD, FACC Albert J. Hicks, III, MD, MPH Philip D. Houck, MD, FACC Billy Don Jones, MD, FACP, FACC Mark E. Lawrence, DO, FACC Jeffrey B. Michel, MD, FACC Lazaros A. Nikolaidis, MD Robert C. Scott, III, MD, PhD, FACC Carl W. Tong, MD, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Srikala M. Devabhaktuni, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

CHILD & ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH Michael P. Carey, PhD Tracy C. Carey, PhD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Kyle Morrow, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple Joachim A. Sullivan, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple CHILD DEVELOPMENT Jerry A. Hall, MD Nhung Tran, MD, FAAP McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple CLINICAL CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Gregory D. Olsovsky, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple CLINICAL PATHOLOGY Robert Fader, PhD A. Mike Spiekerman, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple COLORECTAL SURGERY Rahila Essani, MD Harry T. Papaconstantinou, MD, FACS J. Scott Thomas, MD, FACS, FASCRS Rajalakshmi Nair Warrier, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE D. Mike Anderson, MD Edgar J. Jimenez, MD, MCCM Scott & White Clinic - Temple Bhupinder S. Sangha, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple CRITICAL CARE SURGERY Randall W. Smith, MD, FACS Scott & White Clinic - Temple CYTOGENETICS Sheila Marcks Dobin, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple DENTISTRY Kyle Frazier, DDS, FAGD Ace Jovanovski, DMD Scott & White Clinic - Temple

DERMATOLOGY Kirstin Altman, MD Katie Fiala, MD Ronald E. Grimwood, Jr., MD Chad D. Housewright, MD Natalie B. Lane, MD Palak Parekh, MD Erica A. Tillman, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Northside DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Krista L. Birkemeier, MD Matthew B. Crisp, MD Jose M. Santiago, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Ashley Kallina Gist, MD Christopher S. Gouner, MD Rodney Lewis Hajdik, MD Barrett N. Luce, MD Paul Metzger, MD Debra L. Monticciolo, MD L. Gill Naul, MD Michael L. Nipper, MD Linda Parman, MD Michael J. Phillips, MD James B. Schnitker, MD Spencer Travis Sincleair, MD Natalie Sivak, MD Connie C. So, MD Tim D. Truitt, MD James V. Vasek, Jr, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Whitney B. Edmister, MD, PhD Ricardo Garza-Gongora, MD Clint M. Gerdes, MD Ian Hamilton, PhD, CHP, DABR(D) Scott & White Medical Center - Temple EMERGENCY MEDICINE Bruce C. Bollinger, MD Clifford J. Buckley II, MD, MBA Jason N. Collins, MD, FACEP Dorian Drigalla, MD, FACEP David A. Fritz, MD Shawn D. Horrall, MD Margaret K. StreckerMcGraw, MD, FACEP Scott & White Clinic - Temple Heidi L. Alvey, MD Brandon M. Barth, MD Mark Basso, MD Michael Benham, MD Matthew W. Fannell, MD Robert D. Greenberg, MD, FACEP Jeffrey Jarvis, MD T. Russell Jones, MD Andrew L. Juergens, II, MD Victoria D. Klovenski, MD Scott A. McAninch, MD, FACEP Ryan Morrissey, MD Pratiksha Desai Naik, MD


Taylor K. Ratcliff, MD Sierra Read, MD Timothy C. Stallard, MD Eric W. Stern, MD C. Keith Stone, MD J. Scott Wieters, MD Nicole Zadzilka, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

Sharon Hall, MD Jeffrey K. Hubert, DO Shane R. Maxwell, MD Ernesto Sanchez, MD Thu P. Vo, DO Baylor Scott & White Convenient Care Clinic Killeen

ENDOCRINOLOGY Sabita Challagulla, MD Keith Cryar, MD Veronica K. Piziak, MD, PhD David Wenkert, MD, PhD Scott & White Center for Diagnostic Medicine

W. George Bartels, MD Clinton Fatter, MD Michael P. Hagen, MD Penelope Holland-Barkis, MD Darin K. McDonald, MD E. Don Parker Jr, MD Scott & White Clinic - Belton

FAMILY MEDICINE Lezli Braswell, MD Karen P. Harrison, MD Krupapen C. Patel, MD Baylor Scott & White Clinic Copperas Cove

Edward Fasolino, MD Sarah Hovland, MD, MPH Melissa J. Nieland, MD Stephen J. Sewell, MD Scott & White Clinic - Belton South

Justin A. Feeney, DO Michael O. Kirkpatrick, MD Vivek-Thomas Sankoorikal, MD Elena V. Wilson, MD Baylor Scott & White Clinic Killeen West

Jeffrey A. Hall, DO Cameron Kielhorn, DO Joshua C. Kilpatrick, MD Kenneth R. Kindle, DO Lorry Thornton, DO Scott & White Clinic - Harker Heights

Stephanie D. Redding, MD Linu V. Samuel, MD Cristina Blejan, MD

William M. Averitt, DO Amanda K. Beretta, DO Frank Betanski III, MD

Christine Bridges, MD Jed S. Fritz, MD Paul D. Gerdes, MD John A. Joseph, II, MD Joyce C. Odigboegwu, MD Jason D. Ramm, MD Scott & White Clinic - Killeen Billy Ligon, MD Cheryl L. Warren, MD Scott & White Clinic - Salado Tiffany Berry, MD Glen R. Couchman, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Daniel W. Elliott, MD Terry G. Rascoe, MD Jocelyn Mary-Estelle Wilson, MD, MPH Scott & White Clinic - Temple Northside Sharon L. Barber, MD Judy Embry, PhD Samuel N. Forjuoh, MD Tove M. Goldson, MD, PhD John L. Manning, MD Michael D. Reis, MD Candace Ripperda, MD Janice K. Smith, MD, MPH R. Marc Via, MD Scott & White Family Medicine Clinic - Santa Fe

Yoon Sin Kim, DO Paul Smith, DO, M.Arch Scott & White Medical Center - Temple FEMALE PELVIC MEDICINE AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Bob L. Shull, MD Paul M. Yandell, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple FOOT AND ANKLE SURGERY Scott M. Munroe, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute Naohiro Shibuya, DPM, MS, FACFAS VA-Temple GASTROENTEROLOGY Andrejs E. Avots-Avotins, MD, PhD Phillip L. Chaney, MD Richard A. Erickson, MD Mark A. Jeffries, DO Christopher M. Johnson, MD, PhD Christopher R. Naumann, MD Timothy P. Pfanner, MD Jonathan C. Ramirez, MD Don Rawls, MD

Dawn Sears, MD James (Tommy) Sing, Jr., DO Harry J. Thomas, MD Jennifer L. Vincent, DO Duc H. Vu, MD Joseph G. White, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple GENERAL SURGERY Maria A. Provost, MD Metroplex Health System Killeen Stephen W. Abernathy, MD Debra Doherty, MD Jacqueline A. Lappin, MD, FACS, FRCSI Joaquin A. Rodriguez, MD Richard E. Symmonds, Jr, MD, FACS Scott & White Clinic - Temple GERIATRIC MEDICINE Nadia Ali, MD Aval-Na’Ree S. Green, MD Katya Maillard-Gonzalez, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY Charles V. Capen, MD Timothy C. McCormick, DO Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Continued

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BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE PHYSICIAN FINDER HEADACHE MEDICINE D. Michael Ready, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple HEMATOLOGY/ ONCOLOGY Mohit Bansal, MD Ashwini Bhat, MD Christian T. Cable, MD, MHPE A. Clay Gowan, DO Kathleen G. Halka, MD Mark Holguin, MD Vinit G. Karur, MD, PhD, FACP Scott & White Vasicek Cancer Treatment Center Derrick D. Nguyen, MD Scott & White Cancer Center - Killeen Sripriya Santhanam, MD Rakesh Surapaneni, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple HISTOCOMPATIBILITY AND IMMUNOLOGY Marcelo J. Pando Rigal, PhD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE Laurel Kilpatrick, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple George B. Nguyen, DO Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Autumn H. Stratton, MD Temple Home Health Hospice INFECTIOUS DISEASE Karen Brust, MD Lizbeth J. CahuaymeZuniga, MD Alan Howell, MD Richmond L. Hunt, MD John Midturi, DO, MPH Sangeetha Ranganath, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Robert Plemmons, MD, FACP, CWS Scott & White Clinic & Dialysis Center - Temple South Loop Lauren Sisco, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple INPATIENT MEDICINE HOSPITALIST Imtiyaz H. Hakeem, MD Jenny T. Jacob, MD Bindu Raju, MD Hemalkumar Chandulal Ramani, MD Erin C. Reed, MD 20

Venkata Sami, MD Minesh P. Sheth, MD Asmat Q. Siddiqi, MD Metroplex Health System Killeen Austin Metting, MD Scott & White Center for Diagnostic Medicine Sonal Admane, MD, MPH Elizabeth Aguirre, MD Hameed Ali, DO Ammar Alqaid, MD Robert L. Anderson, MD Sofia Blinchevsky, MD Karla P. Bolanos, MD Fernando A. Bolanos Cruz, MD Luis C. Camarillo, MD Jose Cesani, MD Kevin Chang, MD, MS Salmann I. Chaudry, DO Divya R. Danda, MD Robin L. Dauterive, MD Ahutiben J. Desai, MD Cindy Lynn Douglas, MD Angela R. Eklund, MD Asfia Fatima, MD Jayne M. Garcia, MD Srikanth Gogineni, MD Mary Gaines Irish, MD Sadia Kanwal, MD Baljit Kaur, MD Durreshahwar Khursheed Khan, MD Aliya R. Laeeq, MD Mudassar Malik, MD Paul Mansour, MD Renee L. Martinez, MD Tresa McNeal, MD Curtis Mirkes, DO, FACP Jennifer D. Moran, MD Megan Greene Newman, MD James Onorato, MD, PhD Mahire Ozlem Ozcan, MD Kartik N. Patel, DO Sabitha Rajan, MD, MSc, FHM Brian Reasoner, MD Chaitanya C. Reddy, MD Ismail Salejee, MD Tanuja Salim, MD Christopher W. Sartin, MD Aubrey N. Schmidt, MD Monish A. Sheth, MD Rubin M. Simon, MD Lydia A. Sutherlun, MD Ashley J. Thomas, DO Sunita E. Varghees, MD, PhD Adam Wood, MD Noor Yazdanie, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple INTERNAL MEDICINE Raymond J. Harrison, MD, MBA Baylor Scott & White Clinic Copperas Cove

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Roberto I. Aguirre, MD Adam L. Brown, DO Chelsea H. Chang, MD Bijal P. Dave, MD Lisa D. Forrester, MD, PhD Rafael Gonzalez-Ayala, MD Vernon D. Holleman, MD Cassie Huynh, MD, FACP, CMD Richard H. Jesse, IV, MD Raagsudha Jhavar, MD Kristina Jones, MD Kathy Kimmey, MD Maybelline V. Lezama, MD Michael P. Martin, MD Michael McNeal, MD John David Myers, MD Cathleen M. Rivera, MD, MS Emran Rouf, MD, MBA, FACP Susan Elizabeth Seago, MD Daniel J. Smith, MD Noah Stratton, DO Holly A. Van Cleave, MD Juvencio Velasquez, Jr, MD Stephen C. Walker, MD Thomas J. Westwick, MD Scott & White Center for Diagnostic Medicine Veronica Broadnax, MD Bryce C. Bushe, MD Jessica E. Garza, MD Raina Karanjeet, MD Dane Langsjoen, MD Darla Lowe, MD Catherine J. McNeal, MD, PhD Joseph A. Stafford, MD Barbara A. Weiss, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple

MATERNAL & FETAL MEDICINE Steven R. Allen, MD Richard O. Jones, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple MEDICAL GENETICS Maria Blazo, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Colleen Forsyth Macmurdo, DO McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple MEDICAL ONCOLOGY Sherronda M. Henderson, MD Lucas Wong, MD, FACP Scott & White Vasicek Cancer Treatment Center MEDICAL ORTHOPEDICS Bryan L. Lane, DO Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute NEONATAL - PERINATAL MEDICINE Madhava R. Beeram, MD, MBA, CPE, FAAP Vinayak Govande, MD David R. Krauss, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center NEONATOLOGY Greg S. Miller, MD, PhD, MBA Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

Matthew J. Crowe, DO Jessica S. Garner, DO Sam E. Sawaya, MD Stephen Sibbitt, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

M. Nasir Uddin, PhD, FAHA Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Beatriz M. Hall, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute

Luis A. Concepcion, MD Mark S. Duke, MD Paula A. Duran, MD Roshny George, MD Nimrit Goraya, MD John W. Idoux, MD Tony Issac, MD Luciana B. McLean, MD Charles E. Moritz, MD Nidhi Mattoo Munshi, MD Mohanram Narayanan MD, FACP, FASN, FNKF,FRCP(C) Scott & White Clinic & Dialysis Center - Temple South Loop

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY Timothy A. Mixon, MD, FACC, FSCAI Scott & White Clinic - Temple INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Bradley T. Dollar, MD Douglas McDonald, MD Mark Montgomery, MD Steven Ruiz, MD Anastacio Saenz, Jr, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple JOINT REPLACEMENT Bryce Allen, MD Clint D. Barnett, MD Kirby D. Hitt, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute

NEPHROLOGY Donald E. Wesson, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Bruce Kaplan, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple NEUROLOGY George B. Creel, MD, MBA Killeen Neurology at Hemingway

Sally Borucki, MD Cristina M. Cabret-Aymat, MD Jeffrey W. Clark, DO Dan L. Keyser, MD Batool F. Kirmani, MD, FAAN, FAES Richard P. Lenehan, MD Sai K. Mula, MD Arpita Patel, MD Jennifer E. Rasmussen, MD Michael J. Soileau, MD J. Terry Wilkinson, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Judy J. Jia, MD Sowmya Katragadda, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Kerry O’Mahar, PhD, ABPPCN McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple Daniel Cruz-Laureano, PsyD Crystal Lantrip, PhD Richard A. Phenis, PsyD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Jared Benge, PhD, ABPPCN Scott & White Medical Center - Temple NEURORADIOLOGY Gordon W. Calderwood, MD Srilatha Joglekar, MD Walter S. Lesley, MD, MBA, CPE, FACR Harold Sonnier, MD David H. Uhrbrock, MD Kenneth D. Williams, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple NEUROSURGERY Dhruve S. Jeevan, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Ethan A. Benardete, MD Kevin Cooper, MD David Garrett, Jr., MD Frank S. Harris, MD Jason H. Huang, MD, FACS Scott & White Clinic - Temple Dongxia Feng, MD, PhD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Ekokobe Fonkem, DO Scott & White Vasicek Cancer Treatment Center NUCLEAR MEDICINE Michael L. Middleton, MD Mark D. Strober, MD Bradley R. Trotter, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Eric Allerkamp, MD Cedric T. Day, Jr, MD Nathan A. Kwan, MD April A. Schiemenz, MD Paul M. West, MD Killeen OB/GYN Clinic at Hemingway

Kenneth Lao, MD David Liang, MD Michael A. Magee, MD Joseph Newman, MD Robert H. Rosa, Jr., MD Kyle H. Smith, MD Jonathan H. Tsai, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Pavilion

Aleigha A. DeLukie, DO Alisa A. Furman, MD Scott & White Clinic - Belton South

OPTOMETRY Joseph D. Cessac, OD Ashley Chennankara, OD Scott & White Eye Clinic Harker Heights

Christopher J. Birkholz, MD Nathan S. Drever, MD Russ Fothergill, MD Pamela Sue Greene, MD Kevin P. Huddleston, MD Belinda M. Kohl-Thomas, MD Kimberly A. Pilkinton, MD Lauren Q. Smith, MD Joanna Stacey, MD Patricia J. Sulak, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Jessica L. Langsjoen, MD Scott & White Family Medicine Clinic - Santa Fe F. Lurry Leavelle, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE Don A. Mackey, MD James E. Madsen, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple OPHTHALMOLOGY Glen O. Brindley, MD J. Paul Dieckert, MD Calvin G. Eshbaugh, MD Derrick S. Fung, MD Mark F. Hollingsworth, MD

Brian M. Knieriem, OD Joshua Morrison, OD William White, OD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Pavilion ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Lance A. Read, DDS Scott & White Clinic - Temple Justin D. Bonner, DDS Byung Joo Lee, DDS Philip W. Vance Jr., DMD, OMS Scott & White Medical Center - Temple ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY Sandy M. Bidner, MD Scott & White Specialty Clinic - Killeen Hemingway Kindyle L. Brennan, PhD, PT Charles F. Kallina, MD, MS Robert A. Probe, MD Daniel L. Stahl, MD Russell A. Ward, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute

ORTHOPEDIC TRAUMA Michael L. Brennan, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute ORTHOPEDICS HAND AND UPPER EXTREMITY SURGERY Douglas S. Fornfeist, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY Jeramie B. Hanson, MD Rebecca L. Laurich, MD Katie B. Reding, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center

OTOLARYNGOLOGY Melissa G. Kress, DO Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY Ashish V. Banker, DO Soi-Yu Chan, MD Judith Lazol, MD John E. Pliska, MD Saradha Subramanian, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Thomas G. Brammeier, MD David W. Clark, MD Gerhard ‘Trey’ Hill, III, MD Lewis R. Hutchinson, MD Douglas W. Martin, MD D. Randall (Randy) Pinkston, MD Ryan P. Raju, MD Kyla C. Sherrard, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE Richard B. Bonner, MD Manish Desai, MD Deborah R. Douty, MD Sowmya Kallur, MD Lori L. Wick, MD Abel R. Yarrozu, MD, MPH Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center

Bryan S. Newbrough, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE Robin N. Boeck, MD Aleta B. Bonner, MD Dominic Lucia, MD, FACEP, FAAP Kellie L. Quinn, DO Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center

Chris Himmelheber, MD Scott & White Specialty Clinic - Killeen Hemingway PATHOLOGY Walter J. Linz, MD, MBA Lina Liu, MD Debby Rampisela, MD Edward S. Rappaport, MD Frank Shan, MD, PhD, FACP Scott & White Clinic - Temple Martin P. Fernandez, MD Bing Leng, MD Arundhati Rao, MD, PhD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY William P. Bryant, MD Stephen W. Ponder, MD, FAAP, CDE Matthew D. Stephen, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY Ashis Barad, MD Murali Jatla, MD, MBA Suma N. Raju, MD Jonathan Ramprasad, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY/ ONCOLOGY Melissa R. DeLario, MD Guy Grayson, MD Javier R. Kane, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE James H. Brien, DO McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple Manjusha (Manju) Gaglani, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center PEDIATRIC INPATIENT MEDICINE HOSPITALIST Sheeba A. Alexander, MD Stephanie Blasick, DO Amanda Farris, DO Jeremy L. Gibson, MD Pamela Gregerson, MD Larry Herrera, MD Sarah M. McCormick, DO Paulina A. Saenz, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center PEDIATRIC MEDICINE/ INTENSIVE CARE Julia Ruiz, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center

Continued

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BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE PHYSICIAN FINDER PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY Elie S. Firzli, MD Faris Q. Hashim, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY Fares Kokash, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple Mazen A. Almidani, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Tricia Ritch, MD, PhD Scott & White Sleep Institute PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY Matthew S. Recko, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Pavilion PEDIATRIC ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY Christopher D. Souder, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY Rosser K. Powitzky, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple PEDIATRIC PULMONARY MEDICINE

Arthur Chester Ogborn, Jr., MD

Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center John M. Palmer, MD Malvika Sagar, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple PEDIATRIC SURGERY Danny Little, MD Kelly D. Mattix, MD Lena Perger, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple

PEDIATRICS John L. Boyd, III, MD, MBA Trichelle A. Newman, MD Neha Patel, DO Shanti Baireddy Reddy, MD Michael C. Smith, MD Erica L. Ward, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Katrina May Baca, MD Jessica Choe, MD Jessica W. Drigalla, MD Rebecca E. Freeman, MD Lisa Sullivan, MD Sara E. Sultz, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Belton Soo C. Battle, MD Abel Y. Castro, MD 22

Jayne Ann SansonJaraczewski, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Hillcrest

Charles N. Verheyden, MD, PhD, FACS Scott & White Cosmetic Surgery Center - Temple

John R. Asbury, MD Christopher B. Hovland, MD Neelam Konnur, MD Cassandra M. Lefevre, MD Fahad M. Malik, MD Elena I. Meza, MD John Q. Thompson, Jr, DO McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple

Wendy L. Czerwinski, MD, PhD, FRCS(C), FACS Robert A. Weber, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute

Melissa Colbath, MD Tinku Davis, MD Allie M. Fuller, MD Randy R. Kastner, MD Sarah B. Nickerson, MD Sharyl Santema, MD Charlie D. Williams, MD McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - West Temple Andrew G. Faniku, MD Metroplex Health System Jamie Avila, MD John K. Blevins, MD Rachel S. Dawson, DO, MPH Lance Kunz, DO Lisa A. Minsloff, MD Susan P. Nickel, MD Scott & White Clinic - Killeen Matthew B. Bierwirth, MD Linda J. Kirby-Keyser, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Ashita Shetty, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Thu Nguyen, MD Robert Jean-Luc Organ, MD Scott & White Specialty Clinic - Killeen Hemingway PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION Fouzia S. Khan, DO Scott & White Medical Center - Temple James H. Albers, MD Paul A. Friedman, MD Mounir F. Khalil, MD Jill M. McGowan, MD Taras Ploskanych, MD John David R. Seno, MD Hejun Yuan, MD, PhD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Andrew M. Altman, MD Marcin Czerwinski, MD, PhD, FRCS(C), FACS Michel H. Saint-Cyr, MD, FRCS(C) Scott & White Clinic - Temple

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

PODIATRIC SURGERY Richard N. Goad, DPM, MA McLane Children’s Scott & White Clinic - Temple Dale Lane, DPM Scott & White Specialty Clinic - Killeen Hemingway PODIATRY John Brust, DPM Killeen Podiatry at Hemingway Christopher G. Browning, DPM, FACFAS, CWS J. Marshall Devall, DPM Donald M. Lynch, DPM Douglas P. Murdoch, DPM Scott & White Clinic & Dialysis Center - Temple South Loop PSYCHIATRY Julia Najara, MD Tarik Shaheen, MD Benjamin L. Wiseman, MD Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center Pamela Mathews, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple V. Maxanne Flores, MD Scott A. Francis, MD Rebecca Frost, MD Randall F. Moore, MD, JD Jason H. Sapp, DO Scott & White Mental Health Center - Temple PSYCHOLOGY Cynthia Brown, PhD Scott & White - Belton South Julienne A. Clowney, PsyD Dean K. Paret, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Killeen Amy O’Neil Adcock, PhD Scott & White Family Medicine Clinic - Santa Fe Cinamon C. Romers, PhD Jae L. Ross, PsyD Scott & White Mental Health Center - Temple PULMONARY MEDICINE Badri Giri, MD Killeen Pulmonary at Hemingway Alejandro C. Arroliga, MD, FCCP, FACP

Richard C. Beckendorf, MD Carl D. Boethel, MD, FCCP, FAASM, D’ABSM Veronica Brito, MD Jeana D. O’Brien, MD, FCCP, MMI Francisco Perez-Guerra, MD, FCCP William G. Petersen, MD, FCCP Juan F. Sanchez, MD Heath D. White, DO, MS, FCCP Scott & White Clinic - Temple Whitney S. Prince, MD Alfredo Vazquez-Sandoval, MD Jorge F. Velazco, MD Peter Yau, MD, FCCP Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Shekhar A. Ghamande, MD, FCCP, FAASM Scott & White Sleep Institute RADIATION ONCOLOGY Sunita Boddu, PhD Oscar Calvo, PhD Niloyjyoti Deb, MD Swetha Oddiraju, PhD Geethpriya Palaniswaamy, PhD Mehul K. Patel, MD, MHSA Gregory P. Swanson, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Sameer G. Jhavar, MD, PhD Rufus J. Mark, MD Niraj H. Pahlajani, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple Moataz N. El-Ghamry, MD Scott & White Vasicek Cancer Treatment Center RADIOLOGICAL PHYSICS Rajesh Gutti, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY AND INFERTILITY Thomas J. Kuehl, PhD Jose F. Pliego, MD Thomas J. Wincek, MD, PhD Scott & White Clinic - Temple RHEUMATOLOGY Bruce Baethge, MD Marilyn K. Clark, MD Montu K. Parekh, MD Neal I. Shparago, DO Scott & White Center for Diagnostic Medicine SLEEP MEDICINE Shirley F. Jones, MD, FCCP, FAASM, D’ABSM Scott & White Sleep Institute

SPINAL SURGERY Christopher D. Chaput, MD Mark D. Rahm, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute SPORTS MEDICINE Bill Hamilton, MD Rodolfo R. Martinez, DO Robert E. Reeve, MD Brett N. Robin, MD Scott & White Roney Bone & Joint Institute SURGICAL ONCOLOGY Matthew R. Bower, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Courtney M. Edwards, MD Stacey A. Milan, MD Henry A. Reinhart, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple TRAUMA SURGERY Richard C. Frazee, MD Justin L. Regner, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Claire Larson Isbell, MD Travis Isbell, MD Stanley Kurek, DO, FACS Scott & White Medical Center - Temple UROLOGY Stephanie E. Harris, MD Killeen Urology Services Erin T. Bird, MD, MBA Jason D. Bourque, MD King Scott Coffield, MD Jill McHenry Danford, MD Marawan El Tayeb, MD Patrick Lowry, MD T. Philip Reilly, MD, FACS Kristofer R. Wagner, MD Jeffrey A. Waxman, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Belur J. Patel, MD, MPH Scott & White Medical Center - Temple VASCULAR SURGERY William T. Bohannon, MD J. Leigh Eidson III, MD Thomas R. Warren, II, MD Scott & White Clinic - Temple Robert S. Smith, MD Scott & White Medical Center - Temple WOUND CARE Liza De Olazo Banaag, MD, CWS, UHM/ABPM Scott & White Clinic - Temple Rita Haws, MD Scott & White Clinic & Dialysis Center - Temple South Loop


IN R E RE

s n o i s s e f o r P h t l a He CA A FOR

IC ONS SURG FESSI  O R P S RE  EM TORY CA Y H A P R I A RESP OGR SON SING  L A EDIC NUR TIC M TIONAL S O IAGN OCA  V  D E G N N YGIE URSI TAL H EGREE N N E D ED CIAT ASSO

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TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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BRINGING

Award-Winning HEALTH PROFESSIONS PROGRAMS TO C E N T R A L T E X A S Temple College offers a variety of exciting, highly successful health professions programs that support the college’s mission of fostering student success for our diverse community. Students can earn an Associate of Applied Science degree (A.A.S) in six different fields: ✔ Dental Hygiene

✔ Nursing

✔ Diagnostic Medical Sonography

✔ Respiratory Care

✔ Emergency Medical Services

✔ Surgical Technology

We also offer Certificates and Advanced Technical Certificates in some of these fields. Located along the bustling I-35 corridor, our clinical partners include Baylor Scott & White Health, one of the fastest-growing healthcare systems in the country, and the Central Texas VA Health Care System. Many other local clinics and medical facilities offer clinical experiences as well. Our health programs boast award-winning faculty members, many of whom are Temple College graduates with a sense of pride and commitment to providing their community with highly qualified and prepared health professionals. Students have on-campus access to state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratories in our Health Sciences Center, which includes a contemporary 12-chair dental hygiene clinic. Our Health Sciences Center also houses an award-winning and internationally recognized Clinical Simulation Center — a 9,800 square-foot “mini-hospital” designed for multidisciplinary health care education using human patient simulators.

2016 - 2017

HIGHLIGHTS The Dental Hygiene program received the 2017 AWARD OF EXCELLENCE from the Texas Association of College Technical Educators (TACTE). For the 20TH CONSECUTIVE YEAR, the Dental Hygiene students had a 100% pass rate on the national board exam. Students completing the Surgical Technology program in 2016 had a 100% PLACEMENT RATE and a 100% PASS RATE on the National Certification Exam. The Medical Sonography program was named one of the TOP 50 ULTRASOUND TECHNICIAN PROGRAMS at two-year colleges in the country. Students completing the program in 2016 had a 100% PASS RATE on all of their board exams and a 100% PLACEMENT RATE.

With consistently high student achievement outcomes and job placement rates, the Temple College health professions programs offer quality, value and guided pathways to lifelong learning.

Shelley M. Pearson, Ed.D., R.T. (R)(M) ARRT Associate Vice President, Health Professions, Temple College

2018 APPLICATION DEADLINES February 15, 2018  DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY June 1, 2018 EMS PROFESSIONS January 4, 2018  ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING April 13, 2018 VOCATIONAL NURSING January 18, 2018  RESPIRATORY CARE June 18, 2018 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY January 31, 2018

DENTAL HYGIENE

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SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL


Dental HYGIENE

NEXT APPLICATION DEADLINE

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DENTAL HYGIENE Become a licensed preventative oral health professional. Typically takes three years to complete: one year of prerequisite courses and two full years of study within the Dental Hygiene curriculum. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to sit for the Dental Hygiene National Board through the American Dental Association, a clinical exam administered through the Western Regional Examining Board, and a jurisprudence exam given by the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners. Students who would like to earn a bachelor’s degree in Dental Hygiene may do so through our online dual enrollment and completion partnership with Texas Woman’s University.

15

FEB

DEGREES OFFERED

2018

MAY classes start

2018

APPLICATION PROCEDURE ✔ Attend an information session ✔ Apply to ✔ Complete program application ✔ Take the ATI TEAS exam

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS Since Temple College began offering dental hygiene in 1995, its graduates have had a 100 percent pass rate on the Dental Hygiene National Board. The program also has consistently had a high placement rate. The Temple College Dental Hygiene program received the 2017 Award of Excellence from the Texas Association of College Technical Educators. Students and faculty in the program serve the community through the Head Start programs in Bell County, long-term care facilities, the community free dental clinic, and many ISDs in the area.

2017 - 2018

INFORMATION SESSIONS * September 11, 2017 October 9, 2017 November 13, 2017 January 8, 2018

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY

March 19, 2019

2012 - 2022

30% EXPECT APPROX.

GROWTH RATE

Highest in Health Care Professions

30 $36

$

FO R M O R E I N F O RMAT I O N www.templejc.edu/dental-hygiene

TO

April 9, 2018 June 11, 2018 EXPECTED SALARY IN TEXAS

/hr* * Texas Workforce Commission

Rosemary Laws, Program Liaison rosemary.laws@templejc.edu (254) 298-8651

July 9, 2018 August 13, 2018 * Sessions begin at 4 p.m. in the Health Sciences Center, Room 1832.

Melissa Machalek, Department Chair mmachalek@templejc.edu (254) 298-8657 TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY Become a nationally and globally registered sonographer. Typically takes three years to complete: one year of general education courses and two full calendar years of study within the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. VASCULAR SONOGRAPHY CERTIFICATE Obtain a Vascular Sonography Certificate while in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. This program is an additional 9 Semester Credit Hours taken during the summer and fall of the second year. ADVANCED TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE FOR STUDENTS WITH A PREVIOUS AAS OR BS DEGREE Become a nationally and globally registered sonographer. Typically takes two years to complete. Students are eligible and typically sit for the national ARDMS Board two months prior to graduation. Temple College graduates enter the workforce as Registered Vascular Sonographers (RVT), General Abdominal Sonographers (AB) and OB/GYN Sonographers.

NEXT APPLICATION DEADLINE

JUN

Diagnostic

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

01 2018

AUG classes start

2018

APPLICATION PROCEDURE ✔ Attend an information session ✔ Complete application ✔ Take ATI TEAS VI test ✔ If selected, attend interview ✔ If selected, submit for drug test, background check, orientation and CPR training

2017 - 2018

INFORMATION SESSIONS *

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS Temple College sonography graduates have a 100% job placement rate. Students are double, if not triple credentialed, placing them up to five years ahead of other graduates.

September 18, 2017

In 2016, the program was recognized as one of the top 50 Ultrasound Technician Programs at two-year colleges in the country.

November 13, 2017

48,660 $99,100

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY

$

March 26, 2018 April 16, 2018 May 7, 2018

/YR*

SONOGRAPHER’S EXPECTED SALARY DEPENDING ON CREDENTIALS

www.templejc.edu/sonography

26

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

January 22, 2018 February 26, 2018

TO

FO R M O R E I N FO RMAT I O N

October 16, 2017

* Sessions begin at 9 a.m. in the Pavilion, Room 2807. * U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Jane Johnson, Department Secretary jane.johnson@templejc.edu (254) 298-8652

Dr. Felix Guzman, Department Chair felix.guzman@templejc.edu (254) 298-8695


EMS PROFESSIONS DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

NEXT APPLICATION DEADLINE

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN EMS PROFESSIONS Become a Licensed Paramedic. Typically takes 16 months to complete: 4 hours of prerequisite courses and 56 hours of study within the paramedic curriculum.

Applications for all programs are available year round. Applications for the EMT program are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

PARAMEDIC CERTIFICATE Become a Certified Paramedic. Typically takes 16 months to complete.

Applications for the AEMT program offered in Hutto are due in August for the fall semester and applications for the AEMT program offered in Temple are due in December for the spring semester. Applicants who successfully complete the AEMT program may apply for admission to the Paramedic program as part of the AEMT program.

EMT CERTIFICATE Become an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Typically completed in one semester. AEMT CERTIFICATE Become an Advanced EMT. Typically takes 10 months to complete. Programs are offered in both Temple and Hutto. Upon successful completion of one of these programs, graduates are eligible to sit for the national paramedic and advanced EMT exam or the national certification exam given by the National Registry of EMTs. Students are then able to obtain a certification or licenses from the Texas Department of State Health Services.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS ✔ 96% job placement rate

✔ High employer satisfaction rates

STARTING SALARIES

CENTRAL

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY

55,000 $32,000

www.templejc.edu/ems

✔ Complete the Application Packet www.templejc.edu/ems ✔ Schedule the FISDAP Entrance Exam Paramedic and AEMT students only ✔ Schedule an interview Paramedic and AEMT students only

INFORMATION SESSIONS *

✔ Students are sought after by local EMS agencies

PARAMEDIC

/YR*

EMT

FO R M O R E I N F O RMAT I O N

✔ Apply to

2017 - 2018 Temple

✔ 95% first-time pass rate on NREMT Paramedic Exam

$

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

/YR*

* Texas Workforce Commission

October 23, 2017 February 26, 2018 April 30, 2018 June 25, 2018 August 27, 2018 * Sessions begin at 6 p.m. in the Health Sciences Center, Room 1832.

See website for Hutto sessions.

Molly Green, Office Manager emsinfo@templejc.edu (254) 298-8697 TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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ADN APPLICATION DEADLINE

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING Become a Registered Nurse. Typically takes two years to complete after one semester of prerequisite courses. LVN-ADN BRIDGE For students who hold a License of Vocational Nursing. Requires 14 Semester Credit Hours of general education courses followed by one year of nursing courses. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN, administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

13

APR

DEGREES OFFERED

2018

AUG classes start

2018

LVN BRIDGING PROGRAM DEADLINE

19

DEC

Associate

DEGREE NURSING

2018

MAY classes start

2018

Graduates of the ADN program may go on to obtain a bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN) from partner institutions such as Texas A&M UniversityCentral Texas, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Texas Tech University, Chamberlain College of Nursing, Grand Canyon University and Western Governor’s University.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

✔ Take the HESI Admission Assessment

✔ Approved by the Texas Board of Nursing

✔ Print ADN application from nursing website www.templejc.edu/nursing

✔ Accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY EXPERIENCED

$61,635*

ENTRY LEVEL

$44,573*

10,000

MORE THAN

WILL NEED

NEW RNs EACH YEAR THROUGH 2024**

* U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics ** Texas Workforce Commission

FO R M O R E I N FO RMAT I O N www.templejc.edu/nursing

28

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

✔ Submit official transcripts to Admissions

✔ Submit complete application packet to the ADN office by the deadline

✔ 88% NCLEX-RN pass rate for 2016 graduates

CENTRAL

✔ Apply to

Tracey Cooper, ADN Program Director tracey.cooper@templejc.edu

ogram r P g n i rs See Nu n Sessions on tio Informa owing page. the foll

Nancy Miller, ADN Secretary nancy.miller@templejc.edu (254) 298-8666


Vocational NURSING VN APPLICATION DEADLINE

18

JUN

classes start

VOCATIONAL NURSING CERTIFICATE Become a Licensed Vocational Nurse. Typically takes 12 months to complete. Offered in Temple and Taylor.

JAN

CERTIFICATES OFFERED

Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination-PN (NCLEX-PN) given by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

✔ Take the HESI A2 exam

✔ Students in the Temple program have NCLEX-PN pass rates of more than 90% since 2011 with a 100% pass rate in 2016.

✔ Complete and return an application

✔ Students in the Taylor program had a 100% NCLEX-PN pass rate in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2017.

18 $22 $

2018

✔ Attend an information session

✔ Apply for Blue Card/Declaratory Order from the Texas State Board of Nursing

2017 - 2018 Nursing

VN ENTRY LEVEL

HOURLY RATE

CENTRAL

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY

2018

INFORMATION SESSIONS *

/HR*

EXPERIENCED VN September 5, 2017

/HR*

January 2, 2018 February 6, 2018

12.4%

March 6, 2018 April 3, 2018 May 1, 2018 June 5, 2018

INCREASE

FO R M O R E I N F O RMAT I O N www.templejc.edu/vocational-nursing

November 7, 2017 December 5, 2017

by 2024 EXPECT

in VN Positions in Central Texas**

October 3, 2017

* U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics ** Texas Workforce Commission

Debbie Stobaugh, Temple debra.stobaugh@templejc.edu (254) 298-8664

* Sessions begin at 4 p.m. in the Dell Martin Nursing Education Center, Room 1003.

Louise Gore, Taylor louise.gore@templejc.edu (254) 298-8942 TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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Respiratory CARE

Surgical

TECHNOLOGY

DEGREE OFFERED

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN RESPIRATORY CARE Become a respiratory therapist. Typically takes two years to complete. Three prerequisite courses are required.

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE IN SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY Become a surgical technologist. Typically takes two years to complete: four full semesters plus one summer.

Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to take the Therapist Multiple Choice Exam then the Clinical Simulation Exam given by the National Board for Respiratory Care.

SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE Awarded following the first full year of the Associate of Applied Science program. Two long semesters and a 12-week summer semester.

Associate degree graduates of the Temple College Respiratory Care program can go on to obtain a bachelor’s degree in Respiratory Care from any of the five baccalaureate degreegranting institutions with Respiratory Care programs in Texas.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS ✔ 100% employment rate for the 2016 graduating class

Both programs provide the technical and educational experiences that prepare graduates for entry-level positions as surgical technologists and to sit for the national certification examination sponsored by the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA).

✔ Temple College graduates pass national credential exams on par with baccalaureate program graduates.*

Professionals who possess a Certificate in Surgical Technology and have successfully earned credentials may complete their associate degree with Temple College.

✔ Most graduates attain Registered Respiratory Care Therapist certification within two months of graduation.*

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

September 8, 2017 October 6, 2017 November 3, 2017 December 5, 2017 January 5, 2018 February 2, 2018

EMPLOYMENT AND SALARY

41,970 $80,440

$

/YR** TO MEDIAN SALARY $57,790/YR. EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK GOOD

** U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

18 AUG

NEXT APP DEADLINE

classes start

2018

2018

APP PROCEDURE

Students completing the Surgical Technology program in 2016 had a 100% job placement rate and a 100% pass rate on the National Certification Exam.

31 MAY

NEXT APP DEADLINE

JAN

INFORMATION SESSIONS *

*Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care

JUN

2017 - 2018

2018

October 9, 2017

✔ Attend an information session

✔ Attend an information session

April 6, 2018

✔ Submit transcripts indicating completion of prerequisite courses

✔ Pass ATI TEAS pre-entrance exam with required minimum score

✔ Pass TSI or equivalent and TEAS V

✔ Submit a formal application

* Sessions begin at 9 a.m. in Health Sciences Center, Room 1818.

September 11, 2017

APP PROCEDURE

March 2, 2018

May 31, 2018

INFORMATION SESSIONS *

2018

✔ Complete the admission procedure

May 4, 2018

2017 - 2018

classes start

✔ Submit two letters of reference

November 13, 2017 January 8, 2018 February 12, 2018 March 19, 2018 April 9, 2018 * Sessions begin at 3 p.m. in the Health Sciences Center.

✔ Interview

F O R M O R E I N F ORMAT I O N

FOR M ORE INFORM ATION

Dr. Bill Cornelius, Program Chair Molly Green, Office Mgr bill.cornel@templejc.edu molly.green@templejc.edu 30 298-8928 SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL(254) 298-8697 (254)

Rosemary Laws, Program Liaison rosemary.laws@templejc.edu (254) 298-8651

www.templejc.edu/respiratorycare

www.templejc.edu/surgical-technology


SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS

Six years of healing in Heights By CATHERINE HOSMAN

N

ow in its sixth year of service Seton Medical Center Harker Heights, and the adjacent Wellstone clinic continues to grow in the comprehensive services it provides to the community. It is part of the Austinbased Seton Health Care Family, and in partnership with Nashville based Ardent Health Services who merged with LHP Hospital Group, adding SMCHH to its roster of hospitals. In May, Modern Health Care named SMCHH as one of AHS’s best places to work in the U.S. “It speaks to our ability to achieve building a great center and place to enjoy one’s time,” said CEO Zach Dietze. SMCHH recruits staff and physicians from all over the country. Dietze said the hospital’s more than 300 employees are attracted to the Central Texas lifestyle, its economy, slower pace, recreational areas and proximity to larger cities like Austin, Dallas and San Antonio. “Staff and physicians come from other hospitals,” he said. “Everyone has worked someplace else.” Dietze started his career at SMCHH when it opened its doors in 2012. He was hired as the assistant administrator and said the hospital has experienced many changes and challenges in its first five years. The first challenge was building a new hospital from the ground up. “It was unique, not an old hospital being retrofitted, but a de novo building.” The three-story, 83-bed hospital is 220,000 square feet with a vacant third floor that gives the center room to expand. The 60,000-square-foot Wellstone Clinic, part of the Seton family, is 100 percent occupied with Wellstone doctors and independent practitioners. Among the services offered include orthopedics, cardiology, imaging and diagnostics. The hospital is a Level IV Trauma Center and includes a 17-bed emergency department; an intensive care unit; imaging and diagnostic services including MRI, 64-slice CT with cardiac package, digital radiology, and digital mammography, and a recently added electromyography machine.

Zach Dietze

Women’s services include labor and delivery, obstetrics and gynecology, and a nursery, medical and surgical services. Acute care services include cardiology, interventional cardiology, oncology, orthopedics and neurology. The hospital has minimally invasive surgical suites, a catheterization lab and electronic medical records. A helipad allows for emergency transport by helicopter. The clinic also has a sleep lab, and cardiology department in partnership with Austin Heart Center. The hospital recently earned its chest pain accreditation and is in the process of obtaining primary stroke accreditation. “We are in the stages of developing procedures and recruiting personnel that meet the standards (for stroke care),” Dietze said. “But we have to prove it to ourselves first.” SMCHH’s active heart care clinic continues to grow and Dietze said they are building relationships throughout the county for cardiac care.

KEEPING THE COMMUNITY HEALTHY The hospital’s emergency department is in the process of recertification as a Level IV Trauma facility. This gives the hospital the ability to stabilize patients and transfer them to a Level 1 Trauma Center, if indicated. “EMS knows what type of patients they should bring in here,” said Dietze. Last year, the hospital partnered with the new Armed Services YMCA

to open an off-campus physical therapy clinic. “We didn’t have enough space for outpatient therapy on campus, it wasn’t in the design,” Dietze said. “We knew we would have to go off campus. When the ASYMCA approached us, they wanted to partner with a local health system in building the wellness center.” Also this year SMCHH formed a joint venture with Freedom Urgent Care and opened a second urgent care clinic in Killeen. “It’s Freedom Urgent Care Seton Harker Heights Central Texas,” said Human Resources Director Mona Tucker. “It offers options for non-hospital emergency type issues like lacerations, broken bones, occupational health services for employers. It’s a better option if someone does not have a primary care doctor they can go to one of the clinics and their co-pay will be a lot less than the ER, and it’s more accessible.” SMCHH strives to deliver quality care to all individuals and four years ago partnered with the Delivery System Reform Improvement Program. The statewide initiative’s goal is to find new ways to provide care to communities outside the treatment center, Dietze explained. Working with the Killeen Free Clinic, SMCHH provides a nurse practitioner, registered nurse and social worker to provide service for acute care and chronic disease management. “If eligible for the free clinic, a person with no insurance can enroll in the chronic disease management program to help keep his or her illness stable and not have to go to the ER,” he said. “Zach was very instrumental in putting the program together. There is a huge need to support that population,” Tucker added. “When Marlene DiLillo, executive director of the Killeen Free Clinic, presented the opportunity to us, we were well aware of the need in that area they served. This was a perfect fit for the new hospital to support the clinic.” Looking forward Dietze said their mission is to continue providing exceptional patient care. “We want every patient to have the best patient experience available. We are patient-centered. Every decision we make impacts the patients.” TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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MENDED HEARTS Mended Hearts is a national organization founded 65 years ago by Dr. Dwight E. Harken. It has more than 300 local chapters and satellites nationwide, and partners with 460 hospitals and rehabilitation clinics. Mended Hearts offers services to heart patients through visiting programs, support groups, meetings and educational forums. Cynthia Romero, RN Seton Cardiac Catheterization Lab, learned about Mended Hearts when she was seeking information about heart health from a heart attack survivor for one of her patients. “She began to tell me about Mended Hearts and I thought this was something we could use here,” Romero said. “The group offers patient to patient support to each other.” Romero said patients can comfort each other by their experiences, even giving post-care advice, like placing the heart-shaped-pillow patients receive post surgery, between the seatbelt and patient when heading home from the hospital. Patients hug the pillow tightly to their chest in case of a cough, sneeze or even a laugh. “It avoids openings of chest wounds,” she said. Romero started a group at SMCHH in March and it has grown from two to 11 people. “I got to witness the group in action,” she said. “One patient who just had open heart surgery came to the May meeting, but he kept to himself. When we went around the table and everyone said why they were there, he met another heart patient who had open heart surgery in the same hospital a week apart. The quiet person started to ask questions. When you are able to see someone else going through the same thing, you can talk to that person about the different aspects of heart issues.” Romero facilitates meetings and brings in guest speakers to talk about topics from counseling to diet. At one meeting the group was taught bi-standard CPR, a method that uses chest compressions only, no mouth-tomouth resuscitation. “If you see a stranger go down, there is more of a chance you will help him if you don’t have to resuscitate,” Romero said. “You only have to do compressions until EMS gets there.” 32

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS

The uncertainty of emergency medicine Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Photo by MIKE BARTOSZEK

K

ari Shulz thrives under chaos. As the director of the emergency department at Seton Medical Center Harker Heights, and trauma nurse for 17 years of her 20-year nursing career, she is calming presence to her staff when facing the medical emergencies that come through the door of the ED. The ED sees more than 130 patients each day and Schulz said, “You don’t know what’s going to come through the door.” “During the first six months of this year we’ve seen more violent trauma,” she continued. “It’s been eye opening. Some of the things we deal with are not fun.” Shulz is a “boots on the ground” manager who supervises a staff of 65. She handles the day-to-day operations of a busy ED with four Fast Track rooms and 17 beds. More than 54,000 patients pass through the doors of the Seton Medical Center Harker Heights emergency department each year. She joined SMCHH as trauma coordinator in 2013, and was promoted to her current position in 2014.

A QUIET UPBRINGING Born in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis, Schulz’s family moved to Forman, North Dakota, when she was 5. “It had less than 500 people,” she said. It was her father’s hometown, the place he was born and reared. She said it was “very Mayberry.” “People left their keys in their cars in the driveway, doors were never locked,” she recalled. During those magical years she and her friends spent their after school hours and summer days riding their bicycles throughout the town. “We were never inside,” she said. “We came inside for meals. There was

no technology, no video games. I had 27 people in my graduating class.” Townspeople looked out for one another and to help parents know where their children were a fire siren rang at 12, 5 and 9 p.m. “For lunch, supper and curfew,” she said. And in the harsh North Dakota winters, children still played outside. “We had a ditch in front of our house and my brother would bury me in the snow.” A self-proclaimed tomboy and avid swimmer, Schulz was just 14 years when she discovered she wanted to be a nurse. Each summer she took a job as a lifeguard at the community pool in Forman. As part of her training, Schulz learned how to administer CPR. Sitting on top of her perch, overlooking the swimmers, she started thinking about the power of CPR and how it could help save someone’s life. It was that moment that put her on a path to become a nurse. “Every summer I was a lifeguard, anticipating what’s going to happen,” she said. “It was a huge pool. We had great leaders. I knew it (nursing) was something I wanted to do. I was driven as a kid.” Seven years earlier, when she was 7 years old, she recalled the time when her grandfather was in the hospital with leukemia. She remembered the nurses comforting her family. “It’s a sad memory. I was watching those nurses in action,” she said. “They didn’t even know my parents, they had no relationship, yet they were still able to comfort them, help them. That’s the caring aspect. Even if you’ve only met someone for a day, you can help them.” Schulz worked in the town’s Skid Steer Bobcat Factory after high school graduation. “Dad retired from there and employees’ kids could work for the summer,” she said. “I worked five 12-


Kari Shulz meets with the team at the Seton Medical Center Harker Heights Emergency Department. From left is Schulz, Sean Upham, Amanda Hank, Kristin Cummings, Robert Thomason and Christina Case (seated).

hour shifts and earned $14 an hour. I did everything from putting on decals to working with power tools and driving a forklift. “Many classmates went on to work full time,” she continued. “It was easy shift work in a factory. In Forman, you farmed or worked in the factory. This motivated me to go to college.” She graduated from the University of Mary in Bismark, North Dakota, in 1997. Since there weren’t many nursing jobs available at the time, she began her career as a surgical nurse at Heartland Health Systems in Fargo, North Dakota. A few years later, the hospital was preparing to move to a new location and they were closing the medical surgery floor. “I wanted to try something different so I moved to the emergency room in 2000,” she said. “I fell in love with it right away. It is my favorite place to work. I love the uncertainty of it. I found that I am calm in stressful situations and thrive under stress, chaos.”

MEETING COMMUNITY NEEDS More than 50,000 people each year come through the doors of the ED and Schulz said it takes creativity to be able to manage all of those patients quickly and get them out the door. As the community grows, so does the need for a larger emergency department. Schulz said she is hoping for an expansion of the ED. Emergency medical personnel work under life altering stress because of the types of trauma they see daily and the care they administer. Schulz said it is important to make sure her employees are happy, and that they are always at full staff in the department. Michael Hales, RN and ICU director at Seton worked with Schulz as the ED manager from 2015 to 2017, before being promoted to his current position. During that time Hales said Schulz was instrumental in changing the staffing ratio in the ED, ensuring that the day shift and the night shift had an equal amount of staff. “When I got the manager’s position,

Kari needed a night shift charge nurse and asked me to work nights,” Hales said. “She said she wouldn’t let me do it myself and she came and worked as the triage nurse.” Before Schulz got involved with the night shift, Hales said there was less staff and patients waited for “long periods of time.” “Directors don’t typically come in and work as staff,” he said. “When she came in and worked as staff, that showed her dedication to employees and that’s what got everyone’s loyalty. She leads by example. Employee morale on the night shift went up dramatically. Now we have 90 percent employee retention.” “You really can’t do anything, take good care of patients, move them out, without a happy engaged staff,” Schulz added. “A happy staff yields happy patients and gets the work done.”

SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS 850 W. Central Texas Expressway Call 254-690-0900 setonharkerheights.net TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS PHYSICIAN FINDER FAMILY MEDICINE Allen Barkis, DO 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2880

Elizabeth Matson, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2880

Jerry Baskerville, MD 2003 W Avenue H Temple, TX 76504 254-774-1880

Kyle Morsch, MD 880 Prospector, Ste. 200 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-690-1475

James Cain, MD 187 PR 4060 Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621

Morris Patteson, MD 187 PR 4060, Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621

Mark Fierro, MD 800 W. Centex Expwy. Ste. 125 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1050

Robert Perry, MD 880 Prospector Trail, Ste. 200 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-519-8922

Matthew Furman, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2880

Cheryl Polkowski, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 125 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1050

David Go, MD 2401 Walker Place Blvd Copperas Cove, TX 76522 254-547-7777 Vanna Gold, DO 187 PR 4060 Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621 Robin Gruen, MD 187 PR 4060 Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621 Arturo Guajardo, MD 101 E. 24th Ave. Belton, TX 76513 254-415-7598 Georgia Hay, MD 187 PR 4060 Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621 Barry Holdampf, MD 2851 North Main Belton, TX 76513 254-939-1844 Thikra Kadhim, MD 4520 E. Central TX Expwy Ste. 101 Killeen, TX 76543 254-298-9355 Roger Kylberg, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2880 Mark Lane, MD 187 PR 4060 Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621

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Edward Spencer, MD 502 W. Jasper Drive Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-6300 Jeremy Swain, MD 300 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 117 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-340-0042

OB/GYN Marisol Carpio-Solis, MD 2025 Memory Lane, Ste. 500 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-220-4833 Luis Castellanos, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 255 254-526-8300 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1060 Mark Lobaugh, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 200 254-298-2822 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-519-2229 Cynthia Shirley, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 255 254-298-2822 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1060

Heather Gage, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2571 Kevin Gallagher, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

Lenore Chiles, MD 1300 E. 6th Ave. Belton, TX 76513 254-778-5400

Adolph Mares, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

Jordan Ilse, MD 1300 E. 6th Ave. Belton, TX 76513 254-778-5400

Randy McCollough, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

Marcos Sosa, MD 2025 Memory Lane, Ste. 500 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-220-4833

Richard Olstein, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

PEDIATRICS Yasmeen Ali, MD 200 Nola Ruth Blvd Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-698-6629

Paul Pagley, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

Ashley Chamberland, MD 187 PR 4060, Lampasas, TX 76550 512-556-3621

Sanjay Pandya, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

INTERNAL MEDICINE Yetunde Olusanya, MD 850 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 390 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-4330

Omar Homsi, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 222 Killeen, TX 76549 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 255 254-526-8300

Sarla Patil, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2860

Rebecca Riser, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 200 254-298-2822

Norman Risinger, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

Jacqueline Sosa, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 255 254-298-2822

Javier Sanchez, MD 3000 N IH35, Ste. 700 Austin, TX 78705 512-807-3150

Hermann Poteet, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2860 Latha Sukumar, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 112 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-3131 Sundaram Sukumar, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 112 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-3131 Nancy Zegarra, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 390 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-4330

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Larry Price, DO 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 250 Harker Heights, TX 76548 512-807-3150

Daphne Wright, MD 581 Pan American Dr., Ste. 1 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-213-4052

Stanley Wang, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

CARDIOLOGY Paul Coffeen, MD 7800 Shoal Creek 512-206-3600

Jason Zagrodzky, MD 3000 N IH35, Ste. 700 Austin, TX 78705 512-807-3150

Frederick Dixon, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 355 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-2085

DERMATOLOGY Sulochana Bhandarkar, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 200 254-213-0766

Leo Conger, MD 1300 E. 6th Ave. Belton, TX 76513 254-778-5400

Weilan Johnson, MD 1300 E. 6th Ave. Belton, TX 76513 254-778-5400 Russell Rowe, MD 300 Richland W Circle, Ste. 2C Waco, TX 76712 254-340-6000 DENTISTRY Stephen Brandt, MD 1201 S WS Young Drive, Ste. D Killeen, TX 76642 254-690-3380 GASTROENTEROLOGY Conway Huang, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 290 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1151 Richard Tay, MD 1717 SW HK Dodgen Loop, Ste. 103 Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2536 Xiaotuan Zhao, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 102 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-8490 GENERAL SURGERY Nancy Marquez, MD 301 Seton Parkway, #102 Round Rock, TX 78665 512-498-4860 Senthil Sankaralingam, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 370 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-4320 Gillian Stuart, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 370 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-4320

Continued


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SETON MEDICAL CENTER HARKER HEIGHTS PHYSICIAN FINDER HEMATOLOGY/ ONCOLOGY Thomas Aung, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 512-421-4100 Vivian Cline-Burkhardt, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 512-421-4100 David George, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 512-421-4100 Mani Subramanian, MD 2207 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 302 Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-5353 Courtney Yau, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 512-421-4100 NEUROLOGY Elizabeth Alwohoush, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 275 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1070 Hector Colon, MD 2105 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 106 Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-2343

Abraham Rajan, MD 625 Central TX Expwy Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-690-0613

Robert Hansen, MD 2301 S Clear Creek, #204 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-1313

Woody Reese, MD 625 Central TX Expwy Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-554-3366

Erik Lovria, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 175 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1095

OPHTHALMOLOGY Austin Chang, MD 1815 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-773-7785 John Esters, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 150 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-519-2020

PAIN MANAGEMENT Bradley Carpentier, MD 716 Indian Trail, Suite 120 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-393-2114

Todd Gorden, MD 1618 Canyon Creek Dr. Ste. 120 Temple, TX 76502 254-791-2020

Brian Dezutti, MD 2300 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 103D Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-1900

Gerard Marten-Ellis, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 116 Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-5505 OTOLARNYGOLOGY Jacob Minor, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 205 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1080 Kimberly Caperton, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-289-2615

Karthi Kathiresian, MD 2105 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 106 Killeen, TX 76549 254-526-2343

ORTHOPEDICS Albert Bartschmid, MD 1904 Railroad Street Georgetown, TX 78626 512-863-4563

Shamsuddin Khwaja, MD 2105 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 106 Killeen, TX 76549 254-554-3377

Ryan Bergeson, MD 301 Seton Parkway, Ste. 305 Round Rock, TX 78758 512-388-2663

NEPHROLOGY Habib Bahar, MD 625 Central TX Expwy Harker Heights, TX 76548 254690-0613 Richard Gibney, MD 625 Central TX Expwy Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-690-0613 Biresh Kumar, MD 625 Central TX Expwy Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-690-0613

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Charles Schwertner, MD 1904 Railroad Street Georgetown, TX 78626 512-863-4563

Kevin Caperton, MD 1905 SW HK Dodgen Loop Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2546 John Duggan, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 175 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1095 Christopher English, MD 301 Seton Parkway, Ste. 305 Round Rock, TX 78758 512-388-2663

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Jerome Doyen, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9176 Brian Forzani, MD 4100 Duval Road, Bldg. 3, Ste. 200 Austin, TX 78759 512-475-7200 Brian Goentzel, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9175 Scott Irvine, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9175 Eric Jenkins, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9175 Benjamin Lowry, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9175 Vivek Mahendru, MD 4100 Duval Road Bldg. 3, Ste. 200 Austin, TX 78759 512-475-7200 William Marsh, DO 2300 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 103 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-1900 Andrew McDavid, MD 3800 S. WS Young Dr. Killeen, TX 76542 254-245-9175

Pankaj Mehta, MD 4100 Duval Road Bldg. 3, Ste. 200 Austin, TX 78759 512-475-7200 PLASTIC SURGERY Charles Day, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 100 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-526-5106 PODIATRY Roderick Hunter, DPM 2301 S Clear Creek Rd., Ste. 204 Killeen, TX 76549 254-519-3338 H. Ashley Ledger, DPM 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 155 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-519-3668 Thomas Madden, DPM 2207 S Clear Creek Rd., Ste. 205 Killeen, TX 76549 254-634-3668 Edward McCaffrey, DPM 1717 SW HK Dodgen Loop, Ste. 103 Temple, TX 76502 254-298-2894 Hope Murray, DPM 1007 W 190, Ste. B Copperas Cove, TX 76522 254-542-8637 William Rediske, DPM 2201 S Clear Creek Road Killeen, TX 76549 254-634-2857 PULMONOLOGY Harsh Babbar, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090

Freddie Morales, MD 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd, Ste. 126 Killeen, TX 76549 254-554-3003 Shantanu Naik, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090 Rajesh Shetty, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 275 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090 Said Soubra, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090 Abhishek Vedavalli, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090 RHEUMATOLOGY Jeffrey Jundt, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 250 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-628-5454 UROLOGY Bernard Morris, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 370 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-4320 Jason Poteet, MD 601 W. State Hwy 6, Ste. 105 Waco, TX 76710 254-741-6120 Mark Story, MD 601 W. State Hwy 6, Ste. 105 Waco, TX 76710 254-741-6120

Naomi Mathew, MD 800 W. Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090

WOUND CARE Glennon Einspanier, DO 2300 S. Clear Creek Rd. Ste. 101 Killeen, TX 76549 855-963-4325

Frank Mazza, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090

Horatio Taveau, DO 2300 S. Clear Creek Rd. St. 101 Killeen, TX 76549 855-963-4325

Ellen Middleton, MD 800 W Central TX Expwy, Ste. 295 Harker Heights, TX 76548 254-618-1090


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Bluebonnet Health Services

Home Care: 844-772-5577 | Hospice: 844-751-1790 | bluebonneths.com

Bluebonnet Health Services has been the leading provider of home care and hospice services in Central Texas for over fourteen years. At Bluebonnet Health Services, the safety, comfort and dignity of each and every patient is of utmost importance. The experienced and accomplished staff provides the best possible care as prescribed by each patient’s personal physician. Home health services can help a patient who has difficulty leaving their residence, suffers from limited mobility, suffers from any illness or is recuperating from a surgical procedure or injury. Hospice services provide the physical, spiritual and emotional comfort needed to help patients and loved ones deal with end-of-life issues. Bluebonnet Health Services’ patient care staff has over 500 years of experience in the healthcare profession.

optimum results.” Bluebonnet Health Services proudly received the unprecedented honor of being selected “Best of Waco 2017” in Home Care and “Best of Waco 2017” in Hospice. This is the ninth consecutive “Best of Waco” designation for home care services. The hospice staff received “Best of Waco” in 2011 and 2015 and this year, 2017, as well. Bluebonnet Health Services accepts Medicare and most private insurances. The Bluebonnet Health Services family wishes to thank Temple, Belton, Killeen and Waco for allowing us the privilege to take care of their families.

Your health. Your choice. Ask your doctor for Bluebonnet Health Services.

Local owners, Mark and Holley Walsh, are honored to serve Temple, Belton, Killeen, Waco, and the surrounding communities hand in hand with their wonderful, dedicated and compassionate staff. “We are only as good as our team of professionals. They make Bluebonnet Health Services unique, and we are so proud of each one of them,” Holley said. Mark added, “We operate under a physician’s order. We are his or her eyes and ears in a patient’s home. A customized plan of care is created to ensure that every patient receives the exact treatment regimen needed for TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Left to right: Chuck Simpson, COTA; Sylvia Odenwald, happy resident; Falon Toms, PTA

Cornerstone Gardens

763 Marlandwood Road, Temple 254-771-5950 | cornerstonegardensllp.com Cornerstone Gardens Healthcare and Rehabilitation center opened in 2008 with the goal of “Making a difference ... offering a choice,” which is the facility’s motto. It is Temple’s newest skilled nursing center and has been on the U.S. News and World Report’s list of Best Nursing Homes as well as being voted best in Bell County. Cornerstone Gardens provides resident centered care with state of the art technology. Spacious lounges and lobbies, private dining facilities, interfaith services, a beauty/barber shop, therapeutic whirlpool baths and tatesfully decorated rooms with a large window and view of the surrounding countryside are a few of the amenities. Nutritious meals are provided in a large dining-area. Private dining rooms are also available for residents to use with their family and friends.

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SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Cornerstone’s top priority is the comfort and wellbeing of each resident. Around the clock care is provided by teams of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and state certified nursing assistants. Physical, occupational and speech therapies are available to residents requiring skilled services. Licensed professional therapist offer daily educations to our certified nurse assistants to provide an active resorative program. Being privately owned by native Texans allows decisions at Cornerstone to be made “based on what’s best for our residents and not solely on the bottom line or expectations of investors,’ the administrator, Ryan Holler, says.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Walk-In Clinic Family Practice of Temple

1516 S. 31st. Street, Suite A, Temple | 254-778-6626 | TempleWalkinClinic.com Walk-In Clinic Family Practice of Temple practices compassionate, professional care, one patient at a time. Our patient encounters consistently validate that mission statement. A relative newcomer to the medical scene in Temple, Walk-In Clinic’s talented professionals provide clinical services for the community through family care, student and job-related physicals, illness and preventive care, and minor urgent care. “We treat everyone like family, and our patients with the dignity and respect they deserve,” said Robert Hurst, Director of Clinic Operations and Development. “Our professionals in the clinic have a breadth of experience and training, and truly listen, observe, and then treat and support the patient’s medical needs.” No appointment is necessary. Walk-In Clinic accepts most major insurance plans, as well as Medicare. Clinic hours are 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Kassey Osborn, FNP-C; Robert Hurst, Director; Isela Rebolledo, CMA, CBCS

The Shoe Box

Temple Mall, Temple | 254-773-4560 | TheShoeBoxTempleMall.com Customers appreciate the personal, caring service as well as the great selection and good values at The Shoe Box in Temple Mall. Owned and managed by Johnnie Hahn and Denzil Davis, The Shoe Box opened in 1978. It features quality ladies footwear and accessories including the largest selection of Brighton Accessories between Austin and Dallas. “We attempt to buy products that appeal to our Central Texas shoppers and some of their special needs,” Hahn said. The Shoe Box has been successful by offering “fashion forward, trend relevant products that are at the price points and quality that appeal to the Central Texas shopper. “We are long-term Central Texas residents,” Hahn said. “We appreciate the support of our Central Texas shoppers as we have supported their many organizations and fund raisers for the last three decades.”

Owner Johnnie Hahn

The store’s success also can be attributed to the dedication and knowledge of the staff, including Alma Trevino. “It has been my privilege to have worked with Alma Trevino for over 25 years,” Hahn said. “She has a loyal customer following and is an amazing person.”

The Cultural Activities Center

3011 North 3rd Street, Temple | 254-773-9926 | cacarts.org In 1958 the CAC was established as one of the first arts councils in the nation to be combined with facilities for the performing and visual arts. The Cultural Activities Center, in Temple, Texas, believes in the power of creation! We want to enrich the lives of all Central Texas residents by inspiring exploration, involvement, and enjoyment in the arts. The CAC is a community funded not-for-profit arts center with the goal of encouraging and cooperating with other area arts institutions, supporting the arts in education, and providing resources to get active. What makes the CAC successful is the community, members support, and participants that love supporting the art, enterainment, and activities the CAC has to offer. The CAC has been in the community 59 years and has impacted many lives from its offering of programs on stage, year round classes, summer camps, Contemporarie’s, hands-ons filed trips, Arts in Education, and more.

The statue of Orpheus at the entrance of the CAC

The CAC has upcoming Texas Music Concerts, Central Texas Orchestral Society concerts, new exhibits opening, fall classes for kids and adults, Central Texas Art League pop-up galleries, event rentals and more. We welcome both business and individuals to become a member today. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Elmcroft of Cottonwood 3002 Jack Rabbit Road, Temple 254-778-2222 | Elmcroft.com

Elmcroft of Cottonwood in Temple is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year – a milestone made possible by providing quality care to senior citizens. Opened in 1997, everyone on the staff strives to fulfill its mission and slogan: “Elmcroft Senior Living is dedicated to enriching the lives of the individuals who live and work with us by responding to their unique needs and universal desire for dignity and respect. Here’s to Life.” Elmcroft of Cottonwood is an intimate, senior living community designed to provide optimal comfort, care and privacy. Some features include:

• Private and shared assisted living apartments • Charming, home-like community setting •Common areas for socializing, dining and entertaining • Easy access for those with limited mobility •Signature programing such as: Vitality Club, Walking Tall, and Second Wind Dreams

Elmcroft of Cottonwood has a carefully selected and trained staff, many of them have been providing care to residents for more than 15 years. They assist residents with activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing and management of medications. While offering a helping hand with day-to-day tasks, residents are treated as the accomplished individuals they are. Each assisted living resident has the freedom of choosing their own agenda and activities, while feeling secure in knowing that a member of the Elmcroft team is always there to provide support should they need it. 40

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

Each Elmcroft resident receives a personalized care assessment. Elmcroft caregivers know every resident is different and needs freedom to set their own agenda each day. Caregivers are trained to support resident independence, and identify methods they can use to provide assisted senior living residents with the support they need, while still reinforcing autonomy. Elmcroft team members take time to listen to residents and learn from their life stories, dreams, and hopes in order to make each day more meaningful and fun. This is accomplished through signature programs such as the Vitality Club, Walking Tall and Second Wind Dreams. The Vitality Club life enhancement program creates a unique wellness profile and individualized program of daily activities for each resident. Walking Tall is designed to give residents knowledge and tools to prevent falls. The Second Wind Dreams program gives residents the chance to realize life-long dreams and reassures them that, simple or outrageous, dreams can still come true. Elmcroft offers all-inclusive pricing so seniors and their families can receive exceptional care at affordable prices. The facility will be hosting a long-term care insurance seminar with New York Life Insurance at 2:30 p.m. September 13. Elmcroft is an award-winning facility, earning “The Best of Senior Living Award” two years in a row as well as the “Caring Stars Award” from Caring.com. There were “zero deficiencies” from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services. But the greatest reward comes from residents and their families who express how much they appreciate Elmcroft’s homelike environment and how engaged residents are with the staff and each other.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Forest Trail Dental Care 4206 Lowes Drive, Temple 254-778-5070 | foresttraildental.com

Forest Trail Dental Care has set a high bar for dental care in Central Texas, offering “A Beautiful Smile for Every Budget.” Forest Trail Dental Care is owned and operated by two of the area’s most experienced dentists — Dr. Terry Proctor and Dr. Steve Piña. Both are graduates of the renowned Baylor College of Dentistry in Dallas. Together they have provided quality dental care for more than 50 years. Dr. Proctor and Dr. Piña have lived and worked in the community for years and have built lifelong relationships with their patients. While the office relocated to 4206 Lowes Drive in May 2015, the practice has been serving patients in Temple and the surrounding area for more than 30 years. It is a place where patients are greeted by name and receive quality care in a stress-free setting at an affordable cost.

Dr. Piña, left, and Dr. Proctor

“Patient care is our first priority,” Dr. Proctor and Dr. Piña said. “We care about their overall health, and offer conservative treatment plans.” All of the Forest Trail Dental Care operatories feature heated massage chairs for patient comfort and to relieve stress. Patients are also offered Alpha-Stim, a drugfree therapy for anxiety, at no cost. Forest Trail Dental Care takes care of filing all dental insurance, and an in-house Member Savings Plan is available for patients without insurance. Forest Trail Dental Care is currently offering free second opinions and $1,000 off Invisalign clear braces. New patients mentioning Tex Appeal will receive $100 off their first visit through October 31, 2017. Details are available by calling the office.

Visiting Angels

2213 Birdcreek Terrace, Temple 254-899-9400 | VisitingAngels.com/Temple Visiting Angels has served the Temple-area since 2003. Owners Michael Hillman and Brent Wilson met in preschool and attended school together all the way through college right here in Central Texas. Their company provides quality of life through caregiving services to seniors and others who need long or short-term care, imparting peace of mind to them and their loved ones. Commitment to consistency and superiority has led them to success. Experienced, bonded, well-trained caregivers tend Brent’s grandmother and later served Michael’s grandmother, so they personally know the importance of reliable employees whose backgrounds and references have been thoroughly checked. The experienced management is intimately familiar with all their caregivers’ qualities so they are able to “match” the changing and growing needs of their clients. Further, Visiting Angels has invested in coursework by ROS Therapy—an accredited training program in which all caregivers are trained shortly after being hired.

Ms. Helen Kirby and her caregiver, Marilyn Dixon

Managers offer free in-home consultations, including home safety inspections, and make themselves available around the clock—callers value conversing with knowledgeable managers with the ability to immediately address their needs. Whether you need them for a single hour, or up to 24-hours, you’ll never sign a contract or pay a deposit. They also understand the value of offering care wherever the loved one resides, whether home, facility or hospital. They are happy to help with benefit verification and coordination with long-term care insurance and can also assist with the claim for the VA Aid & Attendance Benefit. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Left to right: Stan Jackson, Jan Marroquin, Amy Jaynes, Joseph Hunter

Extraco Banks

3615 South 31st Street, Temple 866-EXTRACO | extracobanks.com/mortgage You’re in the business to save lives. We’re in the business to save you money. We recognize the special financial needs of our clients who are in the medical field. Whether you’re looking to purchase a home, refinance your existing home, or build a new home with a twoyear lot loan, Extraco Mortgage has a solution for you. Our team of mortgage professionals are here to serve the community by simplifying the loan processes, and building longterm relationships along the way. Sr. Vice President and Branch Manager Stan Jackson understands the process, and strives to create a warm experience to take the fear out of owning a home.

“Mortgage lending is a very unique experience. Most people only go through the process a couple of times in their life and most likely this process changes each time. Typically a mortgage is the largest debt a client will incur and that is why I want them to feel comfortable in the decisions they make. My team and I work with our clients to ensure they understand the long-term effects of home-ownership on their financial lives. We try to build a personal relationship and discuss how we can support them throughout the home buying process.” At Extraco, we’re more than just a bank. We provide services to insure your home, manage savings, or simply bank with us — all under one local roof.

We build personal relationships with homebuyers and discuss how we can support them through the process.

-Stan Jackson, Sr. Vice President and Branch Manager Extraco Banks is a Member FDIC. INSURANCE PRODUCTS ARE NOT DEPOSITS, NOT INSURED BY THE FDIC OR ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY, NOT GUARANTEED BY EXTRACO BANKS OR ITS AFFILIATES, AND MAY GO DOWN IN VALUE. 42

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Legacy Dental

1109 South 31st Street, Temple 254-774-8181 | legacydentaltemple.com As early as your first visit here at Legacy Dental, you will see how Dr. Megens and his team have dedicated their combined experience of over 130 year to focusing care on patients and their comfort. Whether sharing helpful advice that will reduce future dental problems or just getting to connect personally, we consider your beautiful smile as our Legacy. Dr. Megens works diligently to keep abreast of the latest research and education, especially in the areas of cosmetic dentistry and facial and jaw pain—also known as TMJ disorders. He has recently been granted a Fellowship status with the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain, being one of eight in the state of Texas.

“We WeLCoMe NeW PATieNTS”

From left to right: Debbie Hitt, Debbie Martinez, Dr. Jason Megens, and Randi Wheeless

No dental insurance? No problem! We have a membership plan for you! Plans starting as low as $25 per month.

Smile at the World Orthodontics

2027 S. 61st Street, Suite 111, Temple, 76504 254-773-8028 | SmileAtTheWorld.com Providing individualized treatment for every patient utilizing modern techniques is the mission of Smile at the World Orthodontics. “A Better Smile, Because You Deserve It” is the slogan. Smile at the World Orthodontics has been helping create better smiles in Temple for 30 years with braces for children and adults as well as Invisalign. Led by Dr. Josh Knowles, DDS, MSD, every member of the Smile at the World team works hard to make patients and their families comfortable during the process of creating “better” smiles. Dr. Knowles’s first job was for his orthodontist while in high school. It was there he witnessed the positive impact that a beautiful, healthy smile has on a person’s outlook. To him, orthodontics is much more than just straightening the teeth; it is Dr. Knowles and family about cultivating confidence through their smile. He considers it an honor to provide orthodontic treatment to his patients and get to know them and their families on a personal level. He has a commitment to excellence and strives to deliver the highest-quality care to each person by staying on the cutting-edge of technology and individualizing treatment. Dr. Knowles graduated from Texas Christian University with a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry. Dr. Knowles married his high school sweetheart, Katherine, before moving to Houston to attend The University of Texas Dental Branch (DDS) and an additional two-plus years’ specialty training in orthodontics (MSD), where he also earned a master’s in dentistry. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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New Paths for Nursing Careers

“A bachelor’s degree is usually required for management positions and those looking to lead teams; it is also the first step toward earning a master’s degree, which can lead to even more career growth. The best part is that a BSN doesn’t have to take years to earn. At UMHB you can complete it quickly and in a very innovative way.” -Janice Walker, DHA (C), MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, NEA-BC Senior Vice President/Chief Nurse Executive (CNE) (Central Texas Division) Baylor Scott & White 44

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“The Institute of Medicine has called for increasing the number of nurses with their BSN by 2020. There are several evidence-based reasons for this - better patient care, career growth opportunities, and improved outcomes for our patients and families. - Janice Walker, DHA (C), MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, NEABC Senior Vice President/Chief Nurse Executive (CNE) (Central Texas Division) Baylor Scott & White

MyWay at UMHB is an innovative online program offered by the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, which makes it possible for registered nurses with an associate degree to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in a flexible, affordable way as they continue to work full time. The competency-based MyWay at UMHB program does not focus on courses, but on students demonstrating mastery of competencies such as plan of care, leadership and management, and integrative policies. Students demonstrate mastery by scoring 80% or better on each assessment, which qualifies them to move forward to another area of competency. MyWay at UMHB is not a “one size fits all” program. The work is completely selfpaced: the student decides when to take an assessment to demonstrate competency in an area of study before moving on to the next area. No waiting for a prescheduled test date to arrive! Tuition for the MyWay program is not calculated by credit hours. Students enroll for six months at a time, paying $3,000 for a six-month subscription; financial aid and payment plans are both available. They then may

then achieve as many competencies as they wish during that period before signing up for another six months, until they have completed their program. The MyWay curriculum and learning environment reflect UMHB’s Scott & White College of Nursing standards of excellence in education. All content and resources, including textbooks, are accessed through the custom-designed online system. Students are provided with a personal support system of success coaches and faculty, to assist with achieving individual goals. All competencies are taught by UMHB professors, and tutors are available 24/7. The BSN is becoming the degree of choice for nurses looking to progress in their careers. Nurses wishing to move into management or specialty positions need their bachelor degree as a qualification, and many hospitals are giving preference for entry-level jobs to nurses who have a BSN. For RNs who need to continue working but want to take this next step in their education, the MyWay at UMHB offers a great way to do both. For more information, visit the UMHB MyWay website: umhb.edu/rntobsn


Dr. Sharon Souter Dean of the Scott & White College of Nursing

“We really want to spread the word about our DNP

program and the success our students are having. Many nurses in Texas are looking for the opportunity to

grow their skills and advance in their careers, and this program is great way to do that.”

Dr. Sharon Souter, dean of the Scott & White College of Nursing, UMHB The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor also offers a Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum which allows nurses to build on knowledge previously gained in a master’s degree program. Combining online course work with on-campus classes one weekend per month, the program is designed to fit today’s working professionals’ busy schedule. Studies include quality improvement, data analysis, and systems leadership. Other key areas focus on health policy, ethics, and the economics of healthcare practice management. Nurses who have earned the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree are expected to see an increasing demand for their skills in the years ahead, according to forecasts. Calls for

nurses holding the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree to become the industry standard for advanced practice nurses have been issued by the National Institutes of Health, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Academy of Sciences, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the American Organization of Nurse Executives. At the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, nurses enrolled in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program study at the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center when they come to campus for classes once a month. This 77,000 square-foot facility boasts stateof-the-art meeting spaces and classrooms, and a simulation hospital wing.

Additional information about the University of Mary-Hardin-Baylor’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program is available by contacting Stacy Carpenter at UMHB’s Scott & White College of Nursing, 254-295-4662.

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TEMPLE HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCE DISTRICT

Laboratory on the cutting edge Story by EMILY HILLEY-SIERZCHULA Contributed photos

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he Temple Health and Bioscience District common laboratory is gleaming with a million dollar’s worth of state-of-the-art medical research equipment. Three biomedical start-up companies are inside the 5,000 square-foot building located across from the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System hospital and the Texas A&M University Medical School. And there’s room for more. “We need bright, young minds that have a spirit of entrepreneurship for

Temple to become widely recognized as a national leader in bioscience research, education and commercialization,” said Tami Annable, THBD executive director. Scientists in lab coats are hard at work on one machine that uses a hightech printer and a computer program to create realistic polymer plastic models of human organs in 3D. Temple has been a center for medicine for decades, but needed more bioscience technology companies to feed the ever-expanding health industry. “It’s hard for start-up companies: They have great ideas but need funding and nurturing,” Annable said.

Tami Annable, executive director of the Temple Health and Bioscience District watches as 3D replicas of human organs are removed from the SiMMo3D printer. 46

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GREAT IDEAS The founders of SiMMo3D started their company in a garage with a 3D printer. Now they’re one of the tenants at THBD, working hand-in-hand with medical doctors at Baylor Scott &White Health, especially in orthopedics and cardiology. The 3D organ models are used for surgeons for pre-operative planning, medical school students, and benefit researchers. “I realized there was a big need for 3D printing organ models in the medical industry,” said Ryan Quinn, CEO and co-founder. “It’s another way for surgeons and surgical residents to practice their craft noninvasively.” One doctor, confronting a difficult hip dysplasia operation, used a 3D model. “He needed to better visualize the cutting angles to be used during the operation, allowing him to make a smaller incision,” Quinn explained. SiMMo3D printed the patient’s exact hip, thanks to MRI and CT scan technology. The hospital saves time and money by using 3D copies of patient’s organs, to reduce the patient’s time under anesthesia while lowering the hospital’s re-admission rates, Quinn said. Cadavers still are used in medical school. “But they’re expensive and don’t always show certain disease states of interest to medical school students,” Quinn said. SiMMo3D can create models to fill the gap. “We can print 30 diseased hearts for the price of one cadaver.” The time it takes to print an item depends on its size and level of detail. Printing a heart, left and right atrium, and finger bones, all at once, takes about eight hours. The 3D printer can print with materials ranging from hard to soft, and in just about any color. “As a nonprofit, we only charge our affiliates and tenants what it costs to print it,” Annable said. ALL FOR THE COMMUNITY THBD is part of the Temple Health and Bioscience Economic Development


Co-owners Colin Dodson, left, and Ryan Quinn remove 3D replicas of human organs from the SiMMo3D printer.

District established in 2003 by the state legislature, and is funded with taxpayer dollars. Temple voters elect the seven board members. “Temple citizens gave us taxing authority, creating this nonprofit facility for bio-health, biotech, and health-related start-ups,” Annable said. It’s all to benefit the larger community. “We’ve brought young blood to Temple,” Annable said. “These are smart kids who contribute to our economy and then grow their own businesses here.” With two of three tenants already earning revenue, “the premise is working; it’s coming to fruition.” Tenant companies are set up to succeed in a challenging economy. SiMMo3D benefits from the partnership THBD developed among organizations in the region, including Baylor Scott & White Health, Texas A&M

“We’ve brought young blood to Temple. These are smart kids who contribute to our economy and then grow their own businesses here.”

— Tami Annable

University System Health Science Center and College of Medicine, Temple College, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Texas A&M University System AgriLife Research, and the City of Temple. “Immediately our tenants have all these contacts so we can work as a team to help each other grow and succeed,” Annable said. “When a company is ready to spread its wings, City of Temple employees could help find a location and qualified workers.” The THBD provides research grants for local scientists and doctors. Currently four researchers have received $25,000

each. The Texas A&M University System is heavily involved in the biodistrict, with around five biology or bioengineering students receiving summer internships at the lab each year. Two more master’s degree students perform six months of research there. The walls inside the building are filled with photos from old-time Temple, many of which were pulled from the Scott & White archives. Photos of trains, a technology then brand-new, make one realize how technologies change. Temple once again is aiming to be on the cutting edge. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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TEMPLE HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCE DISTRICT

Tami Annable: Taking the long road Story by EMILY HILLEY-SIERZCHULA Contributed photo

T

ami Annable wants the Temple Health and Bioscience District to be a source of inspiration for women considering careers in science, technology and entrepreneurship. “You can do it. Go for it,” Annable said. “The big picture might seem overwhelming but take little bites and anything is attainable.” Often it’s tempting to see only obstacles standing in the way of a goal that can feel lofty when juggling children and jobs. “If you don’t try, you’re going to fail. If you try, you have a chance to succeed,” she said. Annable used her current position as an example. She had the science background required, but she had to learn other skills to secure the appointment. “I could have decided not to take it because of the challenges, but because I took the risk I have my dream job: helping people and the citizens of Temple, while keeping my fingers in science.” Landing her dream job didn’t happen overnight. It took Annable 10 years to earn her bachelor’s degree while raising kids and working. “Plenty of times I had to nap in the college parking lot,” Annable said. “I was doing homework at midnight and at my kid’s baseball games when they weren’t up to bat. Looking back now, I don’t know how I did it.” Now a grandmother of eight, children were always important to her. “They came first and I didn’t want them to feel slighted because of my schedule,” she said. It was a life lesson for her kids to see how hard mom was working. “All three graduated from college,” Annable said, proudly. It was one of those kids who persuaded her to head south to Temple. “It took her two years to wear me down,

holding my grandkids hostage,” Annable said, laughing. She held up a framed picture of three smiling little faces. “This is why I came to Temple.” The native New Yorker was pleasantly surprised by Central Texas. “It felt like home as soon as I pulled up in the moving van. We’re retiring here. The people are just incredible.” As a young girl in the Bronx, Annable wanted to be an OB/GYN, but she said it was an “amazing” 7th grade science teacher who opened her eyes to the larger scientific world. “I was fascinated. I loved dissecting things,” she said. Annable credits that teacher for “planting the seeds” in a young woman who later would become a biologist. Annable worked her way up, starting as a part-time filing clerk in a pediatrician’s office and finding herself office manager a year later. “Along the way I learned lab work skills and really enjoyed it,” she said. Annable later worked for Avon cosmetics, which was making the switch away from using animals for research and needed an experienced lab technician. “I loved Avon and didn’t want to leave,” Annable said. It took another inspirational person to nudge her into what became a life’s work. “Dr. Lee Greenberger from Lederle Laboratories in Pearl River, N.Y., called me and said, ‘Do you want to work on makeup or cure cancer?’” It was a hard pitch to turn down. At one time she was tackling 18 different cancers, — Tami Annable primarily breast and ovarian cancer. She learned the value of teamwork. As a biologist, Annable worked with chemists to find ways to block pathways feeding a cancer cell. Still, “cancer kicked my butt,” despite years of hard work, she said. If just one cancer cell survives the onslaught of chemotherapy, that one cell can multiply and it can lead to a patient relapsing with drug-resistant cancer.

“You can do it. Go for it. The big picture might seem overwhelming but take little bites and anything is attainable.”

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NURSING Licensure pass rates are consistently above the national and state average for CTC nursing graduates. As a registered nurse (RN), you will provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public and provide guidance and emotional support to patients and their family members. As a licensed vocational nurse (LVN) you will provide basic nursing care and work alongside registered nurses and doctors.

Students are taught how to care for senior citizens in CTC’s simulation lab as part of health care related programs.

“Nursing has always been key to health. It’s as important now as it was centuries ago.” Priscilla Clark, DNP, MSN, RN, Department Chair, Nursing

REGISTERED NURSE Potential Earnings: $66,200 annually Market Growth Rate: 20% faster than all other occupations LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE Potential Earnings: $43,000 annually Market Growth Rate: 20% faster than other occupations

The Certified Nurse Aide program provides students with the knowledge, skills and abilities essential for providing basic care to patients in coordination with the nursing team. This program is offered through the CTC Continuing Education department. CTC’s nursing programs prepare students with the knowledge, skills and hands-on training to work in a variety of settings including hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services and nursing care facilities. With experienced faculty, state of the art equipment and a simulation hospital, students are exposed to many avenues of learning. Courses are offered in lecture, online and blended formats with hands-on patient care led by dedicated clinical faculty.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CTC’s simulation lab has ambulances which allow students to train to handle emergency cases.

EMT Potential Earnings: $31,980 annually Market Growth Rate: faster on average, than other occupations (24%) PARAMEDIC Potential Earnings: faster on average than other occupations (24%) Market Growth Rate: $38,936-53,550 annually FIREFIGHTER/EMT Potential Earnings: $46,870 annually

The Emergency Medical Technology (EMT) program is designed to prepare students to deliver emergency patient care in the pre-hospital setting. Central Texas College has been preparing individuals to enter the field of pre-hospital care since August 1983. CTC Offers one of only 35 accredited EMT programs in the state of Texas. Our graduates work around the world and make valuable contributions to the quality of pre-hospital care. Some graduates have continued the training in the medical profession and are now RNs and even some are physicians. Our program prepares students to work in a variety of settings including fire departments, city-based EMS services, county-based EMS services, 911 EMS services, EMS transfer services, flight-based EMS services, hospitals and various other medical facilities. Our courses are offered in a lecture or online format as well as hands-on patient care led by dedicated EMS faculty. The EMT program is offered to qualified candidates seeking a career in the EMS profession. Upon successful completion, students are eligible to take the exam to become certified as an emergency medical technician, advanced EMT or paramedic through the National Registry of EMTs (NREMT) and/or the Texas Department of State Health Services. Central Texas College offers the EMT, advanced EMT and the paramedic as certificates of completion and/ or an Associate of Applied Science degree in paramedicine.

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HISTOLOGY Histologic Laboratory Technology (HT) is the study of the microscopic anatomy of cells and tissues. Histology is an essential tool of biology and medicine since accurate diagnosis of cancer and other diseases usually requires histopathological examination of samples. Successful clinical laboratory students should have a strong interest in science, anatomy and physiology and genetics and excel at tasks requiring attention to detail and problem-solving capacity. The fast-growing field of histopathology, the microscopic study of diseased tissue, is an important part in the accurate diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. Successful histology students should have a strong interest in science, anatomy and physiology and genetics and excel at tasks requiring attention to detail and problem-solving capacity. Classes cover a variety of subjects including Introduction to Histology, Histotechnology I, II and II, Functional Histology I and II, immunohistochemistry and cytology. The program involves 760 clinical hours which will help our students master the field of histology. Upon successful program completion, students will graduate with an Associate of Applied Science in Histology.

HISTOLOGICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN Median Wages: $28.57 hourly

“All of our students for the last 20 years have been hired at graduation, or have had the promise of a job before graduation.” - Ann Kelly, Program Director, MLT/ Phlebotomy/Histology

MEDICAL LAB TECHNICIAN Clinical laboratory testing plays a crucial role in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and as a laboratory professional you will be instrumental in this process. Research has shown that at least 70% of all medical decisions rely on laboratory data. As a laboratory professional, you will play a huge role in this process. CTC’s Medical Lab Technician (MLT) program is NAACLS accredited which means you can transfer your credits to any other NAACLS program if you ever have to move. We have a 100% hire rate upon graduation for students staying in Central Texas, as well as a 100% pass rate for the ASCP board of certification exam. Successful clinical laboratory students should have a strong interest in science, chemistry, or biology, and excel at tasks that require attention to detail and problem solving capacity.MLT classes cover a variety of subjects from introduction to clinical laboratory science, clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology, hematology, urinalysis, immunology, molecular, parasitiology, transfusion services as well as 760 clinical hours, which will help our students master the field of clinical laboratory science.Upon successful program completion, students will graduate with an Associate of Applied Science in Medical Lab Technology.

MEDICAL LAB TECHNICIAN Potential Earnings: $18-23 per hour Market Growth Rate: 29.7% before 2022

“There is such a huge need in the hospitals for medical lab technicians.” - Ann Kelly, Program Director, MLT/ Phlebotomy/ Histology www.ctcd.edu/explore TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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MEDICAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY With projected employment growth of 36 percent in the medical office technology fields, the CTC Office Technology department is excited to help prepare students to enter this industry. Whether your goal is to be knowledgeable in a variety of medical office skills or to focus on a specific skill set like medical coding and billing, an exciting career awaits! It takes as few as six courses to complete a medical office technology certificate program and 14 courses to complete our medical coding and billing certificate program. Our certificates of completion are stackable, which means they are linked and the completion of each one draws you a semester closer to completion of an associate degree.

“Doctors and hospitals will always be around. There will always be a need for medical office personnel.” - Eva Hearn, Medical Program Coordinator/ Faculty, Office Coordinator

The Medical Coding and Billing program prepares students to test to become Certified Coding Specialists, Certified Professional Coders, Certified Professional Billers, and Certified Office Managers for employment as medical coders, billers, and/or professionals. MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT Median Wages: $33,730 annually Projected Growth Rate: 36% from 2012 to 2022, much faster than average for all occupations. MEDICAL CODING AND BILLING AND MEDICAL DOCUMENTATION SPECIALIST Median Wages: $38,040 annually Projected Growth Rate: 22% from 2012 to 2022, much faster than average for all occupations

The Medical Office Technology and Medical Coding and Billing certificates and Associate of Applied Science degree can be completed entirely online (including internship and clinical) or with a combination of online courses including traditional or blended classroom courses on central campus each semester through open-entry courses (start anytime) or weekend courses in our campus Career and Technology Education (CATE) Center.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Non-credit program, offered through CTC Continuing Education. As a Pharmacy Technician you will help the pharmacist package or mix prescriptions, maintain client records, refer clients to the pharmacist for counseling, assist with inventory control and purchasing, as well as collect payment and coordinate billing. This course consists of 200 hours of accelerated classroom training with emphasis on skills mastery through hands-on practice and supervision.

“Having these programs as part of Continuing Education makes it possible to earn a marketable skill certificate at a reasonable cost, and find good jobs in growing fields.” - Sarah Mylcraine, Coordinator, Community Enrichment, Continuing Education

Upon successful completion, graduates will receive a certificate of completion within 2-3 weeks after class ends. Students are then eligible to apply for registration as a Pharmacy Technician in their state and be prepared to take the national Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PCB) exam.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Potential Earnings: $14.86 hourly, $30,920 annually Market Growth Rate (2014-2024); faster than average (9 - 13%)

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PHLEBOTOMY Non-credit program, offered through CTC Continuing Education. As a phlebotomist, you can serve a vital role in the relationship between patients and their treatment teams. A phlebotomist serves patients by identifying the best method for retrieving specimens, preparing specimens for laboratory testing and performing screening procedures.Without a phlebotomist to ensure proper collection, test results can be altered and the clues doctors need to treat patients can be missed. Hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, blood donor centers and other locations will need phlebotomists to perform bloodwork. Central Texas College offers the most comprehensive and in-depth phlebotomy training in the area. The program consists of a 10-week lecture course and a six-week clinical internship. We set up all clinical rotations for our students. Program graduates enter the workforce having completed 120 hours of clinical internship with an average of 300-plus successful specimen collections. Completion of the program qualifies students to take the ASCP PBT Board of Certification test for national certification.

PHLEBOTOMIST Potential Earnings: $10-16 hourly Market Growth Rate: faster on average than other occupations (25 %)

“If you have patience and people skills, phlebotomy is a great way to begin a health care career.” Ann Kelly

MEDICAL ASSISTANT POTENTIAL EARNINGS: $15.71 hourly, $31,540 annually Market Growth Rate (2014-2024); much faster than average (14% or higher)

“Certified Medical Assistant is a growing field. The program is really beneficial for students because they can learn everything they need to know to be placed in a job in a short amount of time.” Sarah Mylcraine, Coordinator, Community Enrichment, Continuing Education

CLINICAL MEDICAL ASSISTANT Non-credit program, offered through CTC Continuing Education. As a Clinical Medical Assistant, the student will be trained to help the physician carry out procedures, care for patients, perform basic lab tests and administer medications. The Clinical Medical Assistant works in a physician’s office or a clinic setting. This course consists of 280-hours of accelerated classroom training with emphasis on skills mastery through hands-on practice and supervision and a 40-hour clinical. (Total 320 hours) Upon successful completion of the course and clinical, students will receive a certificate of completion. Additionally, students will qualify to take an optional certification examination offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA).

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LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPY Non-credit program, offered through CTC Continuing Education.

“Massage Therapy is more a vocation than a job. There’s a huge movement in healthcare toward self-care. Massage therapy is part of what is called integrative healthcare.” - Viola Crowder-Moger, MBA, LMT, LMTI, Director, Licensed Massage Therapy Program

A career in massage therapy gives you freedom and flexibility. Massage therapists work through all stages of life from pre-natal and infant massage to geriatric and hospice massage and even to animal massage. Massage therapy is found in many healthcare settings – hospitals, chiropractic offices, wellness centers, and nursing homes. They also work in a wide variety of venues from spas to cruise ships. Massage therapy pairs well with several other professions from nursing to personal fitness trainers, to social workers and counselors, sports medicine and physical therapy. Use massage therapy as a stand-alone profession or as a foundation for or addition to other specialties. LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST Potential Earnings: $19.17 hourly, $39,860 annually Market Growth Rate (2012-2024): much faster than average (14 % or higher) CLINICAL/MEDICAL MASSAGE THERAPIST Potential Earnings: $19.17 hourly, $39,860 annually

Market Growth Rate (2012-2024): much faster than average (14 % or higher) SPA MANAGER Potential Earnings: $17.65 hourly, $36,700 annually Market Growth Rate (2012-2024): much faster than average (9 – 13 %)

At CTC, a dedicated team of licensed massage therapy Instructors, representing more than 60 years of massage therapy experience, bring students a broad spectrum understanding of the massage profession and strong basic skills. In addition to the basics of massage therapy, instructors emphasize massage therapy in healthcare settings such as chiropractic, hospital and behavioral health. Students learn mindfulness, mind-body skills and self-care techniques to prepare them for a career as a massage therapist. Once licensed, graduates return to take continuing education requirements and further their knowledge and skills.

CERTIFIED NURSE AID Non-credit program, offered through CTC Continuing Education. Certified Nurse Aide training will provide students with the knowledge, skills and abilities essential for providing basic care to long term care residents.

Working at CTC’s simulation lab nursing station involves handling charts and answering inquiries on the phone.

“Certified Nurse Aides are in big demand. We get calls to find people who have recently graduated.” Patricia Gomez, Office Specialist, Continuing Education

NURSING ASSISTANT Potential Earnings: $12.78 hourly, $26,590 annually Market Growth Rate (2014-2024); much faster than average (14% or higher)

This 116-hour course includes 76 hours of classroom instruction (including skills lab) and 40 hours of clinical practice in a long term care facility. Upon successful completion, graduates will receive a certificate of completion within 2-3 weeks after class ends. Additionally, graduates will be qualified to take the required state exam.

HOME HEALTH AIDE Potential Earnings: $10.87 hourly; $22,600 Market Growth Rate (2014-2024); much faster than average (14% or higher)

www.ctcd.edu/explore 54

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METROPLEX HOSPITAL

Metroplex keeps commitment to community Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Contributed photo

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arlyle Walton, president and CEO of Metroplex Health System in Killeen is keeping his commitment to the community when it comes to health care. His vision has always been to provide a broader array of health care locally so citizens don’t have to leave town or go to a bigger city to receive comprehensive care. “2017 has been a year of implementation of changes that the hospital planned in 2016,” Walton said. Patient numbers have increased at the new Heart and Vascular Center and Walton said there are plans to bring in a fifth cardiologist next year. The hospital’s cardiology catheter labs have seen a 15 percent increase in patients that Walton attributes to the “outstanding services provided by a team at the Heart and Vascular Center.” “The word is getting out,” he said. “We have a strong team and we are always looking to inspire quality.” Metroplex Hospital is accredited by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care and recently achieved accreditation for stroke care. Walton said this improved confidence from the EMS and community perspective. “When a person has a stroke, we are getting them treated in the most expedient way,” he said. “It’s that initial golden moment. When a patient receives the appropriate treatment, the prospect for the best outcome is significant.” In 2015, the Metroplex Health System Foundation funded $40,000 to install new cardiology equipment and software in Killeen and Copperas Cove ambulances. The technology enhances the ability for first responders to diagnose a situation and come up with the best course of treatment before reaching the hospital. Critical patient information is wirelessly transmitted to the hospital before the patient arrives. This gives the attending cardiologist readings based on the report. “Our team received the Mission: Lifeline® Gold Receiving Quality Achievement Award from the American

Carlyle Walton

Heart Association,” said Erin Spencer, public relations specialist for Metroplex. Other awards and certificates earned by Metroplex Hospital include the Bronze Award Mission Lifeline NSTEMI, Mission: Lifeline’s Gold-Plus Award, the Get with the Guidelines® -Stroke SILVER PLUS Achievement Award Hospital, and the Stroke Award Silver Plus, Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers from The Joint Commission. In addition the ER uses video conferencing technology to connect neurologists with stroke patients in the ER. “Using this technology, the doctor, in collaboration with the ER staff, can perform assessments, like checking pupillary response, asking the patients to lift limbs as needed, hear through a stethoscope, and gain access to the patient’s medical records,” Walton said. “The doctor can also order life-saving interventions as needed.” The Wound Care Center has been in operation for eight years and last year opened satellite facilities in Harker Heights. “Patients are placed in a hyperbaric chamber and receives pure air on a high level of oxygen,” Walton said. “The

healing rate is 90 percent.” Metroplex Health System wants to help people stay healthy so they don’t have to become returning patients. They have an extensive community outreach program that offers free exercise classes for all levels. “We invite individuals, some with minimal activity levels, to come in and join our free classes,” said Spencer. “We offer classes from low to high impact training to tai chi. We want to get the heart rate moving.” Joint replacements are now less stressful since the hospital opened an Orthopedic Joint Replacement floor this year. It offers patients expanded services, as well as focused and comprehensive care for joint replacements. A Joint Camp helps prepare a patient for their surgery and follow up. The renovated Behavioral Health Center reopened last year and addresses the needs of adults and children. Walton said the hospital is in the process of recruiting psychiatrists supported by mid-level providers for inpatient and outpatient care. “Today we continue to find the most efficient and mission centered way to serve our community in a turbulent health care climate,” Walton said. “The major challenge remains in doing our best in the area of shrinking payments and a statewide and national clinical shortage of nurses. We are seeking creative ways to allow our nurses to serve at the top of their education level.” Walton said in closing that the hospital’s out-of-pocket expenses are growing, but with shrinking reimbursements they are looking for more efficient and creative ways to serve. “We will not sacrifice patient care,” he said. “We will keep our mission: Extending the healing ministry of Christ.” Metroplex Health System includes Metroplex Adventist Hospital and Rollins Brook Community Hospital in Lampasas. They are all part of the Adventist Health System.

METROPLEX HOSPITAL 2201 S. Clear Creek Road, Killeen Call 254-526-7523 or visit www.mplex.org. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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Robin Bodkin, director of marketing, patient experience and community relations, and hospitalist Dr. Bindu Raju facilitate the Physicians Communication Skills Lab for better patient experience at Metroplex Hospital in Killeen.

A new kind of patient experience Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Photos by MIKE BARTOSZEK

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imes are changing for the patient/ doctor relationship. Thanks to new technology patients can access their medical records and recent lab and procedure results through a hospital’s patient portal. With the click of a button, patients now have access to major medical research on the Worldwide Web. This gives people the ability to study their own illness, compare the doctor’s recommendations, learn about medications prescribed and work with their doctor(s) to come up with the best care program to ensure the best outcome for their diagnosis. More and more doctors are listening to their patients needs and encouraging patients to become their own advocates. 56

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Robin Bodkin, executive director of marketing and patient experience for Metroplex Health System said defining the patient experience was a group effort of Adventist Health System. “It’s treating a person as if they were the one you loved the most,” she said. “Patient experience begins the moment a person walks into their doctor’s office, have a procedure, and all the touch points along the way,” she said. A patient admitted to the hospital already has a lot on his or her mind, she said. They are dealing with anxiety, they are not feeling well, they may not be mentally aware of their situation or they may be having family issues. “It’s important that a nurse and doctor can communicate with a patient,” Bodkin said. Elements of patient experience begin

with the nurse or doctor listening to a patient’s needs and questions. Bodkin said medical professionals must be receptive to patients. “It’s been proven that many doctors interrupt between the first 12 and 18 seconds when meeting with a patient,” Bodkin said. “If you have a story to tell, it may be interrupted.” Secondly, the doctor, or nurse, should answer any patient questions and explain clearly to address those needs. “Patients should not be afraid to ask questions and get to the heart of what the matter is and what is important to them,” she said. “When a physician listens to you, he or she connects with you and everybody wins.” And thirdly, every interaction between medical professionals and patients should be done with courtesy


The new sixth floor Center for Joint Replacement at Metroplex Hospital in Killeen offers full service for patients.

and respect. “When a patient leaves the hospital they will receive a survey,” said Bodkin, adding that surveys help the medical staff learn about things that are not working well, or that are working very well.

A NEW WAY TO COMMUNICATE Slowly the old ways of a singular doctor diagnosing and treating a patient, with no input from the patient, is giving way to a new type of doctor/patient communication. “Historically, patients wanted physicians to be authoritarians. It’s been that way for years. Now we are a service industry. (Patient communication) was not taught. Now it’s being taught in medical schools,” said Bindu Raju, M.D., hospitalist. Raju added that the authoritarian physician is a thing of the past. “Now doctors and patients are partners. We’re not just looking at our patient to make a decision. We make the decision as a group,” she said. Raju said what Bodkin is trying to achieve in patient experience is primarily for doctors who graduated 10 years ago or more. “All physicians want to be good, be the best for the patient, the way they experience their lives,” Raju said. “We need to take what is on the inside to the outside and let them shine.” “We are working to get barriers out of the way,” added Bodkin. To help physicians learn about patient experience, Bodkin implemented the Physician Communications Skills Lab. Both she and Raju facilitate the classes.

“It teaches the skills of communication,” she said. “It’s a simple thing. Doctors should listen to the patient. If you are a patient having surgery, ask any question. It’s best for the patients and doctors and provides the best outcome.” Another proven skill for the new doctors is teaching them that sitting down with a patient immediately says “I have time for you.” “When a doctor sits, the perception is he or she has stayed longer,” Bodkin said. “This makes it obvious they want to hear what you have to say. Our hospitalists give out business cards to their patients so they can call if they have a question.” But not all patients are easy to get along with despite the new training for doctors. “We learn how to de-escalate an aggressive patient. If you don’t have the presence of mind it can blow up right away,” Raju said. “By sitting, you de-escalate the situation once a patient realizes you care about them. They will calm down and not be disrespectful.” At the end of the day, Bodkin said their mission is to extend the healing ministry of Christ, “Are we hitting that mark? Ask the patient if we are hitting the mark. “What higher aspiration is there then to help people and get them what they need?” Bodkin continued. “On any given day I know I’ve helped one person. Maybe I prayed with them, gave them a hug — we touch people’s lives all day long. I’m the one who gets blessed by it. When I do something for a patient, they want to thank me — I want to thank them.” TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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METROPLEX ADVENTIST HEALTH SYSTEM PHYSICIAN FINDER CARDIOLOGY Umad Ahmad, M.D. Gregory J Dehmer, M.D. Jason Lange, M.D. 254.618.1600 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 250 • Killeen George Rebecca, M.D. 254.526.9766 4200 W. Stan Schlueter Loop, Bldg. C • Killeen CARDIOLOGY, INTERVENTIONAL Jonathan Mock, M.D. Sunil Naik, M.D. 254.618.1600 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 250 • Killeen Sanjay Pandya, M.D. Richard Olstein, M.D. Randy McCollough, M.D. 254.526.2085 800 W CenTex Expwy., Suite 355 • Harker Heights CARDIOLOGY, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY James Black, M.D. 254.618.1888 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 250 • Killeen Paul Coffeen, M.D. 254.526.2085 800 W. CenTex Expwy., Suite 355 • Harker Heights Larry Price, D.O. 512.807.3150 800 W. CenTex Expwy Suite 250 • Harker Heights EAR, NOSE & THROAT Shrikant Rishi, M.D. 254.634.0145 2207 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 303 • Killeen FAMILY MEDICINE Primary Care Physicians W. Michael Averitt D.O. 254.680.1100 3801 Scott & White Drive • Killeen Ashley Chamberland, M.D. David Go, M.D. 254.547.7777 2401 Walker Place, Suite 300 • Copperas Cove James Cain III, M.D. Georgia Hay, M.D. Mark S. Lane, M.D. Morris K. Patteson Jr., M.D. 187 PR 4060 • Lampasas 512.556.3621

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Bola Elemuren, M.D. 254.699.8521 4200 W. Stan Schlueter Lp. Bldg. C • Killeen Ryan Fowler, M.D. 254.554.8334 401 West Jasper Drive • Killeen Robin Gruen, M.D. 187 Private Road 4060 • Lampasas 512.556.3621 Jeffrey Hall, D.O. Joshua Kilpatrick, M.D. 254.953.7700 907 Mountain Lion Circle • Harker Heights Thikra J. Kadhim, M.D. 254.200.9355 4520 E. Central Texas Expwy., Suite 101 • Killeen Cheung Kim, M.D. 254.554.8668 3106 S. W.S. Young Drive, Suite B203 • Killeen Michael Kirkpatrick, M.D. Elena Wilson, M.D. 254.501.6400 4501 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen Ernesto Malave, M.D. 254.432.5735 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 108 • Killeen Robert Perry, M.D. 254.519.8922 880 Prospector Trail, Suite 200 • Harker Heights Edward Spencer, M.D. 254.526.6300 502 W. Jasper Drive • Killeen Jeremy Swain, D.O. 254.833.8456 800 W. CenTex Expwy., Suite 177 • Harker Heights Dave Webster, D.O. 254.690.8887 5610 E. Central Texas Expwy., Suite 1 • Killeen GENERAL PRACTICE Primary Care Physicians Charles Mitchell, M.D. 254.554.8773 3816 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite E • Killeen

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GASTROENTEROLOGY Christopher Naumann, M.D. Donald Rawls, M.D. James Sing, D.O. Apurva Trivedi, M.D. Jonathan Ramirez, M.D. Duc Vu, M.D. Harry J. Thomas, M.D. 254.618.1400 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 290 • Killeen Xiaotuan Zhao, M.D. 254.519.8490 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 102 • Killeen GENERAL SURGERY Monty Gohl, M.D. 254.634.2857 2300 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 203 • Killeen Daniel McLaughlin, M.D. 254.519.8901 2207 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 203 • Killeen Maria Provost, M.D. 254.618.1444 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 350 • Killeen Senthil Sankaralingam, M.D. Gillian Stuart, M.D. 254.618.4320 800 W. CenTex Expwy., Suite 370 • Harker Heights Griffith Thomas, M.D. 325.247.3138 102 E. Young Street • Llano INTERNAL MEDICINE Primary Care Physicians Jacquelene Adiele, M.D. 254.200.2748 3816 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite A • Killeen Karen P. Harrison, M.D. Raymond J. Harrison, M.D. 254.542.9000 239 W. Highway 190 • Copperas Cove Pablo Leonardo, M.D. 254.526.0404 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 202 • Killeen Stephen Ralph, M.D. 254.554.8773 3816 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite F • Killeen Sundaram Sukumar, M.D. 254.519.3131 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 112 • Killeen Precha Suvunrungsi, M.D. 254.526.6604 2109 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen

INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Ryan Vancura, M.D. 254.519.8139 2201 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen NEPHROLOGY Habib Bahar, M.D. Biresh Kumar, M.D. Abraham Rajan, M.D. 254.690.0613 625 W. Central Texas Expwy. • Harker Heights NEUROLOGY Hector Colon, M.D. Karthikeyani Kathiresan, M.D. 254.526.2343 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 106 • Killeen George Creel, M.D. 254.618.1412 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 210 • Killeen Shamsuddin Khwaja, M.D. 254.554.3377 2105 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen OBESTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Eric Allerkamp, M.D. Cedric Day, M.D. Nathan Kwan, M.D. April Schiemenz, M.D. Paul West, M.D. 254.618.1800 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 370 • Killeen William G. Louis, M.D. 254.634.1500 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 220 • Killeen Arturo Romero, M.D. 254.519.8907 2301 S. Clear Creek Rd., Suite 208 • Killeen Marisol CarpioSolis, M.D. 254.220.4833 2025 Memory Lane, Suite 500 • Harker Heights Luis Castellanos, M.D. Cynthia Shirley, M.D. 254.618.1060 800 W CenTex Expy Suite 370 • Harker Heights

GYNECOLOGY Mark Lobaugh, M.D. 254.519.2229 800 W CenTex Expy Suite 200 • Harker Heights Marcos Sosa, M.D. 254.220.4833 2025 Memory Lane, Ste 500 • Harker Heights ONCOLOGY, HEMATOLOGY Mohit Bansal, M.D. Christian Cable, M.D. Sherronda Henderson, M.D. Kathleen Halka, M.D. Vinit Karur, M.D. 254.200.3200 2207 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 101 • Killeen ONCOLOGY, RADIATION Mehul Patel, M.D. Gregory Swanson, M.D Niloyjyoti Deb, MD 254.200.3200 2207 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 101 • Killeen OPHTHALMOLOGY John R. Esters, M.D. 254.519.2020 800 W. CenTex Expwy., Ste 150 • Harker Heights Gerard MartenEllis, M.D. 254.526.5505 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 116 • Killeen ORAL SURGERY Andrew Campbell, D.D.S. 254.526.5667 2804 S. W.S. Young Drive, Suite 100 • Killeen ORTHOPEDICS Terry J. Beal, M.D. 254.526.0188 2117 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen Sandy Bidner, M.D. 254.618.1555 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 290 • Killeen Robert Hansen, M.D. 254.213.7843 401 Jasper Drive • Killeen


PAIN MANAGEMENT Bradley Carpentier, M.D. Scott Irvine, D.O. Eric Jenkins, M.D. Benjamin Lowry, M.D. 254.245.9175 3800 S. WS Young Drive, Suite 201 • Killeen Steve Marsh, D.O. 254.519.1900 2300 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 103 • Killeen Hiep Tran, M.D. 254.618.1777 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 102 • Killeen PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION Steve Marsh, D.O. 254.519.1900 2300 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 103 • Killeen PEDIATRICS Jamie Avila, M.D. 254.680.1120 3801 Scott & White Drive • Killeen Lilian Blankenship, M.D. Manzoor Farooqi, M.D. Renee Friday, M.D. 254.634.7337 3004 S. W.S. Young Drive • Killeen Robert Organ, M.D. Sarah Nickerson, M.D. 254.618.1704 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 310 • Killeen Omar Homsi, M.D. Daphne Wright, M.D. 254.526.8300 4102 S. Clear Creek Road., Suite 107 • Killeen Ricky Mitchell, M.D. 254.554.8773 3816 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite F • Killeen PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Sameh Alzayat, D.D.S. Stephen Brandt, D.D.S. 254.690.3380 1201 S. W.S. Young Drive • Killeen Todd Bushman, D.D.S. Sara Carpenter, D.D.S. 512.206.2929 412 Lake Road • Belton Andrew Heaton, D.D.S. 254.698.0641 701 Indian Trail, Suite C • Harker Heights

SPECIAL NEEDS DENTISTRY Michael Harris, D.D.S. 254.307.8515 4903 Creekside Drive • Killeen PEDIATRIC PODIATRY Richard Goad, D.P.M. 254.618.1888 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 350 • Killeen PODIATRY John Brust, D.P.M. Dale Lane, D.P.M. 254.618.1444 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 350 • Killeen Roderick Hunter, D.P.M. 254.519.3338 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 204 • Killeen H. Ashley Ledger, D.P.M. 254.519.3668 800 W CenTex Expy, Suite 155 • Harker Heights Thomas Madden, D.P.M. 254.634.3668 2207 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 205 • Killeen Hope Murray, D.P.M. 254.542.8637 1007 W. Highway 190, Suite B • Copperas Cove William Rediske, D.P.M 254.634.2857 2300 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 203 • Killeen PLASTIC SURGERY Charles R. Day, M.D. 254.526.5106 800 W. CenTex Expwy., Ste 100 • Harker Heights Susan Pike, M.D. 512.509.3963 425 University Blvd • Round Rock PSYCHIATRY, ADULT Kenneth Brock, D.O. 254.634.4244 3106 S. W.S. Young Dr. Suite A103 • Killeen

PULMONARY MEDICINE Freddie M. Morales, M.D. 254.554.3003 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 126 • Killeen Badri Giri, M.D. Alfredo VazquezSandoval, M.D. 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 210 • Killeen RHEUMATOLOGY Jeffrey W. Jundt, M.D. 254.628.5454 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 206 • Killeen SLEEP MEDICINE Freddie M. Morales, M.D. 254.554.3003 2301 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 126 • Killeen UROLOGY Erin Bird, M.D. Stephanie Harris, M.D. Patrick Lowry, M.D. Belur Patel, M.D. T. Philip Reilly, M.D. Marawan El Tayeb, MD Kristofer Wagner, M.D. Jeffrey Waxman, M.D. 254.618.1444 2405 S. Clear Creek Road, Suite 350 • Killeen Bernard Morris, M.D. 254.618.4320 800 W CenTex Expy Suite 370 • Harker Heights WOUND CARE & HYPERBARIC MEDICINE Glennon Einspanier, D.O. Charles (Tad) Stiles, M.D. H. Sprague Taveau, D.O. 2300 S. Clear Creek Rd, Suite 101 • Killeen 254.634.4325 5610 E. CenTex Expy, Suite 5 • Killeen 254.519.8980 608 N Key Avenue • Lampasas 512.556. 8700

Phillip Leon, M.D. 254.628.1000 2407 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen PSYCHIATRY, CHILD/ ADOLESCENT Vijay Jampala, M.D. 254.628.0246 Kenyatta Jones, M.D. 254.526.5260 2407 S. Clear Creek Road • Killeen

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CARL R. DARNALL ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

A medically ready force serves Fort Hood troops Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Photos by MIKE BARTOSZEK and contributed by the U.S. ARMY

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his past April the new Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center at Fort Hood celebrated its first year in service, and in July welcomed the new Commander Col. David R. Gibson. Gibson joined the army 30 years ago as an infantry soldier and was later commissioned as a Medical Services Corps officer. He holds several graduate degrees, certifications in business, and administration. He is process and systems focused and observant as he takes command. “I’m taking over a large, complex organization,” he said. “We are in the process of conducting a complete assessment to learn what is working and what might need improvement.” Gibson is in command of a medical center with 105 buildings, including clinical and administrative space, that are spread over Fort Hood, three local communities, and a clinic at the Red River Army Depot located in Bowie County, Texas, 18 miles from Texarkana. He said they are using the McKinsey 7S Model across all service lines in order to better understand the current state, and chart the course for the future. The McKinsey 7S Model is “A watershed model that addresses the critical role of coordination, rather than structure, in organizational effectiveness (www.mckinsey.com).” “The 7S model includes strategy, structure, systems, shared values, skills and staff,” he said. When the new hospital opened its doors in 2016 it replaced the old Darnall Army Medical Center that served the Fort Hood community since 1965. Initially, the old hospital was designed to serve 17,000 soldiers. Today, the new medical center serves more than 100,000 beneficiaries, which includes active duty soldiers, their families and retirees. From the moment a patient walks 60

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through the doors at CRDAMC, they are immersed in natural light coming through the two-and-a-half stories tall picture windows. The walk from the parking garage through the concourse to the front desk seems long, but the paintings, and three-dimensional artwork hanging high on the walls, adds an aura of serenity. Gibson said the hospital was built with “evidence based design,” which is the process of basing decisions about the built environment on credible research to achieve the best possible outcomes. “EBD is an intentional uses of space, materials, lighting, placement of stairwells, and is intended to reduce stress on staff and patients,” Gibson explained. “This 1.1 million square-foot building has more space, but the space is used differently and the cost structure is different. This creates challenges and opportunities. We are currently reviewing the whole healthcare delivery model.”

STAYING MEDICALLY READY AND READY MEDICALLY There is no objective more important than maintaining a medically ready force and a ready medical force, Gibson said. The hospital staff covers all specialties and is 25 percent active duty personnel. From young privates working in administration, pharmacy techs, medics and physicians, chances are patients will be getting their care from someone wearing a green uniform. “These are clinical experts who must maintain their readiness skills when required to mobilize with operational units,” Gibson said. Gibson said 38 percent of soldiers who are patients in primary care clinics have musculoskeletal injuries from physical training. “This is a big population that is non-medically ready for deployment,” he said. “They must be medically ready.” Injuries of this type generally take two weeks to 90 days to heal. Gibson said their goal is to reduce that time to 14.4 days with an interdisciplinary

approach and an integrated care team through the SPARTA program — Soldier Peak Performance and Advanced Reconditioning for the Tactical Athlete.” “This would include a physical therapist, sports medicine physician or orthopedic surgeon,” Gibson said. “Readiness is the Army’s number one priority and we plan to optimize our integrated system for health to help achieve the goal of a medically ready force.”

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS This year CRDAMC formed a partnership with Texas A&M University Medical School to bring in residents to “leverage training in the hospital’s simulation rooms,” Gibson said. On a mannequin simulator, residents will practice a variety of medical skills. “We will have six residents this fall,” Gibson said, adding that the Army has many agreements and partnerships in communities around the country. “Students will be able to train in their specialty. It’s a great opportunity. We take our partnerships seriously,” he said. PATIENT EXPERIENCE Taking patient experience seriously is also an objective of CRDAMC and is


ABOVE: The atrium lobby of the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center is two and a half stories high. AT LEFT: Col. David R. Gibson is the new commander of the Fort Hood hospital.

now as essential to the patient as is his or her medical care. Doctors and nurses are listening more to their patients needs, extending empathy and compassion. “This is essentially the core of the patient center care model,” Gibson said. “It’s an evidence based outcome, how we help people. When the physician goes on their rounds and sits down to talk with a patient about their situation, it sensitizes the doctor and helps us better connect

with our patients.” One of CRDAMCs efforts to connect with patients is a monthly congratulatory meal for new mothers that offers choices from a steak dinner to vegetarian plate. “The patients get so excited,” said CRDAMC Public Affairs Officer Mikaela Cade. “Significant others are welcome but must pay $8 for a meal.” Keeping track of patient satisfaction

is important to CRDAMC and patient responses can help put some money back in the coffers to invest back into staff and operation. After each visit, a patient receives a survey to fill out and return. For outpatient visits it’s the Joint Outpatient Experience Survey (JOES), and for inpatient stays, it’s the TRICARE Inpatient Satisfaction Survey (TRISS). “It’s greatly important,” Gibson said. “For JOES it’s question 23, and for TRISS it’s question 21. “When patients are totally satisfied with the care we provide we can earn up to $1,000 on the survey that we can invest in our services,” he said. “We want to generate health and create wellness versus turning out widgets of health care.” Gibson said they are striving to make access to primary care easier for beneficiaries who can now book 80 percent of primary care appointments directly at www.tricareonline.com. “I am so fortunate to be given the opportunity to add value to this great team at this great place,” Gibson said. “I am very excited for our future and the opportunities ahead.” TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER TEMPLE

Volunteers for veterans Story by CATHERINE HOSMAN Photos by MIKE BARTOSZEK

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ridgett Holmes, voluntary services specialist, for Olin E. Teague Veterans Medical Center at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Temple, is visiting the Community Living Center. Holmes is responsible for the coordination of volunteers for the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System that includes facilities in Temple, Brownwood, Cedar Park, Bryan/College Station, LaGrange and Palestine. She also works with the Killeen Veterans Center. On any given week she coordinates 150 volunteers to serve in different capacities at the facilities, and that number can grow into the hundreds for special events. “I wouldn’t put a number on it, but occasionally we need support to help with a special event,” she said. She said nine new patients arrive daily to the Olin E. Teague Veterans Medical Center enrolling for medical care and volunteers are needed to fill many roles. “Way Finders are needed to help new patients find their way around the Center, from the parking lot to the pharmacy and to the canteen,” she said. “Citizens, and veterans leaving the military, sometimes come to volunteer.” To volunteer for the Department of Veterans Affairs Holmes said applicants are carefully vetted with performance based interview questions.“This helps potential volunteers find their area of interest and understand why they want to serve. The majority want to give back.” She said they look at where they may have a need to fill a void, and this format makes an effort to match a volunteer to a job that fits their skill set and experience. “The need is critical,” she said. “We have so many veterans to take care of, it’s really important that the community out there is willing to support the vets as they get to know the community and resources available to them. Our volunteers aren’t getting paid but they want to show their appreciation (to the vets) for their service, and give back to veterans.” 62

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Bridgett Holmes is the volunteer services coordinator for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System.

Before Holmes became the voluntary services coordinator for DVA, she worked as a music therapist with veterans coping with challenges due to PTSD, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and suicide ideation. Holmes is a board certified music therapist with a BA in Music from Hardin-Simmons University, a MA in

music therapy equivalency from Texas Woman’s University and is currently working on her doctorate of education in leadership from HSU. She served six months as a music therapist intern working with vets and said she realized how important it was for veterans, “to be surrounded by a community who supported them while


Lilo Saenz, a volunteer for the Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Texas Veterans Health Care System since 1972, holds some of the toys she gives to veterans in hospice care.

they were integrating back into civilian life. Holmes wants to see more people come forward to volunteer. She had several family members who served in the military, including her great-grandfather who was a German POW in World War II, and said she carried family values of respecting the military, appreciating them because “that’s what I grew up with.” She said the worst things she sees with vets are the deep anxieties and thoughts of suicide, and vets not knowing when to ask for help when they need it. “It’s so important for them to be a part of our community,” she said. “I see veterans interacting with the community and experience the caring and compassion provided through volunteerism. With a volunteer they get to experience people with a genuine heart.” When she completed her residency at the Waco facility, she said she knew she wanted to work with adults who had mental health issues. “After my internship with vets, I knew where I wanted to be,” said Holmes, who still volunteers every Tuesday in MacGregor, at a therapeutic riding center for veterans. “Volunteering is my self-care. It seems like you are adding more work on yourself but there is something about knowing you can give freely. It cleanses you.”

LIFELONG SERVICE DVA volunteers range from 13 to 87. Some volunteers come and stay for a few days, an event or their entire adult life like 87-year-old Lilo Saenz. Saenz began volunteering in 1972 when she retired from her nursing career to take care of her husband, the late Henry Saenz, a disabled veteran, who served in Korea and Vietnam and was “hit twice,” she said. She serves 250 to 350 hours a month and recently reached 50,000 hours. This year she received the Temple Military Order of the Purple Heart for Woman of the Decade Unit 1919, Austin, for her work as volunteer. “I am old, but I cannot sit and play bingo every day,” she said. “It helps me to come out here and be fussing with the guys when they don’t want to do something.” She comes across feisty, stubborn and willful, but always with a smile and always with her veterans in mind. She is determined not to see a veteran go without, whether that means a box of cookies, a bag of pretzels, a pair of shoes, jeans or a shirt. She will find a way to get it and deliver. “I make phone calls from home to beg for stuff,” she said. “Socks, underwear, jeans, pretzels, Mountain Dew; they know if they need something,

and I have it, they will get it. It might take me a week to get it but I will get it for them.” When she does bring in a stash, she is like a squirrel hiding its harvest for the winter. Saenz stashes away goodies in a two-door wardrobe and two four-drawer filing cabinets. That’s a closet of clothes and eight drawers of snacks that she keeps locked up for when someone asks for something specific. It might be a favorite box of cookies, a bag of pretzels, a candy bar, a pair of socks or a pocket treat of some kind. In addition to her being the guardian of the sweets, Saenz makes red, white and blue horseshoe shaped blankets for amputees and wheel chair patients. She likes to make the vets feel comfortable in their surroundings. For those on their final journey, she places a plush teddy bear or another plush pet in their arms to hold onto while they pass from this world to the next. But she would like to see all veterans feel the joy of a plush pet. “We need more teddy bears,” she said. “We got some from Operation Stand Down Central Texas, but we would like to have more to share with other residents.” Anyone who wants to volunteer may contact Holmes at Bridgett.Holmes@ va.gov. TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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Free clinics serve those in need BODY OF CHRIST COMMUNITY CLINIC

By appointment only Medical Clinic, 8 a.m. to noon Tuesdays 2210-B Holland Road Dental Clinic, 6 to 9 p.m., Thursdays 1508 Oleta St., Belton 254-939-9500 www.bodyofchristclinic.org To be eligible for care, families should be uninsured, low-income or unemployed and should not be on Medicaid, Medicare or eligible for VA services. The clinic aims to serve patients in the greater Belton ISD. All patients are screened for eligibility.

GREATER KILLEEN FREE CLINIC

718 N. Second Street, Suite A, Killeen (Inside the Killeen Arts & Activities Center) 254-618-4211 Monday to Thursday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday Walk-In: Check in 4:30 p.m. Clinic 5 to 6 p.m. Tuesday Walk-In Clinic: Check in 9 a.m. http://www.gkfclinic.org/ The clinic is open to adults and children who are uninsured and ineligible for other healthcare programs. It serves patients in Bell, Coryell and Lampasas counties. Executive Director Marlene DiLillo said volunteers staff the clinic and provides many acute care services, including treatment for uncomplicated illnesses, simple injuries, basic wound care and tooth pain. For any service it is unable to provide, the clinic refers patients to an appropriate agency.

TEMPLE COMMUNITY CLINIC

1905 Curtis B. Elliott Drive, Temple 254-771-3374 www.templecommunityclinic.org Clinic appointments are generally Tuesday through Thursday, but vary based on the number of volunteer physicians available. Eligible patients include adult Bell County residents who do not have health insurance and are not eligible for government health programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP and TRICARE. Services include dental and medical care including dermatology, cardiology, gynecology and podiatry. The clinic also offers chronic disease management for diabetes, hypertension, COPD and asthma, as well as simple illnesses, such as respiratory problems, bladder infections and sore throats. Lab and X-rays are available on orders from Scott & White Medical Center — Temple. The clinic does not provide emergency care, cancer treatment, prenatal care, pregnancy testing and treatment, 64

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL

severe mental health issues and disability or other program paperwork.

FEED MY SHEEP CHILDREN’S FREE CLINIC

No appointment required 613 S. Third St., Temple 254-239-9863 Every third Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon. 9:30 a.m. registration www.feedmysheeptemple.org Serving uninsured or homeless children, newborn to age 18. Patients do not have to complete prequalification process to receive most services. Dr. Stephen Ponder, an endocrinologist at McLane Children’s Hospital, doubles as the clinic’s medical director. The clinic offers well and sick child visits, vaccinations, hearing, vision and dental screenings for children. Specialty doctors regularly offer their services at the clinic including dentistry, podiatry and dermatology. Prescription assistance is also available for sick children at the clinic.

THE COVE HOUSE FREE CLINIC

Tuesdays evenings only No appointments Line forms at 4:30 p.m. Registration 5 p.m. 806 E. Avenue D, Suite D Copperas Cove 254-547-4673 www.covehouse.org/need-help/free-clinic The Cove House Free Clinic serves uninsured adults and children in Killeen, Copperas Cove and Lampasas. There is no residency requirement. Volunteer medical professionals from Metroplex Health System, Family Medicine Clinic in Copperas Cove and Lampasas, Fort Hood, and Baylor Scott & White Clinic in Copperas Cove and private practices staff the clinic. General medical services are available including dental extractions through referral; prescriptions and assistance with labs and X-rays by referral. The clinic does not make appointments and does not offer emergency care.

MARTHA’S HEALTH CLINIC

601 S. Seventh St., Temple Thursdays, 6 to 8 p.m. https://medicine.tamhsc.edu/studentorganization/marthas-clinic/index.html Staffed by Texas A&M medical students it serves the homeless and indigent population in Temple and Bell County. It provides basic health care needs, helps with referrals to Scott & White Medical Center — Temple, social services resources.


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ADVERTISERS INDEX Academy of Medical Professions.................................................... 35 AFC Urgent Care............................................................................. 3 Affordable Insurance........................................................................ 7 American Heart Association............................................................ 9 Atmos Energy...................................................................................11 Bell County Museum........................................................................ 7 Bluebonnet Health......................................................................... 37 Central Texas College................................................................ 49-54 Cornerstone Gardens..................................................................... 38 Cultural Activities Center.............................................................. 39 Curtis Cook Designs.......................................................................11 Devereaux’s Jewelers....................................................................... 57 Document Solutions/Documaxx................................................... 10 Ellis Air Systems................................................................................ 8 Elmcroft of Cottonwood................................................................ 40 English Maids................................................................................. 57 Epiphany Dermatology................................................................... 66 Extraco Banks,Temple/Local.......................................42, Back cover Forest Trail Dental...........................................................................41 Garden Estates/Catalyst .................................................................. 2 Grand Avenue Theater................................................................... 64 Hallmark Service Co....................................................................... 35 Killeen Vision Source..................................................................... 59 Lastovica Jewelers.............................................................................. 9 Legacy Dental.................................................................................. 43 Lone Star Ag Credit.........................................................................11 Metroplex Hospital......................................................................... 67 Pazmino Dentistry.......................................................................... 19 Precious Memories............................................................................ 5 Seton Medical Center..................................................................... 65 Shoe Box......................................................................................... 39 Smile At The World Orthodontics............................................ 9, 43 Stoney Brook/Belton.......................................................................21 Susan Marie’s Boutique.................................................................. 59 Temple College.......................................................................... 23-30 Temple Railroad & Heritage Museum............................................. 8 Total Retirements .......................................................................... 35 Union State Bank............................................................................. 7 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor............................................. 44-45 Visiting Angels.................................................................................41 Walk-In Clinic................................................................................. 39 Wally’s Party Emporium/Erwin Distributing.................................. 9 Wisener’s Auto Clinic.................................................................... 66 Z Medical Aesthetics....................................................................... 64 The Advertisers Index is published for reader convenience. Every effort is made to list information correctly. The publisher is not responsible for errors or omissions. 66

SEPTEMBER 2017 | TEX APPEAL


TEXAPPEALMAG.COM

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Tex Appeal Magazine | September 2017  
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