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CPR 7 Training held at Newark Jr. High

Kids ‘n Kites Festival

A school garden for Earth Month

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 13 No. 18

May 6, 2014

Annual Ball puts charity first

G

iving back is the foundation of any healthy, thriving community, and Indo-Americans for Better Community (IndoABC) was founded for this purpose. Since 2000, the Fremont-based non-profit organization has been working to better society through volunteer work and raising funds to support local charities and service agencies, while showcasing Indian culture and values. IndoABC Founder and President Dr. Rakesh Sharma believes that charity begins at home, and while it is wonderful to aid those in other communities and abroad, there are needs to be met in our own cities. IndoABC provides Indian-American residents with the knowledge and opportunities to help those in need and make a difference right where they live. continued on page 5

SUBMITTED BY IRENE JORDAHL Cool art and hot wheels converge when Olive Hyde Art Gallery welcomes “Decked Out: Skateboard Deck Art and Photography Show.” The show commemorates the one year anniversary of the Fremont Skate Park in Central Park and showcases the artwork of more than 33 artists who, in most cases, are skateboarders as well. continued on page 38

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER Science/Fiction is an exhibition exploring the intersection of scientific inquiry, instrument manufacture, aesthetics and the fictional narratives that surround the real world and the extra-terrestrial. From Space exploration to Roswell, NM, both artists and scientists are obsessed with locating meaning in the beauty and the mystery of unknown worlds. Scientific instruments are expertly crafted sculptures whose function is to reveal the working mechanisms of the world around us. Cells seen at microscopic level are miniature landscapes that reference the geometry of our larger environment and are detailed with exquisite, gem-like beauty. continued on page 6 INDEX Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

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Community Bulletin Board . . 32

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ccording to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), severe sepsis strikes about 750,000 Americans every year, and the estimated death rate among those stricken with severe sepsis is greater than the number of annual deaths from prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined. Yet most Americans don’t even know what sepsis is. “Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition which occurs when the body has a severe infection coupled with an overly robust or ‘dysregulated’ immune response to that infection,” says Dr. Daniel Sweeney, a specialist in critical care medicine and infectious disease on the medical staff at Washington Hospital. “The immune system releases molecules into the blood to combat infections,” he explains. “It is believed that an overload of those molecules can cause widespread inflammation and impaired blood flow that damages the body’s organs. There are basically three degrees of the condition, starting with sepsis and progressing through severe sepsis to septic shock.” Sepsis can progress rapidly. If the condition becomes severe, the patient can experience failure of one or more organs. The body’s blood pressure can drop dramatically, sending the patient into septic shock, at which point multiple organs may fail and the patient can die. “Anyone can get sepsis, but it is important to understand who is more likely to get it, and which patients are more likely to die,” says Dr. Sweeney. “The elderly, infants and

people who have weak immune systems or are undergoing chemotherapy are most vulnerable. People with diabetes or cancer or chronic illnesses such as kidney, lung or liver disease also are at increased risk.” Any type of infection can lead to sepsis. Pneumonia and urinary tract infections are the most common causes of sepsis. Other common sources of sepsis are infections of the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system infections such as meningitis. Even a person with an infected wound can develop sepsis, which is a special concern with patients who have diabetes because they may have poor blood circulation and an increased risk of non-healing wounds. “Early diagnosis and treatment is as important in saving lives for people with sepsis as it is for victims of heart attacks and strokes,” Dr. Sweeney asserts. “That’s why it’s important for people to be aware of the causes, risk factors and symptoms of sepsis.” To help people in the community learn more about sepsis, Washington Hospital is sponsoring a free seminar on the topic on Tuesday, May 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. The seminar will feature presentations by Dr. Sweeney and Dr. Kadeer Halimi, an emergency medicine specialist on staff in the Emergency Department at Washington Hospital. The seminar will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at the Washington West Building, 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Diagnosing Sepsis Sepsis usually presents a constellation of symptoms that might include a fever above

May 6, 2014

To help people in the community learn more about sepsis, Washington Hospital is sponsoring a free seminar on Tuesday, May 13 from 1 to 3 p.m.The seminar will feature presentations by Dr. Sweeney, a specialist in critical care medicine and infectious disease at Washington Hospital and Dr. Kadeer Halimi, an emergency medicine specialist on staff in the Emergency Department at Washington Hospital.The seminar will be held in the Conrad E.Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at the Washington West Building, 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

101.3º F or, conversely, a body temperature below 95? F; chills and shaking; rapid or difficult breathing; a fast heart rate higher than 90 beats per minute; confusion or disorientation; low blood pressure, and a probable or confirmed infection. “Some symptoms of sepsis can be a sign of other conditions, which can make it difficult to diagnose sepsis in the early stages,” notes Dr. Sweeney, who has conducted preclinical research in sepsis. “If a patient is having severe chest pain, it’s fairly obvious that it could be a heart attack,” he observes. “Or, if a patient is experiencing sudden arm or leg weakness and/or slurred speech, it’s highly likely the patient is having a stroke. But with sepsis, we have to evaluate a combination of more vague or nonspecific symptoms, and they can vary from case to case. For example, many – if not

most – patients with sepsis will have a fever, but this not always the case. In fact, some patients with sepsis actually can have an abnormally low body temperature. The symptoms also can vary depending on the original source of infection.” Many sepsis cases are first encountered in hospital emergency rooms. “When a patient in the ER shows signs of sepsis, and we know the person has a chronic condition, we are very vigilant,” Dr. Halimi says. “Sometimes, though, we are surprised to see sepsis in people who are generally quite healthy. Recently, for example, we saw a 34-year-old patient with symptoms of a respiratory infection that turned out to be a serious case of influenza. continued on page 7

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

05/06/14

05/07/14

05/08/14

05/09/14

05/10/14

05/11/14

05/12/14

Your Concerns InHealth: Sun Protection

Deep Venous Thrombosis

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Get Your Child's Plate in Shape

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Don't Let Hip Pain Run You Down

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Kidney Transplants

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Diabetes Matters: Back to the Basic Keys for Success

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Don't Let Hip Pain Run You Down Diabetes Matters: New Year, New You (New)

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Living with Heart Failure

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Lunch and Learn:Yard to Inside Washington Hospital: Table Stroke Response Team Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Heart Irregularities

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Heart Healthy Eating Your Concerns InHealth: After Surgery and Beyond Diabetes Matters: Partnering Senior Scam Prevention with your Doctor to Improve Control

Diabetes Matters: New Year, New You (New)

From One Second to the Next

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Sports-Related Concussions Diabetes Matters: Strategies for Support

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Shingles

Kidney Transplants Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 9th, 2014

Diabetes Matters: Strategies for Support

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Don't Let Hip Pain Run You Down

Sports-Related Concussions

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

What Are Your Vital Signs Voices InHealth: Radiation Telling You? Safety

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling Your Concerns InHealth: Sun Protection

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Washington Hospital Celebrates National Nurses Week

W

hen you’re a patient in a hospital, many different individuals provide specific expertise for your care and recovery. But the individual a patient sees most often is a nurse. Nurses are there 24 hours a day, tending to patients, administering medications, overseeing monitoring systems, working with physicians, supporting families of patients and generally making sure the patient’s medical needs are met. May 6 – 12 is National Nurses Week, dedicated to honoring and celebrating contributions nurses make to patient care. At Washington Hospital, nurses will be honored and thanked on May 9 during a series of teas with the hospital’s senior executives. The theme of this year’s National Nurses Week is “Nurses Leading the Way…” which recognizes the growing leadership role nurses take in providing healthcare Washington Hospital nurses work as a team to provide the highest quality of care to patients. Together, these men and women are helping make our community healthier and services to a community. “Washington Hospital is proud stronger, one patient at a time. of its nursing staff,” Santos said. tient care and, in the community, nurses and “transformational” style of nursing nize and honor nurses as important leaders She noted that most Washington Hospiwork to educate patients, families and management every day throughout the year in meeting tal nurses have bachelor’s degrees in nursthe general public on ways to improve • Structural Empowerment — having the the nation’s health care needs. ing and have specialized certifications in health conditions and how to prevent structure in place for nurses to perform their field of study. Many also have mashealth deterioration from chronic disat the highest level ter’s degrees and some are PhDs. Most of eases. Nationally, nurses have been • Exemplary Professional Practice — the hospital’s nurses are affiliated with CEOs of hospital facilities, researchers this is a place where nurses take ownernational professional nursing organizaand members of state and federal legislaship of their practice and provide care tions and participate in continuing edutures and administrations, Santos added. at an advanced level cation programs to keep current with Because of the outstanding work by the • New Knowledge, Innovation and developments in nursing and medicine. hospital’s nurses, Washington Hospital has Improvements — nurses never stop In keeping with this years theme, Sanbeen recognized as a “Magnet Hospital” by trying to make their practice better tos noted that nurses “lead the way” in the American Nurses Credentialing Cenand use evidence-based knowledge to many ways. Nurses provide leadership at ter. Being named a “Magnet Hospital” is improve satisfaction and outcomes the patient care level, helping to direct pathe highest of awards and one few hospi• Empirical Quality Results — outtient care, taking on evidence-based projtals achieve. comes are measured in a scientific way ects to improve patient outcomes, Santos said magnet hospitals are differWhile National Nurses Week puts providing leadership in hospitals to imWashington Hospital nurses work as a team to provide the ent than the typical hospital and focus on a specific spotlight on nurses, Santos prove the physical environment of care. five distinct attributes: said, Washington Hospital invites all highest quality of care to patients. Together, these men and At the bedside, nurses provide expert women are helping make our community healthier and • Transformational Leadership — effective members of the community to recog- stronger, one patient at a time. knowledge of disease treatment and pa-

Learn about Painful Knee Arthritis—One of Our Most Disabling Conditions May 14 class on treatment options is free and open to the public Knee arthritis is one of the top five most disabling conditions for American adults, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). A 2010 study by the CDC found that nearly half, or 46 percent, of all Americans are likely to develop symptoms of knee arthritis some time during their life. The study also reported that nearly two in three obese adults may develop knee arthritis. continued on page 9

To help the community better understand one of the top five most disabling conditions for American adults – Knee Arthritis – the Washington Women’s Center is holding a free class on Wednesday, May 14 at 7 p.m. The seminar will feature Washington Township Medical Foundation’s sports medicine and fellowship-trained physiatrist Michael Goldin, M.D. The forum is open to the public and will be held in the Women’s Center Conference Room in the Washington West building next to Washington Hospital, 2500 Mowry Ave., Suite 145, in Fremont. To reserve your spot, go online to www.whhs.com/event/class-registration or call (800) 963-7070.


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SPONSORED BY: The American Legion, American Legion Auxillary and The American Legion Riders of District #10

Saturday, May 10 3pm Bronco Billy’s 41200 Blacow Road, Fremont In honor of our men and women who have served our country and helping our homeless veterans throughout the East Bay stand down Contact: Susan Peters 510-656-6848 susan.peters21@yahoo.com $20 per Person $18 Per Senior (60+ years)


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Every year the organization holds an evening event to fund their outreach programs and benefit two charities. On Saturday, May

10, the 11th annual “Charity Ball” will treat attendees to dinner, dancing, and entertainment while supporting Abode Services and Life ElderCare’s Meals on Wheels program. Abode Services works to end homelessness by providing housing and a multitude of services to families and individuals throughout Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Meals on Wheels delivers over 350 meals to home-bound elderly and disabled adults every day, pro-

SUBMITTED BY CHERYL GOLDEN The City of Fremont Community Services Department – Recreation Services will hold its annual Kids ‘n Kites Festival on Saturday, May 17 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Co-sponsored by Dale Hardware and Washington Township Medical Foundation, the festival will take place within Central Park, next to Aqua Adventure Waterpark.

viding nourishment and a friendly face to those in need. By making a simple ticket purchase for an enjoyable evening out, community members can support wonderful local programs that are changing lives, building communities, and most importantly, creating hope for our own citizens. Tickets are $60 per person or $600 for a table of 10 ($10 per ticket is considered a charitable donation and tax deductible). For those who cannot attend but wish to contribute, donations made payable to Indo-American Charity Ball can be sent to: IndoAmericans for Better Community, 707 Pilgrim Loop, Fremont, CA 94539. All donations are tax deductible. For more information, call (510) 657-0396 or visit www.IndoABC.org. Indo-American Charity Ball Saturday, May 10 6:30 p.m. Hilton Newark/Fremont 39900 Balentine Dr, Newark (510) 657-0396 www.IndoABC.org Tickets: $60

The festival is free to the public, and the first 2,500 children in attendance will receive free kites. There will be live entertainment on the main stage, interactive booths highlighting summer activities, a play area for the kids, food, and much more. The festival will have something fun for just about everyone! Make sure you check out all that Central Park has to offer, including the festival, Aqua Adventure Waterpark, Sabercat Playground, and Lake Elizabeth.

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Artwork in this exhibition ranges from the humorous sculptural fantasies of Peter Langenbach to the beautiful photographs of Alonzo Ruiz. Clint Imboden ‘s geodesic spheres generated by the precise manipulation of upcycled hacksaw blades invade the space of the Gallery, while Dickson Schneider’s watercolor paintings of QR codes link directly through your cell phone to animated images of smokestacks and other agents of pollution. Heebee Jeebee land is an imaginary world of aliens and strange events inhabiting a nostalgic landscape, while David Burke creates otherwordly environments with paint and resin. This exhibition promises to be as lively and entertaining as the imagination of audiences from Hayward and beyond. Come see what creativity breeds at the Sun Gallery! Artists included in the exhibition are: Dickson Schneider, David Burke, Clint Imboden, Amy Nelson Smith, Nina Starr, Kathleen Henessey, Julie Barrett Bilyeu,

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Crystal Gonzalez, Rhonda Chase, Tino Banuelos, Tena Kaplan, Jamie Baines, Heebee Jeebee Land, Alonzo Ruiz, Liesa Lietzke, Jacqueline Cooper, Aphra Pia, Patrick Lugo, Spenser Arias, Hollie Adamic, Mary Gustafson, Alan Haley, Jon Zax, Bethany and Christine Bender, Tom Wells, Asia Pesino and Zachary Daly Inherit the wind chimes: a science/fiction musical emergency Saturday, May 10 Get there 7:30 pm; Musical starts 8:00 pm sharp! Free! (But do bring snacks to share) Join us for Inherit the wind chimes: a science/fiction musical emergency; and watch a small mob of songwriters transforming a written story into a musical! In our original tale, feuding neighbors and a robot judge transform a courtroom dispute into a musical journey through the history of the universe. Part science, part history, part family saga, and all inventive and tunefully ridiculous musical. Presented as part of the Sun Gallery’s compelling Science/Fiction Exhibition, our musical will include storytelling, acoustic and electronic soundscapes, unexpected laughs, lyrical precision,

unrehearsed curiosities, and a mix of expert and beginner musicians walking a figurative tightrope of creative daring. See you there! Science/Fiction at Sun Gallery Thursday, April 24 – Sunday, June 1 Reception for the Artists Saturday, May 10 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. This event is free and open to the public Light refreshments will be provided Inherit the wind chimes: a science/fiction musical emergency Saturday, May 10 Get there 7:30 p.m.; Musical starts 8:00 p.m. sharp! Free! (But do bring snacks to share) Sun Gallery 1015 E St, Hayward sungallery@comcast.net www.sungallery.org (510) 581-4050 Note: A display of Czech artist, Silvie Lukacova oil paintings is being shown in the Ken Cook Room of the gallery concurrently, be sure to stop by when attending the SciFi exhibit. Gallery Hours: Thursday-Sunday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

CPR 7 Training held at Newark Jr. High SUBMITTED BY KERRY KNIGHT Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in the United States, killing more than 300,000 people annually. In Alameda County only 28 percent of the victims that sustain cardiac arrest receive CPR in the critical minutes before professional help arrives. Without CPR, a person’s chance of survival decreases by 7-10 percent every minute. Over 2,500 Newark residents were trained in CPR this year through the Alameda County spon-

sored CPR7 program. Newark Junior High School teachers trained 444 seventh graders in CPR during their science classes. Each student was given their own personal CPR kit, which included a manikin and a training DVD, to keep and practice with. In turn, the students went home and trained 2,080 friends and relatives. Last year the junior high trained 1,678 Newark residents through the CPR7 program. Karina Gallo set a new school record training 69 people this year. Newark business partners Tom and Kelly Thomas, owners of the

“Love at First Slice Pizza Parlor,” donated large pizzas to each of the 7th grade teachers to award the top CPR7 trainers in each of their classes. This project is funded by SB 12, which are funds generated by speeding tickets on California Highways and no public school funds are used for this project. The CPR7 kits cost $35 each. For questions on the program, contact: Jamie.Hintzke@acgov.org. (L to R): Newark Jr. High students: Ahmed Ramadan, Jennifer Cabrera, Karina Gallo and Katherine Ortiz


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He had no other risk factors for developing sepsis, yet he quickly went into full-blown sepsis.” If sepsis is suspected, blood tests can be used to evaluate a number of factors that are common with sepsis: • A high white blood cell count indicating infection. • A low red blood cell count (anemia). • Various chemicals in the blood that may be evidence of poor liver or kidney function caused by organ failure. • An abnormally high blood level of lactate, an acid that is produced when oxygen levels in the body drop. • Blood clots. “We also use blood tests to figure out what types of bacteria are growing in the body and which antibiotics are appropriate to treat the specific underlying infections,” Halimi says. Other tests might include urine analysis for urinary tract infections, mucus sample testing for respiratory infections or sampling of wound secretions in infected wounds. If the original site of infection is not obvious, the doctor may order diagnostic imaging tests such as X-rays, computerized tomography (CT) scans, ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Early Treatment Is Key “In patients with suspected sepsis, we may start treatment right away with intravenous fluids to raise the patient’s blood pressure and broad-spectrum antibiotics that kill many types of bacteria,” says Dr. Halimi. “Timing is of upmost importance, and we generally have to initiate therapy as soon as possible, administering fluids and antibiotics within three hours.” After initial treatment in the ER, sepsis patients generally are admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or to medical wards or for continued care. After learning the results of blood testing, the physician may switch the patient from a broad-spectrum antibiotic to one that is specifically effective against the particular bacteria causing the infection. If the patient’s blood pressure remains too low, even after receiving IV fluids, the doctor may order a vasopressor medication to constrict the blood vessels and help increase blood pressure. Other medications to treat sepsis patients might include corticosteroids to control inflammation, insulin to maintain stable blood sugar levels, and drugs that modify the immune system’s responses. Some patients with severe sepsis-related problems may require additional treatment such as a

ventilator to help them breathe or dialysis for kidney failure. Surgery may be needed to remove abscesses (collections of pus) or other local sites of infection. Patients also may require ongoing treatment for underlying conditions such as diabetes. Working to Reduce Sepsis Mortality Washington Hospital has taken an aggressive approach to reducing the number of deaths due to sepsis, focusing especially on efforts in the ER and ICU, developing protocols and instructing staff to recognize the signs of sepsis and treat it aggressively. “We have a standard protocol of screening for sepsis in every patient who is admitted to the hospital,” says Dr. Halimi. “That even includes patients who are admitted for a surgical procedure, whether or not they show any signs of infection.” The hospital also works in partnership with other organizations to promote better management of patients with severe sepsis. “Most recently, we just completed a study in collaboration with Highland Hospital to evaluate how we can teach paramedics to assess patients for sepsis while they are on the way to the ER,” Dr. Halimi says. “We want to train paramedics to begin treating patients who may have sepsis right away with fluids to stabilize their blood pressure and cooling measures to reduce fevers. We also want to establish a ‘code sepsis’ warning for paramedics to promptly alert the receiving hospital that the incoming patient may have sepsis.” Dr. Halimi says that not all people who think they might have early sepsis need to rush to the ER, however. “Most primary care physicians should be aware of the symptoms of sepsis, and they usually know their patients well, including their medications and any chronic conditions,” he says. “If you have any reason to suspect sepsis, you might want to call your primary care provider or advice nurse first before rushing to the hospital. It really is important to catch sepsis early, though. I tell patients that they know their own bodies better than anyone else. If you get a cough or cold, and it continues to get worse instead of better, see your doctor. And people with chronic conditions or other risk factors for sepsis need to be even more aware.” To register for the upcoming seminar at on sepsis at Washington Hospital on May 13, visit www.whhs.com/event/class-registration. For more information about sepsis, visit the Sepsis Alliance Web site at www.sepsisalliance.org.

OPINION

the skills and qualities they will need for college (four years from now) and life after college (10-60 years out)? The term that educators and policy makers use to define the concept of an education that is relevant into the future is “a 21st Century Education.” When our family started the high school application process last year, I started to hear this term for the first time. As a member of the business community, I had not been exposed to it. It was my hunch that this was an industry-specific term. To test this assumption, I asked my business colleagues what the term meant to them: most replied that they had never heard it before, nor had the educational professionals in other countries to whom I had posed the same question.

SUBMITTED BY LAUREL SKURKO March was an important month for educators and students across the country: this is the time when elementary- and high school decision letters come back to the students and families who had submitted their applications. Many learn which schools accepted them, and then, over the course of a one-week period, make a final decision about the school they/their children will be attending. What is on many people’s minds is “the future of our education.” We ask ourselves, “Will the school that these students attend provide them with

I decided to learn more about the concept in two ways: (1) by looking at online educational resources; and (2) by surveying business and education professionals across several industries and cultures to see what they thought what skills would be needed by those in the work force into the future. I found when looking at educational resources, the results were fairly straightforward: it seems that educators had supplemented the “3R’s” (Reading, Writing and Arithmetic) with three additional zones. These included the “4C’s” (Creativity, Collaboration, Communication and Critical thinking), along with other points that seemed logical to the uninitiated. These included “Life and career skills,” in addition to another category

called “Information, media and technology skills.” While this sounds comprehensive, one has to wonder if there may be shifts in priorities as we continue to travel through the 21st Century (we still have over 85 years to go). There will be inevitable changes in what we consider crucial to a 21st century education because of natural developments in the world around us. It is for this reason that I believe that monitoring the market for our educational system over time is essential. With this in mind, I took a simple, second approach. This method involved surveying people in various industries – those making decisions about how students are educated and who will be hired. I asked these decisionmakers how they defined a 21st

Century Education. Over the last couple of weeks, when, in the normal course of doing business, I ran into one of these individuals, I asked the following questions: “How do you define a ‘21st Century Education’”? “When you are hiring people to work with your teams, what skills and qualities are most relevant? What kind of training do you hope is available for students in schools in our community?” The first question, unless I had asked an educator, was met with a puzzled look. This is the reason I asked the question the second way. It opened up a wealth of impassioned responses. Here, I am sharing a small sampling of some of those ancontinued on page 33


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 6, 2014

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Public assistance sought SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD On April 7, 2014, at about 3:35 p.m., a robbery occurred in the parking lot of the shopping complex located at 1650 Decoto Road in Union City. The victim was walking towards a bank located in the area and was approached by the suspect who demanded money from the victim. The suspect told the victim that he had a gun and that he would shoot the victim if he did not comply. The victim, in fear for his safety, gave the suspect his property. The suspect then sprayed the victim in the face with pepper spray and fled on foot. The suspect is described as a Hispanic male adult, 25 - 30 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a medium build and a goatee. The suspect was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and black jeans. Anyone with information relating to this crime is asked to contact the Union City Police Department Investigations Unit at 510-471-1365.

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD Thursday, April 17 At 7:23 p.m., Officer responded to Drigon Park to investigate an assault with a deadly weapon call. Dispatch received multiple calls of a male suspect holding a knife and threatening to kill people at the park. Apparently the suspect and another male got into an argument after the suspect’s dog attempted to attack dogs at the park. Arriving officers located and arrested Ronald Epps (Hayward resident) for threatening to kill people at the dog park. Friday, April 18 Officers conducted a probation search at an address on Holt Street at 1:01 p.m. Officers were attempting to locate a registered sex offender that failed to comply with the conditions of his probation. Officers found Truman Jefferson (Union City resident) hiding in the attic of the residence. Initially, Mr. Jefferson refused to come down out of the attic. Mr. Jefferson had a change of heart when he learned that a Police K-9 would be sent in to retrieve him if he failed to come out. Officers were then able to arrest Mr. Jefferson without further incident. Saturday, April 19 At 7:16 a.m., Officers were dispatched to the area of Meteor Drive to investigate a vehicle fire. The vehicle was fully engulfed in fire as Officers arrived at the scene. The fire appears to be the result of a mechanical issue. The vehicle was towed from the scene for being a hazard. Monday, April 21 At 7:52 a.m., the victim

started his vehicle and left it running in the driveway. The victim removed some items from his vehicle and took the property inside of his home. The victim returned a few moments later to see his vehicle being driven away by an Asian male suspect. The stolen vehicle is a grey 2012 Toyota Camry (license # 6YHN626). Thursday, April 24 At 4:18 p.m., Officer Mangan and Officer Seto contacted a male near 1990 Decoto Road. The Officers contacted John Ellstrom (San Rafael resident) for drinking alcohol in public. Officers found two morphine pills on the thirsty San Rafael resident. Mr. Ellstrom learned that you should not drink in public if you have illegal drugs on your person. Officers ultimately gave Mr. Ellstrom a ride to jail. Friday, April 25 Officers responded to investigate a robbery in the area of Ellen Way at 10:10 p.m. The suspect simulated having a firearm in his waistband as he took the victim’s cell phone, wallet, and keys. Officers canvassed the area and were unable to locate the suspect on Friday. On Saturday (04/26/14) at 5 p.m., Officers were dispatched to the area of Alice Way to investigate a suspicious vehicle. Arriving Officers contacted two juveniles sitting inside of a vehicle. Officers noticed that one of the juveniles matched the suspect description from the prior robbery. The victim responded and positively identified the suspect from the original incident. The victim’s stolen property was also recovered inside the suspect’s vehicle. This incident is a great example of how something as simple as reporting a suspicious vehicle can result in a significant arrest.

Monday, April 28 At 12:29 a.m., Sergeant Derting noticed a vehicle parked illegally in the area of E Street and 10th Street. A check of the license plate revealed the vehicle had been flagged in police databases as a felony “Armed and Dangerous” vehicle. Hayward Police Department listed the vehicle in our automated systems after it was involved in an armed robbery in the City of Hayward. Sergeant Derting ultimately detained Jason Guzman (Union City resident) inside the vehicle. A replica semiautomatic handgun was located inside of the glove box of the vehicle. Hayward Police Department responded and took over the investigation. Tuesday, April 29 Officers responded to Union Landing Shopping Center to investigate an attempted carjacking at 10:14 p.m. The victim was getting out of his vehicle near TGI Friday’s when he was confronted by a male suspect. The suspect threatened to kill the victim if he did not turn over his car keys. The victim was able to close the door on his vehicle and drive away from the suspect. The victim then called Union City Police Department as he kept an eye on the suspect in the parking lot. The victim used his cellular telephone to direct responding Officers over to the suspect. The suspect was arrested and identified as Javiejon Rodriguez (Union City resident). Anyone with information on local crime or any of the listed incidents should contact the Investigations Division at 510-675-5247. Those wishing to remain anonymous can contact the tips line by calling 510-6755207 or email tips@unioncity.org.

Fremont Police Log

Newark Police Log

SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES, FREMONT PD

SUBMITTED BY CMDR. MICHAEL CARROLL, NEWARK PD

Friday, April 25 Washington Hospital security detained a 50 year old adult male trying to steal copper wire from a construction site on the east side of the hospital. Officer Perry arrested the 50 year old adult male for petty theft, narcotics paraphernalia, and a probation violation. Saturday, April 26 Officers responded to investigate a residential burglary on the 41700 block of Paseo Padre Pkwy. Entry was made through a pried rear window. Loss is gold, iPad, cash and personal documents. Case documented by CSO Allen. Sunday, April 27 Officers investigated a commercial burglary at the Malhi Auto Care. The front glass door was shattered and cash was removed from the register. At approximately 4:25 p.m., a victim at Centerville Park reported that he was robbed at gunpoint by 3-4 Hispanic males associated with a light brown vehicle. As that call was coming in, another victim called to report the same suspects had attempted to rob him. The area was searched without success. Investigated

Tuesday, April 15 Officer Coffey investigated a residential burglary in the 5800 block of Oleander Drive at 4:32 p.m. The crime occurred between 6:15 a.m. – 4:20 p.m. and entry was made via a side garage door. The loss is undetermined. Officers responded to Chainry Jewelers at the Mall for a theft of jewelry at 8:56 p.m. Officer Norvell learned a “well dressed” black male adult, approximately 20-30 years old stole two rings. He was last seen running north through the Mall Wednesday, April 16 Officer Coffey responded to a shoplifting at NewPark Mall at 3:06 p.m. He ultimately arrested Raman Naidu of Hayward. A female at Motel 6 called 911 at 3:50 p.m. to report a male was throwing her belongings out and was going to “shoot her up with bullet holes”. Upon arrival the responsible party was gone, and the reporting party was determined to have a false Nevada state identification card. While investigating the initial call, as well as the validity of the fraudulent identification, the female suddenly retreated to the back of the motel room and reached for a vent. Officers utilized control holds to prevent her from reaching into the unsearched area at

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Learn about Painful Knee Arthritis—One of Our Most Disabling Conditions Knee osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that involves degenerative changes of the knee joint, wearing away the cartilage that cushions the joint. The study also found that “arthritis prevalence increased with age and was higher among women than men in every age group,” the CDC states on its web site. Of those who have disabling knee osteoarthritis, about 80 percent experience some limitation of movement, such as difficulty climbing a flight of stairs or walking three city blocks. “Many people who suffer from knee arthritis are unaware of the multiple non-surgical treatment options available that can significantly improve their quality of life,” said Michael Goldin, M.D., a sports medicine fellowship-trained physiatrist with Washington Township Medical Foundation. Dr. Goldin specializes in the diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. On Wednesday, May 14 at 7 p.m., Dr. Goldin will lead a free class on Knee Arthritis sponsored by the Washington Women’s Center. The forum is open to the public and will be held in the Women’s Center Conference Room in the Washington West building next to Washington Hospital, 2500 Mowry Ave., Suite 145, in Fremont. To reserve your spot, go online to www.whhs.com/event/class-registration or call (800) 963-7070. “The purpose of the class is to explain the various treatment options for knee osteoarthritis, from the most conservative to more aggressive approaches,” explained Dr. Goldin. “The American College of Sports Medicine promotes the platform ‘Exercise is Medicine.’ The development of a personalized treatment plan can help increase a patient’s physical activity and gain all the benefits associated with being more active.” People who attend the class will learn what knee arthritis is and how the condition is diagnosed. Effective treatment starts with the right diagnosis, according to Dr. Goldin. “Whenever I see a patient with possible knee arthritis, I spend a significant amount of time explaining the condition and reviewing treatment options,” he said. “In addition to taking imaging studies, it’s critical to do a thorough history and physical exam to rule out alternative pathology and correlate the clinical presentation with diagnostic studies.” Dr. Goldin emphasized that one of the most important treatment options is exercise. Regular exercise strengthens the muscles around the knee, which helps to take stress off the joint. It also helps to keep the muscles around the knee joint flexible, which decreases the passive stress and force across the joint. “Studies have shown that people with knee arthritis who follow a prescribed regimen of exercise can do very well,” he remarked. “However, it can be challenging to get people to adhere to this regimen.” Physical therapy can also be helpful. This may include modalities such as soft tissue mobilization, cold and hot packs, electrical stimulation, ice and ultrasound.

“When I prescribe physical therapy, I frequently recommend minimal to no modalities,” Dr. Goldin cautioned. “The reason I prescribe physical therapy is to help a patient develop a therapeutic exercise plan. Muscles are designed to be used. If we do not use them, they get weaker. Furthermore, as we get older, muscles tend to weaken more easily. It’s not fair, but it is a reality of aging.” At the seminar, he will also discuss numerous other treatment options for knee arthritis. One is to do nothing and put up with the symptoms. “One option is to perform no intervention, although most patients prefer to start some sort of treatment by the time they see a specialist,” Dr. Goldin advised. Other treatment approaches include: • Oral or topical medication: Dr. Goldin will talk about the associated risks and benefits for each. • Foot inserts or various types of knee braces. • Injections: Two of the more common injectable medications are cortisone and hyaluronic acid. The literature has shown that cortisone injections can bring pain relief and functional improvement for about up to about 3 weeks. However, this functional improvement and pain has not been shown to last for more than a few weeks, according to Dr. Goldin. Hyaluronic acid, which has a mechanism of action that is not completely understood, has been shown to reduce pain and improve function for a longer duration than cortisone. “However, with this type of injection, there is a potential for joint capsule irritation,” pointed out Dr. Goldin. “I often add a small amount of a steroid to help reduce the risk of this complication.” At the seminar, Dr. Goldin will also talk about some of the newer treatments for knee arthritis. This includes concentrating growth factors in the blood and then injecting these directly into the affected joint capsule. The key to all procedures is selection of the appropriate candidate, and Dr. Goldin always reviews the positive and negative prognostic factors of each patient. When the symptoms are not sufficiently controlled with these options, he will often recommend seeing an orthopedic surgeon. “I am not an orthopedic surgeon, and therefore do not like to make surgical recommendations. I will often explain to patients that a surgical consultation does not necessarily mean a definite operation. However, it is a good opportunity to talk with a surgical specialist and find out the various surgical treatment options.” “The upcoming class on Knee Arthritis will be helpful, especially for people who would like to learn about non-surgical treatment options for knee osteoarthritis,” concluded Dr. Goldin.

Learn more. To learn more about Washington Women’s Center’s Wellness Classes and Services, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter/wel lness-classes-services. To find out more about Washington Township Medical Foundation, go to www.mywtmf.com.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 6, 2014

Auto Review

PROBLEM WITH YOUR AIR-CONDITIONING?

P

roblems with A/C systems often stem from low refrigerant levels caused by leaks. This potential culprit can be detected with a refrigerant recharge and dye injection (to locate leaks). If pressures at full charge are either too low or too high, it may be indicative of an internal restriction (of expansion valves and receiver driers, due to water vapor in the system that freezes and blocks refrigerant flow). With a full charge at 70 degrees F. ambient temperature, pressures should be about 35-40 psi on the low side and 145-160 psi on the high side. For every 5 degrees F. that the ambient temperature is warmer, pressures should be 5 psi higher, and vice versa.

Summer is coming. If your AC needs a little help, you're better off getting it fixed now than in August. Bring your car into BAY STAR AUTO CARE right away. We will make sure your car is in great shape for the summer driving season, including a check of the air conditioner. Regular maintenance now can save you from big repair bills later. It can also prevent getting par-boiled in a traffic jam on a hot summer day. Give us a call at today for an appointment.

GMC Sierra Denali: Huge, Just the Way You Like I BY STEVE SCHAEFER

P

ickup trucks are a big profit center for General Motors, so when they redesigned the GMC Sierra, they were careful not to change too much. The 2014 is all-new, but you will recognize it at the job site and in your neighbor’s driveway. The Sierra stands more than six feet tall and weighs nearly three tons. It’s a real challenge driving one around town, maneu-

and 17 Combined. I averaged 13.7 miles per gallon, making it one of my least efficient commuter vehicles. But that’s not what it’s made to do. The EPA gives the truck a 6 for Smog and just a 3 for Greenhouse Gas. Driving a GMC Sierra such as my Iridium Metallic test Crew Cab is a lot like being a 7-foot-2 NBA basketball player. You have to be careful, but you also get the best view. In town, the world is not designed for you, but on the open

before. It’s called Driver Alert Seat, and it actually vibrates the lower cushion of the driver’s seat to warn of impending danger. Paired up with Forward Collision Alert and the Lane Departure Warning systems, you can get a real massage if you’re in tight quarters or the guy in front stops suddenly. GM’s research found

HINT: If an A/C system is not fully charged, the compressor will often shut down automatically.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

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Over the past 21 years, Steve Schaefer has tested more than 1,000 cars and published a weekly story on every one. As a teenager, he visited car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models as they first rolled off the transporter. He is a founding member of the Western Automotive Journalists. Contact Steve at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

vering through parking lots and fitting it into increasingly slim parking spaces. Choose from Standard, Double or Crew Cab. The Double Cab, a compromise between the single front row and the capacious Crew Cab, now uses front-hinged doors, which aid entry and exit in the inevitable tight parking situations. The spacious Crew Cab is the choice of more than 60 percent of buyers, and now offers a standard 5-foot-8-inch and a new 6-foot-6inch bed. Upgrading to the Denali level brings a unique grille, 20-inch chrome wheels, chrome exhaust tip and body-color mirrors outside, and projector-style headlamps. Inside, you enjoy leather seating, bright door sills, and real aluminum trim. “Denali” is embossed into the front seats and appears on the steering wheel as well. You also get a customizable driver display, where you can decide what you want shown on your instrument panel. You can pick from the standard 4.3-liter V6 or two mighty V8s; all are members of the redesigned Ecotec 3 family. The 4.3-liter V6 provides 285 horsepower and 305 lb.-ft. of torque, the latter number a segment high, per GM. Step up to the 5.3-liter V8, with 355 horsepower and 383 lb.-ft. of torque available. For $1,995, you can upgrade to the mighty 6.2-liter V8 with 420 horsepower and 460 lb.-ft. of torque. Set up with the trailering Equipment Package, a Sierra with the 6.2-liter engine can tow up to 12,000 pounds. The fuel economy numbers for the big V8 with four-wheel drive are 14 City, 20 Highway,

road, it’s the best seat in the house. Freeway cruising is fine, especially with the quietness in the cabin. That comes from special efforts at aerodynamics, including new mirror shapes and extra care with the gaps between the cab and the bed. The doors are triple sealed. The Sierra Denali is a truck, with an upright, straightforward dashboard and large rubber-overmold knobs that are easy to grip, even with gloves on. But, details and materials are more car-like and exude a more luxurious feeling. Customers can take their Sierra Denali on a Saturday night date or to the lumber yard during the week. You can order two- or fourwheel drive. My tester had the latter, controlled by a small knob on the left of the dash. I had no opportunity to use the all-wheel traction, but the system has a two-speed transfer case and automatically locking rear differential. Cars today are full of safety devices to prevent collisions, but the Sierra Denali offered something I had never seen (or felt)

BY MICHELLE RINDELS ASSOCIATED PRESS LAS VEGAS (AP), A zip line that swoops riders past the vintage casinos of downtown Las Vegas and under the giant video canopy of the Fremont Street Experience is now open for business. The lower zip lines on the $12 million SlotZilla attraction opened to the public Sunday after 14 months of construction, while a set of higher lines is expected to open a little later this spring. “People are really enjoying it,’’ said Fremont Street Experience spokesman Thomas Bruny, who pointed out more typical zip lines take tourists over forests and lakes. “This one is unique because nowhere else are you flying over people and under the largest video canopy in the world.’’ The high-flying rides start from a 12-story tower designed to look like a giant slot machine. Riders can now take the 77-foot-high zip lines, in

that drivers might respond more quickly to this kind of feedback. It certainly gets your attention! The Standard cab with the base 4.3-liter engine and twowheel drive starts at $28,265. The Crew Cab model begins at $36,690. My Sierra Denali 1500 4WD Crew Cab, with the 6.2liter V8, power sunroof, off-road suspension package, trailer brake control, all-terrain tires, and the cushion-buzzing Driver Alert Package, came to $55,185. All prices include nearly $1,100 in shipping costs. Big pickups are about as American as you can get, but in this case, the Sierra is built in Silao, Mexico. However, 40 percent of its parts come from north of the border. The new GMC trucks are impressive, even if they look a lot like the old ones. The sheer number of possible configurations, entertainment options, and safety features is mind boggling. With Ford and Chrysler in their sights, this Sierra, along with its Chevrolet cousin, is GM’s finest entry.

which visitors are harnessed in a sitting position and glide 850 lateral feet to a platform near The D and 4 Queens casinos. A “zoom line’’ opening later this spring launches riders from 114 feet up and sends them soaring in a horizontal “Superman’’ position 1,700 feet across the entire pedestrian mall. That attraction uses a power boost to ensure riders make it the full distance of the wire. Zip line rides cost $20, while zoom line rides will cost $30. The attraction is an expansion of a much smaller, temporary zip line that has for two years scooted families, newlyweds and Elvis impersonators beneath a long metal canopy that displays an hourly light show. That ride was intended to be a 30-day novelty, but it proved such a crowd pleaser the business community began working to make it permanent.


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SEVERN WILLIAMS The East Bay Community Foundation is sponsoring a special, one-day giving spree aimed at attracting donations to nearly 150 nonprofit organizations doing great work in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. The May 6th event is part of a nationwide effort that may be one of the largest online fundraising events in history. Called “East Bay Gives,” the event, according to the Foundation, is an innovative experiment in crowd funding, in which many community foundations are simultaneously participating nationwide. The following Greater Tri-City organizations will be participating: Fremont: Abode Services Fremont Symphony Orchestra HERS Breast Cancer Fdn. Kidango, Inc. Math Science Nucleus Hayward: Community Child Care Coordinating Council of Alameda County Family Emergency Shelter Coalition (FESCO) Hayward Literacy Plus Ruby’s Place, Inc. South Hayward Parish Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center, Inc.

San Leandro: CALICO Building Futures with Women and Children “As part of our role as a leader broadening and deepening charitable giving in the East Bay and changing the lives of disadvantaged and underserved people, we aim to support important causes and needs these organizations are addressing,” said Janet Y. Spears, the Foundation’s interim President & Chief Executive Officer. From the stroke of midnight on May 5th through the stroke of midnight on May 6th, anyone can go to www.eastbaygives.org and contribute to one or more participating nonprofit organizations doing outstanding work in education, economic development, youth causes, the environment, health, the arts, and more. The site contains everything you need to know about how to donate, background on participating nonprofits, and how East Bay Gives works, said Spears. The East Bay Community Foundation, one of the oldest charitable institutions in northern California, and one of largest sources of philanthropic support for the East Bay, was established in 1928. “Many people wrongly believe that you have to be wealthy to give back and have an impact, but the truth is, the combination of many smaller donations can make a huge difference,” Spears added. To donate, please visit www.eastbaygives.org.

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SUBMITTED BY NATHAN SILVA The California Highway Patrol (CHP) and the Castro Valley Library present the Start Smart: Teen Driver Program. CHP officers will discuss traffic collision avoidance techniques, collision causing factors, driver/parent responsibilities and seatbelt usage. Additionally, testimonies will be provided by officers who have investigated fatal collisions involving teens, and by family members who have lost loved ones in traffic collisions. The Start Smart program is a driver safety education class, which targets new and future licensed teenage drivers between the ages of 15 and 19 and their parents/guardians. To register for the program or for more information, please call (510) 667-7900. Start smart: Teen driving Tuesday, May 20 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave, Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 TTY: 888-663-0660 Free

SUBMITTED BY IVY WU FUSS (Fremont Unified Student Store) is honored to work with Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) to put together the District Theme Song Contest. The winning song will become the FUSD District Theme Song! In order to give more time for the Fremont community to participate in this very unique opportunity, the deadline for submissions has been changed to August 24. A $500 award will be given to the student/staff who wins and to their school/department ($250 for participants and $250 for schools/departments). To register, visit http://www.fuss4schools.org/fusds-districtsong-contest/

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SUBMITTED BY DESIREE SELLATI Thanks to tablet technology, toddlers at the Fremont Main and Newark Libraries are tapping, touching and swiping as part of Alameda County Library’s new early literacy pilot project. There among the picture books, parents and children now have one more option – pre-loaded iPads with educational apps for the very young – to interact and build pre-reading skills at their local library. Research shows that children need positive ways to engage with parents and caregivers – by reading, talking and playing – to learn about their environment. For babies and toddlers, Alameda County Library’s Tots Touch! Project extends the learning experience with enhanced (animated and narrated) picture books and educational games recommended by the American Library Association, Common Sense Media and youth services librarians. Over the next six months, the Tots Touch! Tablets will be available for families to use in the Library. After the trial period, Library administrators will assess the project and evaluate whether to use it as a model in other Alameda County libraries. For more information, call (510) 745-1504.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 6, 2014

10 Things to Know for the California primary BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Your look at the top issues in California’s June 3 primary election. 1. PRIMARY PROVIDES FIRST TOP-TWO GOVERNOR’S CONTEST The June 3 primary will the first in which the governor’s race and the seven other statewide constitutional offices, including attorney general and secretary of state, fall under California’s new primary system. The top two vote-getters, regardless of party affiliation, will move on to the November general election. 2. BALLOT WILL BE DEVOID OF CITIZEN INITIATIVES This year’s primary also is notable because it is the first in decades with no statewide citizen initiatives on the ballot. The Legislature’s Democratic majority passed legislation in 2011 that requires all citizen initiatives and referendums to go on the November general election ballot, where they can be decided by a far larger number of voters. The two measures on this year’s primary ballot were placed there by the Legislature. 3. MORE RACES WILL BE COMPETITIVE The independent process to draw political boundaries approved by California voters has made many of the races highly competitive, with about a half dozen congressional seats and an equal number of legislative seats identified as essentially up for grabs this year.

Eclipse Automation to expand operations to Fremont SUBMITTED BY MATTY MAYAKRISHNAN Cambridge, Ontario based Eclipse Automation Inc has announced that it will be expanding its operations to Fremont effective June 1, under the name “Eclipse Automation Southwest, LLC.” The new facility which includes engineering offices and a service shop will be focused on servicing customers in the southwest region. “We are very pleased to be expanding Eclipse Automation operations to our second location in the USA. I believe our commitment to growth with regional presence will facilitate the increasing demands for rapid delivery of Eclipse technology and services to our customers,” said Steve Mai, President/CEO of Eclipse Automation in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. Jason Bosscher, General Manager of Eclipse Automation Southwest adds, “We are motivated to continually enable our clients to react with agility to very diverse opportunities in the market place, and are excited to provide our customers with local access to Eclipse’s exceptional solutions and support.” Since its founding in 2001, Eclipse Automation is a leading supplier of custom automated manufacturing equipment for the energy, health sciences, transportation, consumer/industrial and telecommunications/electronic industries. Eclipse Automation partners with companies worldwide to build efficient and profitable assembly and testing operations. The company will begin hiring for new positions in May 2014. Interested applicants are invited to visit the company’s career page at www.eclipseautomation.com.

4. PARTIES BATTLE OVER SUPERMAJORITY CONTROL Democrats hold a two-thirds supermajority in the state Assembly but are two seats shy of that in the Senate after three Democrats ran into serious legal trouble and were suspended. Republicans are pushing hard in a handful of legislative races to prevent Democrats from holding a supermajority in at least one of the chambers. 5. RACE FOR SCHOOLS CHIEF A CONTEST OF COMPETING VISIONS Democratic state schools Superintendent Tom Torlakson, a former teacher with strong union backing, is being challenged by a fellow Democrat, Marshall Tuck, who wants schools and parents to have more freedom and wants to tie teacher evaluations to student performance. 6. SECRETARY OF STATE RACE DRAWS CROWDED FIELD The usually quiet race for the office overseeing elections and campaign finance has turned into a flashpoint for political reform and government transparency after numerous lawmakers found themselves in serious legal trouble this year. Top candidates include a Republican, two Democrats and an independent. 7. REPUBLICANS PONDER COURSE CHANGE IN GOVERNOR’S RACE California Republicans are trying for a reboot after years of sliding voter registration and election losses, and this year’s governor’s race provides the biggest chance

yet to show how far the change message has played with the party faithful. Will they choose tea party favorite and ardent gunrights advocate Tim Donnelly or former U.S. Treasury official Neel Kashkari, and Indian-American who is moderate on social issues? 8. STATE WANTS LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO PAY FOR PUBLIC ACCESS Proposition 42 would amend the state constitution to require cities, counties, school districts and other local agencies to comply with state laws to make documents available and open their meetings to the public. They also would be required to cover the costs for doing so, a provision that has raised concerns among some local government representatives. 9. DEMOCRATS CONTINUE TO DOMINATE Voter registration continues to lean heavily Democratic in California. As of April, 43.5 percent of voters were registered as Democrats and 28.6 were registered as Republicans, while 21.1 percent have chosen no party preference. 10. VOTER TURNOUT EXPECTED TO BE LOW The Public Policy Institute of California says the state’s primary election turnout has averaged about 10 points higher than in the rest of country over the past 30 years, but that could change with all citizen initiatives switched to the November ballot. Turnout was the second lowest on record in 2012, and the absence of initiatives in the future could cause it to drop as much as 7 percentage points.

Brown: Little state could have done to keep Toyota BY JULIET WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AGov. Jerry Brown said Friday that it appears there was little California could have done to keep Toyota, the world’s largest automaker, from moving its U.S. headquarters and about 3,000 jobs to Texas. “Change is inevitable,’’ he told reporters after addressing the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Brown cited comments from senior Toyota officials who said the decision to consolidate operations in Plano, a suburb of Dallas, was based partly on its proximity to company manufacturing plants in Texas, Kentucky, Mississippi and Indiana. Texas Gov. Rick Perry said the state offered Toyota $40 million in incentives, and the mayor of Plano said the city aggressively courted Toyota. “So, you know, this is a company decision, whether – why and how – I think they explained it,’’ Brown said. ``But now, if you don’t want to believe them, they gave their reasons – and their reasons were consolidation.’’ Republicans have said Toyota’s move is another sign of California’s inhospitable business climate and failure to aggressively court companies, even as Texas and New York target California businesses with what they say are more favorable tax and regulatory environments. The two leading Republicans who are campaigning for governor in hopes of challenging Brown in November criticized him for failing to enact policies that retain major companies such as Toyota. Neel Kashkari, a former U.S. Treasury official, called Brown’s comments “unbelievable. It’s so dismissive, and it’s disrespectful to the millions of Californians who are looking for jobs.’’ “That’s the next question: Why aren’t we manufacturing Toyota vehicles in California? It’s this benign resignation that the destruction of the middle-class is inevitable and there’s no role for the governor to play in turning it around,’’ Kashkari said Friday. Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, R-Twin Peaks, said earlier this week that California is “watching job after job after job leave without a fight.’’ Brown pointed Friday to other signs that he said indicate a robust economy and strong investment in California. “We’re getting 60 percent of the venture capital. We’re the number one place for direct foreign investment in the United States. Do we have everything in all respects? No. But we have an abundance that constitutes a $2 trillion economy,’’ he said. “Is that any reason for complacency? No. That’s why we have GO-Biz, that’s why the legislature meets every year. And I’m certainly always on the look-out for things that can improve California.’’ Palo Alto, California-based electric car-maker Tesla Motors Inc. recently announced it is considering four states as sites for two new battery-making facilities: Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Nevada. Toyota will maintain about 2,300 jobs in California after the company settles into its new corporate campus in late 2016 or early 2017.


May 6, 2014

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School chief race tests reach of unions, reformers LISA LEFF ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Tom Torlakson, the veteran lawmaker seeking a second term as California’s elected superintendent of schools, and Marshall Tuck, a former charter school executive hoping to unseat him, are both Democrats. The two agree the state spends too little on education, favor giving local districts more discretion about how to use their funding and share support for the Common Core State Standards, the national learning benchmarks that have generated a backlash over whether they undermine states’ rights. As they prepare to compete along with a Republican candidate in the June primary, however, Tuck and Torlakson’s backgrounds and perspectives on a handful of hotbutton issues are making the nonpartisan race a referendum on whether change is coming quickly enough in a state where the traditional might of labor unions is being challenged by increasingly restive education reformers. Tuck, 40, who has never held elected office, counts himself among the latter. A graduate of Harvard’s business school, he spent five years leading Green Dot Public Schools, a Los Angeles charter school operator, and six years as CEO of a nonprofit founded by former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa that took control of 17 poorly performing public schools. He says his experience running schools that were staffed with unionized teachers but given flexibility in terms of recruiting, setting curriculum and measuring results persuaded him that state government stifles innovation in education more than promotes it. “Is Sacramento creating the conditions for superintendents, principals and teachers locally to be most successful? The reality is they are not right now, and I don’t think the current people leading are capable of leading in that area,’’ he said. Unlike Torlakson, who has been endorsed by California’s two main teachers unions and the state Democratic Party, Tuck opposes California’s generous teacher tenure system, has challenged the law that bases teacher layoffs on seniority and believes strongly that student’s standardized test scores should be a factor

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in teacher evaluations. He also supports California’s pioneering “parent trigger’’ law, which Torlakson voted against when he was a member of the state Assembly. The 2010 law allows parents at low-performing schools to petition for a takeover that can include installing new leadership, closure or conversion to a charter school. These positions don’t make him anti-union, just impatient with the status quo, Tuck said. He has secured endorsements from the Los Angeles Times and San Francisco Chronicle. “A lot of people are like, ‘Hey, why wouldn’t you just wait until 2018 versus going up against an incumbent?’’ he said. “I’m like, `Are you kidding? We have 2.5 million kids who can’t read or write at grade level.’’’ Torlakson, 64, spent eight years as a high school science teacher in the San Francisco Bay Area before entering politics fulltime in 1980. He said he has earned the chance to follow through on the major policy shifts upon which California has embarked since he was elected as superintendent of public instruction in 2010. During a second term, Torlakson said he would prioritize additional funding for implementing Common Core, ensure an effective transition to the new school funding formula that directs more money to schools with the most disadvantaged students, and continue championing programs that meld academics with career preparation. Torlakson also touts his productive relationships with the unions, with Gov. Jerry Brown, with the Brown-appointed state Board of Education and with former colleagues in the Legislature, where he served for 14 years. All played a role in securing passage of Proposition 30, the temporary tax increases that helped restore school funding cuts made during the recession, he said. “I’m a great advocate for kids. People believe me, they trust me because I’m a teacher, and as a coach I know all about creating teams,’’ he said. “So I have the experience, we are living up to all of the promises we made when I ran and more, and we are continuing the momentum.’’ He said he is open to revising the law that grants teachers tenure after two years and includ-

ing student test scores as ``a tool in the toolbox of teacher evaluation.’’ But such changes should be made as part of a comprehensive teacher preparation initiative that seeks to cultivate good teachers as well as get rid of bad ones and only with “buy-in from everyone involved,’’ he said. Silicon Valley Education Foundation Chief Executive Officer Muhammed Chaudry agrees with Torlakson that California already has adopted an ambitious agenda for reforming its public schools and said he thinks Tuck’s candidacy is premature. “Changing courses right now would be disastrous,’’ Chaudry said. “It’s no longer about policy. It’s about execution now.’’ Former state. Sen. Gloria Romero, who sponsored the parent-trigger law and ran for state schools chief four years ago, said that while she disapproves of Torlakson’s allegiance to the California Teachers Association, she has more faith in him at this point than the untested Tuck. “Unless I’m willing to vote against Brown and (Attorney General) Kamala Harris, which I’m not, I can’t vote against Torlakson. They are all part of the same sauce,’’ said Romero, who does not plan to endorse either candidate in the primary. A third candidate seeking the superintendent’s post is Long Beach educator Lydia Gutierrez, a Republican who also ran four years ago and has expressed doubts about California’s embrace of Common Core. Under California’s new primary system, the top two vote-getters in the June 3 primary advance to the November general election, regardless of party affiliation. While Gutierrez does not have the money her two opponents do, it would be a mistake to count her out because “opponents of Common Core, who are not numerous in California, are highly mobilized and motivated,’’ said Stanford University professor David Plank, who directs the nonpartisan Policy Analysis for California Education research center. “Tuck will have financial support from the reform community, the people who are frustrated with the current regime. Torlakson will have support from the education establishment and the unions. Gutierrez is a wild card,’’ Plank said. “So it’s really anyone’s guess how this is going to go.’’

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Counseling Corner

Common Resume Problems and How to Fix Them (Part I) BY ANNE CHAN, PHD, MFT

R

esumes are one of the most difficult documents to write – not only do you need to be thoughtful and confident about your work experience, you also need to have the requisite skills and abilities to highlight for the potential employer. Even if you had a perfect job history, it is still a feat to put together a great resume. If you do not have a perfect work history, resume writing can be a tough and painful exercise. But, fear not! First, take comfort in the fact that you are not alone – many, if not most, people have something in their work history that they are embarrassed, nervous, or concerned about. In this article, I will discuss the most common resume problems/questions that I’ve encountered as a career counselor. Question: How many pages should my resume be? I recommend that resumes be no more than two pages. A crisp, well-targeted one-page resume is far more effective than a rambling, unfocused two-page resume. (There are a few rare exceptions to the two-page recommendation, such as federal resumes and curriculum vitae for academic positions). When you write your resume, bear in mind that the employer will likely spend mere minutes (perhaps even seconds) to glance at your resume. So whatever you put on your resume should be information that targets what the employer needs. Do NOT put information that is completely irrelevant, unless you’re sure that the information will interest the employer. Yes, it is painful to cut out your significant accomplishments, but it is critical that you show concisely that you are a great fit for the job. Worse, putting irrelevant information in

your resume will distract the employer from seeing you as a viable candidate. For instance, if you are proficient in an obscure software program that your prospective employer will likely not need or care about, then leave it out. Or if you have a job in your work history that is completely different from the job you are applying for, give a brief description of it or leave it out altogether (unless it leaves a gaping hole in your work history). Many people make the mistake of including everything in their resumes, thinking or hoping that something will stick with the employer. This is a risky strategy to take because employers do not have the time to sift through your work history. Worse, they might reject you outright because you have not demonstrated that you understand their job requirements. Here’s an analogy that will hopefully make this clear – say you’re the prospective employer and you want a cheese pizza with tomatoes and olives. Instead of serving you a cheese pizza with tomatoes and olives, the jobseeker decides to “impress” you by throwing in extras like salami, anchovies, and pineapple. Not only do they serve you stuff you don’t need or want, they also decide to deliver the pizza with a wrench (since they’ve done plumbing in the past), a scuba diving tank (since they know how to do deep-sea diving), and a forklift (since they’ve done warehousing as well). If all you wanted was a cheese pizza with two vegetarian toppings, would you welcome a pizza with meat toppings you didn’t want, together with implements that won’t help you eat the pizza? Problem: What should I do with a gap in my work history? Gaps in work histories are fairly common since people often

take a break from the workforce for a variety of reasons, such as being laid off, getting fired, having a child, or going to school. How to address this resume dilemma depends on the reason for the gap. If you were laid off or decided to further your education, you can explain this in your cover letter or email. Remember that whatever your write on your resume and cover letter is fair game for the interviewer to ask about during the interview – so think carefully before putting anything in your resume or cover letter that you’d rather not talk about. For instance, if you took time off work to raise your child but do not want prospective employers to ask you about this, then do not mention this in your cover letter. If you’d prefer not to discuss the gap, you can make it less obvious by putting a part-time job or volunteer position that you held during that time period. These are two of the most common dilemmas that I’m often asked about. Next column, I will write about more common dilemmas and how to fix them. If you have any questions about your resume, email me at the link below and I will try to address them in my next column. On a final note, know that almost everyone has something in their resume that they are concerned about. You are certainly not alone if you have something that concerns you about your resume – the good news is that there are ways to fix these concerns! Anne Chan is a career counselor and licensed psychotherapist in Union City. She specializes in helping people find happiness in their careers, lives, and relationships. Her website is www.annechanconsulting.com © Anne Chan, 2014

SUBMITTED BY JENNIE COMSTOCK Bay Area Animal Shelters continue to be filled with Chihuahua’s looking for their forever homes. Come and meet one of these pint-sized bundles of love during the Hayward Animal Shelters annual Chihuahua Palooza special adoption event taking place all week Tuesday, May 6th – Saturday, May 10th. In an effort to home all of these little dogs the Hayward Animal Shelter is offering discounted adoptions throughout the event. All Chihuahua’s and Chihuahua mixes are available to qualifying good homes for only $20 plus the cost of a dog license if you live in Hayward. In an effort to decrease the number of Chihuahuas born that later end up homeless in shelters, on Saturday, May 10th from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m., the Hayward Animal Shelter Volunteers will be offering

a limited number of spay and neuter vouchers at 50 % off the regular price to City of Hayward Chihuahua owners. Please contact the Hayward Animal Shelter for more information about the event and voucher pricing at (510) 293-7200. Chihuahua Palooza Saturday, May 10 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Discounted adoptions of Chihuahuas Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Ct, Hayward (510) 293-7200


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Voter statistics, trends ahead of June primary BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Voter dynamics and registration ahead of California’s June 3 primary election: _ As of April, California had 17.6 million registered voters, about 73 percent of those eligible to vote. _ Registration is 43.5 percent Democratic, 28.6 percent Republican and 21.1 percent no party preference. _ San Francisco County has the highest percentage of voters registered Democratic (56.3 percent) and no party preference (30.7 percent).

_ Modoc County has the highest Republican Party registration (49.2 percent). _ While Democrats dominate in registration, Republicans dominate geographically, at least according to county. Of California’s 58 counties, 31 are majority Republican and 27 are majority Democratic. _ The electorate for the June primary is expected to be overwhelmingly conservative, older and whiter than California’s overall voter registration base. Sources: Secretary of state’s office; Public Policy Institute of California.

SUBMITTED BY ALAMEDA CTC Winter is behind us, and it’s time to spring into motion. Bicycling and walking are essential components of Alameda County’s transportation system. Alameda CTC and Measure B have been supporting active transportation (biking and walking) in a variety of strategic ways, and data collected through the Alameda CTC bicycle and pedestrian count program suggest that levels of cycling and walking are growing, and that the diversity of cyclists is increasing. From 2010 to 2013, bicycling in the county increased 17 percent. Efforts to make our communities more walkable and bikeable include targeted grant programs and funds to each city for bicycle and pedestrian improvements. We also require all local jurisdictions that receive transportation sales tax funding to adopt a “complete streets policy” to ensure that our streets are safe, convenient and inviting for all users. To continue and expand this investment in active transportation, the 2014 Transportation Expendi-

ture Plan includes $651 million for bicycle and pedestrian paths, safety projects and educational programs - more than doubling the existing investment. In addition, 15 percent of the $2.3 billion in funding for city and county streets will support bicycle and pedestrian investments. Thursday, May 8 is Bike to Work Day and Bike to School Day. Alameda CTC supports the innovative BikeMobile, which is part of the Safe Routes to Schools program. The BikeMobile, along with its bicycle mechanic staff, visits schools and community organizations and events to deliver no-cost hands-on bicycle repair and bicycle safety training to promote riding bikes to school. As you prepare to bike to work on Thursday, May 8, or bike to school during one of the many Bike to School days in May, consider taking one of the many free bicycle safety and education classes in cities throughout Alameda County. Family cycling workshops, free adult “Urban Cycling” and “Learn to Ride” classes and safety seminars are listed at BikeEastBay.org.

New Haven Unified news SUBMITTED BY NEW HAVEN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Foundation awards nearly $80,000 in scholarships: Fifty-one seniors from James Logan and ConleyCaraballo high schools and the Decoto School for Independent Study received $79,050 worth of college scholarships at the New Haven Schools Foundation’s annual Scholarship Luncheon held April 23. Over the next few weeks, names of the student recipients will be listed along with the scholarship sponsors and the award amounts. This first group of student awardees represents Logan High School: Sena Agbemadon (Hector & Shirley Caraballo $1,000, New Haven Administrators Association $500), Amihan Agustin (Raymond Castro Memorial $300), Samantha Bonilla (Dorothy Lenz Memorial $1,000), Claudia Castillo (Zoe Means Life $500), Katie Chang (Shutes & Ladders $250, Union City Management Leadership $1,000), Marilyn Cruz (Puente Project $250), Maranda Decierdo (JAM Memorial $500), Ashley DeLaVega (Puente Project $250), Harjot Dhaliwal (Masonic Homes of California $2,500, Washington Hospital $1,000), Selena Flores (Zoe Means Life $500), Filiberto Garcia Nunez (Migrant PAC Education $500), Mursal Gardezi (Lawson/Curry 1983 $5,000, Union City Management Leadership $1000), Anthony Gonzalez (E&H Graulich Memorial $500, Jess & Ruth Orozco Memorial $500, New Haven Administrators Association $500), Sarah Goulart (Puente Project $250), Justin Hernandez (David Mattingly Memorial $500, Jeff Curson Memorial $500, Yvonne Givens Memorial $500), Catrina Kay (Zoe Means Life $500), Vishnu Kumar (Lawson/Curry

1983 $5,000, Tom Kitayama Sr. & Jr. Memorial $1,000). “Artists Take Flight” at Logan: Students studying several disciplines will display their work when Logan High’s Art Department and the school’s Regional Occupational Program photography class put on “Artists Take Flight,” the school’s first invitational mixed media student art show. The event will be “showcasing the best of our student artists” in studio art, ceramics, digital art, drawing, multicultural art, two-dimensional animation and photography, teacher Elba Rios reports. A free opening reception is scheduled from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, in the lobby of the school’s Center for the Performing Arts, 1800 H Street, Union City. The works also will be on display for ticket holders to the school’s Performing Arts Gala on Friday, May 9. Bike to School Day: Hundreds of students at Alvarado, Eastin, Kitayama, Pioneer and Searles elementary schools and Cesar Chavez Middle School – along with a few teachers, classified employees and administrators — will be taking part Thursday, May 8, in “Bike to Work and School Day.” “It’s time to dust off your bike, pump up the tires, and check the brakes,” reports site coordinator Carrie Harvilla of Alameda County’s Safe Routes to School program. “Join your friends, reach out to your neighbors, form a bike train — hop on and pedal. Each year more and more schools join the celebration and fun of using pedal power to get to and from school. Bike commuting is good for our health, the community, and the planet. Be part of the solution!” More information is available online at www.ebbc.org/btwd or by e-mail: charvilla@transformca.org.

Traffic Talk SGTS. DONN TASANO & MARK DANG, FREMONT POLICE DEPARTMENT

Motorcycles Q: Are motorcycles allowed to split lanes on any road? A. Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible but must be done in a safe and prudent manner. The California Vehicle Code does not prohibit lane splitting in any of the sections.

Sgt. Donn Tasano

Sgt. Mark Dang

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change Tuesday, May 6 9:15 – 11:00 Daycare Center Visit – FREMONT 2:00 – 2:30 Daycare Center Visit – FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, May 7 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Leandro 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:15 – 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr., & Camellia Ct., Fremont Thursday, May 8 9:50 – 10:20 Daycare Center Visit – Fremont 10:40 – 11:30 Daycare Center Visit – Newark 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:00 – 3:15 Graham Schoo, 36270 Cherry St., Newark Friday, May 9 9:45 – 11:15 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 11:35 – 12:05 7th Step, 475 Medford Ave., HAYWARD 1:45 – 2:10 Daycare Center Visit SAN LORENZO 2:10 – 3:00 Hesperian School,

620 Drew St., SAN LORENZO Monday, May 12 9:20 – 10:00 Daycare Center Visit – Fremont 10:15 – 11:15 Daycare Center Visit – Fremont 1:45 – 2:45 Pioneer School, Blythe St., & Jean Dr., Union City 3:05 – 3:25 Alvarado Elementary Schoo, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 – 4:45 Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, May 13 10:00 – 11:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, May 14 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, May 14 1:45-3:00 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 3:15-3:45 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas


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Message from the Director Onus Dental Health Plan is very different from other dental plans. Onus offers a dental health plan within our own private Dental offices. We offer quality care at an affordable price. Our plan offers more coverage than most including implants, orthodontics and cosmetic dentistry. The enrollment process is easy with no annual fee or deductibles. There are no limits,restrictions and absolutely no paperwork. Our Onus team is passionate about helping others and providing low cost dental care. We want our Onus members to have the best experience possible. Brenda Sgroi Onus Dental Health Plan

City of Fremont News Briefs SUBMITTED BY CHERYL GOLDEN ‘10 Ways to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse’ Bursting with creativity among the living dead, the City of Fremont Children’s Repertory Theater will perform “10 Ways to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse” written by Don Solidis and directed by Grant Ewing. Described as “a whimsical comedy of apocalyptic proportions,” this comedy finds our remaining survivors at the end of the world battling hordes of rampaging zombies. This guide to surviving the zombie apocalypse is part scripted, part improvised and is full of nonstop action and hilarity. Two performances of “10 Ways to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse” will be playing at the Niles Veterans Hall, 37154 Second St., in Fremont on Friday,

May 9 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 10 at 4 p.m. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased online at www.RegeRec.com (for Friday’s performance, use #207328, and Saturday’s performance, #207329). For more information contact (510) 494-4322 or regerec@fremont.gov. Learn how to use Buses and BART Learn about public transit features that make riding easier for seniors and people with disabilities. Through classroom instruction and a field outing on bus and BART, you will learn how to plan trips, read transit schedules, pay fares, transfer between buses and BART, and travel on transit safely. Attend any of the upcoming free Travel Training Workshops that fit your schedule. To sign up, call (510) 574-2053. Internet Resources for Transit Planning Learn how to use 511, Google maps, and other websites to plan public transit trips. Friday May 9 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Fremont Senior Center,

40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy (510) 574-2053 Travel Training for Seniors and People with Disabilities Learn how to use buses and BART, and get your senior clipper card. Please note that the first day is classroom instruction and the second day is a field outing on the bus and BART. May 13 and May 14 9:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr, Newark (510) 574-2053 Registration is required The Tri-City Travel Training Program and workshops are provided by the City of Fremont and made possible through Measure B funding from the Alameda County Transportation Commission. Free Personal Emergency Preparedness Class The City of Fremont’s Fire Department is offering a free Personal Emergency Preparedness (PEP) class, which will teach you how to take care of yourself and your family before, during and after a disaster. Class will be held

from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Fremont Fire Training Tower, 7200 Stevenson Blvd. on Wednesday, May 14. Additional classes have been scheduled at later dates. To register for a free PEP class, please call (510) 4944244 or send an email to FirePubEd@fremont.gov. If you are part of a group and would like to schedule your own personal group PEP class at another location, please contact Chuck Guaraglia, Public Education with the Fremont Fire Department, at (510) 792-3473 or guaragliac@comcast.net. Vote for Your Favorite Downtown Logo! For the first time ever, community members have the opportunity to vote for their favorite logo to represent Downtown Fremont. We announced the arrival of the first phase of development in the downtown by unveiling three logos at Downtown Fremont Street Eats on Friday, April 25. If you were unable to attend the Street Eats event, you can still vote online at www.Fremont.gov/OpenCityHallDTLogo through May 16.

The logo with the most votes will be used in the City’s marketing materials and will symbolize the excitement and imagination of our up and coming Downtown. The Downtown is a 110-acre area bounded by Fremont Boulevard, Mowry Avenue, Paseo Padre Parkway, and Walnut Avenue. The Downtown Community Plan was approved by the Fremont City Council in 2012. Implementation efforts have begun with the award of a $5.8 million One Bay Area Grant. We’re Hiring: Part-Time Veterinary Technician Do you love caring for animals? If so, the City of Fremont is hiring for a part-time Veterinary Technician. Our ideal candidate has a valid Animal Health Technician certificate in veterinary medicine from the California State Board of Examiners and a Class C California Driver’s License. First review of applications is May 26 at 5 p.m. For more information visit www.Fremont.gov/CityJobs

Waste Management unveils recycling facility expansion Youth Enrichment Services at The Hayward Center for Education and Careers (Adult School) has partnered with the City of Hayward, Employment Development Department/Youth Employment Opportunity Program, Hayward Chamber of Commerce, Community Resources for Independent Living, Dr. Jennifer Ong, Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and Southland Mall to organize a job fair for youth in our community to find employment.

The job fair is for ages 16-25. Come dressed for success and bring your resume. Door prizes (for every two cans of food brought to support the Alameda County Food Bank, receive an extra ticket). Youth Job Fair Friday May 9 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Hayward City Hall 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 459-7056 jromero@has.edu

SUBMITTED BY JOE CAMERO The unveiling of an $10 million expansion of a high diversion material recovery facility (MRF) on May 6, 2014 celebrates the “marriage” of public policy and engineering design to meet CalRecycle’s CalGreen Construction & Demolition (C&D) and Alameda County’s commercial diversion goals. It is the only MRF in the region that meets both requirements. Construction on the expanded MRF began in early January and was completed in late April. It includes upgraded technologies, which increases sorting capacity from 700,000 lbs. per day to 1.6 million lbs. per day, and two separate lines for sorting construction/demolition and dry commercial volumes. Materials less than 8 inches are screened to 2 inches and again to ?-inch fractions. Magnets recover ferrous metal, while optical-sorting technology separates wood and aluminum. Vibratory air separators recover rock and other inert materials. Recovered commodities are then sent to markets and used in WM EarthCare™ landscape products. The Davis Street Resource Recovery Complex is located at 2615 Davis Street in San Leandro. For more information about Waste Management, visit www.wm.com


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New Hanuman Ji Murti Sthapana will be held on May 9-11.

SUBMITTED BY RAJESH OBEROI On the weekend of April 11 to April 13, the Sankata Mochana Hanuman Temple held its 1st anniversary celebrations which turned out to be a phenomenal suc-

cess. The three day event attracted devotees and their families from all over the Bay Area to partake in the religious ceremonies and seek the blessings of Lord Hanuman. The celebrations commenced on Friday evening with the “Sri Suktham Homam,”

Young Children writing Ramakoti Patram at the Temple

President, Board of Trustees, Dr. Pradeep Kumar, Chief Priest, Pt. Govind Srinivasan, & City of Newark Mayor, Mr. Alan Nagy at the Temple on April 13.

followed by Lakshmi Abhishekam, Alankaram, and Aarati. On Saturday, the temple echoed with the voices of the devotees chanting the “Hanuman Chalisa,”108 times, without stopping for 8 hours. This was followed by the “Ramakoti Patram Samarpan” and “Homam”. Watching the young children enthusiastically complete the written “Ramakoti Patram” was an absolute delight. Prominent Bay Area singers, musicians, and their students hosted a cultural program on Sunday afternoon. Melodious performances filled the air as children and young adults showcased acts of music, dance, and the veena. City of Newark Mayor, Mr. Alan Nagy, graced the event and presented a commendation to the temple. Mayor Nagy acknowledged that the temple has been a positive addition to the city of Newark by providing services to community members, the homeless, students of all ages, and young artists as well. On the evening of April 13, the temple was packed and buzzing with devotees decked in beautiful

finery, joyously enjoying the wedding of “Rama and Sita.” By the Grace of Lord Hanuman and the dedication of Pandit Govind Srinivasan and his team, the community is blessed with an opportunity to witness the wedding of the Divine. Sankata Mochana Hanuman Temple, located at 35463, Dumbarton Court, Newark, (next to Ardenwood Challenger School) has just received a new (5 feet 8 inches) Hanuman Ji Murti made of marble from Jaipur, India. Laghu Prana Pratishtha (Sthapana) of this new Murti will be held on the weekend of Friday, May 9 through Sunday, May 11. Additional information may be obtained from www.bayareahanumantemple.org or by calling Pandit Govind Srinivasan Ji at (510) 378-1770. Prana Pratishtha Friday, May 9 – Sunday, May 11 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Sankata Mochana Hanuman Temple 35463 Dumbarton Ct, Newark (510) 378-1770 www.bayareahanumantemple.org


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Discounts/Discounts/Don’t Discount Us Out INSURANCE

Who’s Got Your Hands? 510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

SUBMITTED BY LAUREL SKURKO At the end of March, Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) students from across the Bay Area gathered in San Jose for a one-on-one workshop with Silicon Valley technology experts from Success Factors and Ariba. Working with these technology volunteers, Bay Area students learned to design mobile apps and create websites for their own original business ideas. At the workshop, students worked directly with local technology experts to hone their website/web app-building skills with the hope of ultimately getting to compete for prizes in the NFTE SAP Tech Innovation Challenge and even the NFTE National Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge (October 9), where the top prize is $25,000.

#OB84518

Participating students from Hayward High School, San Leandro High School, as well as Andrew Hill High School in San Jose have been enrolled in a semester or year-long entrepreneurship class provided by their teachers with the support of NFTE. A youth education program, NFTE trains students in entrepreneurship. It is provided to high school students, serving those in at-risk communities throughout the Bay Area. The program was founded in New York in 1987, and now operates in 18 states, Washington D.C., and 10 countries. The goal is to help youth from low-income communities stay in school, learn how to recognize business opportunities and plan for successful futures. For more information, visit www.nftebayarea.com.

The rodeo is on its way to town but before the broncos start bucking, the annual “Rowell Ranch Rodeo Parade” takes to the streets of Castro Valley. On Saturday, May 10, over 100 local parade participants and more than 2,000 spectators will celebrate the “Rowell Ranch Rodeo” happening May 17 and 18. The parade route is on Castro Valley Boulevard between Redwood Road and Lake Chabot Road, starting at

Nunes at Castro Valley Boulevard and runs about an hour and a half. Equestrian awards will be given out in the BART parking lot at the close of the parade. Honorary Marshal Sponsors for the parade are B.A. Morrison General Contractor, The Music Company, Redwood Christian, and Hayward Area Recreation and Park District.

Rowell Ranch Rodeo Parade Saturday, May 10 10 a.m. - noon Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley (510) 402-5001 www.rowellranchrodeoparade.com


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

A school garden for Earth Month

SUBMITTED BY LISA MARIE WILSON PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW hole Kids Foundation and Glenmoor Elementary School celebrated Earth Month as students, teachers, parents and volunteers inspired a connection with food

Jellicles Farms and enjoyed organic salad in the garden. Dedicated to improving childhood nutrition with programs including school salad bars, gardens and nutrition education for teachers, Whole Kids Foundation works to inspire schools and families to provide more healthy food choices for children and help connect them with where food comes from.

through gardening and discovered the magic that grows from planting seeds. The school was recently awarded a garden grant from Whole Kids Foundation, and has been growing their garden yearround. This is Whole Food’s second time returning to assist with planting and they are expanding the number of students participating. On April 28, nearly 480 students, teachers and volunteers from Whole Foods Market planted the school’s organic spring garden, learned the basics of gardening with Sunol-based

Glenmoor Elementary is one of 75 schools across the country that has invited students, parents, educators, and volunteers to attend garden parties during spring thanks in large part to generous corporate donations and in-kind support from the Foundation’s supplier partners. These include: Applegate, Cascadian Farm, Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day, Organic Valley, Roots Food, Suja and Rudi’s Organic Bakery. To learn about additional Whole Kids Foundation programs and how you can apply for a school garden grant, visit wholekidsfoundation.org.

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LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be give preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 6, 2014


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Thursday, May 9 - Friday, May 24

Grease $

7 p.m. Classic 50’s musical

Continuing Events Saturdays, Mar 22 -May 10

Chinese Folk Songs $R

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Learn about a special genre of music

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 http://ohlone.augusoft.net Monday, Mar 24 – Saturday, May 31

Spring Exhibition

Washington High School 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-3414 http://www.fremont.k12.ca.us/D omain/3078 Thursday, May 9 - Sunday, Jun 7

Decked Out

12 noon - 5 p.m. Commemorating Fremont’s Skate Park

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org

2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Over 200 pictures from patrons & students

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photcentral.org Monday, Jun 23 - Friday, Jul 31

Chabot College 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 www.chabotcollege.edu/theaterarts Wednesdays, May 7

Square Dancing

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Dance and meet new friends

Newark Pavillion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-7015 www.farmersandfarmerettees.org

What Hayward Restaurants Need to Know – R

Wednesday, May 7

9 a.m. - 11 a.m.

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Discuss legislation for restaurants

Docent led tours of historic home

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 www.hayward-ca.gov

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352

Open House $

Wednesdays, May 7

Square Dancing

Investment Strategies in Today’s Market

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Structure a diverse portfolio Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont

Newark Pavillion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-7015 www.farmersandfarmerettees.org

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. HUSD student pieces Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 Mondays, Apr 7 - Thursdays, Jun 6

10th Street After-School Program

4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Sports, arts-n-crafts and games

Drop-in program, no day care 10th Street Community Center 33948 10th Street, Union City (510) 675-5276 wwwUnionCity.org Wednesday, Apr 30 - Sunday, May 24

Fiber Arts and Flower Show

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Quilts, knits and fiber arts

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Original productions

Summer enrichment program

Art is Education

1351 Driscoll Rd, Fremont (at Christian Science Church)

8 p.m.

Tuesday, May 6

Tuesday, Apr 1-Friday, May 30

Sunday 12:30 pm

Emerging Work $

8 a.m. Registration begins April 1 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com

Unity of Fremont

Tuesday, May 6 - Saturday, May 10

Tuesday, May 6

Ohlone for Kids $R

A positive path for spiritual living

(510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org

Dance and meet new friends

Mom or Dad forgetting things? Are they telling the same stories or asking the same questions over and over? Have they lost interest in socialization and hobbies? This 5-part education support series will offer very practical tips for people who love someone who is living with Dementia, including Alzheimer’s Disease. The dates for this 5-part series are:

5/21/14 from 11am – 12:30pm RSVP at least one week prior to the seminar RSVP via email to: Dave.peper@aegisliving.com or Via phone: (510) 739-1515 and ask for Dave Peper

A light lunch and beverages will be served

FREE


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Farmers’ Markets

Wednesday, May 7

Guest Artist Demonstration

7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Drawing by Kathleen Hill

0FREMONT:

MILPITAS:

Centerville

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Bonde Way at Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 909-2067 www.fremontfarmersmarket.com Kaiser Permanente Fremont Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Milpitas Farmers’ Market at ICC

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

Sundays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Wednesday, May 7

Year-round India Community Center 525 Los Coches St. 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com NEWARK:

Fremont Leadership Class of 2014 $R

12 noon - 2 p.m. Luncheon and graduation ceremony

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 795-2244 kkaneshiro@fremontbusiness.com

Newark Farmers’ Market

Sundays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Thursday, May 8

Hayward Education Foundation’s Hero Dinner $R

Irvington Farmers’ Market

Year-round NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org

Sundays 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Bayfair Mall

Golden Peacock Banquet Hall 24989 Santa Clara Street, Hayward (510) 881-0890

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Thursday, May 8

Year-round Bay Street and Trimboli Way, Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com HAYWARD: Hayward Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Fairmont and East 14th St., San Leandro (925) 465-4690 www.cafarmersmkts.com UNION CITY: Kaiser Permanente Union City Farmers’ Market

Year-round Hayward City Plaza 777 B. St., Hayward 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org

Tuesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

St. Rose Hospital Farmers’ Market

Tuesdays 12 noon – 4 p.m. Year-round 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 264-4139 www.digdeepcsa.com Kaiser Permanente Hayward Farmers’ Market

Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round 27400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

South Hayward Glad Tidings

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Year-round W. Tennyson Rd. between Tyrell Ave. and Tampa Ave., Hayward (510) 783-9377 www.cafarmersmarkets.com

5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Banquet dinner

Life Drawing Drop-In Session $

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Nominal fee for model and no instructor

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Thursday, May 8 -Sunday, May 11

“The Wizard of Oz” $

Year-round Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices 3553 Whipple Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Thurs - Sat: 7:30 p.m. Sat: 2 p.m. & Sun: 6 p.m.

Union City Farmers’ Market

Thursday, May 8

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Celebration of Life –R

Year-round Old Alvarado Park Smith and Watkins Streets, Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Cancer survivors share stories

East Plaza Farmers’ Market

Saturday s 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round East Plaza 11th Ave. and Decoto Road Union City (925) 825-9090 www.pcfma.com

Local students perform classic tale

Fremont Christian School 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont (510) 744-2280

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (800) 963-7070 Thursday, May 8 - Friday, May 9

“Artists Take Flight”

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. ROP student art show

James Logan High School 1800 H Street, Union City Thursday, May 8

Bike to School Day

8 a.m. Children walk, bike or carpool to school

Parkmont Elementary School 2601 Parkside Dr., Fremont (510) 793-3875 www.alamedactc.org Thursday, May 8 - Saturday, May 10

Cinderella $

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Thurs: 4 p.m. Fri & Sat: 7 p.m. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s classic musical

Newark Memorial High School 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 kmoss@newarkunified.org Thursday, May 8 - Saturday, May 10

One-Act Plays $

8 p.m. Performances by Ohlone Student Repertory

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Friday, May 9

Youth Job Fair

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Assistance for youth seeking employment

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 http://youthenrichmentservices.e ventbrite.com Friday, May 9 & Saturday, May 10

10 Ways to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse $

Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday: 4 p.m. Niles Veterans Hall 37154 Second St, Fremont

May 6, 2014

(510) 494-4322 regerec@fremont.gov (Friday, #207328; Saturday, #207329) Tickets: $5 Friday May 9

Internet Resources for Transit Planning

Friday, May 9

Chili Cook-Off $

5 p.m. Rowell Ranch Rodeo kick-off

Rowell Ranch Dublin Canyon Road Between Castro Valley and Dublin www.rowellranchrodeo.com

10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Learn how to use 511, Google maps, and other more to plan public transit trips.

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont (510) 574-2053

Friday, May 9

Internet Resources for Transit Planning – R

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Training to use Google maps and 511

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 574-2053


May 6, 2014

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Student actors and directors present a series of edgy, energetic one-act plays performed in repertory exploring the ins and outs, sideways looks and backwards glances at modern relationships through comedy, drama, emotion and mayhem. May 8 through the 15 five contemporary one-act plays, selected and presented by the Student Repertory Company, will be presented in two performance bills over the course of six nights at the Smith Center at Ohlone College. “These new plays, never performed at a college, are produced by incredibly passionate and skilled directors and equally talented actors,” says Ryan Weible, faculty advisor for Student Rep, “All five of the plays are exciting, entertaining and fully produced. You don’t want to miss this opportunity to see intense young talent performing the latest in modern theatre.” Performance Bill One includes Impromptu, a comedy written by Tad Mosel, which brings a fresh approach to the question of finding the balance between truth vs. illusion in life; Heights by Amy Fox focuses on three young New Yorkers facing relationship conflicts on an apartment rooftop at 2 a.m.; and, The Great War by Neil Labute, a comedic look at a divorcing couple trying to reach an end to their hostility. Performance Bill Two includes Thread Count by

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Lisa Soland, a comedy where fast-paced, witty lines mix modernism with old-fashioned romance; and a two-character dark comedy set in another New York apartment, where Ivan Foley returning home from a long day of job-hunting, finds a different kind of “job” waiting for him in his living room in Come Again, Another Day, by Cary Pepper. Ohlone Student Repertory Series of One-Act Plays Bill One: Thursday, May 8 Friday, May 9 Tuesday, May 13 8 p.m. Bill Two: Saturday, May 10 Wednesday, May 14 Thursday, May 15 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com $12 General/$10 Students, Staff, Seniors $2 Event Parking

(Left to right): Hester Wagner, Rachael Campbell, Emma Feeney

SUBMITTED BY MARY GALDE PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN PIZZIRANI Broadway West Theatre Company presents the compelling mystery/drama, “The Children’s Hour” by Lillian Hellman, directed by John Rutski, on May 16 – June 14. The play has a serious and adult theme about two women, Karen Wright and Martha Dobie, who run a boarding school for girls. After a malicious youngster starts a rumor about them, the rumor soon turns to scandal and precipitates tragedy for the two women. Performance times are 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees: May 25 and June 1 matinee performances begin with a continental brunch (included in price of ticket) at 12:15 p.m., and the show begins at 1 p.m. The June 8 performance starts at 1 p.m. with refreshments during intermission (included in price of ticket). The Children’s Hour Friday, May 16 – Saturday, June 14 8 p.m. (Sunday matinees 1 p.m.) Broadway West Theatre 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org $25 general/$28 Students, Seniors, TBA members $17 Thursday: May 22, June 5, June 12 $10 Bargain performance: Thursday, May 29 $25 - Brunch Sunday performances and Opening night, which include refreshments


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Friday, May 9

Mission Peak Brass Band $

8 p.m. Movie soundtrack music

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

1015 E St, Hayward www.sungallery.us (510) 581-4050

Ages 18+ Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747

Saturday, May 10

Saturday, May 10

Ohlone College Super Flea Market $

Ken Seideman Trio

8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Jazz concert

Support Ohlone College programs

Mission Coffee 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.fremontcoffee.com

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Celebration of Moorthi Sthapna

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285 http://fleamarket.Ohlone.edu

Fri: 7 p.m., Sat: 11:30 a.m. & Sun: 9:30 a.m.

Saturday, May 10

Movie Night $

Obtain blessings

Atheist Forum

7:30 p.m.

Sankata Mochana Hanuman Temple 35463 Dumbarton Ct., Newark www.BayareaHunumanTemple.org

10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Little Duchess, Caught in a Cabaret, Fatty and Minnie He-Haw

Friday, May 9 - Sunday, May 11

Saturday, May 10

Saturday, May 10

Thought provoking talks

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, May 10

Indo-American Charity Ball $R

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, May 10

Pops in the Park

Dinner, dancing & entertainment

“Noir City” Book Signing

12 noon

Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 468-4680 www.indoabc.com

2 p.m.

Ohlone Community Band and Tuba ensemble

Meet author William Matlock

BookSmart NewPark Mall, Newark (408) 824-1838

Saturday, May 10

Chihuahua Palooza

Saturday, May 10

1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

SPARK! Compete for a Cause $

Discounted adoptions of Chihuahuas

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Macla Theatre 510 N. First St., San Jose (408) 982-7266 www.spark.aramsei.org

Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Ct, Hayward (510) 293-7200 Saturday, May 10

Rowell Ranch Rodeo Parade

Saturday, May 10

10 a.m. - noon Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley (510) 402-5001 www.rowellranchrodeoparade.com

Family Bird Walk – R

Saturday, May 10

Artist Silvie Lukacova

1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Proceeds benefit SHP Food Pantry

Westminster Hills Outreach Center 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795

Create a field guide and use binoculars

Canine Capers Dog Walk – R

Ages 5 -10 SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222 x362

9 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Sun Gallery 1015 E St, Hayward www.sungallery.us (510) 581-4050

Asian Pacific American Heritage Concert

1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Fair Trade Festival

Saturday, May 10

Saturday, May 10

Science Fiction exhibit and artist reception

Saturday, May 10

2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Artist reception

Saturday, May 10

Fremont Central Park 4000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-5541

2 p.m. Folk, classical and pop songs

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org

Inherit the wind chimes: a science fiction musical emergency

Saturday, May 10

7:30 p.m. Sun Gallery

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Beneficial Garden Bugs $R Discover pollinators and garden managers

Volunteers needed at Four Seasons of Health Expo SUBMITTED BY TANYA MENDOZA Tri-City Elder Coalition and City of Fremont Human Services Department are looking for volunteers to assist with the 2014 Four Seasons of Health Expo on Friday, June 6 at the Fremont Senior Center. Volunteer tasks include: Setup Vendor check-in Water delivery Meal delivery Registration table Mobility assistants Interpreters (Mandarin, Farsi, and Spanish) Clean up Drivers (Will need DMV printout) General help Other duties as assigned If you are interested in volunteering please sign up at: www.SignUpGenius.com/go/10C0B44A5AB2DA7FC1-2014. Volunteers are needed for 2 hr. shifts, from 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. and must be 14 years of age or older.

Four Seasons of Health Expo Friday, Jun 6 9:30 a.m. –1:30 p.m. Fremont Senior Center, Lake Elizabeth Central Park 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont (510) 574-2044 tmendoza@fremont.gov Free

Explore nature with your four legged friend

Ages 8+ Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (888) 327-2757 Saturday, May 10

Flower Power

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Discover wild flowers

Ages 6+ Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

May 6, 2014

Saturday, May 10

Monday, May 12

Art and Jazz Fair

“Dark Money in Politics”

12 noon - 4 p.m.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Food, live music and art work

Forum addresses big money and democracy

Benefit for Abode Services Mission Hills Athletic Club 10 E. Las Palmas Ave., Fremont (510) 656-2250 Saturday, May 10

Farm Moms $

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Visit the animals and their babies

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org Saturday, May 10

Big Butter Battle $

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Churn and taste butter

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org Sunday, May 11

Mother’s Day Beginning Bird Watching – R

9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Slideshow instruction and easy hike

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 x104 Sunday, May 11

Ohlone Wind Orchestra $

2 p.m. Music for relaxing

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Sunday, May 11

Gifts from Nature for Mom

10 a.m. - 12 noon & 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Create a necklace or make potpourri

Ages 7+ Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 lwvea@aol.com Tuesday, May 13

Bird Walk

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Bring binoculars

Ages 12+ Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895 www.ebparks.org Tuesday, May 13 May 13

Prostate World Support Group Meeting

6:30 p.m. UCSF Oncologist guest speaker

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 264-4044 (510) 783-5121 Tuesday, May 13 & Wednesday, May 14

Travel Training for Seniors and People with Disabilities R

9:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Learn how to use buses and BART; get your senior clipper card. Registration required.

(Day 1 is classroom instruction; Day 2 is a field outing) Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr, Newark (510) 574-2053 Wednesday, May 14

Personal Emergency Preparedness Class

7 p.m. to 10 p.m. How to take care of yourself and your family before, during and after a disaster

Fremont Fire Training Tower 7200 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-4244 FirePubEd@fremont.gov


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Marriage

Obituaries

LANAS ESTATE SERVICES

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont www.fremontmemorialchapel.com

Bernadine M. Goularte

Isauro M. Sison

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 19, 1933 – April 29, 2014

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 20, 1913 – April 12, 2014

Donald J. Greene

Sinforoso Sanut Cimatu

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 10, 1936 – April 30, 2014

RESIDENT UNION CITY February 23, 1922 – April 22, 2014

Jose P. Albano, Sr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 13, 1919 – April 27, 2014

Agnes Mohr RESIDENT OF UNION CITY June 29, 1915 – May 3, 2014

Sharon G. Durec

Estate Sales, Complete or Partial Clean out, Appraisals and more Whether you're closing a loved one’s Estate or your own, it is an overwhelming task. Lana provides solutions for quick completion allowing you to move through the process with ease.

Anphayuanh Xayauong RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE March 5, 1973 – April 28, 2014

Edward G. Pierick RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 19, 1922 – April 30, 2014

Eugene C. Cowell RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 28, 1926 – May 5, 2014

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY March 8, 1947 – May 1, 2014

TAKE A DEEP BREATH, DON'T THROW ANYTHING AWAY, Call direct or contact Lana online

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

510-657-1908 www.lanas.biz

lana@lanas.biz

Daliang Lin RESIDENT OF SAN FRANCISCO November 9, 1927 – April 29, 2014

Naurang Singh

Berge • Pappas • Smith

RESIDENT OF NEWARK March 8, 1932 – April 30, 2014

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

Hayward Police Log SUBMITTED BY SGT. ERIC MELENDEZ, HAYWARD PD Monday, April 21 An armed robbery occurred in the Food Source Parking lot at 26905 Mission Blvd. at 3:29 a.m. The victims were confronted by two suspects who drove up to them in an older Blue or Grey compact sedan. The suspects got out of their vehicle and demanded the victim’s property at gunpoint. The victims surrendered their property and both suspects got back into their vehicle and fled the scene northbound on Mission Blvd. Suspects were described as a Hispanic Male, 16-19 years old, 6’02”, medium build wearing a black hoodie and a Hispanic, Male, 5’08” wearing a red hoodie. An armed robbery occurred to the 7-11 at 24476 Mission Blvd. at 3:07 p.m. Two suspects entered the store and robbed the clerk and owner at gunpoint. As the suspects were leaving the store a citizen wrote down the license plate of their vehicle and called the police. As dispatch put out the suspect vehicle information to patrol units and officer saw the vehicle as it drove by him. The vehicle was stopped a short distance away on Clarendale Street and the passengers ran from the officer. The driver was detained by the officer stopping the vehicle and other responding patrol officers located the two other suspects. After a search of the surrounding area both suspects were located and arrested. The weapon used in the robbery was recovered as well as the cash taken from the store. Wednesday, April 23 An armed robbery occurred to the Chevron Gas Station at 26990 Hesperian Blvd. at 6:50 a.m. A Hispanic male with a handgun entered the station and demanded money. The clerk gave the suspect money from the register. The suspect fled from the store northbound on Hesperian Blvd. The suspect is described as a Hispanic Male in his 30s wearing a white hoodie. Thursday, April 24 An attempted robbery occurred in front of Tennyson High School on Whitman St. at 3:34 p.m. Two suspects confronted the victim as he was walking past the school. The suspects knocked the victim to the ground and went through his pockets. The suspects did not take anything from the victim. The suspects left the school and were stopped by patrol officers a short distance away. Both were positively identified and arrested. Friday, April 25 An assault with a deadly weapon occurred on A Street and Hathaway St. at 11:15 a.m. The victim was walking on A St when a vehicle occupied by three Hispanic males pulls up

alongside him. The suspects ask the victim a question which the victim ignored. When the victim got to the corner the driver got out of the vehicle and hit the victim two times in the leg with a baseball bat. The car containing the suspects fled the scene traveling southbound on Santa Clara St. Saturday, April 26 An officer on his way to a call was flagged down by a citizen regarding a theft at 9:40 a.m. The citizen gave the officer a description of the suspect and his vehicle. The officer located the suspect at Hwy 880 and Winton Ave. The officer recovered appliances taken from the Airport appliance store and arrested the suspect for theft. An assault occurred on Celia Ave between two subjects at 4:08 p.m. Officer responded to a disturbance and found one subject with a head injury. Officer determined that the two subjects had engaged in mutual combat and threw rocks at each other causing injuries. Both suspects were arrested for assault. The Hayward Police Department was called to the downtown cinema on B St regarding a group causing a disturbance at 8:45 p.m. As officers responded they were advised by Dispatch there had been several calls of a subject shooting a handgun up in the air. Responding Officers did not find any victims or evidence of a shooting at the scene. With the assistance of BART PD the group was dispersed without incident. Several hours later Officers responded to a disturbance involving a large group at a nearby hotel. When officers arrive they contacted a subject who matches the description provided by witnesses to the shooting incident. Witnesses respond to the scene and positively identify the subject as the shooter from the cinema incident. The suspect is arrested for reckless discharge of a firearm. Sunday, April 27 An armed robbery occurred in the area of Dixon St and Tennyson Rd. at 5:10 p.m. The suspects approached the victim and demanded his property at gunpoint. The suspects left the scene in a silver / light brown sedan. Both suspects were Hispanic males. A carjacking and assault occurred on the 1300 block of Martin Luther King Dr. at 7:12 p.m. The suspect approached one victim and attempted to rob them of their car. The suspect fled over a fence when they were unsuccessful. A short time later the same suspect confronted a second victim in his garage and assaulted him. The suspect took the second victim’s vehicle and fled prior to police arrival. The suspect is described as an African American male, 6’ 6’2”, 160 to 180 pounds and armed with a large silver revolver. On 07/28 the stolen vehicle was located abandoned by witnesses parked on Central Bl. If you have information to report that could help lead to an arrest in this crime/crime activity, please contact police.

San Leandro Police Log SUBMITTED BY LT. RANDALL BRANDT Thursday, April 24 Between April 24 and April 25, our staff responded to two separate sexual batteries in the downtown area. The two adult female victims stated that a teenage male had approached them and inappropriately touched them and fled. The victims did not know who the suspect was prior to these incidents. On April 25th, approximately 5 p.m., officers were investigating the second incident which occurred in the 300 block of Estudillo Ave. One of the officers observed a possible suspect walking by and he was detained. The suspect was positively identified and he was arrested for committing both sexual assaults. Monday, April 28 At approximately 12:20 p.m., one of our patrol officers was driving a vehicle equipped with a license plate reader. (LPR) He was driving through the area of E. 14th Street and 136th Avenue when the LPR unit alerted him to a stolen vehicle. The officer located the stolen vehicle in a nearby parking lot and arrested the driver for possessing it. The suspect, Amber Augustyn of Livermore, was booked for the incident. At approximately 1 p.m., three San Leandro teenagers committed a strong arm robbery in the 700 block of Marina Blvd. They approached a 22 year old male and started to punch and kick him. The suspects forcibly removed the victims backpack and fled with it heading E/B on Marina Blvd. Officers responded and located the three suspects nearby. The suspects were arrested for the incident and the backpack was recovered. The victim was treated for some minor injuries from the incident. Please contact the San Leandro Police Department’s Criminal Investigations Division with any information regarding this case at 510-577-3230 or contact the Anonymous Tip Line at 510-577-3278. Citizens can also send an anonymous tip to San Leandro Police Department by texting the word SLPD and their tip to 847411. Anonymous web tips can be submitted from the Police Department’s website at http://www.sanleandro.org/depts/pd/at.asp\

Fremont man arrested for auto burglaries SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES, FREMONT PD On April 23, 2014 the Fremont Police Department’s Street Crimes Unit (SCU) arrested auto burglary suspect Kris Sylvester, a Fremont resident, for a felony warrant at the intersection of Stevenson Blvd. and Davis St. During the arrest, SCU Officers uncovered numerous pieces of stolen property, including items taken from an auto burglary that had been reported at the Little Flowers Montessori School earlier in the day. Ironically officers were able to return property to the victim during the arrest, because it was occurring directly across the street from the Montessori School. Officers retrieved a high volume of evidence believed to have been taken during the commission of auto burglaries throughout the City. The investigation remains ongoing as officers continue their efforts to identify additional auto burglary victims and return several stolen credit cards and personal property related to the crimes committed by Sylvester. Sylvester was booked at the Fremont Police Detention Facility on charges of: auto burglary, commercial burglary, possession of stolen property, and unauthorized use of credit card.


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May 6, 2014

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Across 1 Vicinity of home (12) 4 Seven colors of ___- (7) 8 Christmas ___ (5) 10 Really scary (8) 12 "___ Heartbeat" (Amy Grant hit) (5) 13 Support (13) 15 Contents of some urns (5) 18 Connection between people by blood (13) 19 Senior citizen people (7) 20 Onus of doing work (16) 22 Demands (5) 24 Michener best seller (6) 25 Drops of liquid falling (8) 27 XX in numbers (6)

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Tri-City Stargazer MAY 6 – MAY 13 2014 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: This is a week that may provoke confrontations and battles. If the energies are acted upon favorably, everyone would put their cards on the table and opposing parties would be brought to a point of cooperation. There are two sets of opposing planetary energies. The first is Venus opposite Mars, a combination that can make or break relationships. The second opposition is between the Sun and Saturn. This brings emphaAries the Ram (March 21April 20): Within relationships of intensity, there is often a strong sexual attraction, whether or not your personalities are compatible. If the sexual component is not recognized, it may be transmuted into a competition. Avoid commitment to any new relationship on your radar. You need to know more about the individual. Taurus the Bull (April 21May 20): Make note of the lead paragraph because both oppositions pertain to you at this time. You are being tested or you are judging in more than one situation. If you back out, you have definitely lost. If you face the truth head on, you will grow in stature and maturity. Gemini the Twins (May 21-June 20): Mercury travels rapidly through your sign between May 7 and May 30. During this period there likely will be greater emphasis on communications, errands, and other short distance travels. Your mind will be quick and your attitude persuasive. You are loaded with ideas, so remember not to monopolize conversations.

Cancer the Crab (June 21July 21): You have a desire to reach outward to others. You want to share ideas and express yourself in a larger framework. It seems everyone is interested in what you think. Circumstances on the home front are favorable with one who shares intellectual interests. Activities involving legal interests, teaching or learning are positive. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): This is a week of scrutiny. It is possible that you are being tested now. You will get what you deserve. If you have prepared well, you will win the prize or the honor. You may have begun a challenging project during the previous fall which is now ready for unveiling and evaluation. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): Your attention turns toward your life direction at this time. For many this is reflected by the career path. You may be researching needed information or talking with others about where you are headed. Your work is on display or otherwise noticed during this period. The outlook is favorable.

sis to political or corporate parties. Many individuals and relationships are undergoing tests at this time. It is a time in which those who have prepared well and can maintain relationships in tough circumstances will win the prize. It requires that opposing parties must cooperate rather than banging their heads together until the situation cracks.

Libra the Scales (September 23-October 22): You may be backpedaling your way out of one or more relationships right now. What you fear is being smothered or overwhelmed. Your ruling planet, Mars, is retrograde. Be aware that the war is really internal. Perhaps you let yourself become closer than you really wanted.

Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): During this period the fruits of your labors become apparent. People will be offering messages to you about your character and how you have progressed over the years. You may observe your relationship to your children at this point. That is one place you can clearly see outcomes.

Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): You may have an experience in which you feel a figurative sniper at your back. Defend yourself if you absolutely must, but life will be easier if you ignore it. Your sniper will not recognize it, even if you point it out and the confrontation may become embarrassing.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): Last fall you began a new project in relation to your work in the world. You knew it would take some time to develop, but you felt it was worth the effort. During this period you will have feedback from the world on the value of that idea. Don’t listen to self-criticism, which is almost always unfair to you.

Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): You have a desire to celebrate. The temptation to overspend is strong. Consider what would be fun and interesting that doesn't require a big expenditure. Activities concerning education, publishing, the law, and travel have positive aspects. You are talkative and in an inquisitive frame of mind.

Pisces the Fish (February 19-March 20): A misunderstanding could develop between you and a close friend or family member. The blame game is useless. Do your best to unwind the thread to the point that it began and start fresh. It is possible that you will have a minor case of laryngitis. Pipes, whether in your body or your house, may need clearing.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

Boards and Commissions

WILLIAM MARSHAK

participatory system that values outside comment and suggestion. In many cases, especially at the local level, citizens who participate in these bodies receive either minimal or no compensation for their time and effort. And, with the exception of highly visible and politically significant commissions such as the Planning Commission, many of these groups are guided solely by information from appointed Staff. Depending on the form of government and staff members involved, input and comment from such bodies may be functional and valid or have little direct impact on government operations. If impact is minimal, such groups add little to the governmental process, becoming a waste of time and energy by those who volunteer to serve.

“Art Review Board members are currently permitted to serve two four-year terms. It has become increasingly difficult to find new people willing to serve on the Art Review Board. At the same time, existing Art Review Board members who are termed out are willing to continue to serve. In order to allow those members to continue to provide meaningful service to the City, staff believes it would be appropriate to increase the term limit from two to three terms so that Board members would be allowed to serve for three full four-year terms.”

A variety of issues face governmental bodies and use of advisory groups to City Councils and government administration can be invaluable - if their purpose is honored. Cities that employ a strong mayor as chief executive, overseeing day-to-day operations, use the advice and opinions of appointed boards and commission members as a direct pipeline to constituents. Cities managed by a City Manager may not have a direct connection to voters. While commissions typically are directed toward specific tasks and goals, advisory boards may not receive such explicit directives. Instead, they may be a liaison between governmental organizations, a sounding board for staff or convene when a relevant issue arises. The precise role and function of advisory bodies can be modified over time depending on the dictates of the authority that forms them. Whether this is an adjustment to remain relevant and significant or simply decay and entropy is a question that should be asked and answered on a regular basis.

Public agencies, at all levels, use advisory boards and commissions to engage constituents and increase and expand input. These groups can be formed using community members, elected officials or a combination. The concept is to develop a

Quite a few boards and commissions function in relative obscurity. I have visited a few of these meetings and am often surprised by the lack of attendance by the public and, at times, board/commission members. The question that comes to mind at some meet-

Excerpt from the May 6 agenda for Fremont City Council: “The City Council has established uniform regulations for its boards, commissions and committees, including term limits for those bodies. With a few exceptions, members of boards, commissions and committees are limited to two terms (primarily two to four years).”

ings is what functions or direction is given and whether anyone in attendance really understands their significance or simply goes through the motions. Lack of public attendance is understandable since some meetings are held during work hours. However, just as most City Council meetings are subject to scrutiny through agendas prior, minutes following and audio/visual recordings on the internet, so should all advisory groups include with agendas and minutes, an upload of at least an audio recording of meeting attendance, participation and business transacted. As a valuable community resource, boards and commissions should advise elected representatives and their staff; a precious commodity that should hold a special place in our system of government. When left to decline in obscurity and anonymity, they can fade and lose their usefulness. Mayors and City Councils should take care that they encourage reports and input from these groups of concerned citizens. Functional bodies that bring helpful information and advice should be reasonable expectations by both elected and appointed officials. Instead of simply soliciting members for boards and commissions, city councilmembers should be asking what these groups do and actively solicit their opinions.

Alameda County has been selected as the Bay Area’s Most “EV Ready” Large Community as part of the 2014 Ready, Set, Charge! Bay Area Electric Vehicle Readiness Awards, sponsored by the Bay Area Climate Collaborative (BACC) and Silicon Valley Leadership Group. The Awards Committee selected Alameda County for incorporating electric vehicles (EVs) substantially into its Climate Action Plan and General Plans, its impressive EV infrastructure of 80 public and fee-free charging ports, and its expansion of EVs in its fleets - currently at 23 EVs and with 26 more to be deployed this year. Alameda County has also provided region-wide

leadership heading a collaborative procurement of 90 electric vehicles and charging stations for 10 municipal agencies. “We are thrilled to be recognized for the leadership Alameda County provides by adopting environmentally friendly policies that are transforming the way the County delivers services to residents,’’ said Susan S. Muranishi, Alameda County Administrator. Alameda County was one of four winners in the Bay Area competition announced April 25 at the 2014 Silicon Valley Driving Charged & Connected Symposium in Palo Alto. The “EV Ready” award is the latest in a string of accolades Alameda County has received for its environmental stewardship. In 2013, Alameda County’s vehicle fleet

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak COPY EDITOR Miriam G. Mazliach ASSIGNMENT EDITOR Julie Grabowski TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

DELIVERY MANAGER Carlis Roberts

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Alameda County judged as most ‘Electric Vehicle (EV)’ ready SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

was named for the fifth time as one of the Greenest in America in an annual review done by Green Fleet Magazine. In 2012, the County also won a Green California Leadership Award, earning top honors in the category of “Pioneer” for its program of Comprehensive Climate Action for Government Operations and Services. Keith Carson, President of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, says honors such as the “EV Ready” award help to validate the board’s decision in 2008 to adopt a long-term Strategic Vision in which Environment and Sustainability are among the core principles for preserving and enhancing the County’s reputation as a leading place to live, work and do business.

Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes M.J. Laird Gustavo Lomas Isabella Ohlmeyer Medha Raman Mauricio Segura Steve Taylor

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-Cit CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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May 6, 2014

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Computer - IT Positions ECalix, Inc. has multiple openings, all levels, for its Fremont, CA office: Business Systems Analysts, QA Systems Analysts, Programmer Analysts, Software Engineers, and Project Managers. Travel and/or relocation required to unanticipated locations throughout U.S. Fax resume: 510-687-9016

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

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I, Samyak Ganani son o Satyanarayana Kalisetti born on 09-aug-1987, residing at 39463 Gallaudet dr, apt #207, Fremont -94538 CA usa. I am changing my name from samyak ganani to Samyak Gnani Kalisetti (old first name: Samyak Ganani,old last name: no last name) to (new first name : Samyak, new middle name: Gnani, new last name: Kalisetti). Hence forth I would be known as Samyak Gnani Kalisetti.

NEED A TUTOR Need experienced Tutor for 10 & 11th grade Math and Science Call 650-867-8288

Washington Hospital Healthcare System seeks a full-time Biostatistician-Director (Job location: Fremont , CA) Resp as source to all managers/departments for analytical insights and help to direct decisions, medical & clinical research efforts of WHHS. Apply with resume to: Mark Chatman, Director –HR, WHHS 2000 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Letter to the Editor

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 850,000 Median $: 625,000 Lowest $: 360,000 Average $: 628,111 ADDRESS

ZIP

3503 Arcadian Drive 2432 Austin Court 18675 Lamson Road 2463 McLoud Avenue 20115 Redwood Road #11 22041 Vergil Street 18951 Walnut Road 5559 Boulder Canyon Drive 25553 Foggy Glen Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

560,000 709,000 850,000 690,000 360,000 460,000 560,000 839,000 625,000

3 4 3 4 2 3 3 5 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1823 2208 1568 2697 866 1082 1272 2357 1375

1957 1994 1948 1958 1988 1949 1955 1996 1998

03-28-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 04-01-14

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 34 Highest $: 1,630,000 Median $: Lowest $: 235,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

3371 Baywood Terrace #314 94536 3514 Birchwood Terrace #105 94536 4559 La Salle Avenue 94536 3786 Oxford Common 94536 38500 Paseo Padre Parkway #30494536 38047 Stenhammer Drive 94536 4490 Stickley Terrace 94536 4952 Thornton Avenue 94536 1024 Walnut Avenue 94536 40358 Blanchard Street 94538 4132 Eugene Street 94538 39224 Guardino Drive #215 94538 5581 Magnolia Terrace 94538 4243 Providence Terrace 94538 4859 Seneca Park Avenue 94538 41816 Sherwood Street 94538 3971 Wildflower Common 94538 40461 Andorra Court 94539 43359 Banda Terrace 94539 41562 Carmen Street 94539 47426 Cholla Street 94539 1601 Curtner Road 94539 793 Glenhill Court 94539 284 Goldenrain Avenue 94539 49068 Larkspur Terrace 94539 2441 Middlefield Avenue 94539 43859 Olazaba Terrace 94539 508 Sago Palm Terrace 94539 42610 Sully Street 94539 34166 Cromwell Place 94555 3656 Gainsborough Terrace 94555 4042 Isola Drive 94555 5762 Via Lugano 94555 5766 Via Lugano 94555

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

325,000 435,000 535,000 445,000 235,000 380,000 715,000 550,000 285,000 480,000 500,000 275,000 342,500 708,000 631,500 782,000 475,000 905,000 903,000 900,000 820,000 1,630,000 1,050,000 820,000 777,000 1,230,000 729,000 764,500 1,291,000 324,000 410,000 945,000 751,000 797,000

936 1123 1163 1168 750 3232 2036 1796 732 950 1227 693 1006 1437 1552 1118 1152 1957 1987 1050 1595 2511 1272 1292 1611 1934 1502 1409 2068 1694 1166 2188 1387 1481

1987 1984 1954 1973 1970 1984 2008 1951 1984 1955 1956 1990 1971 2007 1961 1959 1987 1966 1984 1954 1971 1979 1961 1962 2004 1959 1986 2008 1964 1970 1970 1978 2007 2007

03-28-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 04-01-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 03-31-14

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 16 Highest $: 720,000 Median $: Lowest $: 210,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

22685 7th Street 94541 595 Blossom Way #2 94541 740 City Walk Place #3 94541 1932 East Street 94541 953 Longwood Avenue 94541 1038 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1161 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 2201 Romey Lane 94541 32306 Ithaca Street 94544 65 May Court 94544 174 Newhall Street 94544 24937 Calaroga Avenue 94545 24139 Eden Avenue 94545 27741 Loyola Avenue 94545 2844 Seahaven Lane 94545 539 Staley Avenue 94557

708,000 680,750

SOLD FOR BDS

1 2 3 3 1 5 3 4 1 3 3 1 2 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 5 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3

SOLD FOR BDS

720,000 210,000 435,000 418,000 442,500 423,000 503,000 685,000 375,000 310,000 395,000 460,000 575,000 351,000 715,000 526,500

8 2 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 -

435,000 471,500

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

4088 1077 1375 1058 1664 2851 1191 1098 1238 1215 1990 1128 2453 -

1930 1989 2001 1953 1951 1949 1951 1952 1954 1959 2007 1957 2006 -

04-01-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-31-14

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 1,050,000 Median $: 701,000 Lowest $: 500,000 Average $: 701,857 488 Alexander Way 95035 701,000 3 1268 1984 04-10-14 216 Callan Street 95035 504,000 3 1032 1958 04-11-14 1501 Coyote Creek Way 95035 656,000 - 04-11-14 320 Edgewater Drive 95035 1,050,000 4 2598 1993 04-09-14 1879 McCandless Drive 95035 732,000 - 04-11-14 1414 Mt. Shasta Avenue 95035 500,000 3 1267 1966 04-10-14 1200 Sassone Court 95035 770,000 3 1771 1990 04-11-14 NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 768,000 Median $: Lowest $: 380,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

7141 Arbeau Drive 36012 Burning Tree Drive 35120 Cardiff Street 37253 Greenpoint Street 35760 Haley Street 36715 Magnolia Street 39935 Parada Street #A 37328 Wedgewood Street

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

630,000 575,000 710,000 510,000 565,000 520,000 380,000 768,000

3 3 3 4 3 2 5

565,000 582,250

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1950 1482 1829 1469 1438 1022 1301 3289

1976 1969 1963 1978 1961 1948 1984 2000

03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-31-14

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 652,000 Median $: 420,000 Lowest $: 157,500 Average $: 408,167 ADDRESS

ZIP

1642 Cascade Road 94577 236 West Broadmoor Boulevard94577 895 Coburn Court #B 94578 16479 Liberty Street 94578 16531 Los Banos Street 94578 450 Olive Street 94578 14790 Ruthelen Court 94578 14104 Corvallis Street 94579 15246 Laverne Drive 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

275,000 3 425,000 3 652,000 10 360,000 2 335,000 3 157,500 3 469,000 3 420,000 3 580,000 3

780 1710 3882 1290 1024 1056 1107 1081 1415

1948 1930 1964 2008 1924 1947 1953 1951 1958

03-31-14 04-01-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 03-31-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-28-14 03-31-14

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 585,000 Median $: 410,000 Lowest $: 380,000 Average $: 450,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

1410 Bockman Road 15920 St. Johns Drive 1709 Via Escondido 1966 Via Rancho

94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

410,000 425,000 585,000 380,000

3 3 4 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1520 1160 2801 1360

2009 1954 1954 1955

03-28-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-28-14

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 589,000 Median $: Lowest $: 293,000 Average $: ADDRESS

33548 10th Street 4110 Aquarius Circle 1009 Carnelian Terrace 32259 Coronation Drive 1041 Emerald Terrace 4335 Planet Circle

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

456,000 293,000 500,000 570,000 589,000 392,000

3 4 3 3 3 4

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456,000 466,667

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1363 1342 1675 1349 1431 1583

1915 1970 2006 1970 2006 1971

03-28-14 04-01-14 03-28-14 03-31-14 03-28-14 03-31-14

Water Conservation and Emergency Drought Relief Legislation SUBMITTED BY SENATE MAJORITY LEADER ELLEN M. CORBETT (D-EAST BAY ) Although precious rain recently fell on our local communities, I have had scores of conversations over the last few weeks and months with local residents at farmers’ markets, town halls and community events about a topic that remains at the forefront of our minds: California’s drought. Unfortunately, the recent rainfall has only minimally impacted our depleting water supply. Further aggravated by a low snow pack, California’s severe water crisis has prompted Governor Jerry Brown to declare a Drought State of Emergency. California State Senate leadership accepted the Governor’s call to action by developing a proposal allocating over half a billion dollars to implement shovel-ready water projects in communities throughout the state, assist agricultural communities and prevent drinking water shortages. Fortunately, the legislation passed quickly through the Legislature and the Governor promptly signed it so we can deliver much needed relief to local communities. The Tri-Valley water agency, Zone 7, is receiving only 5% of its normal water allocation from the state, for example. As a longtime advocate for our environment and local communities, I will continue working closely with my colleagues in Sacramento to address pertinent water issues to help secure California’s water future. It is crucial

that we recognize local water districts that have responded quickly and appropriately to address water reliability and conservation. The Governor has instructed state agencies to begin water conservation efforts and has recommended—though not yet mandated—that state residents reduce their water use by 20%. State water agencies must work collaboratively with stakeholders and residents to manage California’s water supply, while simultaneously assist farmers and communities that are most impacted by the drought. As a result of the ongoing dry conditions, the state has begun a statewide public awareness campaign called “Save our H2O.” As Californians, we can conserve water by implementing some of the daily tips offered by “Save our Water” at SaveOurH20.org, such as: • Take shorter showers, use a lowflow shower head and turn off water whenever possible. • Place mulch around plants and combine with a drip system to conserve gallons of water each time you water outdoors. • Plant drought-resistant trees and plants that are most appropriate for your climate. Please also consult my Senate website at http://sd10.senate.ca.gov/ where I have posted additional important information—both in English and Spanish—regarding water conservation and drought measures. You can find more information at the following websites from water agencies and water districts in the 10th State Senate District:

Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters seeks volunteers SUBMITTED BY SUPERVISOR DAVE CORTESE Poll volunteers are needed to help out on Election Day, Tuesday, June 3 and Tuesday, November 4. Although the jobs are described as volunteer, if you attend a training class and work on either Election Day, you can earn stipends of up to $180. In addition to English speakers, the Registrar is looking for volunteers who speak Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog and Vietnamese. Election Officer: To sign up to be an election officer, you need to be at least 18 years old, a registered voter or a legal permanent resident of the United States. Clerks can earn stipends of $95 to $125, and Inspectors will receive $150 to $180. Student Election Officer: If you’re 16 and older, you can volunteer for the Student Election Officer Program. You also need to be a U.S. Citizen and have a GPA of at least 2.5. Stipends are $130 for a full day and $82.50 for a half day. Other Jobs: You also may earn stipends as a courier to distribute or pick up materials and ballots or as an emergency support staff member on Election Day and Night. Stipends range from $50 to $80 for most of these assignments. Emergency support staff who work on June 3 can earn $10 an hour. Visit Registrar of Voters website: http://www.sccgov.org/sites/rov/Pages/ Registrar-of-Voters.aspx for an application, or call (408) 282-3063. The last day to register to vote for the June 3 election is May 19. You can register online at registertovote.ca.gov or call 408-299-VOTE (8683). The last day to request a Vote by Mail Ballot is May 27. For more information, visit the Registrar of Voters website or call (408) 299-8683 or toll free 1-866430-8683.

• Alameda County Water District: http://www.acwd.org • City of Hayward: https://www.hayward-ca.gov/utilitybilling/(S(hi10mnfu2bn2lzvavo2vjw55))/default.aspx • City of Milpitas: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/gov ernment/engineering/storm.asp • City of Pleasanton: http://www.cityofpleasantonca.go v/services/utility/watersystem.html • City of Santa Clara: http://santaclaraca.gov/ • East Bay Municipal Utility District: https://www.ebmud.com • San Jose Water Company: http://www.sjwater.com/ • Santa Clara Valley Water District: http://www.valleywater.org • Zone 7 Water Agency: http://www.zone7water.com I encourage each of you to take immediate action and begin conserving water. I have heard recently from some constituents that they are worried that they may be penalized for voluntarily cutting back on water use, if and when, water rationing becomes mandatory, as it has in some communities in the 10th District and in other parts of the state. Water districts assure me that is not the case, so please continue to do your part to help our state and local communities. As the State Senator representing the 10th District, I am committed to combating the drought’s impact on residents, communities and our environment and I look forward to partnering with you to address California’s long term water needs.

Governor announces Johanson appointment Martha Johanson, 50, of Milpitas, has been reappointed to Area Board VII of the California State Council on Developmental Disabilities, where she has served since 2013. Johanson has been founder and president of the Johanson Healing Institute since 2013. She was co-founder of Building Martin’s Miracle from 2005 to 2012 and a Spanish immersion educator at Forest Glen Elementary School from 2003 to 2004. Johanson was District 6 interim director of Pupil Personnel and guidance counselor at the New York City Board of Education from 1997 to 2000, an early intervention coordinator at GrahamWindham from 1996 to 1997 and a teacher and coordinator at Project Reach Youth Inc. in 1996. She was a consultant for the Children’s Television Network from 1995 to 1996 and for Migrant Head Start of Central Indiana in 1995 and a Spanish immersion teacher at the Park Tudor School from 1993 to 1995. Johanson earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree in clinical Christian counseling from Cornerstone University, a Master of Science degree in school counseling from Indiana University and a Master of Education in education administration from the Universidad Inca Garcilaso de Vega. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no compensation. Johanson is a Republican.

State Board of Equalization receives recognition SUBMITTED BY BRIAN MILLER The California State Board of Equalization (BOE) received two statewide awards from the California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) for its newly redesigned website and informative use tax video series. CAPIO, an organization of public communication professionals, honored the BOE with a first place Award of Excellence for its reengineered website, www.boe.ca.gov, and an Award of Distinction for its use tax video series. “These honors spotlight the hard work of our BOE staff in developing customer-focused tools designed to make it easier for businesses to partner with the BOE and to increase voluntary compliance,” said Executive Director Cynthia Bridges. The BOE’s new website, developed by BOE employees and unveiled in August, is customer-friendly and task-oriented. The website was built with California tax and fee payers in mind, and incorporated many of their suggestions. The CAPIO judges said they were wowed by the transformation and stressed that, “The site was a refreshing approach to government website design and a huge improvement!” Watch a video highlighting the new BOE website at: http://bit.ly/BOEWebPromo


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Kakela caps off career with Player of the Week award SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM Cal State East Bay’s Chelsie Kakela has been named the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Softball Player of the Week for the week of Apr. 21-27. Kakela led the Pioneers to a 3-1 mark on the weekend of April 26-27, over Chico State to wrap up 2014 season in fifth place, the best finish since joining the CCAA. Over the final three at bats of her collegiate career the senior slugger hit a 3-run homer, double, and solo homer in leading Cal State East Bay to its first .500 season record in CCAA play. All six of her base hits in the series went for extra bases including a pair of two homer contests to bookend the series with the Wildcats. Kakela posted a slash line of .600/.714/2.000 and reached base safely in 10 of her 14 trips to the plate. Her final swing vaulted her into a tie for the league lead with 11 homers and was enough to make her the CCAA regular season slugging champion with a .833 slugging percentage. On average she hit a home run once every 8.2 at bats against league pitchers in 2014. She finished conference play with CCAA top 10 marks of 24 runs scored (5th), 31 RBI (5th), 75 total bases (4th), 15 walks (7th), seven times hit by a pitch (3rd), 11 homers (1st), a .491 on base percentage (5th) and slugging percentage (1st). Her .367 batting average was 11th best among CCAA qualifiers. Cal State East Bay (27-26, 18-18 CCAA) earned its highest finish taking fifth place in the final league standings. Kakela was one of four seniors to finish her collegiate career this past weekend along with Meli Sanchez, Mandy Dale, and Shaunna Purkey.

Vikings show power at the plate Baseball

SUBMITTED AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Irvington Vikings baseball team put on a great hitting display against the American Eagles on April 30th as they scored seven runs on 10 welltimed hits. Final score: Vikings 7, Eagles 0. They opened up the game in the third inning as they scored their first three runs of the game and never looked back, adding another run in the fourth inning, closing the door in the fifth when they tacked on an additional three runs.

Softball James Logan vs. Newark Memorial May 1, 2014 James Logan 16, Newark Memorial 7 Newark Memorial High School Strong - P (0+ IP, 4 H, K, BB, 4 RA, 4 ER, 2 2B, 3B) Rojo (L) - (5 IP, 11 RA, 9 ER, 14 H, 2B, WP) Acosta - Orndoff ( 1 RA, 1 ER, WP) Hadfield - C (7 IC, SBA, CS) Rodriquez 1-4, RBI, R Acosta-Orndoff Herrera 2-4, 2 R

A team effort, six of the starting Vikings reached base with a hit; Catcher Jake Doty and Cameron Cabigas with two hits each. At the end of the day, the Viking team batting average was a hefty .370. Viking pitcher Michael Newman added a standout performance on the mound as well as his fast ball and change up were working; he only give up one hit to Eagle David Shan. As Mission Valley Athletic League baseball winds down to its final weeks, this type of powerful performance could elevate the Vikings in close league competition.

Matos 2-4, 2 R, 3 RBI, 3B Hernandez 3-4, 2 RBI Strong 1-4, R Knudson 1-3, BB, ROE Rojo 1-3, R Hadfield 1-3, K Donn 0-2, Sac Extra Base Hits 2B None; 3B Matos RBIs Rodriguez, Matos (3), Hernandez (2) James Logan High School Pelland - P (1 IP, 8 H, K, 6 RA, 6 ER, 2B, 3B) Gonzalez-?Patino (W) -(5 ? IP, 1 RA, 0 ER, 4 H, BB, SB)

Burpee - C (7 IC, PB) Mattos 4-5, 2 R, 2 RBI Sanchez 3-3, 3R, RBI, 2B, 2 BB Peters 3-5, 3 R, 2 RBI, 2B, 3B Garza 2-4, 2 R, 3 RBI, HBP Burpee 5-5, 3 RBI Rubio (CR) R Davis 0-5, R Bailado 1-5, R, RBI, ROE Kowaki 2-4, R, 2RBI Gonzalez-?Patino 1-3, RBI, BB Rios (CR) R Extra Base Hits 2B Sanchez, Peters, Garza; 3B Peters RBIs Mattos (2), Sanchez, Peters (2), Garza (3), Burpee (3) Bailado, Kowaki (2), Gonzalez-Patino


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Trio named to All-CCAA Squad Softball

SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM Senior Chelsie Kakela, junior Kelsey LaVaute, and freshman Ali Cerminara were named to the 2014 AllCalifornia Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Softball Team, announced on Friday, May 2, 2014. Kakela is the third player in Pioneer history to earn first team All-CCAA honors and the first since 2012. “They all turned in solid seasons and are deserving of the recognition. I am excited for what it means for our program and future,” said Cal State East Bay Head Coach Barbara Pierce. Kakela, a native of Bainbridge Island, Wash., earned an at-large selection after starting in 52-of-53 games as the Pioneer designated player. Over the final 23 games of the season she hit .422 (27-for-64) with six home runs and 22 RBI. In conference play she tied for the league lead with 11 homers and posted a CCAA best .833 slugging percentage. LaVaute, a newcomer to the Pioneers from Missoula, Mont., was named to the second team as an atlarge selection. In conference play she led the league with 35 runs batted in, tied for third with 10 long balls, and ranked fifth with a .699 slugging percentage. The Cal State East Bay first baseman played in all 53 games and led the team with 45 RBI and seven stolen bases in 2014. Cerminara, hailing from Phoenix, Ariz., earned a second team selection at catcher after appearing in 48-of53 games this season. In CCAA play she ranked in the top 12 overall with seven home runs and a .554 slugging percentage. Cerminara led the league throwing out 11 base runners attempting to steal on her. The only three players originally from outside the state of California to be named to the All-CCAA were Kakela, LaVaute and Cerminara. It is the third straight year the Pioneers have placed multiple players on the All-CCAA squad. Cal State East Bay went 27-26, 18-18 CCAA and finished fifth in the final regular season league standings. The Pioneers posted their best result in league play and finished with a .500 record in CCAA for the first time since joining the CCAA in 2010.

Gladiator update Rugby The Life Chiropractic College West Gladiators took the next step toward a spot at the U.S. National Rugby Finals to be held in Madison Wisconsin on May 31st. In regional play on May 3rd in Boise, Idaho, the Gladiators beat the Northwest Champion Budd Bay Buffalos 34-24. The next step toward the finals is quarter and semi-final rounds May 17-18 in Dallas, Texas. Any individuals or businesses that would like to support the team can contact Coach Dr. Tez Molloy on (510) 3291769, or visit the team website at www.lifewestrugby.com.

Eagles score big win

SUBMITTED AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The American Eagles won a close one as they beat The Mission Warriors 4-3 in a game that could have gone either way on May 2, 2014. The Eagles started the game off right in the first inning with a nicely timed series of hits that drove in the first two runs of the game, taking an early lead, 2-0. But the Mission San Jose Warriors stayed in the fight as they started an offensive attack of they own in the fourth inning, closing the gap with a run, followed by two more in the fifth. Score: Eagles 4, Warriors 3. A game filled with exciting plays from both teams as both hit the ball deep into the outfield, setting up an unusual amount of action around home plate and some exciting plays. Jordan Terbeek of the Warriors who filled in at the catcher

position, made some heads up plays to keep the game close but the Eagle offense just seemed to get the hits at the right times. A team effort, Dave Shan, Naeem Knox and Arric Bischofberger posted RBIs for the day and Knox had another stand out day behind the plate with 2 hits for 2 at bats with an RBI as well. This was an important game in

Finding jobs SUBMITTED BY SEVERN WILLIAMS Finding solutions for persistent unemployment among East Bay residents is the subject of a new report by the East Bay Community Foundation. The report spotlights practical ways in which employers, government job-training programs and jobs-focused nonprofit organizations can all work together to increase employment among individuals in the shadows of unemployment.

The report is a follow-up to the Foundation’s 2009 study, Putting the East Bay to Work. The 2009 research and the new report are aimed at reducing poverty in the East Bay — specifically among the 325,000 residents of Alameda and Contra Costa counties, 12 percent of the total population, living below the Federal Poverty Level. Both the full current report and executive summary are available on the Foundation’s website at www.ebcf.org.

Share My Lesson website assists educators SUBMITTED BY NATALIE DEAN Share My Lesson has reached a milestone of 300,000 user-generated online lesson plans and other classroom resources. It is now the largest digital collection of free materials for educators, paraprofessionals, parents and community organizations. The joint venture between the American Federation of Teachers and TES Connect, which launched in June 2012, has a community of more than 480,000 registered users. Just recently, Share My Lesson posted “Care Packages,” making it easier than ever for users to find the most applicable resources for their classroom. The virtual Care Package is specified by grade or subject and features relevant Common Core-aligned resources for each category. Share My Lesson allows educators to collaborate with each other through the sharing of teaching and learning best practices. Resources are easily accessible and quality checked through a peer-review process. Among the 300,000 classroom resources is the largest collection of Common Core-aligned lesson plans and other teaching materials— more than 30,000 aligned resources. For more information, and access to free Share My Lesson resources, visit www.sharemylesson.com.

the Mission Valley Athletic League competition; with the victory, the Eagles put themselves into a four-way tie for third place with Kennedy Moreau Catholic and Irvington at 5-5. With just two weeks remaining in league play, all games will important in the standings and North Coast Section play.

Williams selected as Deputy County Executive SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/LAUREL ANDERSON County Executive Jeffrey V. Smith recently announced that James R. Williams will assume new responsibilities as Deputy County Executive. Thirty-year-old Williams played a substantial role in advancing the County’s position on the dissolution of redevelopment agencies. Williams delivered oral argument before the California Supreme Court in California Redevelopment Association v. Matosantos, where the County’s successful argument resulted in the dissolution of the state’s 400+ redevelopment agencies on February 1, 2012. In June of 2012, Smith appointed Williams to serve as Special Assistant to the County Executive with a primary role in the dissolution of the redevelopment agencies. He has worked on every aspect of this unprecedented effort, including oversight boards, legislation, audits, and tax distribution. In January 2013, he was promoted to the post of Deputy County Executive, focused on dissolution and other special projects in Finance, Valley Health Plan, and public safety. Williams will coordinate, on behalf of the County Executive, Procurement, Countywide Contracting, County Communications (9-1-1), Office of Emergency Services, Fire Department, housing issues, and work with the Board of Supervisors’ Finance and Government Operations Committee. Williams began his career with the County of Santa Clara in 2010 as a Social Justice & Impact Litigation Fellow in the Office of the County Counsel. His impressive work landed him a role as Deputy County Counsel where, among other duties, he advised the County’s Finance Agency and its Auditor-Controller, Treasurer, and Tax Collector functions. Williams graduated from Stanford Law School in June 2010. In 2006, he graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University, where he received the Pyne Prize, Princeton’s highest undergraduate distinction. He is a Harry S. Truman Scholar and Paul & Daisy Soros Fellow. In Spring 2012, Williams was named a “Lawyer on the Fast Track” by The Recorder, recognizing California attorneys in their first 10 years of practice “whose early accomplishments indicate they will be tomorrow’s top lawyers and leaders.” Williams and his wife, Mary Anne, live in San Jose with their three children: Jesse, age 4; Boman, age 2; and Susanna, age 6 months. His salary is $182,000.


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May 6, 2014

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club of Fremont We meet Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at Spin-a-Yarn Restuaruant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, 510-656-9141 Service through Fun http://the/ fremontrotaryclub.org Please come visit our club We wlecome new members

Dawn Breakers Lions Club Our Motto is: WE SERVE Meetings -1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:45am-8am El Patio Restaurant 37311 Fremont, Blvd., Fremont We welcome Men & Women with desire to serve our community 510-371-4065 for Free Brochure

KIWANIS CLUB OF FREMONT We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 a.m. Fremont/Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark www.kiwanisfremont.org Contact Elise Balgley at (510) 693-4524

Interested in Portuguese Culture and Traditions? PFSA (Portuguese Fraternal Society of America) Promotes youth scholarships, community charities, and cultural events. All are welcome. Contact 510-483-7676 www.mypfsa.org

Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society, Inc. Meetings: Third Saturday 5:30pm in member homes Call: 510-793-8181 for location Email: contact@aachisi.com See web for Speical Events www.aachis.com We welcome all new members Celebrating 40th anniversary

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:Accgr43@gmail.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Mission Trails Mustangs Mustang & Ford Enthusiast Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call 510-493-1559 We do Car Shows and other social activities monthly

Maitri Immigration Program Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening. email: immigration@maitri.org

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every TUESDAY in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Fremont Area Writers Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Carol at (510) 565-0619 www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You'll find valuable information about your community and voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are non-partisan and free to the public.

Maitri Immigration Program Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening. email: immigration@maitri.org

Bring Your Heart to Hospice Hold a hand, lend an ear, be a hospice volunteer. Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Call Alicia Schwemer at 408/964/6800 or Visit Vitas.com/Volunteers

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area Experience a country and its culture with local hosts and promote global goodwill. Clubs in 56 countries. Visit Australia in Feb. Host French in Sept. Monthly programs & socials. www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org Call 510-794-6844 or 793-0857.

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tuesday & Thursday at 1900 Mowry (4th floor in the conference room) 6:45-8:45 pm & Friday 9:15-11:00 am. 510574-2262 Hotline 510-794-6055

Walk to Cure Arthritis Saturday, May 10th at LifeStyle RX 1119 E. Stanley Blvd., Livermore Registration 8:00 a.m. Walk 10:00 a.m. 1 or 3 mile options, Tailgate Extravaganza, Raffle Prizes, Refreshments, Kids Activities, www.TriValleyArthritisWalk.org or Call (800) 464-6240

Hayward Demos Democratic Club Monthly meetings-learn about current issues from experts, speak with officials. Annual special events such as Fall Festival, Pot-lucks and more Meetings open to all registered Democrats. For information www.haywarddemos.org

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Help with Home Repairs from Alameda County No cost or favorable, low interest loans are available for home remodeling for qualified homeowners in Fremont, Union City, Sunol and Newark. Call (510)670-5399 for an application and more information. http://www.acgov.org/cda/nps/

Tri-City Ecology Center

Help with Math & Reading You can make a difference by helping Newark children with Math and reading. If you can give one hour a week, you can give a life-long gift of learning to a child. Contact 510-797-2703 dia_aarp_4486@yahoo.com

Unity of Fremont

Your local environmental leader! A Positive Path for Spiritual Living Eco-Grants available to 12:30 pm Sunday Service Residents & Organizations of the 1351 Driscoll Rd Tri-City area working on (at Christian Science Church), Environmental projects. Fremont www.tricityecology.org 510-797-5234 Office open Thursdays, 11am-2pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-783-6222 “The Church of the Daily Word”

Docents Needed Museum of Local History

Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank

190 Anza Street, Fremont Learn about Fremont’s local history Docent training first Sat. each month Beginning March 10 am -12noon Call Patricia Schaffarczyk 510-677-8461 pathikes@yahoo.com

Invigorate your spirit & volunteer. Drop ins welcome Mon - Fri. Work off your Traffic violation by giving back to the community in need. Students 14 years & older welcome. Email Erin: ewright@tri-Cityvolunteer.org

SparkPoint Financial Services

Troubled by someone’s

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Caring, Sharing, Serving God 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont Sun Worship:8:45am 11:00am Child-care provided.Education for all ages: 10:00am. Nacho Sunday: First Sunday of every month. (510)793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Messiah Lutheran Church Church Service - Sunday 10 a.m. Bible Study - Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday School 2nd & 4th Sunday each month @ 11:15am and community events 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Phone: (510) 782-6727 www.MessiahHayward.org

drinking? Help is Here! FREE financial services and coaching for low-income people who Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups A no cost program of support want to improve their finances. for people suffering from effects SparkPoint Info Session of alcoholism in a friend or 3rd Thursday, 6-7pm loved one. Call 276-2270 for City of Fremont meeting information Family Resource Center email: Easyduz@gmail.com To reserve a seat: 574-2020 www/ncwsa.org Fremont.gov/SparkPointFRC You are not alone. SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Palma Ceia Baptist Church Present 3rd Annual Juneteenth Frestival “Emancipation Day” Saturday, June 21 10am-4pm Family Fun, Music,Food

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon

Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

City of Newark 50+ Senior Softball League Players Needed Open Games Mondays & Wednesday Nights Practice starts 3/10/14 @ 5p.m. Season runs 4/7/14 – 6/3/14 Sign-up @ Newark Silliman Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 578-4668

TCSME Model RR Open House - FREE Family Fun Weekend June 14 & 15 Plus Swap Meet on 14th 10am-4pm Niles Plaza, Fremont HO & N layouts in operation Q: bobcz007@comcast.net Nearby: NCRW Steamfest

28650 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-786-2866 or 510-552-5222

Fair Trade Festival South Hayward Parish Sat. May 10 -10am-3pm Proceeds to directly to SHP FOOD PANTRY. Enjoy FT coffees, teas, chocolates. Support Fair Trade. Help farmers, workers and artisans. W-Hills Outreach Center 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (Across from Weekes Library)

New DimensionChorus Men’s 4 Part Vocal Harmony In the “Barbershop” style Thursdays at 7pm Calvary Luther Church 12500 Via Magdelena SanLorenzo Contact: ncchorus@Yahoo.com 510-332-2489

FAA ~ EVENTS Art in the Garden, Artists Call 4/13 - G. Rankin Art Showcase 6/28, 29-Art in the Garden 9/22 Fine Art Show, Receiving Check on-line for ongoing classes, art shows & events www.fremontartassociation.org 37697 Niles Blvd. 510.792.0905

Larry O Car Show Saturday, August 9 9am - 3pm Classic & Custom Cars, Trucks Oldies Music, Bicycle Show Prizes-BBQ-Bounce House-Prizes Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd. Union City www.unioncity.org 510-675-5495

50th Year Class Reunion Washington High School Class of 64’ & Friends September 26 & 27, 2014 Spin A Yarn Steakhouse,Fremont Contact Joan Martin Graham billjoan3@pacbell.net

Cougars Girls Basketball Camp June 23-27 - M-F Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark Full & Half Day options Girls ages 8-15 Darryl Reina, Camp Director 510-578-4620 www.Newark.org


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swers, as I believe they provide a snapshot of the skills and qualities that educators and those interested in expanding their careers need to focus on today. If we continue to survey those around us in this way, we will all understand where our educational system needs to be headed for the next 85 years, and beyond. “Running a startup in San Francisco, you quickly realize that success is gated by the availability of software engineers. Marketing (as Facebook proves) has become a technical skill. Hailing a cab (as Uber proves) is a technology business. Even caring for a parent (as CareZone proves), is made easier via software. Those are the skills that will continue to transform industries everywhere.” (Jonathan Schwartz, CEO CareZone, formerly CEO Sun Microsystems) “Rather than ‘brilliant’ lecturers, our educators need to find ways of deeply understanding the context of the students whom they serve. If they have an appreciation of their lives, their neighborhoods and their communities, they can provide them with the skills and tools their students will need into the future.” (Kevin K. Kumashiro, PhD, Dean, USF School of Education) “We need problem solvers. Rather than people who can follow along a dotted line, we need those who will ask critical ques-

tions to get to the most effective solution. Designers are specifically trained to do this. In the high tech industry, design-thinking and creative-thinking are highly relevant skills that are needed to solve the types of challenges posed by our clients.” (Francisco Delgadillo, Creative Director, Oracle) “As we look at shaping the future of medical school education, we are focusing on both ‘blended’ and ‘adaptive’ learning. ‘Blended learning’ is the integration of online learning opportunities to compliment classroom experiences. This provides the opportunity for students to progress based on individual learning styles and preferences (‘adaptive learning’) and makes education much more effective and targeted.” (Clay Johnston, MD, Inaugural Dean, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin) “The most successful people in our organization are those who can be creative solution providers. They are able to think and work in an interdisciplinary environment. Many come with a background in the arts. This way of thinking is essential, as they are trained in finding different approaches, improvising and thinking on their feet. Ultimately, we need those who can react to a changing situation, and yet have a creative vision that keeps them

grounded in their approach.” (Jim Nadel, Executive Director, Stanford Summer Jazz Festival) “It is an entrepreneurial mindset that will give our youth the skills they needfor success in the 21st century. Specific skills include being able to recognize and create opportunity, think critically, delay gratification, to take risks and to assume ownership for outcomes.” Krista Katsantonis Bloome, Executive Director, The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship) “We are looking for the nimble – those who can turn on a dime and are able to re-prioritize–many times just adding more work to the priority list. Things move fast in a start-up and the more, well-rounded, “can do” anything types who are also happy to work in a fast, kinetic and always-changing environment, the better.” (Elissa Hambrecht, COO, NewCo) “Our company has a very small staff-to-sales volume ratio. This means that we have no time or resources for training. We look for those who have both industry-experience and a high degree of maturity. This means that they are able to take in new information and act on it efficiently. For myself, I found that my education enabled me to see the world around me from a broader vantage point. This was of enormous value in my work today.” (Sarah

Board of Supervisors to hold FY 2015 budget workshops SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/LAUREL ANDERSON At budget workshops beginning Tuesday, May 6th, the County of Santa Clara Board of Supervisors will review the County Executive Jeffrey V. Smith’s Recommended Budget for Fiscal Year 2015, which begins in July. The Recommended $4.9 billion budget includes all services, operations, capital improvements and reserves. The County Executive’s Recommended General Fund Budget is $2.57 billion, which covers all discretionary and many mandated services for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014. In the Recommended Budget, the County Executive recommends the allocation of $34.3 million in available resources. The budget workshops are the public’s early opportunity to engage and comment on the planned allocation of resources. Budget hearing meetings to make final decisions on the FY 2015 Budget will take place June 16-20, 2014. Tuesday, May 6, 2014 – 1:30 p.m. Budget Overview Children, Seniors and Families – Part 1: Department of Child Support Services, In Home Supportive Services Health and Hospital – Part 1: Custody Health Services, Behavioral Health Services, Public Health, Valley Health Plan Tuesday, May 6, 2014 - 6:30 p.m. Children, Seniors and Families – Part 2: Social Services Agency Health and Hospital – Part 2: Community Health Services, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 1:30 p.m. Finance and Government Operations: Spe-

cial Programs and Reserves, Appropriations and Contingencies, Board of Supervisors, Clerk of the Board, County Executive’s Office and LAFCO, Assessor, Procurement, County Counsel, Registrar of Voters, Information Services Department, County Communications, Facilities and Fleet, Capital Programs, County Library, Employee Services Agency, Finance Agency Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 6:30 p.m. – only if the afternoon session was recessed to finish in an evening session Thursday, May 8, 2014- 1:30 p.m. Public Safety and Justice: Public Safety Realignment (AB109) Program, Office of the District Attorney, Office of the Public Defender, Office of Pretrial Services, Criminal Justice System-wide Costs, Office of the Sheriff, Medical Examiner-Coroner, Department of Correction, Probation Department Housing, Land Use, Environment and Transportation: Planning and Development, Agriculture and Environmental Management, Environmental Health Department, Vector Control District, Parks and Recreation, and Roads and Airports Department, County Fire Department, Los Altos Hills Fire District, South Santa Clara County Fire District County Budget Workshops Tuesday, May 6: 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 7: 1:30 p.m. (& 6:30 p.m.) Thursday, May 8: 1:30 p.m. Board Chambers, County Government Center 70 W. Hedding Street, San Jose FY 2015 Recommended Budget is located at www.sccgov.org under Hot Items

Mills named Deputy County Executive SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/LAUREL ANDERSON County of Santa Clara County Executive Jeffrey V. Smith has announced the appointment of John P. Mills to the post of Deputy County Executive. Mills began work in his new role on Monday, May 5, 2014. Mills has provided dedicated service to the residents of Santa Clara County for more than twelve years. He has served as Chief of Staff to District 4 County Supervisor Ken Yeager since Yeager took office in December 2006. As Chief of Staff, Mills advised the Supervisor on all policy matters, including social services, health and hospital system, labor and employment, housing, land use, environment, transportation, public safety and justice, finance, government operations, and state and federal legislation. He also was responsible for managing and supervising the operation of the District Office. Prior to joining the County, Mills honed his skills with the City of San Jose as District 6 Chief of Staff, working on a wide range of policy issues, including public safety, transportation, capital budget, cultural services, planning and land use.

Garcia, President and Ower, Pacific Produce) “We need employees who are both excellent communicators and problem solvers. If you have a great idea, it needs to make sense to others, even to a client who does not have the time or interest in understanding it. It is a given that all job applicants are technically proficient, but insuring that they are of the most value to the organization means that they will be able to translate their knowledge to our clients.” (Francisco Delgadillo, Creative Director, Oracle) “I look for people who have both broad perspective on the marketplace, as well as a detailed, technical understanding of the product itself. That is to say that our staff needs to understand our customers and competitors and general trends in the market place, on the one hand. On the other hand, we rely on everyone in the chain of distribution (from manufacturer to vendor to salesperson) so have a true, technical mastery of the product itself. If any one person in the chain is not a product specialist, the entire system breaks down.” (Xiao Yan Zhu, CEO, Pinnacle Interior Elements LLC) “It is my hope that educators and policy-makers continue to tap the market to unearth new areas of demand, as they arise. Using various methods to insure

that our educational institutions match the real-life needs presented across industries is critical. For those who are concerned with issues surrounding future productivity and the relevance of our educational system, perhaps the insights from professionals shared in this piece will provide a means of opening up the dialogue and will motivate continual improvement.” (Laurel Skurko, Principal, Linc Marketing) Background on Laurel Skurko: Laurel Skurko, Principal at Linc Marketing, works with local, Silicon Valley based, organizations, in addition to global businesses in the healthcare, education, and technology sectors. She serves organizations ranging from start-ups and non-profits to Fortune 500’s. Her objective is to spread the word about valuable resources in the community using digital marketing techniques and her network in The Bay Area and beyond. She grew up in Silicon Valley and global citizen, having lived and worked extensively in America, Europe and Asia. She has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University. She is also a parent of three children in San Francisco, ages 9-15, and is passionate about the interface between education, industry and technology.

From 2001 to 2004, Mills was the District Director for 24th District Assemblymember Rebecca Cohn, where he managed all district office operations and designed and coordinated a constituent service and outreach plan to keep residents informed of the Assemblymember’s activities, legislative hearings and community events. For the past several years, during his personal time, Mills has made substantial contributions to community life by serving on various public advisory groups, including the Parks and Community Services Commission, the Housing Advisory Committee, and the Economic Development Advisory Committee for the City of San Ramon in Contra Costa County. In his role as Deputy County Executive, Mills will coordinate, on behalf of the County Executive, Legislative Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations, Public Safety and Justice Committee, Probation, Office of the Sheriff, Medical Examiner-Coroner, Pretrial Services, Office of Human Relations, and the Registrar of Voters. Mills holds a Master of Science in Genetics from the Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his Bachelor of Science in Genetics from the University of California at Davis in 1996. His minor was in history. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society, Phi Sigma Biology Honor Society, Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, and Golden Key Honor Society. Mills also was a finalist for the University Medal, the highest honor awarded a graduating senior, and received a Genetics Department Citation for his achievements within his major field of study. Thirty-nine-year old Mills lives in Contra Costa County with his husband of more than five years, Nathan Lawrence, and their two young sons. His annual salary will be $180,000.


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Are you a writer?

May 6, 2014

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

City Council/Public Agency MEETINGS Readers are advised to check websites for special meetings, cancellations, minutes, agendas and webcasts CITY COUNCILS Fremont City Council 1st/2nd/3rd Tuesday @ 7 p.m. City Hall, Bldg A 3300 Capitol Ave., Fremont (510) 284-4000 www.fremont.gov Hayward City Council 1st/3rd/4th Tuesday @ 7 p.m. City Hall, second floor 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 583-4000 www.ci.hayward.ca.us Milpitas City Council 1st/3rd Tuesday @ 7 p.m. 455 East Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3001 www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov Newark City Council 2nd/4th Thursday @ 7:30 p.m. City Hall, 6th Floor 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4266 www.ci.newark.ca.us San Leandro City Council 1st/3rd Monday @ 7 p.m. 835 East 14th St., San Leandro (510) 577-3366 www.sanleandro.org Union City City Council 2nd/4th Tuesday @ 7 p.m. City Hall 34009 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-3232 www.ci.union-city.ca.us

WATER/SEWER Alameda County Water District 2nd Thursday @ 6:00 p.m. 43885 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont (510) 668-4200 www.acwd.org East Bay Municipal Utility District 2nd/4th Tuesday @ 1:15 p.m. 375 11th St., Oakland (866) 403-2683 www.ebmud.com Santa Clara Valley Water District 2nd/4th Tuesday @ 6:00 p.m. 5700 Almaden Expwy., San Jose (408) 265-2607, ext. 2277 www.valleywater.org Union Sanitary District 2nd/4th Monday @ 7:00 p.m. 5072 Benson Rd., Union City (510) 477-7503 www.unionsanitary.com

SCHOOL DISTRICTS Castro Valley Unified School Board 2nd/4th Thursday @ 7:00 p.m. 4400 Alma Ave., Castro Valley (510) 537-3000 www.cv.k12.ca.us Fremont Unified School Board 2nd/4th Wednesday @ 6:30 p.m. 4210 Technology Dr., Fremont (510) 657-2350 www.fremont.k12.ca.us Hayward Unified School Board 2nd/4th Wednesday @ 6:30 p.m. 24411 Amador Street, Hayward (510) 784-2600 www.husd.k12.ca.us Milpitas Unified School Board 2nd/4th Tuesday @ 7:00 p.m. 1331 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas www.musd.org (406) 635-2600 ext. 6013 New Haven Unified School Board 1st/3rd Tuesday @ 6:30 p.m. 34200 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-1100 www.nhusd.k12.ca.us Newark Unified School District 1st/3rd Tuesday @ 7 p.m. 5715 Musick Ave., Newark (510) 818-4103 www.newarkunified.org San Leandro Unified School Board 1st/3rd Tuesday @ 7:00 p.m. 835 E. 14th St., San Leandro (510) 667-3500 www.sanleandro.k12.ca.us San Lorenzo Unified School Board 1st/3rd Tuesday @ 7:30 p.m. 15510 Usher St., San Lorenzo (510) 317-4600 www.slzusd.org Sunol Glen Unified School Board 2nd Tuesday @ 5:30 p.m. 11601 Main Street, Sunol (925) 862-2026 www.sunol.k12.ca.us

TAKES FROM SILICON VALLEY EAST

Wheels and Walls:The Food Truck Trend and Why We Like It BY KELLY KLINE, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Last Friday was the seasonal debut of Street Eats, a food truck event sponsored by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. Over the next few months, a rotating list of trucks selling everything from Korean barbecue to cupcakes to ceviche will descend on Capitol Avenue, Fremont’s future Main Street, every Friday from 4:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. We’ve blogged before about the important role this event plays in creating community. However, in spite of the growing popularity of food trucks, there are still lingering concerns about competition with “brick and mortar” establishments. We recognize the sensitivity, but having given this much thought, we’d like to present a case for the food truck. 1. Food trucks function as retail incubators.

Let’s face it. Starting a restaurant is expensive, and survival statistics are grim. We’ve watched many family restaurants (and large chains as well) succumb, based on high costs, small margins, and changing customer desires. We believe that food concepts should be able to incubate in a manner that doesn’t jeopardize the owner’s home mortgage. Food trucks offer a lower-risk method of testing menu items, and help establish a reputation and customer base. One local success story is Curry Up Now – a thriving restaurant with three Bay Area locations that started on the road. 2. If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em! Increasingly, food establishments are taking a “multi-modal” approach to their real estate needs, especially when testing or penetrating new markets. One example is San Francisco-based The Melt – a grilled cheese phenomenon with a strategy of “wheels and walls.” You can actually “book the bus” from

the website, which brings a whole new dimension to catering (often the life-blood of a successful restaurant). Just ask Whole Foods. The market chain has successfully integrated food trucks into its business model, which allows it to take advantage of serving events such as “South by Southwest.” 3. The food truck model has changed to be more compatible with dining districts. It used to be that food trucks scoured city streets looking for a place to do business for a few hours at a time. While that still occurs on a limited basis, food truck operations have shifted to an event model organized by professional planners such as Fremont-based Food Truck Mafia, and Off the Grid. For example, Food Truck Mafia works in collaboration with Chamber organizations and shares profits to support business districts. There is also a growing list of best practices from cities like New York, Portland, and Milwaukee that have successfully integrated food trucks. RHI is a Santa Cruzbased organization that collects these best practices and helps

cities walk the fine line between encouraging vibrancy and limiting unfair competition. 4. Food trucks drive unique traffic to a district. Food trucks can fill customer dead zones by driving traffic to particular places at particular times. How do they accomplish this feat? Two words: social media. Food trucks have distinguished themselves by effectively employing social media to mobilize their fan base. They tweet out locations, specials, customer selfies, and generally create excitement around their “community.” It is safe to argue that customers would not have otherwise visited a particular district without the invitation. Districts can benefit through spill-over traffic, and more importantly, by planting seeds with new customers who will come back later and explore. Food trucks are here to stay. And it’s not just food that we’re talking about. I’ve seen trucks for vintage clothing, haircuts, and bike repair. As creative entrepreneurs find new avenues to grow commerce, cities need to respond in kind.

Alameda CTC City of Hayward seeks Board, recognized for Commission and Task Force applicants S M L financial reporting UBMITTED BY

SUBMITTED BY TESS LENGYEL The Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC) has been awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) for its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for the year ended June 30, 2013. The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting. “This award represents a significant accomplishment by our agency thanks to the diligent work and leadership of Patricia Reavey, Alameda CTC’s director of finance,” says Alameda CTC Executive Director Arthur Dao. “In addition to the agency’s award, Ms. Reavey received an Award of Financial Reporting Achievement for the preparation of our award-winning CAFR.” “This award comes on the heels of the Alameda County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series 2014 being rated AAA by both Fitch Ratings and Standard and Poor’s ratings services, and their successful sale,” says Alameda CTC Chair Supervisor Scott Haggerty. “This is a banner year for Alameda CTC, demonstrating to voters that the agency continues to be an excellent steward of public funds.” Earlier this year, Alameda CTC sold $137,145,000 (par value) of the Alameda County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series 2014 through a syndicate led by Citigroup Global Markets Inc. Strengthened by their AAA rating, the bonds sold quickly at an allin true interest cost of 1.587 percent. The proceeds of the sale will finance certain transportation improvements and projects outlined in Alameda CTC’s 2000 Measure B Transportation Expenditure Plan, including BART extensions, key freight corridor improvements and other projects that support economic vitality, reduce traffic and serve the spectrum of transportation needs in Alameda County.

IRIAM

ENS

The City of Hayward is seeking individuals interested in serving Hayward. We currently have openings on the following bodies, which serve in an advisory capacity to the City Council: Community Services Commission (2 vacancies, 4 potential vacancies) Council Economic Development Committee (1 vacancy, 3 potential vacancies) Downtown Hayward Business Improvement Area Advisory Board (3 vacancies, 1 potential vacancy) Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force (KHC&GTF) (3 vacancies) Library Commission (2 vacancies) Personnel Commission (1 vacancy, 2 potential vacancies) Planning Commission (3 potential vacancies) Prospective applicants must be registered voters residing within the Hayward city limits. Applicants for the Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board do not need to live in Hayward; however, they must own a business in the Downtown Business Improvement Area of Hayward and pay assessments. Applicants for the Council Economic Development Committee must be residents of Hayward, own/operate a business in Hayward, be senior management at a corporate business in Hayward, or be formally affiliated with and represent another entity or agency concerned with economic development in the City of Hayward. Individuals appointed to the Planning Commission, Community Services Commission, Council Economic Development Committee, and Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force will need to file a Fair Political Practices Commission Statement of Economic Interests (Form 700). Interested individuals can apply online at www.hayward-ca.gov, or obtain applications from the Office of the City Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, or call (510) 583-4400. The application submission deadline is 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 10. Interviews with the City Council are scheduled for Tuesday, July 22. Qualified Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force applicants will be required to interview with the Task Force Panel on Wednesday, July 16.

Assembly Committee approves electric charging stations bill SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Seeking to expand the number of charging stations available to drivers of electric vehicles, on April 28 the state Assembly Transportation Committee approved AB 1696 by Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) to make increasing the stations a priority at parkand-ride lots and parking facilities. The bill passed on an 11-5 vote. “California is where 40 percent of all electric vehicles are sold in the United States and they are the most widespread type of zeroemission vehicles on our roads,” Wieckowski said. “If we can reduce the worries people have that they won’t be able to find a charging station, we can reassure drivers and potential buyers. By putting more electric vehicles on the road we can reduce our emissions and improve our environment.” In 2012, Governor Jerry Brown issued an executive order calling for the state to be prepared to support 1.5 million zero emission vehicles by 2025. Transportation emissions are

the primary source of carcinogenic particulate matter and smog. Low-income communities are disproportionately affected by the transportation emissions. AB 1696 clarifies that adding parking spaces with charging stations for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids should be a priority in the Department of Transportation’s and the state Department of General Services’ vehicle parking incentive programs for parking facilities and park-and-ride lots. Having more charging stations in public spaces will allow EV drivers to “top off” or fully recharge their vehicles to travel to their destinations. The bill is supported by the Union of Concerned Scientists. They note that in the most populous cities in the United States, driving an EV will not only reduce emissions, but save owners money compared with driving the average gasoline vehicle. Assemblymember Wieckowski represents the 25th Assembly District, which includes Fremont, Newark, Milpitas, San Jose and Santa Clara.


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PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC Sec. 6105 and Sec. 24073 et. Seq. B&P.C.) Escrow No. 1412449AL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the seller(s) is/are: KATRIBU HAYWARD INC, 421 PICCADILLY PL #8, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 Doing business as: KATRIBU HAYWARD All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s), is/are: The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) is/are: BCDE, LLC, 2038 BIARRITZ PL, SAN JOSE, CA 95138 The assets being sold are generally described as: FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY AND ALL BUSINESS ASSETS and is located at: 32208 DYER ST, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: BAY AREA ESCROW SERVICES and the anticipated sale date is MAY 22, 2014 This Bulk Sale is subject to California Uniform and Professions Code(s) sections set forth above. The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: BAY AREA ESCROW SERVICES, 2817 CROW CANYON RD, STE 102, SAN RAMON, CA 94583 and the last date for filing claims by any creditor shall be DATE on which the notice of the liquor license is received by the Escrow Agent from the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Date: 4/25/14 BCDE, LLC, Buyer(s) LA1411695 TRI-CITY VOICE 5/6/14 CNS-2616908#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14723581 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Rashmitha Rallapalli on behalf of Gurukumari Adithe a minor for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Rashmitha Rallapalli filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Gurukumari Adithe to Swara Gurukumari Adithe The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: August 1, 2014, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Inter City Express Date: May 1, 2014 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27/14 CNS-2618641# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14717910 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Ryan Anthony Lederer for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Ryan Anthony Lederer filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Ryan Anthony Lederer to Ryan Anthony Wiseman The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: June 13, 2014, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room: n/a, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: March 19, 2014 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2614851# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14720840 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Wei-Chi Chen for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Wei-Chi Chen filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Wei-Chi Chen to Diana Miki Chen The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 07/11/2014, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street / Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Apr. 09, 2014 S/ WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2613174# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14721629 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Kevin Drew Fishbein for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Kevin Drew Fishbein filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Kevin Drew Fishbein to Kevin Drew Garcia The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: July 11, 2014, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94642 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice - Fremont Date: April 16, 2014 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2612836# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14720635 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Margaret Houlton for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Margaret Irene Houlton to Margaret Irene OrandiKnopp The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indi-

cated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: July 18, 2014, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: April 8, 2014 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609703# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14718095 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Khampeng Meksavanh for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Khampeng Meksavanh filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Khampeng Meksavanh to Cammie Ho The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 06/13/2014, Time: 8:45a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: March 20, 2014 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609504# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14716377 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Brian Smith Wendy McFadden for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Brian Smith Wendy McFadden filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Grace Loren Grimes-Smith to Grace Loren McFadden-Smith The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Fri May 23, 2014, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Mar 06, 2014 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609494# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG14719528 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Joel Van Eck for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Joel Van Eck to Joel Noe The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: June 27, 2014, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What Happening Tri-City Date: 4/1/14 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2608553#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490986 Fictitious Business Name(s): Benegear US, 44351 View Point Circle, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Tien-Chieh Yen, 44351 View Point Circle, Fremont, CA 94539 Business conducted by: an individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 3/1/2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Tien-Chieh Yen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 29, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27/14 CNS-2618234# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 491048 Fictitious Business Name(s): Red & Gold Construction, 3226 Red Cedar Ter., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Ruben Gievanni Hernandez, 3226 Red Cedar Ter., Fremont, CA 94536 Business conducted by: an individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on Feb 18, 2009 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Ruben Gievanni Hernandez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 30, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section

17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27/14 CNS-2618126# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490818 Fictitious Business Name(s): Emeston Medic, 37600 Central Court, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda, P.O. Box 1566, Union City, CA 94587; Alameda Registrant(s): Emmanuel G Udoh, 2300 Kendree Street, Antioch, CA 94509 Business conducted by: an individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Emmanuel G Udoh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 24, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27/14 CNS-2617656# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490383 Fictitious Business Name(s): Money Transport, 2100 Decoto Rd. #2, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Prithpal Dhonchak, 2100 Decoto Rd. #2, Union City, CA 94587 Business conducted by: An Individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Prithpal Dhonchak This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 15, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27/14 CNS-2617035# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490404 Fictitious Business Name(s): Vapor Planes, 3679 Thorton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Registrant(s): S & M Vapor Inc., 33008 Marsh Hawk Rd., Union City, CA 94587; California Business conducted by: a Corporation The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 11/1/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Munvir Aulakh, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 15, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2615830# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490766 Fictitious Business Name(s): One Access Medical Transportation, 7921-C Enterprise Dr., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Registrant(s): One Access Medical Transportation, 7921-C Enterprise Dr., Newark, CA 94560; California Business conducted by: a Limited Liability Company The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Ronald Camaisa, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 23, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2615802# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490637 Fictitious Business Name(s): Kingdom Apparel, 6252 Joaquin Murieta Ave. #C, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Leslie Tracy Miller-Wilson, 6252 Joaquin Murrieta Ave. #C, Newark, CA 94560 Business conducted by: An Individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 12/21/14 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Leslie Tracy Miller-Wilson This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 21, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business

name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2615409# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489790 Fictitious Business Name(s): Taste Of India, 5144 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Chaat Masala, LLC, 9119 Eastpointe Ct., California 95624; California Business conducted by: A limited liability company The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Sonia Pabla, Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 1, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2615403# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489997-490000 Fictitious Business Name(s): (1) Studio Arts, (2) The Peanut Shell, (3) Alma’s Designs, (4) Belle Baby Carriers, 33300 Central Avenue, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Farallon Brands, Inc., 33300 Central Avenue, Union City, CA 94587. CA Business conducted by: a corporation. The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 8/24/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Laura E. Tauscher, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 4, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2614973# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490529 Fictitious Business Name(s): Enigma Cafe LLC, 3623 Thornton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Registrant(s): Enigma Cafe LLC, 40473 Davis St., Fremont, CA 94538, CA Business conducted by: limited liability company The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Sandra Elkaz, Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 17, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2614964# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490538 Fictitious Business Name(s): Bay Area’s Best Relocation Services, 37171 Sycamore St., #1122, Newak, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Carlos L. Mora, 37171 Sycamore St., #1122, Newark, CA 94560 Business conducted by: an individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Carlos L. Mora This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 17, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2613770# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 446785 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Tax Pros, 38485 Fremont Blvd., #B, Fremont, CA 94536 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on 1/14/11 in the County of Alameda. Donna Hanna, 44301 Parkmeadow Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business was conducted by: Individual S/ Donna Hanna This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 18, 2014. 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20/14 CNS-2613759# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490493 Fictitious Business Name(s): WOWzy Company, 30166 Industrial Pkwy, SW #135, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Richelle Dale Hartwell, 369 Tippe Canoe Ave., Hayward, CA 94544. Brian Thomas Hartwell, 369 Tippe Canoe Ave., Hayward, CA 94544. Business conducted by: married couple The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Richelle Hartwell, Pincipal

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 17, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2613298# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489967 Fictitious Business Name(s): Cathy Lin, 559 Enos Street, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Lin, Chih-Ling, 559 Enos Street, Fremont, CA 94539 Business conducted by: An Individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Lin, Chih-Ling This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 4, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2611766# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490211 Fictitious Business Name(s): The Lil’ Genius Kid, 2500 Hansen Rd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda. 38440 Princeton Ter, Fremont, CA 94535Registrant(s): Kidz Grow Inc., 38440 Princeton Ter, Fremont, CA 94535, CA Business conducted by: a corporation. The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Anil K. Gupta, Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 9, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2610662# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489498 Fictitious Business Name(s): Leisure Health Spa, 1764 Decoto Blvd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Shee Wah Chow, 43988 Rosemere Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Business conducted by: an individual. The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Shee Wah Chow This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 21, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2610658# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 490117 Fictitious Business Name(s): My Italian Treats, 3340 Coventry Ct., Fremont, CA 94336, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Sophia Bianco, 3340 Coventry Ct., Fremont, CA 94336. Piero Bianco, 3340 Coventry Ct., Fremont, CA 94336. Business conducted by: married couple The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Sophia Bianco This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 8, 2014. NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2610193# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489489 Fictitious Business Name(s): EZ Sun Solutions, 37527 Glenmour Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Wing Keung Lal, 37527 Glenmour Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 Business conducted by: An individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 3/20/2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Wing Keung Lal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 21, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLIC NOTICES in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609667# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489926-927 Fictitious Business Name(s): 1. Hope Enterprise, 2. Hold On Pain Ends, 6351 Thomas Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Registrant(s): Gaurav Kainth, 6351 Thomas Ave., Newark, CA 94560 Business conducted by: An Individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Gaurav Kainth This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 3, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609497# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489800 Fictitious Business Name(s): Forced Perspective, 35798 Blair Pl., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Registrant(s): Gabriel Medeiros, 35798 Blair Pl., Fremont, CA 94536 Chad Bice, 420 Alberto Way, Los Gatos, CA 95032 Cameron Cross, 2488 Savannah Court, Oakland, CA 94605 Business conducted by: a limited liability partnership The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 3/16/2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Gabriel Medeiros This statement was filed with the County Clerk of

Alameda County on April 1, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609324# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489709 Fictitious Business Name(s): Destiny International, 26795 Clarkford St., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda 39270 Paseo Padre Pkwy #350, Fremont, Alameda, CA 94538 Registrant(s): Innocent Canyiam, 39270 Paseo Padre Pkwy #350, Fremont, CA 94538 Business conducted by: An Individual The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Innocent Canyiam This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 28, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2609158# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 489741 Fictitious Business Name(s): Knack Studio 18, 46539 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; 3501 Birchwood Ter Apt 112, Fremont CA 94536; Alameda Registrant(s): Hyzo Studio LLC, 3501 Birchwood Ter Apt 112, Fremont CA 94536; California #201404510332 Business conducted by: a limited liability company The registrant began to transact business using the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section

17913 of the Business and Professions code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars [$1,000].) /s/ Chu Ching Lin, Sole Member Hyzo Studio LLC This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 28, 2014 NOTICE: In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in office of the county clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2608561#

PROBATE

with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Teresa L. Green, Cambpell Law Offices, 1970 Broadway, Suite 625, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: 510-832-0742

4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14

4/22, 4/29, 5/6/14 CNS-2611819#

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOROTHY LEE REESE CASE NO. RP12644992 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Dorothy Lee Reese A Petition for Probate has been filed by Mark Piccolotti in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Jennifer Keystone be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on May 14, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704-1109. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim

Fremont Police Log continued from page 8 by Ofc. Ramsey and FTO Samayoa. Suspect Description: Hispanic male, approximately 18-20 years old, with shoulder length wavy hair. Suspect seen leaving in a vehicle with 2-3 other Hispanic males. Officers were dispatched to Walmart on Osgood Rd. after two males left out the emergency exit carrying clothes and shoes. They fled the area in a U-Haul pick-up truck. Case investigated by Officer Hernandez. Suspect Descriptions: Suspect #1: Hispanic or South Asian Indian male adult, about 40 years old, 5’10’’, regular build, black hair, black beard, last seen wearing a black jacket, black shirt, and black pants. Suspect #2: White male adult, about 40 years old, 5’10’’, medium build, blond hair, blond mustache, last seen wearing a long sleeved grey shirt, and black pants. Monday,April 28 At approximately 5:10 p.m., Loss Prevention from the Safeway in Warm Springs called to report that two suspects stole several cans of baby formula and fled in a red Hyundai. The loss prevention officer followed the suspects and watched as they then went across the street to the CVS store. While the trunk was open, they could see several additional boxes of baby formula. Officer Malcomson caught up to the suspects driving on 880 at Stevenson Blvd. He followed the suspect vehicle as it exited the freeway and until it got to the Holiday Inn Express on Albrae Street. Once sufficient units arrived, a traffic stop was made and both suspects were arrested without incident. The suspects, a 21 year old adult male, Oakland resident and a 24 year old adult female, Oakland resident, were both booked for burglary. A McDonald’s Mission Pass employee called to report two suspicious men inside a vehicle parked in the parking lot, one of which was wearing a mask and had a gun. The reporting party described the vehicle as a newer white Mercedes. The caller last saw the vehicle northbound on Mission Blvd. Sgt Mahboobi spotted a similar white Mercedes driving westbound on Driscol Rd. A traffic stop was conducted in the area of Apricot and Chadbourne. The vehicle was only occupied by one male and a search of the vehicle yielded McDonalds food but no mask and/or gun. Officer Hernandez documented the incident in a suspicious circumstances report. Tuesday,April 29 At approximately 9:40 a.m. officers responded to a report of a disturbance at a storage facility. The reporting person

with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Teresa L. Green, Cambpell Law Offices, 1970 Broadway, Suite 625, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: 510-832-0742

told dispatchers that her purse had been stolen from her unlocked vehicle. Officer Stone investigated and located the victims purse in a different storage unit, however an iPad and wallet belonging to the victim was missing. Officer Stone was able to develop information that led him to the recovery of the iPad and the arrest of a 38 year old adult male, Fremont resident and a 49 year old adult female, Fremont resident for possession of stolen property and drug offenses. The stolen property was later returned to the owner. At approximately 7:00 a.m. CSO Gott and CSO Aguirre responded to the 46100 block of Fremont Blvd to investigate a commercial burglary that had occurred during the night. Multiple storage containers were broken into and construction tools and materials were taken. Officers responded to a residential burglary on the 46000 block of Fernald Common. Sometime during the day, unknown suspects removed a screen from a window and opened an unlocked window. The suspects took small electronics, tablets/computer, a bike and a purse. A victim reported his $80, 2014 black, Granite Peak 26 inch men’s 4 speed mountain bicycle was stolen while it was cable locked on the north side of the station between 7:30 a.m. – 6:10 p.m. Wednesday, April 30 Officer Stillitano investigated a burglary from Marshall’s where the suspects stole several thousand dollars in merchandise. Officers are working with loss prevention and Detectives to coordinate follow up. Thursday, May 1 Officer Hunt conducted a traffic enforcement stop near the intersection of Canterbury and Peralta and arrested a 32 year old adult male, Fremont resident, for two outstanding warrants and possession of stolen property. He was in possession of property that had been stolen during a residential burglary back in July from Rustica Circle in Fremont. Officers were sent a battery at the Hub CVS. The area security guard claimed he was hit by an unknown male who fled the area before officers could arrive. Officer Collins arrived in the area and began looking for the suspect. Officer Collins located the suspect in the Lakeview apartments attempting to hide. After the investigation it was determined that the 31 year old adult male was in possession of needles/syringes and heroin so he took a short trip to Santa Rita.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILFORD OLAN REESE CASE NO. RP12644986 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Wilford Olan Reese A Petition for Probate has been filed by Mark Piccolotti in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Jennifer Keystone be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on May 14, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704-1109. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim

CNS-2611818#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 22nd day of May, 2014 at or after1: 30 pm pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Fremont, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Chanel Padilla 177 3/11/14 Sandra Taylor 255U 3/17/14 Recovery 258U 2/3/14 Recovery 314 3/1/14 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2618209# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 22nd day of May, 2014 at or after 12: 30 pm pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date David West B120 2/4/14 Venencio Torres B137 3/17/14 Ann Marie Zepponi B173 3/17/14 Lue Cheng B178 2/25/14 Lee Ann Elwell B185 1/23/14 Claude Bennett C146 1/27/14 Gerald Holmes C173 1/12/14 5/6, 5/13/14 CNS-2618206#

Newark Police Log continued from page 8 which point she began to violently resist. She was placed in a lower leg restraint device. At Santa Rita Jail she again violently resisted deputies. A search of her cell phone number revealed she is involved in prostitution out of our local motels. No officers or deputies were injured. The female was booked under the name provided of Nicole Johnson of Reno and was booked for possession of a forged drivers license, resisting arrest and possession of a weapon in a jail. Officer Reyes responded to JC Penney’s at 8 p.m. and accepted a Citizen’s Arrest of Elvira Zayas, San Francisco. She was released on a citation. Thursday,April 17 During a pedestrian stop at 9:59 a.m., Officer Cerini contacts Shad Carmack (San Francisco) on Cedar Ct. Officer Cerini recognizes that Carmack matches the suspect description of the person responsible for three separate bike thefts from a secured bike locker area at Newark Memorial High School over the past several weeks. Officer Johnson responds to assist and Carmack eventually admitted to the theft of all three bicycles. Carmack admitted that he sold the bikes for money. Carmack also had hypodermic syringes on his person used for unlawful drug use. He was arrested and booked at Santa Rita Jail. Excellent work by Officers Cerini and Johnson! Officer Coffey responded to Macy’s at the Newpark Mall at 6:23 p.m. and accepted the arrest of two female adults for shoplifting. Sudha Raghavan of Fremont and Agnesvennila Marlowe of Fremont were cited and released from the scene. Friday,April 18 1331 Hours: Officer Fredstrom recovered a stolen 2005 Toyota Camry (reported to East Palo Alto) at the intersection of Sycamore St. and Graham Ave. The vehicle was stripped. Saturday,April 19 All units responded again at 11:40 p.m. to report of a large fight at a wedding reception at the Chandni Restaurant. None of the combatants in the fight wanted the assistance of the police or to identify those involved in the fight. Due to the high number of intoxicated people, the open bar was shut down and the reception was closed down. Just as soon as officers left the parking lot of Chandni Restaurant, tempers began to flare with the same wedding party at the Hilton Hotel. Shamsher Singh of Cypress was arrested at 12:42 a.m. for public intoxication and booked at Santa Rita Jail. Officers spent a significant amount of time escorting intoxicated people to their rooms for the night. Sunday,April 20 Officer Losier arrested Gilbert Lomas (Newark) at 9:39 a.m. for Domestic Violence, after he assaulted his wife during an argument. Gilbert was later booked at Fremont Jail. At 2:33 p.m., Officer Nobbe investigated a residential ransack burglary at a residence in the 35700 block of Haley Dr. The reported loss was a computer and jewelry. A pedestrian stop on Mowry Ave. at 10:18 p.m. by Officers Smith and Simon resulted in the arrest of Manuel Espinoza (of Oakland) for a

Felony Burglary warrant. Espinoza was booked at Santa Rita Jail. Monday,April 21 At 9:31 a.m., CSO Verandes investigated a vehicle burglary in front of a residence in the 37800 block of Goldenrod Pl. The loss was clothing items and a several woman’s bags. Officer Reyes investigated a residential ransack burglary at a residence in the 35100 block of Lido Blvd. at 5:35 p.m. The burglary occurred between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Entry was made when the suspects kicked the door open. Loss was a laptop and jewelry. Tuesday,April 22 At 7:11 a.m., CSO Verandes investigated a theft from 8100 Mowry Avenue. Victim reported a Honda construction generator was chained to a construction trailer and stolen overnight. Officer Ramos investigated a residential burglary at 11:40 a.m. in the 6300 block of Mayhews Landing Road. Entry was made via a bathroom window. While on a security check of Cedar Court at 4:31 p.m., Officer Lopez watched a vehicle leave the parking lot of the E-Z 8 motel. Officer Lopez followed and conducted a traffic stop on Cedar Boulevard/Smith Avenue. The driver of the vehicle Armando Rosales Castillo of Modesto is active to probation for drugs. A probation search of the vehicle led to a loaded Ruger handgun, methamphetamine, and a digital scale. Special thanks to Fremont PD K-9 Officer Baca who responded and located additional methamphetamine inside of the vehicle. Wednesday,April 23 Officer Norvell investigated an auto burglary that occurred in the west parking lot of BJ’s restaurant at 8:46 p.m. Entry was via a window smash and the loss was a Dell laptop. The burglary occurred between 8:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Friday,April 25 At 4:18 p.m., Officer Bloom arrested Shavon Walker for commercial burglary. Walker (of Fremont) entered the JC Penny’s store with cutting tools and removed security tags from clothing items. Walker was transported and booked into Fremont City Jail. Saturday,April 26 Officer Bloom investigated a Shoplift case from Macy’s at NewPark Mall at 2:14 p.m. Hua Chen was arrested for stealing men’s polo style shirts. Hua concealed the shirts into her purse them left the store. Hua was released on a citation. Officer Bloom investigated another shoplifting from Macy’s at 5:32 p.m. Michael Puno was booked into Fremont Jail for theft and vandalism. Monday,April 28 CSO M. Verandes investigated a vehicle burglary at the apartments at 6345 Baine Ave. at 10:27 a.m. The victim parked her 1998 Cadillac in front of her residence. When she returned to her vehicle, she found her stereo was missing and the steering wheel damaged. Officer Arroyo arrested Prem Dhillon (Fremont) at 11:33 a.m. for Petty Theft. Prem was continued on page 38


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continued from page 1

“The range of artistic styles weave together different aspects of the skateboard culture including graffiti art, tattoo art, and pop surrealism. All of the work is skateboard themed and the pieces range from photography to works on canvas. The actual skate deck itself, however, is the surface that most of the artists choose to create their work on,” said guest curator, artist, and skateboarder Matt Ritchie. This exhibition features outstanding works by artists from Berkeley, San Jose, San Ramon, San Francisco, Vacaville, Sacramento and other locations throughout the Bay Area to Los Angeles and even one from New

through June 7. The Olive Hyde Art Guild sponsors the reception with light appetizers. This gathering is a great opportunity to meet the artists and talk a little shop; whether an artist, skateboarder, enthusiast of cool art shows, or all of the above, this exhibit is sure to leave its mark. For more information, call the Olive Hyde Gallery at (510) 7914357 or (510) 494-4322.

York. Participants include Christie Benjamin, John Berger, Paul Bosch, George Campise, C.B . Canga, Brian Canio, Greg Dyer, Philip Eggleston, Emonic, Joe Fenton, Todd Fuller, Ricardo Gonzalez, Jessica Jenkins, Joe Kelly, Marcos Lafarga, Phillip Long, Patrick Lugo, Cameron Miller, Joseph Murdach, Patrick O’ Connell, Shannon O’ Connor, Goran Rajkovik, Matt Ritchie, Lucien Shapiro, Timothy Tang, Joey Vela, Visible Damage, Richard “Ricky” Watts, Jonathan Wayshak, Cody Williams, Nana Williams, and Lauren YoungSmith. “Decked Out” opens with a reception on Friday, May 9 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and runs

Silvie Lukacova SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER Set within the Sun Gallery as a completely independent exhibition space, the Ken Cook Room has tall white walls, a clerestory window on one side and ample floor space to act as a dedicated project room and space to show work specific to one artist. Our first exhibition, currently showing through June 1, 2014 in the Ken Cook Room, is that of Czech artist, Silvie Lukacova (http://www.silvielukacova.com/home.html) “I apply paint to the surface of canvas or a wood panel to explore and express my understanding and view of the world around me and within me. My work is largely intuitive, exploring connections and relations between shapes, lines and colors, as a way of making sense of events and relations in real life; as well as a contemplation on the human condition, and a search for simplicity and order in the seemingly chaotic.” Silvie Lukacova Through Jun 1 Reception: Saturday, May 10 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Sun Gallery 1015 E St, Hayward www.sungallery.us (510) 581-4050

Decked Out: Skateboard Deck Art and Photography Show Friday, May 9 – Saturday, Jun 7 Thursday – Sunday, noon – 5 p.m. Opening Reception: Friday, May 9 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd, Fremont (510) 791-4357 http://olivehydeartguild.org/

Newark Police Log continued from 37 caught by Macy’s Loss Prevention stealing men’s clothing. Prem was cited and released at the store. Officer Coffey arrested Jack Enriquez (Milpitas) for Domestic Violence and False Imprisonment at 2:44 p.m. Jack assaulted his girlfriend whom he currently lives with. The two were involved in an argument while at the NewPark Mall. The argument turned violent when Jack began to punch the victim in the face while inside the couple’s vehicle. Victim attempted to flee the vehicle but was held against her will. The incident was witnessed by several people who called 911. Jack was taken into custody without incident. He was later booked at Santa Rita Jail. Officer Neithercutt arrested Carlos Colin for violating his restraining order at 3:48 p.m. Carlos showed up at his father’s house and started a disturbance. Upon learning the police had been called, Carlos fled the area. He was contacted at Marv’s Liquors on Mayhews Landing Road where he was causing another disturbance. Carlos was taken into custody for the restraining order violation. During the ride to jail, Carlos became combative and began to kick the patrol car doors, and windows. Thank You to Fremont PD who dispatched several officers to help secure Carols in the police car. Carlos made several attempts to bite and head butt Officer Neithercutt. Carlos also threatened to kill Officer Neithercutt, his wife, and his children providing explicit details how this was going to happen. Carlos was transported to Santa Rita Jail where he was booked for court order violation and death threats to a public official. Officer Norvell investigated an auto burglary that occurred in the parking lot of the 24 hour Fitness Center at 9:06 p.m. A window on the victim vehicle was smashed and a laptop computer, an IPad and other electronic items were

taken from the vehicle. Time frame was from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. At 9:07 p.m., Officer Sandoval investigated an auto burglary that occurred in the parking lot of the Nijo Castle Restaurant. A window of the victim’s vehicle was broken and a laptop was stolen. The theft occurred between 7:45 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 Officer Kovach met at 11:53 p.m. with a victim of Domestic Violence at the Police Department. The victim was assaulted by his girlfriend at their Newark residence. Officer Kovach was not able to contact the suspect, Tenaya Sabsay, (of Fremont). Wednesday, April 30 At 6:57 a.m., Officer Warren contacted the suspect from last night’s domestic violence incident’ Tenaya Sabsay (of Fremont), she was arrested for felony domestic violence and was booked at Fremont City Jail. Thursday, May 1 During a traffic stop at 10:54 a.m., Officer Rodgers arrested Brett Scott (of Sunnyvale) for the violation of a domestic violence restraining order as he was in the vehicle with protected person. He was booked at Fremont Jail. At 11:30 a.m., Officer Fredstrom investigated a cold residential burglary occurred at 35500 block of Blackburn Drive. The loss was a purse and its contents. At 1:58 p.m., Officer Johnson investigated a vehicle burglary at 5889 Central Ave. Loss is unknown at this time. Officer Horst investigated a vehicle burglary at 2:02 p.m. at the 6100 block of Thornton Ave. Loss was money and a 12v charger. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.


May 6, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

MEDICAL INSURANCE RATES INCREASING - THINK MELLO

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

#OB84518

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 6, 2014

Page 40

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right) Most Cars and Trucks

SMOG INSPECTION

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Exp. 6/30/14

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

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LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

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Exp. 6/30/14

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Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 6/30/14

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+ Coolant

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A wonderful opportunity to showcase and sell your art amongst the flowers and live music. This is a juried show for fine art and crafts. The booth fee is $60.00.

Event held at Regan’s Nursery on Decoto Rd., Fremont June 21 and June 22 11:00 am ~ 4:00 pm

Fremont Art Association Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd. Fremont, CA 94536 Contact www.FremontArtAssociation.org 510.792.0905 Simone Archer Open Wednesday Sunday, 11:00 a.m.– 5:00 p.m. sarcher239@aol.com

$19.

$79.

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Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 6/30/14

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

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Tcv 140506  

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