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winter edition

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Vol. I, Issue 2

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C MPASS

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A Publication of Traverse City West High School

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06 We are West

By Ariana Burk

By Megan Bezemek

By Steven Starlin

By Keri Beaudri

By Ariana Burk

By Compass Staff

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08 Life as a Teen Mom 10 We Art West

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12 Hoopin’ it Up

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20 Fiddlin’ with the Family 26 The Pit for Phantom By Steven Starlin 28 Kendama Takes the Trend By Odyssey Staff

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Foreign exchange student

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CONTENTS

Traverse City West Senior High School 5376 North Long Lake Road Traverse City, MI 49685-8217 (231) 933-7500

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Taeler Aspenleiter

Ariana Burk Editor-in-Chief

I am so excited to have the privilege of being the editor for The Compass. When I graduate I hope to pursue a career in medicine along with journalism. Telling stories is a way to open so many doors and opportunities. Once someone hears the triumphs and trials others face, they will realize they can connect with the world.

Writer/Photographer/ Layout Editor

I am a Senior at TC West Senior High. I absolutely love journalism and design because I am able to tell stories others might not be able to tell by themselves. This is my third year in yearbook and I hope to get a degree in English and Graphic Design.

Steven Starlin Writer/Photographer /Graphic Designer

I’m a professional graphics designer and I even started my own business in printing T-shirts with my templates on them. I plan on going into college for a Master’s Degree in Business. If you would like to order, please visit my blog at whitefangimpressions@charter.net.

Keri Beaudrie

Mrs. Hansen

Megan Bezemek Writer /Photographer

I’m on the Titan Cheerleading team. I take a lot of art classes, my favorite is drawing. Currently I take two advanced drawing classes. I like to play piano but I am not the best at it. I write songs and play guitar. I have worked for two trimesters with The Compass Magazine as a writer and photographer.

Writer/Photographer

I am currently in West Senior Highs’ school newspaper and journalism class. I have taken photography for 3 years and photo journalism. I am also involved in web publishing. When I graduate I hope to become a photographer because it would be a good thing to take on in my life.

Advisor

I have been advising publications for nearly 10 years.I started as a yearbook advisor for the Maple Leaf yearbook in Adrian, Michigan. I have been the advisor for the West Odyssey yearbook since 2003 and The Compass online magazine since 2010. I have been taking master’s classes at MSU in journalism and also write for Families First magazine.

Note from the Editor

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Dedication is a trait many know of and many posses. Here, at the Compass, we are truely dedicated to our passion. That is, serving our community. This issue was developed by a staff of five, which was not a simple task. We have a commitment and dedication to sharing our school’s experiences and events with all of our viewers. This particular issue is much smaller then our first issue, but that is due to the fact that this Compass was not offered as a class. Last issue, we were blessed to have a larger staff in a class during the school hours. However, since the class does not expand to the complete three trimesters, five dedicated staff members have independently been working on developing this issue, just for you. We hope you enjoy our creation and become encouraged to be apart of the community, called West Senior High.

Staff


W h a t ’ s H a p p e n i n g a t We s t Check out our latest, greatest achievements: TCAPS held its first Futures of Learning Summit to discuss how to best serve students and keep up with educational trends as we move toward a global and technically diverse future. Parents, students, teachers, administrators, and business owners came together to discuss the goals for our district and brainstorm new ways of reaching our school and local community in meaningful ways. More summits will take place as the district moves forward in planning for the upcoming year. Freshman and sophomores will receive their own Netbooks in early March. Students will pay $20 annually to use their personal computers, which were paid for through funds that came in a technology millage. The MME and ACT tests will take place the last week in February. Exams will take place the week after. Practices are under way for The Phantom of the Opera. TC West will be the first school in Michigan to take on the longest running Broadway musical. The drumline marched in to the State Theatre downtown Traverse City to announce the opening of the movie Step & Close. Produced by One Up Web, the movie was about the marching band and the dedication required from music students to form a united marching team. We competed against Central in a food can drive to support the Father Fred Foundation. We beat our biggest cross town rivals, supplying more than 2,000 cans to the organization which supplies food, clothing, and shelter to area homeless and the needy. The food drive was sponsored by NHS. The Key club held a collection to benefit Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. In total, the school donated almost $2,000 to benefit cancer research, and Mrs. Batcha’s class brought in the most money, $430. Her class will be rewarded with pasta party from the Olive Garden. What’s up with our past students? Eliza Foster (2010) had a spread featured in MSU’s ING Magazine. She will work as Managing Editor of the magazine in her sophomore year. She was Edito-in-Chief for the 2010 Odyssey yearbook. Jordan Wagner (2008) announced on her Facebook page that she will intern for the British Parliament while attending The London School of Economics. David Guthrie (2002), after serving in Afghanistan, just won a 2011 Corvette Coupe at Burger King. Amy Rushlow (2002) is now the online editor for Men’s Health Magazine. She served as Editor-in-Chief for the Occidentalist Newspaper her senior year at West.

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What’s Happening at West


A r e We s t


Counter clockwise: The drumline performs for an assembly in front of the whole school body. A student in Mrs. Keck’s class melts a metal to begin the process of creating jewelry, for the Metals and Jewelry class. In the class, students create jewelry by melting different classes of metals into fine works of art. Many students wear their pieces around school as an everyday accessory. Members of the newly established Coloring Club, color a picture together. Many new clubs have been developed this year, including the Photo Club, the Green Club, and even a Quidditch club. Chloe F., Kayla S., Kaitlyn P. jump around outside while showing off their individual fashion styles. Casey V. warms up before preforming for the Holiday Music Concert on the xylophone. A music student expresses her individuality while playing the piano. Currently, there are many practice and warm-up music rooms, which are equipped with pianos, to assist singers and musicians in becoming more prepared for performances. By Ariana Burk

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We are West

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Main: Cuddling with a flower, Sophia adores her mother, whose behind the camera. Above: Playing the popular game, ‘airplane’, Dani holds her baby. Before falling asleep, Sophia welcomes kisses from her mother. Right: David, Dani and Sophia pose for a family photo. Photos: Dani Hernendez

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Life as a Teen Mom


Life

as a teen mother

High school is supposed to be about dating, parties, homework, and just having fun being a teenager. However, Dani Hernendez experienced an event not many any high schoolers imagine; giving birth. “I never thought that I would be the one getting pregnant,” Dani said. When parents of teenagers find out they are going to be grandparents, their reactions are not gauranteed. “My dad didn’t talk to me and David for at least a week,” Dani said. Dani, who was a junior, was not kicked out of her house, as many predict would accur. When a girl finds out she is a pregnant, a wave of every emotion, thought, and action crosses through her mind. For Dani, her first thoughts were about her high school career. “I thought, ‘What am I gonna do? Will I get kicked out of school?’,” Dani said. Being a teenage girl in high school is scary enough. With all the gossip, stress of grades, social responsibilities, and extracurricular committments, there is already plenty for a girl to handle. Adding a pregnancy to the experience makes things a lot more difficult. When a girl discovers she is pregnant, there are constant reminders of what others think and most girls don’t brag and tell everyone when they first discover they are carrying a child. “The year I was pregnant and at school people did say horrible things about me,” Dani said. “They said stuff like I would drink every night while I was pregnant, but others were excited for me.” It is not uncommon for a the young, soonto-be father to disapper at the discovery of a pregnancy. However, Dani experienced something completely different when she told her boyfriend, David, that she was pregnant.

“Before I told David that I was pregnant, I thought that he would be one of those guys that run away from their problems,” Dani said. “But thankfully, he stuck through everything with me.” The hardest thing about having a child at any age is the loss of freedom that comes when you have to care for another living being. Freedom is a gift many teenagers take for granted. “The hardest thing about being a teen mom is not being able to hang out with my friends,” Dani said. When a girl becomes pregnant she adds something to her life, but her freedom is also taken away as her love and time becomes concentrated towards her child. The loss of freedom may meen regrets for some, but for Dani, her precious little daughter is worth the things she will have to sacrifice over the years. “I would have liked to have waited but I still do not regret anything, I love Sophia.” Sophia was born September 24th. She is an exciting addition to Dani and David’s families. David and Dani may be working a lot harder than most to finish their high school career on time, but they are still on track to finish their education. They know how their education is important for their daughter’s futre. They are lucky to have a supportive family that are essential parts of Sophie’s life. “Every thing is going great,” Dani said. “My parents and David’s parents adore Sophia and same goes with my sister and David’s brothers.” Life doesn’t give you advice and a guidebook on things like what to do when your pregnant or how to raise your child. Just like life, no one knows the future. For Dani, she wants to ensure her daughter learns from her experiences. “I want Sophia to know that it is not good to get pregnant at an early age. But also know that not for one second did I think about giving her away.” By Megan Bezemek

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Life as a Teen Mom

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Artistic Articulations

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1. Band members play their clarinet during the holiday concert. 2. Alexa M. transforms a wet and dirty piece of clay into a masterpiece. 3. Billy B., as the Beast, in Beauty of the Beast, contemplates a plan to woo the beauty. 4. Robert M. ‘12 listens to his iPod while sketching in art class. 5. Kayla S. expresses her artistic side when presented with a blue wall and daisies.

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titlename We art West me

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We Art d f 4 West By Steven Starlin

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We art West


Hoopin’ It UP

Fan distractions become a destiny developer The screaming fans. The score board buzzing. The screech on the wooden floor. The anxiety of the next pass. The bounce of the dribble. These experiences describe the noisy sport of basketball. Each new season brings new cheering fans. Basketball season is a time when all who are loud and proud can encourage their favorite team when they are dribbling on the court. Bleacher Creature themed fan nights increase the amount of excitement and enthusiasm. “I like to go to the basketball games and cheer to help them win the game,” Alyssa Wolf ‘12, said. “It’s fun to stand in the bleachers with all my friends and watch my schools’ team win the games.” There are times when the loud chanting can become a distraction for the team however, and players sometimes feel they are loosing control of their focus. “When we have a game against another school I try my best to stay in the game and bring our team to victory,” Jack Flynn ‘11 said. “As hard as that may be, it’s something all the players try to do.” While cheers are chanted from every side of the gymnasium, players make their last moves and the opposing team starts with the mind games. These distractions are

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Hoopin’ it Upname

a part of every game and when the fate of the game rests in the hands of the ball carrier, pressure is brought to a whole new level. Graem P., a seasoned varstiy player knew this all too well. “I remember when I first became part of the team,” he said. “I got my head out of the game by all the fans cheering for me because I had the ball. Then, when I went to pass it, the other team ended up taking it. Ever since that day I remember to stay focused so I don’t lose the ball for the team.” Cheering and chanting may be a distraction for every team, but without the crowd the teams wouldn’t have an audience to perform for. The players definately need their fans to motivate them and sometimes the Bleacher Creatures drown out the opposing team’s rants and chants. There’s a saying, ‘Do your best and whatever happens, happens’. This is a motto the players live and preform by. However, when it comes to winning, there’s a time when the amount of teamwork determines the outcome of the game. “Its not all about us winning, even though it would be nice to win,” Coach Graham said. “I care about how our team is working together and becoming a stronger team every time we play a game.” By Keri Beaudrie


During a time out, Coach Graehm, discusses the next play the team is supposed to carry out. Running towards the basket for a lay-up, Julius M., concentrates on making a basket. The team sits on the bench while the coach deliberates with them. Running around the three-point line, Marshall

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Hoopin’ it Up


skype

virtual video is viciously vanquishing the In

It wasn’t long ago that ink and pen were all one needed to say “Hello”. But the times they are changing and technology is enveloping society. The ability to access Facebook, the latest news on apps, and games and entertainment are all accompanied by one more growing trend; Skype. The reality that one can physically identify the person on the other side of the receiver has become an infectious sensation. High school students can use the convenience of Skype to give and receive homework advice while being able to view their peers work. For Lauren Bell ’11, Skype is a way to communicate with friends and family who live far away. “I use Skype whenever I need to talk to someone who doesn’t live in Traverse City,” Lauren said. Along with Lauren, many men and women who serve overseas use Skype to communicate with their families while away. College students can keep in touch their friends and family on the other side of the country, and exchange students are able to stay closer to families back home.However, just like there is with every piece of technology, there are unforgettable defects with Skype. “I would change the internet connection,” Lauren said. “Sometimes the pictures blackout and you can’t see the person you are talking to. It’s frustrating.”

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Skype

Eventually, the person reappears and the call begins one more time. Since there if no cost when using Skype, each call is entirely priceless. People from all different states, cities and countries are taking advantage of this technology in order to communicate with loved ones whom are far away. Skype is not only helping people stay close, it has worked its way into the classroom. Mrs. Hansen, a Spanish teacher, found a way to make Skype work for her students. Recently, a student who was studying to be a Spanish teacher came to her classroom to work with her students. He was leaving later that week to study abroad in Argentina. He used Skype a lot and Mrs. Hansen’s students asked if they could Skype with Mr. Ranke while he was there so they could learn more about the Argentinean culture and hear the language from native speakers. “It’s amazing to me how much my students know about technlolgy,” Mrs. Hansen said. “Many of the already use Skype, so if I run into problems, they can help me out. It is amazing to me how technology is changing the way we learn. It has opened up so many opportunities for my students.” Mrs. Hansen also planned to use Skype with to communicate with another school in Mexico.


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Above: Rachel G. pulls up her Skype account on her laptop. She has been using Skype for over a year now. She started using it because her best friend was going to college and they wanted a way to stay in touch. “It’s a great way to keep in touch and I also use it for studying,” she said. “I have friends that like to study over skype, so then we can be visual and verbal.”

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Skype


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Winter

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Freshman, Owen W. is old-school preppy in his argyle sweater and red converse shoes. His style was comfortable, relaxed, and hip.

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Winter Wearable Wonders

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Wearab l e style

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Senior, Megan B. shows off her signature style by wearing knee-high argyle socks with high heeled patent leather shoes.

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Junior, Betsie S. is stylish-hippie in her fl dress and emboidered boots. “I usually comfortably, but some days I try to look she said. “In winter I mostly dress warm nicer than I do in summer.”

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e W o n d e r s es in the winter of

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flowered dress good, too,� m and i dress

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2011

by Steven Starlin

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d Senior, Calvin B. is preppy-grunge in his sweater, shirt, jacket layered look. His signature style was fresh, regardless of the season.

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Foreign exchange student from Norway, Ane Eliasen learned to keep warm in the Northern Michigan winters by bundling up in a waist length, warm coat. Luckily, winters in Norway are similar, so Ane came prepared.

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Winter Wearable Wonders


lucky jack’s A New Fun-in-One Land

new hot spot. The 12,000 square foot arcade has 80 games and a redemption store where winners can spend their winnings to purchase Wii and Xbox games, clothes, giant-sized stuffed animals, lava lamps, neon lights, and household itmes like cookware. The laser tag room is full of obstacles and black lights, and is a challenge for all who enter. After each game players receive a print out of their scores to use as bragging rights. Students can also test their agility by competing in the lazer maze. The object of this game is to get from one end of the room to the other without breaking any laser beams. There are 8 billiard tables, 33 lanes of bowling and the region’s only bumper cars. Friends are sure to enjoy this gathering place with all the specials that are offered. Lucky Jack’s has glow bowling from 9 pm to 1 am on Friday nights. There is also a “friendly special” where groups can get a pizza, 10 wings, pitcher of pop, and two $5 Lucky Jack’s Fun Cards for $39.99. Friends can gather at comfy couches at one of the new bowling lanes and order from the diverse and affordable menu. Lucky Jack’s also has party packages available for birthday or graduation parties.

The Old Timber Lanes takes on a new look. An added game room, laser tag, bumber cars, a laser maze, additional bowling lanes, and eatery have made this one wild hangout with lots to do. Just when we needed to be revived from the winter duldrums, a new funland opened to boost our spirits and entertain us during the cold long months of winter. Filled with neon lights, upbeat music, and interactive games, Lucky Jack’s offers a bright spot where students can relax, hang out with friends, and feel rejuvinated. Lucky Jack’s may seem new by the name, but in reality it has been around a long time. In fact, it has been family owned and operated by the Mohrhardt family for 50 years. Most would recognize it by its old name, Timber Lanes. While the bowling team practiced and competed there, few expected the major changes that came this winter. There is something to do for every age at the

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Lucky Jack’s


An added benefit to the game room is the reloadable fun cards. Players can add money to their cards to use in the game room, bowling alley, laser tag games, and rides. The cards keep track of winnings that can be spent to purchase prizes in the redemption room. Earnings can be traded in for Wii and XBox games, huge stuffed animals, neon lights, lava lamps, candy, and even house hold items like cookware and clothes. The arcade features 80 new games, including skee ball, basketball, Guitar Hero, toy cranes, air hockey, and 3D rides and target games. A new bowling alley was added with couches and high tables where guests can order food and drinks to have while bowling. The menu is diverse, with all the party favorites - pizza, wings, burgers, hot dogs, salads, and sandwhiches. A fun night for students is Friday Night Glow Bowl, where the lights are turned down, black lights are turned on, and players use neon colored balls to knock down their pins. The bowling alley hosts parties for large groups. The business has been in the family for four generations and the family vibe is still very prominent. In fact, David and Ben Morhrardt both attend West. It is comfortable area for everyone to have fun, regardless of age.

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Lucky Jack’s


Fiddlin’ With the F

Sophomore Savannah Buist has many talents. Many know her around school for her neon blue colored violin that she uses to play in school concerts with the orchestra. What many don’t know is that her violin turns into a fiddle when she plays and sings folk music with her family at local venues. Savannah started playing violin in sixth grade when it was a requirement for music class. She already had a little experience with music, though. Her parents were both musicians, and Savannah taught herself how to play the piano at age four. It was no easy task getting her parents to let her join the band, though. She started asking early on, and her mom kept telling her to wait another year. She finally wore her mother down and she started playing with the family band when she was

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Fiddlin’ with the Folk Family

13 years old. Savannah’s family band, Summerson, is a mix of family and friends. It brings together an eclectic and energetic mix of drums, piano, guitar, cello, violin, and vocals. While only her mom and dad also play in the band, Savannah refers to other band members as family, too. “Luke and Laura are like my siblings, and Matt is like my uncle,” she said. Luke Purcell plays drums in the band, Matt Mansfield plays guitar, and Laura plays cello. Her mom, Amber plays guitar and sings and her dad, Rick, plays piano and also sings. Playing with her family had its benefits, too. “I like it when we’re actually playing,” Savannah said. “ When we’re jamming out, we don’t worry about the little


Folk Family

things.” While jamming gave the Buists quality family time, making music also meant work, which added challenges. “Reahearsals can get difficult,” Savannah said. “As well as prioritizing for gigs.” Fans can easily spot Savannah at concerts. Whether she is playing with her family, or amongst a large group of students in the orchestra, it is hard to miss her neon blue colored violin, which she nicknamed, “Red.” Whether it was the color of her instrument, or the pure quality of the sound she made with it, Savannah earned her position as first chair in orchestra. She also earned her seat sitting next to Mom and Dad on the folk stage.

Savannah warms up with her violin before the holiday concert.

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Fiddlin’ with the Folk Family


WE ARE WEST

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We are West

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Glynnis P. performs in Beauty and the Beast for the Theater Arts Class. Pagie B., Anglekia D, and Brianna S. have fun in their newspaper class where they keep people up to date with the online issue

Jessie gets ready for another bowling frame at Lucky Jack’s.

Allison B. plays Guess Who during lunch in the NAP program.

David L. installs wiring for the drive system in the new Robotics class.

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Clancey H. prepares for a cross country race by warming up and stretching out. Richard B. celebrates a victory in his wrestling match

Ian K. ‘12 dances to show his school spirit at the pep assembly for the West VS. Central Basketball game.

The Titan hockey team lines up for the the big game against Traverse City Central. Shaina S. ‘12 gets ready for a pie eating contest at a football game pep assembly.

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We are West


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We Care

We Care ST

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Far Left: Ronnie S. Donates blood during the annual blood drive. Student senate sponsored the blood drive in the new gym, which was filled the entire day with donors. The blood drive supported MI Blood, an organization committed to supplying blood to hospitcals around Michigan, and also to place around the country in times of need. Grant B. and Logan H. pick up garbage around the parking lot in Mrs. Hansen’s advisory class. Students wanted to help clean up the school to show their support for the school wide community. Kaylee V and Mykala F count cans for the NHS food drive. Students donated more than 2,000 canned food items for the Father Fred Foundation. We beat Central High School in collections. Bryne E. from the Key Club counts changed donated for the Pennies for Pasta collection which benefited the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. In total, the school donated almost $2,000, and Mrs. Batcha’s thrid hour class won the pasta party from Olive Garden for collecting $430. Rachel B. sells baked goods for a fundraiser to benefit a softbal player at Elk Rapids High School. The members of our softball team wanted to help a player, Michelle Cook, a two time cancer survivor in need of a double lung transplant. The team decided to hold a bake sale to help. The team proved that competition on the field may be fierce, but compassion for fellow players is what really matters. Erika G. take notes in a Green Club meeting. The goal of the group was to make the school a greener place by recycling and rasing awareness of environmental issues. The group was planning to spruce up the outdoor classroom that was located outside of the theater. Photos; Odyssey Staff

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We Care


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Mac Templeton ‘12 picked up an instrument when he was four years old. The piano was the harbinger of his musical future and it opened the doors to many opportunities. One of which was playing the clarinet. “I didn’t choose it.” When he was in fourth grade, Mac joined the Interlochen Pathfinder School Wood Winds Ensemble. He decided to try his hand at playing the clarinet part in the upcoming musical performance of Phantom of the Opera. “Phantom of the Opera is one of my favorite musicals,” Mac said. “It’s going to be a lot of fun.” The Pit, as it’s called in musical performances, is tricky in the case of Phantom because of the fast paced tempo and the odd notations. The musical notes have a large range, to cover the vast difference between Soprano (the highest notes) and Low Base (the lowest notes). Despite what most people think, there is no ‘lead’ clarinetist, or any particular instrument that is more important than the others in a musical pit. They all need to work in perfect form to enhance the experience for the audience. The musicians are not placed at a certain “seat” because of the difficulty of a piece. Rather, they are placed there be-

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The Pit ame

FOR

cause that’s what’s needed. The singers aren’t the only ones that work hard; it takes a lot of time, and effort for the musical to be ready for opening night. Everyone has their own instrument, whether it’s their voice, clarinet, a spotlight or a sound board. They’re all equally important to having a successful opening night. Mac loves the music in this year’s musical, but more than that, he loves the characters. “I like Raoúl, but he’s not my favorite.” Raoúl is too nice for Mac’s tastes, and though a good person, he’s not quite as intriguing as the cleverly predictable Phantom. “He’s awesome because he entrances people with his voice.” Though Phantom is his present, Mac’s future is surprising. He’s thinking about dropping the clarinet possibly after high school, and joining a true freestyle band that encompasses all of his instruments such as guitar, piano, saxophone and maybe even a little clarinet.


Counter clockwise; Mac T. ‘12 plays both the clarinet, and the base clarinet in the Phantom of the Opera. Brittany V. ‘12 is the other very talented clarinetist in the Phantom Pit. Though Daphne C. ‘13 plays violin in Orchestra, she reached out and got a part in the chorus. Ms. Jones is the orchestra teacher who conducts the pit crew, She also plays violin throughout the production.

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The Pit


Kendama

The Japanese skill takes over the school It’s hard to ignore the wooden balls “clackety-clacking” in the hallways, the commons and even in the classrooms. A new trend is taking over and students can thank Drew Holt for bringing Kendama to our school. He first saw the toy on the Internet, and soon started play-

sociation lists 101 different tricks for the toy. However, players have developed thousands of variations on the original moves. While many students have been playing kendama for fun, students are becoming quite competitive in mastering the skill by trying to out-do each other in tricks. There are even competitions where players try

ing it with friends at school. “It’s a time killer,” he admitted about playing with the toy. “It distracts me.” Kendama is a traditional Japanese toy which consists of a wooden hammer-like object with a ball connected to it by a string. The game originated in Japan as a simple “skillball” toy that was used to develop hand and eye coordination. The goal of the game is to catch one object with another, where both are joined by a string. To play with a kendama, a player grips the toy and using one hand only, jerks the ball so that it may be caught in one of the cups or impaled on the spike. More advanced tricks include flipping the ball over a 360 degree loop and still catching the ball on a cup. Players can achieve high ranks for mastering moves, and a book published by the Japan Kendama As-

to ourperform each other by performing a sequence of tricks successfully. A school wide competition is scheduled for late February, where the winner will recieve a Golden Sunrise Kendama, one of the best skill-ball toys avaialable. In the days of digital games, electronic devices that mezmerize and turn the brain to mush, it is nice to see so many younger students playing an “old-school” game that requires a skill beyond moving the joy stick. Why has Kendama been so popular? Drew has his own ideas about this. “It’s like a rumor,” he said. “It grows bigger and bigger as more people get involved with it. Also, It’s challenging. Whem you want to be good at something, you want to be the best. Because so many people are doing it, you want to feel like you have the most skills.” Drew is willing to accept the blame for introducing the addictive game to eager students, and he is also willing to admit that he is one of the more experienced players, simply because he has been practicing longer than most.

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Kendama


Twisting the Tricks & facts “ken” = stick “tama” = ball

}Kendama

To compete in Kendama players must successfully perform tricks to show their mastery of the game. Players earn points for competing the tricks, and more difficult tricks can earn a player more points. Here are some of the tricks a player might use: Swing-flip-lighthouse Bird Fly Over the Valley Slip Grip Special Around the Cosmos Slip-on-Stick Earth Turn Swing Candle According to the Japanese Kendama Association, to qualify for any given grade, you have ten attempts to achieve each trick listed the required number of times. Kendama is made up of:

Top: Connor P., Kyle P. and Octavion W. play Kendama in their fifth hour Spanish class. Bottom: Grant B. and Logan H. show off a few tricks to their Advisory class.

kensaki = spike ken = main body ozara = large cup kozara = small cup


Jan K., a German Exchange student leaves the school on a cold winter day in February.

WINTER EVENTS

The West Compass Winter Edition  

A magazine put out by the Intro. to Journalism students at West High School in Traveser City

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