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Morrisson Theatre to present "The King and I"

Showcase features “Scapes”

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Direct Marketing

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

October 25, 2011

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 10 No. 85

SUBMITTED BY DEBORAH BLACKFORD NewPark Mall’s popular Cultural Corner presents the works of internationally acclaimed artist Diego Marcial Rios in an exhibit observing Dia de los Muertos – Day of the Dead, on October 29-30. Rios’ work includes mural canvases, paper maiche masks, acrylic paintings, water color paintings and prints all in the theme of Dia de los Muertos. Rios lives in the San Francisco Bay Area and paints in acrylics. He completed his Bachelor’s degree at the University of California at Berkeley and achieved honors in graduate work at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His artwork illustrates many complex social-economic issues faced by contemporary society. For almost 30 years, Rios has been showing and publishing his artwork both nationally and internationally; his fine art has been included in more than 400 continued on page 30

BY NISHA PATEL PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHABOT SPACE & SCIENCE CENTER

BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH PHOTOS BY MARY LYNN PELICAN Get ready for a morning filled with brain-stimulating and hands-on math and science adventures! Inquiring young minds get a chance to learn and expand their horizons at the American Association of University Women’s twenty-fifth “Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day.” The fun-filled morning of interactive and educational activities for fifth and sixth grade girls, will be held on Saturday, November 5, from 8:30 a.m. -12:45 p.m. Students are asked to prioritize their preferences, to select five workshops from among nine offered. These exciting workshops are: Planetarium Show; Bristle Bots; Electricity; Origami Cubes; London Bridge is falling down; Vital signs: Learn to take your blood pressure and listen to your heart; Kitchen Chemistry, Levers & Pulleys: Can you lift your mom with one hand? and Making your own slime. Classes will be assigned in order of registration received. Slots are filling up quickly, so don’t delay! The cost is $22 per mother/daughter pair. ($12 for each addi-

In spirit of Halloween, the Chabot Space & Science Center in Oakland is hosting an exciting Sinister Science Halloween Party Saturday, October 29. Guests will have the opportunity to wear costumes, participate in special exhibits, and enjoy other hands-on activities featured at the event. Although it is aimed toward elementary school age children, activities for students of all grade-levels will be available. In the Discovery Lab, younger children between the ages of two and seven will have the exclusive opportunity to dress up in costumes and build objects with blocks, Legos, and other hands-on materials. Addicontinued on page 34

continued on page 34 INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Stroke is the most disabling disease out there, so if we can prevent it, that is the ideal outcome.” Dr. Jain’s recommendation is to learn more now in order to

October 25, 2011

most people didn’t know,” Van Houten says. “Then I asked how to prevent a stroke, and most didn’t know. There were even people who didn’t know that strokes occurred

Help Family and Friends Recognize and Prevent a Deadly Condition When something is free, easy—and could help save lives, including your own, how can you afford to pass it up? Next Tuesday, Nov. 1, members of Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program invite community members to attend a comprehensive introduction to stroke and its risk factors during the hospital’s free Community Stroke Education Series. Awareness increases stroke survival “Continuing advancements in acute management of stroke have saved many lives,” according to Ash Jain, M.D., cardiologist and medical director of Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program. “However, as long as there are people who remain unaware of what stroke is and the dangers it poses, we will continue to see people waiting too long to call 91-1 and seeking treatment later than we would like.” Fortunately, according to Dr. Jain, the treatment window for stroke—the third leading cause of death in the United States—has increased in recent years, particu-

larly at certified Primary Stroke Centers like Washington Hospital. “There is a window of up to eight hours that you can successfully manage strokes, though in most of the hospitals the window is limited to 4 1/2 hours,” he explains. “Beyond that timeframe, you have to go into the brain, which requires specialized expertise and equipment that we employ at Washington Hospital, one of the few centers in the Bay Area with this capability.” A serous condition with serious risks Despite advances in stroke care, Dr. Jain cautions against taking this condition lightly. During ischemic strokes, which represented 80 percent of all strokes, a clot impedes the blood flow to the brain, cutting off vital oxygen. Without this oxygen-rich blood, brain cells begin to die, and the impact can be devastating. “In studies of ischemic stroke survivors, statistically significant percentages of patients with severe stroke-related deficits actually perceived stroke equal to or worse than death,” according to Dr. Jain.

Get a head start on stroke prevention by determining high-risk areas, such as hypertension and diabetes.To learn more about stroke and how to prevent it from happening to you, come to the upcoming Stroke Education Series on Tuesday, November 1, from 6 to 8 p.m. The free lecture will take place at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Visit www.whhs.com/stroke to learn more about Washington Hospital’s award-winning Stroke Program.

recognize symptoms of stroke and understand how risk factors, such as high blood pressure and smoking, can increase the chances of suffering a stroke. What you don’t know can hurt you Would you be able to recognize the signs if a friend or family member had a stroke? According to Doug Van Houten, R.N., clinical coordinator for the Stroke Program at Washington Hospital, the truth is that most people wouldn’t be able to. “During the Fremont Central Park Summer Concert Series, we had a table set up, and I would ask people how they would know if somebody was having a stroke, and

in the brain. I heard answers like kidney, lung and heart.” “It’s so ironic that you’ve got a preventable condition sometimes considered worse than death that’s the third leading killer in the United States, and people just don’t know about it.” Spread the word Van Houten, who runs the monthly Stroke Support Group at the hospital and goes to countless community events to teach people about stroke, says he’s still dissatisfied with the number of people getting the message about how dangerous stroke is. “I think most people know somebody who has had a stroke, somebody in the family or a

friend,” he says. “I think there is enough stroke out there that it’s not too foreign.” What he wants to see is people in the community getting involved and helping make a difference in the fight against stroke. “Public awareness campaigns have worked with heart attack,” he says. “During the concert series I did hear people say they recognized the signs of heart attack—including pain in the chest going down left arm and heavy perspiration—as well as what to do about it. They said, ‘Take two aspirin and call 9-11.’ Many people knew that.” “I think we can achieve the same level of awareness for stroke if people get involved.” For the stroke seminar coming up next Tuesday, Van Houten encourages people to come with a friend—or attend the talk and then commit to teaching a friend or two about stroke, its symptoms, when to call 9-1-1, and how you know you’re at risk. Know stroke, prevent stroke To get detailed information about the factors that put you at risk for stroke, as well as the warning signs you shouldn’t ignore, make sure to attend the Introduction to Stroke/Risk Factors for Stroke seminar on Tuesday, Nov. 1, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in the Washington West building. For more information or to register, call (510) 745-6525 or visit www.whhs.com/stroke

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

10/25/11

10/26/11

10/27/11

10/28/11

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Washington Women's Center: Arthritis Exercise Program

Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run! Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Washington Women's Center: Circulation 101 for Women - Part 1: Varicose Veins (Late Start)

Women's Health Conference: Beyond Sadness - Depression (Late Start)

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY 10/31/11

10/29/11

10/30/11

Voices InHealth: Washington's Community Cancer Program

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier (Late Start)

New Surgical Techniques for Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Women's Health Conference: Chronic Pain Management

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Raising Awareness About Stroke

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help (Late Start)

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

Disaster Preparedness

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Neurological Disorders: How Brain Tumors are Treated

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Living with Heart Failure & Heart Irregularities (Late Start)

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure Voices InHealth: Bras for Arthritis: Do I Have One and Slow Your Heart Rate Body & Soul of 100 Types? (Late Start) Kidney Disease

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Your Concerns InHealth: Measles Resurgence

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Decisions in End of Life Care

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Prostate Enlargements and Cancer

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Learn How Exercise Can Diabetes and the Kidneys Cooking Demonstration: Minimally Invasive Help Diabetes Surgery for Lower Back Learn About Healthy Men's Health Fair: Stroke Disorders Eating Skin Care and Prevention and Interventions Used (Late Start) of Skin Cancer Voices InHealth: Medicine (Late Start) Safety for Children Voices InHealth: (Late Start) Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center Do You Have Sinus Washington Township Washington Township Problems? Health Care District Health Care District Board Meeting Board Meeting October 12, 2011 October 12, 2011 Brain Health for Seniors Community Based Senior Supportive Services (Late Start) Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy Osteoporosis Update: Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment (Late Start) Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options Strengthen Your Back! Important Immunizations (Late Start) Learn to Improve Your for Healthy Adults Back Fitness

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Men's Health Fair: Menis- Voices InHealth:The Legacy cal Tears of the Knee Strength Training System

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure & What is Cholesterol and How to Lower It

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Voices InHealth: Cyberbullying - The New Schoolyard Bully (Late Start)

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage? World Kidney Day

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Eat Better! Keys to Healthy Eyes


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Women’s Classes Can Help Improve Breathing and Relieve Tension Yoga has been around for thousands of years. The ancient practice can have many health benefits in this modern, often stressful, world we live in today. If that sounds promising, you may want to consider taking a yoga class at the Washington Women’s Center. “Yoga has health benefits beyond just flexibility and strength,” said Bonnie Maeda, RN, a certified yoga instructor. “It can help you relieve stress, cope with chronic illness and pain, and improve balance as you age.” Yoga involves a series of poses called asanas that help to release the lactic acid that builds up in the muscles and causes stiffness, tension, pain, and fatigue. It also stretches not only the muscles, but also the ligaments and tendons. “Most people don’t realize that some of the asanas also massage the internal organs, improving the health of those tissues,” Maeda added. “The benefits of yoga are physical, emotional, and spiritual.” The Washington Women’s Center offers yoga classes on Tuesday evenings, Wednesday afternoons and Thursday afternoons. Classes are held at the Washington Women’s Center, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To learn more about the wide array of programs at the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

When people think of yoga, they often picture willowy figures twisting their bodies like pretzels, giving the impression that you must be fit to do yoga. Maeda said that couldn’t be further from the truth. “Those who are advanced yoga practitioners may be able to do that, but yoga is really about mindful movement,” she said. “Yoga is for people of all ages, sizes, shapes, and abilities.” Maeda said a big part of yoga is body awareness and focused breathing. You need to be aware of your body so you know your limits and keep your body safe. She said it also helps you stay present and in the moment. “You learn how to come into your body and out of your head,” she explained. “Being aware of your breathing can help you stay focused and reduce stress. It also brings more oxygen to the brain and the rest of the body. I start every class with body and breathing awareness.” Classes for Women Maeda teaches restorative or gentle yoga classes at Washington Women’s Center. The classes are accessible to all women no matter your fitness level or physical abilities. Many of her yoga students are dealing with chronic illnesses like arthritis or fibromyalgia. Yoga can help with both the physical and mental aspects of dealing with pain and discomfort. “Improving your flexibility and strength can help with the physical part of pain by reducing the tension on muscles,” she said. “Studies show that gentle stretching and movement can decrease the intensity and duration of pain. Yoga can also help you feel more control over your body, which improves your ability to cope with pain.” Maeda said it is important to find an experienced yoga instructor who understands your physical limitations. Injuries can happen when people push themselves too hard. She begins her classes with gentle stretching to prepare the body, which helps to prevent injuries. Then she moves into the poses. “The classes at the Washington Women’s Center are very individualized,” said Kathy Hesser, RN, Women’s Center coordinator. “You may not be able to do a full pose, or you may need the help of assistive equipment like blocks and straps. We also offer chair yoga for people who can’t stand.” Yoga classes are offered on Tuesdays at 6 p.m., Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. and 5:45 p.m. Classes are held at the Washington Women’s Center, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West). “It’s important to find what is right for you,” Maeda said. “Yoga may not be for you. It has to feel right. I encourage people who have never done it to give yoga a try. Take a friend with you if you are feeling a little intimidated. Yoga has been helping people improve their physical and emotional well-being for centuries and it may offer some benefits for you.”

Women’s Center To Offer Tai-Chi Exercise Class The Washington Women’s Center new Tai chi class is a unique extension of the current Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program.Tai chi offers a greater emphasis on improving balance and core muscle strength. The new classes will be one-hour long, beginning with a warm-up specified to tai chi, moving on to the program’s core movements and ending with a proper cool-down.To learn more about the gentle yoga class and other programs and services offered at the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter

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Learn How to Avoid the Pitfalls and Leave the Grocery Store with Healthy Food Grocery stores can be filled with temptations. Labels are Key Even if you don’t intend to buy junk food, somehow A big part of Mazzei’s talk will focus on food labels. it ends up in your cart. And even if you can avoid Nearly every packaged food product sold in the impulse buys, is the food you are choosing really United States is required to have a nutrition label that that good for you? lists the ingredients and nutritional value of the item. If you or someone you care about has diabetes, The best place to start when looking at the food you know how important it is to eat right. But that label is the portion size at the top. Portion control is can be difficult. critical for people with diabetes. The label provides the “Grocery stores are good at enticing you to buy serving size and the number of servings in the product. things you don’t need,” said Anna Mazzei, a regis“That means if the label says the food item has tered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at three servings and you eat the entire package, you Washington Hospital. “They are set up specifically have to multiply the calories, carbohydrates, and for impulse-buying.” other nutrients by three to Mazzei will present know what you are really “Food Shopping Strategies eating,” Mazzei explained. for People with Diabetes,” The number of calories, part of the hospital’s free carbohydrates, and other monthly Diabetes Matters nutrients are also listed on education series. It will be the label so you know how held on Thursday, Novemmany are in one serving. ber 3, from 7 to 8 p.m., at Other nutrients listed on the the Conrad E. Anderson, label include fat, cholesterol, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 fiber, protein, sodium, calMowry Avenue (Washingcium, iron, and vitamins A ton West), in Fremont. and C. You can register online at “The label is regulated by www.whhs.com, or call the FDA (Food and Drug (510) 745-6556 for more Administration) and is reinformation. quired by law to provide “I’ll give some basic certain information,” she points to consider when said. “But food manufacturshopping so you leave the ers have figured out loopstore with the healthy items holes, like including the you need,” Mazzei said. words ‘whole grain’ on the “We’ll talk about strategies front to make you think it’s for convenience and costhealthy. You have to watch savings in addition to shopout for health claims on ping tips that will help you food packaging.” Anna Mazzei, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes edkeep your carbohydrates She said cereal is a prime ucator at Washington Hospital, will provide important food under control.” example. While the box may shopping tips at an upcoming Diabetes Matters seminar.The She said the number one free education session will take place on Thursday, Novem- say whole grain, if it’s loaded tip is to make a list and stick ber 3, from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Au- with sugar, it’s not a good ditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To to it. Don’t even think learn more about the services available at the Washington pick. about buying items that “You have to be aware of Outpatient Diabetes Center, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes. aren’t on the list. And don’t what these claims really shop when you are hungry. mean,” she said. “For example, ‘low sugar’ doesn’t “You tend to make bad choices when you are mean the item is carb-free or calorie-free.” hungry, especially if you are also tired,” she said. Mazzei said she will also talk about ways to keep “Tired and hungry is the worst. Everything sounds costs down while shopping. so good and you are too tired to think clearly.” “Coupons are good, but not if you are buying Mazzei said try to stick to the perimeter of the something you wouldn’t ordinarily buy,” she said. store. That’s where the healthiest foods are, includ“Buying fruits and vegetables that are in season helps ing fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, and dairy. to keep costs down.” “Most of the impulse foods are at the end of the To learn about other diabetes programs at Washisles,” she said. ington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

SUBMITTED BY TONY ACOSTA

SUBMITTED BY BARRY ZEPEL In late October, Cal State East Bay’s Hayward Campus will become the center of science for the San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California. On Saturday, October 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., CSUEB’s College of Science will host the first event in a 10-day series of sciencerelated programs making up the Bay Area Science Festival running through November 6 at locations throughout the region. “Discovery Days” at Cal State East Bay will feature experiments, demonstrations, exhibits, hands-on activities, and lectures “to delight everyone young and old,” said Michael Leung, dean of CSUEB’s College of Science. Although science festivals are not new to Cal State East Bay – they’ve been a biennial tradition since 1974 – this is the first time that CSUEB will participate in a regional festival with other leading science organizations from throughout the Bay Area and Northern California. The purpose of the Bay Area festival is to show how the region is an unparalleled world leader in science and technology, said event organizers. “The Bay Area has long been a worldwide leader in science and technology innovation, and this region remains an incubator of countless breakthroughs,” said Susan Desmond-Hellman, chancellor for the University of California, San Francisco, which received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create the regional event. For CSUEB’s festival, approximately 50 activities – including a chemistry magic show – are scheduled, and many will encourage participation from the audience and school-age children. Selected presentations featured include: "Life of a Criminalist," geophysical prospecting, observing the sun through a telescope, computer simulation, robot in action, sea slugs, mathematical puzzles, fossil casting, potpourri of physics, bugs and other creatures. Health screenings also will be offered to those in attendance. continued on page 28

The Union City Human Relations Commission (HRC) is pleased to present Make A Difference in the Community Awards at its upcoming regular meeting October 26 in the City Council Chambers located in City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, CA. This new award program recognizes those in the community who, through volunteer and/or vocational efforts, make a positive difference in the lives of others, thereby making Union City a better place in which to live, work, and play. Each is nominated by an individual Human Relation Commissioner, and is presented an engraved plaque to commemorate their contributions to our community. Family members, work associates, and community members are invited to attend and express their appreciation for the many contributions of this year’s inaugural awardees: RICHARD VALLE, President and CEO of TriCED Community Recycling, California’s largest nonprofit community recycling company. HRC Chair, Jean Harper, nominated Mr. Valle with the following statement “The list of events and organizations that Richard is involved in is pretty much equal to all the events in the city. Richard is a leader in our community who doesn't seek recognition for his many accomplishments. He is a true humanitarian, always looking to help and improve the quality of life for residents in the community - especially veterans, at-risk youth, unemployed workers, and students. I have nominated Richard because I believe he is the "heart" of Union City.” JUAN GOMEZ, President of the Board of Directors for the Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center, Inc., a community health center founded in Union City, with clinics located in the Decoto neighborhood and on the campus of James Logan High School. TVHC has provided culturally and linguistically appropriate health services for over 40 years to residents in Southern Alameda County, serving over 11,000 residents through more than 52,000 separate visits. Juan is nominated by HRC Vice-Chair, Jonathan Pettey. CINDIE ALONSO-SIERRA, Cynthia AlonsoSierra, a Retired Vocational Rehabilitation counselor is being recognized for 20 years of community service and activism in Union City. She has dedicated hundreds of hours at many local community organizations in order to foster empowerment of our youth. continued on page 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Fashion fundraiser STORY AND PHOTO BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Acacia Creek, a senior retirement community located on the 305-acre site of the Masonic Homes in Union City, is sponsoring a fundraiser Luncheon and Fashion Show on Saturday, November 5. Proceeds from this inaugural event will benefit New Haven Schools Foundation’s (NHSF) “Innovation in Education” grant program as well as the American Association of University Women’s (AAUW) “Tech Trek” program, a science and math camp. During the fashion show portion of the luncheon, members of NHSF, AAUW and Acacia Creek residents will model stylish clothing, provided by Chico’s in Pleasanton. Mary Jane Hodges, Community Relations Director at Acacia Creek, recalls that the idea for the fundraiser first came up at a Chamber of Commerce mixer in June when discussing that Acacia Creek could be a great event location. AAUW member, Mary Lynn Pelican, talked to some of the residents, many of whom were retired educators. Next, after broaching the idea with Barbara AroValle, the Executive Director of the New Haven Schools Foundation, the fundraiser became a reality. Lois Johnson, an AAUW member, suggested designating their portion

persevered and was able to raise $100,000 to save co-curricular activities (drama, music, sports, etc.) in the schools. Now funds from the fashion show will help support the teacher grant program, which had been in danger, due to the budget crunch Aro-Valle explains, “In the past four years the New Haven Schools Foundation “Innovation in Education” classroom mini –grant program has put money directly into classrooms for special activities that enhance and enrich learning activities that teachers often pay for out of their own pockets. Proceeds from the Acacia Creek Lunch and Fashion Show will be used to help fund our “Innovation in Education” teacher mini-grant program. The Foundation really appreciates everything Acacia Creek is doing to help us raise the funds needed to continue providing these grants to teachers,” says Aro-Valle. With tickets priced at $30, the goal is to raise $2,000 for the two worthwhile organizations. The event begins at 11:30 a.m. with a social hour, followed by the luncheon and fashion show, concluding at 2 p.m. Hodges adds, “Although the Acacia Creek retirement community opened in March 2010, we’re the best kept secret in the East Bay. We want to help out the community and also let people know we’re here. It’s a

These ladies will model at Acacia Creek’s fashion fundraiser.” (L to R): Mary Lynn Pelican, Edith Ecklund, Elizabeth O’Donnell, Betty Robinson, and Shirley Roehl. (Not pictured: Charmaine Kawaguchi).

of the proceeds to the Tech Trek program in order to provide three camp scholarships. As Pelican states, “Held on a university campus, Tech Trek is a science and math camp designed to develop interest, excitement, and self-confidence in young women who will enter eighth grade in the fall. It features hands-on activities in math, science, and related fields.” The Acacia Creek fundraiser couldn’t have come at a more opportune time. This past year, when the New Haven district’s school bond measure failed to pass, New Haven Foundation

great place to live, with wonderful service and active, independent residents,” she says of the complex which offers a full-range of activities, in a luxurious setting. Lunch & Fashion Show Saturday, November 5 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Acacia Creek Retirement Community 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 441-3740 www.acaciacreek.org RSVP requested by October 31 $30 per person

www.skinlaseressentials.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Union City Police Log October 18 A commercial burglary occurred at the Cigarettes Cheaper business located in the 31800 block of Alvarado Niles Road. An unknown suspect was able to unbolt access panels on the roof and lower himself down into the business. The loss is unknown at this time. October 19 A homeowner on Flint Street returned to her residence and found a burglar inside. Armed with a

hammer, she chased the burglar down the street. The victim then returned to her residence and called police. A patrol officer located the fleeing vehicle as it entered the freeway southbound on highway 880. A high speed pursuit began but was terminated when the driver began driving recklessly in excess of 100 mph, endangering the public by driving on the shoulder of the roadway. The investigations section is following up on the case to attempt to identify and arrest the suspect.

Robbery Suspect Convicted

SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD On July 11th, 2011, the 7-11 convenience store at 39989 Farwell Drive was robbed by a lone adult suspect wearing a bandanna around his face and a bag over his right hand. The suspect approached the victim teller and demanded money from both registers. After taking an undisclosed amount of money and cigarettes the suspect fled the store. Through investigation done by Officer Fowlie and members of the Fremont Police Department Robbery Unit, William Moore, a 25 year old male transient, was identified as the robbery suspect. Moore was later arrested and charged with the robbery. On October 17, 2011, following a two-week jury trial, Moore was found guilty of felony robbery. Moore is scheduled for sentencing in early November, 2011.

SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/MARINA HINESTROSA Domestic violence is a very serious threat to women’s well-being. This year, 12 domestic violence related deaths have been reported in Santa Clara County. In 2010, the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office reviewed 4,433 criminal domestic violence complaints, and issued charges in over 2,500 cases. There were five domestic violence related deaths last year. The 18th Annual Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council Conference explores the cuttingedge topic of the role of men in domestic violence prevention. The conference’s goal is to provide attendees with an understanding of the central role men must play in the eradication of domestic violence. Event will spotlight programs and interventions that promote nonviolence, healthy relationships, the importance of fatherhood, men as

leaders and coaches, and how to engage men in order to break the cycle of violence. County agencies and community-based organizations continue to collaborate to provide emergency shelters, around-the-clock crisis hotlines, legal assistance support, and protection services for victims. Free continuing Education Credit will be offered for MFT, LCSW, RN, and JD for those who register and attend the whole program. Domestic Violence Conference Friday, Oct 28 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Santa Clara Marriott Hotel 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 294-0006 ext. 2 http://dvcconference.sccgov.org Registration fee $110 each. At the door is $150 each.

Free Class for Veterans Military Personnel SUBMITTED BY STEVE CHO AARP wishes to acknowledge, recognize and thank veterans and all military personnel (active duty, retired, guard or reserve regardless of age) for their dedication and commitment to service. AARP’s Driver Safety Program (DSP) is being offered to all veterans and military personnel free of charge for the month of November, 2011. Spouses also qualify for the free class as well. Non-veterans may also sign up for the class but there is a nominal charge of $12 (AARP members) and $14 (non AARP members), The DSP class is an 8 hours class (2 classes of 4 hrs each). Participants who complete the class and who are at least 55 qualify for a special discount on their auto insurance policy. Discounts will vary depending on the insurance company. Classes will be offered at the Crossroads Church in Fremont (41386 Fremont Blvd, Fremont, CA 94538, Irvington District): Friday: Nov 4 & Nov 11 from 8:15am – 12:15pm Saturday: Nov 5 & Nov 12 from 8:15am – 12:15 pm Volunteer instructors for the classes are Carol Rostamic and Steve Cho To register for either of the classes, please call Steve Cho at (510) 797-6426. Registration must be completed by Wed, Nov 2. To qualify for the free class, veterans need to present a valid form of military ID (i.e., Military ID, discharge papers – DD Form 214, American Legion card, dependent ID card, VFW card). Spouses need to present a valid military spouse ID (i.e., Dependent ID card – DD Form 1172, membership card to organizations such as the American Legion or VFW).


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Public Safety Expo SUBMITTED BY CITY OF HAYWARD The Hayward Police Department will host a Public Safety Expo on Saturday, October 29, 2011, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Southland Mall. This free event is open to the public – residential, business and commercial. The Public Safety Expo is unique as it will encompass a variety of public resources and private vendors to promote “Public Safety” information/services to the Hayward community, its businesses and residents and neighboring cities. A long list of local vendors (public safety-related, safes, security, locks, lighting and alarm companies), law enforcement agencies, first responders, various departments from City of Hayward and non-profit groups will be present. There will also be a Bike Safety Rodeo for children in the parking lot closest to the I-880 with bicycle equipment, displays and hints and tips

for safe and sensible cycling. Vendors interested in participating at the Public Safety Expo will be assigned an individual 8’ x 10’ space for a booth. Southland Mall will provide each booth with one table and two chairs. All vendors are encouraged to bring giveaway or raffle items for their booth. For more information, contact Hayward PD’s Crime Prevention Specialists Gale Bleth at (510) 293-7151 or gale.bleth@haywardca.gov or Mary Fabian at (510) 293-1043 or mary.fabian@hayward-ca.gov Public Safety Expo Saturday, October 29 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Southland Mall 1 Southland Mall Dr., Hayward (510) 293-7151 gale.bleth@hayward-ca.gov Free event

The future of Medicare:

Clipper card for seniors

politics & policies

SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL MAEDA Seniors can obtain a Clipper Card that will be programmed to charge discounted, senior fares at the BART Customer Services Center at the Lake Merritt BART Station from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A government-issued photo ID, showing birth date, such as driver’s license, senior identification card or passport is required. Senior Clipper Cards are also available free-of-charge at the following locations: Fremont Senior Center Friday, October 28 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. 39465 Padre Parkway, Fremont Bay Fair BART Station Wednesday, November 9 6:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Hayward BART Station Friday, November 11 6:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. South Hayward BART Station Monday, November 14 6:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Fremont BART Station Wednesday, November 16 6:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.

SUBMITTED BY DONNA KREHBIEL Does Medicare Have A Future? Medicare has received much attention lately. There have been several proposals to reform Medicare as politicians grapple with the deficit. Is reforming Medicare code for cutting benefits? To better understand these proposals, we need to understand how Medicare is financed and the politics and policies behind this program. “Does Medicare Have a Future?” will be presented by Elaine Wong Eakin from California Health Care Advocates in partnership with the AAUW. The free program will include how Medicare is financed, how the new health care law is changing Medicare and what the different proposals mean. Most importantly, we’ll discuss how you can play a role in where we go from here. Bring your questions and concerns to this forum. The Castro Valley Library, a branch of the Alameda County Library system, is at 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, and is wheelchair accessible. An ASL interpreter will be provided with seven days notice. For more information, or to register, call the Library at (510) 667-7900 or visit www.aclibrary.org The Future of Medicare: Politics & Policies Tuesday, October 25 6:30 p.m. Chabot Room 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 www.aclibrary.org/branches/csv

LEGO League solves Chicken Contamination SUBMITTED BY KAREN PACHECO This free program is presented by 6th grade students from Gomes Elementary School who are participating in the First LEGO League challenge. This competition is not just about creating robots. It is about making connections between robot missions, scientific understanding of the Challenge theme, related problems and coming up innovative solutions to these real world prob-

lems. So, come learn about food safety and how it occurs. The students have developed an innovative food safety solution they would like to share with the community. For all ages. Fremont Main Library Thursday Nov 3 3:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Storytime Theatre) 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

History

Direct Marketing

W

hen we hear the expression "direct marketing," we often think of annoying telemarketers or perhaps, catalog or online shopping. The term can probably relate back to when man started trading and bartering. In Washington Township, this kind of exchange started with peddlers who usually carried their wares in horse drawn wagons. Peddlers were reported at Mission San Jose in 1846. Our business directories do not usually include peddlers, but Dennis Sullivan is listed as a peddler at Decoto in1879. Bud Scott recalled that the Washington Hotel in Mission San Jose had a large hall where traveling salesmen displayed their goods. Traveling photographers were apparently popular in the 1870s because references are made to one named H. E. Dart, another "from the east taking pictures for two weeks at Washington Corners" and one whose "picture tent left for Pleasanton today." Peddlers didn't usually make the news in the 1880s, but they were here selling their wares

Watkins became famous for its liniment, baking products, Mary Kay Cosmetics, household medicines and especially for the free samples!

around the township. In August 1880, Frank the fish peddler from Newark made news when he had a serious accident. A train caught him and his wagon on the track. He was thrown some distance but escaped serious injury. The horse was not hurt, but the wagon was turned into kindling and the fish were scattered. It's been noted that Mission San Jose residents were visited by sales people who went door to door several times a week. Mentioned are a horse drawn vehicle carrying fruits and vegetables, a fish peddler from San Jose, an Irvington man selling berries, a Chinese man from San Francisco with baskets hanging from a pole across his shoulders who came to buy produce, and a woman who sold notions, materials, and clothing. Many residents have memories of these early business people. In his book, Wes Hammond describes "veggie trucks" that came from San Jose in the 30s. Newark residents remember Wing Sing, the Chinese man who came from San Francisco on the train to sell fish. Isola Dyer once told of her grandfather, Bartalomeo Lanfri, who raised vegetables on Vallejo St. and carried them on a horse

Red Skelton as The Fuller Brush Man

bottles, sacks'. The meat man was the children's favorite because he sold delicious hot dogs and occasionally gave one to the children. The iceman across from the bank was also popular because he gave the children ice, but he sold mostly coal in the winter time." Scheduled home delivery of many items became common in the 20s and 30s. Most people remember the milkman as characterized by Cloverdale Creamery and others as well as the iceman. A bread box on the front porch meant that it would be filled with fresh bread by the likes of Harold Millard. Residents looked forward to the less regular visits of traveling salesmen such as "The Watkins Man." It was a delight to watch him open his large case on the kitchen table and see what new products he'd

J.R.Watkins began selling his now-famous Red Liniment home to home to his neighbors in Minnesota in 1868

brought. J.R.Watkins began selling his now-famous Red Liniment home to home to his neighbors in Minnesota in 1868 and founded the Direct Sales Industry to become the largest sales company in the world. Watkins became famous for its liniment, baking products, Mary Kay Cosmetics, household medicines and especially for the free samples! The company continues to flourish with new products available through representatives and at retail stores such as Target, Walgreens and Whole Foods. Watkins' closest competitor was the Raleigh Company. Established by 18-year-old W. T. Raleigh in 1889, it offered four "good health products." Starting with $15, a borrowed horse and a mortgaged buggy, the business

There were many tea companies in the late 1800s, but the Jewel Tea Co. was probably the best known.

drawn cart to Sunol to sell for a nickel a bunch. Theo Overacker once described the vendors she remembered in Niles: "The fish man came in a car with a large horn. The 'rag man' shouted, 'rags,

best known. It began in Chicago in 1889 with one man, a horse and wagon and $700. It was named Jewel because anything considered superior was called a "jewel." It gave coupons redeemable for merchandise to set itself apart from the others. By 1917 the company had 1700 routes delivering tea, coffee, grocery items, cleaning products, linens and china. Due to the economy and changing demographics, the company ceased operation in 1981. The Fuller Brush Co. was established in 1906 by a young entrepreneur from Nova Scotia, Alfred C. Fuller. With a very humble start, he set out to make "the best products of their kind in the world." Fuller Brush has gone from one man's fiber suitcase filled with custom-made

prospered, following a pattern similar to Watkins. The tradition lives to this day and continues to develop new products. There were many tea companies in the late 1800s, but the Jewel Tea Co. was probably the

brushes to a continually growing sales force offering over 2,000 products. Development of the automobile and growth that brought many retail stores as well as changes in the economy did away with much of the direct sales business. However, many continue to prosper. Avon is still calling and Tupperware still has parties. Street peddlers have always existed. Today many are chefs with sophisticated menus driving state-of-the-art trucks. Websites are devoted to them and they twitter their locations - a far cry from Frank the fish peddler!

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


October 25, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Footnotes I am absolutely thrilled to report that the new book of Shel Silverstein poems, Every Thing On It, is fabulous! It is full of funny and sometimes thought provoking poems, as well as quirky illustrations like those in Where the Sidewalk Ends and Light in the Attic. This isn’t a re-release of old poems - these are 130 never before released gems, chosen by Mr. Silverstein’s family. My favorite, though, is the last, the very poignant “When I Am Gone”: When I am gone what will you do? Who will write and draw for you? Some smarter - someone new? Someone better - maybe YOU! We will miss you, Mr. Shel Silverstein. We will miss you tremendously, that’s what we’ll do! (Harper Collins hardback, $19.99) For 2nd grade and up: Ten Rules You Absolutely Must Not Break if You Want to Survive the School Bus by John Grandits and Michael Allen Austin Kyle is really worried about riding the bus to school - he’s never done it before. Fortunately he’s got his older brother James, who has ridden the bus for years. James has given Kyle a list of Ten Rules that he MUST NOT BREAK. But poor Kyle breaks the first one almost immediately, and the second rule is beginning to look impossible. How on earth is he going to make it to school, much less make it home, without having his life end in disaster?! Parents, don’t worry - Kyle will win the day, but I have to tell you he does it by completely ignoring James‘ rules. A hint for even more fun: watch the sneaky little squirrel! (Clarion hardback, $16.99) For 3rd grade and up: War in Afghanistan and Iraq: the Daily Life of the Men and Women Serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, by Janet and Gerry Souter Kids often ask questions that are difficult to answer: Why did the war start? What are we doing there? How do the soldiers find bombs? How do they blow up the bombs? What this book does is answer those questions and many, many more, showing candid color pictures of the troops in action (without dead bodies). It can be read either from page one to page 45, or by flipping through and picking out the things that strike your child’s interest. What kind of weapons do the soldiers use? What do they do when they’re not fighting? How are the soldiers helping? There’s a glossary in the back for the more difficult concepts (terrorist, Taliban, sniper), and an index in case you don’t find what your child is looking for immediately. If your family has a member serving overseas, or if your child is simply curious about what he or she has heard and seen in the news, this book has the kind of explanations that will make sense. (Carlton Books hardback, $16.95) For 4th grade and up: Wonderstruck, by Brian Selznick In Selznick’s award winning book, “Invention of Hugo Cabret”, the author and illustrator used his amazing images to enhance and progress the story. In Wonderstruck, he tells two stories side by side. The one in words tells the story of Ben, who is living with his aunt and uncle after the sad death of his mother. He has never known his father, not even the man’s name. The house he grew up in is just 83 steps away, and one afternoon he decides to go back there and look at his mother’s things left behind. In the back of a closet he discovers a book he’s never seen before, Wonderstruck, and in it is a bookmark from a funny little bookstore in New York City. On the back Ben discovers a message to his mother, with love from a man who left his name, phone number and address. Could this be Ben’s father? He grabs the phone to call, and lightning strikes! Ben is struck deaf, but remains determined to make it to New York City and find the man who gave his mother that bookmark. Within the pictures is the story of Rose, a rebellious girl who also runs away to NYC, 50 years before Ben. They both wind up, through a series of wrong turns, in the American Museum of Natural History. There they each find clues to the where-

By Dominique Hutches Dominique Hutches is an avid book nut who works for the FUSD libraries and is a Booklegger for Alameda County Library

abouts of their families, and eventually clues to find each other. This is a lovely book, one that both children and adults can enjoy. Go through it once, for Ben and Rose’s stories, then go through it again, just to relish the details of the prose and pictures. Mr. Selznick has again provided us with a jewel of a book - enjoy! (Scholastic hardback, $29.99) 6th grade and up: Dead End in Norvelt, by Jack Gantos Jack has been looking forward to his summer away from school filled with ball games, hot days and fun stuff every day. Then he makes two errors in judgment: he fires the gun his father brought home from the war (and it was loaded!), and he mows down his mom’s cornfield. It wasn’t his fault, honest! His dad bought a cheap broken airplane, planning to rebuild it, and told Jack to mow down the corn so that he can have a runway. Now Jack is grounded for the entire summer! Not only can he not go play baseball, he can’t hang out with his buddies, but now his mom has sent Jack to help ole’ Miss Volker. She has terrible arthritis, so Jack at first assumes he’ll have to open jars, or wash dishes or something. Instead, Miss Volker hands him a pencil and paper, and dictates… an obituary! She writes the obituaries of the older members of the community, the last surviving members of the original founding families of Norvelt. There’s only a few of them left. What starts out as a job that Jack thinks will be boring, turns fascinating, and then a little grim as more and more of the old folks pass away. Jack and Miss Volker begin to get suspicious but these people are very old. They could be dying of natural causes… maybe. But, maybe not, and if not, who is killing them off? For fans of Richard Peck’s “Year Down Yonder” and “A Long Way from Chicago.” (FSG hardback, $15.99) For young adults: Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor Karou has a complicated life. On the one hand she is an art student, studying in Prague. On the other hand, she runs errands for Brimstone, the mysterious man/demon/creature who raised her from childhood (with the help of some very nonhuman friends). At any moment of the day or night, Karou might be sent through the mystical doorways to all parts of the world, sent to pick up urgent packages of… teeth. Teeth?! They might be animal or human, but Brimstone is always paying traders for teeth. What could he possibly use them for? She has no idea. One night, after several exhausting trips, Karou refuses to answer the summons. She has school work to finish, and her human friends need her, so she tells the messenger “no.” She could not possibly foresee the consequences of her simple choice - all the doorways are shattered, and when she finally finds a way back to Brimstone’s sanctuary, everyone who helped to raise her is gone, their home torn apart. Why? What had Brimstone been involved in that would create such anger? Is her foster family dead? What happened to them? It takes Karou some time, but she begins to piece together the answers; answers that she is not sure she wants to know. This is the first in a series that takes on the war between the forces of light and dark and gives it a fresh new spin. (Little Brown hardback, 18.99)

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Calif treasurer defends tax break for energy firms BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Oct 19 - The state treasurer on Wednesday called California's tax break program for clean energy companies a ``wise and needed one'' despite the failure of its most high-profile recipient - the solar startup Solyndra. Treasurer Bill Lockyer told a panel of state lawmakers that the program is intended to promote the growth of alternative energy manufacturing plants in California and complements the state's push for renewable energy. He said nearly 70 percent of all businesses do not make it past

Judge grants restraining order for Calif. lawmaker BY JULIET WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Oct 21 - A Tehama County judge on Friday granted a restraining order sought by Republican Assemblyman Jim Nielsen against a constituent who has been trying to show that the Northern California lawmaker does not live in the district he represents. The injunction issued by Superior Court Judge Richard Schueler prohibits Donald Bird from coming on the lawmaker's property in Gerber, a small town between Redding and Chico. Bird, 76, also cannot attempt a citizen's arrest on Nielsen for at least three years. Court documents say Bird sent Nielsen handwritten warnings, and he acknowledges driving by Nielsen's home 108 times over a 2 1/2-year period. The notes, which were attached to newspaper stories, included messages such as ``Hi Jimmy we are getting close. We will get you sir, Jimmy you will pay the price,'' according to the court documents. Nielsen said he was afraid the threats could escalate to violence against him or his family. continued on page 32

eight years, and that risk extends to clean energy companies such as Solyndra. ``We take some risks by having this policy in place, and we probably take a bigger risk by never having the tax exclusion because the jobs and investments don't come to California,'' Lockyer said Wednesday. ``That's a bigger risk and, one we need to be very concerned about.'' Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Los Angeles, and Sen. Lois Wolk, DDavis, called a joint Senate committee hearing to find out if regulations need to be changed after the state awarded $25 million in sales tax breaks to the failed Fremont solar startup.

Padilla said while the program might need to be tweaked, he believed it should continue because it provides an incentive that could help businesses expand in the state. Sen. Bob Huff, R-Diamond Bar, said the program doesn't appear to run the state as much risk as other incentives that could be considered tax giveaways. ``Well, there's not a whole lot of risk,'' Huff said. ``If they don't invest, they're not paying anything anyway. And maybe we help them become more viable.'' Then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Padilla's bill, SB71, in March 2010, when continued on page 32

Hedge fund CEO admits $2.5M inside trade scheme BY LARRY NEUMEISTER ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK (AP), The Denver owner of a hedge fund pleaded guilty Friday to securities fraud, admitting making up to $2.5 million by trading on inside information about a pending acquisition that he got from a friend. Drew “Bo” Brownstein, 35, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, agreeing to serve up to four years in prison when he is sentenced on Dec. 20. The hedge fund portfolio manager admitted buying shares of Mariner Energy Inc. in April 2008 after learning from a longtime friend that it was going to be acquired by Apache Corp. The Securities and Exchange Commission said Brownstein made more than $5 million in illegal profits by trading in his personal accounts, the accounts of relatives and for two of his hedge funds ahead of the oil and gas company's $3.9 billion takeover by Apache in April 2010. The up to $2.5 million Brownstein admitted to in court was the amount of money related to the criminal charge but an SEC civil case against him cited the higher figure as being the actual profits. The owner of Big 5 Asset Management LLC choked up as he apologized to family, colleagues, investors and friends. “I accept full responsibility for what I have done,” he told Judge Robert Patterson. “I can only say these actions run contrary to the principles and values I've tried to run my life by.” He was freed on $500,000 bail. Sanjay Wadhwa, deputy chief of the Securities and Exchange Commission's enforcement division's market abuse unit, said the case was “further evidence of the pervasive nature of insider trading by hedge funds, and a sobering reminder that such conduct is not limited to the immediate vicinity of Wall Street but is taking place in cities around the country.” U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara called Brownstein “the latest example of a privileged professional who thought he could make a quick and easy profit by trading on his access to confidential information.” FBI Assistant Director Janice Fedarcyk called it a “textbook example of the kind of conduct for which the law imposes a heavy price.” Authorities said Brownstein acted on inside information he received from Drew Peterson, another Denver investment adviser, who got tipped about the acquisition from his father, Clayton Peterson, who sat on Mariner's board. The father and son pleaded guilty in August. The father received two years' probation while the son is awaiting sentencing in January.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

BY M. J. LAIRD

R

ebuild and remain open. Dale Hardware, a Centerville business since 1955, faced this challenge, launching a massive reconstruction last year to expand its location near Thornton Avenue at Fremont Boulevard. After months of routing customers through a maze-like entry facing Moraine Street and past “pardon our dust” signs, Dale Hardware opened its new doors last Friday welcoming customers to wide aisles, expanded product lines and a greenhouse gardening department. “We have finished the most strenuous rebuild,” says owner Garth Smith, relieved the challenge was met. “What occurred last Friday is we opened our new entry doors and our new parking facility. We’ve finished our first phase.” Nearly twice its former size, Dale Hardware now features a 13,000 square-foot greenhouse with gurgling fountains amid lush California-grown shrubs, perennials and annuals. Enclosed by towering glass, the greenhouse marks the company’s first foray into full-scale

“live” goods, according to Smith. Experienced, California-certified nursery personnel were hired to operate the gardening-arm of the business and offer classes, slated for next spring. With Phase One, Dale increased product selection in several departments including plumbing and electrical, aimed at attracting more commercial business. “We’ve added probably 20 lineal feet of cleaning supplies,” says Smith, hoping to attract residential and commercial customers alike. “We’ve also dramatically expanded our fasteners—nuts, bolts, screws—as well as power tools.” Customer feedback drove department expansions, says Smith, noting a change in Tri-City demographics in two decades, leading to changes in product demand. “When customers speak, we listen,” he says. Although facing a Phase One wrap-up, Smith is eyeing Phase Two, a 25,000 square-foot drivethru lumber yard slated for completion in 2012’s first quarter. A third and final phase, also scheduled for 2012 completion, will raze Fremont’s original post office that led to Post Street’s name. This

phase will lead Dale Hardware to greater visibility on a major Fremont thoroughfare. Their address has already been changed to 3700 Thornton Avenue. As many businesses across the nation became tight-fisted and reluctant to invest in expansions, how did Smith decide otherwise? He viewed the lifeless economy as opportunity knocking. “For years, customers have asked us to stock various product lines to complete their shopping experience. We just did not have the space. In an economy with cheap money and our pick of builders and contractors, it was perfect timing.” As an expansion neared completion, Smith reasoned two and a half years ago, the economy would rev back up and Dale Hardware would meet demand for home improvement goods and materials. “We were right about two out of three,” says Smith, with a chuckle. “We received the pick of contractors with very competitive bids. Financing was right, but the economy just hasn’t gotten better.” Still, Smith is confident the decision was right. “I don’t have second thoughts. Never once did I wish we hadn’t started this. It will

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prove a good, profitable decision as we more forward.” This marks the fourth time in Dale Hardware history that the company has undertaken a major expansion. Smith came into the family business after college as his father planned a Post Street relocation, making the move from nearby Center Square, now a redevelopment site. When Dale Hardware opened on Post Street in 1983, Garth Smith was 28 years old, expecting to work along side his dad for years learning the business. Three months later, his dad died, leaving Smith at the helm. “The business landed on my shoulders a lot quicker than anyone anticipated. For me, the adage was true. I learned from my mistakes,” recalls Smith, who isn’t challenge-averse. His son, Kyle, also joined the company upon finishing college, only to have Smith recommend a work experience outside Dale to gain perspective. Smith wished he had gained that perspective of first working for someone else and encouraged his son to experience work in a corporation before returning to a smaller, family-run operation. After 11 months of working for a competitor, Kyle returned and today serves as an assistant manager, overseeing two departments. “I hope the expansion will mean a long career for Kyle and his family as well as all the employees we have on board,” says Smith. He

isn’t sure what the expansion will mean for Centerville, though his traffic count can only help when a developer emerges for the redevelopment site. At third phase end, expansion will take Dale Hardware from 38,000 square feet to 98,000 and increase parking from 140 spaces to 232.Smith won’t put a dollar amount on the expansion, saying only “it was more than I wanted to spend.” The first phase boosted jobs, from 100 to 118. Within six months, the payroll is expected to grow to 150 employees.Seven employees have worked for the company for more than 30 years; 15 for more than 25 years. Employees average more than 12 years employment on the job. Smith says the work ethics of Ralph, Harry, and Mike Promes, minority partners and stockholders, have been pivotal to Dale Hardware’s growth. “Their dedication is virtually unheard of these days,” says Smith. A grand opening will wait until all three phases reach completion. “We’ve had some soft opening teasers,” says Smith. “We don’t want to create too much excitement. Every item has not found its permanent home, but we will be revved up for the holiday seasons.” Last weekend employees had already unpacked Christmas trees and decorations, setting up displays aimed at holiday shoppers.

Fremont Bank Foundation Honored SUBMITTED BY LEE DAWSON The Fremont Bank Foundation was recently honored by Project Second Chance (PSC) with the Margaret Lesher Memorial Award. PSC is the adult literacy program of the Contra Costa County Library that provides adults with low literacy skills the opportunity to read, write and spell through individual tutoring from qualified volunteers. The award recognizes individuals and organizations for their continued support of PSC’s programs. PSC first honored the Fremont Bank Foundation in 2004 with the Margaret Lesher Memorial Award. This is

the first time in PSC’s history where an organization has been honored with the award twice. “One of the key factors that drives our ongoing support for Project Second Chance is that it’s truly a community based program that provides people with tools that will help them to help themselves for the rest of their lives,” said Fremont Bank President Andy Mastorakis. “The Fremont Bank Foundation is honored to receive this award and to continue to support Contra Costa Library’s Project Second Chance.” “Fremont Bank Foundation’s dedication to support the Contra Costa County Library’s efforts to eliminate

adult illiteracy has been remarkable and commendable,” said PSC President Terry Stinnett. “Project Second Chance has helped thousands of adults lead new and richer lives with skills many of us take for granted. We are thankful to them and look forward to their ongoing support to help better the lives of those in our community.” Fremont Bank Foundation has been a long-time supporter of PSC, and has been the lead sponsor of PSC’s annual fundraising dinner, “The Bookies.” Fremont Bank provides assistance for “The Bookies” by selling tickets and providing credit card processing.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

October 25, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Page 15

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

1

2

3

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6 2 4

7 2 1 8 7 7 5 9 1 6 4 8 2 9 2 1 3 9 8 1 5

5 6

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1

B 134

Crossword Puzzle

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1

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2

C O N H

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T 17

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Across 1 Mathematical operation (14) 6 Master weavers (7) 8 Use this, not the stairs (9) 10 Cut off (8) 12 Agenda entries (5) 14 Homo-sapiens (6) 15 Legislatures of countries (11) 17 Moved from one place to another (11) 19 Elegance of form or motion (5) 22 Serving as a foundation, withstanding pressure (10) 23 Organization that provides some service (6) 25 Small cloth for wiping face (12) 29 Sagittarius, with "the" (6) 30 Decorate cakes using _____ (5) 31 Taking the burden of obligations (16) 33 For the entire living span (8) 34 Tuthenkamun and Cleopatra were this nationality (9) 35 Thinking carefully about when making decisions (11)

Down 1 Discussions at the office (8) 2 Demonstrates using examples (11) 3 Get gifts for _____ (9) 4 Arctic ___ (5) 5 Dinosaurs are ____ beasts (11) 6 Person who grazes cattle (8) 7 Vivid, bold (8) 9 Heebie-jeebies (6) 11 California county (6) 13 State of being let down (14) 16 Muscular power (8) 18 In addition, besides (11) 19 In the existing circumstances (5) 20 By chance (12) 21 Drops from above (8) 24 More and more mishievous (9) 26 Go after (5) 27 Shipping hazards (8) 28 Combing hair (8) 30 Gang (6) 32 Any Time (5)

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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Venus goddess of love beauty and harmony continues to traverse troubled waters. This is a time that will test the mettle of our relationships. Dormant or hidden tensions that are gnawing at the edges of any relationship are likely to become apparent now. Make an effort to recognize the difference between ego conflicts and genuine differences of opinion. In ego conflicts, we posture and wave our feathers. We operate with false pride and do battle for the sake of being “right.” If the differences are truly profound we may decide the relationship is not worth the effort to move forward. Aries (March 21-April 20): Irritability and a tendency toward short temper may be your companion this week. Beware the temptation to obsess over minor issues. Take especially good care of your body at this time. You are in a physically low cycle and subject to accidents or minor injuries with tools vehicles or exercise. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Conditions concerning relationships are complex indeed. The images are mixed. It appears one type of relationship is growing stronger while another one may be going south. Some Taureans receive good news concerning education, publications, the internet and travel. Gemini (May 21-June 20): You may feel somewhat edgy and irritable this week. Parts of your mind are scattered into so many corners that it is hard to pull everything together. It doesn’t help that you can’t be sure if you have the truth or all the facts. Make a special effort to keep up with keys, tickets and other small items.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): This week begins with the New Moon in the sign of Scorpio. You may conclude projects or make decisions to tear them up and start over in a different way. It is a favorable time to ferret out difficulties in your relationships; lay them out in the daylight and work to find positive resolutions. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Attention centers on home, family, security and property. You have an interest in clean-up and fix-up. It helps you feel more organized and grounded. One family member is disturbing your sense of peace. She is probably an intensely emotional female who periodically stirs the pot and makes a brew. Virgo the Virgin (August 3September 22): Your planetary ruler Mercury is involved with both Neptune and Mars. On the high side you may feel inspired and desire to make others happy in some way. The negative side of this arrangement could cause your mind to feel both irritated and foggy at the same time. Use caution with any type of tools or machinery at this time.

Libra (September 23-October 22): This is not a time to make purchases of luxury. If anything it is a time to spend your money wisely and with long term outcomes in mind. What will you be glad you bought now when it is four or five years down the road? The arenas of love and romance are in a bad patch for the present. Wait it out. Don’t panic. Scorpio the Phoenix: (Oct. 23 - Nov 20) Activities involving education or teaching are favored. Short distance travel will go well. There are positive exchanges between you and your neighbor’s siblings or those nearby your vicinity. There are challenges in romance and in relationship(s) to children. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): If you have been channeling your energy into a project that has positive value for many, you may be receiving recognition and applause now. Others are recognizing the value of your efforts. For many, this time frame represents improvements in a job situation or beneficial changes in job conditions.

Capricorn (December 22-January 19): At last! The Sun shines through the clouds in your life. You may become the leader in a project that will be good for many. Love life appears or perhaps it improves and you are enjoying your roles in life. This is a time in which you may realize that your struggles have been worth the effort. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): This is a good week to tackle projects that require tools and/or muscle. Partners or special friends are willing to offer an assist if needed. Your mind, as well as your reflexes, is steady and reliable at this time. Relationships are not exciting but they are supportive.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): In the larger scheme of things, you have arrived at a point of accomplishment. You have communicated your philosophy in a way that others are changed. However, in the microcosmic view, you are encountering others who want to quarrel and disparage your opinions. Focus on the higher intent, that which you felt “called” to present.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Ohlone Humane Society

BY NANCY LYON

never to be seen again to a fate we perhaps don’t want to know. Trick or treating is meant for humans who understand it’s all in fun. Don’t take along your dog, cat, or…? It’s not really fun for them and it’s a setup for disaster. For everyone’s safety, leave them home. When reveler’s return home with their hoard of sweets make sure it’s secure in a place that’s out of reach of even the most determined and agile animal. Dogs love candy as much as kids, and like kids, they can become ill and in their case, it can be deadly. Definitely off the menu is toxic and potentially lethal chocolate and raisins. Although I can’t understand why, some animals don’t object to being dressed in costumes. My only comment is that if it makes them uncomfortable, remember it’s unnatural for them to wear anything but their furry skin, so don’t put them through the stress or expose them to the potential hazards simply for the entertainment value. Also, keep in mind that the night belongs to a number of critters. Nocturnal creatures such as raccoons, opossums, skunks, and foxes wake up and venture out for food, and Halloween is just another night to them. If you encounter a wildling, keep a safe distance between you. Respect the nighttime regulars and their space. It’s their world too. If the worst happens and your animal companion runs away or disappears for any reason, don’t wait, contact your local animal shelter as soon as possible and ask for advice in finding your friend. Don’t wait hoping they will “show up,” it could cost them their lives.

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he countdown to Halloween is on and in a very few days, our homes and yards will be swarming with frightening creatures that defy description. The fact that all … well, maybe not all... are young children just having fun means little to the members of your animal family who may see them as terrifying invaders where the only choice is to stand and protect… or head out down the road as fast as their legs can carry them. Many people take the welfare of their animals seriously on this night of the unexpected. However, it doesn’t hurt to go over the fundamental things we should be doing for their protection on All Hallows Eve when it’s said that the light side of the year gives way to the darkness and spirits of the dead roam free. If you fail to take reasonable precautions and your critters give way to fear of the frightening apparitions at the door and bolt, it helps to get them safely home if they are wearing a collar (not a dangerous choke chain) with ID tags and current contact information. Also, being micro-chipped will get them back to you much faster if they get lucky and end up in a shelter. To prevent this nightmare, the best solution is to keep them in a closed, quiet room away from scary trick-or-treaters with costumes and noises they don’t understand. It can also prevent a bite brought on by anxiety from the stress of it all; your calm, loving dog may turn into Cujo if he thinks you are threatened. A bite with all the grief involved or a lost animal is a poor end to what should be a celebration. If your animal is either in510-792-4587 door/outdoor, or sadly, delegated to being an outside only 39120 Argonaut Way dweller, they can be at harm’s #108, Fremont way from sickos that think it’s Ca. 94538-1304 entertaining to torment and even injure unprotected animals. To avoid the bad guys, www.ohlonehumanesociety.org make your four-legged family Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the Trian inside only or confined away City Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organifrom view for several days bezations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city fore and after Halloween. Black or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. animals are targets during this Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today. time and they have disappeared

E

xchange screams for a good laugh and celebrate Halloween in hilarity with Made Up Theatre. The improv and sketch comedy venue in Fremont offers a special Halloweenthemed show on Friday, October 29 with a brew of improv games and a completely improvised scary thriller story. Attendees are also encouraged to come out in their costumed best for the costume contest – there will be prizes! Made Up Theatre holds shows every Saturday night, creating unduplicated entertainment using audience suggestions to create fully improvised scenes, games, musicals, and stories. They offer three types of shows using different improv

styles: Laugh Track City, Five Play Improv, and Showcase. “In light of the unfortunate passing of Steve Jobs, Made Up Theatre wants to help raise the spirits of the community,” says theatre co-owner and performer Ben Stephens. “During the month of October, Made Up Theatre will be donating half of the proceeds raised at our theatre to the American Cancer Association. We would like to encourage people to come out and laugh with us. Hopefully this can help raise awareness.” Note: The Halloween show may contain adult language and situations that may not be suitable for a young or sensitive audience. Halloween Improv Killer Thriller Show Saturday, October 29 8 p.m. Made Up Theatre 3392 Seldon Ct., Fremont, (510) 573-3633 www.madeuptheatre.com Tickets: $10

Recognition for Neha Verma

Pictured left to right: Fremont Schools Superintendent James Morris; student Neha Verma; Mission High School Principal Sandra Prairie;Alameda Trustee Eileen McDonald, and Alameda County Superintendent Sheila Jordan.

SUBMITTED BY CLAUDIA MEDINA PHOTO BY PHIL GRASSO At the Alameda County Office of Education, Alameda County Board of Education Trustee, Eileen McDonald honors Neha Verma with a Public Education Service Award for her humanitarian actions in the community. States McDonald, “Neha Verma a junior at Mission San Jose High School in Fremont recently decided she could make a difference in her community by harnessing her innate fashion and design skills. In August, on her 16th birthday, Neha organized and hosted a fashion show/dinner and raised $9,000 to benefit the Cancer Center at Children’s Hospital and Research Center, Oakland. She will continue her fundraising efforts this holiday season.” Editor’s Note: TCV featured Neha Verma’s story in our August 12, 2011 issue.


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October 25, 2011


October 25, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

SUBMITTED BY CAROLYN POPESCU Kids are invited to dress for a Halloween costume contest, fun activities, and more, as part of the Simon Kidgits Club Halloween Celebration at Great Mall, Milpitas, on October 31, 2011. Win great prizes and treats and revel in Halloween activities. Great Mall’s complete Code of Conduct rules apply, which include no toy weapons, no hoods or hoodies covering the head and face, masks allowed or full face paint only on children 12 and under, and costumes may only be worn during designated Halloween celebration event hours. The event is free for Simon Kidgits Club members. Nonmembers may sign-up for $5 at the event. For more information, call Guest Services at (408) 9562033 or visit www.greatmallbayarrea.com Monday, October 31 Halloween Celebration 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Great Mall – Entrance 2 Court 447 Great Mall Drive, Milpitas (408) 956-2033 www.greatmallbayarrea.com Free for Simon Kidgits Club members; $5 for non-members

SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG SUBMITTED BY MARISSA VERA Join UCLS and a city full of ghost and goblins for a safe spooky and fun filled evening. Tour our haunted house, play ghoulish games, win wicked prizes and have some tasty treats. It is a fun and safe Halloween alternative for families. Open to children ages 3-12 (plus parents). Community Carnival Sunday, October 30 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City 510-675-5488 $6 (pre-sale @ Union City Sports Center, Holly or Kennedy Community Center) / $8 @ the Door

Southland Mall is getting all spooky for Halloween this year. On Saturday, October 29 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., the shopping center will host a Halloween Kids Fest in Macy's Court to celebrate the autumn season. Parents are invited to bring their children to the mall for a full line-up of free family-friendly activities including make-and-take crafts (Trick-or-Treat bag, masks, hats and decorations), face painting, DJ playing family-friendly music, and games and prizes. Kids ages 2 - 12 are welcome and encouraged to wear costumes; children must be accompanied by an adult. All activities are free; prizes and crafts are while supplies last. For information, call (510) 782-3527 or visit www.southlandmall.com. Halloween Kids Fest Saturday, October 29 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Southland Mall One Southland Mall Dr., Hayward (510) 782-3527 www.southlandmall.com Free

SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN

SUBMITTED BY RENE LORENTZEN Have a hauntingly fun time with the Milpitas Community Concert Band as they kick off their new season with a Halloween concert. Musical selections include “Carmina Burana,” “Funeral March of the Marionette,” “March to the Scaffold,” “The Phantom of the Opera,” selections of music by Danny Elfman and more tunes from the crypt! Come in costume for a chance to win the costume contest! The musical selections are guaranteed to entertain the entire family. Light refreshments will be served after the concert. Free admission (suggested donation of $2 – all donations are used solely for the Milpitas Community Concert Band). A Little Fright Music Friday, October 28, 7:30 p.m. Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov Free

The Milpitas Parks and Recreation Department along with the Milpitas Humane Society presents the first “Howl at the Moon” Halloween Event! Dress up both your two-legged and four-legged kids and come have a howling good time! This new Halloween event is host to kooky, spooky fun for both your child and your dog. If you’re looking for an event that has it all for everyone in your family - you’re “barking up the right tree!” The evening will include Photo Opportunities, Kids & Canine Costume Parade, Demonstrations, Children’s Activity Area, Resource Tables for Dog Owners, Pumpkin Patch, Costume Contests (most original, most silliest and most spookiest), and live music by the Milpitas Community Concert Band. Please note: All dogs must be well socialized, on a leash and under control and be current in their vaccinations. For more information call Parks and Recreation Services at (408) 586-3210. Howl at the Moon Friday, October 28 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Milpitas Civic Center Plaza 455 E. Calaveras Blvd. (between Community Center and City Hall), Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Free Admission

SUBMITTED BY CAROLYN POPESCU Kids looking for a spooktacular good time should head over to Great Mall on Monday, October 31st from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and take part in the Simon Kidgits Club® annual Halloween festivities. The event, presented by DOLE, is sure to be a frightfully fun time with several activities and games for everyone to enjoy. Free Halloween goodies, arts & crafts, costume contests, giveaways and more are just a few things you could encounter. Additionally, Great Mall will be hosting a special “Yo Gabba Gabba Costume Contest” for children of all ages. The winner of the best Yo Gabba Gabba character costume contest will win a Family 4pack ticket to the upcoming “Yo Gabba Gabba” concert on November 19 at San Jose Civic. For more information about the Simon Kidgits Club, visit http://www.simon.com/kidgits/.

Halloween Kids Fest Trick-or-Treat in the NewPark Mall in the center court. Activities, music, crafts, prizes for costumes. Face painting and more. Kids 2 to 12 with the parents are welcome. Monday October 31st 4-8p.m. NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK MEMORIAL HS ATHLETIC PROGRAM Come one, come all to support Newark Memorial High School’s athletic program. The high school athletes representing all sports will be participating in a Walk-A-Thon on Saturday, October 29th from 10:00-11:30 am. This event will be held on the NMHS all-weather track. Athletes will be collecting flat donations or pledges for any amount per lap. Every athlete will be walking a total of twelve laps. There will be a celebratory barbeque to honor the walkers following the event. Newark Memorial believes sports is an essential part of a teenager’s development and needs the community to help. If you would like to make a monetary or barbeque donation (waters, sodas, hamburgers, paper products), please contact rcroce@sbcglobal.net. Or tvaresio@mnhs.k12.ca.us.

SUBMITTED BY WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS Join the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter for their first annual Halloween Party Fundraiser at the Haunted House of Prospect Hill in Downtown Hayward on October 31, 2011. Come dressed to kill, enjoy spiked adult punch, munch on sinful morsels and scare trick-ortreaters. Chapter Members: $25 / Guests: $35. For more information, visit www.WCRTC.org or call (510) 886-2662. Women’s Council of REALTORS Tri-Cities Chapter Halloween Party Fundraiser Monday, October 31 6 – 9 p.m. Haunted House of Prospect Hill Downtown Hayward


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS The Fremont Art Association is pleased to announce its Fourth Quarter Showcase featuring over 20 colorful landscape paintings (oil, acrylic and watercolor) by 15 members of The Fremont Art Association’s Tuesdays Painters’ Group. The show will exhibit paintings of pastoral hillsides, dramatic seascapes, vibrant cityscapes, and the romantic scenes of Europe. A variety of new works from additional member artists will compliment the gallery’s South of France: South of France by Grace Rankin

Seascape: Seascape by Emi Tabuchi

fourth quarter offerings. The show runs from Friday, October 28 through Sunday, November 20 at the newly located Fremont Art Association Centre, 37695 Niles Boulevard in Fremont (corner of J Street). This event is open to the public and admission is free. Artists featured are: Donna Arrillaga, Dave Bionti, Barbara Cronin, Jaci Daskarolis, Karen Fraher, Toby Gross, Nga Ngo, Kiyoko Penso, Carol Pulliam, Carol Ramos, Grace Rankin, Inez Robbins, Marty Spellman, Emi Tabuchi, and Christine Wilson. Tuesday Painters’ Group is a group of artists that meet every Tuesday at The Fremont Art Centre to paint for fun, mutual support, camaraderie, and en-

SUBMITTED BY WENDY WINSTED Join in the fun at Sulphur Creek Nature Center as we travel to Neverland! Find out the real truth about Halloween’s dark and creepy creatures from Peter Pan, Captain Hook, and the rest of the adventurous Neverland characters. Fly into Neverland with Peter Pan and an owl. Find out why Tinkerbell likes to hang out with bats, and discover what Wendy and the opossum have in common. Enjoy the rest of the evening with Halloween crafts, storytelling, and a campfire at no charge; along with

richment. The group was formed by a long-time FAA member and watercolor artist, Donna Arrillaga in 2006 to have a day reserved once a week just to focus on painting. This drop-in session is open to everyone and all levels are welcome. The hours are from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Bring basic supplies of paint in any medium. $2 donation (for the use of the facility) is appreciated. A reception honoring the talented artists will be held on Sunday, October 30 from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the centre. For details about the show or the Tuesdays Group, please call (510) 792-0905 or visit www: FremontArtAssociation.org. Fourth Quarter Showcase October 28 - November 20 Friday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Artists’ Reception Sunday, October 30 1:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Free

games, tasty treats, face painting and a night hike for a small fee. Spend a fun, family evening together and have a ghoulishly good time! The Unhaunted House is located at 1801 D Street, Hayward on Friday October 28, 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. and Saturday October 29th, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. Tickets are $7 per person, children under 3 free. Limited availability. Buy tickets early for your preferred date and time. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please contact the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District at 1099 E Street in Hayward, (510) 881-6700.

Reserve your apartment by 10/31/2011 and receive Professional Moving Assistance (Value of $1,200).

All-Day restaurant-style dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.

Women Alive Fall Conference hosted by Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Ave., Fremont

November 4-5 Pam Farrel, international speaker and best-selling author of “Men are Like Waffles, Women are Like Spaghetti” will be speaking on “The Best Decisions a Woman Can Make!” Breakout sessions include topics on relationships, parenting, and interpersonal skills. Tickets are $35. Register on line at www.bridgescc.org.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Tuesday, Oct 25

Friday, Oct 28

Saturday, Oct 29

Senior Resource Faire

Selling FlimFlam $

Farmyard Story Time

9 a.m. - Noon

7 p.m.

11 a.m. - Noon

Information and services including BP and Flu shots

Psychology of influence

Favorite farm tales and meet the animals

Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 742-4400

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Friday, Oct 28-Saturday,Oct 29

Wednesday, Oct 26

Travel to Neverland $R

AC Transit Board Meeting

4 p.m. - 8 p.m.

5 p.m.

Adventure with Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Tinkerbell

Comment on bus services and AC Transit business Newark City Council Chambers

37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1400

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747 Friday, Oct 28

Thursday, Oct 27

Voices from the Past $

Madeline's Halloween and other Spooky Tales Movies

7p.m. - 3 a.m.

3:30 p.m.

Meek Mansion 17365 Boston Rd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

Celebrate Halloween with children's book characters Fremont Main Library

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Thursday, Oct 27

Mobility Matters

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Public comment on transportation planning

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (650) 290-0542 Friday, Oct 28

A little fright music

7:30 p.m. Concert by Milpitas Community Concert Band

Phantom Art Gallery Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 Friday, Oct 28 - Saturday, Oct 29

Fall Candlelight Tours $R

7 p.m. Tour Patterson House from the Victorian Era

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Friday, Oct 28

Halloween Twilight Hike $R

5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Hike looking for witches and ghosts, return for treats and stories

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Participate in paranormal investigations

Saturday, Oct 29

Ace the Interview Free Workshop

10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Critical skills for midlife jobseekers

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 Saturday, Oct 29 -Sunday, Oct 30

Diego Marcial Rios

11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

10 a.m. - 12 a.m. Help plant Native plants

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 x102 Saturday, Oct 29

Geology and History of the Hayward Shoreline

2 p.m. - 3 p.m. History of the Bay Area

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Oct 29

Halloween Kids Fest

1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Free event with crafts, games, prizes and music

Southland Mall One Southland Mall Dr., Hayward (510) 581-5498

NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 793-5683

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, Oct 29

Discovery Day

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Science extravaganza with demos, experiments and activities

Cal State University East Bay 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-2572 (510) 885-3441 Saturday, Oct 29

Diwali Celebration

1 - 7 p.m. Indian Festival of Lights

Shreemaya Krishnadham Temple and Community Center 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas (408) 586-0006 Saturday, Oct 29

Family Day: Monarch Butterflies R

Hayward Mariachi Festival

Explore butterflies through hands-on crafts, visit nectar garden

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410

Gardening with Native Plants R

Saturday, Oct 29

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Music, Vendors, Food

Saturday, Oct 29

Artist exhibit observing Dia de los Muertos

Friday, Oct 28

5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Harvest Festival International food, games, crafts, face painting, lots of fun

Our Lady of Guadalupe Church 40382 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-3411 Saturday, Oct 29 - Monday, Oct 31

Haunted House of Horrors$

7p.m. - 12 Midnight 6 haunted rooms and 8 haunted hallways

$3 donation for non profit Haunted House 4307 Delaware, Fremont Saturday, Oct 29

Killer Thriller Show $

8 p.m. Halloween Improv

Made Up Theatre 3392 Seldon Ct., Fremont www.MadeUpTheatre.com Saturday, Oct 29

Leopard Shark Feeding Frenzy

2 - 3 p.m. Assist staff during daily feeding our shark tank

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Friday, Oct 28

Howl at the Moon

6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Kooky, Spooky fun costume parade, kids and pets

Milpitas Civic Center Plaza 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Friday, Oct 28-Sunday, Nov 20

Landscape Painting

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Artist Showcase

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

A prayer centered church of spiritually bonded friends

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM A positive path for spiritual living

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Lecture series on human rights Mission San Jose High School SPONSORED BY AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Wednesday October 26 at 3 pm (tentatively A Wing Cafeteria): Dr. Tomas Jimenez from Stanford University will speak about unauthorized immigration and how it relates to human rights.He is the author of Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans Immigration and Identity. 41717 Palm Ave Fremont (510) 657-3600


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Saturday, Oct 29

Sunday, Oct 30

Friday, Nov 4

Public Safety Expo

Pumpkin Carving

Salsa Dinner Dance $

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

6 p.m.

Public safety information, demonstrations, presentations free gifts, raffles

Bring your own or buy one here. Learn history of Halloween

Salsa and Ballroom Dances and Dinner, demonstrations and raffles

Southland Mall One Southland Mall Dr., Hayward (510) 581-5498

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Oct 29

Sunday, Oct 30

Ralph & Mary Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495 (510)795-0302

Sinister Science Halloween Party $

Weather Wonders

11 a.m. - Noon

Saturday, Nov 5

11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Discover weather basics through experiments, nature hike and games

Mother/Daughter Discovery Day $R

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

8:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Scientific activities for Halloween

Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland (510) 336-7300 Saturday, Oct 29

Soulciety Garage Sale

Monday, Oct 31 Saturday, Nov 12

Fundraiser for "The Bridge" program

4 - 6 p.m.

Candidate Boot Camp $R

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Road, Hayward (510) 962-0456

Free Activities, Trick-or-Treating, music and fun

9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 742-2326

HARD Southgate Community Center 26780 Chiplay Avenue, Hayward (510) 917-2611

Saturday, Oct 29

Walk-A-Thon

10 a.m. Three mile walk and BBQ

Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 Sunday, Oct 30

Creepy Crawlers

2 - 3 p.m. See snakes, spiders, make spider craft. Prize for best Halloween costume

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Sunday, Oct 30

Halloween Community Carnival

2 - 4 p.m. Safe, spooky fun, haunted house, games treats

Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City (510) 471-6877

Halloween Marsh Mask Makers

What it takes to run for political office

Monday, Oct 31

Jobs Workshop R

7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free event Registration required

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Monday, Oct 31

Trick-or-Treating at Fremont Hub

3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Trick-or-Treating, face painter. Bring bag for candy and goodies

Fremont Hub 39261 Fremont Hub, Fremont (510) 793-5683

Continuing Events Saturdays - Sundays, Oct 15 - Oct 30

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

6 - 10 p.m. Step into the Haunted Hotel, games, food

Chadbourne Carriage House 39169 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0595 Friday - Sunday, Oct 21 - Oct 31

Halls of Madness Haunted House

Dark - 10 p.m. Tuesday, Nov 1

Terrifying local haunt

How to Retire in our Economy R

4315 Dorsey Avenue, Fremont

7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free event - Registration required

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063

Sunday, Oct 30

Here is the link to our website where you can view all five videos pertaining to this program. http://lifeeldercare.org/about-us/videos/

Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 683-9377

Halloween Kids Fest

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

LIFE ElderCare's Fall Prevention program works with older adults, in their own homes, to create a personalized physical activity routine that includes aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility components specifically designed to increase mobility. The program also includes a home safely check, minor home modifications and a medication review. Each week, for 12-weeks, Unitek College LVN students visit each participant to answer questions, provide support and assess progress. The program is free to Tri-City residents.

Hands on science and math fun

Wednesday, Nov 2

12:30 - 1 p.m.

Daniel Alarcon

Make fun spooky Halloween masks of creatures at the marsh

7 p.m. Peruvian author reads from his work

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Cal State University East Bay Library 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3183

Friday, Oct 28-Sunday, Nov 20

Landscape Painting

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Artist Showcase

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

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B

lacksand Manor, sometimes referred to as Fremont’s best free haunted house, returns for lucky year 13 on Halloween night from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. What started in 1998 as a heavily decorated front yard has evolved into a traditional walk-through haunted house with multiple scenes including Ghouls at Home, The Black Lab, The Creepy Corridor and The Witch’s Kitchen. Says founder Marc Ricketts, “I remember how much fun it was as a child to go to a Halloween party that had a haunted house. With that in mind, we started adding more and more to our annual decorations, until we were finally able to include the inside of our house.” The main focus of the annual haunt is providing some extra fun for the trick or treaters that live in the 28 Palms neighborhood and surrounding areas, so “We’re only up for a couple of hours on Halloween. We’ve had many kids over the years tell us how they enjoy and remember our house, and how they look forward to coming here on Halloween. That’s what it’s all about. Some of the ones that volunteer to help these days first visited when they were in Kindergarten. Fortunately, as my son has aged, it has become less of a one man endeavour.” Blacksand Manor is about ghosts and skeletons, and other traditional Halloween imagery. “We all know that kids love a good scare, but our audience is mostly pre-teens,” says Ricketts. “Therefore, we don’t want anything too gruesome. We’ll try to give a few moments of unexpected frights, but it’s all low key. When very young children are walking though, we signal anyone lurking within to tone it down as they pass.” Blacksand Manor is located at 5008 Blacksand Road, just off of Royal Palm Ave. Most of the exterior decorations are in place during the week leading up to Halloween. It will be open on Halloween night from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 Nov 12

Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 Nov 12

Rhythm and Light

Patterns of Abuse

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

7 - 9 p.m.

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

9:30 - 11 a.m.

The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

Photography show

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

SUBMITTED BY STEVE NORMAN

D

ue to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Nutcracker marionette performance last December, New Hope Community Church is sponsoring a marionette version of Hansel and Gretel as a gift to the community. The National Puppet Theatre is proud to present

a delightful musical adaptation of the favorite Grimm’s fairy tale, featuring music from Engelbert Humperdinck’s opera. The wicked witch, candy cottage, exploding oven, and dancing brooms all combine for great entertainment for young and old alike. The string puppet version of Hansel and Gretel features beautiful handcrafted marionette puppets created by The National Puppet Theatre. The National Puppet Theatre has been creating and performing marionette shows throughout the country since 1950 at schools, fairs, theatres and on television. This presentation is sure to capture the

Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053

interest and imaginations of audiences of all ages. Says Rev. Steve Norman, "My family started the National Puppet Theatre in 1950, a few years before I was born. Making puppets and doing puppet shows was just a normal part of growing up in the Norman family. My earliest memory is being set down for a nap in an open puppet trunk as a baby. While most children went on a vacation during the summer months, I was traveling the country performing with my family. The marionette Peter and the Wolf was packed in storage for many years until my daughter and her husband rebuilt and restored the show to its original charm in 2008.” Rev. Norman’s father Eric and uncle Len Piper formed the National Puppet Theatre and toured the Midwest performing primarily at schools. As time passed the touring company branched out to television, fairs and other venues. Rev. Norman’s cousins and siblings also performed with puppets and have gone on to careers in theater and puppetry. New Hope Community Church hosts events such as the puppet show to let the community know that they are here and that they care about the neighborhood. Worship is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday and childcare is provided. For details, contact Steve Norman.

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Marionette Hansel and Gretel Show Saturday, October 29 2 p.m. New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 739-0430 http://www.newhopefremont.org Free

Winning lottery ticket unclaimed A Fantasy 5 ticket purchased in Antioch (Contra Costa County) matched all five numbers to win a prize worth $203,363. The lucky ticket still has not been claimed. The winning ticket was purchased at Lone Tree Chevron, located at 4600 Lone Tree Way in Antioch. Winning numbers on the ticket are 12, 34, 27, 32 and 24. The California Lottery reminds winners to sign the back of their tickets, keep tickets in a safe place and contact Lottery officials or visit their local Lottery District Office as soon as possible. Winners have 180 days from the date of the draw to claim prizes. www.calottery.com

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October 25, 2011

Logan continues to dominate MVAL SUBMITTED BY JOHN HERNANDEZ The Logan Colts continue to steamroll the competition. After beating all three MVAL teams and scoring over sixty points in each game, the Logan Colts put on a dominating performance Friday night (October 21), completely shutting down the Irvington Vikings’ offense to just 90 yards rushing and no passing yardage. The Colts’ offense had no problem moving the ball, rushing for 114 on 23 carries and over 265 yards in total offense. Logan scored 21 points in the first half and the onslaught was in gear. Superior speed was obvious from the beginning of the game and

the Colts’ defense disrupted any attempt by the Viking offense on almost every play. As a result, the

Colts were able to score at will. Final score 64-0.

OPEN SINGLES: Gold, Zhou Xin; Bronze,

Gold, Ariel Hsing; Silver, Tian Meng U 18 BOYS: Bronze, Sagar Arun U 18 GIRLS: Bronze, Vidya Pingali U 13 BOYS: Bronze, Krish Avvari & Shivansh Kumar U 13 GIRLS: Gold, Ishana Deb; Bronze,

Lily Zhang Women's singles: Gold, Tian Meng; Silver, Ariel Hsing; Bronze, Prachi Jha U 22 MENS: Bronze, Dan Liu U 22 WOMEN'S:

Anjalee Patel & Jia-Yu Sung (Trinity) U 10 BOYS: Silver, Shreyas Prasanna; Bronze, Kumar Nikhil U 10 GIRLS: Gold, Jia Yu Sung(Trinity);

Silver, Rachel Sung U 2500: Bronze, Ranbir Das OVER 50: Bronze, Mark Johnson U 2375: Gold, Aashay Patel; Bronze, Nelson Yu U 2250: Gold, Aashay Patel; Bronze, Daniel R. Seemiller Jr U 2125: Gold, Nelson Yu U 2000: Bronze, Avinash Nayak U 1550: Silver, Ishana Deb; Bronze, Rohan Mennam U 1400: Gold, Rohan Mennam; Bronze, Shreyas Prasanna U 1100: Gold, Abhishek Rangarajan; Bronze, Jimmy Liu U 950: Gold, Abhishek Rangarajan; Silver, Nikhil Kumar; Bronze, Jimmy Liu U 800: Gold, Benjamin Lam; Silver, Abhishek Rangarajan; Bronze, Nikhil Kumar U3600 DOUBLES: Gold, Jerry Poon & Nelson Yu

ICC Table Tennis Team wins big at Berkeley Open SUBMITTED BY RAJUL SHETH PHOTOS COURTESTY OF ICC TABLE TENNIS In an amazing showing, Team ICC players and coaches won medals in almost every event at the recent Berkeley Open Table Tennis Tournament. In all, Team ICC garnered 13 gold, seven silver and 18 bronze medals. The following results illustrate the hard work of this group that has steadily risen in national and international rankings.

Fremont Christian vs Chinese Christian School SUBMITTED BY BILL KRUPPA Fremont Christian School lost a tough match to a determined Chinese Christian School squad in an away match on October 21. FCS 22 25 26 22 CCS 25 14 28 25

Women’s Volleyball: Ohlone vs. Skyline SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR

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October 21 at Ohlone College Ohlone defeats Skyline College, 3-0 (25-12, 25-18, 27-25) Go Renegades!


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Logan excels in Phoenix tournament play

Moreau continues unbeaten string SUBMITTED BY COACH ROSE BORJA

In a grueling schedule of volleyball for the Logan High School women’s team, after traveling to Phoenix Arizona to participate in the Tournament of Champions, the Colts were unbeaten in pool play on Friday, October 21. Dobson (AZ), St. Paul (OR) and Show Low (AZ) fell to the Colts and the following day, quarter- and semi-final bracket competitions against Temple Prep (AZ) and West Anchorage (AK) followed the same pattern. In a hardfought finals match with the Deer Valley Skyhawks (AZ), the Colts were unable to contain opposition scoring and were Defeated. However, Colt performance was outstanding, a credit to their selection to participate in the 2011 Tournament of Champions. Pool Play: Defeated Dobson (AZ) 25-23, 25-17 Defeated St. Paul (OR) 25-17, 25-18 Defeated Show Low (AZ) 25-17, 25-22 Bracket Play (Ruby Division): Quarter Finals: Defeated Tempe Prep (AZ) 25-23, 26-24 Semi Finals: Defeated West Anchorage (AK) 25-18, 25-19 Finals: Lost to Deer Valley (AZ) 21-25, 7-25

Directors go to the community In an effort to increase public input and make its meeting more accessible to the community, the AC Transit Board of Directors will convene its regularly scheduled meeting at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 2011, in the Newark City Council Chambers instead of at the AC Transit headquarters in downtown Oakland. The change of venue will give southern Alameda County bus riders and the general public the opportunity of easier access to and greater participation at a board meeting. “As a board, we think it’s essential to come to our riders because we understand that they cannot always come to us,’’ said Board President Elsa Ortiz. “It’s important for us to see and feel the communities we serve and for the residents to be able to meet us, ask questions face-to-face and to expect to look us in the eye for answers. It’s the way the process is supposed to be.”

As at all board meetings, attendees may comment on any item on the agenda by signing up to speak when they arrive. Additionally, during “Public Comment,” at the beginning of the meeting, the public may also speak about items not on the agenda. The meeting agenda was posted to the AC Transit website on Friday, October 21, 2011 (see “Board meetings” on the homepage). Among other things, the board is expected to consider an update on service and operations in southern Alameda County; a report on the District’s Automated Vehicle Annunciation (talking buses); a report on Intra-Vehicle Text Message Signage; and the possible adoption of the 2012 state and federal advocacy programs. For more information, visit www.ACTransit.org AC Transit Board Meeting Wednesday, Oct 26 5:00 p.m. Newark City Council Chambers 37101 Newark Boulevard, Newark www.ACTransit.org

The Latino Business Roundtable of the Hayward Chamber of Commerce and the City of Hayward are proud to present the City Hall Plaza Mariachi Fiesta Dos in Remembrance of Dia De Los Muertos. Spend your Friday night in the company of fantastic mariachis while enjoying food, awards, vendors and much more.

As families across the country begin to prepare for what has become an increasingly popular holiday, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), a worldwide leader in fire, electrical, building and life safety, reminds everyone to take a few simple safety precautions to ensure a fun, safe and not too scary Halloween. “It’s an exciting holiday especially for the kids but if precautions aren’t taken, scary things can happen,” said Lorraine Carli NFPA’s VP of Communications. “Candle decorations and flowing costumes present additional fire hazards. Candles a leading cause of U.S. home fires and Halloween is one of the top five days for candle fires.” NFPA offers the following safety tips to help keep horror from striking your home this season: When choosing a costume, stay away from billowing or long, trailing fabric. If you make your own costume, choose material that won't easily ignite if it comes into contact with heat or flame. If your child wears a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so they can see properly. Provide children with flashlights to see their way or glow sticks as part of their costume. Dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper are highly flammable. Keep these and other decorations well away from all open flames and heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters. It is safest to use a flashlight or battery-operated candles in a Jack-o-lantern. If you use a real candle, exercise extreme caution. Make sure children

Varsity Logan, 6 – Irvington, 1 Jr. VarsityLogan, 6 – Irvington, 1 Mercedes Le (L) vs. Aporna Dhinakoran (I) 6-7 (1-7), 6-1, 6-1 Camille Su (L) vs. Abigail Garcia (I) 3-6, 3-6 Marjorie Bartolome (L) vs. Congrai Lin (I) 6-1, 6-2 Marycon Jiro (L) vs. Tanyeer Malhi (I) 6-1, 6-4 Jessica Bautista (L) vs. Sariha Utainsing (I) 7-5, 7-5 Paula Baluyut Vida Bao Jasmine Bautista (L) vs. Serena Bui (I) 6-2, 6-2 Jeena Villamor Jamie Lagman Bella Haugen (L) vs. Karina Uchiuni (I) 6-1, 6-1 Archana Pandya Sherman Tan

AC Transit receives federal funding SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE L. JOHNSON AC Transit announced on October 21, 2011, that it has been awarded $6,677,074 in Department of Transportation funds to help upgrade facilities and equipment. The funding comes from the Federal Transit Administration’s “State of Good Repair” program which seeks to ensure the continued safety and integrity of America’s bus and rail systems through projects to maintain infrastructure, manage information and innovatively finance public transportation systems. AC Transit Interim General Manager Mary King called the grant “extremely good news,” particularly at a time when funding for public transit is so difficult to obtain. “This grant will allow us to make some critical capital improvements and repairs,” King said. “We will now be able to replace elevators, upgrade our facilities to meet environmental standards and develop an asset management database to more effectively track the condition of the agency’s facilities and equipment. This reduces the need for costly emergency repairs and major rehabilitation and minimizes the drain on our operating budget which helps to ensure more bus services for the public.” King also thanked Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-Oakland), who was equally gratified after helping to secure the funding for the agency. “This grant award is wonderful news for my constituents and for all of those that rely on AC Transit for its vital services,” said Lee. “I’m pleased AC Transit will receive these critical funds to make necessary upgrades that will ensure its environmental sustainability and advance its technological capabilities. I strongly support continued and robust investment in public transportation systems, like AC Transit, to provide sustainable and affordable transportation services, and are often the sole form of transit for low-income communities.” For more information, visit www.ACTransit.org

Entertainment will be provided courtesy of Costa de Oro Ballet Folklorico, Mariachi Juvenil de Hayward, Mariachi Femenil, Mariachi Los Halcones, and Mariachi Mexicanisimo. Sponsors for the event include AT&T, Bay Area News Group, Calpine, Everest College, Hayward City Council

Stay safe on the spookiest day of the year SUBMITTED BY NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION

Logan girls top Irvington OCTOBER 21:

SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER

Tennyson was the latest victim of Moreau’s strength on the tennis courts as the Mariners women’s tennis team scored a 7-0 victory October 20 in a match played at Hidden Hills. So far, the Mariners season record stands at 13-4 and a perfect 11-0 in HAAL play. Singles 1S) Nicole Dawang (MC) d. Gurwant Khabra (THS) 6-0, 6-2 2S) Jana Lee (MC) d. Navpreet Khabra (THS) 6-0, 6-0 3S) LIsa Wilson (MC) d. Gianna Uson (THS) 6-0, 6-0 4S) Sachi Shetty (MC) d. Hargot Jhaas (THS) 6-0, 6-0 Doubles Ashley Ma/Ianne DeLeon (MC) d. Adrienne Dimarucut/Alendre Uintada (THS) 6-0, 6-4 LeiAhn Drake/Alyssa Gonzales (MC) d. Vanessa Anilao/Erica Reyes (THS) 6-1, 6-2 Alma Chen/Angelea DeLara (MC) d. Thu Che/Sukhddep Brar (THS) 6-4, 6-4

SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE L. JOHNSON

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are watched at all times when candles are lit. When lighting candles inside Jack-o-lanterns, use long fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter. Place illuminated pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and out of the way of trick-ortreaters, doorsteps, walkways and yards. Candle decorations should be well-attended at all times. Keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes. Tell children to stay away from open flames. Ensure they know how to stop, drop and roll if their clothing catches fire. Make them practice stopping immediately, dropping to the ground, covering their face with hands and rolling over and over to extinguish the flames. Use flashlights as alternatives to candles or torch lights when decorating walkways and yards. They are much safer for trick-or-treaters, whose costumes may brush against the lighting. If your children are going to Halloween parties at other homes, tell them to identify ways out of the building and to plan how they would get out in an emergency. Children should always go trick-or-treating with a responsible adult and stay together as a group and walk from house to house. Review how to cross a street with your child. Look left, right and left again to be sure no cars are approaching before crossing the street. Make a rule that children will not eat any treat until it has been brought home and examined by a grown-up. For more information, visit www.nfpa.org

Member Mark Salinas, Hayward City Council Member Francisco Zermeno, Kaiser Permanente, Manada Roofing Inc., and PG&E. Admission is free; those interested in vendor spaces should contact Susan at the Chamber by calling (510) 537-2424 or e-mailing susanoc@hayward.org for more information. Mariachi Fiesta Dos Friday, Oct 28 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. City Hall Plaza 777 B St., Hayward (510) 537-2424 Free

Veterinary hospital earns accreditation SUBMITTED BY JASON MERRIHEW Central Veterinary Hospital in Fremont has earned accreditation following a thorough evaluation by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) that included a quality assessment review of the hospital’s practice protocols, medical equipment, facility and client service. “I would like to congratulate Central Veterinary Hospital on achieving accreditation through AAHA,” said Michael Cavanaugh, DVM, DABVP, AAHA executive director. “They are clearly committed to doing their very best as evidenced by the hard work and effort they put into this voluntary process.” Accreditation is a voluntary commitment practices make to their clients and patients, and AAHA is the only organization in the U.S. and Canada that accredits companion animal hospitals based on standards that go above and beyond state regulations. The AAHA Standards of Accreditation, viewed as the standard of veterinary excellence, contain more than 900 individual standards, divided into 18 major sections. These areas of focus include: patient care and pain management, surgery, pharmacy, laboratory, exam facilities, medical records, cleanliness, emergency services, dental care, diagnostic imaging, anesthesiology, and continuing education. Only 15 percent of all small animal hospitals in the U.S. have achieved accreditation by the Association. To maintain accredited status, Central Veterinary Hospital must continue to be evaluated regularly by AAHA. Central Veterinary Hospital, located at 5245 Central Avenue in Fremont, has been accredited with the association since 1980 and can be reached at (510)797-7387. For more information about AAHA-accreditation, visit www.healthypet.com.


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October 25, 2011

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council Fremont City Council October 18, 2011 Consent: Use of unclaimed police evidence monies ($71,859.56) for replacement of video cameras in police vehicles Authorize contract with Alameda County Public Health Department in the amount of $169,250 for Health Promoter Project Approve Joint Powers Agreement with Alameda County and other cities defining Association Community Action Program Ceremonial: Recognize Fremont Police Detective William Veteran for 25 years of service Public Communications: Reminder to the public of November 3 meeting of Dumbarton Rail Committee meeting at Fremont Community Center 6-8 p.m. Comment and request for council attention to current “restoration” efforts at Sabercat Creek. Neighbors are distressed by use of excessive asphalt and grading that is destroying the environment. Other Business: Consider amendment of City’s CalPERS contract for fire safety employees by shifting cost sharing arrangement, asking employees to pay more for retirement benefits. (Harrison recuse) Bicycle Master Plan Update to integrate this with the General Plan, ensure compliance with Caltrans requirements and identify new projects and programs. The adoption process will coincide with General Plan adoption. The plan covers pathways, use of bicycles, needs analysis and priorities for future funding. Public comment centered on what should be highest priority, use of funds for engineering or bicycle education? Mayor Bob Wasserman Aye Vice Mayor Suzanne Lee Chan Aye Anu Natarajan Aye Bill Harrison Aye (recuse CalPERS) Dominic Dutra Aye

Logan graduates attend college at high rates SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE A higher percentage of James Logan High School graduates enroll in a college or university than in Alameda County in general or in the state as a whole – and the trend holds regardless of ethnicity, race, socioeconomics, language or disabilities – according to data released today by the California Department of Education. Data from the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) was matched with postsecondary enrollment data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). According to the results, 83.2 percent of Logan graduates in 2008-09 – the most recent data available – enrolled in a postsecondary institution in the United States. The college-going rate was 70.9 percent in Alameda County and 74.4 percent in the state as a whole.

Hayward City Council

Hayward City Council October 18, 2011 Consent Amended 2002 Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Lease Revenue Bonds. Authorized City manager to negotiate and execute a lease amendment and a right-of-entry with the United States Government. The City of Hayward leases 27 acres of land to the US Government for use by the California Air National Guard (CAANG) and US Air Force. Since 2008, the CAANG has not used the site; the Army National Guard occupies three acres and will remain in situ. The CAANG will return the 24 acres to the city but is responsible for site remediation and will require access to the site for the same for approximately four years. Accepted Annual Investment Review, adopted FY 2012 Statement of Investment Policy; extended delegation if investment authority to Director of Finance and created a Local Agency Investment Fund for the Hayward Public Financing Authority. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Olden Henson – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Bill Quirk – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeño – Yes

Milpitas City Council Milpitas City Council October 18, 2011 Presentation Mayor Esteves proclaimed October 2011 as Filipino American History Month. Consent Approved two-year extension request for the Disposition and Development Agreement (DDA) with South Main Street Senior Lifestyles, LLC, and approved amendment memorializing the extension; DDA requires development of a 180-unit, residential senior housing rental complex, 63 affordable units for low/very low income households and 207 family housing units. Approved seven Milpitas Arts and Culture Grants for in-kind performance space and city staff support; the cultural or artistic events are open to the public for little or no cost. Authorized two Milpitas Parks and Recreation Department grants; $1,900 to assist with Rainbow Theatre’s Fall Production of “Annie, Jr.” and $1,300 to the Recreational Assistance Program which helps low-income residents participate in recreation programs. Approved budget appropriation of $93,760 into the Building and Safety Department’s budget for the remaining eight months of FY 2011-12 to hire a temporary building inspector for developer Lyon Communities’ Lyon Milpitas Apartments project; annual cost for the temporary inspector position is $140,640 which will be paid by the developer. Waived $891.50 fee for facility rental for the Alcoholics Anonymous annual Unity Day to be held Sunday, August 19, 2012 at the Milpitas Community Center.

Approved 2012 regular City Council meeting schedule, including cancellation of both meetings in July 2012. Approved Amendment No. One to agreement with Camp, Dresser & McKee for Professional Engineering Services in reviewing Allied Waste’s annual reimbursement request to the City for 2009 regulatory costs to the Newby Island landfill; agreement not to exceed $10,030. Approved joint use agreement with the Santa Clara Valley Water District for recreational use of Coyote Creek Trail Reach One; new agreement will cover southward trail extension and access point to the New Cerano Park with no significant environmental impacts. Received report on emergency repairs to City Hall Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) by ACCO Engineered Systems; also approved ACCO as sole source provider, whose software regulates City Hall’s HVAC systems. All parts and labor will cost $39,708.32. Public Hearing Accepted 2011 Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grant for $13,913 to purchase portable radios for the police department. Unfinished Business Adopted resolution opposing the movement of between 400 and 800 additional inmates (36 percent increase) to Elmwood Correctional Facility by the end of 2012; Elmwood currently houses more than half of all Santa Clara County inmates. Heard report on Open Government Ordinance. Received report on Barbara Lee Senior Center operating hours; survey results favor current operating

hours; evenings and weekends are reserved for special events. Economic Development Corporation Meeting Approved agreement with Milpitas Chamber of Commerce for Business Retention and Recruitment services for amount not to exceed $60,000, with quarterly reports required before funds are dispersed. (4 YES, 1 NO (Gomez)). Public Art Committee Approved Public Art Committee’s Water Tower and Wagon Sculpture recommendations for the Alviso Adobe Art Project; costs are $20,000 and $19,360, respectively. (3 YES, 2 NO (Gomez, Polanski)). Reports of Mayor Directed staff to produce oneyear operating budget summary and two-to-three year projections to anticipate potential deficits. New Business Received report on city’s Pavement Maintenance Program. Some street maintenance postponed due to RDA suspension; currently, $2M available annually for street maintenance. Ordinance Waived second reading of and adopted Ordinance No. 243.4, amending Campaign Finance and Disclosure Requirements for City Elections. The second reading of the ordinance is intended to clarify and increase transparency in Milpitas’ public elections process. (4YES, 1 No (Giordano)). Mayor Jose Esteves Vice Mayor Pete McHugh Debbie Giordano Jose Gomez Jr. Althea Polanski

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Governor signs bill to streamline alternative vehicle technology incentives program SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill on October 6, 2011, by Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) that streamlines the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology program to return more people to work and place more clean vehicles on the road. The bill, AB 1314, passed the Legislature with strong bipartisan support before the end of session last month. “This bill emphasizes investment in projects and reductions of administrative burdens,” said Wieckowski, co-chair of the Assembly Select Committee on California’s Clean Energy Economy. “People will be able to set to work more quickly on building car parts, fueling stations and other clean fuel and clean vehicle programs.” AB 1314 is supported by Tesla Motors, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Revolution Motors, the Coalition for Clean Air, the California Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition and CALSTART. Assemblymember Wieckowski represents the 20th District, which includes all of Fremont, Newark, Union City and Milpitas, and parts of Castro Valley, Hayward, Pleasanton and San Jose.

“This is very encouraging and very exciting news,” New Haven Unified School District Superintendent Kari McVeigh said. “It validates the work being done by our students and their parents as well as our teachers and the classified employees and administrators who support Just as encouraging, Ms. McVeigh pointed out, is that Logan graduates outpaced their county and state counterparts in every subgroup. Among Hispanic or Latino students, for example, 75.2 percent of Logan graduates enrolled in a college or university, compared to 55.8 percent in the county and 65.9 percent in the state. Among African-American students, 79.3 percent of Logan graduates enrolled in a college or university, compared to 58 percent in the county and 77.9 percent in the state. The trend also held among whites (84.3, 79.1, 79.1), Asians (86.3, 79.7, 85.7) and Pacific Islanders (89.7, 67.3, 69.8).

In addition, among students defined as socioeconomically disadvantaged, 82.2 percent of Logan graduates enrolled in a college or university, compared to 56.5 percent in the county and 68.5 percent in the state. Among English learners, 71.1 percent of Logan graduates were enrolled compared to 44.5 percent in the county and 52.2 percent in the state. And among students with disabilities, 75.7 percent of Logan graduates were enrolled, compared to 60.4 percent in the county and 62 percent in the state. Superintendent McVeigh also pointed out that, over the past two years, virtually every graduate of the District’s continuation high school, Conley-Caraballo High, has enrolled in either a community college or at a four-year school. “We’ve succeeded in establishing a college-going culture in New Haven,” Ms. McVeigh said, “and we’re looking forward to the challenge of helping that culture grow.”

Gorbachev says he would join Wall Street protests BY BOB MOEN ASSOCIATED PRESS LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP), Oct 14 - Former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev (mih-kah-EEL' gohr-bah-CHAHV') says he is sympathetic to the protest movement against poverty, corporate greed and injustice that has sprung up in the United States and elsewhere. Gorbachev said in a speech to about 6,000 people at the University of Wyoming on Friday that he would join them if he were on Wall Street. But the 80-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner warned that extremists must not be allowed to exploit the protests. He didn't specify what he meant by extremists. Gorbachev is popular in the West for the role he played in ending the Cold War but is disliked by many in Russia for the collapse of the Soviet Union and the years of social and economic turmoil that followed.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Page 27

Community memory and action WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

t times, I am asked to address civic groups, commenting on the role of Tri-City Voice within our communities. Follow-up questions often revolve around current events and how civic leaders address major issues and concerns. Invariably, there is an amazing amount of latent civic memory and wisdom within the membership of these groups, far beyond what I can claim. However, no matter how well organized, unless the group is formed specifically for a political purpose, its influence on civic affairs is usually unfocused. At a recent meeting, it struck me that the combined knowledge and institutional memory within the room far exceeded that of City staffs, councilmembers or consistent observers, if any, at advisory committees. What, I wondered, would be the result if each of these groups polled their membership and asked them to follow developments in a particular area of interest? Members could divide attendance and responsibilities, pledging to attend advisory group meetings or those of city council, planning commission, park district, water district, sanitary district, transit district, schools or any other public entity. Some of these commissions hold meetings with few, if any, observers. Those volunteering their time and effort on committees and commissions should welcome review and diligent comment on pending legislation or civic action. They could use the support and interest of other citizens. I believe the result of heightened attention would be an immediate change in attitude by all involved, elevating the

importance of advisory committees, providing valuable input and facilitating the distribution of factual information throughout the community. Valid information would become common currency in our communities, legitimatized through observation by multiple sources. Traditionally, newspapers and other media filled this role, but on a local level, daily newspaper reporting has virtually disappeared due to economic pressure and strict attention to the financial bottom line. On the other hand, Tri-City Voice continues to focus on local people, events and venues… what we call “news.” TriCity Voice has always realized the importance of citizen involvement and information since it is virtually impossible to be everywhere at all times. For this reason, a well-informed and interested citizenry is vital to the continuation of Tri-City Voice as a robust local paper and, in turn, healthy, vibrant communities. In the past, even with a large staff of reporters, local newspapers were dependent upon interested citizens. Tips and leads could direct reporters to significant issues and reporting that combined reasonable context as well as content. With the decline and exit of local daily newspaper reporting, citizen involvement has become even more important. Groups that can assemble eyes and ears throughout the extensive mechanics of communities have become extremely important. If each fraternal, service and social organization made the decision to expend a portion of their energy toward observation and reporting of civic affairs, the amount of collective knowledge within the Greater Tri-City area would expand exponentially. Tri-City Voice stands ready to assimilate and coordinate such information as a means to disseminate the results of these endeavors to the community at large. An informed electorate can create wondrous changes in our area, making sure elected

leaders are responsible and responsive. Each civic project or expenditure should bear the scrutiny of public advice and comment. If studies are initiated with consultant fees, who continues to ask questions of where they lead and what results emerge? Public attentiveness means that such plans will be less likely to gather dust on a backroom shelf. As civic interest increases, it is my hope that so will scrutiny of systems within our local governments. Assuming that all is well because things have been done in a certain manner for decades is not always productive. Fremont, for instance, has grown substantially since incorporation, yet continues to use a governmental structure that may not serve today’s reality. Issues of district elections, city charter and a mayoral form of government are raised on occasion but seem to be summarily dismissed. Although entrenched interests may resist, it is not unreasonable to examine these ideas without a bias toward status quo. The first step is citizen involvement. Organizations such as Retired Teachers, SIRS, Rotary, Lions, Kiwanis, Optimists and many others have the right attitude toward service to their community. Some may be restricted from political action, but a logical extension of their role as proponents for civic health could be non-judgmental observation. Is it worth a try?

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Hayward Woman Wins $2 Million SUBMITTED BY CALIFORNIA LOTTERY Most people would never imagine that a trip to their local supermarket would completely change their life. But for one lucky California Lottery player, that’s exactly what happened. During a routine grocery shopping trip, Hayward resident Shirley Mills decided to pick up a couple of Scratchers® tickets. One of those tickets would end up being worth $2 million. Mills purchased a winning “Set for Life” Scratchers® ticket at

Lucky Supermarket located at 15840 Hesperian Boulevard in San Lorenzo. The “Set for Life” jackpot pays the winner $100,000 each year for 20 years. The retailer will receive a bonus check of $10,000 for selling the winning ticket. Mills purchased the winning ticket on Saturday afternoon and said she was so excited and nervous she couldn’t sleep that night. She plans on paying off some bills and also helping out her two children with their expenses. Mills has one grandchild and another on the way. www.calottery.com

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CNS-2182612#

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING OF THE CALIFORNIA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY PURSUANT TO INTERNAL REVENUE CODE SECTION 147(f) Notice is hereby given that the California Housing Finance Agency (the “Agency”) will hold a public hearing on November 14, 2011, pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 147(f) with respect to the proposed plan of financing providing for the issuance by the Agency of one or more separate issues of housing revenue bonds or notes in an aggregate amount sufficient to finance loans for the construction, acquisition or rehabilitation of one or more multifamily housing developments located in California and/or to refund bonds previously issued to finance one or more multifamily housing developments located in California. Each of the developments to be financed is/are identified on the attached list, which also provides a general, functional description of each development (including the approximate number of units in each development) and identifies the address, initial owner, operator and/or manager, and the maximum face amount of obligations to be issued with respect to each development. Inclusion on the list is neither a final commitment by the Agency to finance a development nor a final commitment by the owner to participate in the financing. FACILITY NAME AND INITIAL OWNER ADDRESS OPERATOR/MANAGER MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF BONDS TO BE ISSUED DESCRIPTION OF FACILITY Lion Creek Crossings I 881 - 69th Street Oakland, Alameda County 94621

OWNER: Oakland Coliseum Housing Partners, L.P. OPERATOR/MANAGER: Related Management Company, L.P. $4,220,000 115 Units/Family 5-story Garden New Construction

Noble Towers 1515 Lakeside Drive Oakland, Alameda County 94612

OWNER: Noble Tower Preservation, L.P. OPERATOR/MANAGER: Related Management Company, L.P. $4,030,000 195 Units/Elderly Fifteen-stories Highrise Acq/Rehab

The Surf Apartments 15320 Tropic Court San Leandro, Alameda County 94579

OWNER: Surf Housing Associates, L.P. OPERATOR/MANAGER: Eden Housing, Inc. $2,840,000 46 Units/Family Two-story Single Family Acq/Rehab

Baywood Apartments 225 – 41st Street Oakland, Alameda County 94611

OWNER: Baywood Affordable, L.P. OPERATOR/MANAGER: Terracorp Financial, Inc. $4,080,000 77 Units/Elderly Six-stories w/elevator Acq/Rehab

Mission Gateway 33155 Mission Blvd. Union City, Alameda County 94587

OWNER: MP Mission Associates, A California Limited Partnership OPERATOR/MANAGER: Midpen Housing Corporation $6,920,000 121 Units/Family Three-story New Construction The hearing will commence at 10:00 a.m. and will be held in the California Housing Finance Agency Conference Room, 500 Capitol Mall, 14th Floor, Sacramento, California. Interested persons wishing to express their views on the issuance of such bonds or on the nature of the developments to be financed with the proceeds of the bonds, will be given the opportunity to do so at the public hearing or may, prior to the time of the hearing, submit written comments to the California Housing Finance Agency, Attention: Loretta McGrath (lmcgrath@calhfa.ca.gov), 500 Capitol Mall, 14th Floor, Sacramento, California 95814. No particular form for the written comments is required. To allow all interested individuals a reasonable opportunity to express their views, the California Housing Finance Agency will impose the following requirements on persons who wish to participate in the hearing: (1) persons desiring to speak at the hearing must file with the Agency a request, in writing, at least 24 hours before the hearing; and (2) each person is to limit his/her oral remarks to a period no longer than ten (10) minutes. DATED:

CLAUDIA CAPPIO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CNS#2195326

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG11585997 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS to SYRAH MAE GRANNIS The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition

for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/01/2011 Time: 2:30 p.m., Dept.: 608, Room: n/a The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: TRI-CITY VOICE Date: AUGUST 23, 2011 ----JUDGE of the Superior Court 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456597 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heartbox Photography, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 27, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194502# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456839-40 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) San Francisco Salt Company, (2) San Francisco Bath Salt Company, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda LJW Incorporated, California, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/1/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Lee Williamsen, CEO/Founder This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194499# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456863 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Tadamasa Ramen, 34672 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Shau Ping Ho, 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shau Ping Ho

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193778# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457276 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Power Plumbing & Rooter, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Rameez Khan, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/13/11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rameez Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 13, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193770# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456757 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mantiques, 37390 Niles Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Joseph J. Tarquini, 5325 Brophy Dr., Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/1/11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Joseph Tarquini This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 30, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/11 CNS-2191181# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456648 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Hydrolypozene, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Matt Bidner, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a

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In addition to CSUEB faculty-led activities, demonstrations and experiments are planned that will be facilitated by scientists and other world renowned experts from Chabot Space & Science Center, Lawrence Hall of Science, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Sandia Labs, The Tech Museum and UC San Francisco. “California State University, East Bay’s College of Science has a tradition of opening its facilities to the community with the goal of bringing science awareness to the largest possible audience,” Leung said. “By joining forces with the Bay Area Science Festival, we will make that happen. The Science Festival is an important event to the university, as Cal State East Bay is committed to an increased focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education as a way of preparing our students to fill the current and future workforce needs of this region.” Previous festivals at CSUEB each have drawn more than 5,000 attendees, and a similar size crowd is expected this year, said Charlene Lebastchi, festival coordinator and College of Science staff member. Find additional information about CSUEB’s Discovery Day festival online at www20.csueastbay.edu/csci/festival/. For details about scheduling and locations of other events in the Bay Area Science Festival visit www.bayareascience.org. Discovery Days Saturday, October 29 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Cal State East Bay 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3441 www20.csueastbay.edu/csci/festival/ Free

She has been an avid activist in New Haven schools from the classroom to Sacramento. While mentoring young Latino women, she has connected them with positive role models, community services and encouraged them to attend college utilizing her counseling background, as well as her command in Spanish and English languages. Recently she mobilized her neighbors to form and participate in a neighborhood watch group, the first such group in her area and served as a neighborhood watch captain. She has been committed to continually inspire average citizens to get involved and make a difference in our city. Nominating Commissioner Sarabjit Cheema, who grew up in India, says, “I admire the work of Mother Teresa for the poor in India. For the last 15 years, I have witnessed Cindie’s spirit, living by the words of Mother Teresa to be concerned about our next door neighbors and the poor in the society.” MAKHAN SINGH BAINS, successful local businessman and long-time major donor to Union City community events and organizations. Owner of Raja Sweets Indian Cuisine, one of the largest Indo-American restaurant and catering companies in the Bay Area, Mr. Bains has served on the Board of

I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Matthew Bidner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 28, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11 CNS-2183282# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455792 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MD Consulting, 2884 Cutler Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Yong Song, 2884 Cutler Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yong Song This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 1, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11 CNS-2183268#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF FREMONT PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of Fremont City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the following proposal. Said public hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 8, 2011, Council Chambers, 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg. A, Fremont, CA, at which time all interested parties may attend and be heard: CENTRAL PARK SOUTH MAJOR PLANNED DISTRICT AMENDMENT Public Hearing (Published Notice) to Consider Planning Commission Recommendation to Introduce an Ordinance Adopting a Major Planned District Amendment to P-2005-131 (Central Park South) to Modify Condition of Approval A-5 (Affordable Housing Plan) Provisions Related Apartment Building Construction by a For-Profit Developer Located at 41075 Railroad Avenue in the Irvington Planning Area If you challenge any decision of the City Council in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing. SUSAN GAUTHIER DEPUTY CITY CLERK 10/25/11 CNS-2194947#

Directors of the Union City 50th Anniversary Committee and donated generously to the UC50 and many other Union City causes. Makhan is nominated by HRC Commissioner Harpreet Kaur. MARVIN BOWERMAN, staff counselor at the Fremont Family Resource Center, the Administrative Director of La Honda Music Camp, and Cub Scout Den Leader and Unit Commissioner of Cub Scout Pack 268 in Union City. Mr. Bowerman has also participated in the City’s Youth Violence Prevention and Intervention Advisory Board process. Marvin is nominated by HRC Commissioner, Helen Hsu. JIM SOLTAU, long-time Youth Minister at St Anne’s Catholic Church, located in Union City. Under Mr. Soltau’s leadership, the Youth Ministry at St. Anne’s has grown and developed into one of the largest youth ministries in the East Bay, serving scores of young people and providing a positive role model for our youth. Jim is nominated by HRC Commissioner, Jerico Abanico. CHRIS VALUCKAS, Recreation Supervisor for Union City Leisure Services and manager of the Kennedy Community Center located in the Decoto neighborhood of Union City. Mr. Valuckas has had many accomplishments in his career spanning over 14 years with the City, but is being recognized for his exemplary role in building and maintaining Union City’s Special Needs Program that gives residents with physical and mental challenges an opportunity to participate in sports and social events that are inclusive, sensitive, and just plain fun. Chris is nominated by HRC Commissioner, Carmen Smeester. The public is invited to join the Human Relations Commission in recognizing these individuals who Make a Difference in our Community, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26th, 2001 in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Nile Road, Union City. Light refreshments will be served after the award ceremony. For more information, please contact Tony Acosta, Secretary to the Human Relations Commission, at 510.675.5394 or at Tonya@unioncity.org.

US solar firms file trade complaint against China AP WIRE SERVICE WASHINGTON (AP), Oct 19 Seven U.S. solar panel companies filed a federal trade complaint Wednesday against Chinese companies they accuse of dumping solar products on global markets to depress prices. The U.S. solar companies filed their case with the Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission. The complaint asks the government to impose tariffs of ``well over 100 percent'' on Chinese solar imports, said Greg Stanko, a spokesman for the U.S. companies.

The group of U.S. solar manufacturers said in a statement that China is unfairly subsidizing its industries with “an arsenal of land grants, contract awards, trade barriers, financing breaks and supply chain subsidies to advance its pricing and export aggression.” The Chinese Embassy did not respond to a message seeking comment Wednesday. The U.S. companies also accused China of illegally dumping its products on the global market, a trade violation in which a country sells goods below the price of production to wipe out competition. “China's wrongful tactics run systematically across the board. ... China actually

has no production cost advantage,” Gordon Brinser, president of SolarWorld Industries America Inc., said in a statement. The U.S. solar industry is struggling against stiff competition from China as well as weak demand in vital markets, particularly recession-battered Europe. Those struggles were underscored by the collapse in Solyndra LLC. The solar panel maker based in Fremont, California, was the beneficiary of a half-billion-dollar federal loan but filed for bankruptcy in August and laid off its 1,100 workers.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Page 29

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

Obituaries

L

Isabel Brown RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 8, 1914 - October 12, 2011

Donavon D. Meyer

Sharon Chandler-Tindall

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 24, 1986 - October 13, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 13, 1927 - October 15, 2011

RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

Jose A. Ulloa

Drake R. Benton

Wanda L. Morris

Celia Ramirez

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY April 8, 1914 - October 12, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 7, 1934 - October 19, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Bobby James Holland

Glen W. Alberici

Saokram Bouth

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 13, 1965 - October 21, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY February 21, 1937 - October 19, 2011

Lillian E. Silva

Ruperto Vasquez

RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 6, 1932 - October 20, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 2, 1924 - October 21, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Theo E. Overacker

George Redfearn, Jr.

Lupe Arriola

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 2, 1928 - October 24, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

Nick Bruckner

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 5, 1914 - October 21, 2011

Juanita Mathues RESIDENT OF NEWARK November 9, 1918 - October 22, 2011

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Deborah Ann deKnoop-Graves RESIDENT OF LIVERMORE June 17, 1955 - October 23, 2011

Chapel of the Angels

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark

(510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Special Life Events

(L-R): Rita Gleason ’66, Sofia Apitz ’12, Kristen La Torre ‘12

Local student named as National Merit Commended Student SUBMITTED BY THIEN NGUYEN Rita Gleason, Principal of Notre Dame High School, recently announced that Seniors Sofia Apitz of Fremont and Kristen La Torre have been named Commended Students in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. A Letter of Commendation from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation will be presented to the students in May. These students are among the top 50,000 of over 1.5 million students who entered the 2012 National Merit Program by taking the 2010 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

Special Life Events

GROCO named in top ten SUBMITTED BY REBECCA SEIPERT

G

reenstein, Rogoff, Olsen & Co. (GROCO), one of the top accounting firms in the San Francisco Bay Area, announced October 11 that it has received the prestigious recognition as one of the 10 Fastest Growing Accounting Firms in the nation by INSIDE Public Accounting Magazine (IPA). In addition to this honor, they received recognition as one of the Top Five Fastest-Growing firms, by region, and Top Five Fastest-Growing firms, by revenue ($510 million) in the nation. “GROCO is honored to receive this recognition,” says Alan Olsen, Managing Partner of Greenstein, Rogoff, Olsen and Co. “The firm has

been able to see continuous growth, despite our nation’s economic challenges. This award is a reflection of our dedicated team of partners and staff who have enabled us to receive this great accomplishment.” Greenstein, Rogoff, Olsen and Co. was selected as one of the fastest growing firms by IPA from more than 400 participating companies based solely on their performance in specific areas of management and growth. Collectively, the firms who participated in IPA’s annual survey this year had an average growth rate of just 0.85%. Only 6% of firms that participated this year turned in a doubledigit organic growth rate – a sharp comparison to just four years ago when it was the norm rather than the exception. In 2011, the 10 fastest-growing firms in the nation, as named by IPA, are turning in double-digit growth during a time when many considered it to be nearly impossible. “The success of these firms is a tribute to their leadership. Their performance defies economic trends by recognizing the long-term goals that are needed in order to sustain growth through both prosperous times and down times,” says Kelly Platt, managing editor of IPA. “We salute all of these firms and recognize their overall management strategies as models that the profession can be quite proud of,” Platt concludes. To view the full list of firms fastest growing accounting firms, please visit: http://www.insidepublicaccounting.com/PDF/fg2011.pdf For more information about GROCO, visit www.groco.com

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published biweekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, Oct 25 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Oct 26 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, Oct 27 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Ln., Fremont 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 So. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Fremont Monday, Oct 31 1:00 – 2:10 p.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cherryland

School, 585 Willow Ave., Hayward 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, Nov 1 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25 – 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 – 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, Nov 2 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apt., 1300 Kentwood Ln., San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Nov 2 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 1

Theatre

SUBMITTED BY GEORGE LEDO

exhibitions from Japan to Bulgaria including Canada and Puerto Rico. His work is included in a number of Museum Collections: The Auchenbach Foundation Collection at the Palace of the Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco; Coos Art Museum, Coos Bay, Oregon;

mural’s imagery is inspired by the ‘Dia de los Muertos.’ The new Cultural Corner, which opened in May of this year, is located on the Lower Level near Sears. The exhibit is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.NewParkMall.com.

October 25, 2011

Douglas Morrisson Theatre in Hayward will once again present the all-time favorite Rodgers and Hart musical "The King and I." The show, which opened the Morrisson in 1979 when it was named The Little Theatre, has been one of the most requested shows by audiences over the years, and was most recently performed at the Morrisson in 1994. Directed by Sue Ellen Nelsen and starring T.K. Armstrong as The King and Anna Cook as Anna, the upcoming production will open on November 11 and run through December 4. Written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, the musical is based on the novel “Anna and the King of Siam,” written by Margaret Landon in 1946. The novel, in turn, was inspired by the real-life memoirs of Anna Leonowens, who served as governess at the court of King Rama IV (also known as King Mongkut) from 1862 to 1867. "The King and I" premiered on Broadway in March of 1951, starring Gertrude Lawrence as

Anna and Yul Brynner as The King, and won Tony Awards for Best Musical, Best Actress (Lawrence) and Best Featured Actor (Brynner). Although Lawrence died of cancer a year and a half later, the show had a Broadway run of over three years, with 1,246 performances, before embarking on a national tour. The King and I Nov 11 – Dec 4 8 p.m. (Sunday: 2 p.m.) Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Adults: $28 Seniors: $25 Juniors & Students: $20 Group rates available Box Office open Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Finding the Fountain of Youth BY MAUREEN PARENT Can physical activity lead to The Fountain of Youth? Well, perhaps. It will get us pretty close.

Laguna Beach Museum, Laguna Beach, CA; and Museo National De La Estampa, Mexico City, Mexico. He has also illustrated a number of books and his work is part of a number of Public Collections: Harriet Taubman Gallery, MD; Mission Cultural Center, SF; Irish Arts Council, Belfast, Ireland and many more. Rios’ artwork has been published in over 80 magazines. On October 29 and 30, Rios will produce two large portable mural canvases in front of NewPark Mall’s Cultural Corner. The

To learn more about the artist visit www.diegomarcialrios.com. Local artists interested in displaying their work at the new Cultural Corner are invited to call Kenia Ortiz at (510) 2841600. Diego Marcial Rios Saturday, Oct 29 and Sunday, Oct 30 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.NewParkMall.com Free

No matter how late in life you begin, physical activity can impact your life in so many positive ways – more energy, improved outlook, overall wellness and slowing the progress of disease. In other words, for many it can be a new lease on life! Research has validated this to be true. So, it’s never too late to start. Simply beginning is the hardest part… agreed? For Sylvia, it started with a wish. She wanted to dance at her great-grandson’s wedding. Like most 93-year-olds, she lacked muscle strength due to a sedentary life-style. Getting up from a chair, dressing and even walking were difficult tasks that were becoming increasingly difficult to manage. Motivated and committed, Sylvia spent twenty minutes a day doing simple exercises with resistance bands. In weeks she became more confident in her ability to walk. After three months, she was able to stand on one foot for eleven seconds.

And the fairytale ending indeed came true. Sylvia waltzed at her great grandson’s wedding and her happiness was overwhelming both at the thought that she was creating a new memory, but also that she took the initiative that so improved the quality of her days. So Tri City seniors sixty years of age and older, no matter your health issues, bed-ridden, chair bound or simply afraid of falling, doing custom designed, daily exercises will improve your mobility. LIFE ElderCare’s free Fall Prevention Program includes a personalized 12-week in home exercise program, weekly visits from a Unitek College student nurse, a home safety check and a medication review. Interested individuals are encouraged to call Sandy at 574-2088 to learn more about LIFE ElderCare’s program and the benefits of decreasing the risk for falls and fear of falling. You can also learn more by logging onto our website at www.lifeeldercare.org and watch the recent film clips of seniors who have benefited from this program. Maureen Parent is the Fall Prevention Coordinator of LIFE ElderCare.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 25, 2011

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 31

CLASSIFIEDS Joyce Cares for Life

In-Home Care Services Personal Care Light House Cleaning Meal Preparations- Bath/Showers Companionship 2 Hours Minimum People first than things We are reliable, trustworthy, with years of experience working with the elderly and disabled of all ages.

Call for a quote today

510-695-7360 Sissie091093@yahoo.com Insured and Licensed #142030

Complete LANDSCAPING CONCRETE WORK CARPENTING Call John (510) 284-7790 Fremont-NewarkUnion City 30 years

What’s It Worth? H&H APPRAISAL SERVICES

Certified Specialist *Free Verbal Opinion “Call us when you are ready to sell.”

Jewelry, Fine Art & Collectibles In Castro Valley & Hayward 510-582-5954 In Tri City & the Valley 510-744-1564 norm2@earthlink.net MERCHANT ENTERPRISES PRESENTS

WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz

Thousands of products at Low Cost Prices clothes shoes vacations franchies and much more How you can save hundreds of dollars by simply ordering at 70-80% below department store prices direct over the internet

Log on to www.wholesalecostless.com 510-472-1844 email: apparelwholesale@hotmail.com

Garden Apartments $975 Jr 1 Br w/spec, 1 & 2 Bedrooms Available FREMONT’S BEST HOUSING VALUE Water, Garbage, Carport included Swim Pool/ Rec Room/Laundry Close shopping & Fwy Gated Security Walk to Bart/HUB 1 & 2 Bedroom No Sec 8/Pets

HASTINGS TERRACE/EAST APTS 510-793-2535, 510-792-4983

Volunteers Needed: IT Professionals ISTS Worldwide, Inc, http://www.istsinc.com has permanent positions for i) Datawarehousing Analyst for Analysis, Design, Development,Testing, Installation, & configuration, of Data Warehousing applications. (ii) QA Analyst for evaluation & testing & compliance of software applications (iii) Software Developer w/exp in J2EE Architecture & Java Technologies. MS/BS in Comp Sci/Eng related field w/1-5 yrs exp. Must be willing to relocate/travel to client sites across USA. Send resume to HR, 39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 390, Fremont, CA 94538 or email to hr@istsinc.com

Computers: Software Developers sought by ISTS Worldwide, Inc, http://www.istsinc.com for permanent positions. (i) w/exp in J2EE Architecture & Java Technologies (ii) Design, development & support of .Net Applications using .Net, C#, C++,ASP.NET, Oracle, SQL, SQL*Plus, PL/SQL, SQL Server & Java in client/server environment. Must be willing to relocate/travel to client sites across USA. Send resume to HR, 39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 390, Fremont, CA 94538 or email to hr@istsinc.com

Help Wanted Project Mgr to plan floor design and construction, analyze materials, review architectural/construction docs & estimate costs (Job#P8) Res to Century Carpet Inc, 703 A St, Hayward, CA

HELP WANTED

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Wanted Hair Stylists & Beauty Supply Service people

If you love cats and kittens... and have a little time and lots of TLC to share, we need YOU. PURRFECT CAT RESCUE is a not-for-profit group, and we have cats and kittens who need some TLC. We also need help with our adoption showcase on the weekends. We provide the training. In return, you will get the joy, laughter, furry purrs and the heartwarming satisfaction of knowing you are just doing the right thing. www.purrfectcatrescue.org or call 510-739-1597

Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

Southland Senior Club The club is open to all Seniors 50+

Affordable Appartment Housing

FREE Yourself from Hurts, Habits and Hang-ups Meets Every Thursday Night 7-9pm Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 510-586-5747 Ilona or 510-520-2769 Tom Corner of E St. and 9th St. Union City

Irvington Terrace, an affordable apartment community in Fremont, is opening its waiting list for a limited time for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments. Applications for the waiting list will be available and accepted at the leasing office from Monday, October 31st at 9 am until Friday, November 11th at 5pm, 2011. Staff will be available to answer questions starting October 31st. No need to line up—applications will be randomly ordered after the 31st. Income and other restrictions apply. Beginning Oct 31st, applications will be available at the leasing office located at 4109 Broadmoor Common (at Grimmer). Office hours will be M-F, 9am to 5pm starting Oct 31st. Local preference is available for persons who currently or previously live/work in Fremont. Starting Oct 31st, call 510-979-1159 for more information.

Various Activities at the Club include: Line Dancing Lessons, Card Playing, Tap dancing. Chance to work on Jigsaw puzzles or read books. A good supply of both are free for borrowing. Various Crafts including Knitting, Sewing Trips and events Free cookies, coffee or tea

510-264-0850 Mon -Thur from 10am-3pm Fri 10am-1 pm. Closed Sat & Sun Southland Shopping Center. The Club is located in the Food Court.


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Judge grants restraining order for Calif. lawmaker continued from page 12

Bird, a former U.S. Marine, said he has never gone onto Nielsen's property and would abide by the ruling. He said Friday's order gives him new energy to try to prove his claim that Nielsen actually lives in Woodland, about 20 miles from the state capital. The California Constitution says a person can serve as a member of the state Legislature only if they have lived in the legislative district for at least one year and been a California resident for the preceding three years, but the requirement has not always been strictly enforced. Nielsen's chief of staff, David Reade, said Nielsen lives in Gerber. “That's where their home is; it's where it always has been,” Reade said. “At every point along the way that Mr. Bird has made his false accusation and attempted to adjudicate it, he has been rebuffed by the court.” Bird, a former Marine and contractor who lives in Rancho Tehama, has been making his claim since before Nielsen's election to the Assembly in 2008. “I'm not ashamed or embarrassed about what I'm doing at all because I'm right ...,” Bird said. “I'm not doing this as a personal thing or a political thing. I am a registered Republican just as he is. But the guy lied to get into office.” Bird said the judge also granted his request that he continue to be allowed to own firearms and that he be allowed to picket events at which Nielsen appears. A Tehama County judge also previously awarded Nielsen $7,500 in attorney's fees, but he has agreed not to seek the money if Bird complies with Friday's order.

Proposed SHARE regulations available for public comment

October 25, 2011

continued from page 12

Calif treasurer defends tax break for energy firms the Republican governor was in the midst of an ambitious push to move California to the forefront in developing alternative energy. The bill passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. The California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing Authority has approved 33 applicants for $104 million in sales tax exemptions under the roughly year-old program, according to the state treasurer's office. The law allows qualified companies to waive the state sales tax when purchasing manufacturing equipment in California. Last month, the treasurer suspended the program to new applicants while the authority reviewed its application process. Solyndra was among 11 companies that have claimed some of those tax breaks. The company closed its doors Aug. 31 and has filed for bankruptcy protection. It also is the subject of congressional inquiries because it received a $528 million federal loan that has become an embarrassment to the Obama administration. Padilla opened the hearing Wednesday by saying California's tax-break program should be assessed now that it has been in effect for a year. He wants to know whether the program is helping create jobs in the state and promoting the clean-energy industry, or is just giving away tax money that otherwise would come to the state. “How's it going? What's working? What's maybe not working?” Padilla

said. “Naturally we will have a lot of questions about Solyndra. Should we have handled it differently?” California is one of a few states that require businesses to pay sales tax on manufacturing equipment, which business and manufacturing groups say puts the state at a competitive disadvantage. Lockyer said the tax-break program is unusual because it is one of the only ones that tries to assess whether the benefits to California outweigh the cost of the tax subsidy. California offers 86 other tax breaks that result in $43 billion a year less coming to the state. “My conclusion is SB71 was a wise and needed one,” Lockyer said. While the goal of the program is to create more manufacturing jobs in the state, Lockyer cautioned that it would be imprudent to try to decide which companies should get the sales tax break by trying to assess each company's financial viability. That's a job better left to investors, he said. Lockyer said it's also not the right approach to police a company based on how many jobs they create in the state. “That just poisons the relationship with these businesses,” he said. Two companies testified Wednesday about California's tax exemption program and showed mixed results for the state. One company decided to build in Mississippi despite being approved for California's sales tax exemption and another picked California over

Oregon because of the manufacturing sales tax exemption. Melissa Zucker, vice president of human relations at Solaria Corp., said California's tax program enabled the Fremont-based solar module company to avoid the state's use tax when it shipped manufacturing equipment to California from offshore. Solaria was also courted by Oregon, which does not have a use tax. Zucker said Solaria has so far used about one-third of the tax exemptions it has been approved for and has already reached two-thirds of the jobs it anticipated to create. “We have been going through an exhaustive process ourselves on where we would expand further our manufacturing capacity,” Zucker said. “At this point we are focused on California and SB71 has been very integral to our process.” Frank Yang, senior director of business development for Stion Corp., said the solar company built a manufacturing plant in Mississippi because local economic development leaders offered a comprehensive incentive package, from research to real estate. Yang said the San Jose-based business still supports California's program. “In terms of why we haven't officially conveyed any of this equipment (in California),” Yang said, “we've been fairly conservative in our planning as a company and didn't want to make any claims or go forward with any project plans until it's completely set in stone.”

SUBMITTED BY VICTORIA BARR The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) is proposing to add a section to the California Code of Regulations, Title 14. The regulations proposed clarify and make specific the landowner enrollment process, the public application and permit issuance process and the general operating conditions for the Shared Habitat Alliance for Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) program. The proposed regulations (Section 602) will be available for public review and comment through November 28, 2011. They are available on the DFG website at www.dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/share. All comments must be received by DFG by 5 p.m. on November 28, 2011. Comments can be emailed to vbarr@dfg.ca.gov, mailed or hand-delivered to: Victoria Barr, Department of Fish and Game, 1812 Ninth St., Sacramento, CA 95811. Comments received by the due date will be considered before the regulations are adopted. Questions about the regulations should be directed to Victoria Barr, Environmental Scientist, at (916) 445-4034 or vbarr@dfg.ca.gov.

Stop Waste at Work contest SUBMITTED BY ELIZABETH PIETRZAK Now through mid-November 2011, individuals who work in Alameda County (employees of commercial businesses as well as civic organizations and non-profits) can win prizes for properly sorting their office waste and encouraging co-workers to do the same. People can pledge directly by ‘liking’ StopWaste.Org’s Facebook page and clicking on the ‘contest’ tab where followers will also be provided with contest updates, helpful tips and other useful information about recycling at work. It is also possible to pledge directly at www.StopWaste.org. In addition, the “Stop Waste at Work” Contest Prize Crew will travel to randomly selected businesses throughout Alameda County to sort through their garbage and reward those who are doing an exceptional job of recycling. Those businesses deemed to be accurately separating their recyclables, food waste and other compostables (where service is available) are eligible to win an office pizza party. For more information, visit www.StopWaste.org.

Prevent the spread of ‘Pink Eye’ SUBMITTED BY ALLISON NEVES According to the American Journal of Infection Control, more than 164 million school days are missed annually in U.S. public schools due to the spread of infectious diseases. An astonishing three million of those school days are lost as a result of acute conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” The American Academy of Ophthalmology wants to teach parents and educators how to prevent the spread of pink eye in the classroom. “Pink eye is all too common amongst children; it is one of the most common conditions I treat,” says Lee Duffner, MD, ophthalmologist and clinical correspondent for the Academy. “The only way to really prevent pink eye from spreading is to practice good hygiene.” What is conjunctivitis? Conjunctivitis is the term used to describe swelling of the conjunctiva — the thin, filmy membrane that covers the inside of your eyelids and the white part of the eye, known as the sclera. There are three forms of conjunctivitis: viral, bacterial and allergic. Viral conjunctivitis, the most common form of pink eye, is caused by the same virus that causes the common cold. Just as a cold must run its course, so must this form of pink eye. It is also very contagious. Bacterial conjunctivitis is a highly contagious form of pink eye, caused by bacterial infections. This type of conjunctivitis usually causes a red eye with a lot of pus. Allergic conjunctivitis is a form of conjunctivitis that is caused by the

body’s reaction to an allergen or irritant. It is not contagious. This type of conjunctivitis is usually associated with redness in the white of the eye or inner eyelid.

sues to wipe their face and eyes.

How do you get pink eye and how do you prevent it?

With viral conjunctivitis, symptoms can last from one to two weeks and then will disappear on their own.

Conjunctivitis, whether bacterial or viral, can be quite contagious. Children are usually most susceptible to getting the condition from bacteria or viruses because they are in close contact with so many others in schools or daycare centers. Some of the most common ways to get the contagious form of pink eye: Reusing handkerchiefs and towels when wiping your face and eyes

Change their pillowcase frequently. Treatment:

For bacterial conjunctivitis, an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) will typically prescribe antibiotic eye drops to treat the infection. Allergic conjunctivitis treatment often includes applying cool compresses to the eyes and taking antihistamines. Home care tips:

Forgetting to wash hands often Frequently touching eyes Using old cosmetics, and/or sharing them with other people Not cleaning contact lenses properly. Prevention: Practicing good hygiene can help prevent the spread of conjunctivitis. If a child is infected, make sure to do the following to help prevent the spread of the illness: Encourage children to wash their hands often. Tell them to avoid touching their eyes. Discourage the reusing of towels, washcloths, handkerchiefs and tis-

A compress applied to closed eyelids can relieve some of the discomfort of pink eye. To make a compress, soak in water then wring out a clean, lint-free cloth. If a child has conjunctivitis in one eye only, don't use the same cloth on both eyes in order to avoid spreading the infection from one eye to the other. If a child has bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, a warm compress is usually best. If their eyes are irritated by allergic conjunctivitis, try a cool water compress. Over-the-counter lubricating eye drops - artificial tears - may also provide relief from pink eye symptoms. If these symptoms persist, be sure take your child to see an ophthalmologist to receive proper care. To find out more information on pink eye and other eye conditions and diseases, visit www.geteyesmart.org.

Giraffe naming contest has one rule: Not Fluffy AP WIRE SERVICE ERIE, Pa. (AP), Sep 30 - A Pennsylvania zoo is holding a naming contest for its new giraffe and there's only one rule for entries: Anything but Fluffy. The Erie Zoo created a website called AnythingButFluffy.com for people to suggest names for its 1-yearold giraffe. It's also accepting submissions at the zoo and local credit union branches. Zoo executive director Scott Mitchell told the Erie Times-News (http://bit.ly/ob6yyT ) on Friday that

more than 5,000 suggestions have come through the website alone. The original deadline for entries was supposed to be Saturday. But Mitchell says the overwhelming response has led zoo officials to extend the contest - likely until Oct. 7. The male giraffe, which now stands about 10 feet tall, arrived in July from the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory in St. Paul, Minn. Information from: Erie Times-News, http://www.goerie.com


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tors about a black or a white story but about an American story from which invaluable lessons were learned. For more information, sponsorship opportunities, how to donate or provide exhibits, contact The Tuskegee Airmen Museum Committee, 22655 Skywest Drive, Hayward, CA 94541, call (510) 259-1062 or email ben@maltaviation.org.

BY SIMON WONG A Hayward-based museum telling the story of the service and commitment of the Tuskegee Airmen is a step closer as administrative details are put in place to return the California Air National Guard (CAANG) site to the City of Hayward and its proposed redevelopment. The US Government has leased 27 acres on West Winton Avenue from the city since 1949 for use by the CAANG and US Air Force. The lease ($1 per annum for the space) expires on June 30, 2014. The CAANG has not used the site since 2008. Hayward Executive Airport staff met with CAANG representatives and their environmental consultants in 2009 to discuss the property’s return and the need to mitigate contamination as per state and federal regulations. In June 2010, the National Guard Bureau agreed to return 24 acres to the city, remediate all CAANG contamination and requested unobstructed access, which Hayward City Council granted on October 18, 2011, to the site to facilitate clean-up which is expected to take four years. The Army National Guard occupies three acres and will remain in situ. Hayward Airport Development LLC will redevelop the site in stages. Phase 1 will include renovation of the large CAANG hangar and immediate ramp area and installation of a fire suppression system. Subsequent phases are expected to last five years and will entail construction of additional hangars and small commercial buildings along the West Winton Avenue frontage. Additional property tax revenue will benefit the city’s General Fund; the Airport anticipates extra ground lease revenue.

Phase 1 will also provide between 2,800 sq. ft. and 3,000 sq. ft., possibly as soon as late 2012, at the rear of the CAANG hangar for the Tuskegee Airmen Museum. "Tuskegee Airmen" is the popular name for all who were involved in the "Tuskegee Experiment," the Army Air Corps program to train African Americans to fly and maintain combat aircraft during World War II. The Tuskegee Airmen included pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff, instructors and all personnel who kept the planes in the air. They were the first African American fighter pilots in the US armed services and trained and flew with distinction when Jim Crow laws still existed. They faced racial discrimination within and outside the military. The American bomber crews they protected nicknamed them the "Fighting Red Tail Angels" when they painted the tails of their Republic P-47 Thunderbolts planes red. The Germans feared and knew them as Schwartze Vogelmenschen (Black Birdmen). Racial segregation in the US military forced a total of 992 black military aviators to train at an isolated, specially constructed army airfield near Tuskegee, Alabama, and at the Tuskegee Institute from 1941 to 1946. On March 19, 1941, the 99th Pursuit Squadron (later designated a fighter squadron), was formed; the first cadre consisted of enlisted technical and administrative specialists who had trained at the US Army Air Corps Technical Training School at Chanute Field, Rantoul, Illinois. They established a superior grade point average during their training between April and November 1941. The 99th Fighter Squadron, already distinguished by its impressive combat record over North Africa, Sicily, Italy and

the Anzio beachhead, was joined by the 100th, 301st, and 302nd Fighter Squadrons, comprising the 332nd Fighter Group. The Tuskegee Airmen, who overcame segregation and prejudice to fight racism and intolerance in Europe and become one of the most highly respected fighter groups of World War II, flew more than 200 missions as fighter escort on long-range bombing raids. They never lost a bomber to enemy fighters. They flew 15,533 combat sorties and destroyed more than 600 enemy aircraft. Of the 992 black aviators trained at Tuskegee Army Airfield, 66 died in combat and 32 were taken as prisoners of war in Germany. Not only did they prove African Americans could fly and maintain complex aircraft, their distinguished service, coupled with the actions of those who supported them, led to eventual desegregation within the US military starting with President Harry S. Truman's Executive Order 9981 in 1948. “The space to be occupied by the Tuskegee Airmen Museum will need some work. A R&D committee is being established to explore funding and source exhibits. It will meet shortly. At this stage, it has not been decided if there will be an admission fee or if we might encourage donations from visitors once the museum opens,” stated Ben L. Henderson, Executive Director, East Bay Aviators, Inc. “The museum, itself, will be dedicated to former Hayward resident and Tuskegee Airman Leon “Woodie” Spears who passed away in May 2008, aged 84.” The new museum will be the first on the west coast devoted to preservation of the memory and accomplishments of the Tuskegee Airmen. It will not inform visi-

Many military and aviation museums across the nation have a room or corner of a World War II exhibit that mentions the Tuskegee Airmen but few are devoted entirely to the Tuskegee Airmen story: Tuskegee Airmen National Historical Museum, Detroit, Michigan www.TuskegeeAirmeNationalMuseum.org Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site Tuskegee, Alabama www.nps.gov/tuai/index.htm Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. (55 chapters nationwide) www.TuskegeeAirmen.org

Study highlights East Bay economic assets and challenges SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY A new study shows innovation drives the East Bay economy. The presence of three national research laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia) and UC Berkeley, means the East Bay’s concentration of scientific research and development is more than three-and-a-half times than in other regions. Projected to grow at an average annual rate of 3 percent over the next eight years, the region’s professional, scientific and technical service industries are expected to significantly drive growth and the East Bay, according to the report. “It’s clear professional, scientific and technical activities, including life science and clean energy firms, play a vital role in our regional economy,” said Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson, Chair of the East Bay Economic Development Alliance (East Bay EDA) which produced the report. “They’re the drivers of economic growth in the East Bay and, as the report shows, critically linked to the East Bay’s strength in advanced manufacturing, too.” The study, “Building on Our Assets: Economic Development & Job Creation in the East Bay,” was produced by East Bay EDA in partnership with Workforce Investment Boards in Alameda County, Contra Costa County, Oakland and the East Bay Community Foundation. Funding for the research and analysis was provided, in part, by Bank of America, Kaiser Permanente and the Y & H Soda Foundation. Despite the current economic situation, the East Bay has underlying assets that bode well for the region’s future: a highly educated workforce, world-class research and development institutions, growing innovation industries in life science and clean and renewable energy, a central location, vital goods movement infrastructure at the Port of Oakland. Moreover, a wide variety of housing options, open space and recreational opportunities give the East Bay an edge over other regions. The report examines trends in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties over the past 15 years and looks ahead to ways to keep the economy strong and growing. “With these assets identified, now comes the task of taking action to maintain their strength and to allow employers and job seekers to benefit from them and from all the East Bay offers,” said Karen Engel, East Bay EDA’s Executive Director.

“Although the recession has taken a heavy toll on East Bay jobs and recovery is currently limited, the report shows why the region is poised to return to prosperity in the long term - across a variety of industry sectors.” Venture capital trends reveal strength of innovation sectors in the East Bay In a 2010 national ranking of U.S. counties, Alameda County was in the top 10 in receipt of Venture Capital (VC) funds in nine of the 14 industries tracked. It ranked second in three industries, just behind Santa Clara County in each case. In three of those industries – industrial (or clean) energy, semiconductors, and electronics instrumentation – East Bay firms received more than 11 percent of all such investments nationwide. The East Bay is also a leading recipient of computer technology, consumer and business products and biotechnology. The East Bay’s top ten VC investments exceeded $1 billion in 2010. Advanced manufacturing offers hope The report reveals the East Bay’s advanced manufacturing sector’s strength. The East Bay is seeing an increasing concentration of employment in advanced manufacturing even while employment in manufacturing overall continues to decline. This reveals a more subtle story: the key role the East Bay plays in providing production space for high technology companies in Silicon Valley and elsewhere in the East Bay. In fact, the report provides evidence of the very close economic ties between Silicon Valley (Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties) and the East Bay in terms of employment and establishments. Company moves not a big factor in job change The vast majority of jobs in the East Bay are created by establishments that start and expand in the East Bay. While the East Bay is a net job importer, companies moving into the region are not a major factor in job change. In an average year, companies moving to the region represent 7,600 jobs – or less than 0.7 percent of all jobs in the region. Similarly, companies moving out of the East Bay in an average year represent about 5,400 jobs - or less than 0.5 percent of all jobs. Business survival rates healthy Like other regions, most of the employment in the East Bay is created by small to mid-sized establishments with three to 100 employees. Very small firms of one to two employees comprise two-thirds of all businesses, but only create 15 percent of the region’s jobs. One third of the East

Bay’s jobs are created by establishments that employ more than 100 people. The survival rate of new businesses is consistent with state trends. The ability of East Bay businesses to survive past their 5-year anniversary is also comparable to firms in the state. Slightly more than half (54 percent) of the East Bay’s new business establishments survive more than 5 years, compared to California’s survival rate of 53 percent. Education and workforce development a top priority The report recommends the East Bay makes education and workforce development its top economic priority. In particular, it examines the region’s challenge of addressing the growing demand for skilled workers. The availability of a skilled workforce is one of the East Bay’s major competitive advantages in attracting new investments and business expansion in the region. Nevertheless, seven out of every 10 job openings in the East Bay over the next decade will be due to the need to replace an existing worker. “The baby boom generation is gradually leaving the workforce and has the highest educational attainment of any American generation. The succeeding generations must surpass the educational attainment rate of the boomers or they will not be able to fill the jobs of those who are retiring from the labor force,” said Stephen Baiter, Executive Director of the Workforce Development Board of Contra Costa County, which assisted in developing the regional study. East Bay EDA is collaborating with workforce development partners to identify ways to address these challenges. According to the East Bay Community Foundation’s Nicole Taylor, it is critical to address educational challenges at all levels to create opportunities for individuals and their families across the region. Employment and infrastructure The East Bay’s transportation and commercial real estate infrastructure is critical to its economic recovery and success. The report finds that the East Bay’s job growth is happening in existing employment centers but the share of employment near transit has actually dropped over the last 15 years. In addition, the areas with older commercial infrastructure have seen persistent declines in employment while areas with newer developments have seen the most growth. Copies of the report can be found online at www.eastbayeda.org

Selling FlimFlam SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER The Ohlone College Psychology Club presents Dr. Anthony Pratkanis, professor of psychology at UC Santa Cruz, with “Selling FlimFlam” The Social Psychology of Influence. Discover the secret influence tactics of con artists, quacks, psychics, and the power of phantom dreams. Recently seen on the Discovery Channel, where producers censored his lecture, Dr. Anthony Pratkanis will discuss the psychology of influence including commonly used tactics, the reason people fall prey to them, and how we can learn to recognize “flimflam” and protect ourselves and others. See and hear for yourself what the Discovery Channel doesn’t want you to know. Selling FlimFlam Friday, October 28 7 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont (510) 659-6031 http://www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $10, Parking: $2


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tional 5th or 6th grade daughter). Checks made payable to Fremont Branch AAUW, must be received with registration by

October 30. After that time, please call to check on space availability. Mail to: Helen Yu, 39547 Gallaudet Dr., #2016,

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tionally, these young builders will be able to use microscopes with large viewfinders to closely study objects like rockets and dinosaurs. Galaxy Explorers, comprised of a group of teen science ambassador volunteers, will conduct a variety of demonstrations. Some of the most popular exhibitions include making slime and identifying meteorites. Another featured activity will help young scientists make necklaces that use materials to view and understand the light spectrum. Additionally, take-home projects including kaleidoscopes will encourage learning about science in an interactive fashion. Guests will be able to fly a space mission in the Challenger Learning Center, a simulated trip to Mars in which they will assume the role of flight leaders communicating with Earth. In deference to Halloween, the Challenger Learning Center will add the suspense of a haunted house abducted by space aliens. Two space missions: 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. will require separate tickets in addition to general admission. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the box office at (510) 336-7373. Visitors are encouraged to dress up in costumes throughout the day. In the past, popular costume characters have included Star Wars icons, extra-terrestrials, and space travelers. Families will be able to “Trick or Treat” at the Chabot Space & Science Center, drink spooky punch, and learn about science from a different perspective. All activities taking place in the Discovery Lab along with demonstrations by the Galaxy Explorers are available at no additional cost with general admission. Activities in these two areas will be occurring between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. The observatory will be open until 10 p.m. and families are welcome to enjoy the activities, including telescope viewing during the evening hours, until closing. Visitors to the “Sinister Science Halloween Party” will be treated to a unique and enjoyable experience. Don’t miss it!

Sinister Science Halloween Party Saturday, October 29 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Space missions: 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland (510) 336-7300 www.chabotspace.org General admission: Adults: $15.95 Seniors and students: $12.95 Ages 3-12: $11.95

Fremont, CA 94539. For registration questions call (510) 3725097 or email: discoveryday@att.net. Participants are encouraged to dress warmly and comfortably. Beverages, snacks, and a folder with fun stuff to take home, will be provided by AAUW. The American Association of

University Women (AAUW), established in 1881, was created to ensure that women receive an equal opportunity for education. Miriam Keller, working together with fellow AAUW members, helped create the Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day in the early 1990’s. “It is our hope that these events will help get girls interested in the STEM courses – science, technology, engineering and math,” says Keller. “Many girls return year after year because it is entertaining and they learn a lot.” Another similar event is planned for third and fourth-

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grade girls in the Tri-Cities area on February 25. Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day (For 5th and 6th grade girls) Saturday, November 5 8:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Road, Fremont Information: (510) 683-9377 or email: miriamkel@comcast.net Registration: (510) 372-5097 or email: discoveryday@att.net www.aauwfremontbranch.org RSVP and fees due by October 30 $22 per mother/daughter pair


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