Page 1

Making friends that last a lifetime, one country at a time

Images of Ladakh Page 18

Chinese Calligraphy Page 31

Page 17

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

April 13, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 30

The reception will feature Western artifacts including a wagon wheel provided by Rowell’s Saddlery in Castro Valley, Western, themed refreshments and Appalachian clog dancing by Summerlyn at 2:30 p.m. as well as additional entertainment. Rowell Ranch Rodeo’s Queen will be in

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER

S

un Gallery is proud to host “The Wild, Wild, West III,” an exhibition timed to run concurrently with the events that take place during Castro Valley’s 92nd Annual Rowell Ranch Rodeo. Show dates are April 18 to May 19 with a reception for the artists, Saturday, April 28 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. This exhibition features work in all media including painting, drawing, photography, and mixed media sculpture. Artists include: Barbara Rockhold, Fleur Spolidor, Lynne Wagner, Fred Roessler, Joyce McEwen Crawford, Theresa Jessie, Joan Miller, Wanda Worthington Kersey, Amy Nelson Smith, Jacqueline Cooper, Alberta Rivera, Thelton Parker, Mark Sublett, Russ White, Patra and David Steffes, with more artists expected. INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

attendance, so come and have your photo taken with her. We look forward to seeing you at the Sun Gallery for what promises to be a very lively exhibition and entertaining reception. Sun Gallery will also offer our School Tour Program for this Exhibit. Students, grades K-8th grade, led by Sun Gallery art educators, have the opportunity to view our special art exhibits and take part in active discussions as they explore, learning art principles and vocabulary, while encouraged to ask questions and share their impressions. The field trip culminates in our art studio classroom, where each student creates a hands-on art project. Under the direction of the art educator, young artists can create a

piece that relates to work seen in the gallery tour. To schedule a tour, call the gallery during business hours, Wednesday – Saturday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

The Wild, Wild West III April 18 – May 19 Wednesday – Saturday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Reception for the Artists April 28 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Free


Page 2

BY FRANCISCO VARA-ORTA SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS SAN ANTONIO (AP), On a recent evening, Pecan Valley Elementary School Principal Merrill Ramsey, dressed in a formal white shirt and black bow tie, greeted students and their parents near the entrance to the school cafeteria to escort them into the “restaurant.” About 20 teachers dressed as waiters bustled around tables covered in white cloths, taking orders from about 50 students in pre-K through third grade and their families. The main course wasn't edible, though it was food for

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

thought. On the menu were books, just books, all available for “takeout.” At the “Reading Restaurant,” students and their families decide what to order, and a teacher comes over to read their selection with those at the table. Later they take books home. While it mimics a fancy dining room and bookstore – both in short supply near Pecan Valley – the restaurant is an unconventional approach to literacy. “I think elementary school is a critical time where you can help kids learn to love books,” said Lauri Peters, a dyslexia specialist at the school for 24 years.

“So doing ‘Reading Restaurant’ helps put books in hands of a lot of families that don't possibly have books at home to share with their children.” It also reinforces the message that parents need to read to and with their children, making it a priority in the home. “I think allowing them to choose their book gets them motivated,” Peters said. “I get goose bumps because reading is my love and the goal is to make reading fun. And watching parents reading with their kids gives me a positive feeling of what we can do when we all get involved.” Peters recently won a $1,000 grant from the Association of the Texas Professional Educators to fund the restaurant, now in its fifth year. The school in East Central Independent School District can't afford the once-a-year event, so Peters wins grants. “It really is an example of teachers taking matters into their own hands,” Ramsey said. “More educators and administrators are going to have to seek out

those additional funds if we were going to do programs like these.” East Central has avoided massive layoffs, but Pecan Valley has lost funding for some staffing positions, such as an assistant vice principal and paraprofessionals. Three Pecan Valley teachers have won grants to supplement their programs this year, Ramsey said. With this year's grant, Peters was able to buy about 300 books to give away. To save money for books, teachers have recycled their “waiter” costumes over the years. Across the state, districts cut library services to cope with a $5.4 billion cut in state funding. Federally funded programs, such as Reading is Fundamental, which has provided money for free book giveaways at districts nationwide, have lost their funding and will end at many local high-need districts this year. At the same time, local civic leaders are touting literacy. San Antonio has signed on to the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, competing with 150

April 13, 2012

cities developing communitywide literacy plans to improve third-grade reading achievement, when most research indicates students should know how to read well to ensure future academic success. Various programs have been launched to ramp up the local efforts, including reading centers at some H-E-B stores. “Getting the parents just to come to the school is important because many parents might have had a bad experience in school and they don't feel comfortable in a school,” Ramsey said. “So this event shows we can have fun with them, they get to know staff better and seem more willing to work with us.” The restaurant is only open one hour a year. At closing time, every child in the room strolled up to a table full of books – from Dr. Seuss' classics to “Curious George” – selected one and headed home to start spring break. Information from: San Antonio Express-News, http://www.mysanantonio.co


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

3555 Whipple Road, Union City

10:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Fishing for ages 7-15

Wednesday, Apr 14 - Sunday, May 6

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

Oil and Watercolor Showcase

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4948

Thursday, Apr 12 - Sunday, Apr 22

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

Monday, Apr 10 - Sunday, Apr 30

8 p.m.

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

Friday, Mar 30-Sunday, Apr 28

Featuring Farshid Namei and Carol Ramos

Thursday, Apr 5-Sunday, Apr 21

Continuing Events

Sylvia $

Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

A dog threatens a long standing marriage

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu Tuesdays, thru Apr 24

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. American Buddhist monk teaches and answers questions

Buddhanusorn Buddhist Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont (650) 556-6428 www.watbuddha.org Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m. Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

8 p.m. (Sun: 1 p.m.)

Textile Exhibit

12 noon - 5 p.m. Innovative art work with textiles and fibers

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Monday, Aug 2

Jun

Ohlone for Kids $R

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com

Kaiser Permanente PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

18-Friday,

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

Mondays, thru May 7

Community Emergency Response Team Training

6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Must be 18 or older and a resident of Hayward or the Fairview area

Electricidad $

Artwork Display

Mon-Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat-Sun: 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 623-6920

Featuring Simone Archer & Christine Wilson

Latino interpretation of Greek tragedy "Electra"

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 Thursdays, Apr 12 thru Apr 26

Friday, Apr 13 - Sunday, Apr 15

The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley Jr. $

7 p.m. (Sat & Sun: 2 p.m.)

Computer Help in English & Spanish R

Production based on the children's book

Tuesday, Apr 10 - May 16

6 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Photo Central Spring Show

Learn the basics & improve your skills

Mon: 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat: 12 noon - 3 p.m.

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 ext: 20

Irvington High School Valhalla Theatre 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 885-3151

Photographs from students and patrons

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District 1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org

Fridays, Apr 13 thru May 18

Zumba $R

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Apr 11 - Thursday, Apr 12

Spring Break Camp: Freshwater Fishing Clinic $R DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Latin inspired aerobic fitness

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 742-2303 www.ohlone.augusoft.net PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Biff Jones Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura

Friday, Apr 13

"Prophesy, Divination, and Faith Healing" $

7 p.m. Guest speaker James Randi

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Helen Tracey-Noren Angie Wang WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Saturday, Apr 14 - Sunday, Apr 15

Saturday, Apr 14

Saturday, April 14

Spring Wildflower Festival

Alternatives to Lawn R

35th Anniversary Celebration 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Roaring 20's party with jazz band, cars, and entertainment Les Belles Antiques 37549 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 794-4773

11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sunol Regional Wilderness Old Green Barn Visitor Center, Sunol (888) 327-2757 www.ebparks.org Parking fee

9 a.m. – 12noon Convert your lawn into a California native plant garden with integrated pest management

Saturday, Apr 14

Saturday, Apr 14

Alameda County Water District 43885 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont (650) 349-3000 landscape@bawsca.org to register

Tartan Day Scottish Fair $

Spring's Songbirds $R

Saturday, Apr 14

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Celebrate Scottish heritage with music, dancing, food and games

Meet the Sulphur Creek songbirds. Adult only program

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.haywardrec.org

Tri-Cities Women's Club "Spring Fling" Luncheon $R

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Benefits Tri-City Volunteers food bank & thrift store

Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont (510) 793-5683 Saturday, Apr 14

Congressman Pete Stark Town Meeting Sudoku Solutions

4 8 5 3 2 6 9 7 1

1 2 7 9 8 4 6 3 5

3 6 9 7 1 5 8 4 2

5 4 6 1 9 8 3 2 7

2 7 8 5 4 3 1 6 9

9 1 3 6 7 2 5 8 4

8 9 4 2 3 1 7 5 6

6 3 1 4 5 7 2 9 8

7 5 2 8 6 9 4 1 3

F 8 B 0 1 6 5 C 7 9 D E 3 4 2 A

E 2 3 C 9 F 7 8 4 1 5 A 6 B D 0

D 5 1 A E 3 2 4 0 6 8 B C F 7 9

9 6 4 7 0 D B A F C 3 2 1 5 8 E

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. 2 3 8 F A E 1 D 5 B 0 C 7 9 4 6

C A 6 D B 2 4 9 1 E 7 F 5 0 3 8

5 9 7 B 6 0 8 3 D A 2 4 E 1 C F

0 1 E 4 5 C F 7 6 3 9 8 D A B 2

7 4 0 9 3 5 D F C 2 E 1 A 8 6 B

6 C A E 2 7 9 1 8 0 B 5 4 3 F D

8 B 2 3 4 A C 6 9 7 F D 0 E 5 1

1 D F 5 8 B 0 E A 4 6 3 2 7 9 C

B E C 2 F 8 A 5 3 D 4 0 9 6 1 7

4 F D 1 7 9 3 0 E 8 C 6 B 2 A 5

3 0 9 8 D 1 6 2 B 5 A 7 F C E 4

A 7 5 6 C 4 E B 2 F 1 9 8 D 0 3

Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Meet your Congressman

Union City Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 675-5328 Saturday, Apr 14

Rabbit Adoption Event

12 noon - 3 p.m.

Bring a friend and this ad, receive FREE warm-up Bingo packet for you and your friend Exp 4/30/12

April 13, 2012

Tri-City Shelter rabbits need new homes

Saturday, Apr 14

Pet Food Express 39010 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 713-9999

1:30 p.m.

"Mother, Caring for 7 Billion" Humanitarian film about population growth

Boogey Woogey Bug Family

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 14

Family activities

Mind and Meditation

Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon 1999 Walnut Ave., Fremont (510) 790-6284 www.msnucleus.org

11:15 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 14

Increase energy, focus and calmness of mind

Compost Giveaway and Electronic Waste Drop-off

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 709-9209

9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 14

Saturday, Apr 14

Must be a Union City resident.

"Our Fun Dad" Book Signing

Tri-Ced Community Recycling 33377 Western Ave., Union City (510) 471-3850

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Meet author Scott Ellis Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-0660

Saturday, Apr 14

San Francisco & the Earthquake $

Saturday, Apr 14

7:30 p.m.

Science Lecture for Children

"The Shock", "A Trip Down Market Street", "The Destruction of San Francisco"

2 p.m. Presented by members of Science for Youth

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help There has been fantastic community support We qualify for adjudication and have filed to go to court. The bad news is the Bay Area News Group/MediaNews has filed to stop us again and they have filed to change the judge. The Bay Area News Group MediaNews is trying to convince the Judge not to let us go to court. Bay Area News Groups opposition is based on maintaining a financial monopoly. We need a judge to allow us to present our case. We need the community to go to court to observe and show support for Tri-City Voice.

We will give you the court information as soon as we get it.

Qualifications to become a “Newspaper of General Circulation” are quite simple. A portion of the California Government Code that outlines one method of “adjudication” is Section 6000. Tri-City Voice easily meets all of these requirements. The code states: A “newspaper of general circulation” is a newspaper published for the dissemination of local or telegraphic news and intelligence of a general character, which has a bona fide subscription list of paying subscribers, and has been established, printed and published at regular intervals in the State, county, or city where publication, notice by publication, or official advertising is to be given or made for at least one year preceding the date of the publication, notice or advertisement. Listed in order, the following are the requirements… 1) Distribute news of general interest…TCV qualifies 2) Have a valid paid subscription list…TCV qualifies 3) Printed and published in the City of Fremont for at least one year… TCV qualifies That’s it! Those are the requirements under Section 6000 to become a Newspaper of General Circulation.

Page 5


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 7

Over 50 Shops & Specialty Stores “Has Anybody Seen My Girl” Walk the Red Carpet Saturday & Sunday Noon to 2:00 PM Best Dressed Flapper Contest Saturday & Sunday 2:PM 1st Place Trophy & $50 Gift Certificate from Les Belles Antiques 2nd Place Surprise & Gift Certificate 3rd Place ‘Close But No Cigar’ & Gift Certificate ‘What’s The Secret Word Contest’ Anniversary Tokens to Every Flapper to use for Savings at Les Belles Bands for Roaring 20s East Bay Scout Band Venture Crew #224 The Jazzinators Youth Band Sponsored by the East Bay Traditional Jazz Society Christian Jazz Band from Niles Barry Bailey Thank you to our Sponsors: Bronco Billies Pizza, The Vine, CiCi’s Italian Restaurant, The Nile Cafe, A Moment in Time, Bite & Browse Cottage Charm, Don’s Antique Auto Parts Kieth’s Collectibles Lost in the Attic Mantiques My Friends and I, Morning Glory Niles Antiques, Tyme for Tea & Co. Timeless Treasure, The Florence Bar, Switch The Turquoise Shop, Antique Treasures Color Me Quilts, Kiki’s Konfections Not Just Quilts, Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, and Special Thanks to Al Cuna and Gary Mills for their Antique Automobiles

SUBMITTED BY ALAMEDA COUNTY WOMEN’S HALL OF FAME Four East Bay charities received $2,500 each from proceeds raised by the Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame awards program, which honored 11 local women March 30, 2012 for their

outstanding contributions to improve the quality of life in our local communities. A packed house of nearly 500 people turned out for the event, co-sponsored by the Alameda County Board of Supervisors and the County’s Commission on the Status of Women. Highlights included passion-

ate remarks by Oakland real estate agent Oral Lee Brown, who has helped underwrite the college educations of more than 200 youth from some of Oakland’s most under-served neighborhoods on her own and through her foundation. “I do this because I believe education offers the chance for

a young person to live a life rather than just exist,’’ Brown said as she received rousing applause for her work. Alameda County Administrator Susan S. Muranishi, the event co-chair, brought more cheer to the festivities when she presented a $2,000 youth scholarship to 17-year-old

Arooj Haq, a senior at San Leandro High School. Her eyes rimmed with tears, Arooj said the money would be put to good use as she plans to begin studying toward a nursing degree at UC Santa Barbara in the fall. Funds raised by the Women’s Hall of Fame program paid for the scholarship as well as $2,500 donations to the East Oakland Youth Development Center, the Davis Street Family Resource Center, Sojourner Truth Housing and the Women’s Initiative for Self-Employment. Saturday’s luncheon featured a raffle drawing, silent auction and live jazz by a quintet of teen-age musicians who study at the JazzSchool in Berkeley. The talented youths performed several numbers with their director, the acclaimed Oakland saxophonist Kasey Knudsen. Nine other women were inducted into the Women’s Hall of Fame in addition to Brown, who was inducted in the education category; and Arooj, the Youth category inductee. The other women honored on Saturday were: Terry Alderete of Newark, Business and Professions; Barbara Bernstein of Berkeley, Community Service; Mildred Howard of Berkeley, Culture and Art; Connie Galambos Malloy of Oakland, Environment; Pamela Arbuckle Alston, DDS, of Oakland, Health; Jocelyn Larkin of Berkeley, Justice; Nicole Taylor of Oakland, Philanthropy; Dawn Shaughnessy of Livermore, Science; and Debby De Angelis of Hayward, Sports and Athletics. To learn more about the 2012 inductees to the Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame, go to http://www.acgov.org/cao/hallo ffame/.


Page 8

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012 Tribune Media Services

Dr. Seuss' the Lorax 3D (PG) Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu. American Reunion (R) Fri. -

The Shock (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M. A Trip Down Market Street Before the Fire (NR) Destruction of San Francisco (NR)

11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:35, 10:10

21 Jump Street (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 1:50, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40

Wrath of the Titans (PG–13)

Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu.

American Reunion (R) Fri. - Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 12:40, 1:55, 3:05, 4:20, Sun. - Thu. 11:10, 12:30, 3:15, 4:35, 5:55, 7:20, 8:40, 10:00 Thu. 11:05, 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:10, 10:25

11:10, 2:05, 4:50, 7:25, 10:05

Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 1:35, 4:00, 7:05, 9:35

11:00, 1:35, 4:10, 6:40, 9:25

Titanic (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:00

Titanic 3D (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:10, 12:30, 3:15, 4:35, 5:55, 7:20, The Cabin in the Woods (R) 8:40, 10:00, 11:25

& Sat. 11:00, 11:50, 12:45, 1:40, 2:30, 3:25, 4:20, 5:10, 6:15, 7:00, 7:50, 8:55, - Thu. 11:45, 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 The Raid: Redemption (R) 9:40, 10:30, 11:35, 12:20 Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:15 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 11:50, 12:45, 1:40, 2:30, 3:25, 4:20, 5:10, 6:15, 7:00, 7:50, 9:40, 10:30 Lockout(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 8:55, Thu. 11:00, 11:50, 12:45, 1:40, 2:30, 1:45, 4:45, 7:15, 10:10 3:25, 4:20, 5:10, 7:00, 7:50, 9:40, 10:30 5:40, 7:00, 8:05, 9:35, 10:30

The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.

The Hunger Games (PG–13) Titanic 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Fri. - Wed. 12:10, 3:35, 5:20, 7:00, 8:45, 12:40, 5:00, 9:35 Fri. - Wed. 3:15, 7:35 10:25 Thu. 12:40, 3:15, 5:00, 7:35, 9:35 Thu. 12:10, 3:35, 7:00, 10:25

Astronaut (NR) Fri. 2:30 P.M.

Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG) Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 12:10, 2:30 Sat. 2:30

Dawn of the Space Age (NR)

11:45, 2:25, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25

Thu. 11:25, 12:45, 2:20, 3:25, 5:10, 6:20, 7:50, 9:15, 10:30

Wrath of the Titans (PG–13) The Cabin in the Woods (R) The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. American Reunion (R) Fri. Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 10:15 - Thu. 11:40, 12:50, 2:00, 3:15, 4:25,

Fri. - Wed. 12:25, 7:30 Thu. 12:25

Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

21 Jump Street (R) Fri. - Thu.

American Reunion (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:40, 12:50, 2:25, 3:40, 5:05, 6:55, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30, 11:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:40, 12:50, 2:25, 3:40, 5:05, 6:55, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30

The Cabin in the Woods (R)

Fri. & Sat. 11:40, 12:50, 2:00, 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:40, 7:50, 9:00, 10:10, 11:20, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:40, 12:50, 2:00, 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:40, 7:50, 9:00, 10:10

Sat. 11:30 A.M. Sun. 11:30, 4:15

Fri. & Sat. 4:30 P.M.

Secret of the Rocket (NR)

16mm Film Fest (NR) Sat. 7:00 P.M.

The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri. Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu. Fri. & Sat. 11:45, 1:10, 2:20, 3:35, 4:40, Sat. & Sun. 12:30, 2:30 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 5:55, 7:00, 8:15, 9:20, 10:35, 11:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:45, 1:10, 2:20, 3:35, Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. Wrath of the Titans (PG–13) 4:40, 5:55, 7:00, 8:15, 9:20, 10:35 6:30, 8:30 Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 5:10, 10:30

Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

2:30, 7:50

Titanic 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:40, 1:45, 3:50, 5:55, 8:00, 10:05

Titanic (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:50

Fri. - Thu. 2:15, 6:50

The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. & Sat. 10:50, 12:00, 1:15, 2:30, 3:55, 5:15, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:25, 11:35 Sun. - Thu. 10:50, 12:00, 1:15, 2:30, 3:55, 5:15, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:25

The Raid: Redemption (R) American Reunion (R) Fri. - Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 1:40, 4:05, 7:15, 9:55 Thu. 11:05, 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15 Lockout(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:15, The Cabin in the Woods (R) 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00 Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 7:55, 10:30 Corazon (NR) Fri. - Thu. 10:55, The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. 2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 10:15 - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:25, 7:05, 9:35 Blue Like Jazz (PG–13) Fri. The Raid: Redemption (R) Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:45 Fri. - Thu. 11:55, 2:20, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 Housefull 2 (NR) Fri. & Sun. 11:20, 3:05, 7:00, 10:20 Lockout(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:35, Wed. Sat. 3:05, 7:00, 10:20 2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 9:45

The Metropolitan Opera: La The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata - Live (NR) Sat. 9:55 Traviata - Live (NR) Sat. 9:55 The Godfather, Part II (R) Grateful Dead Meet Up Thu. 2:00, 7:00 (NR) Thu. 7:00 2012 Grateful Dead Meet Up 2012 (NR) Thu. 7:00

The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. & Sat. 11:15, 12:25, 1:35, 2:45, 3:55, 5:05, 6:15, 7:25, 8:35, 9:45, 10:55, 12:05 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 12:25, 1:35, 2:45, 3:55, 5:05, 6:15, 7:25, 8:35, 9:45

Tales of the Maya Skies (NR)

The Raid: Redemption (R) Fri. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05, 12:30 Sat. 10:00, 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, The Hunger Games (PG–13) 10:05, 12:30 Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 12:10, 1:00, 1:50, Sun. - Thu. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, To Be an Astronaut (NR) 2:40, 3:20, 4:10, 5:00, 5:50, 6:30, 7:20, 10:05 Fri. 1:00 P.M. 8:10, 9:00, 9:40, 10:30, 11:20, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 12:10, 1:00, 1:50, 2:40, 3:20, 4:10, 5:00, 5:50, 6:30, 7:20, Lockout (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00, 12:20 8:10, 9:00, 9:40, 10:30 Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:30, 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50, 11:10 Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG) Sun. - Wed. 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:15, 4:45, 10:00 9:15 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 The Hunger Games (PG–13) Sat. 11:00, 4:45, 9:15 Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 12:35, 2:25, 3:50, 5:35, Dr. Seuss' the Lorax 3D (PG) Corazon (NR) Fri. & Sat. 12:00, 7:10, 8:50, 10:20 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00, 12:30 Fri. & Sat. 2:30, 7:00, 11:30 Sun. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG) Sun. - Thu. 2:30, 7:00 10:00 Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:05 21 Jump Street (R) Fri. & Sat. Dr. Seuss' the Lorax 3D (PG) 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:55, 12:30 Blue Like Jazz (PG–13) Fri. & Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 4:15, 9:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:55 Sat. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45, 12:15 Sun. - Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 21 Jump Street (R) Fri. - Thu. Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. & Sat. 11:10, 1:40, 4:30, 7:35, 10:20 11:40, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:00, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:40, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, Housefull 2 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 12:20, 3:50, 7:20, 10:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu. 10:00 Sun. - Thu. 12:20, 3:50, 7:20 11:05, 1:40, 4:40, 7:25, 10:10 Fri. & Sat. 1:00, 3:30, 7:30 Sun. 1:30, 3:30 Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

Wrath of the Titans (PG–13) Wrath of the Titans (PG–13) Fri. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05, 12:30 The Metropolitan Opera: La Sat. 10:00, 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, Traviata - Live (NR) Sat. 9:55 10:05, 12:30 Wrath of the Sun. - Thu. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, Titans 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. The Godfather, Part II (R) 10:05 Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:20

The Hunger Games (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 10:45, 11:35, 2:10, 3:10, 4:00, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45, 10:40 Thu. 10:45, 11:35, 2:10, 3:10, 5:30, The Hunger Games (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 4:05, 7:15, 10:30 6:30, 8:45, 9:45, 10:40

11:20, 4:35, 10:05

Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG)

Titanic 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 4:35, 9:30

21 Jump Street (R) Fri. - Thu.

11:20, 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 10:00

Titanic (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:05 11:00, 3:00, 5:05, 7:25, 10:00

Thu. 2:00, 7:00

Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

11:15, 1:40, 4:05, 6:30, 8:55, 11:20 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 1:40, 4:05, 6:30, 8:55

Grateful Dead Meet Up 2012 (NR) Thu. 7:00


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Project shows children will eat healthier food ARTICLE AND PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY TAWNEY WARREN

I

n an unusual nutritional study, third-grade students Emma Warren and Camryn Ambur from Mattos Elementary School in Fremont showed that kids would eat healthier foods, and even prefer them, if presented in a tasty manner. For their Science Fair project this year, the girls tested 211 students, grades K-6, in

brownies. There was a noticeable difference in texture from regular brownies because of the reduced oil, but they still tasted like brownies. The findings from the surveys show that even though the majority of kids could tell which brownie was healthier, nearly 80 percent of them said they would eat the healthier brownie if their parents made them. Furthermore, many of the kids who said they didn’t like to eat vegetables picked the regular brownie as the healthier

(Left to right): Emma Warren and Camryn Ambur pose with their Science Fair project board.

a double-blind taste test of regular brownies and healthier brownies using a recipe from “The Sneaky Chef”©™ cookbook by Missy Lapine (http://www.thesneakychef.com). “We did a double-blind study so we wouldn’t influence any of the taste testers,” explained Emma. Specifically, the girls helped bake, then bag the brownie samples, and one of the mom’s labeled the samples so the girls wouldn’t know which brownie sample was A or B. This way they wouldn’t influence anyone participating in the survey. The study is unusual because it involves kids testing kids. With some guidance from Emma’s mom Tawney Warren, the girls tried out a brownie recipe that included wheat germ, baby spinach, and blueberries. “It didn’t sound good to us, but we were willing to try it,” said Camryn. The girls made some sample batches, tasted them, and were surprised that they still tasted like

brownie, and said the healthier brownie tasted better. The girls effectively showed that if parents add extra nutrition in this way, kids would eat it. This is exciting news for millions of families with picky eaters. The girls have concluded that if parents make it, most kids will eat it. The girls have set up a Facebook page and are hoping to inspire kids in every state to try this project at their schools. To join in on the conversation, or to find out how to do a project like this at your school, you can access their Facebook page at http://www.brainybrowniekids.com Find “sneaky” recipes at Missy Lapine’s website: http://www.thesneakychef.com including the recipe for Brainy Brownies. Sneak more nutrition into your kids’ food for their own good! For more information contact Tawney Warren at: tawney_warren@hotmail.com

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

April 13, 2012

Judith M. Myers RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 7, 1943 – April 3, 2012

James F. Berkheimer RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 27, 1913 - April 4, 2012

Rahul Sharma RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 27, 1991 - April 4, 2012

Eleanor Conwell RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 11, 1924 – April 4, 2012

Sr. Laureen Boyle RESIDENT OF FREMONT January18, 1933 – April 4, 2012

Dorothy M. Conde Regina P. Goss RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 4, 1915 - April 8, 2012

John “Jack” S. Reynolds RESIDENT OF DUBLIN April 16, 1926 - April 8, 2012

Thomas M. Cain RESIDENT OF UNION CITY September 24, 1959 - April 10, 2012

Nita DeGuzman RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 29, 1940 - April 10, 2012

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 FD1007 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel FD 1115 (510) 793-8900 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

RESIDENT OF CASTRO VALLEY November 15, 1917 – April 5, 2012

Isabel M. Woolf RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 26, 1912 – April 6, 2012

Frances A. Babroff RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 16, 1918 – April 7, 2012

Helen L. Morris RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 27, 1948 – April 8, 2012

Joe N. Kimura RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 18, 1934 – April 8, 2012

Isabel O. Castro RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 19, 1921 – April 8, 2012 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 11 11 Page

Sunday, Apr 15

Sunday, Apr 15

Monday, Apr 16

Thursday, Apr 19

Celebrating Baisakhi – R

Shoreline Botanical Bio-Blitz

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Ohlone College Master Plan Meeting

Newark State of the City Address $R

Children participate in Bhangra workshop, tie dye & other crafts

Help survey plants at the shoreline

11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

India Community Center 525 Los Coches Street, Milpitas 408-934-1130

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave.,Hayward (510) 670-7270

Sunday, Apr 15

Monday, Apr 16

7 p.m. Guest Speaker Dr. Gari Browning Fremont Cultural Arts Council 2275 Country Drive, Fremont www.lwvfnuc.org

Swing Fever

Bicycle safety class - R

Monday, Apr 16

2 p.m.

12 noon - 1 p.m.

Jazz music of the 1930's and 1940's

No bike needed

MacGregor/Bridgepoint School Auditorium 35653 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-5683 www.lov.org

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 www.ebbc.org/safety

Sunday, Apr 15

Monday, Apr 16

VFW Post 1917 Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser $

Poetry Prize Winners Lorna Dee Cervantes & DeClercq

Monday, Apr 16

8 a.m. - 12 noon

7 p.m.

7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Breakfast, raffle and live entertainment

Author reading & book signing

Hidden Jobs vs. Advertised Jobs

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3151

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Mondays, Apr 16 thru Jun 18

Thursday, Apr 19

Washington Township's Veteran's Building 37154 2nd St., Fremont (510) 938-2436 Sunday, Apr 15

Folk Jam

4:30 p.m. - 7 p.m. Bring your instruments to play and sing along

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 FolkMusicFremontArea@yahoogroups.com

Community Emergency Response Team Training

Presentation by Mayor Al Nagy. Includes lunch

Reservation required by April 16 Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark www.newark-chamber.com

6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 21

Must be 18 or older and a resident of Hayward or the Fairview area

Celebrate Creation

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4948 Thor Poulsen

Retreat for young adults. Lunch provided. RSVP by April 16

Links to Jobs

Basics of Watercolor and More $

Language and Culture Center for Deaf Studies Anniversary Celebration

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Five sessions on drawing, perspective, composition & design

Meet faculty, visit the programs & new state-of-the-art lab

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

Ohlone College Bldg. 6 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6269 nchopelas@ohlone.edu

9:30 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335 Sunday, Apr 22

Spring Musicale $R

4 p.m. Performances by young artists. Dinner at Bijan Reservation required by April 15.

Antelope Hills Clubhouse 1801 Ocaso Camino, Fremont (510) 793-1938

AP WIRE SERVICE ROME (AP), – Since the start of the month it has been illegal to die in Falciano del Massico, a village of 3,700 people some 50 kilometers (30 miles) from Naples in southern Italy. Mayor Giulio Cesare Fava issued the tongue-in-cheek decree because the village has no cemetery and it is feuding with a nearby town that has one – creating a logistical problem about what to do with the deceased. The mayor told newspapers that villagers are content. “The ordinance has brought happiness,” he was quoted Tuesday as saying. “Unfortunately, two elderly citizens disobeyed.”


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org (510) 794-6844

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521 FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7pm At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda (510)794-7002

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Newark Optimist Club “Friends of Youth” Newark Optimists have been dedicated to their mission of providing hope and positive vision to children since 1968. We meet weekly at IHOP to re-charge our Optimistic spirit. For meeting times and more info call 510-793-1498 Cougar Wrestling Camp 3rd - 8th Grade Boys & Girls Newark Memorial HS Wrestling Room Mon-Thurs 6/11-14 10AM-Noon 510-578-4620 Register at http://www.newark.org/departments/recreation-and-community-services/register-for-classes/

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

FCA Camp is coming! June 29 - July 3, 2012 @ UCLA 9th - 12th graders Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Football, Soccer, Sprint & Distance, Surfing, Tennis, Volleyball and Wrestling. Whitney Elliott 408 712-4112 or http://www.westernregionfcacamps.org

New Fremont Chess Club Fremont Symphony Guild

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Learn more about this dedicated group of music lovers who help bring “Great Music Close to Home” www.fremontsymphony.org We welcome new members! For more information call (510) 656-8763 or (510) 371-4859

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

www.newfremontchessclub.org

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11p.m. 3375 Country Dr., Fremont (510) 623-9935

8 x 8 CAL SPA HOT TUB

FREE

Good running condition Large filter, new tub cover Buyer removes from premises 510-794-7463 or 510-304-4829 Photo of tub available upon request

GLEE Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at (510) 276-7520 www.sshsa.org

for Grown-Ups! Harmony Fusion Chorus Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mondays, 7 p.m.–10 p.m. Hill & Valley Club 1809 “B” Street, Hayward Debbie (510) 862-1073 www.harmonyfusion.org

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00 p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Union City Football & Cheer League

Cougars Girls Summer Basketball Camp

Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer and Football Coaches

Mon - Fri, July 16 -20, 9.30am -2.30pm Camp for girls 8 -15 years old All skill levels are welcome Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave, Newark www.newark.org 510-578-4620, darryl14r@aol.com

Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST Dawn Breakers Lions Club Sunday, May 6th 8am-NOON Fremont Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont All you can eat! Adults $7 Children under 6 FREE Proceeds for local charities Information or Questions 510-371-4065

FREE Loan Modification Workshop April 21,2012 - 2pm - 5pm Intero Real Estate Service 43225 Mission Blvd., Fremont RSVP 510-651-6500 or cara@khlawoffices.com Hernandez Law Group, Inc.

Having trouble controlling the way you eat?

Page 13

Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty St. Fremont, CA 94538 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed 2/20/12 President's Day Mon & Wed (4 p.m. - 8 p.m.) Fri (10 A.M. - 1 P.M.) No Appointment Needed

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English 7pm - 9pm Tuesdays - Free 36054 Niles Blvd. (650) 556-6428 Meditation, Discussion, Q&A with Ajahn Guna, American Buddhist monk in Ajahn Chah Thai Forest Tradition. All are welcome.

Jazzinators East Bay Youth Jazz Band Tues March 20, April 3 &17 Bronco Billy’s, Irvington 7-8 p.m. - No Cover chg. https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Mission Gold Jazz Band at Sunol Jazz Cafe 1st & 3rd Wed. 7-9 p.m.

Can Your Child Get Smarter Hearing Stories? Yes! Bilingual exposure enhances Intelligence & academic ability! FREE Online Hindi-English Story Time. 4-8 yr olds. 20 spots. Tue 6:30 pm. Register at cheenifortots.com/Library/story time 510-300-5719 storytime@cheenifortots.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

2nd Annual Fair Trade Festival Saturday, May 12, 2012 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. South Hayward UnitedMethodist Church 628 Schafer Road, Hayward Why Fair Tade? So that the farmer, or worker receives a afair wage for their product. Join us, and make a difference

Homeless Solutions

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS

Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home.

Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 p.m. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS

Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1.30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Auditions May 14-June 25

Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Ages 18 & up. FREE Coaching All voice ranges needed. Harmony Fusion Chorus. Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mon 7pm-10pm 510-862-1073 1809 B St, Hayward www.harmonyfusion.org

Women’s Show Choir/Chorus


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT

Ethics and real estate Join the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter and Bay East Association of REALTORS President Doreen Roberts for the WCR monthly luncheon at the Hilton Hotel, Newark, on April 18, 2012. Networking at 11:30 a.m.; program and lunch from noon until 1:30 p.m. Ever worked with an agent or service provider and been amazed at the level of professionalism (or lack thereof )? REALTORS subscribe to strict ethical standards and one of many duties a REALTOR has is to mentor others to ensure the highest standards of professionalism. Are you a mentor? Or are you shady without knowing it? Hear what Doreen Roberts has to say. Be reminded of our responsibilities to safeguard the reputation of REALTORS and to serve clients well by maintaining integrity and probity and how to better deal with and report sharp practices and shoddiness in our own industry. This program is NOT just for REALTORS! It is for anyone concerned about "policing" our own industry and is sponsored by Bank of the West and JCP-LGS Disclosures. All, including members of the public, are welcome to attend the luncheon. $20 online by April 16, $25 at the door (Chapter members); $30 online by April 16, $35 at the door (non-members). For more information about the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter, visit www.WCRTriCities.com or call (510) 886-2662. For 2012 Sponsorship opportunities, contact Greg Jones at (510) 881-1234 ext. 105 or email GregJones@GregJonesRealEstate.com Women’s Council of REALTORS Luncheon Wednesday, April 18 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 886-2662 www.WCRTriCities.com

April 13, 2012

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 589,000 Median $: 317,500 Lowest $: 265,000 Average $: 350,864 ADDRESS

ZIP

5068 August Court 2340 Bentley Court 2797 Betlen Court 19212 Center Street 5157 Crane Avenue 4548 Lawrence Drive 4068 Mabel Avenue 21423 Tanglewood Drive 2973 Wisteria Lane 20343 Woodbine Avenue 5444 Briar Ridge Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

295,000 335,000 317,500 290,000 430,000 589,000 305,000 380,000 310,000 343,000 265,000

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1160 1262 1098 1008 1962 2460 1010 1505 1802 1287 1397

1953 1960 1953 1941 1960 1956 1950 1949 1979 1949 1978

03-12-12 03-13-12 03-08-12 03-08-12 03-08-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-08-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-09-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 33 Highest $: 1,435,000 Median $: Lowest $: 90,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

3770 Alder Avenue 94536 5109 Brophy Drive 94536 890 Cherry Glen Circle #213 94536 38918 Cherry Glen Common 94536 38627 Cherry Lane #91 94536 3755 Dunbar Place 94536 35502 Fisher Place 94536 2789 Harrisburg Avenue 94536 37641 Iron Horse Lane 94536 4675 Portola Drive 94536 37381 Sequoia Road 94536 2963 Southwycke Terrace 94536 4421 Ashwood Common 94538 4270 Bidwell Drive 94538 4286 Bidwell Drive 94538 3878 Eugene Street 94538 39580 Kahlua Court 94538 39901 Lindsay McDermott Lane94538 40429 Paseo Padre Parkway 94538 39472 Seascape Road 94538 45523 Cheyenne Place 94539 925 Concho Drive 94539 43528 Laurel Glen Common 94539 131 Pilgrim Loop 94539 1425 Salamanca Court 94539 40178 Santa Teresa Common 94539 48342 Sawleaf Street 94539 3776 Harlequin Terrace 94555 2817 Huxley Place 94555 32933 Lake Bluestone Street 94555 32481 Lake Ree Street 94555 34931 Nova Terrace 94555 4251 Tanager Terrace 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

400,000 500,000 254,000 247,000 150,000 380,500 525,000 658,000 238,000 427,500 90,000 490,000 482,500 365,000 555,000 301,000 425,000 228,000 401,000 345,000 762,000 748,000 1,270,000 1,435,000 870,000 500,000 635,000 505,000 450,000 400,000 350,000 500,000 320,000

1453 1732 840 1168 799 1453 1688 2383 742 1653 421 1466 1112 999 2356 1400 1652 1127 1006 1477 1780 2850 3525 1866 1329 1544 1855 1390 1651 1180 1988 1471

1976 1964 1987 1987 1974 1977 1971 1987 1902 1954 1986 1988 1987 1962 1962 1953 1967 1981 1962 1974 1977 1998 1990 1978 1970 1963 1991 1969 1970 1975 1990 1985

03-13-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-08-12 03-08-12 03-12-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-12-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-09-12

3 3 2 2 2 3 4 2 5 2 3 5 4 3 4 2 2 3 5 5 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 2

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 22 Highest $: 490,000 Median $: Lowest $: 95,000 Average $: ADDRESS

332 Annette Lane 620 Artisan Place 17992 Azalea Road

ZIP

94541 94541 94541

427,500 491,136

SOLD FOR BDS

165,500 239,000 160,000

2 2 2

236,000 249,409

SQFT

BUILT

841 1597 1270

1951 03-13-12 2004 03-12-12 1973 03-09-12

CLOSED

1374 B Street 22296 Cynthia Court 836 Harmony Drive 2987 Hidden Lane 23900 Madeiros Avenue 22721 Marolyn Court 18180 Meekland Avenue 22792 Moura Court 21743 Princeton Street #8 25112 Vista Greens Court 674 West Sunset Boulevard 34 Ballard Court #2 322 Brookview Way 463 Custer Road 29284 Lone Tree Place 28471 Rochelle Avenue 27649 Seminole Way 24582 Thomas Avenue 24594 Eden Avenue

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545

95,000 372,500 215,000 330,500 390,000 269,000 270,000 335,000 163,500 183,000 275,000 110,000 490,000 235,000 285,000 260,000 236,000 209,000 199,000

1 3 2 3 3 3 2 4 3 2 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 2

692 1826 1142 1675 1582 975 1391 1538 1431 1250 1130 1160 2284 951 1386 1260 1000 1100 647

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 9 Highest $: 490,000 Median $: Lowest $: 185,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

472 Dempsey Road #172 464 Dempsey Road #264 1774 Ellwell Drive 1336 Olympic Drive 1168 Park View Drive 1201 Sassone Court 855 Spirit Walk 486 Taylor Drive 135 Valmy Street

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

185,000 198,000 407,000 490,000 485,000 482,000 417,000 402,000 388,000

2 2 3 6 3 3 2 3 4

ZIP

35047 Charmwood Court 36387 Darvon Street 37348 Ingraham Street 8250 Juniper Avenue 6109 Rockrose Drive

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

400,000 450,000 735,000 291,000 376,000

3 5 5 3 3

ZIP

2328 Claridge Place 94577 1710 Clarke Street 94577 1134 Donovan Drive 94577 1139 Huff Avenue 94577 348 Maud Avenue 94577 781 Maud Avenue 94577 347 Parrott Street 94577 725 Rodney Drive 94577 14165 Seagate Drive 94577 358 Warren Avenue 94577 2137 Whelan Avenue 94577 16610 Foothill Boulevard 94578 15205 Hesperian Boulevard #C94578 2234 Pomar Vista Street 94578

SOLD FOR BDS

247,000 236,000 228,000 235,000 205,000 355,000 237,500 495,000 241,000 230,000 305,000 199,000 170,000 245,500

2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3

407,000 383,778 BUILT

CLOSED

842 842 1102 1984 1146 1771 1534 1198 1500

2007 2007 1960 1970 1962 1990 2000 1965 1955

03-21-12 03-16-12 03-16-12 03-20-12 03-22-12 03-16-12 03-20-12 03-21-12 03-16-12

400,000 450,400

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1617 1908 3289 1080 1168

1968 1971 2000 1961 1969

03-08-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 16 Highest $: 495,000 Median $: Lowest $: 170,000 Average $: ADDRESS

03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-13-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-08-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-08-12 03-08-12 03-12-12

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 5 Highest $: 735,000 Median $: Lowest $: 291,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1924 1980 1942 1984 1959 1950 1930 1997 1978 1973 1949 1984 1999 1951 1989 1954 1954 1973 1945

236,000 258,063

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1723 2401 832 988 920 1295 1018 1570 1596 787 1274 1602 1348 1300

1977 1948 1942 1919 1941 1952 1924 1936 1987 1943 1944 2007 1987 1952

03-12-12 03-12-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-12-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-08-12 03-09-12 03-12-12 03-09-12


April 13, 2012 589 Beatrice Street 1440 Belding Street

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE 94579 94579

170,000 330,000

2 3

986 1190

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 7 Highest $: 398,000 Median $: Lowest $: 235,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1294 159th Avenue 16032 Bayberry Lane 1851 Bockman Road 538 Drew Street 17114 Via Chiquita 17392 Via Chiquita 1206 Via Dolorosa

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

349,000 398,000 260,000 235,000 350,000 255,000 288,000

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

32616 Brenda Way #2 5038 Bridgepointe Place 3116 Courthouse Drive 2636 Great Arbor Way #55 1046 Jade Terrace 4734 Louise Lane 31404 San Carvante Court 241 Teddy Drive 34417 Torrey Pine Lane

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

BY BOB MOEN ASSOCIATED PRESS BUFORD, Wyo. (AP), Buford is a small place for sure, but so is the world. A remote, unincorporated area along busy Interstate 80 that advertised itself as the smallest town in the United States, Buford was sold at auction for $900,000 on Thursday to an unidentified man from Vietnam. Its owner for the last 20 years, Don Sammons, served with the U.S. Army as a radio operator in 1968-69. After meeting the buyer, an emotional Sammons said it was hard for him to grasp the irony of the situation. “I think it's funny how things come full circle,” he said. The buyer attended the auction in person but declined to meet with the media or to be identified. Sammons and others involved in the auction would not discuss the buyer's plans for Buford.

SOLD FOR BDS

142,000 175,000 380,000 230,500 315,000 341,000 439,000 290,000 605,000

2 3 4 3 2 3 4 3 5

288,000 305,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1817 1948 1078 1080 1250 1031 1043

1997 1994 1954 1950 1950 1951 1950

03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-09-12 03-08-12 03-13-12 03-09-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 9 Highest $: 605,000 Median $: Lowest $: 142,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1948 03-12-12 1956 03-12-12

315,000 324,167

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

903 1154 1434 1320 1203 1340 1556 1025 2671

1974 1984 1985 1985 2007 1973 1971 1957 2000

03-13-12 03-13-12 03-12-12 03-09-12 03-09-12 03-13-12 03-13-12 03-13-12 03-09-12

It will take about 30 days for all the paperwork to be completed before ownership of the place located almost equidistant between Cheyenne and Laramie in southeast Wyoming changes hands, Sammons said. The new owner will get a gas station and convenience store, a schoolhouse from 1905, a cabin, a garage, 10 acres, and a three-bedroom home at 8,000 feet altitude – overlooking the trucks and cars on the nearby interstate on one side and the distant snowcapped mountains in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado on the other. The town traces its origins to the 1860s and the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad. Buford had as many as 2,000 residents before the railroad was rerouted. Sammons, who moved to the Buford area about 30 years ago from Los Angeles to get away from the busy city life, bought the trading post on Jan. 31, 1992. He

plans to retire from his unofficial title as “mayor” and write a book about his experiences in Buford, he said. “I felt my time here has been very happy for me, and hopefully the new owner will be able to enjoy what I've enjoyed over the years – conversations with people, the uniqueness of the area and so on – and keep the history alive,” Sammons said. As workers boarded up the windows of the convenience store behind her, Rozetta Weston, a broker with a Cheyenne real estate auction company that represented the buyer, said the buyer was excited to own a “piece of the United States.” But she declined to discuss the buyer's future plans for Buford. Weston said the buyer and a companion arrived in Wyoming – their first trip to the United States – on Monday, touring Cheyenne and the University of Wyoming at Laramie before the auction. Williams & Williams Co. of Tulsa, Okla., conducted the auction on a sunny, windy day outside the trading post, which has been closed since Dec. 31. The number of bidders was not released. Dozens of people, including some of the 125 residents who live in remote areas and get their mail at the outdoor post office boxes on the property, showed up for the event. Officials with Williams & Williams stood out in their business suits among the locals dressed in jeans and western attire. Inside the convenience store, most of the candy, snacks, pop, beer and all the Marlboro cigarettes had been sold off already. Bags of charcoal, whistles made from animal antlers and dozens of T-shirts proclaiming Buford as the smallest town in the United States remained unsold. Wearing a weather beaten cowboy hat, Gary Crawford, who lives about 4.5 miles northeast of the trading post – “Post Office Box 7” – said the trading post is important to the surrounding residents who mostly live on widely scattered ranches. “At different times, this has been a community gathering place where you caught up with your neighbors and shoot the breeze, learn what's going on, who is around,” Crawford said. He looked forward to meeting the new owner. “I think we may have very nice, new neighbors,” he said.

Page 15


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

New Haven rallies for Measure H SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL RITCHIE PHOTO BY ROBERT SINGER More than 1,000 students, parents, teachers and staff held a march and rally on the morning of March 30 in support of the Measure H Parcel Tax (June election) to help New Haven District Schools. The rally began at James Logan High School and supporters marched 2.5 miles to the Union Landing Shopping Center. After the rally, there were speeches by students and local government officials. Supporters state the following reasons when urging a “yes” vote on Measure H: Funds from Measure H will help local schools prepare our children for college and careers with outstanding core academic programs in reading, writing, math and science and highly qualified teachers and staff. Measure H authorizes local school funding that can’t be taken or cut by Sacramento politicians. Measure H will: Provide high-quality college preparation classes and programs to prepare students for jobs and careers, Provide quality academics to help students excel in core subjects such as math, science and English, Attract and retain quality teachers, Minimize stateimposed budget cuts, including lost classroom time for students and class-size increases that impact our youngest children, Ensure that our schools continue to offer a well-rounded education, including after-school activities that help kids stay on track, Keep schools clean and safe. Measure H won’t prevent all cuts imposed by continuing budget problems in Sacramento, but it will help significantly by providing local resources that cannot be lost to our children by political games in Sacramento. All funds raised by Measure H will stay local, protecting our children’s future. By law, Measure H funds cannot be taken away by the state or spent on administrator salaries. An independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee will monitor expenditures to ensure funds are spent as promised. Exemptions will be available to senior citizens and disabled residents on fixed incomes. Good local schools improve home values. Measure H is good for our entire community. Take a positive step to protect New Haven children. Please - VOTE YES on H. For more information about Measure H, please email NewHavenCares@aol.com or call (510) 441-3074.


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY CANDICE NANCE

Y

ou dream of traveling the world but don’t know where to start. Traveling can be expensive and you have no idea how to get around on your own. This is the same way I felt as a young undergraduate student before learning about a study abroad program to Cambridge University offered through Ohlone College. “My whole world changed, and it changed for the better. A decade later I am still in contact with my host family and friends from around the world. I’ve traveled to over 20 countries and don’t plan on stopping anytime soon! There are many misconceptions about studying abroad. Programs are no longer exclusive to the wealthy. Study abroad participants vary in age from young adults to retirees. Programs run from as long as a year to as little as a week. If you’ve ever dreamed of traveling the world, a study abroad program can be the step in the right direction. Look at a variety of programs and decide what factors are important to you. Are you looking for a long- or short-term study abroad program? What region of the world excites your interest? How much structure versus free time would you prefer during a program? For decades Ohlone College has served as the wings of flight for many students. Participants have climbed the Harbor Bridge in Sydney, Australia, studied theatre in London, England, and visited global corporations in Shanghai, China. In June last year, I led a three-week Global Business Immersion study abroad program to China. Ten participants visited over a dozen businesses, including the American Chamber of Commerce, Bao Steel, Deloitte, and General Electric. The program included a variety of cultural visits in Shanghai, Suzhou and Wuxi, China. This year Ohlone College is offering our community opportunities to: study European business in Ireland (August 2012), tour the breathtaking Iguazu Falls in Argentina (January 2013), and develop your creative process studying art and literary destinations in London and Paris (June 2013). Experience what the world has to offer. Visit www.ohlone.edu/studyabroad or contact Candice Nance at CNance@ohlone.edu and get started on filling your passport, one stamp at a time. Editor’s Note: Candice Nance is an Adjunct Professor, Business Administration Department at Ohlone College.

Ohlone College business students visit a Caterpillar manufacturing plant in Suzhou, China.

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN The City of Milpitas' Phantom Art Gallery debuts a new exhibit in the Milpitas Library, "Images of Ladakh" by local artist Tony Sehgal, through June 14. The photographs in the exhibit were taken during a five-day visit to Ladakh, the goal according to Sehgal being “to depict the diversity and beauty of this remote and seldom seen part of the world.” “During the summer of 2011 I traveled to Ladakh, an arid and mountainous re-

gion in northern India. Ladakh resides in the Himalayan mountain range in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. My base was the city of Leh, Ladakh’s most populous

city, situated at about 12,000 feet. Ladakh is home to numerous Buddhist monasteries that retain their rich cultural heritage and architectural character,” says Sehgal. “The region is also home to Khardung La, one of the highest motorable roads in the world at 17,582 feet. Another spectacular feature of Ladakh is Pangong Tso, an endorheic lake that extends from India to Tibet. Its clear blue waters greet the adventurer after a mountainous five hour drive from Leh. Stunning fertile valleys along the way, juxtaposed with snow covered mountain peaks make for breathtaking views.” Sehgal is a Bay Area photographer and digital media professional. His past exhibits have focused on the Indian subcontinent and the cloud forest of Monteverde, Costa Rica. Sehgal is a graduate of the Stanford Documentary Film Program, and has worked as a video producer and streaming media technologist for several Bay Area companies. His photographic interests focus on landscapes, people, and sports. Sehgal’s recent travels to Death Valley, California, have rekindled his interest in natural landscapes and black and white photography. More images from Sehgal’s show and travels relative to this exhibit can be found at http://www.pygmymammoth.com within the “Travel” gallery. Photographs are available for purchase from the website

April 13, 2012

as high-resolution metal prints or as traditional prints. An exhibit reception will be held on Saturday, April 14 from 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. at the Milpitas Library. Light refreshments will be served and all are welcome.

Images of Ladakh Through June 14 Mon-Thur: 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sun: Noon – 6 p.m. Reception Saturday, April 14 2:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Milpitas Public Library 160 N. Main St. (408) 586-3409


April 13, 2012

“Cinde” A109531 Cinder is a female Pit Bull. She is a beautiful grey color with intriguing white and tan markings

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

a family with no small kids and who have had experience with her breed. She is a great dog that already knows 'sit', and is waiting for you to bring her home. Come visit her today!

ality. He is very easy to handle and loves to interact with people. Monty is looking for a new forever family, so come see him today!

Monty is a male rabbit with very soft grey/brown fur. He is an adult and has developed quite the person-

BY SUE MANNING ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES (AP),Age may creep up on man, but his best friend gets there at warp speed. Going from pup to grandpup doesn't leave much prime time under American Veterinary Medical Association labels that cats and small dogs are geriatric at 7 – and large dogs at 6. But not everyone agrees, and rescuers say those definitions can be a death sentence to older animals in need of homes.

Total in Shelter: Cats - 38 Dogs - 46 Other - 7

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6640

making her look very unique. She is about 3 years old. She get along well with other dogs, and loves to play. She is mellow and easy going, but is also very strong, so she is looking for

Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 p.m. Saturdays: 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

Dr. Emily Pointer, staff internist and medical coordinator at the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York, said she considers the last third of life the sunset years. “That seems fairly crazy,” she said of the AMVA designations. “I would never consider a person in their 40s or 50s to be senior.'' The AVMA said the oldest cat on record was 34, the oldest dog was 29. Forget the notion that seven dog years equal one human year, the

Dedicated to the Rescue of Stray and Abandonded Cats and Kittens

Kittens & Cats need YOU! Incoming Kittens & Cats need FOSTER HOMES to provide the loving care and socialization they need to be adopted.

“Monty” A109840

Page 19

AVMA said. A 7-year-old dog weighing less than 50 pounds is like a 44to 47-year-old human; 10 equals 56to 60-year-old humans; 15 is like a 76- to 83-year-old; and 20 is like a 96- to 105-year-old human, the group said. Pet health improved in the 1950s and ‘60s when commercial dog food and vaccinations became popular and spaying and neutering increased, said Stephen Zawistowski, ASPCA executive vice president and science adviser. Technology has advanced and today's owners are more willing to

If you love cats and kittens... and have a little time and lots of TLC to share, we need YOU. PURRFECT CAT RESCUE is a not-for-profit group, and we have cats and kittens who need some TLC. We provide the training. We provide the dry food, litter, vaccinations and all vet care. Plus a wonderfully supportive network of great people who are there to give help or advice if you need it. Kitten Season is Here -- Please Help! Must Be 18 Years or Older, Please

www.purrfectcatrescue.org or call 510-739-1597

go the distance for their pets, Pointer said. “In the past, if your cat was diagnosed with diabetes, the recommendation was probably to euthanize the cat. Now, a lot fewer people are willing to do that because it's a treatable disease,” Pointer said. Kristin Dewey of Los Angeles has an 18-year-old Ragdoll cat named Cokie. He fell from an 80-foot palm tree 16 years ago and seemed OK until four years ago when something temporarily paralyzed him and left him incontinent.

“Indoor-only cats that are loved and treated like family start to get old around 15 but can still live good lives until 19 or more. They may be a little creaky and have some health issues, but so do we all,” Dewey said. Pointer agreed: “Well-loved pets live longer than unloved pets.” “We find that most dogs become geriatric after age 12, and that at 12-ish they are like humans at 65,” said Judith Piper, founder and executive director of the rescue continued on page 28


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (SECS. 6104, 6105 U.C.C. & B & P 24073 et seq.) ESCROW NO: 9460-CV DATE: April 10, 2012 Notice is hereby given to creditors of the within named seller that a sale that may constitute a bulk sale has been or will be made. The individuals, partnership, or corporate names and the business addresses of the seller are: Top Brothers LLC 1616 Washington Blvd., Fremont , CA 94539 The individuals, partnership, or corporate names and the business addresses of the buyer are: Rengang Wen and Dade Tan 1616 Washington Blvd., Fremont , CA 94539 As listed by the seller, all other business names and addresses used by the seller within three years before the date such list was sent or delivered to the buyer are: NONE KNOWN The assets sold or to be sold are described in general as: ALL FURNITURE, FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, TRADENAME, GOODWILL, LEASE, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS & ALL OTHER ASSETS OF THE BUSINESS KNOWN AS: Top Brothers AND ARE LOCATED AT: 1616 Washington Blvd.,, Fremont, CA 94539 . (a) The place, and date on or after which, the Bulk Sale is to be consummated: Business & Escrow Service Center, Inc. 3031 Tisch Way, Suite 310 San Jose, CA 95128 on or before May 1, 2012. (b) The last date to file claims is April 30, 2012, unless there is a liquor license transferring in which case claims may be filed until the date the license transfers. BUYER’S SIGNATURE: Rengang Wen Dade Tan 4/13/12 CNS-2296091#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. RG12624553 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Adrianna Mercado for Andrea Razo for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Andrea Giselle Razo to Andrea Giselle Mercado The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 6-29-12, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador, Hayward, CA 94544. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: April 6, 2012 --Judge of the Superior Court 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2295929# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

Case No. HG12621886 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Byron D. Zhang & Stella Lee as individuals and as parents on behalf of minors Cathy Lee and Harvey Zhang for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Byron D. Zhang to Byron Z. Tripp Stella Lee to Stella L. Tripp Cathy Lee to Cathy L. Tripp Harvey Zhang to Harvey Tripp The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 6-15-2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: D504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: March 19, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2283772#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462982 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: M.G.B. Company, 5035 Anaheim Loop, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Milagros Bumagat, 5035 Anaheim Loop, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 3-19-12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Milagros S. Bumagat This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 19, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2294563# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463198 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Clean Up Guys, 3856 Jacana LK Ct., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Sonearra E. Cross, 3856 Jacana Lake Ct., Fremont, CA 94555 Eliesha V. Gordon II, 3856 Jacana Lake Ct., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by General partner-

ship The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Feb. 2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sonearra E. Cross, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 26, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2294548# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463179 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: California Pro Drain, 41717 Chadbourne Dr., Fremont, CA 94539-4605, County of Alameda Sam Suk Choe, 41717 Chadbourne Dr., Fremont, CA 94539-4605 Young Hee Choe, 41717 Chadbourne Dr., Fremont, CA 94539-4605 This business is conducted by husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/2/2006 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sam Suk Choe This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 26, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2294215# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463662 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: XFit, 34077 Paseo Padre Parkway #166, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Delano June Valdez, 34077 Paseo Padre Parkway #166, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ June Valdez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 05, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2294214# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463514 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sizemix Lab, 2001 Duval Ln., Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda Mark Gonzales, 2001 Duval Ln., Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 4/2/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mark Gonzales This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 02, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4/12 CNS-2294212# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462710 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sport Clinic, Inc., 39180 Farwell Dr., Ste-101, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Sport Clinic, Inc., CA, 39180 Farwell Dr., Ste-101, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/19/2005. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Pono V. Aiona, DC, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27/12 CNS-2291823# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463269-463270 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Home Enhancement, (2) Savvy Consumer, (3) Home Enhancement, (4) Savvy Consumer, 36661 Nicholas Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Terri Yurkovich, 36661 Nicholas Ave., Fremont, CA 94536. John Yurkovich, 36661 Nicholas Ave., Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1995.

I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Terri Yurkovich, wife This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27/12 CNS-2291744# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463325 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Amazing Spa, 39966 Cedar Blvd., Suite D-2, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. 33502 11th St., Union City, CA 94587. Hong Xian Li, 33502 11th St., Union City, CA 94587. Robert Michael Zelenak, 33502 11th St., Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on TBD/N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hong Xian Li, Owner Robert M. Zelenak, husband This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 28, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27/12 CNS-2291730# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462633 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Archstone Day Spa, 3923 Piedmont Ave., Oakland, CA 94611, County of Alameda. My Tayler, Inc., CA, 1507 Chandler St., Oakland, CA 94603. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/28/10. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ying E. Deng, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 8, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

PUBLIC NOTICES Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27/12 CNS-2290269# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463461 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Grime Cleaners, 133 Camphor Ave., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Crime Or Grime Cleaning, CA, 133 Camphor Ave., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Laurie L. Guirra Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 30, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27/12 CNS-2290174# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462882 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fur Sure Mobile Pet Grooming, 4413 Porter Street, Fremont, CA 94535, County of Alameda. Kelley Gallaghan, 4413 Porter Street, Fremont, CA 94535. Ken Gallaghan, 4413 Porter St, Fremont, CA 94535. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kelley Gallaghan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20/12 CNS-2287800# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463031 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Xentech Computers, 43941 Osgood Road,

Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Junxiao Lin, 43638 Skye Rd., Fremont, CA 94539 Yuqi Xie, 43638 Skye Rd., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by Co-Partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 08/19/2008 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Junxiao Liu Partner Yuqi Xie, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 20, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20/12 CNS-2285833# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 451243 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Stars Day Spa, 46819 Warm Spring Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on May 3, 11 in the County of Alameda This business was conducted by Individual Xue Ning Yang, 4941 Corona Ct., Union City, CA 94537. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Xue Ning Yang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 12, 2012. 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2283938# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462752 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Stars Day Spa, 46819 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Danping Yang, 15153 Swenson Street, San Leandro, CA 94579 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dan Ping Yang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 12, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2283932# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462973 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kraken Marketing Group, 46560 Fremont Blvd., #113, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Born Creative, Inc., California, 46560 Fremont Blvd., #113, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 03/1/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ George Abouzind, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 19, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2283777# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462850 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: GL Trading Services, 33757 Heritage Way, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda. P.O. Box 56361, Hayward, CA 94545. Genoveva C. Munsayac, 33757 Heritage Way, Union City, CA 94587. Lida P. Rativo, 33757 Heritage Way, Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by a general partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Genoveva C. Munsayac Lida P. Rativo, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 14, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2283705# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462949 The following person(s) is (are) doing business

as: FRISBEY’S HOME REPAIR, 37077 2ND STREET, FREMONT, CA 94536, County of ALAMEDA BRUCE R. FRISBEY, 37077 2ND STREET, FREMONT, CA 94536 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 3/16/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BRUCE R FRISBEY This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MARCH 16, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2282161#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY Department of Public Works City Project No. 08-16B Notice to Contractor Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: UNION CITY POLICE EVIDENCE STORAGE BUILDING, will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012, 2:00PM PST, at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. Project is funded by the CAPITAL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT FUND. The Contractor shall possess a Class B California contractor’s license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans specifications and proposals forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $15.00 PER IMPROVEMENT PLANS ON A CD & PRINTED SPECIFICATIONS WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $25.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, consists of demolition of existing pavement, site work (includes grading, water, sewer, and gas improvements), construct steel frame building, interior finishing, concrete foundation, sidewalk improvements, curb & gutter, install mechanical systems, install electrical systems, plumbing and other such items indicated and required by the plans, and these technical specifications. Call Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request bid packages to be mailed. All questions should be emailed or fax to Travis Huang of City of Union City, email: travish@unioncity.org or fax to (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary

of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication.) CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: April 10, 2012 4/13, 4/17/12 CNS-2295997# CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS CITY CONTRACT NO. 11-20 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEM INSTALLATION – INTERSECTION OF DYER STREET AND JEAN DRIVEwill be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2012 AT 2 P.M., at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Counci Chambers of said building. The Contractor shal possess a Class A or C-12 license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans, specifications and proposals forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at ARC Western at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive, Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at http://www.e-arc.com/ locations/256, Phone (408) 262-3000; Fax (408) 262-5312, for a non-refundable fee. In addition, please contact ARC Western for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, of installing a traffic signal system at the intersection of Dyer Street and Jean Drive, saw-cutting existing concrete and asphalt pavement, removal and off-haul of same and installation of new concrete Sidewalk, Curb & Gutter,Wheelchair ramps and other miscellaneous work shown in the plans, specs and bid schedule and all associated items indicated and required by the plans, Standard Specifications, and these special provisions. All questions should be faxed to Michael Renk, City of Union City, at (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shal furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: 4/2/12 4/10, 4/13/12 CNS-2291864#

6-legged Swiss calf uncowed by disability AP WIRE SERVICE GENEVA (AP), A six-legged calf has defied the odds by thriving despite a vet's prediction at birth that it wouldn't survive.

Seven-week-old Lilli is now a minor celebrity in her native Switzerland after local media were splashed with images of the calf frolicking across a sunny field.

Farmer Andreas Knutti from Weissenburg, which is 19 miles (30 kilometers) south of the capital Bern, says he couldn't bring himself to euthanize the animal because she

was “so full of life.” He told Swiss daily Blick Thursday that a curve in her spine means Lilli may never become a normal milk cow.

But Knutti says if the calf stays healthy she'll still be allowed to join the others when they head for their Alpine pastures this summer.


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

Newspapers erect pay walls in hunt for new revenue BY RYAN NAKASHIMA AP BUSINESS WRITER LOS ANGELES(AP),Newspapers are returning to a business strategy that served them well in the heyday of street-corner newsboys shouting the front-page news. They're enticing people with a little free online content before asking them to pay up. After years of offering news for free, a growing number of newspapers around the country have launched so-called metered pay walls, which give readers a few free stories online before requiring them to sign up for a digital subscription. About 300 newspapers have adopted such plans, which usually give subscribers some mix of Web, smartphone and tablet computer access. “A lot of our customers are telling us, ‘that's fair,’” says Rob Gursha, vice president of consumer marketing at the Star Tribune, a 300,000-circulation daily in Minneapolis. In November, the newspaper began charging people as much as $1.99 a week for online access after they have looked at 20 stories for free. If a reader pays for

the Sunday newspaper in print, however, online access can be as little as 30 cents a week. Nearly 20,000 readers have signed up. For newspapers like the Star Tribune, it's a second chance at digital success. As the Internet gained in popularity in the 1990s, newspapers decided to give away news on their websites while continuing to charge readers for print editions. By keeping online editions free, publishers hoped to gain enough readers to attract Web advertising. But as readers flocked to free news on websites, many of them canceled their print subscriptions. And online advertising hasn't generated enough revenue to make up for the combined declines in print subscriptions and print advertising. Fewer than a quarter of the nation's 1,350 daily newspapers charge for online access so far, but industry executives are increasingly optimistic pay walls can boost digital revenue. Newspapers take different approaches and have different price structures. Some set a limit on the number of stories and some on the number of page views. But there's little doubt executives are hoping pay walls will

spur a turnaround in the industry. As publishers and media executives gather in Washington this week at the Newspaper Association of America's annual meeting, the question of how to increase digital revenue is front and center. Attendees will take part in panel discussions and lectures such as “New Revenue Models and Strategies” and “Reaching Young Readers: Digital Tips From the Digitally Savvy.” They'll trade notes on how to develop applications for tablet computers and smartphones. And they'll talk about ways to derive new forms of revenue from tablets and e-readers such as the iPad and Kindle. “We're really looking at innovation and execution,” says NAA president Caroline Little. On their own, online pay walls won't make up for the print advertising revenue the industry has lost the past decade. Rick Edmonds, a media business analyst with The Poynter Institute, which offers training for journalists, in St. Petersburg, Fla., says calling 2012 a turning point for newspapers and digital revenue is a “little strong.” But, he says, pay walls are one of many salves for easing the indus-

try's pain. Already, they have helped shore up circulation of weekend newspapers because many weekend subscriptions come with online access included. That's important because the Sunday edition is the most profitable for most newspapers. In their quest for digital revenue, many publishers have turned to Press+, a company started by entrepreneur Steven Brill and former Wall Street Journal publisher Gordon Crovitz that helps newspapers build and operate pay walls. The company says it has launched pay walls for 292 U.S. newspapers. Of course, convincing readers to pay for something that was once free isn't easy. Brill recommends publishers give away enough free page views so that only the heaviest users are asked to pay. “You ease them into the idea that they're going to be asked to pay,” Brill says. “It works much better than an abrupt message.” Many readers who realize they're about to hit their limit sign up early to save themselves the hassle, he says. On average, a subscriber gained through Press+ pays $6.50 a month, of which Press+

keeps 20 percent. The New York Times Co., which is not a Press+ client, served as a model for the rest of the industry. The Times says 454,000 people have signed up for digital access to the Times and International Herald Tribune in the year since it started charging. It is cutting free access from 20 to 10 pages a month starting this month. The Times charges as much as $35 a month for full access to its content. This isn't the Times' first attempt at a pay wall. In 2005, the company launched TimesSelect, which fenced off premium news stories and commentary by Times columnists including Maureen Dowd, Joe Nocera, and Thomas Friedman. Readers paid $7.95 a month or $49.95 a year to read TimesSelect content. The company ended TimesSelect in 2007, explaining that it could generate more revenue by making content available for free and supporting it with advertising. Under its recent pay wall plan, the Times' digital and print circulation revenue grew 5 percent to $242 million in the final quarter of 2011. That helped blunt the im-


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

pact of an ad revenue drop of 7 percent to $359 million. Overall revenue was down 3 percent. That success, although with one of the best brands in journalism, has prompted others to follow suit, including some of Lee Enterprises Inc.'s 52 newspapers, and some of Tribune Co.'s 12 newspapers, which include the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune. Gannett Co. Inc., publisher of USA Today, said in February that it would expand its online pay walls from six test markets to all 80 of its small-market newspapers by the end of the year. The company is limiting free access to five to 15 stories a month depending on the market, and offering free digital access with at least a Sunday print subscription. At the same time, Gannett is raising single-copy prices – sometimes by doubling them – and raising subscription prices by as much as a third

for its printed newspapers. Combined with the digital push, the company expects its changes to add $100 million in annual profit. Gannett says that by bundling digital access with paid print subscriptions, enough people will keep subscribing at the higher subscription price to more than offset the loss of revenue from those who cancel because of the price hike. That assumption is proving true in Gannett's six test markets. The News Journal in Wilmington, Del., for example, is now charging $15 a month for a digital and print subscription, up from one offer of $12.75 for print only. The early reaction to the change is positive, says Bob Dickey, president of Gannett's U.S. community publishing division. “This is a turning point for us,” Dickey says. “What we are saying is our content has great value and it

serves a great purpose. The consumers have told us that.” Newspapers that have tried a pay wall say online visits decrease – at first. The Star Tribune's online page views dropped by up to 15 percent before rebounding to pre-pay wall levels within a few weeks, says Gursha. Lee's Billings Gazette saw traffic fall by a quarter and then bounce back within a few months. The Dallas Morning News took a slightly different approach when it installed what's known as a “leaky pay wall” in March last year. Editors tag exclusive or premium stories and reserve them for paying subscribers, while giving all other stories away for free. Although the move reduced online traffic by about a third, the newspaper has seen a steady flow of new digital subscribers, says Morning News publisher Jim Moroney. Print circulation revenue, meanwhile, also has gone up.

Obama signs small business legislation BY KEN THOMAS ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), –President Barack Obama signed bipartisan jobs legislation Thursday that will help small businesses and make it easier for startups to raise capital, saying it could be a “gamechanger” for entrepreneurs dreaming of founding the next Microsoft or Facebook. “When their ideas take root, we get inventions that can change the way we live,” Obama said in the Rose Garden, flanked by lawmakers of both parties who backed the bill. “And when their businesses take off, more people become employed.” He said the initiatives in the bill paralleled many of the provisions that he sought last fall in his jobs agenda to encourage small-business growth. Republicans, who promoted the pro-small business ideas in the House, joined Obama at the signing ceremony, including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va. Sen. Scott Brown, RMass., whose seat has been targeted by Democrats, also looked on as Obama signed the bill into law. “This bill represents exactly the kind of bipartisan action we should be taking in Washington to help our economy,” Obama said.

Cantor, speaking to reporters after the ceremony, said the bill was aimed at “the problem that we face in America today which is that our economy is lagging and our small businesses are having too hard of a time getting up off the ground.” Some Democrats, however, raised concerns that the bill softened investment protections enacted after the dot.com excesses and Wall Street meltdowns and the changes could lead to fraud and abuse. Speaking to an audience that included small business owners, Obama indicated he's aware of those concerns and has directed top officials to “keep a close eye” on how it goes into effect. The main part of the bill would phase in Securities and Exchange Commission regulations over a five-year period to let smaller companies go public sooner. Firms that have annual gross revenues of less than $1 billion would enjoy this “emerging growth company” status. The legislation may be one of the few accomplishments for a Congress stymied by partisan divisions heading into the fall elections. The bill combines a number of bipartisan bills that exempt newer companies from SEC reporting rules in

order to reduce costs and red tape. Another provision facilitates the practice of “crowd-funding” in which the Internet is used to solicit a large number of smaller investors. Senate Democrats were unsuccessful in their efforts to add more investor protections but succeeded in attaching one provision that requires websites involved in crowd-funding to register with the SEC. It also demands that companies seeking to raise money this way provide information on its financial status, business plans and shareholder risks. Sara Hanks, a securities attorney and co-founder of CrowdCheck, a company aimed at helping startups, said the crowd-funding element will help make it easier for small companies to access capital but warned it will be up to investors and entrepreneurs “to protect themselves from deals that are too good to be true.” In addition to the emerging growth company and crowd-funding provisions, the legislation removes SEC regulations preventing small businesses from using advertisements to attract investors and raises from 500 to 2,000 the number of shareholders a company or community bank can have before it must register with the SEC.

Page 23


Page 24

SUBMITTED BY JOHN SUZA PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW With a rain front moving in, play was cut short at the Eagle

SUBMITTED BY JOHN SUZA PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW As cross-town rivals Kennedy and Irvington start the Mission Valley Athletic League season, both teams are hopeful that the year will begin on a wining track. The new coaching staff at Kennedy, Doug Friend and Chris Gomes, were excited to see a complete game victory from Frank Barrios. With a new set of pitches, the ball game was much improved over last year and kept Vikings hitters off-balance. Kennedy catcher C.J. Giles proved to be masterful be-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classic Baseball Tournament held over Spring break. Even though shortened, the action still allowed a look at how two MVAL teams will stack up against teams from of out the area.

hind the plate. Teammate, cleanup hitter and third baseman Emilio Ruiz, who lost his grand-

John F. Kennedy Titans played St. Mary’s, a team with a powerful lineup of hitters and a starting pitcher on his way to Oregon State at the end of the year. Could the Titans hit against excellent pitching? This is one area of improvement that the coaching staff has stressed this year. Although holding St. Mary’s to two runs, Kennedy was unable to break through excellent St. Mary’s pitching. Another interesting contest was between Mt. Eden of the Hayward Area Recreation League and American H.S. Eagles A great defensive effort on

April 13, 2012

both sides kept the game close until the 8th inning when the Eagles were able to score the winning run. The Irvington Vikings had their hands full with Foothill,

losing 10-4. With a shortened schedule due to rain, the tournament had no clear outcome. The games played gave clues to this season, but nothing conclusive.

On the Irvington side, the Vikings achieved their fourth straight winning game this season and look to continue their streak. In the previous season, in a great team performance at Division I North Coast Sectional playoffs, they upset sixthseed Monte Vista in eight innings before beating fellow underdog Bishop O’Dowd in 10 innings. Irvington eventu-

ally lost to Division I champion James Logan, 8-4. This year, the Vikings need captain Mark Mathias to perform well and help improve on their low hitting average. Mathias was the only member of the team to hit over .300 last season (.407). With Denny Martinez at the helm, the Vikings are looking forward to a good season.

father the day before and dedicated the game to him, had two hits and a sparkling defensive play. The Kennedy Titans, who have won their seventh game of the year are on track to their first winning season in many years. Anthony Babb and Fabio Torres are two up-and-coming players to watch this year.


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Mission San Jose (MSJ) varsity baseball team played three games on consecutive days in three different cities last week. MSJ first traveled to Antioch to face a strong Deer Valley high school team who is ranked near the top of NCS Division I. They then faced Liberty High School in Brentwood, followed by same-city rivals Kennedy High School. MSJ sent their junior ace Brandon Facha to the mound in an attempt to silence the Deer Valley bats. Overall, Facha pitched well enough to keep MSJ in the game but two runs proved to be the difference as MSJ ended up losing 4-2, dropping their record to 7-3-1. MSJ next played Liberty

High School in Brentwood. Liberty came into the game with a 3-6 record but played a solid game and handed MSJ their second consecutive loss by a 7-4 score. Mission took an early 3-0 lead but Liberty outscored MSJ 7-1 the rest of the way to claim the victory. MSJ pitcher Chris Donoghue took the mound for MSJ but could not hold the early 3-0 lead as Liberty reached him for three runs in the second inning to tie the score with the key play being an error by MSJ third baseman Brandon Fuhs to start the inning that ultimately led to an unearned run. Liberty scored four more runs in the fourth inning as Donoghue walked two batters and allowed three base hits before he was replaced by Havard who retired two batters to quell the

rally. Again, MSJ bats were unable to come up with clutch twoout hits as they left a total of seven runners in scoring position during the contest. In more friendly confines of their home field against Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) rival Kennedy High School, MSJ bats rapped out 12 hits and forced Kennedy to commit eight errors in an 11-3 victory. MSJ hurler Kyle Welker was the benefactor of the 11-run outburst. Even though he shut down the Kennedy bats through the first five innings, Welker’s erratic control resulted in five walks and three hits giving Kennedy excellent scoring opportunities but the slinging side-armer had just enough to keep Kennedy off the board and helped his own cause as he started a slick 1-6-3 double play in the fourth inning. The victory brings the MSJ overall record to 8-4-1 and their MVAL record to 2-1.

SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER

April 11 Colts win all games: 25-7, 25-18, 25-16 It was nice to see a lot of different people playing together on our home court in front of a very vocal and supportive crowd. All 13 players had significant playing time during the course of the match and everyone contributed to the win.

The "Colts" have the rest of the week off for a well-deserved break. Next week JLHS will be playing MVAL opponent Castro Valley AWAY on 4/19. Meanwhile the JLHS JV team will be at Campolindo for a tournament trying to defend their championship from last year! "Go Colts"!

Tour was awarded a sponsor’s exemption and Fischer, a Pleasanton product and former star at the University of San Francisco, received the fourth and final sponsor exemption. The TPC Stonebrae Championship will showcase the talents of 156 aspiring TOUR players competing in 72 holes of stroke play, with a cut to the low 60 and ties through 36

holes. The tournament is part of the 2012 Nationwide Tour, the official proving ground of the PGA Tour. The TPC Stonebrae Championship is Nationwide Tour’s only Northern California appearance. For more information about the tournament, visit www.TPCfun.com

SUBMITTED BY ED HUGO

SUBMITTED BY ED VYEDA Mini-tour champion Jeff Corr and Bay Area favorite Todd Fischer and are included in the field of golf professionals for the 2012 TPC Stonebrae Championship, a Nationwide Tour event April 12-15 at TPC Stonebrae (Hayward). Corr, 2011 Player of the Year on the National Golf Association

Page 25


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

April 13, 2012

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD April 10 An 18 year-old victim called us at 5 p.m. to report that at around noon he cashed his paycheck and walked toward home on Eggers. Two suspects confronted him and demanded his cash. They kicked and punched him several times, leaving visible injuries, before leaving with the money. Officer Lobue investigated. During the day, unknown suspect(s) kicked open a locked door and gained entry at 40600 block of Fremont Boulevard. Two rooms were ransacked. Some cash and jewelry were stolen. CSO Allen investigated. The reporting party was house-sitting for his in-laws at 3000 Mission View Drive and discovered that the home had been burglarized within the past week. Officer Tarango investigated. A clerk at C&C Liquors called to report that a male claiming to have a gun attempted to rob him. The clerk said the male was next door at the 7-11 on Delaware. Officer Edwards was passing by as the call came out, and immediately spotted the described subject at the 7-11. The male refused to follow commands and was telling the other patrons they couldn't leave. It appeared as if he wanted to run. Officer Edwards directed other officers in. After a few moments of indecision, the suspect, a 29 year-old male, made a run for it and was introduced to K-9 Timo. After the dust settled, we learned that although the suspect was screaming he had a gun, he never actually attempted to rob the liquor store. The suspect was sent to the hospital for a dog bite and a psychological evaluation. April 11 Officers responded to a “panic alarm” at a business on the 3900 block of Washington Boulevard. Upon arrival, officers contacted employees and confirmed that a robbery had just occurred. The suspects were armed with a handgun. Officers stopped several subjects, but ultimately the suspects successfully fled the scene undetected. Patrol, detectives and members of the Street Crimes Unit assisted with the investigation. CSO Allen located a stolen vehicle and saw two black males associated with the vehicle walk from Taco Bell into the north doors of Safeway

at the Hub Shopping Center. Several units set up and a K9 search was conducted in Safeway but the suspects were not located. Four residential burglary reports were taken during the shift: 3600 block Turner Court 4800 block Coco Palm Drive 4900 block Creekwood Drive 4400 block Rosoli Terrace April 12 Employees at the GameStop Store (Fremont Hub) called to report that they had just been robbed by two males. The suspects used a handgun during the crime and stole cash and several gaming systems, then fled toward the center of the shopping center. Several officers were close by and Sgt. O’Connell was able to locate the suspects as they fled from the scene in a vehicle (Wheeler/Sundale) and detain one suspect; the other suspect fled on foot. A perimeter was set and after a short period, Officer Manrique spotted the remaining suspect attempting to flee in the flood control canal on the north side of Kennedy H.S. The suspects were identified by the witnesses/victims. The loss and weapon (pellet gun) was recovered. Officer Piol and Officer Tran conducted the investigation. Kaiser called to report they had just spoken to a patient (M45), who wanted medication. During the call the patient said he was armed (unknown weapon) and wouldn’t hesitate to kill himself or someone else. He told the RP that he was walking toward Kaiser Fremont or WTH. Officers worked the call for over an hour, checking the area, doing background work to find Fremont ties, etc. Eventually Hostage Negotiator Huiskens was able to speak to him on the phone. He apologized and claimed he was in South San Francisco. We have so far been able to locate him. Homeowner reports a subject in a hoodie is on the front porch of a residence on Gatewood Street, knocking lightly on the door. The subject took the screen off the front window and opened the window. The homeowner armed himself with a .45 and waited in the hallway with his family in the back room. Units arrived and searched the house and yards with negative results. Residential burglaries: 42200 Palm Avenue Rancho Sol Apartments 35600 Terrace Drive

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UC PD April 2 An officer on routine patrol in the area of the Crowne Plaza Hotel located on Alvarado Niles Road saw two subjects throwing rocks at parked vehicles in the parking lot. The officer attempted to contact the subjects, but they both ran away. Additional officers responded and eventually apprehended the subjects and arrested them for vandalism. April 3 A patient arrived at a local medical clinic with bruises all over her body. She is developmentally disabled and medical staff alerted UCPD. The patient was taken to a special interviewing center to determine if the injuries were inflicted in a criminal nature. The investigations section is following up on the case.

We see it throughout our country, no matter where we travel, where we visit; the signs of graffiti seem to have infiltrated every walk of life. From a rail car, to the side of a building, to school yards and some of the most unimaginable places; we find graffiti. Regardless of the “quality” and yes, some can be very creative; graffiti is a significant drain on public resources. The process to remove these drawings or "tags” can be very time consuming to remove, requiring expensive materials and effort that could be spent elsewhere. The inherent problem is that one act of graffiti encourages many acts of graffiti. Whether it is a territorial issue or just simply one’s ego driving them to outdo others, it is rare that other graffiti marks or “tags" don't begin showing up around or even on top of the first incident. This compounds the problem, increases the overall unattractiveness of the area and makes removal much more difficult. Taking time to promptly remove graffiti from your property will reduce the chances of others applying their marks, “tags” or drawings. Responding to Graffiti: • If you notice graffiti on your property, paint it over as soon as possible. This lets these “artists” know that your property is not an acceptable place for their “work.” • If you see active graffiti taking place, contact the police! It is a crime and important for us to catch these taggers. To learn more about crime prevention or become involved our Graffiti Abatement Volunteer programs please contact Tim Jones, Newark Police Dept. (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org

Neighbors on Landes Place are joining together to help make their community a safer place to live. This and all Neighborhood Watch meetings will be in coordination with the Newark Police Department. If you would like to attend this meeting or start a Neighborhood Watch in your area please contact: Tim Jones Special Assistant Community Engagement Division Newark Police Dept. (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org It’s time to stand up to crime. Together we can make a difference!


April 13, 2012

H

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

elp Out the Special Olympics of Northern California with a “Bagging for Bucks” Fund Raiser! Your tip will help some very special athletes! When you're done with your grocery shopping at FoodMaxx, personnel from the Newark Police Department will bag your groceries and escort you out to your car. With your generosity, "tips" donated will help support Special Olympics and the Northern California Law Enforcement Torch Run.

Bagging for Bucks Friday, Apr 13 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. FoodMaxx 39966 Cedar Blvd., Newark

Arrests in murder of 14-year-old Vernon Eddins

Assault Suspects Arrested at Dave and Buster’s

SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER MARK DOYLE, MILPITAS PD

Union City Police have a major development in the fatal shooting of 14-year-old, James Logan High School student Vernon Eddins in front of Barnard-White Middle School on December 21, 2007. Six men were charged on April 5, 2012 with gang-related murder by the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office: Robert Yim (21), Eric Anthony Camacho (21), Jovencio Luis Camacho (22), Richard Antonio Corona (21), Alexis Alfonso Pamiroyan (22) and Derek Justin Rodriguez (23). The District Attorney’s Office will charge the suspects under a felony murder charge. “This is a tremendous advancement in our efforts to control violence in the community,” stated Mayor Mark Green. “I am pleased at the progress made to bring closure to the victim’s family and to the community. I commend Union City Police for their resolve,” added Councilwoman Emily Duncan. “I am glad the accused are now in custody and are being charged,” said Vice Mayor Pat Gacoscos. “Finally, justice is served; a tremendous relief for Vernon Eddins’ family.” The arrests were made in an investigative operation by Union City Police Department, Southern Alameda County Major Crimes Task Force, with other assisting agencies. The investigation is on-going and additional details will be released as they become available. Anyone with additional information related to this case should call the Union City Police Department tip line at (510) 6755207 or e-mail tips@unioncity.org.

On April 6, 2012, at approximately 12:52 a.m., Milpitas Police Department officers responded to the report of a fight at Dave and Buster’s at the Great Mall. Dave and Buster’s security officers had broken up a fight between ten to fifteen subjects inside the business and were escorting them outside. Once outside, Adrian Jacob (San Jose) pushed a security officer and then punched his face. Jacob was subdued by Arthur Caeser Corpuz Pagaduan the security officers. Marko Severo (San Jose) then approached the previously assaulted security officer, punched his face, and ran away. Security officers chased him and subdued Severo in the parking lot. Arthur Pagaduan (San Jose) approached them and kicked the assaulted security officer’s head as the security officers were handcuffing Marko Severo. Pagaduan was arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for felony assault. Jacob and Severo were cited for misdemeanor assault & battery and were released from the scene. The assaulted security officer was treated by paramedics at the scene. Anyone with any information regarding this case should contact the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Page 27


Page 28 continued from page 19

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

Vets say dogs, cats turn old halfway through life

group Old Dog Haven in Lake Stevens, Wash. Most shelters consider dogs old at 8, Piper said, so Old Dog Haven works with dogs 8 and up. The group tries to place the 8- to 12-year-olds they rescue from shelters and find final refuge homes for those over 12. At age 14, Solomon is one of those final refuge or hospice dogs. Part Dalmatian and part German shepherd, he has been with Lisa Black for 30 months. Black owns the Stardust Salon and Spa in Seattle and Solomon goes to work with her every day to greet customers. ``If they don't like him, it's not the place for them,'' Black said. “Old dogs are usually good with other dogs and housebroken. They are easy and don't require a lot of trips to the park. They are usually happy with us and do whatever we want,” she said. Losing them is hard, she said, but you focus on the dog. “It's what Old Dog Haven does so they don't end up alone in a shelter. We give them a happy ending,” Black said. “Even if the time they have with

the dog is short, it's worth it,” Piper added. Dori Repuyan of Columbus, Ohio, says Tucker, a 60-pound German shepherd-beagle mix her family rescued nine years ago is between 11 and 13. She worries that calling dogs old so young will cost them good homes because “people don't want old dogs.” Tucker started showing his age a few years ago, Repuyan said. He stopped running with her, limited his walking and had trouble jumping on the bed. He started going gray and when he tore a ligament, developed weight problems. Repuyan and her husband had two children and it seemed to depress Tucker, she said. They rescued Phoebe, a small, young dog that brought Tucker out of his funk. However, Tucker now sees the vet more often, gets a supplement for arthritis and is no longer allowed on the stairs. “It's not so much that pets are living longer than their life expectancy, although they are, but we are taking better care of them and they are surviving longer. Sixty is the new 40 is true

for pets,” said Fadra Nally, a writer and blogger from Raleigh, N.C. Nally figures large dogs should be old at 8 and small dogs and cats old at 9 or 10. Tracie Hotchner of Bennington, Vt., author of “The Dog Bible” and “The Cat Bible,” believes the AVMA's numbers are right. “It raises people's awareness of the need to get more frequent and more thorough wellness checks,” she said. “Not enough people respect the fairly serious physical changes that take place in older cats and dogs and the kind of preventive care that's available.” Dogs don't have middle age, she said. At 6 or 7, pets can experience kidney failure, digestion problems, arthritis, obesity, teeth trouble or other ailments that can be treated. Hotchner has two older dogs with knee problems. They had surgeries, are on medication and undergoing stem cell therapy harvested from their own belly fat, she said. The quality of their lives has been extended decisively because of those things, she said.

SUBMITTED BY SGT. RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD On March 29, at approximately 7:28 p.m., the victim, a 44 year-old male from San Jose, California, was seated at the bus stop on Dixon Road when he was approached by Bikim Rashad Mobley. Initially, Mobley asked the victim for $2 to buy a beverage and the victim provided him with the money. Once Mobley received the $2, he asked the victim for more money, but the victim refused. Mobley moved his hand towards his waistband while threatening the victim by saying he would put a bullet in the victim. Fearing for his safety, the victim ran into a nearby store and called 9-1-1. Milpitas Police officers responded to the area and eventually located Mobley in the area of Dixon Road and Arizona Avenue in Milpitas. Mobley was arrested for attempted robbery and booked into the Santa Clara County Jail. The Milpitas Police Department would like to remind the public that the crimes of robbery and assault Bikim Rashad MOBLEY are serious and usually money is the motivation. These incidents are considered crimes of violence because they involve the threat or actual use of physical violence. The basic rules of prevention are to be sensible and to be alert. If possible, don't walk alone during late-night hours, walk in groups whenever you can as there is always safety in numbers. If you are a victim of a robbery, please don't resist, give up your property and don't give up your life or get injured. Immediately report the crime to the police and try to describe the attacker accurately. Your actions can help prevent others from becoming victims as well. Anyone with information about this investigation should telephone the Milpitas Police Department at 408-586-2400. Those who wish to remain anonymous can telephone the Crime Tip Hotline at 408-586-2500 or utilize the on-line crime tip form: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/citydept/police/crimetip/default.as


April 13, 2012

Helping neighbors get back on their feet SUBMITTED BY LOIS PAULA B. RITURBAN Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) or Church of Christ, one of the fastest growing international Christian organizations, will hold a career fair for residents in Fremont, one of many to be offered throughout Northern California throughout the month. Attendees can take home free professional

Page 29

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

attire, and will leave with a network of support and career development tools to empower them move forward in work and in life. Professionals will offer oneon-one training and share expertise on how to get started in the fields of medical and health; law enforcement; technical support and information technology; media/arts/entertainment; health and nutrition; science and

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD April 9 Officers responded to 5600 block of Byington Drive at 11:15 p.m., where the residence was ransacked between 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. Entry was made through a rear window. At this time the loss is jewelry and the resident was compiling a further list of stolen items. April 10 At 3:38 p.m., Sears Loss Prevention and Newpark Mall Security called police stating that a subject had just stolen fragrances and ran from security. Officers located the subject running north across Mowry Avenue towards BJ’s. Officers detained the subject, Thomas Winkle, age 31, (Fremont) and ultimately arrested him. He was booked at Fremont jail.

biotech; and business and administration. Residents can have their resumes reviewed with a human resource professional and attend free workshops addressing online job searching; writing a resume that works; tips and tools for interviewing; and self-branding to network and dress for success. All community members are welcome. “We hope to directly demonstrate the INC’s continuing commitment to those who may need a small gesture of support,” says Joselino Castillones, Iglesia ni Cristo District Minister of Northern California. “Many volunteers are combining their professional and educational resources for this effort, and for even more activi-

ties to come; we know it is a duty to provide not only spiritual needs, but assistance for our neighbors in any manner possible. It is our way of saying we are here to help.” The event is part of the INCGiving Project, which inspires ongoing activities that support the efforts of community partners by offering time and resources for the wellbeing of those in need. Member volunteers are taking a multi-service approach to address the issues facing residents of the area while setting the tone for future programs that support family and community development – a global project to share faith through acts of kindness. The Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) or

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On March 31, 2012, Milpitas Police Officers responded to a burglar alarm at 300(B) Los Coches Street. Officers arrested two subjects for suspicion of a variety of crimes, including burglary, possession of burglary tools, possession of narcotics, conspiracy and outstanding arrest warrants. At approximately 5:37 pm, Milpitas Police Officers responded to an activated burglar alarm at the business. Officers arrived on scene within two minutes of the initial call and saw a male suspect hiding inside the fenced area of the business. Additional officers set up a perimeter around the business and fenced yard area. As offiVincent Tschirhart cers entered the yard to take the suspect, later identified as Vincent Tschirhart of San Jose, into custody, they noticed a second suspect also hiding inside the fenced yard. Officers took the second suspect, tran-

Church of Christ is a global Church comprising of more than 5,400 local congregations in nearly 100 countries and territories. There are more than 250 congregations in the U.S. and Canada, 33 of which are in Northern California alone. Its Central Administration is in Quezon City, Philippines. The INC will celebrate its centennial on July 27, 2014. Career Fair and Clothing Drive Saturday, April 14 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Iglesia ni Cristo, Church of Christ 39700 Logan Dr., Fremont incgiving@inctvprod.net www.INCMEDIA.org

sient Clinton Benson, into custody without incident. A search of the suspects revealed burglary tools and suspected methamphetamine. Both suspects appeared to be under the influence of a stimulant, had outstanding felony arrest warrants, and were wanted as parolees at large. Tschirhart and Benson were booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for Clinton Benson burglary, possession of narcotics, conspiracy, possession of burglary tools, prowling, outstanding arrest warrants, and for being under the influence of a controlled substance. Anyone with information about this case should telephone the Milpitas Police Department at 408-586-2400. Those who wish to remain anonymous can telephone the Crime Tip Hotline at 408586-2500 or utilize the on-line crime tip form: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 13, 2012

Master Sudoku

1

8

7

4 letter words Ajar Egis Inch Naif Pare Plop Rare Zinc

2 8 1

4

6

7 9 2 9 8 3

3 4

8 7 9

22

4

22

3

26

26

3

1

12

19 21

6

18

1

3

4 23

6

6

1 19

21

26

9

23

3

6

23

4

21

6

13

7

8

4

25

4

19

3

1

5

19

20

17

6

7

4

18

14

16

14

26

3

21

9

8

6

4

20

1

9

12

26

9

1

4

16

26

4

1

3

20

4

16

11

26

21

21

21

5 26

6

1 22

15 6 2

17

3 6

9 4

6

26

21

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

3

6 letter words Bantam Extort Ignore Ironed Trowel Trying 7 letter words Bandbox Sincere 8 letter words Expected Immodest Increase Milepost Nutrient Oblation

12 16

6 6

24 20

19

4 19

19

19 21

19

20

25

16

6

16 12

3 24

6

3 6

2

10

9

26 3

23

12

9 20

4

26

3

15

19

17

3

21

16

3

4 16

19

21 4

21

21 3

6

7

1 12

1

19 3

3

Sudoku Solutions on page 4

13 letter words Merchant banks Monkey puzzles

5 letter words Apron Arrow Cater Joist

In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

26

F

Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

1

6 4 9

5 3

Sudoku

9 letter words Marquetry Town halls

2

10 letter words Fellowship Ovulations

Word Search ASTRONOMY AGN Apoapsis Cluster Coma Comet Earth Eclipse Epoch Europa Galaxy Hour angle Io Mars Mean time Mercury Moon Orbit Periapsis Phase Planet Pleiades Pluto Quasar

C 3 A

A 7

0 A 2 D 4 9 3 2 9 0 5 2 4 C 3 D C A B 1 4 4 A 6 B 3 E 0 B C 8 C 8 3 B 2 7 9 1 C 5 F E 4 8 3 0 7 E B F 4 1 D 6 1 D 0 2 9 9 A 8 3 6 2 C 6 9 E 0 2 7 8 F 1 C 7 5 A 9 6 B 0

M P P Z H G A L A X Y A M C T

1

F

V E R L O R B I T A P P E L E

Red dwarf Red shift Saturn SETI Star Sun Telescope Uranus Venus

E R E N U R A N U S E O A U L

R I D M R T A E N C M A N S E

N A D N A E O M L I A P T T S

A P W P N S D I E K R S I E C

L S A H G I P S M R S I M R O

E I R A L S E P H V C S E Z P

Q S F S E U L R K I J U O T E

Vernal equinox

U P C E R E P O C H F I R J Q

I N L O I V E N U S O T E Y U

N M P A M O S M O O N S A S A

O A D O N A A T A G F E R U S

X E C O M E T Y A G M T T N A

S A T U R N T E X R N I H M R


April 13, 2012

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS

O

live Hyde Art Guild is presenting a program about the beauty and art of Chinese calligraphy. To the casual observer, a Chinese calligraphy piece may sometimes be interpreted as a painting since both are accomplished using similar tools and techniques. When more is learned about calligraphy, however, different levels of appreciation are developed. Over the history of Chinese civilization several styles of Chinese characters have developed. There are rules governing the strokes or lines of the characters, but individual artistic expression is encouraged on the structures of characters and the overall presentation of a work in calligraphy. Complex

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

strokes can involve an elaborate thought process often filled with emotion. Artist and presenter, Shuchen Chen, originally became fascinated by Chinese calligraphy when she was in elemen-

tary school. Her career path, however, was in Finance and Accounting. When choosing extra-curricular activities for her own children she rediscovered calligraphy and again picked up the brush. Chen has studied the art of calligraphy with Mei-Ju Chang and Huai-Ning Fu, both exceptionally accomplished calligraphers. She has also taken workshops from Pei-Jen Hau, who combines tradition and modernity in his unique splash ink paintings. More recently she has been studying under Pao-Tsa Yuan, a renowned master of bamboo paintings. Cur-

rently Chen teaches calligraphy at the Fremont Senior Center, the Northwest Region Tzu Chi Foundation, and at her Fremont studio. During the presentation at Olive Hyde Art Center, Chen will introduce the five calligraphy styles, Zhuan shu (seal script), li shu (clerical script), xing shu (semi-cursive/running script), cao shu (cursive/grass script), and kai shu (traditional standard script). She will also introduce the “Four Treasures of the Study”: ink brush, ink, paper, and inkstone. She will demonstrate wielding the brush and basic strokes. Finally there will be an opportunity for group practice with standard script. This program will be held on Tuesday, April 17 at the

Olive Hyde Art Center on 123 Washington Boulevard in Fremont, from 10 a.m. to noon in the Art Center's Mission Room Admission is free, reservations are required, call Elaina at (510) 651-4441.

Chinese Calligraphy Tuesday, April 17 10 a.m. to noon Olive Hyde Art Center 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-4441 www.olivehydeartguild.org Free; reservations required

Page 31

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY NONNIE MOORE Please join the Board of Directors of the Eden Youth and Family Center at our annual “You Gotta Have Heart” celebration on Friday, April 20 in the Hayward City Hall Rotunda. Tickets are $40 in advance or at the door and include delicious hors d’oeuvres and desserts, fine wines and beer, sublime classical guitar and lively jazz, and an assortment of silent auction items. You will have an opportunity to participate in an Arms Length Raffle and a 50/50 raffle!

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINA BROADWIN PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAURA FLEMING

O

n March 31st, Gusting winds and torrential downpours were no match for the spirit of the Kimber Park neighborhood, as residents staged a wildly successful community garage sale with more than 20 sites and over 50 families participating. Avid bargain hunters streamed through the neighborhood in search of treasures with all proceeds (over $5,000) going toward the community’s Save Kimber Park effort, a grassroots group whose goal is to preserve the existing zoning on nearly 13 acres of open space in the middle of the neighborhood. The community also hosted two information stations, where volunteers decked out in rain gear passed out neighborhood maps and gathered signatures for the Protect Fremont Open Space 2012 Initiative. The initiative, once passed in the November election, would let Fremont voters decide if open space that

In addition, programs at the Eden Youth and Family Center will present multimedia information about their services. All proceeds support the work of the Center’s programs: Eden Early Childhood Development Program, Intel Computer Clubhouse, New Start Tattoo Removal Program, Hayward Day Labor Center, Silva Pediatric Clinic, and the Alameda County Community Day School. Don’t miss this opportunity to enjoy an evening out and benefit a vital community resource! For more information or to purchase tickets go to www.eyfconline.org or call (510) 887-1146.

is privately owned can have its zoning changed to another use (such as residential). Kimber Park is a model for Fremont neighborhoods and includes diverse ethnicities and age groups. This unique community has joined hands in a unified stance to protect what makes this area special, a 12.7 acre parcel of land that is

neighbors helped each other set-up, organize and price items. Everyone worked together borrowing canopies, tables and chairs. Many people baked or donated plant cuttings and fresh fruit to be distributed as a “thank you” to those who supported the Save Kimber Park effort. One could say that supporters who came to shop were not just getting bargains but were also taking “live” pieces of Kimber Park home with them. Saturday arrived and so did the predicted rain storm but the “show must go on” so everyone persevered. Bargain hunters were not deterred and traffic was steady

Neighbors were a bit wet but persevered. From left to right: Nancy Wagoner, Ruxi Chiang, Kathy Mertens and Marilyn Williams.

zoned as private open space, currently at risk of development from land speculators. On Friday, before the garage sale, there was a flurry of activity as

throughout the day due, in part, to a plethora of advertising. Many homes were also selling delicious baked goods which brought an old-

April 13, 2012

You Gotta Have Heart! A Benefit for Eden Youth and Family Center Friday, Apr 20 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Hayward City Hall Rotunda 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 887-1146 www.eyfconline.org Tickets: $40

(From left to right): Aman Chopra, Kathy Mertens, Christina Broadwin, Zhiyuan Guan,Arvind Chopra, Nelia Belen and Elliot Broadwin take a break from frantic selling.

fashioned, small town, community feel to the event. Although bargains were definitely the main attraction, there were also a number of very unique items, including life-sized cardboard cutouts of Yoda, Captain Kirk, and Xena Warrior Princess, all of which went for a song. The unwavering commitment of this community and tireless energy of so many members should be an inspiration to all. It is clear that this event accomplished all its goals. Funds were raised, signatures were gathered and awareness of the Kimber Park and Open Space issue in Fremont spread. However, most importantly, the community continues to grow stronger and more bonded. A neighborhood like this is priceless and irreplaceable. There is a wonderful Kenyan proverb "Vijiti katika kifungu na ni madhubuti" or "Sticks in a bundle can not be broken." The Kimber Park neighborhood has come together in

a special way and together they are not only stronger, but unbreakable. For more information please see: www.ProtectFremontOpenSpace.co m and www.SaveKimberPark.com

Marcia Dang and Paula Doherty are both interested in purchasing Xena Warrior Princess from one of the Garage Sales!


April 13, 2012

Page 33

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY COACH RUSSELL CHOY The team of Sycamore Lodge 129, Odd Fellows, Hayward (formally known as Canyon Middle School) placed first in State competition on Saturday, March 31, 2012. With a search for a community sponsor complete, they successfully met fierce competition at Odyssey of the Mind State Finals. They emerged as California State Champions. “The competition was the fiercest I’ve seen in five years of participation,” said Choy. There were four teams within about 12 points of one another after the compulsory weight placements. All four teams supported in excess of the equivalent of 750 lbs on structures that weighed between nine and 12 grams (about the weight of three nickels) made solely of balsa wood and glue.” More than 1,400 students attended the competition, representing over 200 teams from throughout California. Team Odd Fellows will compete internationally at the World Finals at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, from May 23 until May 26, 2012. There are typically more than 7,000 competitors with

Front row (l-r): Emily Hoang, Brandon Choy, Zachary Deigert. Back row: Kelly Chen, Claire Wong, Brendan Hwang, Matthew Heng

about 20,000 people in attendance. This year, the number of teams from Castro Valley dwindled from 14 to one due to loss of sponsorship. The community is still interested in forming teams. Team Odd Fellows’ motto has been

Women’s Softball MVAL Softball Preview BY JOHN SUZA PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW James Logan is still the team to beat as they came very close to winning their second straight North Coast Sectionals title last season, losing to Amador Valley in the championship game. The Colts have already shown what they can do against Castro Valley and Alameda this season. Junior Raeann Garza is back from making her MVAL debut on first team last season. Senior Jazmine Reed was the league’s player of the year, hitting the cover

off the ball with .395 average and 11 extra base hits. Seniors Alexis Martinez and Marissa Perez were also first team MVAL, and Martinez hit .494 with 15 extra base hits, including two home runs and 24 runs batted in. Coming up right behind Logan are the Newark Cougars. Their team features junior pitcher Marissa Chapa (first team) and senior infielder Erica Contreras. The Cougars were 22-4 last season and made it to the Division I semifinals. Washington High School has junior pitcher Angelina Lombardi, while Irvington High School

“Knowledge, Creativity, and Opportunity.” Coach Choy hopes other community sponsors will come forward, as the Odd fellows did, and give more students an opportunity to participate in this creative, intellectual competition. The team

boasts sophomore catcher Shannon Rodriguez and junior Ashley Martorella. American High School juniors Christine Thompson and Alexandria Gibson could be poised for big years after making it to the MVAL second team last season. John F. Kennedy and Mission San Jose are considered doubtful as contenders this year. On April 3, the Irvington Vikings met cross-town rivals Kennedy. Irvington Softball Coach Kim Martin was pleased to get the team off to a good start and a win against Kennedy. The Vikings' young players were hitting the ball with power and beat the Kennedy Titans, 14-4 in seven innings. Titans pitching broke down early and set the tone for the rest of the game. Irvington also benefitted from good infield defensive plays.

seeks donations to help defray costs associated with attending the World Finals. For more information, visit www.OdysseyOfTheMind.com or contact Coach Russell Choy at cvootm@gmail.com.

It was a game of power hitting - a real slam fest. Not to be outdone by the Titans, Kennedy showed a little power of their own by scoring four runs and preventing a shutout. However, the Vikings just seemed to get hits at just the right time

with effective pitching able to get them out of a couple of tight spots. If the other teams in the MVAL turn out to put up as much of a fight as Kennedy and Irvington, then softball is sure to keep spectators on the edge of their seats this year.


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Information about the differences between strangers kids should look out for and strangers kids can trust. Kids see strangers every day in stores, in the park, and in their neighborhoods. Most of these strangers are nice, normal people, but a few may not be. Parents can protect their children from dangerous strangers by teaching them about strangers and suspicious behavior, and by taking a few precautions of their own. Who is a stranger? A stranger is anyone that your family doesn’t know well. It’s common for children to think that “bad strangers” look scary,

like the villains in cartoons. This is not only not true, but it’s dangerous for children to think this way. Pretty strangers can be just as dangerous as the not-so-pretty ones. When you talk to your children about strangers, explain that no one can tell if strangers are nice or not nice just by looking at them and that they should be careful around all strangers. But don't make it seem like all strangers are bad. If children need help - whether they’re lost, being threatened by a bully, or being followed by a stranger - the safest thing for them to do in many cases is to ask a stranger for help. You can make this easier for them by showing them which strangers are okay to trust.

Who are safe strangers? Safe strangers are people children can ask for help when they need it. Police officers and firefighters are two examples of very recognizable safe strangers. Teachers, principals, and librarians are adults children can trust too, and they are easy to recognize when they’re at work. But make sure that you emphasize that whenever possible, children should go to a public place to ask for help. You can help your children recognize safe strangers by pointing them out when you’re out in your town. Also show your children places they can go if they need help, such as local stores and restaurants and the homes of fam-

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)

ily friends in your neighborhood. Recognizing and Handling Dangerous Situations Perhaps the most important way parents can protect their children is to teach them to be wary of potentially dangerous situations – this will help them when dealing with strangers as well as with known adults who may not have good intentions. Help children recognize the warning signs of suspicious behavior, such as when an adult asks them to disobey their parents or do something without permission, asks them to keep a secret, asks children for help, or makes them feel uncomfortable in any way. Also tell your children that an adult should never ask a child for help, and if one does ask for their help, teach them to find a trusted adult right away to tell what happened. You should also talk to your children about how they should handle dangerous situations. One ways is to teach them “No, Go, Yell, Tell.” If in a dangerous situations, kids should say no, run away, yell as loud as they can, and tell a trusted adult what happened right away. Make sure that your children know that it is okay to say no to an adult in a dangerous situation and to yell to keep themselves safe, even if they are indoors. It’s good to practice this in different situations so that your children will feel confident in knowing know what to do. Here are a few possible scenarios: • A nice-looking stranger approaches your child in the park and asks for help finding the stranger's lost dog. • A woman who lives in your neighborhood but that the child has never spoken to invites your child into her house for a snack. • A stranger asks if your child wants a ride home from school.

April 13, 2012

• Your child thinks he or she is being followed. • An adult your child knows says or does something that makes him or her feel bad or uncomfortable. • While your child is walking home from a friend’s house, a car pulls over and a stranger asks for directions. What Else Parents Can Do In addition to teaching children how to recognize and handle dangerous situations and strangers, there are a few more things parents can do to help their children stay safe and avoid dangerous situations. • Know where your children are at all times. Make it a rule that your children must ask permission or check in with you before going anywhere. Give your children your work and cell phone numbers so they can reach you at all times. • Point out safe places. Show your children safe places to play, safe roads and paths to take, and safe places to go if there’s trouble. • Teach children to trust their instincts. Explain that if they ever feel scared or uncomfortable, they should get away as fast as they can and tell an adult. Tell them that sometimes adults they know may make them feel uncomfortable, and they should still get away as fast as possible and tell another adult what happened. Reassure children that you will help them when they need it. • Teach your children to be assertive. Make sure they know that it’s okay to say no to an adult and to run away from adults in dangerous situations. • Encourage your children to play with others. There’s safety in numbers! Source: National Crime Prevention Council


April 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER The Deaf Studies Division at Ohlone College cordially invites you to join us in celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Ohlone College Language and Culture Center for Deaf Studies. In 1972, under the inspired leadership of George Attletweed and other visionary educators, the Deaf Studies Division at Ohlone College was opened as a way for Deaf students in the area to continue their education at an institution for higher learning. This led to the growth of language instruction in ASL and the Interpreter Preparation Program. Now 40 years later, we invite you to join us in celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Language and Culture Center for Deaf Studies at Ohlone College. On Thursday, April 19, visit the largest and most comprehensive Deaf Studies Program in the West. Meet the award-winning faculty, visit classrooms and programs and see our

new state-of the-art lab. This event is sponsored by Ohlone College and Sorenson Communications. For more information contact Nora Chopelas at nchopelas@ohlone.edu, (510) 659-6269 (v) or (510) 344-5700 (vp) or visit http://www.ohlone.edu/deafstudies. We look forward to having you join the milestone celebration with us!

The annual Air Rally is staged by the Hayward Air Rally, Inc., a not-for-profit California public benefit corporation and charitable organization with IRS 501(c3) status. Originally conceived by the City of Hayward’s Mayor in 1964, the Air Rally’s primary charter is to

SUBMITTED BY PAUL BUENROSTRO The Hayward Air Rally, the oldest proficiency flying event in North America, has selected four California and Oregon teenagers to receive fully-paid scholarships, to include tuition and roundtrip airfare, to the Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA) Air Academy for the summer 2012 program. In partnership with local chapters of the EAA)and the International Organization of Women Pilots, Inc. (aka 99s), the Hayward Air Rally is pleased to announce the winners of the four scholarships as Amanda Feriante, a homeschooled student in Fremont; Kira Olson, of Foothill High School in Palo Cedro; Tanner Parks, Weaverville Elementary School, Weaverville, and Devan Simpkins, Cascade Middle School, Bend, Oregon. EAA Chapters VAA29 in Hayward, EAA1148 in Corning, EAA157 in Redding, EAA1345 in Bend, Oregon,

Page 35

Deaf Studies Anniversary Celebration Thursday, Apr 19 1:30 p.m. Ohlone College 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont (510) 659-6269 http://www.ohlone.edu/deafstudies

2012, originating at Hayward Executive Airport and continu-

Amanda Feriante, Fremont

EAA617 in Prineville, Oregon, and the Mount Shasta and Alameda County Chapters of the 99s made significant cash donations to support the overall scholarship project. The Air Academy is located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin and is an aviation-oriented residential summer camp for students to develop and explore their interest in aviation. These camps provide the foundation for a life-long love of aviation and the opportunity to create friendships with fellow aviation enthusiasts.

Tanner Parks, Weaverville

Kira Olson, Palo Cedro

enhance general aviation safety by encouraging aircraft pilots to stay proficient in basic flight and fuel management techniques. The 48th annual Air Rally will take place on June 8-9,

ing over a challenging and competitive route to Redding with an ultimate destination of Bend, Oregon. The Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) was founded in 1953 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a local club for those who built and restored their own aircraft. It quickly grew to include anyone who enjoys flying for recreation and welcomes all aviation enthusiasts to participate. Today, EAA is a non-profit

501(c3) that includes 160,000 members in more than 100 countries. EAA has chartered approximately 1,000 local chapters worldwide, which promote local aviation activities in their communities and regions. EAA’s mission is dedicated to providing aviation access to all who wish to participate. EAA is committed to preserving aviation history and heritage, and helping to prepare future generations of aviators. The Ninety-Nines, Inc. International Organization of Women Pilots is headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is a non-profit organization that promotes aerospace education and training, provides aviation scholarships and preserves the unique history of women in aviation through the 99s Museum of Women Pilots and the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum. For more about the Hayward Air Rally, visit www.hwdairrally.org. For more about the EAA Air Academy, call (888) 322-3229 or visit www.eaa.org/airacademy


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

April 13, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


April 13, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

Page 37

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510-659-1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org

Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org

Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

April 13, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


April 13, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

Page 39 31 Page

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408

filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2012-04-13  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you