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Washington High student becomes a diplomat

Building a machine takes time

Halloween Carnival

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

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Vol. 12 No. 44

October 29, 2013

BY SARA GIUSTI PHOTOS COURTESY OF JUREK ZARZYCKI

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here’s nothing like the twang of a banjo and the twirl of a square dance on a bright fall day, whether 150 years ago or 2013. Sunol Regional Wilderness brings back its old-time roots with the “Cowboy Hootenanny Folk Festival” on Saturday, November 2. While this year’s “Cowboy Hootenanny” is in its first “officontinued on page 11

SUBMITTED BY PHOTOCENTRAL Hayward Area Recreation District’s PhotoCentral presents two exciting views of Native American Celebrations, “Still Here: Native American Celebrations: Photographs by Sue Reynolds” and, “Kay Franke’s Silver Gelatin Powwow Prints” running November 1 through January 12. Sue Reynolds is a fourth-generation Californian of Northern European descent. A fine arts and documentary photographer, she is passionate

SUBMITTED BY HILARY BURNS The “Day of the Dead” observance dates back more than 2,500 years and is linked to the preHispanic era. Each year, celebrants visit ancestral graves to build private altars and decorate graves with ofrendas (offerings). This ancient “grave decorating” tradition is conducted every fall to celebrate the deceased and encourage visits by their souls. Chapel of the Chimes Hayward celebrates “Day of the Dead” with traditional Folklorico and Aztec dance performances by Youth Folkloric Dance Troupe and Ollin Anahuac Traditional Aztec Dance Group, a Catholic service, music by Mariachi Mexicanisimo de Raymundo Coronado, grave decorating, and Mexican food from Tacos la Portanca. This year, Chapel of the Chimes will have sugar skulls to decorate in the ancient tradition of keeping skulls as trophies and to display them during the rituals to symbolize death and rebirth. INDEX Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

More than 300 guests from all backgrounds will attend the festival Friday, November 1st to witness and participate in the time-honored rituals of “Day of the Dead.” Robin Russell, Chapel of the Chimes Sales Manager, and Gus Acob, official Chaplain of Washington Hospital, will also attend the event. “Day of the Dead” remains an important part of cultural life in today’s Hispanic community and will be celebrated at other Tri-City locations: Mexico Tortilla Factory in Newark is sponsoring Dia De Los Muertos on Saturday, November 2 to honor departed loved ones. An altar will be erected in the adjoining plaza and families are invited to stop by for kids face painting, and arts and crafts. Handmade crafts will be available for sale. Festivities will begin at 1 p.m.; Aztec dancers and a blessing are scheduled at 6 p.m. Take part in an “Altar Walk” in the historic Niles District to visit altars or shrines built in

about creating bridges of understanding between non-native and native peoples. Since 2005, she has photographed American Indian people and their celebrations across the West. Her images have appeared in exhibits in California, Montana, and Japan, and in publications including Montana Magazine, Indian Country Today, Cowboys & Indians and her books, “Proud People” (2007) and “Still Here: Not Living in Tipis” (2013). She resides in Walnut Creek. You can see more of her work at www.susanreynoldsphotography.com. Kay Franke was a long-time volunteer and supporter of PhotoCentral and the arts in Hayward. When she died in 2003, she left a rich body of

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Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Community Bulletin Board . . 32

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

continued on page 9 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

Washington Urgent Care Now Offering the 2013-2014 Flu Vaccine

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hat sniffling, sneezing, coughing season is just around the corner. You can do your part to avoid the flu this year by getting a flu shot and following some simple guidelines. Seasonal influenza, commonly called the flu, is caused by influenza viruses that infect the respiratory tract. Every year, an estimated 5 to 20 percent of the population gets sick with the flu and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized due to flurelated complications, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also experience vomiting and diarrhea. “The timing of the flu is very unpredictable and can vary from season to season,” says Dr. Sarkis Banipalsin, Medical Director of the Washington Urgent Care Clinic. “Flu activity most commonly peaks in January or February, however, seasonal flu activity can begin as early as October and continue to occur as late as May.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. Flu vaccines must be administered on a yearly basis because a person’s immunity declines over the course of a year. Also, flu viruses often change from year to year, so vaccines created for flu viruses circulating last year may not provide protection against this year’s viruses. Because it takes about two weeks to develop immunity after vaccination, the CDC recommends getting vaccinated as early in the fall as possible.

Banipalsin says. “Complications might include serious sinus or ear infections, pneumonia, lung inflammation, severe dehydration and worsening of chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease.” People considered to be at high risk include: • Children under age 5 - and especially those under 2 years old • People over age 65 • Pregnant women • People with chronic health conditions such as diabetes, lung disease, asthma, heart disease, liver disorders and kidney disorders People who have a weakened immune system because Flu season is upon us. You can protect yourself and your family by of diseases such as cancer or getting vaccinated now.Visit Washington Urgent Care to get your flu HIV are also at high risk for shot today by calling (510) 791-CARE. Washington Urgent Care is complications,” Dr. Banipalsin open every day from 8 am. to 8 p.m.Visit www.whhs.com/urgentcare cautions. “The flu can easily for more information. put these patients in a very dangerous situation.” The CDC is recommending flu vaccinations this year for everyone over the age The flu is a contagious respiratory illof 6 months. Because children younger ness that is spread mainly by droplets than 6 months are too young to be vaccimade when people with the flu cough, nated, the people who care for them sneeze or talk. The CDC cautions that should be vaccinated instead. Vaccinations healthy adults may be able to infect others also are important for healthcare workers beginning one day before symptoms deand other people who live with or care for velop and up to five to seven days after behigh-risk people. coming sick. Some people, including “Vaccination of people who are at high children and people with weakened imrisk for developing serious complications mune systems, might be able to infect othfrom the flu is especially important,” Dr. ers for an even longer time.

“If you do get sick with the flu, you should seek medical treatment as soon as possible,” Dr. Banipalsin says. “There are prescription antiviral drugs available that can reduce the severity of the illness and shorten the duration, but it’s important to use these drugs within the first couple of days after the onset of symptoms.” Symptoms of the flu may include: • Fever • Cough • Sore throat • Runny or stuffy nose • Body aches • Headache • Chills • Fatigue “Less often, a person might also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose,” Dr. Banipalsin adds. “This is why washing your hands often with soap and water and trying to avoid close contact with sick people is so important. But getting a flu vaccine is really your ‘best shot’ for avoiding the flu.” Get a Flu Shot Today Washington Urgent Care Clinic (www.whhs.com/urgentcare) is located in the Washington West Building at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 212, in Fremont. For information about flu vaccine availability and clinic hours, call 510-791-CARE. Washington On Wheels Mobile Health Clinic is also offering flu shots at four different locations in the TriCity area. For more information, call (510) 608-3203 or visit www.whhs.com/wow. For more information about flu vaccinations and flu prevention, visit www.cdc.gov.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

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1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

10/29/13

10/30/13

10/31/13

11/01/13

11/02/13

11/03/13

11/04/13

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Deep Venous Thrombosis

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Minimally Invasive Surgery Reduce the Risk of for Lower Back Disorders Cancer?

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Diabetes Matters:Vacation or Travel Plans? Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Meal Planning

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Wound Care Update

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Kidney Transplants

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Diabetes Matters: Back to the Basic Keys for Success

Sidelined by Back Pain? Get Back in the Game

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Deep Venous Thrombosis

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Disaster Preparedness

Kidney Transplants Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Lunch and Learn:Yard to Table

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Alzheimer's Disease

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Sidelined by Back Pain? Get Back in the Game

Disaster Preparedness

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms Skin Cancer

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Diabetes Matters: Key To A Healthy Heart with Diabetes

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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f you ever consider surgery for any given health issue, most likely you will want to find the best possible surgeon and the best possible surgical facility available. So if you are contemplating hip replacement surgery, why not speak to the experts at the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research (IJRR) at Washington Hospital, right here in your own backyard? In the September 2013 issue of Consumer Reports magazine, Washington Hospital’s IJRR was ranked among the top five facilities in the country for hip replacement surgery, out of 733 hospitals nationwide that provided the most hip replacement surgeries. “The Consumer Reports ranking was particularly encouraging, since we are a community based hospital that is not connected with an academic institution,” says orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Dearborn, co-medical director of the IJRR. “In fact, the report noted that teaching hospitals were no better than other hospitals for hip replacement surgery.” To help people in the community learn more about hip replacement surgery and other treatment options for hip pain, Washington Hospital is sponsoring a free Health & Wellness seminar on Friday, November 8 from 2 to 4 p.m. The seminar will feature presentations by Dr. Dearborn and his co-medical director of the IJRR, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Alexander Sah. The seminar will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at the Washington West building, 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

“In addition to discussing the various causes and treatment options for hip pain, including hip replacement, we will talk about some of the factors that make our patient care exceptional,” says Dr. Dearborn. “The experience and skill of the surgeons are important, of course, but so is the quality of care provided by our nurses and physical therapists. “It’s also important to minimize surgical complications, such as infections,” he adds. “Facilities like ours that have a higher volume of hip replacement surgeries have been shown to have fewer surgical complications. In addition, it helps that the IJRR is housed in a separate facility from the hospital, so our patients are secluded from other patients with infectious diseases. Another factor contributing to good surgical outcomes is the duration of the surgery. Because we perform a high volume of hip replacement surgeries and we have a very experienced surgical team, we have learned how to be very efficient in the operating room.” The new facility for the IJRR opened in June 2012. In addition to all-private patient rooms and expansive therapy areas, the IJRR provides space for conducting clinical research and hosting conferences for visiting physicians. “Having 17 years worth of data on hip and knee replacement surgeries makes it easy for us to conduct retrospective research studies and share our information with other surgeons to improve the quality of these procedures,” says Dr. Sah. “In the past couple of years, we have been trying to provide more of our data to

Stroke Experts Talk About Stroke and its Risk Factors When you’re not feeling well, it’s natural to think that taking a nap will fix the problem. However, when it comes to something serious like stroke, a nap won’t help. In fact, it might hurt—because not recognizing a stroke in time can lead to deadly results. Stroke’s telltale signs—such as weakness on one side, difficulty speaking, blurred vision and facial drooping—often are misunderstood by those unfacontinued on page 14

Learn how to identify a stroke by acting FAST - Facial Weakness, Arm Weakness, Speech Impairment, Time (Stroke is an emergency that requires calling 9-1-1.) To get a comprehensive introduction to stroke risk factors, attend Washington Hospital’s Stroke Education Series on Tuesday, Nov. 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. The free lecture will take place at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

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To help people learn more about various causes and treatment options for hip pain, Washington Hospital is sponsoring a free Health & Wellness seminar featuring presentations by orthopedic surgeons Dr. John Dearborn and Dr. Alexander Sah, who are co-medical directors of the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research. The seminar will take place Friday, November 8 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com/event.

national audiences,” he notes. “For example, we currently are doing research on patients who have replacement surgery on both hips, noting the importance of recognizing the difference in anatomy from one side to the other. We are looking at the advantages of using different implant sizes to account for the variability in anatomy. It’s simply not a case of ‘one size fits all.’ We will be presenting our research findings at the next national conference of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons in New Orleans.” Another current research study at the IJRR focuses on the use of cemented vs. non-cemented femoral (thighbone) fixation in total hip replacements. “Originally, only cemented fixation was used in total hip replacements, but today there are hip replacements being done without cement,” Dr. Sah explains. “Both procedures have advantages and disadvantages, and both can work well. The research is showing, however, that in patients age 75 and older, there may be more blood loss and a risk of higher fracture rates without using cement.

“The bottom line is that we want to give our patients the best possible longterm outcomes for total hip replacement surgeries,” he concludes. “We also want patients to make the most informed decisions possible.”

Learn More at Upcoming Seminar To register for the seminar on November 8, visit www.whhs.com and click on the tab for “Upcoming Health Seminars.” To learn more about the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research, visit www.whhs.com/joint-restoration.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

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other surrounding farms being purchased by wealthy construction engineer Willis Brinker. Surprisingly and ironically, Brinker was a vegetarian cattle rancher. His construction company built the original San Francisco Airport and part of the Bay Bridge. This is only a tidbit of the unique, quirky history the Geary Family and “Cowboy Hootenanny” have to offer. Admission to the Hootenanny is free, and parking is only $5. While there are plans to provide a food truck, the park encourages attendees to bring a picnic lunch, and recommends calling ahead about food purchase options. The “Cowboy Hootenanny Folk Festival” will prove to be a refreshing reverie away from technology. Come on out, put down the iPhone, and jump in the square dance line.

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cial” year, Sunol Regional Wilderness is no stranger to holding many annual events celebrating and spreading awareness of its history – Pioneer Day may come to mind. The park decided to go a different route this year, focusing more on celebrating the cultural aspects of Sunol’s ranching and cowboy history. “It’s more of a music festival this time,” said Erica Herron, Supervising Naturalist for East Bay Regional Parks. After all, “hootenanny” itself means an informal gathering or party with folk music. And plenty of folk music is definitely in order. Banjo-ologist Gordy Ohliger, “The Musical Mark Twain,” will lead the crowd in a performance and history of the banjo, playing real vintage instruments from the time period. Santa Cruz-based band Jimmy Chickenpants will also take the stage, crooning bluegrass and “newer-grass” tunes. With such old-timey music, dancing is a must: the festival also includes square dancing with Bob Elling, a professional square dance caller, as well as performances from two Bay Area clogging groups, the Diablo Mountain Cloggers and the Clogging Express Team. On top of music and dance performances, the “Cowboy Hootenanny” offers a range of activities, from branding demonstrations, pony rides, a petting zoo, making clothespin dolls and ropes, to tugof-war games, sack races, and stilts. Each activity and game harks back to the ranching and cowboy era of the mid-to-late 1800s; classic games that have stood the test of time. The Hootenanny will also have educational activities for both children and adults in the barn on festival grounds. These Barn Shindigs include a presentation about Sunol’s cattle and ranching history; vintage clothes dress-up for “Ranch Dressing”; a Living History Timeline; tasting of traditional food from the era; and historical, firsthand accounts from the Geary Family, Sunol Valley’s oldest family. “Real live descendants [from the Geary Family] will be talking about the ranching history of the area, Great Depression, and more,” said Herron. The Geary Family began living in Sunol Valley in 1865 after Patrick and Mary Ann Geary were married in Fremont. For decades, the Gearys farmed and raised their families, despite their land and

Cowboy Hootenanny Folk Festival Saturday, Nov 2 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunol-Ohlone Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (510) 544-3249 http://www.ebparks.org Free Admission, $5 parking fee Entertainment Schedule: On Stage: 11 a.m.: Welcome by Board member Ayn Weiskamp 11:30 a.m.: Diablo Mountain Cloggers and the Clogging Express Team 12:45 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.: Banjo-ologist Gordy Ohliger performances and history 2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.: Square Dancing with Caller Bob Elling 3:30 p.m. - 4 p.m.: Music by Jimmy Chickenpants Barn Shindigs: 11:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. -3 p.m.: Cows, Cowboys and Conservation with Sheila Barry, Natural Resource and Livestock Advisor Noon - 12:30 p.m. and 1:45 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.: Ranch Dressing 12:30 p.m. - 1 p.m.: Living History Timeline 3:15 p.m. - 4 p.m.: Geary Family History


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

NEED DENTAL INSURANCE - THINK MELLO

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

IN THE ENDS

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xcessive tire wear due to an inaccurate toe setting (part of a wheel alignment) may be caused by worn rack-and-pinion inner tie-rod ends. When worn tie-rod ends move inward and outward as the suspension system moves up and down, the toe setting can be dramatically altered. Along with the uneven wear this problem imposes on tires, there can also be handling problems, including “bump steer” and excessive steering-wheel movement (without turning the wheels). To check for the cause of these symptoms, the auto technician will inspect the vehicle while its full weight is on its wheels and again while the vehicle is on the lift. Once the worn component is replaced, accurate toe adjustment will prevent future uneven tire wear.

No matter what sort of car you drive, or plan to drive, it will last longer and run more efficiently if you keep it in good shape. A key part of that is regularly scheduled preventive maintenance. At BAY STAR AUTO CARE, our friendly and experienced ASEcertified technicians can provide the preventive maintenance that will catch small problems before they become big repair bills. That is going to save you a lot of money over the life of your car, no matter what make or model. HINT: It is not necessary to replace the outer tie-rod ends when replacing the inner ones unless the outer ends are also worn.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

SUBMITTED BY: NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT Are you interested in law enforcement? Are you between the ages of 14 and 20? Do you live in the Newark area? Well, if you answered yes to these three questions, the Explorer Program might be for you. The Newark Police Explorer Program is a volunteer organization that is derived from the Boy Scouts of America. Its mission is to provide an in-depth, firsthand experience in law enforcement and related areas of the criminal justice system for young adults. The program develops leadership and mature judgment through training and teamwork, provides support and assistance to the community through various events and projects, and develops a positive rapport between young adults and agents of the criminal justice system. Newark Police Explorers, Post #467, is an elite group of young adults who are seriously interested in learning more about law enforcement and related careers. Although pursuing a career in a law enforcement-related career is not required for admittance, often an Explorer will enjoy his or her experience in

SUBMITTED BY MANOHAR KAMATH Forgetting where the car’s parked happens to everyone. But what if there was an app for that. Wait, there is! And not only does it help locate your car, it will identify the issue that caused your check engine light to turn on too. I am a long time Fremont resident and partner in a startup enterprise called Park.IT, a handy app dubbed a “Parking God,” that comes with AutoAide, a new plug-and-play hardware device that couples with a free iOS or Android app to offer topof-the-line vehicle diagnostics, navigation, and parking support. AutoAide allows your smartphone to talk directly with your car’s on-board system and features an integrated GPS system, accelerometer, and parking/driving status sensor. Launching on Kickstarter, this three-in-one product offers something for everyone – and for practically every type of car. “Connectivity is a growing demand for many drivers,” said Calvin Liu, co-founder of AutoAide. “Our product has three core functions that serve all makes and models produced after 1995, making it the most compatible device for a variety of consumers, no matter if they drive a 1996 Plymouth Voyager or a 2013 Cadillac CTS Coupe.” Another thing that sets AutoAide apart from its competitors: price. The device, which includes hard-

SUBMITTED BY AVANTHI KANMATAREDDY The flowing water of the bay, the architectural lines of the bridges, and the majestic mountains surrounding the Bay Area are all quintessential local scenes. Fremont Art Association Plein Air a.k.a. East Bay Outdoor Painters (FAAPA/EBOP) will exhibit their landscape paintings of local Bay Area scenery at the Fremont Art Association Gallery beginning Saturday, November 9th. “En plein air” is a French expression which means “in the open air,” and is used to describe paintings that have been created chiefly outdoors, rather than in the studio. Painting in plein air is one of the most difficult and challenging ways of painting. Plein air artists attempt to capture an impression of what the eye sees, rather than what the viewer knows or feels about the scene. Starting with a blank canvas, artists make immediate decisions about design, composition, color, and values. They study how light appears on subjects in different weather and at different times of the day; capturing the essence from temperature of color and atmospheric changes to finding the truth in rapidly changing natural settings. Working outdoors in natural light, plein air artists pursue spon-

the Post and decide that they wish to pursue that career path. The journey to becoming an Explorer is a simple process in which a potential candidate attends meetings. After attending several meetings, the candidate will be asked questions during an oral board interview conducted by current Explorers and Explorer Advisers. Upon completion of the oral board interview, a written examination testing the candidate’s knowledge of police codes is administered. For a candidate to be considered, they must be a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident, be between the ages of 14 and 20, have no prior criminal record, and either be in high school with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 or have completed high school (or any equivalent). At weekly Explorer meetings, various topics are discussed, including future events in which their services may be needed. Explorers are also given basic training of various tasks performed by the police officers of the Newark Police Department. For more information on this program or becoming an Explorer, please contact Officer Salvador Sandoval at (510) 578-4289 or salvador.sandoval@newark.org.

ware and software components, is available to early Kickstarter backers for $55, and will retail for $65 with no subscription fees or update costs. Compare that to commercial GPS Bluetooth devices that sell for $100 or more, and only offer a fraction of the functionality. Other core functions of AutoAide: deciphers dashboard warning light causes the moment they appear, monitors car battery health and reminders drivers when a new battery is needed, reduces phone battery drainage while on the road by enhancing smartphone GPS, improves the performance and accuracy of any smartphone app that uses GPS, finds available parking for drivers in unfamiliar areas, tells drivers if open parking spaces are legal to park in, and finds a car’s location. Additionally, AutoAide can sense whether a car is being driven, idling, or waiting for the driver to return after parked, and conveniently sets up automated reminders that help drivers avoid parking tickets. “Every car and driver need help every once in a while,” said Manohar Kamath, co-founder of AutoAide. “Our device helps people drive safer, find parking more efficiently, and be smarter about vehicle maintenance.” For more information on AutoAide visit: www.park.it/autoaide or to help us promote and fund our enterprise at the Kickstarter project, visit: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1700006728/autoaide-be-smarter-when-driving-and-maintaining-y.

taneity, sunlight, and color rather than studio sketches or photographs. Being in the moment, able to absorb it all from sight to sound, the moving light, clouds, and water, adds to the challenge. Landscape paintings that comprise the exhibit are, for the most part, are local scenes created directly on location. Most of these paintings are studies from the group’s weekly informal plein air excursions. A schedule is maintained on the Fremont Art Association Plein Air link; the group is always looking for more people to paint with them. The location changes every two weeks; all mediums are welcome. For more info contact Robyn at (510) 656-4939 or www.fremontartassociation.org/faapa.php Landscape Painting Exhibit Nov. 9 – 24 Reception: Sunday Nov. 10 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Fremont Art Association Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-4939 www.fremontartassociation.org/faapa.php


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY DIRK FILLPOT

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eams of high school and middle school students across the country can now register to compete in the 24th annual Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl (NSB), one of the largest academic math and science competitions in the country. The top two high school teams nationwide win educational adventure trips and the top middle and high school teams are awarded cash for their school science departments. “Participating in the National Science Bowl, both regionally and at the national championships, encourages student involvement in math and science activities, which is of importance to the Department of Energy and the nation,” said Patricia M. Dehmer, Acting Director of the DOE Office of Science, which manages the National Science Bowl and sponsors the NSB finals competition. Teams of students can sign up to participate in the NSB by registering with the coordinator for their local competition, which they can find on the NSB website: http://science.energy.gov. Separate competitions are held for high school and middle school. Regional competitions for each area typically last one or two days and take place throughout the country between January and March. Each regional competition has different deadlines set by their coordinators, so the deadline is “the sooner, the better.” During the regional and national competitions, students participate in a fast-paced verbal forum to solve technical problems and answer questions from all branches of science and math. Each team is composed of four or five students and a teacher who serves as a coach. Teams can find sample questions on the NSB website to help prepare for the competitions. The winning team from each qualifying regional competition will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to compete in the National Finals held in Washington, D.C., from April 24 to April 28, 2014. The national events include several days of science activities, sightseeing, and competitions. As part of the National Finals, middle school students design and race lithium ion battery-powered model cars. High school students compete in team science challenges in addition to participating in the academic competition. Prizes for the top two high school teams for the 2014 NSB will be announced at a later date. The high school team that won the 2013 NSB received a nine-day, all-expenses-paid science trip to Alaska, where they learned more about glaciology, marine and avian biology, geology, and plate tectonics. The second-place high school team at the 2013 NSB won a five-day, guided adventure tour of several national parks, which included a whitewater rafting trip. The top 16 high school teams and the top eight middle school teams in the National Championship also win $1,000 for their schools’ science departments. Last year, approximately 14,000 high school and middle school students from 49 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico competed in the NSB. DOE created the National Science Bowl in 1991 to encourage students to excel in mathematics and science and to pursue careers in these fields. More than 225,000 students have participated in the competition since it began. Visit http://science.energy.gov for more information.

Fight the stigma of mental illness SUBMITTED BY NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT Officer Neithercutt of the Newark Police Department is inviting the community to participate in a special event! Please join Team Newark PD as they ride 60 miles to support programs and research funded by NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Team Newark is a group of Newark Police Officers who work to promote and raise funds for all types of charitable organizations. Previous rides have raised funds for the Special Olympics, and the Police Chaplaincy of Sonoma County. Team membership varies from ride to ride based on schedules, but usually consists of Officers, Sergeants, and sometimes, the Chief of Police. All NAMIBikes events include multiple distances, family rides, kid’s events, music, food and more. Most events are road courses, but some feature mountain bike rides, BMX courses and terrain parks. From the time you arrive at check-in until you load your bike on your car, we will keep you well-fed and well-hydrated! Click the below link to view the Newark Team webpage, then click on “join team” if you feel up to riding alongside them, or “sponsor this team” if you’d like to support their goal of raising $1,000 for NAMI! Register with the Newark Team or individually by Oct. 31. For more information or to register, visit www.namicalifornia.org. To support Officer Neithercutt, visit http://my.e2rm.com/TeamPage.aspx?teamID=480759&langPref=enCA&Referrer=direct%2fnone Fight Stigma & Ride Saturday, Nov. 2 7:30 a.m. Central Park 401 C St., Davis

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Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

SUBMITTED BY SGT. KEN A. FORKUS, HAYWARD PD The Hayward Police Department will be conducting its third annual “Halloween Costume Giveaway” on Tuesday, October 29th at the Hayward City Hall Rotunda starting at 3 p.m. Over 270 children this year from eight different elementary schools in Hayward have expressed a desire to participate in the annual giveaway. Many of these children would not have the opportunity to participate in Halloween activities either at school and at home without the assistance of this program. Each child will be provided with a new Halloween costume matching their gender and age along with bags of candy. In addition, over a dozen different businesses in downtown Hayward will be providing candy to the children immediately after they receive their costumes.

In the previous two years, the Hayward Police Department has distributed over 500 costumes to children in need. The Hayward Police Department would like to thank the following organizations and individuals who have contributed to make this event a success: Party City Halloween Store in Union City and store manager Shane Singh who provided the majority of the Halloween costumes at a substantial discount; The California Narcotic Officers’ Association Region One who contributed the largest cash donation; The Hayward Police Officers’ Association; J&J Paper Company; American Licorice Company & Annabelle’s Candy Company who both donated all of the candy for the children; & Hayward community member Edward Montgomery.

Newark PD K-9 Unit competes in Police Dog Trials SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

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Costly Homeseller Mistakes You Need to Avoid When You Sell Your Home!

Congratulations to our K-9 Unit for their recent performance in the 30th annual Witmer-Tyson K-9 trials. This event gave officers and their K-9 partners the chance to train and exhibit just how skilled they are as a team. They demonstrated what they’re capable of doing under simulated street encounters. Officer Mavrakis and K-9 “Ares” and Officer Jackman and K-9 “Eliot”, along with 24 other Bay Area K9 teams, participated in this two day competition which included four categories: Obedience, Obstacles, Protection, and Searching. Officer Mavrakis and “Ares” followed up last year’s 2nd place overall finish in the novice class with a very impressive 1st place finish in “Protection” and a tie for 4th in “Searching” in the veteran class. This is a very tough competition and both teams represented NPD well, which reflects their commitment to the Department and to training their K-9’s. Special thanks to retired Sergeant Al Lewis and Sergeant Ray Hoppe for all of their hard work and training in preparation for the competition.

Tri-City – A new report has just been release which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today’s market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers don’t get what they want for their home and become disillusioned and – worse – financially disadvantaged when they put their home on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled “The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top Dollar”. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-228-3917 and enter ID #1000. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

This report is courtesy of Capital Realty Group. Not intended to solicit properties currently listed for sale.

Fremont Police Log

Union City Police Log

SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES, FREMONT PD

SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD

Friday, October 18 At approximately 9:20 a.m. officers responded to vandalism that likely occurred during the night. A large plate glass window was shattered by an unknown object at the Muslim Eastern House Restaurant on the 34400 block of Fremont Blvd. No evidence of theft from the business was discovered. No suspect leads at this time. Incident investigated by Ofc. Leopardi. A Cabrillo Dr. homeowner arrived home at 2:25 a.m. and noticed a suspicious SUV parked in front of his house. As he approached his front door the SUV sped away. The homeowner then realized his front door was left open by a burglar. A camera and jewelry were taken. The suspects were not seen and the SUV was described as an older one. Saturday, October 19 A 1996 Acura 4-door was recovered at the Good Nite Inn by Reserve Officer Grant. Stolen out of San Jose. A 1994 Nissan truck was stolen from the County Club Apartments. Report taken by C.S.O. Anders. A stolen 1995 Honda Civic was located at the County Club Apartments. Report taken by C.S.O. Anders. Stolen out of Hayward on 10/18. Sunday, October 20 Stolen Vehicle: 400 block of Rancho Arroyo Pkwy. - 2008 Chevy Malibu Attempt Stolen Vehicle: 40600 block of Sundale Dr. - 2013 Nissan Sentra

Thursday, October 10 At 6:10 p.m., a Hispanic female was walking on 10th Street when she was approached by a male suspect. The suspect pointed a black semi-automatic handgun at the victim and demanded the victim’s property. The suspect threatened to kill the victim if she did not turn over her property. The suspect took the victim’s cellular phone and purse and fled the area on foot. The suspect was described as a black male, between 35 and 40 years old, 6 foot tall, with a thin build. The suspect was wearing a blue button down shirt, black tie, black hat and black dress slacks. Friday, October 11 At 9:25 a.m., a male holding a double barrel shotgun entered the “OO Liquors” store on Whipple Road. The suspect pointed the shotgun at the clerk while demanding money. The suspect fled the store after taking currency from the cash registers. The suspect was described as wearing a Halloween “Scream” style (black and white) mask, black hooded sweatshirt, black jeans and black gloves. The suspect was further described as an adult male, about 5 foot 8 inches tall, with a thin build. Witnesses in the area saw the suspect run and get into the passenger seat of a beige SUV, similar to a Land Rover or Nissan. At 9:53 p.m., officers responded to an address on I Street, to investigate a damaged gas meter. Responding officers worked with PG&E to determine the cause of the damage. Bullet fragments were recovered inside of the gas meter and a .22 caliber bullet casing was located in the surrounding area. Tuesday, October 15 At 1:30 p.m., a 17 year-old female was jogging on Mission Blvd, when a Ford F-150 pulled up next to her. The driver exited his vehicle and exposed his penis. The suspect then got back into his vehicle and drove southbound on Mission Blvd. The suspect’s vehicle was last seen making a right turn on

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hand-tinted silver gelatin prints of powwows and Native American portraits. PhotoCentral is proud to share these vintage and contemporary prints from the Kay Franke archive expressing both the traditions of Native Americans and of hand-tinted photography. Proceeds from sales of Kay Franke prints will go to PhotoCentral, the Red Cross, and the American Indian College Fund. Thank you to Hahnemühle FineArt for donations to make this exhibition possible. There will be a public reception and Gallery Talk with Photographer Sue Reynolds and Ohlone Indians Andrew Galvan and Vincent Medina on Friday, November 1st. Other Gallery Talks with Sue Reynolds will be on Saturday, November 23rd, Sunday, December 8th and a closing event on Sunday, January 12th. All events are free and the public is invited. PhotoCentral offers quality artwork in its gallery and outstanding facilities for the dedicated photographic artist with classes, workshops, darkrooms, digital workstations, and a matting facility. Expand your creativity in a supportive community!

Still Here: Native American Celebrations: Photographs by Sue Reynolds Kay Franke’s Silver Gelatin Powwow Prints Friday, Nov 1 – Sunday, Jan 12 Monday: 5 p.m. -10 p.m. Tuesday/Thursday: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Reception: Friday, Nov 1 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Gallery Talk at 7:30 p.m. Additional Gallery Talks: Saturday, Nov 23 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec 8 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Closing Event: Sunday, Jan 12 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. PhotoCentral Gallery Hayward Area Park and Recreation District Offices 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org Free

Bay Area Afghans hold community memorial SUBMITTED BY AISHA WAHAB On October 12, 2013, the Afghan Community of Northern California held a memorial at Lake Elizabeth in Fremont. Over 500 individuals came to mourn the confirmed loss of the roughly 5,000 innocent individuals that were kidnapped, tortured, and killed by the Soviet-backed government of Afghanistan in 1978-1979. The Netherlands National Prosecutor’s Office and National Police made the 30-year-old Death List public. Individuals confirmed on the list were men, women, and some children that included different ethnicities of the Afghan Community. Khedamat Amiat Daulati or KhAD, the government organization modeled after the K.G.B. of the Soviet Union, were responsible for these kidnappings and mass murders similar to those of Joseph Stalin. Sadly, this is just one of the lists that have been released with the names of those killed. Previously, lists of over 12,000 people have been published with speculation of thousands of other unknown victims.

Dozens of volunteers wore green armbands and women wore a small scarf over their heads or around their necks out of cultural respect, while everyone wore a green ribbon in honor of those lost in 35 years of war. Artwork by local artists and photos of victims were displayed and a board set up for attendees to write their thoughts. An organizer of the event stated, “This Memorial is to offer the community some closure.” Fremont is home to a very large population of the Afghan diaspora. “Many young Afghan Americans want peace after 35 years of war, to come together and mobilize for a positive change. Similar to the victims of the Holocaust, we must stand up against these atrocities so that it shall never happen again. But first, we must heal.” Rona Popal, Executive Director of the Afghan Coalition, said, “We are the lucky ones, and we must remember what happened, and what could happen. We seek justice for the fallen.”

Baby clothing drive helps little ones in need Help babies get a better start in the world by providing them with much needed clothes. East Bay Spinal Decompression is hosting their 3rd annual “Loved Twice Donation Event” Monday, October 28 through Friday, November 8 and asks the community to help clothe needy infants by dropping off new and gently used baby clothes (up to 12 months only), including bibs, booties, hats, blankets, and socks to their Fremont office. (Please no cribs, strollers, car seats, high chairs, or any baby furniture.) Loved Twice is a non-profit organization based in Oakland, which collects baby clothes for underprivileged newborns in the Bay Area. Donated clothing is distributed to babies in need through licensed social workers in hospitals, shelters, and clinics. Individual boy and girl boxes contain enough items to clothe a baby for a full year, with approximately 75 items sizes 0-12 months including onesies, sleepers, booties, hats, a blanket, and books, as well as an educational new parent kit supplied by First Five California. As a thank you for those who donate, East Bay Spinal Decompression is offering chiropractic services at a discounted rate: $25 exam and x-rays for new patients, $20 for chiro treatments, and $40 for DRX existing maintenance patients. All proceeds will be donated to Loved Twice. For more information on the clothes drive call (510) 790-1000. To learn more about Loved Twice, visit www.lovedtwice.org. Loved Twice Donation Monday, Oct 28 - Friday, Nov 8 Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 8 a.m. – 12 noon; 3 p.m. - 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday: 8 a.m. – 12 noon East Bay Spinal Decompression 40000 Fremont Blvd., Ste. H, Fremont (510) 790-1000 www.lovedtwice.org

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History

A

foundry is a shop or factory that casts metal. In this case, workers are casting metal for stoves or parts. James Graham came from Canada to the United States and eventually became an employee of the Tay Foundry at Alvarado. He also worked making stove parts for the South Pacific Coast Railroad Company established in Newark. With some encouragement from the railroad managers, he started the James Graham Manufacturing Company at Newark in 1882. At first he had only two employees and faced large competitors such as

Manufacturing workers

Courthouse and Jail in Niles

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the Tay Foundry. His company depended on the casting business of the local railroads at first, but he was very innovative and developed new products. Recalling his experience casting stove parts, Graham began making wood-burning stoves; many were used to heat cars of the local railroads. The business grew and by 1904, the company employed 87 men turning out 45 stoves a day. James Graham died in 1898 and his eldest son, Georg, took over management of the James Graham Manufacturing Company. For a while, the company made fittings, couplings and manhole covers. After the 1906 earthquake, the company was swamped with orders for wood-burning stoves burned-out families needed to cook their meals and heat their rebuilt houses. Company engineers produced a stove that was more efficient than those made previously. It delivered more heat per armful of firewood. Graham simplified the assembly line and imported 15 expert molders to provide quality control. He was assisted by Harry Jackson, son-in-law of James, in marketing and management. A policy was instituted whereby all

stoves were sent out of the country. It was noted in 1898 that local foundries were making a stove particularly adapted to the needs of the Klondike Country. Completion of natural gas lines from the oilfields to the Bay Area and marketing pressures resulted in a boom in the gas cooking business. Sixty-seven percent of the stove business done by the James Graham Company in 1927 was in sales of gas-fueled ranges. Introduction of bottled and butane gas practically ended the manufacture of wood and coal stoves at the Graham plant. The need for heaters and wood-burning stove by the Civilian Conservation Corp in Depression days revived the business for awhile. Irvington also had a stove manufacturing plant. Reid Bros, Inc. erected a large building at Irvington in 1921 – 1922 to manufacture hospital supplies. The building was sold to Steiger and Kerr Stove and Foundry Company in 1938. New equipment was installed and they began making their occidental stoves and heaters in June 1939. During World War II, the United States Navy used the facility as a

fire with his left hand while he dumped coal into the old stove with the right. The judge inherited the stove when he bought a barber shop in Niles. It later became the property of the Boy Scouts who were on the point of throwing it away when the judge bought it back from them for $2. He says he is going to gold-plate the thing and put it in his living room; a nice background for couples who come to get the nuptial knot tied—reminding some folks of the old adages of getting out of the frying pan into the fire, being in hot water, and other expressions connected with weddings. Not long ago, an irate customer came to the judge and wanted his money back. “You told me I was at the end of my troubles when you married me to my wife,” he said. “Well, I didn’t say which end”, the judge replied. And that was that.

Graham manufacturing

Graham-built stoves were sold by retailers at full list price. Important retailers included: Bullocks, Capwells and the Emporium. One of the molders bragged that the English translation of his name was “Wedgewood.” He repeated the name at a local bar where some of the German workers often stopped after work. Jackson heard about the discussion and decided that it would be a good name for the Graham line of cast-metal wood stoves. The name “Wedgewood” was advertised in newspapers, on billboards and farmers’ barns. By 1920, some 400 Wedgewood stoves were manufactured every working day. By 1925, over 100 men and women were employed on the assembly line. By 1940, over 40,000 ranges were produced per year. Many of the

supply depot. Manufacture of Occidental stoves resumed in the spring of 1947; about 50 factory workers produced an average of 35 stoves per day. Production ended in 1949 and the plant became a distribution center for stoves made in Los Angeles. Then there is the tale of the one-legged stove… The one-legged stove that has graced the Niles Justice Court for the past several years succumbed to progress this week and was replaced by two modern gas heaters salvaged from the old court house at Oakland. Judge J. A. Silva who owns the stove, is really up against it figuring out how he is going to use two hands to turn on the gas heat. Being ambidextrous, he likes to do something with each hand at the same time. For instance, he always poked the

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

All Souls Day Friday, Nov 1 4 p.m. Cedar Lawn Cemetery 48800 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (408) 263-2868 http://www.dignitymemorial.com/cedar-lawncemetery/en-us/index.page

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memory of loved ones followed by a small celebration. Bring a picture or memento to put on a community altar or create a personal altar in memory of ancestors and loved ones. An opening ceremony and blessing for the event will be held at 6 p.m. Also in Niles, the Muddpuddle Shop will be hosting a concert with ArtemesiaBlack featuring Americana Gothic Swamp Lullabies and other spooky tunes. See “Day of the Dead” through an artists’ eye by visiting Sun Gallery’s “A New Beginning” exhibit through November 10. Or have your own private event by visiting the resting places of those you have loved and lost and honor them by your memories and presence.

Niles Altar Walk: Entre los Velos – Between the Veils Friday and Saturday, Nov 1 and 2 Friday: 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday: 3 p.m. – 9 p.m. Uptown Gallery 37275 Niles Blvd., Fremont sunsolrae@yahoo.com https://www.facebook.com/events/12398336777 1905/

Day of the Dead Festival Friday, Nov 1 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Chapel of the Chimes Hayward 32992 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 471-3363 www.hayward.chapelofthechimes.com Free

Dia De Los Muertos Saturday, Nov 2 1 p.m. – 7 p.m. Face painting, crafts for sale, craft table for kids, Aztec dancers Magnolia Plaza (next to Tortilla Factory) 7015 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 792-9909

Dead of the Dead Show Friday, Nov 1 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. Mudpuddle Shop 37433 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 www.michaelmcnevin.com www.artemesiablack.com

A New Beginning Through Sunday, Nov 10 Thursday - Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun Gallery, Hayward Forum for the Arts 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Nominations for Hayward’s Business Person of the Year SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT You can play a role when Hayward honors its Business Person of the Year at the 70th annual Hayward Chamber of Commerce Celebration Awards Gala on January 25, 2014. Nominations will be accepted until November 7 for this year’s award winner. They will be honored at the gala celebration along with Hayward’s Police Office, Firefighter, and Educator of the Year. Identify your nominee and submit answers to the questions below to the selection committee at the chamber office. All nominations will be held in strictest confidence. The selection committee will evaluate nominees on responses to each of the following questions. Please number your answers. 1. Give three reasons why your nominee deserves recognition. 2. How long and why has the nominee maintained his/her business in Hayward? 3. Describe the person’s business. For example,

what products or services are provided, how many employees work there, what factors have contributed to its success? 4. Describe the person in terms of their business innovation, imagination, creativity, resourcefulness, and dealing with challenges. 5. What are some interesting or special characteristics that single out your nominee from others in the same industry? 6. Describe the nominee’s service or volunteer efforts in the community, such as work with service clubs, nonprofit organizations, city commissions or committees, or the chamber of commerce. Each submission must be signed and dated, including contact information for the person making the nomination. Send your nominations to: Hayward Business Person of the Year Committee, Hayward Chamber of Commerce, 22561 Main St., Hayward CA 94541. Call (510) 537-2424, Fax (510) 537-2730, or visit online at www.hayward.org.

Scholarships available for high school students SUBMITTED BY BART POGUE Approximately 600 scholarships are available for the 201415 academic year for American high school students to study language through the National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) program. NSLI-Y is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The program seeks to increase Americans’ capacity to engage with native speakers of critical languages by providing formal and informal language learning through a study abroad experience, which includes language classes and living in a local community abroad, often with a host family. Scholarships to participate in summer or academic year programs are available for the study of Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Hindi, Korean, Persian (Tajiki), Russian, and Turkish. The merit-based scholarships cover domestic and international travel, tuition, related academic expenses, daily language classes, supporting cultural activities, room and board, and secondary health benefits for travel abroad. Launched in 2006, the goal of NSLI-Y is to increase the number of young Americans with the language skills necessary to advance international dialogue and increase understanding between cultures. Alumni of NSLI-Y can become leaders in a variety of international fields in the private, academic, or government sector. To be eligible for 2014-15 program scholarships, applicants must be: U.S. citizens, current high school students with a GPA of 2.5 or higher, and 15 - 18 years of age at the start of the program. The application deadline is Nov 5. For more information about the NSLI-Y program or to apply, visit www.nsliforyouth.org.

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California gov vetoes semi-automatic rifle ban BY DON THOMPSON ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), California Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a bill Friday that would have imposed the nation’s toughest restrictions on gun ownership, saying it was too farreaching. The legislation would have banned future sales of most semi-automatic rifles that accept detachable magazines, part of a firearms package approved by state lawmakers in response to mass shootings in other states. It was lawmakers’ latest attempt to close loopholes that have allowed manufacturers to work around previous assault weapon bans. Gun rights groups had threatened to sue if the semi-automatic weapons ban became law. “I don’t believe that this bill’s blanket ban on semi-automatic rifles would reduce criminal activity or enhance public safety enough to warrant this infringement on gun owners’ rights,’’ the Democratic governor wrote in his veto message. He also noted that California already has some of the nation’s strictest gun and ammunition laws. The legislation was among 17 gun bills considered by the governor as he works toward a Sunday deadline to act on bills sent to his desk last month. He signed 10 firearms bills into law while vetoing seven. Democratic Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, who proposed the rifle restrictions, said in a statement that more than 1,100 Californians have been killed with guns since the mass school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in December. “I believe aggressive action is precisely what’s needed to reduce the carnage in our communities, and to counter the equally aggressive action

by the gun industry,’’ Steinberg said. The bill sought to ban the sale of assault rifles, but Brown objected that it also would have applied to low-capacity weapons commonly used for hunting, firearms training and target shooting, and some historical and collectible firearms. Brown also didn’t want thousands of legal gun owners to have to register their existing weapons as assault rifles and be blocked from selling or transferring the weapons. “That was, without a doubt, the most egregious piece of anti-gun legislation ever brought to a governor for his signature,’’ said Clint Montfort, an attorney with Michel and Associates, West Coast counsel for the National Rifle Association. “We appreciate that the governor has respected the rights of California gun owners.’’ Montfort said the NRA is examining the bills that Brown did sign into law to see if any merit legal challenges. The governor signed a measure from Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, which bans kits that allow people to turn regular ammunition magazines into high-capacity magazines, as well as two other pieces of legislation that restrict the ability of mentally ill people to possess firearms. Brown approved a measure making California the first state to impose a statewide ban on lead bullets for all types of hunting. Hunting with lead bullets already is prohibited in eight counties with endangered California condors. About two dozen states also have partial bans, most in sensitive wildlife refuges. But Brown rejected a bill that would have required owners whose firearms are lost or stolen to promptly notify law enforcement. The governor noted he vetoed a simi-

California receives nearly $12 million for affordable solar power SUBMITTED BY U.S. DEPT OF ENERGY Energy Secretary Moniz announced October 22, 2013 that nearly $12 million will go to California to support innovative solar energy research and development. As part of a total $60 million Energy Department investment through its SunShot Initiative, these awards will help lower the cost of solar electricity, advance seamless grid integration and support a growing U.S. solar workforce. “The tremendous growth in the U.S. solar industry over the past few years is helping to pave the way to a cleaner, more sustainable energy future that protects our air and water and provides affordable clean energy to more and more Americans,” said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. The Department is also awarding about $7 million – including nearly $1.2 million to Stanford University – to develop stronger, more reliable solar components as well as dependable performance tests for microin-

verters and microconverters. These projects provide easier installation and more effective capture of energy for both photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems. The Energy Department is investing about $8 million to help utilities forecast and integrate high levels of renewable energy generation into the grid, while ensuring reliable and affordable power. As part of this, the Energy Department is awarding about $500,000 each to Clean Power Research and University of California-San Diego to improve the accuracy of load forecasting in California and develop better real-time dispatch tools. About $15 million is being awarded to develop power engineering curriculum and launch four regional training consortiums. Valencia-based Electricore will receive about $2.3 million to help train the next generation of energy engineers, system operators and utility professionals. For more information, visit www.energy.gov/sunshot.

lar bill last year and still doubts that criminalizing the failure to report missing weapons would help law enforcement track down gun traffickers or those prohibited from owning weapons. Nick Wilcox, whose daughter was killed by a gunman during a 2001 Nevada County rampage, said he was hopeful Brown would have approved more. “It’s a step forward. It’s not as big a step forward as we would have liked,’’ Wilcox said on behalf of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. Paul Song, executive chairman of the Courage Campaign, an advocacy organization that supported the gun bills, said in a telephone interview that Brown appeared to be trying to defuse a possible campaign issue as he runs for re-election next year. The organization later released a much stronger statement accusing the governor of “cowardly behavior’’ and saying he “will have blood on his hands.’’ Sam Paredes, executive director of Gun Owners of California, said gun owners’ rights groups will consider mounting recall campaigns or election-year challenges against Democratic lawmakers who voted for the gun bills. Final votes on the legislation occurred last month, just as two Colorado state lawmakers were recalled for supporting tougher gun laws in that state. Paredes predicted lawsuits challenging bills that require safe storage of handguns; against Skinner’s highcapacity magazine bill; and against legislation requiring that buyers of rifles and shotguns pass a safety test. Still, he said, “We were only shot in the heart 6 times instead of 12 times, and I guess we should be happy with that.’’

Apply now to PROPEL Small Business Growth Program SUBMITTED BY DARLENE CRANE Beginning today, the Alliance for Community Development is looking for the next group of entrepreneurs and business owners for the 2014 PROPEL Small Business Growth (PBSG) Program. We are seeking 1520 business owners who are ready to focus on taking their business to the next level. What is PROPEL? The PSBG Program is a unique, engaging, and empowering experience that helps business owners get ahead of the dayto-day details and complete the steps to growth. Through a series of halfday workshops and individual advising session, PROPEL delivers practical tools and skills that can be immediately applied to your business. Visit the PROPEL Small Business Growth Program page to see if this program is right for you, or to download your application now. All business owners are welcome, but diverse entrepreneurs (inclusive of minorities, women and disabled veterans) are strongly encouraged to apply. Applications must be received by January 15, 2014. Additional information available at: (510) 886-4483 or allianceforcommunitydevelopment.com

Court hears argument on pension benefit increases BY RACHEL LA CORTE ASSOCIATED PRESS OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP), The state Supreme Court on Thursday heard arguments over legislative action in recent years to end some pension benefit increases for state and local government employees. At issue are two actions taken by lawmakers. In 2007, the Legislature repealed pension “gain-sharing’’ that benefited retirees when the markets were doing well. Then in 2011, lawmakers ended cost-of-living increases

for pensions for public employees enrolled in two older pension plans. Lawsuits were filed by various unions and others opposed to the changes, including the Washington Federation of State Employees. In 2010, a King County judge ruled that lawmakers violated contractual rights by taking away gainsharing without providing comparable replacement benefits. And last year, a Thurston County judge ruled that the Legislature was wrong to eliminate the annual increase in benefits to retirees.

In 1998, state lawmakers decided pensioners should share the wealth when the state’s Wall Street investments did well, so they established “gain-sharing.’’ In 2007, the Legislature eliminated the pension bonus, but in exchange, some pensioners received cost-of-living increases, and many qualified for earlier retirement without reducing their pension. In arguments before the high court on Thursday, the state noted that the statute surrounding gainsharing very clearly stated that the continued on page 37


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

Ohlone Humane Society

Animal protections and States’ Rights come under the axe continued from page 3

miliar with stroke, which can lead to a delay in seeking emergency medical treatment. Improving stroke outcomes through knowledge “Stroke is a silent disease that typically comes on suddenly, and many people may not readily recognize the symptoms,” says Dr. Ash Jain, M.D., medical director of Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program. Next Tuesday, Nov. 5, Dr. Jain and Doug Van Houten, R.N., clinical coordinator of the Stroke Program, will present a free seminar aimed at educating community members about stroke and what puts you at risk. “Risk factors for stroke—such as hypertension and diabetes— develop over the course of years, even decades, increasing the likelihood of stroke,” Dr. Jain says. “Without being aware of the risk factors for stroke, it’s easy to be taken by surprise.” By taking steps to understand stroke and its risk factors, community members can talk to their doctor to better assess their risk level and then take steps to mitigate their chance of suffering from stroke. “Preventing stroke by managing risk factors is ideal, but if a stroke does occur, our program works to minimize damage and prevent any further strokes through risk factor management and patient education,” Dr. Jain says. “Community members can help us to help them and improve our community stroke outcomes. As much as we can try to provide aggressive care once stroke happens, the benefit is not as much as it is by controlling the risk factors.” “The important risk factors we need to pay attention to are diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, previous strokes, and irregular heartbeat, also known as atrial fibrillation.” Dr. Jain adds that knowing these risk factors and discussing their management with your doctors will better enable your health care team to control and prevent diseases like stroke and heart attack, two major killers. “I cannot express enough to community members how important it is to learn about stroke so that they can take the appropriate steps to both recognize it and understand the risk factors involved.” Are you ready to act FAST if stroke happens? Being able to recognize stroke is everyone’s responsibility, ac-

cording to Doug Van Houten, R.N. To illustrate this point, he cites a study that examined who is most likely to call 9-1-1 in the event of a stroke—patients themselves or their family members. The results? Researchers found that stroke victims only called emergency services in one out of every 600 cases. In other words, in almost all cases, it will be a family member who recognizes stroke and calls 9-1-1. Going a step further, if you suspect a loved one is potentially suffering from a stroke, language is the key, Van Houten says. “It’s interesting—in almost any assessment tool you use to identify stroke, speech and language are part of it because the left side of the brain has a huge section dedicated to language processes,” he explains. “Almost any motor deficit due to stroke will lead to slurred speech, so speech problems will be a symptom in most strokes.” In these cases, the speech might be slurred or unclear because the mouth is not working perfectly to form words clearly. In others, the person’s ability to use words in conversation is impacted. “This deficit is called ‘aphasia,’” Van Houten says. “An acute stroke patient with aphasia knows what he or she wants to say, but is unable to do it normally. Sometimes the aphasic person cannot come up with simple and normal words; other times there is no speech at all.” If you notice a change in a family member’s speech patterns, Van Houten recommends remembering the pneumonic FAST, which stands for: Facial Weakness Arm Weakness Speech Impairment Time (Stroke is an emergency that requires calling 9-1-1.) “Family members are the ones who will pick up subtle changes in speech and language the quickest,” he points out. “What they need to be able to do is to act on this detection and to do it FAST!” Learn More To learn more about stroke and how to identify it and also learn about risk factors, attend the free community education seminar next Tuesday, Nov. 5, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, (Washington West building) located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

Green Business Program honors Fremont Bank SUBMITTED BY KURT HEATH Fremont Bank was recently honored by the Alameda County Green Business Program for its commitment to long-term environmental sustainability. Fremont Bank achieved the status of a Certified Bay Area Green Business earlier this year, which the Alameda program formally recognized at its annual Green Business Recognition event. “Our recognition event is an opportunity to acknowledge the efforts of organizations like Fremont Bank to reduce waste, conserve resources and prevent pollution,” said Pamela Evans, coordinator for the Alameda County Green Business Program. “As a Certified Bay Area Green Business, Fremont Bank is performing in the top tier in several areas of environmental performance at its Operations Center.” Fremont Bank Director of Facilities and Logistic Services Sandi Redmond and Facilities Manager Beth Fancher attended the event to receive Fremont Bank’s recognition. Fremont Bank (www.fremontbank.com) can be found on Facebook at www.fb.com/FremontBank and on Twitter at @FremontBank.

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f an amendment attached to this year’s U.S. House of Representatives Farm Bill becomes federal law, it threatens to overturn hard-won state and local animal protection legislation. The result will be far-reaching and devastating to animals, the environment and human health. States with animal welfare laws such as Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Guam, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, the Northern Mariana Island, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and Rhode Island, will find existing legislation in serious danger of being abolished Authored by Rep. Steve King of Iowa, H.R. 2642, the House bill includes dangerous provisions that could virtually annihilate cruelty laws by preventing states from enforcing existing and implementing future anti-cruelty legislation. Congressman King is no friend of animals and has a long history of attempting to block federal legislation regulating dog fighting, horse slaughter; he was even against a federal policy that came in the wake of Hurricane Katrina to help ‘pets’ in disasters. During the consideration of the 2012 farm bill last summer, King also tried, unsuccessfully, to block an amendment that would make it a crime for an adult to attend or bring a child to a dogfight. The “King Amendment” would wipe out most state and local laws regarding the production and manufacture of “agricultural products.” The provisions are so broad in their interpreta-

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org

tion that if enacted, it would not only create the ability of the agricultural industry to legally eliminate protections for farmed animals, but could extend to puppy mills, gestation crates, battery cages for chickens, shark finning, horse slaughter for food and conceivably eliminate prohibitions regarding eating companion animals. The scope of the amendment is sweeping and states “The measure is designed to prevent states from applying their own standards for any agricultural product to standards made in other states.” Federal law defines an agricultural product broadly. The term encompasses a wide swath of products such as such as livestock, poultry, dairy and plants, and “any and all products raised or produced on farms and any processed or manufactured product thereof.” According to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the Iowa Republican introduced the amendment in response to California’s Proposition 2, which requires egg-laying hens to be housed in roomier cages so they can stand up and spread their wings. If the King Amendment should end up as part of the final Farm Bill, California would no longer be able to apply this standard to the sale of eggs produced in other states. HSUS fears that the nation’s 250 million egglaying hens would suffer. Wayne Pacelle, President and CEO of HSUS stated in Time

A step to end global poverty SUBMITTED BY AGA KHAN FOUNDATION USA Around 1,000 participants walked to end global poverty in the annual San Francisco Partnership Walk at Lake Elizabeth Park on Sunday, October 13, 2013. The San Francisco Partnership Walk is an initiative of Aga Khan Foundation U.S.A. (AKF USA) to raise awareness and funds that reduce poverty, hunger, illiteracy, and poor health in Africa and Asia. One hundred percent of the funds raised at Partnership Walk go directly to projects supported by the foundation; not a cent is spent on administration. An inspiring feature of Partnership Walk is the Village in Action, where participants enjoyed interactive exhibits spotlighting the foundation’s practical solutions for alleviating poverty from Afghanistan to Zanzibar. Partnership Walk events are being held in 10 major U.S. cities this year; the last walk in Houston on Nov. 2. Since 1995, Partnerships in Action has raised $54 million for poverty alleviation projects supported by AKF USA. Participants help communities in some of the poorest areas of Africa and Asia to create long-term, self-help solutions to lift themselves out of poverty. These contributions make a tremendous impact by creating opportunities for girls in Afghanistan to go to school, for farmers in Mali to feed their families, and mothers in India to lead healthy lives. AKF USA, established in 1981, is a private, non-denominational, not-for-profit international development organization committed to alleviating poverty, hunger, illiteracy, and poor health. AKF USA works to address the root causes of poverty by supporting and sharing innovative solutions in the areas of health, education, rural development, civil society, and the environment. For more information, or to make a donation, visit www.partnershipsinaction.org.

Magazine, “It’s one of the most destructive and far-reaching anti-animal welfare provisions we’ve seen in decades… It could nullify state laws to crack down on extreme confinement of animals on factory farms, on standards for puppy mills, on prohibitions on the sale of shark fins and much more.” This federal overreach with intentionally broad language will impact a wide range of other concerns including food safety, child labor, and environmental requirements such as the use of dangerous pesticides and labels on farm-raised fish and other agriculture-related health warnings. The amendment, officially known as the Protect Interstate Commerce Act, is not included in the Senate-passed Farm Bill. However, it is extremely dangerous and needs to be removed when it comes before the House and Senate Agriculture Committee where differences will be resolved. The first conference will be held October 30th with the goal to reach agreement by December 13th. Immediate, brief and polite calls to your U.S. Representative and two U.S. Senators are needed requesting removal of the King Amendment from the final draft of the 2014 Farm Bill and opposition to the attack on states’ rights.

To contact California members of the U.S. Congress, visit: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/CA

AARP Tax-Aide seeks volunteers SUBMITTED BY ROBERT FRANCIS AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, the nation’s largest free, volunteer-run tax preparation and assistance service, is seeking volunteers in Castro Valley, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Hayward, Union City, Fremont, and Newark to help taxpayers who are seeking assistance preparing and filing their 2013 tax returns. Volunteers do not need to be an AARP member or retiree to participate. AARP Foundation Tax-Aide volunteers receive free tax training and are reimbursed on a limited basis for qualified program-related expenses. They help taxpayers learn new skills while giving back to countless communities. “In 2013, we’ve assisted over a thousand people in preparing and filing their tax returns,” said Robert Francis, District Coordinator for Southern Alameda County. “We could not do it without our volunteers, who make an indelible mark on the communities they help.” Our volunteers join the more than 35,000 Tax-Aide volunteers across the country, helping millions of taxpayers each year. The AARP Foundation Tax-Aide program is offered in conjunction with the IRS. Learn more about the AARP Foundation Tax-Aide team by visiting www.aarp.org/taxvolunteer and click on “Become a Volunteer.” For more information contact Robert Francis at (510) 791-0351 or rlfranc@comcast.net


October 29, 2013

Letter to the Editor

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Domestic violence awareness

At a recent Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments’ (SAVE) Breakfast Eye Opener event, I heard the harrowing story of one young mother’s experience with domestic violence. The abuse she suffered by her partner, then husband and father of her child, was ignored by family. This remarkable woman somehow found the inner strength to remove both her child and herself from this dangerous environment, contacted SAVE and, with legal assistance, left her husband and gained sole custody of her child. This strong woman is now self-empowered, going to school and restoring balance to her life. Stories like this make it clear that more must be done to combat domestic violence and that it is clearly possible to survive and thrive after horrific events and experiences. It was only 27 years ago—in October 1987—that our nation observed its first Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Since that time, it has become an annual time of remembrance and action for victims of domestic violence, survivors and advocates across the country. It is with sadness and a great deal of unending hope that I once again observe Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I am sad because domestic violence and its toxic effects remain in our local communities. I am hopeful because every year we create more awareness, more desire for and cause for action, more compassion, as well as more services for survivors and victims of this abuse.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), upwards of 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been the victims of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by their partner during their lifetime. However, we must also remember that “domestic violence” also covers victims of elder abuse and teen dating violence; incidences of both are on the rise. As domestic abuse is one of the most underreported crimes in America and 33% of female and 4% of male murder victims were killed by their intimate partners, it is clear that we must reflect on these disheartening statistics this month. We must reflect on what more we can do to alleviate the pain and suffering of victims and move our society in a direction where we no longer tolerate domestic violence. Since I was first elected to the State Legislature in the late 1990’s, I have worked to expand protections for victims of domestic violence. I have authored legislation to: • Standardize the definition of “dating relationship” under the Domestic Violence Prevention Act allowing more victims to be able to obtain restraining orders; • Authorize victims of domestic violence to be able to receive relocation expenses; • Extend protections from adverse employment actions to victims of domestic violence; • Extend state services to male victims of domestic violence; • Streamlined and clarified the Safe-at-Home program that has

helped protect the identities of nearly 6,260 survivors of domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault since its inception in 1999. This year, I authored and Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 107—sponsored by the Alameda County District Attorney’s office and the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA)—that provided for continued funding for the administration of rape kits, funding that I successfully advocated for a couple of years previously. In the months and years ahead, I will certainly continue to work to help provide victims, survivors and advocates with the tools they need to combat domestic violence. If you are suffering from domestic violence, I encourage you to reach out to one of the many local organizations that help victims and survivors. Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments, located in Fremont, can be reached 24 hours a day at (510) 794-6055; Tri-Valley Haven, located in Livermore, can be contacted on their crisis line at (800) 884-8119; Building Futures with Women and Children, located in San Leandro, can be reached 24 hours a day at 1-866-A-WAYOUT; the Alameda County Family Justice Center, located in Oakland, can be reached at (510) 267-8800; and the Family Violence Law Center in Oakland can be contacted at (800) 947-8301. Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-East Bay)

‘Tikkun Olam’ Awards seek nominations SUBMITTED BY LINDSEY STEINSEIFER Know a socially conscious Jewish teen creating change locally or globally? The Helen Diller Family Foundation is now accepting nominations for the 2014 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) Awards, that recognizes up to 10 Jewish teens with $36,000 each for exceptional leadership and visionary actions that

How to Sell Your House Without an Agent

are helping to repair the world. Up to five teens from California and five from other communities across the country will be acknowledged for their socially-minded volunteer service. Visit www.dillerteenawards.org to begin the nomination process. Deadline for nominations is January 5, 2014. For more information, email dillerteenawards@sfjcf.org or call (415) 512-6432.

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Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY ALEX H. KASPRAK, NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Travel 890 million miles through our solar system and you’ll arrive at Saturn’s moon Titan. You might feel strangely at home. It has large lakes, flowing rivers, and sandy dunes just like Earth. It has an atmosphere, clouds, and it even rains from time to time. Instead of water, the lakes, rivers, and clouds are made from chemicals called hydrocarbons. Even the sand in the dunes is hydrocarbons!

The Bookworm

But one major thing has been absent—wind. Scientists have been able to take a close look at Titan since 2004. That’s when NASA’s Cassini spacecraft began orbiting Saturn. In all that time they have never seen even a ripple in any of Titan’s lakes. Scientists don’t know what to make of this. They know that there has to be wind—how could the dunes have gotten there without it? One possible answer: it just hasn’t been the right season for wind yet. Seasons last for a long time on Titan—it takes seven whole Earth years to change seasons! Scientists think they have been looking at Titan during a quiet period. They think that the changing seasons could bring the wind they have been looking for.

And not just any wind, but maybe even hurricanes! On Earth, summertime heating of the ocean fuels hurricanes. Air and water vapor rising from the sun-warmed ocean warms the air and causes it to rise. The rising air sucks more warmed air in. This new air swirls in to replace the rising air. The storm picks up speed and a hurricane is born. On Earth, ocean heating changes with the season. Hurricanes come only during the warm months. Scientists think that the hydrocarbons in Titan’s lakes might do the same thing as water in the oceans here on Earth. It just needs to be the right season. As the seasons slowly change on Titan, the Sun will begin to heat up the hydrocarbon lakes in its northern hemisphere. With that warmth could come wind and maybe even hurricanes.

The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

“Start Your Own Home Business After 50” by Robert W. Bly Retirement is too far away. You can see it from your work desk. It’s tantalizingly close, filled with sun and sand, golf and travel, but it’s oh-so-unreachable. Yes, you have a job you’re happy to have. No, you don’t want it forever. So how would you feel being your own boss?

Making good money, doing something you love, having flexibility to travel, learning new things? If you think you’re too old for that, you’re not – and “Start Your Own Home Business After 50” by Robert W. Bly explains why. One of these days, you’d love to be able to throw the alarm clock away and forget work. You hope to retire sooner, rather than later - which means, of course, that money (and lack thereof) is a definite concern. And you’re not alone. Robert Bly says that the number of workers age 55 and older is projected to grow by nearly fifty percent in the next three years. Stretching retirement dollars has never been more important - which is where this book comes in. The first step, Bly says, is to decide which of your former jobs you enjoyed and were good at. If nothing in particular sticks out, what hobbies would you like to develop into “an expert-level gig”? Can you freelance, or do consulting? Would a former employer make a good client? Use your experience (an advantage you’ve got over younger workers) to winnow through the possibilities.

Next, decide if the business is for you. Do your strengths mesh with what’s needed to run things properly? Do you have stick-to-itiveness enough to stay focused and work solo? Are you prepared to do your billing, tech support, and other necessary tasks, or would you hire someone to do them? Can you market yourself and promote your new business? Do you need financing (the availability of which is another advantage)? Once you’ve figured out the details, then it’s time for launch, but Bly says there’s one thing to remember first: “Make yourself happy. When you do,” he says, “those who care about you will eventually be happy for you.” Someday, you’ll retire and you’ll get to do the things you love. So why not make money doing them, with the help of “Start Your Own Home Business After 50.” Beginning with a handful of home business opportunity ideas, author Robert W. Bly offers plenty of sound advice here, including food for thought to determine if the endeavor is viable. His words are encouraging, but cautious, and he doesn’t forget to warn his readers of the pitfalls in becoming an entrepreneur. That kind of balance is great to see, particularly if you’re on the fence about business-ownership or are just starting to think about self-employment. There’s a little bit of annoying repetition in this book but, overall, it’s a valuable tool for anyone who needs to plan for the future or just wants a good change of pace. If that’s you, then “Start Your Own Home Business After 50” is a book you won’t want too far away. c.2013, Quill Driver Books $16.95 / $18.95 Canada 204 pages

Free law clinic SUBMITTED BY MARI DANI BANDOMA The Filipino Bar Association of Northern California, API Legal Outreach, Filipino Advocates for Justice, and the City of Union City will be hosting a free legal clinic (Immigration and other areas of law) on Monday, November 4th. There will be Tagalog-speaking attorneys and volunteers. Anyone is welcome to attend. Free legal clinic Monday, Nov. 4 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City legalclinics@fbanc.org

October 29, 2013

Forecasting weather on Earth is hard enough. You can imagine how hard it is to predict weather somewhere else in our solar system! Still, if scientists are right, it could be an exciting summer on Titan. Read “Planet X-treme Weather” on NASA’s Space Place to learn about the exciting weather elsewhere in our solar system. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planet-weather Learn more about Saturn, it’s moons, and our solar system at http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/saturnkids. Check out our great sites for kids: Like us on Facebook: http://spaceplace.nasa.gov https://www.facebook.com/nasaspaceplace http://scijinks.gov https://www.facebook.com/scijinks http://climatekids.nasa.gov Follow us on Twitter: @nasaspaceplace

Lights On Afterschool BY SARA GIUSTI PHOTO COURTESY OF SADHNA SHARMA As art, music, and after school enrichment programs have been cut across the nation, some people are fighting back, refusing to let young minds go to waste. Now in its 14th year, Lights On Afterschool is at the forefront of this creative revolution. Started by the Washington, D.C.-based Afterschool Alliance and held on October 17th, Lights On Afterschool is a nationwide rally for all after school programs. Afterschool Alliance is a nonpartisan nonprofit working towards providing quality after school programs to all children. This year, Young Rembrandts-East Bay held their own Lights On Afterschool art contest, asking students to decorate a Lights On Afterschool lightbulb and answer, “How the Young Rembrandts Afterschool Enrichment Drawing classes have kept the Lights on Afterschool for them.” “Most schools don’t have after school programs,” said Sadhna Sharma, Director of Young Rembrandts-East Bay. “The Lights On Afterschool Art Contest brings light to the fact that after school enrichment programs are important.” Out of over 600 entries, second grader Neha Panda of Newark’s James L. Bunker Elementary is Young Rembrandt’s Lights On Afterschool winner. Neha’s winning statement was, “After [Young Rembrandts] class, I feel more interested and confident to draw because I understand drawing a little bit better. I also came to know about the artist Faith Ringgold and many other new things.” Neha won a gift basket full of drawing supplies such as markers, colored pencils, and sharpies, a giant Young Rembrandts pencil, a fun crayon-shaped thermos, and a full scholarship to a Young Rembrandts Enrichment Drawing session. Fremont Young Rembrandt classes are held at the Fremont Community Center and many elementary schools: Ardenwood, Azevada, Forest Park, Gomes, Leitch, Mattos, Millard, Niles, Vallejo Mill, and Warm Springs. Newark classes are held at James L. Bunker, Kennedy, and Lincoln Elementary. Class times, age range, and prices vary. To learn more about Young Rembrandts-East Bay, visit http://www.youngrembrandts.com/eastbay/ or call (925) 353-1704. For more about Lights On Afterschool, visit http://afterschoolalliance.org.

Young Rembrandts instructor Viji Natarajan, contest winner Neha Panda, and YR East Bay Director Sadhna Sharma.

Eden Housing turns 45 SUBMITTED BY EDEN HOUSING Join Eden Housing and help celebrate 45 years of creating communities and changing lives. The Sapphire Anniversary Gala Reception will supply guests with hors d’oeuvres, desserts, and a wine bar. Eden Housing’s mission is to build and maintain high-quality, well-managed, service-enhanced, affordable housing communities that meet the needs of lower income families, seniors, and persons with disabilities. In lieu of a ticket purchase, Eden Housing asks that you donate to the Bill Vandenburgh Fund for Residential Services. Honoring both the 45th anniversary and the retirement of founding board member Bill Vandenburgh, Eden Housing will launch the fund at the celebration.

The fund will provide direct services to its residents, including: fostering independence among individuals with special need, help low-income residents bridge the digital divide and use technology to enrich their lives, and support young people in reaching their potential through after-school and summer enrichment programs. Sapphire Anniversary Gala Reception Thursday, Nov. 14 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Hayward City Hall Rotunda 777 B St., Hayward (510) 582-1460 RSVP: www.EdenHousingTurns45.eventbrite.com


October 29, 2013

BY NICOLE ELLIS H.G. Wells wrote about one. Marty McFly rode in one. And Armand Stephens built one. Stephens, of Fremont, finished crafting his hand-made wooden time machine back in June. Spending over 700 hours sketching, practicing, and creating, his hard work resulted in a large industrial time machine that now resides in his backyard. “There is no such thing as a time machine, but this gives you some kind of a feeling that you could hook a wire to it, stand here, and flap your arms,” he joked. Stephens, now retired, once worked as a local woodshop teacher. His 35-year career started at Washington High, continued on to a continuation school, and ended at

Walters Junior High. Teaching helped perfect his woodworking skills, but Stephens’s childhood on the farm was the inspiration behind the abstract sculpture. He grew up on a farm just outside of Bakersfield. “My dad was a sharecrop farmer, so a lot of these things you see here are related to farm machinery,” Stephens explained. “As a kid I got use to working on this kind of equipment with my dad: tractors, hay mowers, and those kind of things.” Stephens had been thinking about building a sculpture, but it wasn’t until last November that he decided to bite the bullet. “I started with sketches,” he shared. “I just had a sketch book and started sketching out a lot of the stuff.” The second step in creating the machine was trial and error. Stephens found old particle board and junk wood to practice on. He cut the desired pieces out of the scrap wood and then tested them to see if his measurements and concept were correct. “Not everything worked out,” Stephens admitted. “I had to throw some stuff away, but by building and experimenting with the prototype first, then when I built the real thing everything seemed to work.” The real thing isn’t made out of junk wood. Stephens traveled to Berkley to buy

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costly wood, like cherry and walnut. “Some of the wood is so expensive that they sell it to you by the pound. You think you’re dealing with a drug dealer or something,” he joked. He opted out of painting the time machine. Instead, Stephens showcased the beauty of natural colors in the wood. Aside from glue, a few hidden nails, and a concealed electric motor under the base, the entire sculpture is carved from wood. Stephens used old mechanical concepts when it came down to designing the machinery. “These gears, sprockets, and chains, like this (points to a gear toward the back of the machine) is called a planetary gear, and it was designed by the guy who invented the steam engine back in 1775,” he explained. “So it’s not new tech-

nology. Everything here is really old technology, but it works.” Stephens spent seven months building the time machine in his garage. He didn’t use industrial tools or heavy-duty equipment. His in-home shop consists of “just home owners stuff.” The garage is where he experienced difficulties and successes— like the chain. “The most challenging parts were the chain links,” Stephens described. “There’s hundreds of pieces and the spacing of the holes have to be ever, ever so accurate or it won’t work, so I think that was probably the most exciting thing to do, to get one of them together that actually worked. That was kind of like getting over the hump. I thought, I got a chain that works, I got it made now.” The machine’s design wasn’t completely thought through beforehand. “We had friends over here and one of them was my college roommate and he said, ‘Wow, you must have really drawn out the blueprints

and you must’ve known where everything was going to go,’” Stephens shared. “And I said, ‘No, no that’s not how it was. Everything sort of grew.’” He knew he wanted certain elements, like chains and gears, but not knowing every detail prior to building allowed him to tap into his creative side— like the machine’s “face.” Stephens gave his sculpture an abstract-looking face. Complete with eyes, ears, a smile, a nose, a set of nostrils, and a tie. The wooden face looks like something Van Gough would’ve dreamt of. As of now, the time machine sits in Stephens’s backyard, but he hope to find a new home for it soon. “I knew that when I started it,” he said. “Our house is so small that I would have no space for it here. I’m not planning on adding on to it, but if I can’t find a home for it I may take it apart and display the parts inside the garage, on the wall or something.” Stephens fears that the machine will self-disintegrate if it’s left outside like it is now.

Once the sculpture finds a new home, Stephens doesn’t plan on starting a new one. “I don’t want to make any more sculptures,” he admitted. “I’ve done one, I’m satisfied. It was a great process. I have no regrets.” Although Stephens is a man of projects, he doesn’t see himself diving into a new one anytime soon. “I’ve done a lot of one-time things,” he explained. “I restored a 1935 Dodge pickup truck. Got it out of a junk yard and restored it and Mary and I have completely remodeled this house. We’re done,” Stephens laughed. The process of creating the time machine was just as rewarding as the finished product. Having hurdles and overcoming them made the end result that much more worthwhile. “That’s one of the lessons I used to try and teach my students, not to get discouraged,” Stephens shared. “Everything isn’t going to work out in life. It’s how you deal with it. Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and get going again.”


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“Rebound,” “Ring Any Bottle,” “7-11,” “Roller Bowler,” “Ski Ball,” and “Slap Shot.” Once again, admission to the event is free, but tickets for the carnival games will cost $1 each (or six tickets for $5). Other attractions include a jump house, popcorn, cotton candy, a Halloween costume contest, and live performances. The carnival has become a popular annual event that raises much-needed funds that will help sustain co-curricular programs in our school district. The NHBA/NHSF would like to extend its appreciation to cosponsors New Haven Teachers Association, Too Much Fun Club, Inc. and the New Haven Administrators Association (NHAA) for their donations and continued support of student activities. For more information and/or volunteer opportunities, contact Rebecca Venable at rvenable@newhavenboosters.org.

SUBMITTED BY EMMA VICTORIA G. BLANCO The New Haven Boosters Association (NHBA) and the New Haven Schools Foundation (NHSF) would like to invite families to its annual “Halloween Carnival” on Tuesday, October 29 at James Logan High School. The celebration will take place on the parking lot and include many carnival games such as “Amaze O,” “Lollipop Tree,” “Loop De Doo,” “Egg Roll,”

Halloween Carnival Tuesday, Oct 29 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. James Logan High School 1800 H St., Union City rvenable@newhavenboosters.org Free admission Carnival games $1 each

October 29, 2013

‘Pirate’s Alley’ scares for a cause SUBMITTED BY FLORENCE VAN KLEEF When the sky shifts to darkness, it’s time to visit “Pirate’s Alley” and get your scare on for a good cause. Now in its 7th year, Dan Jarvis has created his most scary haunted house, with his entire backyard set up as a fright zone. This is not only to scare people and have fun, but to collect canned food for the Alameda County Food Bank. Last year Jarvis collected 480 pounds of food, which was able to feed 350 families. This year his goal is to feed more. Students from Kennedy High School help put on the haunted house, and the event gives them a great opportunity to gain some service learning hours as well as help feed hungry people. What is the cost for this frightful delight? One can of food for the Alameda County Food Bank. Come out and celebrate Halloween with a good scare and a helping hand. Pirate’s Alley Thursday, Oct 31 - Saturday, Nov 2 Dark until 10 p.m. Willkie Place, off Farwell Dr., Fremont Cost: One can of food


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

City of Fremont Briefs BY: CHERYL GOLDEN We Need Volunteers! Looking for a different kind of volunteer work? Interested in helping your community? Consider volunteering to help low- to moderate-income families and in-

day, Nov. 12 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Caribbean Conference Room located at the Fremont Family Resource Center, 39155 Liberty Street – Building EFGH in Fremont. For more information, please contact VITA Coordinator Carolyn Robertson at (510) 574-2020 or croberston@fremont.gov. Roll, Pinch, and Pound! Explore the City of Fremont’s ceramics classes for children, youth, and adults. Join us for a hands-on and tactile experience using clay as we create artistic ceramic projects. Register today and learn how to sculpt and mold clay into beautiful works of art!

dividuals file their income taxes for the 2013 tax season. The Fremont Family Resource Center’s (FRC) Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is recruiting volunteers for the 2013 tax season. FRC VITA prepares income tax returns and e-files them for low- to moderate-income individuals at no cost. In many cases, tax refunds are their lifeline. Not only does the VITA Program provide tax preparation services, VITA volunteers also connect families to important services such as CalFresh benefits, financial coaching, asset building programs, financial education workshops, and referrals to other valuable programs available at the FRC. If you are interested in becoming a VITA volunteer, please attend the VITA Volunteer Information Meeting on Tues-

FoCus, fOCus, FOCUS! At this year’s “Educational Paint Out,” celebrate 20 years of art and conservation of the FOCUS group and explore your connection to the environment in creative and conscientious ways. Participate in a canvas mural project as well as individual art projects. Art activities will encourage kids to bring their individual creative sensibilities and unique experiences to a group collaboration highlighting environmental themes and issues. FOCUS is a nationwide campaign in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Wyland Foundation, which uses the beauty of art and the wonder of science to make kids aware of the shared relationship between the health of each ecosystem and the health of the planet. Artwork from this event will be showcased at the Olive Hyde Gallery from Dec. 13 to 15. The event will take place Nov. 17 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Fremont Community Center. Check out our Recreation Guide for more art classes or visit us online at www.RegeRec.com. For more information contact the City’s Irene Jordahl at ijordahl@fremont.gov or (510) 494-4322. It’s Not Your Grandma’s Center Looking for healthy, dynamic, engaged baby boomers and seniors who love to mingle with people of all ages? If so, visit the Fremont Senior Center located in Central Park. The Senior Center provides services that include excellent breakfast and lunch cooked onsite (Monday through Friday), many fitness and exercise classes, Zumba Gold and Hula classes, free health services, special events and speakers, a local and international trip program, legal and health insur-

ance counseling, and many opportunities to meet new friends and socialize. Everyone is welcome, and can participate in most programs at minimal cost and without an age designation. For more information visit www.Fremont.gov/SeniorCenter and “Like” them on Facebook. The Fremont Senior Center is located at 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., and the phone number is (510) 790-6600. Credit Repair Class Do you need to fix your credit report and improve your credit score? Our Credit Repair Class can help! Increase your financial knowledge, learn how to fix your credit report and improve your credit score. Wednesday, Nov 6 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. FRC Millennium Room Register at: (510) 574-2020, Ext. 3 Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont FREE to Tri-City residents Free light dinner provided Free childcare available if requested by Nov. 4


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Wednesdays, Sep 25 thru Nov 13

Newark Police Department Citizen Police Academy – R

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Art display

Discuss media’s portrayal of women

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 www.MissRepresentation.org

Thursday, Oct 25 - Sunday, Nov 30

Wednesday, Oct 30

12 noon - 5 p.m.

Participants learn about local law enforcement

Photography show

The Sangha: First Followers of Buddha

10th Street After-School Program

4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Sports, arts-n-crafts, games & special events

Drop-in program, no day care 10th Street Community Center 33948 10th Street, Union City (510) 675-5276 wwwUnionCity.org Tuesdays, Sep 11 & Thursdays, Nov 13

Music for Minors II Training

9:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Learn to become a docent

Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 733-1189 www.musicforminors2.org Saturdays, Sep 21 - Sundays, Dec 29

San Leandro Art Association Member Exhibit

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Variety of art work on display

Casa Peralta 384 West Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 357-4650 Monday, Sep 23-Friday, Nov 11

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org Monday, Oct 28-Friday, Nov 8

Loved Twice Donation Event

Mon., Wed., & Fri: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Tues., & Thurs: 8 a.m. - 12 noon Donate clothes for babies in need

East Bay Spinal Decompression 40000 Fremont Blvd. Ste. H, Fremont (510) 790-1000 www.lovedtwice.org

8 p.m. Presentation & discussion

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-2581 sacbc@sbcglobal.net Thursday, Oct 31

Spooktacular Halloween Party –R

2 p.m. Costume contest, treats, raffle & prizes

Carlton Plaza of Fremont 3800 Walnut Ave., Fremont (510) 505-0555

Saturday, Oct 26 - Sunday, Jan 5

Friday, Nov 1

“Lure of the Wetlands”

Day of the Dead Show $

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Artwork display by June Yokell

Ghost songs, & spooky music

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 shoreline@haywardrec.org

Mudpuddle 34733 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 info@michaelmcnevin.com Friday, Nov 1

Thursday, Oct 31 - Saturday, Nov 16

Fall Dinner & Dance $

Artists’ Annual Juried Exhibit

Live music by the Manny Guiterrez Band

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Artwork from Bay Area artists Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.adobegallery.org Fridays, Nov 1 thur Nov 22

Toddler Ramble: Let the Rain Come Down!

10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

5:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766 Friday, Nov 1

Buster Keaton’s “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” $

8:30 p.m. 1928 silent film accompanied by Organist Jerry Nagano

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Photography Display

Nature class for ages 1 – 3

8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Hayward Senior Center 22325 N Third St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 shoreline@haywardrec.org

Saturdays, Sep 28 thru Nov 16

Friday, Nov 1-Saturday, Nov 30

Governor’s Office of Business & Economic Development Seminar $R

Teen/Senior Computer Gadget Help

Creations by Valerie Manning

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

5 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Learn about hiring credits & tax credits

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Oil & acrylic paintings display

Older adults learn to use cell phones & iPads

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 http://eastbayedabizbriefings2.eventbrite.com

Works by David Steffes

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Friday, Nov 1

Friday, Nov 1–Sunday, Jan 12

Monday, Oct 1 -Sunday, Oct 31

“Still Here”

Friday, Nov 1

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Science Lecture for Children

Mary Sullivan and Father Jun Manalo

Native American Portraits exhibit

4:30 p.m.

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org

Especially for school-age children

5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Local artists share oil & acrylic paintings

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

#OB84518

Miss Representation

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

“Perceptions”

Mondays, Sep 9 - Thursdays, Dec 20

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

Tuesday, Oct 29

Ray McGinnis Paintings

5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Register by Sept. 9th Newark City Council Chambers 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4352 beverly.ryans@newark.org

MEDICAL INSURANCE RATES INCREASING - THINK MELLO

Monday, Oct 1 -Friday, Nov 26

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400


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Farmers’ Markets FREMONT: NEWARK: Centerville

October 29, 2013

Friday, Nov 1

Saturday, Nov 2

Saturday, Nov 2

Hallow Fest $R

Mission Gold Jazz Band $

Corn Mosaics $

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

6 p.m.

2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Rotary Club costume party

Buffet dinner, music & dancing

Prospect Hill, Hayward Event address provided upon payment (510) 886-2662

Macro Event Center 37720 Bonde Way, Fremont (415) 602-3511 www.jazzdance.org/missiongold

Create artwork using glue, glitter & Indian corn

Friday, Nov 1

Saturday, Nov 2

Laserium: Bring Back the Light $

Nature Walk for Health

6:30 p.m. & 10:00 p.m.

1.3 mile walk

Wake Up the Farm $

Event features music, light & science

SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222

Little farmers help fix snacks for the animals

Newark Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Bonde Way at Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 909-2067 www.fremontfarmersmarket.com Kaiser Permanente Fremont Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com Irvington Farmers’ Market

Sundays 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round Bay Street and Trimboli Way, Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Sundays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org SAN LEANDRO:

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Beginning Bird Drawing – R

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Wednesdays 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.

4 p.m.

Learn techniques & develop your skills

Blessing of graves, refreshments & music

Ages 8+ Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 ext. 102

April 10 – October 16 Parrott Street Between E. 14th St. and Washington Ave., San Leandro 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Year-round Fairmont and East 14th St., San Leandro (925) 465-4690 www.cafarmersmkts.com

San Lorenzo Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Kaiser Permanente Hayward Farmers’ Market

Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

May 4 – Oct 19 Hesperian and Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com UNION CITY:

Year-round 27400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Kaiser Permanente Union City Farmers’ Market

South Hayward Glad Tidings

Tuesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Year-round W. Tennyson Rd. between Tyrell Ave. and Tampa Ave., Hayward (510) 783-9377 www.cafarmersmarkets.com MILPITAS: Milpitas Farmers’ Market at ICC

Sundays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round India Community Center 525 Los Coches St. 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com Great Mall

Saturdays 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

May - November Great Mall Pkwy. and Mustang Dr., Milpitas (559) 250-2674 www.cafarmersmarkets.com

Saturday, Nov 2

All Soul’s Day

SAN LORENZO:

Year-round Hayward City Plaza 777 B. St., Hayward 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org

10:30 - 11:30 a.m.

San Leandro Downtown Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Hayward Farmers’ Market

Saturday, Nov 2

9 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Friday, Nov 1

Bayfair Mall

HAYWARD:

Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland (510) 336-7300

Year-round Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices 3553 Whipple Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Cedar Lawn Cemetery 48800 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (408) 263-2868 www.LimaFamilyCedarLawn.com

Saturday, Nov 2

1351 Driscoll Rd, Fremont (at Christian Science Church)

Ages 10+ SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222

Teen workshop offers test tips & strategies

Sunday, Nov 3

2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

www.hayward.chapelofthechimes.com

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 www.aclibrary.org

Friday, Nov 1

Saturday, Nov 2

Society Improv Comedy Troupe $

Sip, Savor & Support $R

7:30 p.m.

Dinner & auction

LA comedy troupe delivers hilarious improv

Supports Fremont’s CA School for the Deaf Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel 55 Cyril Magnin St., San Francisco www.csdaptc.org

Folklorico dance, Mariachi music & Catholic service

Chapel of the Chimes 32992 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 471-3363

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont Room C120 www.showtix4u.com www.jointhesociety.com

Geology Walk of the Coyote Hills Learn about trails, rocks & wetlands

Family friendly 1.3 mile walk SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222

5 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Sunday, Nov 3

Busler-Blais, Clements & Au Trio Concert $

2:30 p.m. Performing horn, tuba & piano works

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Saturday, Nov 2 Friday and Saturday, Nov 1 and 2

Cowboy Hootenanny Folk Festival $

Sunday, Nov 3

Altar Walk

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

8 a.m.

Friday, Nov 1: 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov 2: 3 p.m.

Square dancing, clogging, games & crafts

5k & 10k fun run & walk

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 327-2757

City Hall 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City www.UnionCity.org

Walk to alters or shrines errected for loved ones

Uptown 37275 Niles Blvd., Fremont sunsolrae@yahoo.com https://www.facebook.com/events /123983367771905/

Collectibles, baked good & hand crafted items

Sunday 12:30 pm

Learn to use guide books to identify birds

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Year-round Old Alvarado Park Smith and Watkins Streets, Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Unity of Fremont

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Annual Scholarship Bazaar $

A positive path for spiritual living

Bird Watching for Beginners

Free ACT Practice Test – R

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round East Plaza 11th and Decoto Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Sunday, Nov 3

Day of the Dead Celebration

Saturday, Nov 2

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org

Friday, Nov 1

Union City Farmers’ Market

East Plaza Farmers’ Market

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Hill and Valley Clubhouse 1808 B St., Hayward (510) 785-2053

The Running Dead $R

Saturday, Nov 2

Dia De Los Muertos

Sunday, Nov 3

1 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Autumn Walk to a Pounding Rock

Face painting, crafts for sale, craft table for kids, Aztec dancers

Magnolia Plaza (next to Tortilla Factory) 7015 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 792-9909 Saturday, Nov 2

Scholarship Bazaar $R

10:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Enjoy a leisurely 4.5 mile hike

Ages 9+ Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 582-2206 www.ebparks.org

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Sunday, Nov 3

Purchase baked goods & handcrafted items

Country Kitchen Cookin’ $

10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Hill and Valley Clubhouse 1808 B St., Hayward (650) 245-8473

Sample foods grown on the farm

Saturday, Nov 2

Healthy Parks Healthy People Walk

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon

Monday, Nov 4

Enjoy a self-guided gentle trail

Starting Your Own Business

Ages 12+ Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Saturday, Nov 2

Monday, Nov. 4

Monarchs on the Move

Free legal clinic

3 p.m. - 4 p.m.

6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City legalclinics@fbanc.org

Seminar discusses keys to success

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org

Learn about butterfly migration patterns

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

Fremont Unified School District Presents

Classified Substitute Recruitment Job Fair

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

When: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 Time: 5:00 pm, Doors Open at 4:30 pm Where: Fremont Unified School District

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Professional Development Room 4210 Technology Drive, Fremont, CA 94538


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Through Thursday, Oct 31

Perry Farms Pumpkin Patch $

Monday – Friday: 12 noon – 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Pumpkin patch, kids maze & tire maze

Perry Farms 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-6658 Through Wednesday, Oct 30

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

Tuesday, Oct 29

Thursday, Oct 31

NHBA/NHSF Halloween Carnival $

Pumpkin Patch Party

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Carnival games, face painting & food

Carnival games, costume contest, live performances and more

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030 www.bridgesfremont.com

James Logan High School 1800 H St., Union City rvenable@newhavenboosters.org

5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Oct 31 Tuesday, Oct 29 & Wednesday, Oct 30

Boo at the Zoo $

10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Costume parade & treat bags

Oakland Zoo 9777 Golf Links Rd, Oakland www.oaklandzoo.org Thursday, Oct 31

Trunk or Treat

4 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Games, activities, prizes, food and candy galore

Leitch Elementary 47100 Fernald St., Fremont (510) 490-9500 ext. 112 Thursday, Oct 31

Haunted House

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Free & open to trick or treaters

Blacksand Manor 5008 Blacksand Rd., Fremont (510) 651-9507

Halloween Celebration

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Wednesday and Thursday: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Friday: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday: 2 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. – 9 p.m. Oct 28 and 29: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Family friendly ghost house and games

Chadbourne Carriage House Fremont Hub Fremont Blvd. (between Mowry Ave and Walnut Ave. by Chili’s), (510) 796-0595 www.candlelighters.com Through Tuesday, Oct 29

Games, prizes & treats Wear a costume; no masks please

Southland Mall 1 Southland Mall Dr., Hayward www.southlandmall.com Thursday, Oct 31

Halloween Kids Festival

4 p.m. – 6 p.m. Dance-off, costume contest & trick-ortreating

NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall Rd., Newark www.newparkmall.com

Milpitas Rotary Community Pumpkin Patch

Weeknights: 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. 1331 E Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (Parking lot in front of Milpitas Sports Center) http://www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/Home.aspx?accountid=6028 Through Saturday, Nov 2

Pirates of Emerson $

7 p.m. – 11 p.m. Thursday, Oct 31

Kiddie Cartoon Halloween Cavalcade $

4 p.m. Slightly spooky vintage cartoons

Niles Essanay Theatre 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

Six haunted attractions and nightly entertainment

Alameda County Fairgrounds Corner of Bernal and Valley Ave., Pleasanton info@piratesofemerson.com www.piratesofemerson.com Through Saturday, Nov 2

Fear Overload $

7 p.m. – 10 p.m. 7 p.m. – midnight Oct 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26, and 31

Saturday, Nov 2

Trunk or Treat

2 p.m. – 5 p.m. Games, prizes & trick-or-treating

Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont (650) 278-2521

Two horrifying haunted houses

Bayfair Center 15555 E 14th St., San Leandro www.fearoverload.com

SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER Performing music from the golden age of Hollywood, with a few bells and whistles to accentuate the humor, renowned organist Jerry Nagano accompanies Buster Keaton’s 1928 silent comedy “Steamboat Bill Jr.” The combination of Keaton’s comedian/director masterpiece and Nagano’s musical score makes this silent movie a worthwhile experience. Inspiration for Disney’s breakout Mickey Mouse cartoon, Steamboat Willie, “Steamboat Bill, Jr.,” is Ohlone College. Nagano is not only well known for his ability as a concert musician, but also for his expertise in musical accompaniment for silent films. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Nagano began his musical training at age ten and studied under Gaylord Carter, one of the great silent film organists of the time. For the past twelve years, Nagano has delighted audiences by performing at the Stanford Theatre in Palo Alto, where classic films are often screened. Don’t miss out on this incredible journey to the past with Jerry Nagano and Buster Keaton’s 1928 silent masterpiece “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” Tickets are available online or at the Smith Center Box Office. another classic Buster Keaton plot: the brainy, but clumsy, boy trying to get the girl. Set against the backdrop of the paddleboat business, the film is full of wild stunts and physical comedy. Buster Keaton’s onscreen performance is sure to keep audiences laughing hilariously while they enjoy the fabulous organ stylings of virtuoso Jerry Nagano, whose popularity draws people back each season. For the third year in a row, Jerry Nagano performs as part of the Smith Center Season of the Arts at

Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill, Jr. (Accompanied by Organist Jerry Nagano) Friday, Nov. 1 8:30 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont Smith Center Box Office: (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com $10 - $12 admission $2 event parking

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change

Saturday, Nov 23 – Sunday, Nov 24

Saturday, Nov 2

Holiday Boutique Tea & Treasures

Saturday, Nov 2

9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Handcrafted decorations, jewelry & gifts

Handmade items & gifts

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 793-3575

Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 578-4620

Holiday Boutique

10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Harvest Crafters Boutique

Dominican fruitcakes, mission olive oil & homemade goods

MSJ Dominican Sisters 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont www.msjdominicans.org Saturday, Dec 7

Saturday, Nov 2

Sunday, Nov 3

Holiday Crafts Faire

Holiday Gift Fair

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

One of a kind handmade crafts & gifts

Unique holiday gifts, food & homemade latkes

Union City Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495

Holiday Boutique

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

Proceeds benefit Grad Night/Senior Activities

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-1543 Saturday, Dec 7

Christmas Crafts Boutique

Saturday, Nov 2 Saturday, Nov 16

10 a.m. Arts & crafts, bake sale, raffle & Santa

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Holiday Boutique and Craft Fair

Handmade pieces at affordable prices

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Kenneth Aitken Senior & Community Center 17800 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley (510) 881-6778

Handcrafted items & bake sale

Holiday Fine Art, Pottery & Crafts Fair

Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont (510) 797-2121

Bridges of Faith 27343 Whitman St., Hayward (510) 886-7551 Saturday, Dec 7

Christmas Craft Fair

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. All items are handcrafted

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-4062 www.newarkpavilion.com

Tuesday, October 29 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, October 30 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, October 31 9:50 – 10:20 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 10:40–11:30 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., NEWARK 2:00 –3:15 Graham School, 36270 Cherry St, NEWARK Friday, November 1 9:45 - 11:15 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 11:45 –12:15 7 TH Step, 475 Medford Ave., HAYWARD (unincorporated) 2:00 –3:00 Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., SAN LORENZO

Monday, November 4 9:20-10:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 10:15-11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 1:45 – 2:45 Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., UNION CITY 3:05 – 3:25 Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., UNION CITY 4:15 – 4:45 Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., UNION CITY 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, November 5 10:00 -11:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, November 6 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, October 30 1:45-3:00 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 3:15-3:45 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas

SUBMITTED BY THE ROTARY CLUB OF F.U.N. SUNSET

BY MAURICIO SEGURA

T

hey say laughter is the best medicine, but on Friday, November 1st, it’s also going to be the basis for a solid educational experience for Mission San Jose’s drama department. Drama teacher Tanya Roundy has booked Los Angeles-based The Society Improv Comedy Troupe to do both a workshop for her students, as well as a sidesplitting performance for the entire community to enjoy. You may find yourself asking, “Exactly what is improv?” Short for improvisation, improv is the art of acting on cue and unscripted, where dialogue, mannerisms, and content are usually done in the moment. Improv theater actually dates back to Shakespearean England, but it caught on and thrived in the United States during the end of the vaudeville era of the 1930s. Through the years, improv-only theater companies formed around the U.S. at an amazing rate. Many Saturday Night Live alumni got their start with such theater companies: Phil Hartman, Jimmy Fallon, Jon Lovitz, Mike Myers, James Belushi, and Chris Farley just to name a few. Some of our funniest comedic stars of the big screen dove off the Improv platform, including John Candy, Steve Carell, Robin Williams, and Daryl Hannah. Today’s best example of improv theater can be viewed on the TV show “Whose Line Is it Anyway?” Drew Carey hosted the show from 19982007, and it has been revived this year with new host Aisha Tyler. During the show, audience members shout out scenarios, and actors have to do their best to take those cues and make the crowd laugh. Sometimes it makes for great theater experiences due its spontaneity and unexpected flow.

The Society Improv Comedy Troupe features a cast of 10 actors, some who have appeared in major motion pictures, television shows, and late-night talk shows. They occasionally tour throughout the country, and as is the case at Mission San Jose, also perform workshops to teach their craft to aspiring young actors. According to Roundy, her students will be learning “improvisation obviously, characterization, method acting, and the jobs of being in theater; how to use their voice and body language to better enhance their overall acting.” She would like her students to come out with a better understanding of acting and how to apply the skills learned in their own lives - on and off the stage - as well as career options beyond high school if they wish to take their talent to a professional level. That same evening, the Troupe will perform in room C120 at the Mission San Jose Campus at 7:30 p.m. The entire community is invited to enjoy an evening of hilarious improvisational comedy. Tickets are $15 general admission and can be purchased both online and at the door the night of the show. So invite your friends, family, and neighbors. Make it a group outing. As comic strip writer Mort Walker once put it, “Laughter is the brush that sweeps away the cobwebs of your heart.” Some of us need a good cleaning. Society Improv Comedy Troupe Friday, Nov 1 7:30 p.m. Mission San Jose High School Room C120 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont www.showtix4u.com www.jointhesociety.com Tickets: $15 general admission

Auditions for Spamalot SUBMITTED BY BELINDA MALONEY Stage 1 is holding auditions for its upcoming production of Monty Python’s Spamalot, a new musical “lovingly” ripped off from the motion picture, Monty Python and the Holy Grail under the direction of Troy Johnson. Auditions are scheduled for November 2nd and 3rd from 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. at Newark Memorial

High School, 39375 Cedar Boulevard in Newark. Prepare 16-32 bars of a song of your choice. Bring sheet music (pianist provided) and be prepared for a cold reading. Call backs are by invite only. Audition forms and additional information is available at: www.stage1theatre.org. Performances will be March 15-30, 2014; rehearsals begin January 6, 2014.

Join the Rotary Club of F.U.N. Sunset and the Hayward Area Historical Society for their joint Hallow Fest 2013 fundraiser, an event to support youth programs! Tickets are $50 per person (prepaid online by October 31) and include a silent auction, tapas, sangria, no-host wine and beer provided by Buffalo Bill’s. For more information or to register for the event, visit www.FUNRotary.com or call Anna May (510) 886-2662. Hallow Fest 6-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 The Historic Prospect Hill Neighborhood Downtown Hayward (Event address provided upon payment)

Traditional service for All Saint’s Day, All Soul’s Day SUBMITTED BY MARGARET ADAMS Cedar Lawn Memorial Park and Lima Family Milpitas Fremont Mortuary, COA 466**FD1262, is hosting its annual Service of Remembrance and Blessing of the Graves. The service will take place Friday, Nov. 1. The event is free and open to the public. Lima Family Cedar Lawn invites all to come together for a traditional ceremony of honoring and cherishing memories of our loved ones. Immediately following the service will be blessing of the graves, then an evening of refreshments, live band performing songs, and cultural dancing. The park will be open overnight. “The annual All Saints Day, All Souls Day observance is our way of honoring the Filipino traditions of so many of our families by hosting the all night visitation in the cemetery with music and refreshments.” said Margaret Hambrick, Manager of Cedar Lawn Memorial Park and Lima Family Milpitas Fremont Mortuary, honored Dignity Memorial® providers. For more information, visit www.LimaFamilyCedarLawn.com. Service of Remembrance Friday, Nov. 1 4 p.m. Lima Family Cedar Lawn 48800 Warm Spring Blvd., Fremont (408) 263-2868


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Obituaries

Marriage

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RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 10, 1940 – October 20, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 18, 1965 – October 19, 2013

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RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 10, 1930 – October 20, 2013

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RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 1, 1927 – October 27, 2013

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 20, 1939 – October 24, 2013

Arthur L. Hansen RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 29, 1927 – October 27, 2013

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont www.fremontmemorialchapel.com

continued from page 8

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

continued from page 8

Fremont Police Log

Union City Police Log

Walgreens (2600 Mowry Ave) security called at approximately 2:40 a.m. when they saw four suspicious subjects (3 men, 1 woman) possibly shoplifting. In the end, Ofc. Macciola wound up arresting a 34 year old adult male for drug paraphernalia and a 42 year old adult male for a felony CDC warrant, commercial burglary, drug paraphernalia and a parole hold. Monday, October 21 Officer Hamblin was dispatched to a reported armed robbery on Highway 680/Vargas Rd. The victim stated he was driving to work on Hwy 680 at approximately 5:30 a.m. when the driver in front of him began to slow down and eventually stopped. The reporting party rear ended the vehicle. When the reporting party (victim)got out and contacted the driver, he (suspect) brandished a gun and demanded his wallet. Wednesday, October 23 At approximately 5:25 a.m., officers responded to the Warm Springs Plaza after receiving 9-1-1 calls about a shooting victim outside Fremont Bank on Mission Blvd. Officers arrived and found that the victim was conscious but had been shot at least three times while seated in his car. A shooting scene was located a short distance away on Brown Road near Mission Blvd. We believe that the shooting resulted from a road rage confrontation between the victim and the driver of a white 2010 or newer vehicle with large polished chrome rims. The road rage incident began on southbound 680 somewhere in the area of Washington Blvd. and ended where it escalated into a shooting on Brown Rd. The victim was transported in serious condition to a local trauma center with non-life threatening injuries. The suspect fled the scene and the description is that he was a 25-35 year old adult male, Hispanic or Portuguese and had short dark hair that was possibly receding on the sides creating a widows peak. Detectives responded quickly and took over the investigation. We are asking for anyone who may have witnessed this incident to please contact the Fremont Police Department’s Investigative Unit at 510-790-6900.

Daggett Avenue. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male, between 30 and 40 years old, about 5 foot 9 inches tall, weighing about 200 pounds. The suspect was further described as being clean-shaven and missing his two canine teeth. The suspect’s vehicle was described as a white older model, flatbed, Ford F150, with plywood on the sides of the bed. Wednesday, October 16 At 2:30 p.m., an adult male exposed his penis to a 14 year-old female in the Union City Library. The suspect was seated in a chair on the second floor of the library when he exposed himself to the victim. The suspect was described as a black male, around 20 years old, 5 foot 6 inches tall, with a medium build. The suspect was wearing a white shirt and blue shorts with a white and red line down the side. The victim called her mother to report the incident. The victim’s mother then instructed her to call the police. The suspect ultimately fled the area prior to police arrival. Anyone with information on any of the above listed cases should contact the Investigations Division at 510-675-5247. Those wishing to remain anonymous can contact the tips line by calling 510-675-5207 or email Tips@union-city.org. Monday, October 21 At about 8:30 p.m., the Union City Police Department responded to a disturbance that resulted in an Officer Involved Shooting. The suspect, Timothy Lopez, 47, of Union City died after being shot by a Union City Police Officer. The Union City Police Department Investigations Unit and Alameda County District Attorney’s Office are conducting independent investigations of the shooting. Anyone with information related to this case is encouraged to call Detective James Martin at 510-6755275. If you wish to use the anonymous tip line, please call 510675-5207 or e-mail information to tips@unioncity.org.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Friday, October 18 Officer Geser investigated a stolen white company trailer CA license #4EH1422 from the 37300 block of Cedar Blvd. at 7:38 a.m. The truck has “Watermark Builders” logos on three sides. Officer Geser investigated a commercial burglary at 39660 Eureka Dr. (Phonak) occurred between 9:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. the previous night. The door was pried and the loss was two Leica microscopes valued at $10,000. Officer Fredstrom investigated an auto burglary at 1:23 p.m. that occurred overnight near the intersection of Port Sailwood and Cedar Blvd. The loss was a wallet, credit cards and a backpack. Officer Eriksen attempted to stop a motorcycle he recognized for exhibition of speed near the intersection of Mayhews Landing and Spruce St. at 1:54 p.m. The motorcycle accelerated to dangerous speeds and fled from Officer Eriksen. Officer Eriksen did not pursue but observed the motorcyclist nearly hit pedestrians during flight. Officer Eriksen believed the motorcycle was one he had previously observed on Pebble Beach. Officers responded to the residence where Officer Eriksen believed the owner of the motorcycle resided. While gathering intelligence on the residence and potential occupants, Andrew Danvers of 8146 Pebble Beach arrived at the residence. Officer Eriksen interviewed Danvers and after dissecting numerous lies, Danvers admitted to fleeing on the motorcycle. During a search of the residence, officers located the motor-

cycle jacket and messenger bag Danvers was wearing when he fled from Officer Eriksen. During a search of the bag, Officer Eriksen located an empty conceal carry belt holster and a loaded Kimber 1911 .45 caliber handgun. Danvers was ultimately arrested. The firearm was seized for evidence pending further investigation. Danvers was transported to Santa Rita Jail. Sunday, October 20 Officer Khairy was performing a security check on Olive Street at 10:12 a.m. and initiated a tow on a parked vehicle in front of a residence in the 36800 block of Olive Street. The suspect from the felony domestic violence incident which occurred yesterday came out of the residence to inquire about the tow. Officer Khariy ended up arresting Miguel Avila of Newark) for felony domestic violence. At 5:54 p.m., Officer Arroyo handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s store. Ana Perez-Cervantes of Fremont was issued a citation for petty theft. Monday, October 21 At 3:56 p.m.,Officer Neithercutt responded to a residence in the 37000 block of Magnolia St on a report of a theft. A male suspect (wearing an electronic company shirt) had contacted the victim and requested to see her electric bill. Victim let him and in and then left the room to get the bill. When victim returned, she discovered her laptop was stolen. Tuesday, October 22 At 4:30 p.m., Officer Jackman responded to Macy’s Department Store for a shoplifter in-custody. Gloria Napuri of Concord was arrested for petty theft. She was issued a citation and released from the scene. Day and Night shifts responded at 6:13 p.m. to a report of an assault with a baseball bat on Smith near Bunker School. No victims were located. The “bat” was later determined

to be a piece of PVC fencing. Witnesses later provided information regarding the possible identity of the involved people. At 7:33 p.m., Officer Coffey stopped bicyclist Ryan Isaacson of Newark at 7:33 p.m. and arrested him for Drunk in Public. Isaacson was mentioned as the possible victim of the above incident. He had marks consistent with the described incident, but no serious injury. He denied any involvement. He was booked at Fremont Jail for public drunkenness. Thursday, October 24 At 9:14 a.m., Officer Fredstrom investigated the theft of a gray women’s Schwinn 18 speed bicycle from the 7500 block of Birkdale Dr. Officer Katz investigated the passing of counterfeit money at Cargill Salt at 11:01 a.m. At 12:57 p.m., the shift responded to an interrupted residential burglary at a residence in the 36100 block of Crystal Springs Dr. A male subject about 5’9, close shaved hair wearing a red plaid shirt was observed inside the residence by the victim. Officers surrounded the residence within minutes and conducted a search but did not locate the subject. At 1:32 p.m., Officer Knutson investigated a theft from “FANS” store inside Newark Mall. Approximately $2000 of sports related merchandise was stolen by subjects. Officers responded to Wells Fargo bank at 2:58 p.m. for a forgery in progress. Elisenda Ovalle of Oakland was arrested by Officer Eriksen for check fraud. She was transported to Santa Rita Jail for booking. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Hayward Police Explorers: looking for a few good teens SUBMITTED BY EXPLORER POST #275 The Hayward Police Department’s Police Explorer Program provides teens and young adults an opportunity to learn about a career in law enforcement while developing confidence, leadership and life lessons. Applicants must fulfill age (14-19 years old), scholarship and character requirements.

Officer Donald Jenkins, the senior Explorer Advisor at Hayward PD was recently recognized with the “Advisor Honor Award” while attending the Explorer Academy with six new Hayward Police Explorers in San Diego. He was selected from among 41 other candidates. Officer Jenkins, has been with Hayward PD since 1996 and has served as an Explorer Advisor for the last 5 years. He is retired

from the US Army Reserve where he served for 22 years and served two tours in Iraq. Questions about the program or interest in becoming a member of Hayward Police Explorer Post #275 should be directed to: Officer D. Jenkins; Officer R. Bugarin; or K. Nobida at (510) 293-7272.


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Across 1 Little voice in your head (10) 6 Onion, for one (4) 9 Parent's parents (12) 10 Work (5) 11 Clear, as a disk (5) 12 Gillette product (5) 13 1998 film directed by Guy Ferland (9) 15 Excursion (4) 16 Slap target, sometimes (5) 17 8th Director of the National Economic Council (7) 18 audible exhalation of air arising from tiredness or emotion (4) 20 Kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species (14) 23 House of __________ (15) 24 Contemptible one (4)

25 Punish, in a way (4) 26 song by The Magnetic Fields from their 1999 album (11) 31 Aspect (4) 33 material with a definite chemical composition (9) 34 Mathematics name for zero (6) 35 a 2007 film drama directed by Adam Rifkin (4) 36 Says so (6) Down 1 Kind of court (4) 2 To incline or bend (6) 3 Traits (15) 4 Weather (8) 5 Pre-metamorphosis (12) 7 Stereotyping (9)

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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 30 – NOVEMBER 5, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: There is a series of seven clashes between Uranus and Pluto which began in 2012. The fourth exact square occurs this week on Nov. 1, just before the eclipse of Nov. 3. There will be two more in 2014 and one in 2015. Uranus represents the theme of economic and political justice. Pluto represents big money, worldly power, greed, and the forces of nature. The energies have manifested in the Arab Spring and countless other revolutionary changes in the world. The entire middle East is at Aries the Ram (March 21-April 20): A power beyond your control has your career nearly squashed. There is a bright spot and a direction to progress, even if it is only lateral (or less). Take it while you have the chance. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): There is a lot stirring among the people in your life at this time. Your job is to provide support. Others may see things at their worst, but soon Mercury will go direct and the story will improve. Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): Your health is of utmost importance at this time. Double check any physical tests or diagnoses that come your way because they are likely to be based on minimum or inaccurate information. Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): There is high focus in the area of children, lovers, romance,

war or on shaky ground. The wrath of nature is becoming increasingly destructive. This is not Armageddon, in my opinion, but these aspects represent the battles of powerful archetypal energies. The series describes the global reorganization of politics, power, and the economy. Before the end of this decade, all of us will be affected in ways we probably would rather not imagine. This week there are so many harsh aspects in the solar system that it is a challenge to predict the outcome. Toss in a Mercury

and play for you this week. Even so, remember that Mercury is retrograde and decisions or promises can turn on a dime. Don’t make them. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You have high energy in the territory of home, property, and family at this time. Repairs may be critical, whether emotional or physical. A decision may be required between “bad” and “less bad.” Time is of the essence. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): Activities requiring strength and/or endurance are favored. A transformation is at hand if you will reach for it. Help from those more powerful than yourself is available if you need it. Avoid big decisions or contracts for the present. Libra the Scales (Sep 23-Oct. 22): Partner(s), clients, and other important people in your life are changeable and erratic. This

probably affects your income this fall. Try to keep your expenses steady, even as income flows up and down. Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): You have more freedom of motion than you realize. Be careful of what you say and to whom, lest you anger the wrong people. Arrogance is not allowable now. Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): Whatever gossip crosses your path this week is likely untrue. Ignore it. Your old history may come back to haunt you in some way, but the disturbance will be short. Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): You feel pressured by multiple issues concerning home, property, and family life. The body is the ultimate “home” for each of us. Aspects mandate that you care for it as you might a prized jewel.

retrograde and we have a recipe for high tension along with errors in judgment. I am writing this on Sep. 9, with the threat of a Syrian war in the world’s future. According to the horoscope of the US, between 2000 and 2005 we lost significant power and absolutely should not initiate an attack on anybody in the centuries to come, lest the cost be far beyond anything we can imagine.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): There is a subdued and heavy quality in your mind concerning career or life direction. Within a couple of weeks you will be free to change the daily grind and that will be a relief.

ship. People you have met, who live at a distance, will seek your services.

Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): You have favorable and healing aspects coming through travel, the law, the Internet, and/or your place of wor-

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Security or Safety?

WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

t times, international and national debates have a way of filtering to the local level for political action – or maybe it’s the other way around. Questions about the right to privacy and security are always difficult since one of the founding principles of this nation is based on personal rights and protection of those rights. At the October 15, 2013 meeting of the Fremont City Council, an agenda item, “Reallocation of Federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Funds for FY 2013/14” - $269,375 - was discussed. It was proposed that a portion of these monies be used to finance a surveillance system in low and moderate income neighborhoods. The rationale for installation of surveillance cameras on publicly-owned street lights and buildings is that such devices deter and help solve crimes; a test camera is already in use. Fremont Police Department requested funds for 10-20 cameras “to prevent crime and ensure resident safety.” However, no matter whether in agreement with the use of cameras or not, the reason a portion of these particular funds, shifted from use by Allied Housing, should be used for surveillance was unclear. It appeared that this “found money” was simply a convenient source of cash rather than an appropriate allocation.

Although the council wisely questioned the use of CDBG funds for this purpose and tabled the matter for further review, discussion also considered the central issue of citizen privacy and “expectation of privacy.” Such cameras, extensively used in England, indiscriminately record both innocent and criminal actions. On public property, is this an invasion of privacy? Do citizens expect surveillance as they drive on City streets, picnic in Central Park or walk along public thoroughfares? It appears we are already in a world filled with not only public law enforcement scrutiny, but citizen oversight as well. Currently, dashboard cameras are in common use by police and private citizens; cameras in all sorts of electronic devices are commonplace as well. Some neighborhoods have coordinated private observation and recording devices to protect their homes. Are all cameras restricted to scrutiny of their own property? Where does surveillance stop or should it? An international debate currently rages over surveillance of phones and other electronic conversations; sparking outrage by strategic allies and citizens throughout the world. Have we become a world filled with acceptable electronic eavesdropping and surveillance? Councilmembers expressed more concern with the source of funding rather than its purpose. The common thread throughout the conversation was conciliatory toward use of cameras in the public domain. Photographing events and determining an independent view of them is often considered a neutral arbiter of actions (Rodney King, etc.?). However, the use of such devices has also brought to light the fickle nature of captured images; angles, perspective, electronic manipulation, prior and after images as well as

the intent of the photographer are important reality factors. Similar to the flood of Reality TV, what you see may not be as transparent as you think. As with all tools, especially when determining guilt or innocence, it is essential to understand that surveillance tactics are valuable, but possibly flawed as well. Those who demand safeguards and caution serve as guardians of public trust in personal protection both through individual and private initiative and public policing entities. The surveillance genie is out of the bottle and will not return to it. It is up to our collective conscience to consider whether use of these devices is acceptable and under what circumstances. Although use will probably not be contained in the private sector, public response and debate is a critical component of our future. Something within me rebels against observation of my every move when in public. However, capture of criminal activity and perpetrators is also high on my list of concerns. Where is the balance? We live in a large metropolitan area where the adherence to an acceptable code of honor is problematic; where is the line between a safe, fair and respectful society and anarchy?

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes M.J. Laird Gustavo Lomas Isabella Ohlmeyer Medha Raman Mauricio Segura Steve Taylor INTERN Nicole Ellis Britney Sanchez

William Marshak PUBLISHER

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

Hawaii surfer throws punches to escape shark AP WIRE SERVICE LIHUE, Hawaii (AP),A 25-year-old Hawaii surfer and former boxer went toe-to-fin with a shark off Kauai and survived. Jeff Horton was surfing Sunday morning with about 10 others near Kilauea when someone spotted a fin in the water, The Garden Island ((http://bit.ly/16t74Gl) reported. Twenty minutes later, Horton was sitting on his surfboard with his legs dangling in the water when he spotted a dark shape approaching from the left. He thought it was a stingray – dark on top, white on the bottom. “It came flying straight toward me,’’ he said.

He pulled his left leg out of the water and the shark got a mouth full of surfboard. The impact knocked Horton off the board. He rolled onto the shark and grabbed a fin. On top of the shark, holding on with one hand, he began punching as hard as he could with his other fist. He estimated he landed eight blows. “I finally got one nice punch into the eye,’’ Horton said. “I put some really good hits on it, for sure.’’ When his knuckled jammed into the shark’s eye, the shark spit out the board and retreated. Horton scrambled onto his board. With another surfer, he caught a wave and paddled toward shore.

The shark briefly followed but did not attack again, he said. After they reached shore, a tourist gave him $50 and told him to buy a bottle. Horton’s only injuries were scratches from the shark’s rough skin. The 7-foot board, however, was left with a semicircle imprint of the shark’s jaws. It will not go back in the water. “I’m going to put it up on my wall,’’ Horton said. He surfed again Monday at another beach. Information from: The Garden Island, http://thegardenisland.com/

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Ste. B Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

October 29, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth?

Become a hospice patient CARE VOLUNTEER!

H&H Museum and Appraisal Services Certified Museum Specialist Jewelry-Art-Antiques Collections*Estates Auction House Liason

Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Life Changes & Organization Management Over 30 Years Experience

All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: norm2@earthlink.net

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Retail Space for Lease Union City 1,068sf - 2,300sf Available Large shopping center, centrally located in Union City, across the street from BART station and Marina Supermarket, high school nearby. Current tenants include Safeway, Rite Aid, Starbucks, Citibank, Chase Bank. Suitable for Restaurant, Health Care, and other Retail Business. Call: 650-938-1888 x 103

PART TIME Newsaper Delivery Person

WANTED Contact Tri-City Voice 510-494-1999 Financial Accountant in Santa Clara, CA, prepare/analyze financial reports & statements, manage AP/AR accts, reconcile bank accts, etc. Fax resume 866-554-1553 HR, IMPEC Group, Inc.

BART Police Log SUBMITTED BY BART PD Fremont Station: Monday, October 14 A patron locked and left their bike at the racks at 9:00 a.m. The patron returned later the same day around 8:00 p.m. and discovered that their bike had been stolen. The bike was secured with a cable lock. The bike is described as a Raleigh Revenge 4.0, value unknown. Tuesday, October 15 A victim reported that she parked and locked her car in Lot E at 6:30 a.m.. When she returned at 3:25 p.m., she noticed that the driver’s door lock had been removed and the steering column had been damaged in an apparent attempt to start the vehicle. Nothing else inside the vehicle appeared to have been disturbed or was missing. The vehicle was processed for evidence by the investigating officer. Wednesday, October 16 A patron locked (with a cable lock) and left their bike at the north-west racks at 0800 hours. The patron returned at 6 p.m. and discovered that their bike had been stolen. The bike is described as a Thruster brand hybrid bike, black with blue tires. The bike is valued at $160.00. A victim reported that someone took his bike after he left it to enter the station and get change. The unsecured bike was described as a black and yellow Hardrock 24speed. The victim described a possible suspect (HM, long, black hair, beard, red jacket, black pants), but did not see him take the bike.

Retail Space 38521Fremont Blvd., Fremont Good office fo Insurance Agent After School Programs 1250 sq ft $2,195/month with year lease Contact Jenny 510-378-2583

Upcoming Free Emergency Response Team program SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD FD The Hayward Fire Department is providing a free CERT Training Program which will consist of four evening indoor classes and one outdoor “hands on” skills class. Participants learn skills that will enable them to provide emergency assistance to their families and immediate neighbors as well as organize a neighborhood team response. Training will begin in the month of November 2013 at City Hall. The dates and times are as follows: * Class #1, Monday, November 18, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall * Class #2, Monday, November 25, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall * Class #3, Monday, December 2, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall * Class #4, Thursday, December 12, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall * Skills #5, Thursday, December 19, 6-9:30pm (Fire Station #6 W. Winton) You must attend all classes in order to receive certification. CERT training is for all City of Hayward and Fairview residents. Residential verification will be required during the final application process. You must be 18 years or older to sign up and a resident of the City of Hayward or the Fairview area. Residents who are interested in this free training can sign-up via the city’s Disaster Preparedness website: http://www.hayward-ca.gov/CITY-GOVERNMENT/DEPARTMENTS/FIRE/DISASTER- PREPAREDNESS/ENGLISH/index.shtm If without internet access or more information is needed, contact the Public Education Officer at (510) 583-4948.


October 29, 2013

Are you a writer?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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Soccer

CSUEB Soccer Update SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM Women’s Soccer Earns Shutout Win CSUEB 2, Cal State Humboldt State 0 Kelley Brown and Alyssa Rodriguez scored first half goals to give Cal State East Bay a 2-0 victory on Sunday, October 27 at Pioneer Stadium. Both goals came within a five-minute stretch and the defense was stout in posting the team’s third shutout of the season. Brown collected a deflected pass near the Hubmoldt State (310-3, 1-10-3 CCAA) penalty kick area and scored with a blast past Lumberjacks goalkeeper Kelly Lukas. Brown’s goal was her first this season, along with the first game-winner and second overall of her Pioneer career. Cal State East Bay (4-10-2, 48-2 CCAA) controlled the pace throughout the game and continued to put pressure on the HSU back line. East Bay’s Sialei Man-

October 29, 2013

uleleau forced a diving save from Lukas, and Rodriguez was there to put away the rebound just five minutes after taking the lead. It is her second goal in as many games after providing the equalizer in Friday’s contest against No. 7 ranked Cal State Stanislaus. The Pioneers shut out the Jacks in both 2013 matchups. East Bay goalkeeper Donna Williams made two second half saves to earn her third solo shutout of the season. Humboldt State’s Lukas made five saves in the loss. Martin Scores Twice to Take Out Jacks Two first half goals from junior Javier Martin lifted the Cal State East Bay men’s soccer team to a 2-1 league win over Humboldt State October 28 at Pioneer Stadium. Martin now leads the team with four goals on the year and has scored in three of the team’s past five contests. “The guys showed they have the focus and commitment to win late in the season,” said East Bay Head Coach Andy Cumbo. “We were able to counter a couple of times and ‘Javi’ (Martinez) finished with some nice goals.” Humboldt State was the early

aggressor firing off four shots before East Bay took the first of its own. Martin ended two droughts at once with his first attempt in the 18th minute. Martin put four shots in-arow on target and his first found the back of the net. Less than six minutes later he found space inside the 18-yard box and fired off three shots against the Humboldt State (6-9-1, 4-9-1 CCAA) defense. Jacks goalkeeper Ryan Ades stopped the first two at point blank range before Martin dribbled around the sprawling keeper to score on the uncontested net. From that point on HSU went on the attack and outshot CSUEB 10-4 in the second period. Early in the second half Austin Swartz cut the deficit in half after settling a loose ball off a failed clearance and firing it into the Pioneer goal. Cal Lutheran goalkeeper Bryce Bookhamer made four saves, and a crucial stop by a Pioneer defender at the goal line on a free kick attempt from about 10 yards out were key factors in Sunday’s result. “We had a few uneasy moments in the second half,” said Cumbo. “The guys absorbed the pressure well and we hung on for the win.”

CSUEB Soccer Report Soccer

Both goalkeepers Bryce Bookhamer of Cal State East Bay and Evan Drake of Cal State Monterey Bay made three saves.

SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM October 20: Overtime unkind to Pioneers men Cal State Monterey Bay 2, CSUEB 1 OT

Pioneer women hold on to Bay Area Invitational title Women’s Swimming SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM The Cal State East Bay Pioneer women’s swim team repeated as champions at the Bay Area Invitational on Saturday, October 19 at the Trefethen Aquatic Center. The Pioneers swept the meet, winning all 14 events. Cal State East Bay outlasted a field of four teams by scoring 711 points. UC Santa Cruz finished as runner-up with 514. College of Idaho - 497 and Mills - 292 rounded out the field.

Warriors defeat Cougars in Cross Country meet Cross Country SUBMITTED BY JOHN HOTCHKISS The Mission San Jose Warriors Cross Country team won all five races against Newark Memorial’s Cougars October 23rd on the Mission San Jose course. Mission’s strength during the last mile of each race was a key factor. Mission remains unbeaten in all dual meets held so far this season. Scores (low score wins) were: Varsity Boys MSJ 20; NM 41 Varsity Girls MSJ 15; NM 45 JV Boys MSJ 21; NM 39 JV Girls MSJ 15; NM 50 Frosh/Soph Boys MSJ 23; NM 36 Individual race winners were: Varsity Boys 3 miles: Jordan Kirby, NM, 16:00 Varsity Girls 3 miles: Lindy Zeng, MSJ, 18:41 JV Boys 2 miles: Jimmy Qian, MSJ, 11:34 JV Girls 2 miles: Ingrid Lin, MSJ, 13:26 Frosh/Soph Boys 2 miles: Sunny Pasumarthi, MSJ, 11:54

Javier Martin put Cal State East Bay ahead early on during its California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) road tilt with Cal State Monterey Bay. The Otters had the quick response and eventually avenged an earlier loss to the Pioneers after Servando Perez scored the golden goal 68 seconds into overtime. “This loss was a heartbreaker. We put in a strong performance today but unfortunately we didn’t find a way to get a win,” said East Bay Head Coach Andy Cumbo. “We played well and had our moments to win, but we just did not pull it out today.” Martin scored his second goal in three games in the 11th minute to open the scoring. He received the pass from teammate Chris Franco who contributed a point for the second straight game, following his first goal of the season on Friday against San Francisco State. Perez had a part in the equalizer providing the assist to teammate Juan Montellano less than three minutes later. Perez would eventually end things himself in first overtime period scoring his team-leading sixth goal of the season for the game-winner.

ponents over its final four games. October 25: Men Pioneers shut out by Warriors Cal State Stanislaus 2, CSUEB 0

Women Pioneers suffer déjà vu against Otters Cal State Monterey Bay 1, CSUEB 0 Cal State East Bay women’s soccer concluded its four-match road trip on Sunday suffering a 1-0 loss to Cal State Monterey Bay. The Otters defeated the Pioneers by the same score for the second time this season following Kristen Womack’s goal near the hour mark at CSUMB Soccer Complex. Womack scored from inside the 6-yard box after recovering the rebound off her own cross. She and the team’s season leading scorer Jami Murray have each scored the only goal in 1-0 wins over East Bay this season. Pioneers goalkeeper Briana Scholtens earned her first California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) start of the season. She made one first half save, and counterpart Lily Garza recorded two stops for the solo shutout. In both games between these two squads the Otters outshot the Pioneers 9-6 overall. Both teams had three attempts on goal in the first game and a pair each in Sunday’s meeting. Junior Suzanne Bateson and freshman Megan Ravenscroft placed a shot apiece on target. Cal State East Bay (3-9-2, 37-2 CCAA) was mathematically eliminated from the CCAA postseason tournament following Sunday’s result. CSUEB will face three nationally ranked op-

Cal State East Bay suffered a 2-0 defeat to Cal State Stanislaus at home on Friday night in California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) action. The Warriors scored a pair of second half goals, both coming courtesy of assists from Danny Ochoa. Manny Villegas scored the game-winner in the 65th minute. Kyle Cadigan scored on a header off a corner kick in the 82nd minute. Cal State East Bay outshot Cal State Stanislaus (7-7-1, 6-70 CCAA) 14-7 overall and enjoyed a 7-2 advantage in corner kicks.

Women Pioneers hang tough with No. 7 Warriors Cal State Stanislaus 2, CSUEB 1 Cal State East Bay’s Alyssa Rodriguez scored the equalizer in the second half to draw even with nationally ranked No. 7 Cal State Stanislaus. The California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) leading scorer Karenee Demery scored her 17th and 18th goals of the season for the Warriors. The second came in the 77th minute for the game-winning score.

Women’s Volleyball

Ohlone Volleyball Report SUBMITTED BY JEREMY PENAFLOR Ohlone College vs. Foothill College October 23 Foothill defeats @ Ohlone, 3-1 (23-25, 25-18, 25-20, 25-15) Ohlone College vs. West Valley October 25 West Valley defeats @ Ohlone, 3-1 (17-25, 25-13, 25-17, 25-22)


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Gift donation sites needed for annual holiday drive SUBMITTED BY BARBARA LEWIS Family Giving Tree’s 24th annual Holiday Wish Drive to support low-income, Bay Area children is under way. This year’s goal is to serve 67,000 children, an increase of 3,000 over last year. The nonprofit urges businesses of all sizes and community groups to help them reach that goal by providing 1,050 locations needed for the distribution of wish cards and collections of donated gifts. “Stanford University recently published a study reporting that 18.7% of Santa Clara County and 18.4% of San Mateo residents (one in every five children) are living below the poverty line,” says Family Giving Tree Executive Director Jennifer Cullenbine. “I believe we can reach out and touch many more of them with the help of organizations and individuals who will host locations for gift donation collection. Large corporations, small businesses, churchs, and scout groups, can help provide gifts and happy holiday memories to low-income Bay Area children.” This is how it works: Children who have been registered with recipient social services agencies are asked to name their specific gift

wishes. The children’s wishes are printed on cards and distributed to Holiday Wish Drive leaders for employees and customers to fulfill and return. The gifts are then collected, sorted, and wrapped by more than 7,000 volunteers at Family Giving Tree’s warehouse. The gifts are picked up by the participating agencies and presented to the individual children or to their parents to wrap and give to their families. “It is very powerful to give parents the opportunity to give their kids a gift during the holidays, many for the first time ever. They often tear up when we give them Holiday Wish Drive gifts to wrap for their children,” says Jacob Lile, director of Housing Services at InnVision Shelter Network. Deepa Mehta, Childcare & After School Programs coordinator at Glide Foundation–Family, Youth & Childcare Center, agrees. “Nothing compares to seeing the look on the kids’ and parents’ faces: pure joy and happiness. The idea that people in the community really care about them as individuals, means so much to them.” To register, potential hosts should visit www.familygivingtree.org or contact Dawn at (408) 946-3111, extension 226.

A brand new robotics ETF has been launched by Exchange Traded Concepts. It is something I’ve dreamed of and worked towards for six years. The Robo-Stox(TM) Global Robotics & Automation Index is the first benchmark index to provide a comprehensive and focused measure of the value of robotics, automation and related technologies. It empowers investors to capitalize on the continuing worldwide growth in robotics. The new fund is available to trade on NASDAQ, ticker ROBO. Press Release October 22, 2013 ROBO-STOX LLC, the world leader in developing investment solutions targeting the robotics and automation space, has launched the ROBOSTOX™ Global Robotics and Automation Index (Bloomberg: ROBO/ROBOTR), the first benchmark index dedicated to this burgeoning industry. “The growing affordability of robotic productivity gains, coupled with expanding technological capabilities, have moved this sector beyond the ‘tipping point,’ and the adoption of related technologies across multiple industries should continue to accelerate,” said Rob Wilson, Chief Executive Officer of ROBO-STOX. “By introducing the first comprehensive and focused measure of the value of robotics, automation and related technologies, we are giving investors the world’s first benchmark by which to track the growing field of robotics.” The Index consists of 77 domestic and foreign robotics and automation companies that meet listing criteria for the S&P DJI Global Broad Market Index. Since pure-play robotics companies are extremely rare, ROBO-STOX evaluates companies across industries, objectives, geographic locations

Everything-Robotic The Robot Report © 2013 - The Robot Report Santa Barbara, CA 93105 http://www.therobotreport.com/

and market capitalizations to find innovative firms that can fuel productivity and economic growth for years to come. The composite includes a mixture of “bellwether” stocks (securities of companies that the ROBO-STOX Index Committee believes reflect the performance of robotics and automation firms as a whole) and “non-bellwether” stocks (securities of robotics- and automation-related companies the Index Committee believes will generate higher revenue as their products and services grow). The Index is rebalanced on a quarterly basis, and is usually weighted 40 percent toward bellwether stocks and 60 percent toward non-bellwether stocks. Companies can be deleted from the Index at any time at ROBO-STOX’s discretion. “The combination of investment experience and in-depth robotics expertise makes ROBO-STOX uniquely equipped to give investors the truly actionable knowledge they need to fully capitalize on this sector,” said Frank Tobe, Co-Founder of ROBOSTOX and Editor of The Robot Report, a robotics news portal tracking the worldwide business of robotics. “The ROBO-STOX Global Robotics and Automation Index provides investors with a cost-efficient and globally diversified investment vehicle that can take advantage of this emerging field as its importance to the worldwide economy continues to increase.” To learn more, visit www.robostox.com. Frank Tobe

Fremont team wins four straight tournaments Women’s Basketball SUBMITTED BY RICH ADAMS Bay Area Rush, a Fremont based girls 13U AAU team, is off to a red hot start in the AAU fall season. The Rush has won the NP Force “Fall Finale,” Bay Cities “City Life,” Cal Stars “Fall Classic” and Bulldawgs “Scared Straight” tournaments over the past four consecutive weekends. Meghna Nair and Mariah Dunlap have averaged “double-doubles” each game to lead the Rush. Sofia Zamora, Amanda Moral, Alexis Early, Jenna Adams, Sara Tang, Nelia Lechuga, Rylee Sarasua, Naomi Seguara, AJ Monteben, Erin Robeck, Nicole Gramlich, and Sabrina Rodriguez have also contributed to the team’s success. Rush will now head to Anaheim and play in the Nike Swoosh Tournament November 2-3, 2013.

Rebels overcome Dons in ‘must win’ Football SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKEHEIGHTCHEW In a must win game for both teams, the San Lorenzo Rebels beat the Arroyo Dons 46-20. The Rebels offense went into high gear right at the start of the game as Quarterback Kevin Mosi got good protection from his offensive line and was able to look deep downfield to find open receivers in the end zone. Rebel Troy Goodwin added to the Arroyo problems as he picked holes in the Don defense, running almost at will. As the offensive onslaught continued, the Rebels opened a 20-point lead. The Dons battled but the Rebel defensive backfield held steady and Free Safety Ramiah Marshall made a big play in the end zone to deny a Don touchdown. Two major plays for the Dons were called back on penalties; the difference between a close contest and the final 26-point spread.

Irvington victorious at Moreau Catholic homecoming Football SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Irvington’s Vikings beat the Moreau Catholic Mariners 30-14 in their homecoming game on October 25th. As the game began, the Mariner defensive line looked like they were ready to give the Vikings a long, painful night as they showed a tough defensive line, great blocking and relentless pursuit. The Vikings were held scoreless in the first quarter. However, as the second quarter got underway, speed and size differences began to show as the Viking offense found weaknesses and capitalized with power and trap blocking. It was only a matter

of time until Irvington’s Jared Lozoya broke loose on a 50-yard run, followed by a one yard burst for the first score of the game. The Mariners would not fold on homecoming night as they fought back; Quarterback Lucas O’Rourke delivered a great pass to Richard Hampton to stay in the fight as the scoreboard registered a close 8-7 contest. Viking Quarterback Jack Shank went to work as found a hole in the Mariner line and scampered for 80 yards to the end zone. His success continued in the third quarter when, on the first play, he marched the Vikings 31 yards into the end zone to open a 24-7 lead. Although the Mariners fought hard to regain momentum, their receivers were unable to hang on to critical passes and the game slipped away.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC SEC. 6105) ESCROW NO. 1312290PM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the seller(s) is/are: CBK INC, 3539 SHADOW CREEK DR, DANVILLE, CA 94506-1245 Doing business as: ALVARADO CHEVRON & ALVARADO AUTO CARE All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s), is/are: The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) is/are: HARJAS PETROLEUM INC, 32647 ALMADEN BLVD, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The assets being sold are generally described as: FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY AND ALL BUSINESS ASSETS and is located at: 31889 ALVARADO BLVD, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: BAY AREA ESCROW SERVICES and the anticipated sale date is NOVEMBER 15, 2013 The bulk sale IS subject to California Uniform Commercial Code(s) sections set forth above. The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: BAY AREA ESCROW SERVICES, 2817 CROW CANYON RD, STE 102, SAN RAMON, CA 94583 and the last date for filing claims by any creditor shall be NOVEMBER 14, 2013 on, which is the business day before the sale date specified above. Dated: 10-9-13 HARJAS PETROLEUM INC, Buyer(s) LA1351022 TRI-CITY VOICE 10/29/13 CNS-2549820# NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S) (U.C.C. 6105 et seq. and B & P 24073 et seq.) Escrow No. 23511 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is about to be made. The name(s) and business address of the Seller(s)/Licensee(s) are: Gulshan Kumar Kataria and Saroj B. Kataria, 35111 Newark Blvd., Unit C, Newark, CA 94560 Doing Business as: 5 Star Liquor All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the Seller(s)/licensee(s) within the past three years, as stated by the Seller(s)/licensee(s), is/are: None The name(s) and address of the Buyer(s)/ applicant(s) is/are: Lahewala LLC, 36414 Blackwood Drive, Newark, CA 94560 The assets being sold are generally described as: Liquor License, Fixtures and Equipment, Leasehold Improvements and is/are located at 5 Star Liquor, 35111 Newark Blvd., Unit C, Newark, CA 94560 The type of license to be transferred is/are: 21 - OFF SALE GENERAL - Liquor Store, License No: 466534 now issued for the premises located at: Same The bulk sale and transfer of the alcoholic beverage license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at the office of: Redwood Escrow Services, Inc., 19131 Redwood Road, Suite E & F, Castro Valley, CA 94546 and the anticipated sale date is December 20, 2013 The purchase price or consideration in connection with the sale of the business and transfer of the license, is the sum of $150,000.00, including inventory estimated at $0.00, which consists of the following: Inventory not included in the sales price It has been agreed between the Seller(s)/ Licensee(s) and the intended Buyer(s)/ Transferee(s), as required by Sec. 24073 of the Business and Professions Code, that the consideration for transfer of the business and license is to be paid only after the transfer has been approved by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Dated: 10/17/13 /s/ Gulshan Kumar Kataria /s/ Saroj B. Kataria (Signature of Seller(s)/Licensee(s)) Lahewala LLC /s/ Dinyar Lahewala, Member /s/ Zubin Lahewala, Member /s/ Zarin Lahewala, Member (Signature of Buyer(s)/Applicant(s)) 10/29/13 CNS-2549199#

CIVIL

SUMMONS (Family Law) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO): HF13687157 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name) AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): SAI ON NG You are being sued. Lo están demandando. Petitioner’s name is Nombre del demandante: SUE FEN DEBBY WU You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelp california.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawh elpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. 1. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son):SUPERIOR COURT of Alameda, Fremont 39439 Paseo Padre PKWY, Fremont, CA 94538 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): SUE FEN DEBBY WU, 7325 Parkwood Circle #B, Dublin, CA 94568. Tel: 408-209-8336 Date (Fecha): Jul 5, 2013 LEAH T. WILSON, Exetutive Officer/Clerk, by (Secretario, por) GRACIELA PACHECO, Deputy (Asistente) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE RECIBIÓ LA ENTREGA: Esta entrega se realiza as an individual. (a usted como individuo.) 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2550687#

SUMMONS (Family Law) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO): HF13697046 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name) AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): Naveen Kumar You are being sued. Lo están demandando. Petitioner’s name is Nombre del demandante: Premila D. Prasadi You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelp california.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawh elpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. 1. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son): Superior Court of California, 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Petitioner In Pro Per, Premila D. Prasadi, 3538 Altamira Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. 510-673-7498 Date (Fecha): Sep. 26, 2013 LEAH T. WILSON, Executive Officer/Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Illegible, Deputy (Asistente) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE RECIBIÓ LA ENTREGA: Esta entrega se realiza as an individual. (a usted como individuo.) 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2550682# SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): CV176923 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): JOSHUA BENTON HERSH, an individual, DAVID STEPHEN COY, an individual, DOES 1-10, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MARK REALMONTE NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) , the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (w ww.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT, SANTA CRUZ, 701 Ocean Street, Santa Cruz, California 95060 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): JOHN A. COLISTRA, ESQ., 1565 The Alameda, San Jose, CA 95126. 408-293-4747 DATE (Fecha): May 15, 2013 ALEX CALVO, Clerk (Secretario), by EILEEN R. GOODWIN, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2548109# SUMMONS (Family Law) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO): AF13690893 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name) AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): MARIO VALES You are being sued. Lo están demandando. Petitioner’s name is Nombre del demandante: MARIA IBARRA You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response

(form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelp california.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawh elpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. 1. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son): Superior Court of California, County of Alameda, 2233 Shoreline Drive, Alameda, CA 94501 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Cary Schneider, Esq., SB# 288949, 400 Montgomery St., Suite 505, San Francisco, CA 94104, (415) 781-6500 Date (Fecha): August 7, 2013 Johnine Polk-Snell, Deputy (Asistente) (SEAL) 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546934# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13696629 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Prasant Vadlamudi Venkat Yesu, Rachana Rajendra Wankhade for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Prasant Vadlamudi Venkat Yesu, Rachana Rajendra Wankhade filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Rian Vadlamudi Kumar to Rian Kumar Vadlamudi The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12-6-13, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Sep. 24, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544060# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. RG13697220 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sonny Lam Nguyen for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sonny Lam Nguyen filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sonny Lam Nguyen to Son Lam Duc Nguyen The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: December 13, 2013, Time: 9:30 a.m., Dept.: 31 The address of the court is US Post Office Bldg., 201 - 13th St., (2nd Fl.) Oakland, CA 94612 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: September 27, 2013 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2542692#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483376 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: OFS Food & Services, 3281 Seldon Ct., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. HGL Kitchen Inc., CA, 3281 Seldon Ct., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) HGL Kitchen Inc /s/ Guo Piao Xiao, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2550640# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483936 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Akoncierge, 32413 Westport Ct., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda

Sisters 4 LLC, CA, 32413 Westport Ct., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yvonne Bonilla, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 18, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2549883# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483867 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wah Kee Auto Repair, 37557 Dusterberry Way Unit 8, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Wah Chu, 35573 Cabral Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/1/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wah B. Chu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 17, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2549844# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483978 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Everlasting Moving Company, 38350 Fremont Blvd., Ste. 202C, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda YongLi Weng, 40873 Sundale Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 Wei Li, 40873 Sundale Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a General partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ YongLi Weng Wei Li This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2549842# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 456388 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Bay Area International Education Center, 1372 Ocaso Camino, Fremont, CA 94539 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on 9/21/2011 in the County of Alameda. Yajuan Chen, 1372 Ocaso Camino, Fremont, CA 94539 S/ Yajuan Chen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 14, 2013. 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2549392# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483892 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Valley Green Medical, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Matthew Bidner, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Matthew Bidner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 17, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2548820# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 456648 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Hydrolypozene, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on 9/28/11 in the County of Alameda. Matthew Bidner, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 This business was conducted by: individual S/ Matthew Bidner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 17, 2013. 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19/13 CNS-2548818# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483684 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: FD Gas, 36974 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. 10106 Linda Ann Pl., Cupertino, CA 95014. Hong Hai Wang, 10106 Linda Ann Place, Cupertino, CA 95014. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hong Hai Wang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration.

The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2547185# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483597 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Splat-Tek, 1010 D St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Jacques Lefrancois, 1010 D St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1-1-94. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jacques Lefrancois, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 9, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546784# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483651 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Relaxing Massage, 2086 Newpark Mall Sp #018, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda 2522 Barclay Ave., Union City, Alameda, CA 94587 Wen Wei Gu, 2522 Barclay Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/5/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wen Wei Gu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 10, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546385# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483560 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The ESA Company, 40824 Townsend Ter, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Sijie Wong, 40824 Townsend Ter, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sijie Wong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 8, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546343# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483592 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: E Beauty Hair & Nail Spa, 40900 Fremont Blvd., #C1, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda, 202 Chama Way, Fremont, CA 94539 Shao Hong Huang, 202 Chama Way, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shao Hong Huang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 08, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2545776# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483588 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ProActive Physical Therapy and Fitness, 39420 Liberty St., Suite 173, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Genaro A. Jimenez, 4269 Marie Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Genaro Jimenez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 8, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2545609# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483362 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dynamic Solutions Realty, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Amanda Renae Chun, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07/01/08 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amanda Renae Chun


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Newark City Council October 24, 2013 Presentations and Proclamations: Commend Newark Days Committee Proclaim October 24, 2013 as Rotary International World Polio Day Consent: Cancel meeting scheduled for November 28, 2013. Accept Office of Traffic Safety “Avoid the 21” DUI enforcement grant. Removed from Consent: Introduce ordinance and set hearing date to amend Newark Municipal Code regarding buildings and construction. Public comment asked about references to flood hazard areas.

Approve contract modification increasing cost by $33,456 and $5,000 contingency with Planning Center/DC&E for General Plan Tune-up. Public comment referenced flood hazards. Public hearing scheduled for November 29, 2013 at Planning Commission and return to City Council on November 14, 2013. Mayor Alan Nagy Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Luis Freitas Maria “Sucy” Collazo Robert Marshall

Union City City Council Meeting Proclamations and Presentations: Proclamation recognizing October 2013 as Filipino American History Month. Proclamation supporting Rotary International and recognizing October 24, 2013 as “End Polio Now Day.” Presentation by Jagmeet Bhardway of the East Bay Alliance for Children: Learn More about Covered California. Consent Calendar: Appoint Carmen Pineda Doromat to the Public Art Board. Accept work for Union City Boulevard Corridor Improvements. Accept work for Union City 2013-14 citywide overlay. Removed from Consent: Authorize improvement fee agreement with Southern Wine and Spirits. Public Hearings Continue public hearing for Trumark Homes’ general plan amendment application to November 12, 2013. Continued public hearing for site development to rebuild a portion of a fire-damaged shopping center. Property owner Leung Trust. (4 ayes, 1 nay, Navarro) Introduce ordinances conforming to new California Building and Uniform Standards. City Commission/Committee Reports Appoint members of the youth commission for the 2013-14 school year. Oral Communications Mari Dani Bandoma of the Filipino Bar Association of Northern California announced a free legal clinic November 4, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Holly Community Center, 31600 Alvarado Blvd, Union City. Mayor Carol Dutra-Vernaci:Aye Vice Mayor Emily Duncan:Aye Lorrin Ellis: Aye Pat Gacoscos: Aye Jim Navarro: 4 Ayes, 1 Nay

Construction Update: sidewalk closed on east side of Mission Blvd. (North of I-680) SUBMITTED BY SFPUC The temporary sidewalk east of Mission Blvd., that has been open since March for residents living north of I-680 to pass beneath the highway, will be closed starting Monday, October 28. A new sidewalk on the west side of Mission Blvd. will open for pedestrians. For your safety, please cross Mission Blvd. at Paseo Padre, and then cross beneath I-680 using the open sidewalk on the west side of the street.

continued from page 32 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 02, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544820# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483137 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sansar Transport, 33604 4th St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Mandan Lal, 33604 4th St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mandan Lal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 26, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544819# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483370

Absent Aye Aye Aye Aye

Coffee with a Cop SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD PD The Hayward Police Department will host “Coffee with a Cop” event on Wednesday, November 13, 2013 at Fairway Park Donut Shop located at 31125 Mission Blvd. (in the Fairway Park Shopping Center). Residents of Hayward are invited to come and meet Hayward police officers in an informal setting to discuss community issues and build relationships. The event is Wednesday, November 13 from 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. For further information contact Gale Bleth at (510) 293-7151 or gale.bleth@hayward-ca.gov.

Hayward Police Log SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD PD Tuesday, October 15 A robbery occurred at Western Blvd. and Peralta St. at 7:50 p.m. The 14 year old victim was walking on Western Blvd. when the suspect approached her on foot. The suspect grabbed the victim’s purse and cell phone from her hand, and then ordered her to remove her Air Jordan shoes. Suspect fled east on Peralta St. after obtaining the victim’s property. The suspect was described as a Black male, early 20’s, 6’0”, thin build and bald head; he was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Division at (510) 293-7034. An assault with a deadly weapon occurred at 21494 Foothill Blvd. (76 Gas Station) at 9:28 p.m. While sweeping up at the business, the clerk got into an argument with an unwanted male transient who refused to leave the property. During the argument the suspect took the clerk’s broom, and struck the clerk with it. The clerk sustained minor injuries, and the suspect was located a few blocks away and was arrested. Wednesday, October 16 Alameda County Sheriff ’s Deputies advised Hayward Police at 4:34 p.m. of a robbery that had just occurred in their jurisdiction. A short time later a Hayward Police Officer located two subjects matching the description of the sheriff department’s robbery suspects. Both suspects were detained and positively identified in the robbery. The sheriff ’s de-

partment took custody of both suspects for robbery. Thursday, October 17 Officers responded at 12:15 a.m. to the report of gunshots in the area of 171 W. Tennyson Rd. (El Tenampa Bar). An officer made contact with the informant, and his brother, who were both intoxicated. The officer noticed the informant, and his brother, matched the description of two suspects from a robbery/assault with a deadly weapon incident that occurred on 10/7/2013 on Manon Ave. The victim of the robbery was contacted and positively identified both subjects as the persons who robbed and assaulted him. Both suspects were arrested for robbery and assault with a deadly weapon. Sunday, October 20 At 8:38 a.m., East Bay Regional Parks Police (EBRPP) advised Hayward Police they were in pursuit of a vehicle for vehicle code violations. During the pursuit (EBRPP) advised the vehicle collided with a light pole at the intersection of Hesperian Blvd. and Turner Ct. One suspect was taken into custody at the scene of the collision, but two other occupants fled on foot. Hayward Police set a perimeter and the two outstanding suspects were located. The vehicle was found to be reported stolen and one of the suspects located was found to be wanted by the Hayward Police for burglary and forgery. A robbery occurred at 391 W. A St. (76 Gas Station) at 5:10 p.m. The suspect entered the business and selected a beverage. When the suspect approached the clerk he handed him a demand note stating, “Give me your money, I have a gun.” The clerk was unresponsive to the note and the suspect fled taking only his beverage. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Division at (510) 293-7034.

PUBLIC NOTICES The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Transformation Home Repair, 704 San Carlos Ct., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Robin Moy Mar, 704 San Carlos Ct., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Robin Mar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544058# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483335 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Disceli Construction, Co., 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Adriana Yadira Discua, 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560 Ervin Discua, 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by Married Couple The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Adriana Discua This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 01, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b),

where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544056# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483122 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AK Badminton & Tennis, 7691 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Alan Kakinami, 137 Llewellyn Ave., Campbell, CA 95008. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Alan Kakinami This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 25, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2543007# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 482743 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fremont City Family Dental, 4949 Stevenson Blvd. Ste. #J, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda

Matthew J. Teramura DMD Inc., California, 326 Via Rosario, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Matthew J. Teramura DMD Inc. /s/ Matthew J. Teramura, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 13, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2541823#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Alameda County Workforce Investment Board, 24100 Amador Street, 6th Floor, Room 610C, Hayward, CA 94544-1203 INFORMATIONAL BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP ACWIB CRP 2014 Career Readiness Program Friday, November 8, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Eden Multi-Service Center, 24100 Amador Street, 2nd Floor, California Poppy Conference Room, Hayward, CA and Wednesday, November 13, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Tri Valley One Stop Career Center, 5020 Franklin Drive, Pleasanton, CA Response Due by 2:00 pm on December 9, 2013 County Contact: Rosario Flores at (510) 259-3827 or via email: rflores2@acgov.org Attendance at Bidders Conference is not required. The RFP is available via the GSA website— www.acgov.org under Current Contracting Opportunities 10/29/13

CNS-2550518# Notice is hereby given that this is an Online Bid Process; only bids submitted through the online portal will be accepted.Please logon or register at https://ezsourcing.acgov.org/psp/SS/SUPPLIER/ ERP/h/?tab=DEFAULT. NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFQ #901133: Sheriff’s Crime Scene Vehicle South County – Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 2:00 p.m., Castro Valley Library, Canyon-Chabot Room, 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley, CA North County – Wednesday, November 13, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA or participate remotely @ http://gsaalamedacounty.adobeconnect.com/ admin/show-event-catalog Response Due by 2:00 pm on December 9, 2013 County Contact: Ryan DeCoud at (510) 2089619 or via email: ryan.decoud@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/29/13 CNS-2549871# Notice is hereby given that Prequalification Questionnaires must be received at: General Service Agency, Purchasing Department, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 900, Oakland, CA 94612, attention of David Savellano & Gerald Loeper, Project Managers. Pre-Qualification of Contractors for Project #12034 ACSO Sandy Turner II Educational Center and #13016 BHCS Villa Short Stay Facility Mandatory Pre-Submittal Conference: Tuesday, November 5, 2013, 8:30 AM Non-Mandatory Networking/ Proposers Conference: Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 9:00 AM Both at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Response Due by 2:00 pm on November 26, 2013 For ACSO Sandy Turner Center contact: David Savellano at 510-208-9695 or via email: david.savellano@acgov.org; for BHCS Villa Facility contact Gerald Loeper at 510208-9825 or via email: gerald.loeper@acgov D-B Entities are required to attend the Mandatory Pre-Submittal Conference, November 5, 2013. Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/29/13 CNS-2548929#


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10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club of Fremont We meet Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at Spin-a-Yarn Restuaruant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, 510-656-9141 Service through Fun http://the/ fremontrotaryclub.org Please come visit our club We wlecome new members

Dawn Breakers Lions Club Our Motto is: WE SERVE Meetings -1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:45am-8am El Patio Restaurant 37311 Fremont, Blvd., Fremont We welcome Men & Women with desire to serve our community 510-371-4065 for Free Brochure

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You'll find valuable information about your community and voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are non-partisan and free to the public.

Help with Home Repairs from Alameda County No cost or favorable, low interest loans are available for home remodeling for qualified homeowners in Fremont, Union City, Sunol and Newark. Call (510)670-5399 for an application and more information. http://www.acgov.org/cda/nps/

Gamblers Anonymous Has gambling taken over your life or the life of someone you know? Thursday night 7:30pm Grace Lutheran Church 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Helpline (855)-222-5542 or www.gamblersanonymous.org

Mission San Jose Chamber Meets1st & 3rd Wednesdays Dominican Sisters of MSJ Dining Room @7:30 am Find businesses and fun In Fremont’s historical Mission San Jose District info@MSJ Chamber.org or visit our website at www.MSJChamber.org

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area Want to experience a country and its culture with local hosts and promote global goodwill? Clubs in 56 countries. Upcoming local programs on Burma and Norway. www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org Call 510-794-6844 or 793-0857

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society, Inc. Meetings: Third Saturday 5:30pm in member homes Call: 510-793-8181 for location Email: contact@aachisi.com See web for Speical Events www.aachis.com We welcome all new members Celebrating 40th anniversary

Tri-City Ecology Center Your local environmental leader! Eco-Grants available to Residents & Organizations of the Tri-City area working on Environmental projects. For info see www.tricityecology.org Office open Thursdays, 11am-2pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-783-6222

Take Off Pounds Sensibly An affordable, non-profit Weight loss support group Meetings Thurs. 10am Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark For more information, call Diane 510-657-4403 Come and check up out We’ll be weighting for you.

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Seabreeze Community Forum of Union City Be a part of a group of neighbors working towards the improvement of our community. Visit: groups.yahoo.com/group/SCFUC To join, send email to: SCFUC-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

American Legion Auxiliary We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

KIWANIS CLUB OF FREMONT We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 a.m. Fremont/Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark www.kiwanisfremont.org Contact Elise Balgley at (510) 693-4524

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:Accgr43@gmail.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

NARFE National Assoc of Active and Retired Federal Employees Meet 4th Friday of Month Fremont Senior Center Central Park @ Noon All current or retired Federal Employees are welcome. Call Ellen 510-656-7963

Steps Along the Way The Journey to Healing and Wholeness from hurts and hangups using the 12 steps Wednesday nights 7pm New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.newhopefremont.org 510-739-0430

Troubled by someone’s drinking? Help is Here!

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Unity of Fremont A Positive Path for Spiritual Living 12:30 am Sunday Service 1351 Driscoll Rd (at Christian Science Church), Fremont 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org “The Church of the Daily Word”

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Caring, Sharing, Serving God 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont Sun Worship:8:45am 11:00am Child-care provided.Education for all ages: 10:00am. Nacho Sunday: First Sunday of every month. (510)793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Serious Mental Illness

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Maitri Immigration Program

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm

Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening.

Dominican Sisters Holiday Boutique November 23 & 24, Saturday and Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Senior Exercise Class

Serious Mental Illness

MEN & Women South Hayward Wed & Fri 9:00 - 10:15 am 121 Ranchero Way Hayward (Clubhouse) Gentle Aerobics, Hand weights Stretch bands & Floor work 510-304-5492 suziejo@pacbell.net

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness. Starting Jan 11 From 9am-11:30am in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

We Need Volunteers!

Celebrate Recovery

Sparkpoint FRC Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) needs volunteers. No experience necessary. Need Greeters, Translators & Ambassadors. Information Information Meetings Thurs 9/26 & Wed10/16 6-8:30pm Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2003

Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th street Union City Thursdays 7pm -9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

New DimensionChorus Men’s 4 Part Vocal Harmony In the “Barbershop” style Thursdays at 7pm Calvary Luther Church 12500 Via Magdelena SanLorenzo Contact: ncchorus@Yahoo.com 510-332-2489

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Free courses and presentations for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness and those with a mental illness in Alameda County. For details, confidentially contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

Fri SAVE Office 9 am - noon Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

The “NO” List:

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups A no cost program of support for people suffering from effects of alcoholism in a friend or loved one. Call 276-2270 for meeting information email: Easyduz@gmail.com www/ncwsa.org You are not alone.

Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont enter off Mission Tierra Pl. Dominican Fruitcakes Olive Oil from Mission Trees Variety of Homemade Goods www.msjdominicans.org

First United Methodist Church Music Series 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont Free 30 min. organ, piano & guest artist recitals. Generally first Sunday each month 4pm. Check website for exceptions www.fremont-methodist.org Free-will offering benefits humanitarian charities

Messiah Lutheran Church Church Service - Sunday 10 a.m. Bible Study - Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday School 2nd & 4th Sunday each month @ 11:15am and community events 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Phone: (510) 782-6727 www.MessiahHayward.org

Sun Gallery Holiday Boutique Event All kinds of hand made items for Holiday Gift Giving. Supports our Children’s Art Programs 1015 E Street Hayward Thursday, Sat & Sun 10-4pm Fri noon-6pm 510-581-4050 Need Vendors Also

The Bridge of Faith Christmas Crafts Boutique 27343 Whitman, Hayward December 7, 8am-4pm Starts 10am Santa presents Bring own cameras Arts-CraftsRaffle-Bake Sale! Contact: Priscilla For Details 510-861-2680 Kauaistar59@yahoo.com

Little Lamb Preschool Open House Saturday, March 15 1pm-4pm. Drop in and visit the class rooms ad meet the teachers. Registration information will be available. Free ice cream sundaes. Everyone invited!

First United Methodist Church Music Series 2950 Washington Blvd.,Fremont Free 30 min. Organ, Piano & Guest Artist Recitals. Generally first Sunday each month 4pm Check website for exceptions www.fremont-methodist.org Free-will offering benefits humanitarian charties

Writers Open Mic Share your creativity with an audience! 7-9 p.m. fourth Mondays BookSmart, Lower Level, NewPark Mall, in Newark Tony Pino (510) 857-6722 www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank Invigorate your spirit & volunteer. Drop ins welcome Mon - Fri. Work off your Traffic violation by giving back to the community in need. Students 14 years & older welcome. Email Erin: ewright@tri-Cityvolunteer.org

AARP Newark Meetings Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Drive., Newark last Monday of each month at 10:00 am. All seniors (50+) are welcome to attend Contact 510-402-8318 http://aarp-newark-californiawebs.com/

Fremont Wood Carvers Visit our friendly carving group! We help you get started. No need to buy supplies at first. There are no fees or dues. Adults of all ages are welcome. Drop in Wednesdays 7-9pm Fremont Senior Center 40204 Paseo Padre Pdw., Fremont bazlberry@hotmail.com

Fremont Repair Cafe Are you interested in Joining this group Team of Fremont residents want to start a Repair Cafe. Non-Profit organization. Want to encourage people to bring in old items and get them repaired by volunteers. Please respond to repaircafeeastbay@gmail.com

BRIDGE Housing appoints head of community development affiliate SUBMITTED BY BRIDGE HOUSING BRIDGE Housing has appointed Elizabeth Van Benschoten as President of its CDFI (Community Development Financial Institution) affiliate, effective Nov. 4. In this newly created position, Ms. Van Benschoten will lead the organization’s aggregation of capital to fuel affordable housing production and community development. BRIDGE is a nationally recognized nonprofit developer, owner and manager of affordable housing. Ms. Van Benschoten has spent the past 10 years working for Bank of America Merrill Lynch, most recently as Senior Vice President and Senior Client Manager for the Healthcare, Education and Institutions Group, where she managed a $12 million portfolio of business with leading universities and nonprofits. A graduate of Brown University with a B.A. in Political Science and Women’s Studies, Ms. Van Benschoten received an M.B.A. from the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. She is a current Board member and previous Board Chair of the Global Social Venture Competition. “We are thrilled to have Elizabeth join our team,” said Cynthia A. Parker, BRIDGE President and CEO. “Her depth of skill and experience with new products will catalyze our CDFI and position us to achieve our ambitious five-year production goals.”

Fremont hosts Cleantech Open award ceremony In recognition of the leading role of Greater Tri-City area innovation in clean energy technology, the City of Fremont was chosen to host the 2013 award ceremonies for the Western Regional Cleantech Open. The Cleantech Open is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to finding, funding, and fostering cleantech startups. Entrepreneurs are encouraged through mentoring, education, and support programs. This annual competition determines which of California’s most promising cleantech startups are chosen for the final four slots at the Global Forum scheduled for November 20-21 in San Jose. These companies will compete for a $200,000 grand prize. Held at the Fremont Marriott, speakers and a panel discussion at the awards ceremony on October 10, 2013, focused on government contacts and lobbying efforts as well as paths to funding and recognition. Cleantech Open Western Divisional Director Erik Steeb said, “We know what needs to be done” adding that Cleantech Open can guide companies through the path to success that depends upon education, mentoring, support, policy issues, industry recognition and adequate funding. Fremont Mayor Bill Harrison welcomed attendees, noting that Fremont and its environs have become the “epicenter of cleantech and innovation.” Addressing the current investment climate for cleantech industries, Nancy Pfund, Managing Director, DBL Investors, spoke of a “ripe climate” with expanding opportunities. She said that clean tech ventures can not only create a viable return for investors, but drive social improvement as well. A roundtable discussion with Patrick Leathers, Senior Counsel Attorney & Legislative Advocate for Clean Tech Advocates; Kelly Kline, Fremont Economic Development; State Senator Ellen Corbett and Paul Lacourciere, partner at K&L Gates and veteran of the energy industry, explored advocacy and government connection issues. Winners who will move on the Global Forum in San Jose include: Dragonfly Systems, Tyler Co Inc., Polymer Green and Pow Wow Energy.

Mission Trails Mustangs Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

50th Year Class Reunion Washington High School Class of 64’ & Friends September 26 & 27, 2014 Spin A Yarn Steakhouse,Fremont Contact Joan Martin Graham billjoan3@pacbell.net

Fremont Area Writers Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Carol at (510) 565-0619

The Union City Historical Museum

www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

3841 Smith St. Union City Open Thurs.-Sat 10am-4pm Visit our Museum. You’ll find valuable information about our community, past history and current happenings. www.unioncitymuseum.com Call Myrla 510-378-6376

Looking for a place to DISPLAY YOUR ART?

Help with Math & Reading

All Mediums welcome Oils, Watercolors, Ceramics, Etc. Eontact the Fremont Art Assoc. 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org $40 Membership required

You can make a difference by helping Newark children with Math and reading. If you can give one hour a week, you can give a life-long gift of learning to a child. Contact 510-797-2703 dia aarp 4486@yahoo.com

Fremont Unified School District Board meeting report ARTICLE AND PHOTO BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH The following are highlights from the Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) Board meeting held October 23, 2013. Agenda Item – Automated External Defibrillators: Alameda County Emergency Medical Services (ACEMS) gave an informational presentation, to the Board and Staff, on the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) which provide an electrical pulse through the heart to help restore normal heart rhythm during a massive heart attack (Sudden Cardiac Arrest.). In 2012, ACEMS launched Project

(free) AEDs for use by Fremont Unified School District, at high schools and at Tak Fudenna Stadium. A demonstration of the AED then showed that it is quite easy to utilize when providing immediate assistance to someone having a sudden heart attack. ACEMS would also provide training and help as needed for a period of five years. The program does not impact the school district’s General Fund. However, each site selected would need to have a coordinator (teacher, administrator, other personnel, etc.) to maintain the equipment and ensure people are trained on how to use the AEDs correctly. Potential coordinators, for example, could be PE teachers and coaches as

should not fear liability when using the AED to help someone who has been stricken. FUSD needs to inform ACEMS by October 25, if they wish to accept the AEDs. Oral Communications: Public Comments: Parent and coordinator, Chung Wu presented the group of students who had participated in last year’s Science Olympiad. In 2013, local teams comprised of 15 students each and representing several elementary, junior high and high schools participated in and advanced to the state and regional finals. Their hope is to reach the national level in the 2014 competition. The National Science Olympiad was

Parent Chung Wu holds a trophy won by local teams of Science Olympiad students at last year’s competition

Heart Safe to provide AEDs (Philips FRX) and training to 185 public locations. Schools, having a large number of people on-site as well as sports activities, were among the places targeted for distribution of the AED kits. At the meeting, ACEMS stated that they had reserved nine

many have already gone through prior CPR training as part of their job requirement. The county would also provide an assessment of the best location placement for the AED at each school site (classroom, gym or office). Also discussed, due the “Good Samaritan Law,” the District

created in 1983 to encourage and motivate students to become involved in the areas of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). For more information about the 2014 competition, visit http://www.soinc.org.

Fremont scholar awarded top scholarship SUBMITTED BY BIOLA UNIVERSITY Jessica Yee, a freshman of Biola University and resident of Fremont, was among 82 students who received one of the college’s highest scholarships - the President’s scholarship for the 2013/2014 academic year. Freshmen are eligible for the President’s scholarship - $10,000 per year

- if upon entering the university, they meet the requirements of the scholarship. Approximately six percent of this year’s incoming class received this award. Students are considered for this scholarship upon admission to the University based on their GPA and SAT scores. The requirements of the scholarship are a GPA of at least 3.5

and a combined SAT score of 1430, both math and English scores. Students must maintain a GPA of 3.5 to continue to receive the scholarship the following year. For more information about Biola University, visit: www.biola.edu or call (562) 777 – 4061.

Union City recognizes outstanding citizens

SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN The Human Resources Commission recognized Union City citizens at a commission meeting October 23, 2013 during its third annual Make a Difference Award ceremony. The awards program recognizes those in the community who, through their volunteer and/or vocational efforts, make a positive difference in the lives of others, thereby making Union City a better place in which to live, work, and play. Each awardee is nominated by an individual Human Relation Commissioner. Honorees include: Julie Bugarin, dance instructor; Helen Kennedy, business owner; Zoneil Maharaj, journalist; Glenn Nate, youth organizer; Stacey Sarmiento, Mary Schlarb, community volunteer; Mireya Luz Casarez Varela, educator and Sandy Vaughn, mental health professional.


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

Chanticleers Theater has a new look

HOME SALES REPORT

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 1,001,000 Median $: 565,000 Lowest $: 385,000 Average $: 621,786 ADDRESS

ZIP

3611 Arcadian Drive 21102 Ashfield Avenue 18759 Carlton Avenue 18188 Carmel Drive 2829 Crystal Court 4585 Ewing Road 19019 Gliddon Street 1725 Grove Way 18956 Patton Drive 18794 Sandy Road 7768 Coolidge Court 25692 Crestfield Circle 5953 Highwood Road 22125 West Lyndon Loop

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

630,000 448,000 565,000 475,000 385,000 865,000 610,000 492,000 410,000 528,000 900,000 1,001,000 774,000 622,000

1842 1308 1443 1440 1294 3314 1528 1389 994 1403 2697 3526 1901 2379

1957 1955 1962 1962 1978 2000 1953 1950 1952 1953 2001 1998 1963 2000

09-17-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-18-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-18-13 09-12-13 09-17-13 09-12-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-13-13

3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 6 4 4

1833 Lee Way 95035 680 Mente Linda Loop 95035 687 Murphy Ranch Road 95035 1227 Nestwood Way 95035 1242 Nestwood Way 95035 1246 Nestwood Way 95035 1250 Nestwood Way 95035 1254 Nestwood Way 95035 1258 Nestwood Way 95035 820 North Abbott Avenue 95035 1080 Ridgemont Drive 95035 2209 Shiloh Avenue 95035 1101 South Main Street #235 95035 1242 South Park Victoria Drive95035

ADDRESS

ZIP

38715 Adcock Drive 94536 38644 Aurora Terrace 94536 4864 Balboa Way 94536 4538 Bartolo Terrace 94536 38491 Burdette Common 94536 2820 Calvin Court 94536 1086 Canyon Creek Terrace 94536 36515 Coronado Drive 94536 4765 Driftwood Drive 94536 37022 Elm Street 94536 352 Fieldstone Drive 94536 37687 Fremont Boulevard 94536 35124 King Court 94536 37050 Meadowbrook Cn #103 94536 37531 Mission Boulevard 94536 38228 Paseo Padre Parkway #3394536 35858 Plumeria Way 94536 37348 Spruce Terrace 94536 1980 Barrymore Common #V 94538 5736 Birch Terrace 94538 42325 Blacow Road 94538 5444 Borgia Road 94538 5366 Coco Palm Drive 94538 40391 Davis Street 94538 39940 Fremont Boulevard 94538 39199 Guardino Drive #175 94538 4463 Hyde Common #111 94538 4028 Ralston Common 94538 4893 Regents Park Lane 94538 4303 Sacramento Avenue #22494538 3695 Stevenson Bld #E308 94538 41043 Janice Street 94539 41951 McKay Street 94539 44975 Naragansett Court 94539 54 Shaniko Common 94539 49055 Woodgrove Common 94539 49103 Woodgrove Common 94539 34617 Anchor Drive 94555 3583 Johnson Court 94555 3234 Mountain Drive 94555 4259 Nerissa Circle 94555 34651 Pueblo Terrace 94555 2828 Welk Common 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

670,000 380,000 350,000 209,000 310,000 825,000 1,055,000 470,000 685,000 480,000 672,000 700,000 1,050,000 341,000 510,000 216,000 725,000 125,000 339,000 304,000 585,000 575,000 575,000 370,000 222,000 305,000 554,000 365,000 652,000 260,500 340,000 1,550,000 1,100,000 1,850,000 460,000 713,000 535,500 917,000 708,000 1,010,000 710,000 448,000 730,000

1508 1120 1033 988 616 4102 2807 1074 1930 1450 1416 1580 2765 990 386 750 1863 593 991 945 1208 1204 1610 925 730 844 1402 1189 1552 1221 1040 2686 1702 3929 1170 1584 1119 2141 1603 2677 1601 1069 2046

1977 1980 1982 1971 1979 1969 1991 1954 1955 1948 1989 1937 1991 1984 1910 1970 1955 1986 1981 1970 1957 1961 1962 1955 1972 1987 2009 1980 1961 1974 1991 1998 1960 1986 1987 2004 2004 1996 1980 1988 1986 1989 1986

09-11-13 09-17-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-18-13 09-11-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-12-13 09-11-13 09-17-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-18-13 09-17-13 09-11-13 09-12-13 09-18-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-18-13 09-16-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-18-13 09-18-13

2 2 2 2 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 5 2 1 4 1 2 2 3 3 7 3 1 2 3 2 4 1 2 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 2 4

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 40 Highest $: 2,279,500 Median $: Lowest $: 150,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1276 Ash Street 2087 D Street 2304 D Street 2380 D Street 24023 Edloe Drive 23627 Fuller Avenue 22653 Linden Street 18846 Lowell Avenue 23805 Madeiros Avenue 789 Memorial Way 1775 Panda Way #112 641 Paradise Boulevard 21265 Times Avenue 100 Sonas Drive 25796 Spring Drive 24243 Alice Street 31014 Carroll Avenue 31088 Chicoine Avenue 28639 Cole Place 669 Dartmore Lane #253 1636 Folsom Avenue 29106 Hillview Street 672 Janice Avenue 24682 Lyell Way 355 Murray Drive 683 Newbury Lane #374 782 O'Neil Commons 27806 Ormond Avenue 27740 Pistachio Court 26337 Regal Avenue 518 Teasdale Place 27830 Thackeray Avenue 1886 Welford Lane 623 Woodland Avenue 2044 Aldengate Way 25882 Barnard Street 3639 Depot Road 2421 Homer Lane 27356 Marigold Court 21228 Gary Drive #110

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546

2072 Calle Mesa Alta 825 Carino Terrace 33 Cloud Walk 722 Elderberry Drive 1289 Elkwood Drive 340 Gerald Circle 482 Holly Way 1729 Lee Way 1792 Lee Way 1829 Lee Way

ZIP

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

365,000 426,225

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

236,500 400,000 200,000 325,000 370,000 355,000 469,000 280,000 470,000 640,000 245,000 405,000 400,000 862,000 410,000 360,000 450,000 410,000 380,000 285,000 365,000 420,000 335,000 360,000 330,000 195,000 280,000 391,000 355,000 415,000 410,000 365,000 620,000 275,000 150,000 415,000 2,279,500 570,000 278,000 288,000

815 2543 1092 1269 1052 1041 1633 878 1948 2645 900 1665 1438 3452 1449 918 1161 1078 1050 878 1000 1763 1175 1082 1215 906 1333 1000 1457 1059 1546 1162 1873 1501 1050 1374 1703 1254 1047

1946 1946 1975 1975 1953 1950 1943 1890 1984 1963 1980 1942 1951 2010 1951 1946 1955 1955 1952 1988 1954 1995 1955 1952 1950 1988 2007 1954 1973 1952 1957 1955 1994 1960 1968 1959 2012 1971 1982

09-18-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-16-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-17-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-16-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-18-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-16-13 09-11-13 09-12-13 09-18-13 09-11-13

2 4 2 3 3 3 4 2 3 6 2 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 2

SOLD FOR BDS

720,000 750,000 540,000 541,500 685,000 883,000 532,000 558,000 582,500 710,000

3 3 2 3 3 -

ZIP

39887 Cedar Boulevard #152 35255 Farnham Drive 35965 Firestone Court 37896 Goldenrod Drive 6226 Jarvis Avenue 6926 Jarvis Avenue 35205 Lido Boulevard 8561 Peachtree Avenue 39788 Potrero Drive 37162 St. Matthew Drive 6225 Wilma Avenue

588,000 617,188

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2082 2045 1353 1422 1047 -

1990 2006 2000 1990 1963 -

09-27-13 09-27-13 09-27-13 09-26-13 09-27-13 09-23-13 09-24-13 09-26-13 09-25-13 09-27-13

1810 1345 1953 2074 977 1008

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

290,000 690,000 515,000 400,000 480,000 400,000 372,000 585,000 564,000 480,000 440,000

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

2007 1981 1989 1971 2007 1971

09-27-13 09-23-13 09-27-13 09-27-13 09-23-13 09-27-13 09-27-13 09-27-13 09-26-13 09-24-13 09-24-13 09-27-13 09-24-13 09-26-13

480,000 474,182

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1071 1514 1240 1166 1574 1331 1232 1856 1766 1469 1187

1986 1970 1977 1969 1986 1982 1971 1994 1994 1978 1953

09-11-13 09-12-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-16-13 09-13-13 09-11-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES:24 Highest $: 880,500 Median $: 405,000 Lowest $: 272,000 Average $: 438,875 ADDRESS

ZIP

408 Alvarado Street 621 Bixco Street 400 Davis Street #203 881 Donovan Drive 420 Elsie Avenue 14333 Maracaibo Road 1876 Marineview Drive 392 Maud Avenue 3461 Monogram Road 249 Toler Avenue 14555 Trinidad Road 1406 View Drive 1466 Wayne Avenue 1696 140th Avenue 1427 153rd Avenue 15950 Carolyn Street 472 Olive Street 506 Sugar Maple Lane 508 Sugar Maple Lane 1594 Thrush Avenue 1383 Breckenridge Street 15023 Costela Street 1574 Sagewood Avenue 15140 Wiley Street

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

615,000 388,000 303,000 320,000 425,000 460,000 880,500 510,000 473,000 405,000 485,000 650,000 300,000 442,000 310,000 364,500 272,000 505,000 515,000 350,000 460,000 395,000 375,000 330,000

5 3 2 3 3 4 4 3 3 2 4 5 3 3 3 3 2 4 4 2 3 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2412 1210 1431 950 1472 1386 3235 1643 1577 1175 1464 2989 1298 1745 883 1000 864 1667 1667 956 2134 1114 1096 1310

2002 2004 1982 1942 1946 1962 1967 1925 2000 1922 1963 1964 1942 1946 1947 1949 1947 2007 2007 1920 1956 1951 1953 1951

09-17-13 09-11-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-18-13 09-17-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-17-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 02 Highest $: 420,000 Median $: 380,000 Lowest $: 380,000 Average $: 400,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

17469 Via La Jolla 15802 Via Nueva

94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

420,000 380,000

3 3

SQFT

BUILT

1031 1571

1951 09-16-13 1955 09-13-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES:11 Highest $: 680,000 Median $: Lowest $: 240,000 Average $: ADDRESS

SOLD FOR BDS

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 24 Highest $: 883,000 Median $: Lowest $: 350,000 Average $: ADDRESS

554,000 603,512

3 3 3 4 2 2

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 690,000 Median $: Lowest $: 290,000 Average $: ADDRESS

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES:43 Highest $: 1,850,000 Median $: Lowest $: 125,000 Average $:

709,500 670,000 576,000 568,000 588,000 630,500 611,000 617,000 534,000 420,000 800,000 805,000 431,500 350,000

34236 Arizona Street #15 2531 Begonia Street 32664 Brenda Way #4 4274 Comet Circle 4620 Empire Street 900 G Street 4608 Granada Way 32334 Jean Drive 102 Marge Court 35580 Monterra Terrace #202 1063 Sapphire Terrace

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

395,000 625,000 250,000 375,000 680,000 295,000 335,000 457,000 240,000 291,000 460,000

3 4 2 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2

CLOSED

375,000 400,273

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1684 1544 798 1255 1719 1200 1298 1340 1248 1018 1203

1982 1971 1973 1972 1986 1978 1972 1973 1960 2001 2007

09-13-13 09-18-13 09-13-13 09-17-13 09-11-13 09-17-13 09-17-13 09-12-13 09-17-13 09-12-13 09-18-13

BY AL MURDACH Tired of the old Chanticleers Theatre look? Well, take a look now! The theater has been cleaned, repainted and fitted with newer furniture, fixtures, and decorations. The lobby in particular has been completely redone. Included in this “redo” is new storage for props and flats in the backstage area, a security screen for the green room, and a new lobby configuration. All this is the result of countless hours by theater volunteers and friends, especially by artists and craftsmen like Georgia Lee and Floyd Wayne. Their achievement was largely financed - not by government grants - but by donations and ticket sales in the local community. The result is a theater for the 21st Century. Once again we can see the vitality of local community theaters like Chanticleers and the importance of community support. Attend a performance or arrange a visit to see the impressive results of Chanticleers’ new look. The theater is located at 3683 Quail Avenue in Castro Valley, and can be reached by telephone at (510) 733-5483 or online at www.chanticleers.org.

Need non-emergency help? SUBMITTED BY NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT Need help? Get connected and get answers by simply dialing 2-1-1. The service operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with multilingual capabilities. 2-1-1 is a non-emergency, confidential, 3-digit phone number. It provides free, over the phone, information about housing, health, and social services throughout Alameda County. 2-1-1 has information to help you find affordable housing, after-school programs, tenants’ rights assistance, public assistance programs, emergency shelters, hot meals and food programs, rental and utility assistance, services for battered women, and more. Simply dial 2-1-1.

Ohlone College to rebuild main campus SUBMITTED BY FRANK ADDIEGO Ohlone College will soon see sweeping changes; a new parking structure at the Fremont campus by the summer of 2015, and replacement of many older buildings by spring, 2018. The campus is notorious for its hillside steps from parking lots to even the lower levels of the main campus; some call it “Heart Attack Hill.” The college hopes that the South Parking Structure will address some of the problem. Soon after completion of the parking structure, Ohlone College will say goodbye to several buildings that have stood on the hillside for over 40 years. This will be a $135 million project, funded by revenue from 2010’s Measure G, which issued $349 million in bonds for improvements to renovate classrooms, update technology, upgrade safety and improve access for the disabled. “In the summer of 2015, three buildings will come down simultaneously,” said Vice President of Administrative Services Ron Little, with two more demolished and rebuilt, “further down the line.” Among the first to go will be the main building which houses the library and most administration offices. The other two buildings are home to classrooms, laboratories and offices. Replacement for one of the buildings will span from the lowest level of the main campus to the highest, again in an attempt to lessen the climb for students and visitors. Following construction of these buildings, two more will be demolished and replaced; other buildings will be renovated. Ohlone College plans to create three new athletic fields, one of which will replace a problematic baseball field with a large depression in the outfield. Asked about the cost of replacement, College Advancement Director Patrice Birkedahl said, “The cost of repairing is so high compared to the cost of building new.” During construction, classes will be held in portable classrooms as well as the Fremont Campus’ Smith Center and Hyman Hall, which house state-of-the-art classes for performing arts and information technology, respectively. Forty-four portable classrooms will be located behind Hyman Hall, in parking lot spaces and an additional 10-14 at the Newark Campus. “It started a number of years ago because our facility was aging,” said Dr Gari Browning, President and Superintendent of the Ohlone College, “We were spending a lot of resources on keeping it going and it was inconveniencing a lot of people.” Some of the buildings on the campus were experiencing “below-grade water intrusion,” according to Birkedahl. The Ohlone College Board of Trustees meets on the second Wednesday of every month, usually on the Fremont campus, though they are also required to meet on the Newark campus twice a year. The Measures A&G Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee meets on a quarterly basis; its next meeting is scheduled for January 13, 2014 on the Fremont campus.


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Court hears argument on pension benefit increases Legislature reserved the right to change or cut the benefit. “There was never a promise in the statute by the Legislature that gain sharing would continue forever,’’ Solicitor General Noah Purcell told the court. He said the plaintiffs are asking the court “to allow them to cherry pick the parts of the statute that they like, the benefit, and to ignore the parts that they don’t, the fact that it can be terminated.’’ James Oswald, an attorney for the plaintiffs, argued that the Legislature could not unilaterally take away a benefit that it promised. “This isn’t a matter of picking and choosing,’’ he said. “They granted a benefit, it became a vested contractual right for the people who were working.’’ Purcell argued that if the court followed the plaintiffs’ reasoning, the court would go down an “unprecedented road of holding that employee expectations directly contrary to statute can create binding contract rights.’’ In the second case concerning costof-living increases for employees in

older pension plans, the state once again pointed to statutory language that gave the Legislature the option of amending or eliminating what Assistant Attorney General Timothy Leyh called an enhancement to the pension. “There’s no takeaway involved here at all,’’ he said. “There was a limited grant of an enhancement, and a termination of that grant pursuant to the terms of the grant, that’s all.’’ But Rick Spoonemore, an attorney for members of the retirement plans in question, said that these cost-of-living increases are ``a promise to state employees that when you retire, no matter what happens, your benefit will increase at some rate.’’ “It’s not an enhancement, as the state keeps calling it, it’s a benefit,’’ he said. A state actuary report from August predicts that if the court reinstates both gain sharing and the cost-of-living increases, state pension costs would increase by $616 million, and local governments would see an increase of $720 million from 2015-2017. There’s no time frame on when the court may rule on the case.

Morpho Detection (Newark) awarded $10M contract SUBMITTED BY SCOTT FACTOR Morpho (Safran), through its subsidiary Morpho Detection, Inc., announced on October 16, 2013 that it has received a contract valued at approximately $10 million from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) for development of a next-generation checked baggage explosives detection system (EDS). Morpho first began working on the project in 2011 and has, to date, received approximately $7 million in incremental funding from the contract. Under terms of the contract, Morpho will deliver a prototype EDS based on advanced X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology in 2015. By utilizing advanced XRD technology to detect liquid and homemade explosives and IEDs in checked baggage, Morpho’s next-generation EDS will give airports the detection and operational capabilities needed to meet emerging threats while accommodating anticipated growth. “Morpho Detection is honored to continue our decades-long work with the U.S. government develop-

ing explosives detection systems to meet current and emerging security threats,” said Cameron Ritchie, vice president, technology and chief technology officer, Morpho Detection, Inc. “This contract is another example of our commitment to develop next-generation technology and deliver the most advanced solutions available to protect air travelers and streamline the security screening process.” Since 1994, all Morpho EDS systems have achieved TSA certification by meeting stringent requirements for both throughput and detection. In addition to checked baggage, Morpho is developing the XRD-based XDi™ cabin baggage screening system for airport checkpoints. Scheduled for commercial availability in 2015, XDi will provide the detection and throughput capabilities needed to lift current checkpoint liquids restrictions and enhance the passenger screening process. Morpho’s EDS systems are the most widely deployed in the world – with nearly 2,000 in service. For more information on Morpho’s detection products, visit www.morphodetection.com.

Kaiser earns top Medicare rating

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Letter to the Editor

U.S. permanent residence – What’s going on? Even though the U.S. economy continues to display signs of improvement in an uneven economic environment, the waters remain murky when it comes to understanding the decision making process at the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) on PERM applications. What is the USDOL looking for when processing U.S. labor certifications or “PERM” applications? USDOL is a key government agency that monitors the growth of jobs in the U.S. and protects the U.S. workforce. It is also the key agency that determines whether there is a shortage of ready, willing, and available U.S. workers to fill a position that a U.S. employer is seeking to fill with a foreign worker. The labor certification application (“PERM application”) is filed with USDOL, and is a key process for foreign nationals sponsored by their employer for a Green Card. The USDOL is continuing to tighten its interpretation on whether the U.S. labor market was adequately tested to determine if a U.S. worker is available for the PERM position. Every aspect of reach and scope of an employer’s recruitment efforts is under scrutiny. This has made the process a virtual minefield, whereby the employer and employee will not know if a PERM application will be subject to a random audit, adding another 10 months to the process, or whether what was reliable in the past, is a bombshell in the future. This lack of transparency and clear guidance has led to frustration with the entire process. There is a higher likelihood that any foreign national whose employer is looking to sponsor him for U.S. permanent residence via the PERM process, will face delays of up to a year or longer if the case is audited, or even a denial for a minor infraction. Recent statistics show that as of August 5, 2013, the USDOL is reviewing PERM cases from August

21, 2012, cases filed almost a year ago. (http://icert.doleta.gov for additional processing time statistics for PERM applications). Where does that leave the employer and the foreign national looking to proceed with a Green Card case? What can an employer and foreign worker do? Our first suggestion is to start the Green Card process as early as possible, and be careful when documenting each step of this complicated process. PERM recruitment is not like real world recruitment where a job posting on Craig’s list may seem like sufficient evidence to show that the employer adequately tested the U.S. labor market for qualified, willing, and available U.S. workers. Proof that an employer has done its due diligence under very specific USDOL guidelines on recruitment is a requirement. For foreign national workers who are know that they wish to remain in the U.S., establish this early on with your employer and negotiate sponsorship for U.S. permanent residence at the outset. Although the future may be unpredictable, securing sponsorship for U.S. permanent residence as early as possible gives a foreign national a leg up on the timeframe. Even if the case is audited, the priority date that determines how soon a foreign national may proceed with the last step for applying for U.S. permanent residence is established when the PERM application is filed. In these difficult times for U.S. Green Card sponsorship, it helps to think ahead and plan on how to tackle the shifting landscape on U.S. immigration matters, and the economic changes that continue to affect the protectionist tendencies of the USDOL Barbara Wong, Esq. Union City

Lehua Lee named Teacher of the Year SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER

M

ission Valley Regional Occupational Program (MVROP) Sports Therapy instructor Lehua Lee exercises a simple teaching philosophy in her classrooms daily: be passionate about what you teach, cultivate a relationship with each student, develop high expectations for all students, and most importantly, have fun teaching so students have fun learning. This focused dedication towards student learning is one of the many reasons Lehua Lee has been named the 2013 MVROP Teacher of the Year. Ms. Lee’s vast experience and passion for Sports Therapy and Career Technical Education (CTE) adds a unique element to this popular health and science career pathway. Her ability to connect, challenge, and engage each student, through relevant industry specific presentations, videos, and hands-on assessments enables students to confi-

dently perform during internships in local physical therapy clinics and athletic training rooms. Extensive relationships with professionals in the community serve as additional sources of support measuring student internship performance referencing work ethics, initiative, professionalism, communication, basic knowledge and employability-skills that model the purpose of Career Technical Education and echo the MVROP mission statement. Mission Valley ROP Superintendent Thomas Hanson recognizes Ms. Lee as “a well-respected veteran MVROP teacher who has worked hard and is deserving of this great honor.” Ms. Lee was honored at the MVROP Governing Council meeting on October 17 at the Mission Valley ROP Center Campus. For information about MVROP, visit www.mvrop.org.

SUBMITTED BY JESSIE R. MANGALIMAN Only one health plan in California merits the maximum 5-star rating by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for excellence in care and service. Kaiser Permanente recently announced that its Medicare plans in California again have received an overall rating of 5 stars for parts C and D, the highest rating possible from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Through the Medicare Star Quality Rating System, CMS assigns scores of 1 to 5 stars to Medicare plans based on more than 50 care and service quality measures across nine categories including staying healthy, managing chronic conditions, member satisfaction, customer service, and pharmacy services. For the first time, all of Kaiser Permanente’s Medicare health plans have earned 5 stars. The 5-star rating applies to Kaiser Permanente’s 2014 Medicare health plans that operate in California, Hawaii, Colorado, Georgia, Mid-Atlantic States (Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia) and Northwest (Oregon and Washington). Medicare beneficiaries can learn more about the Medicare Star Quality Ratings and Kaiser Permanente’s Medicare plans by visiting www.kp.org/medicarestars, www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan, or by calling Kaiser Permanente at 1 (855) 817-5831.

MVROP Superintendent Tom Hanson with Teacher of the Year Lehua Lee


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 29, 2013

Ohlone College professor honored SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE

R

ick Arellano, Professor of Computer Applications and Occupational Technology at Ohlone College, was one of five honorees who received a Latino Heritage Leadership Certificate of Recognition at Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski’s 1st Annual Latino Heritage Leadership Awards Ceremony on Friday, October 11. The ceremony, which took place at the Newark City Hall Council Chamber, served as a platform to recognize individuals who made significant contributions to the Latino community, and have demonstrated a long-standing commitment to bettering the community. Wieckowski’s office hosted the event in honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, observed September 15 through October 15. “The 25th Assembly District is one of the most diverse areas in the state of California, and we have greatly benefited from the rich cultures and traditions of the Latino community,” said Bob Wieckowski in a letter to the honorees. Ohlone College Trustee Vivien Larsen introduced Rick Arellano, known to her as “Ricardo,” the two having met over 40 years ago in Oakland Technical High School. Larsen highlighted how Arellano

supports, promotes and advocates for the success of the Latino community — in particular for the success and advancement in education, especially in the fields of science, and technology. Arellano is also an advocate for older adults. Larsen described Arellano’s active community leadership as a member of

St. Joseph GOLD plays for a cure SUBMITTED BY LORRAINE CHEW The 6th Grade St. Joseph GOLD Volleyball team placed 2nd in the Volley for the Cure ‘13 Tournament this past weekend, October 26-27 at Assumption School. The tournament was part of Breast Cancer Awareness month activities. The team played strong defense as well as great offense. Players pictured are: back row - Hailey Rodriquez, Madeline Chew, Nadia Gheorghiu, Abigail Viado, front row - Kylie Isaac, Jessica Uyehara and Lindsay Betchart. Coaches Viola Gheorghiu, Dru Gheorghiu and Ron Viado are also pictured.

Fremont Police asking for public’s assistance SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES, FREMONT PD On Tuesday, October 22, 2013, officers responded to the Walmart Store located on the 40500 block of Albrae Street to investigate an indecent exposure incident. Upon meeting with store security, it was learned that the suspect exposed himself while he was in the store. The incident occurred at approximately 2:20 p.m. and the Fremont Police Department is asking for the public’s help to identify the suspect. If you recognize the man or have information related to this case, please contact Officer Bryan Hollifield via email at Bhollifield@fremont.gov or by phone at 510-790-6800 x13620. You can also send us an anonymous tip via Nixle or go to www.fremontpolice.org/tip to learn about other tip reporting programs we offer. We thank you in advance for your help!

the board of directors for Life Eldercare, President of AARP’s Newark Chapter, Secretary of Toastmasters Newark Chapter, a member of the City of Newark Senior Citizen Advisory Committee, and as a Newark Rotary Club member. Arellano also served on the Ohlone College Foundation Board and on Avanzando.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Friday, October 18 Officer Geser investigated a stolen white company trailer CA license #4EH1422 from the 37300 block of Cedar Blvd. at 7:38 a.m. The truck has “Watermark Builders” logos on three sides. Officer Geser investigated a commercial burglary at 39660 Eureka Dr. (Phonak) occurred between 9:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. the previous night. The door was pried and the loss was two Leica microscopes valued at $10,000. Officer Fredstrom investigated an auto burglary at 1:23 p.m. that occurred overnight near the intersection of Port Sailwood and Cedar Blvd. The loss was a wallet, credit cards and a backpack. Officer Eriksen attempted to stop a motorcycle he recognized for exhibition of speed near the intersection of Mayhews Landing and Spruce St. at 1:54 p.m. The motorcycle accelerated to dangerous speeds and fled from Officer Eriksen. Officer Eriksen did not pursue but observed the motorcyclist nearly hit pedestrians during flight. Officer Eriksen believed the motorcycle was one he had previously observed on Pebble Beach. Officers responded to the residence where Officer Eriksen believed the owner of the motorcycle resided. While gathering intelligence on the residence and potential occupants, Andrew Danvers of 8146 Pebble Beach arrived at the residence. Officer Eriksen interviewed Danvers and after dissecting numerous lies, Danvers admitted to fleeing on the motorcycle. During a search of the residence, officers located the motorcycle jacket and messenger bag Danvers was wearing when he fled from Officer Eriksen. During a search of the bag, Officer Eriksen located an empty conceal carry belt holster and a loaded Kimber 1911 .45 caliber handgun. Danvers was ultimately arrested. The firearm was seized for evidence pending further investigation. Danvers was transported to Santa Rita Jail. Sunday, October 20 Officer Khairy was performing a security check on Olive Street at 10:12 a.m. and initiated a tow on a parked vehicle in front of a residence in the 36800 block of Olive Street. The suspect from the felony domestic violence incident which occurred yesterday came out of the residence to inquire about the tow. Officer Khariy ended up arresting Miguel Avila of Newark) for felony domestic violence. At 5:54 p.m., Officer Arroyo handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s store. Ana Perez-Cervantes of Fremont was issued a citation for petty theft.

In addition to Arellano’s commitment to the community, Larsen listed multiple awards he received over the years. In 2010, Arellano was awarded the U.S. House of Representatives - Special Congregational Recognition. He has also received other awards, including the California State Legislature Certificate of Recognition, and an Avanzando Award: Ohlone College Outstanding Educator of the Year. Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski, Congressman Michael Honda, Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett, and San Jose City Councilmember Kansen Hu each presented Arellano with Latino Heritage Leadership Certificates of Recognition at the awards ceremony. In his acceptance speech, Arellano thanked his parents for allowing him to leave Lima, Peru at age 17, saying, “I lived in the Mission District of San Francisco where I met so many individuals dedicated to the advancement of the underserved and underrepresented; I followed their footsteps. Later on, in Oakland, Stockton, and the East Bay, I met other individuals with similar goals; they were also my mentors and role models; I share with all of them this Certificate of Recognition.” nnn

Monday, October 21 At 3:56 p.m.,Officer Neithercutt responded to a residence in the 37000 block of Magnolia St on a report of a theft. A male suspect (wearing an electronic company shirt) had contacted the victim and requested to see her electric bill. Victim let him and in and then left the room to get the bill. When victim returned, she discovered her laptop was stolen. Tuesday, October 22 At 4:30 p.m., Officer Jackman responded to Macy’s Department Store for a shoplifter in-custody. Gloria Napuri of Concord was arrested for petty theft. She was issued a citation and released from the scene. Day and Night shifts responded at 6:13 p.m. to a report of an assault with a baseball bat on Smith near Bunker School. No victims were located. The “bat” was later determined to be a piece of PVC fencing. Witnesses later provided information regarding the possible identity of the involved people. At 7:33 p.m., Officer Coffey stopped bicyclist Ryan Isaacson of Newark at 7:33 p.m. and arrested him for Drunk in Public. Isaacson was mentioned as the possible victim of the above incident. He had marks consistent with the described incident, but no serious injury. He denied any involvement. He was booked at Fremont Jail for public drunkenness. Thursday, October 24 At 9:14 a.m., Officer Fredstrom investigated the theft of a gray women’s Schwinn 18 speed bicycle from the 7500 block of Birkdale Dr. Officer Katz investigated the passing of counterfeit money at Cargill Salt at 11:01 a.m. At 12:57 p.m., the shift responded to an interrupted residential burglary at a residence in the 36100 block of Crystal Springs Dr. A male subject about 5’9, close shaved hair wearing a red plaid shirt was observed inside the residence by the victim. Officers surrounded the residence within minutes and conducted a search but did not locate the subject. At 1:32 p.m., Officer Knutson investigated a theft from “FANS” store inside Newark Mall. Approximately $2000 of sports related merchandise was stolen by subjects. Officers responded to Wells Fargo bank at 2:58 p.m. for a forgery in progress. Elisenda Ovalle of Oakland was arrested by Officer Eriksen for check fraud. She was transported to Santa Rita Jail for booking. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Marijuana cultivation arrests SUBMITTED BY MILPITAS PD On October 7, 2013 at approximately 7:50 P.M., Milpitas Police officers investigated a report of marijuana being grown in the backyard of a residence at the 1000 block of Olympic Dr. Ho Lam and Jennifer Lam were contacted at the residence. Officers gained access into the backyard and located an outdoor marijuana grow. Approximately 100 pounds of marijuana was recovered from the home. The marijuana had an estimated street value of $250,000. Officers located and seized approximately $70,000 in US currency inside the residence. Prior to the conclusion of the investigation another resident of the home arrived, she was identified as Thu Tu. All three suspects were arrested at the scene without incident. Ho Van Lam, Thu Le Tu and Jennifer Hong Lam were booked into Santa Clara County Main Jail for cultivation of marijuana, possession of marijuana for sales and sales of marijuana. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY EMILY HOEVEN

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his summer, I had an unbelievable experience attending the High School Diplomats (HSD) program. The program selects 40 students from the United States and 40 students from Japan to participate in an intensive intercultural exchange at Princeton University. Each American student is paired with a Japanese roommate, and over the course of ten days, we formed bonds that will last a lifetime. HSD was, simply, life-changing. I realized that the second the Japanese students got off the bus, crying, smiling, and irrepressibly excited. I saw my roommate, Marina. We became instant friends, and although it wasn’t always easy to commu-

nicate due to the language barrier, we found a way to overcome that obstacle. Each day, a different theme was chosen to best teach the two countries about each other’s cultures. The American students were able to attend and participate in a traditional Japanese festival and tea ceremony. We were also exposed to the arts of calligraphy, origami, dance, and sushi-making! The Japanese students experienced their first dance, Halloween, a county fair, and a pep rally. We prepared presentations for each other on our country’s respective governments, social issues, education systems, and regional characteristics. I loved the discussion groups, in which we were able to sit and talk about relevant world issues and possible solutions to them. The Japanese students never ceased to amaze me with

SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT At the Milpitas Rotary Club meeting on September 23, Rod Diridon, Sr., Executive Director of the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI) and Chair Emeritus of the California High-Speed Rail Authority Board, presented an update on the multi-billion

dollar California High-Speed Rail (HSR) project to connect California’s major cities. Diridon served in 1971 as the youngest person ever elected to the Saratoga City Council and retired due to term limits in 1995 after completing six terms as chair of both the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors and the Transit Board. He is the only

person to have chaired San Francisco Bay Area’s three regional governments: Metropolitan Transportation Commission, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, and Association of Bay Area Governments. The transportation station in downtown San Jose is named after him. Diridon received his BS in accounting and an MSBA

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their ability to articulate their opinions on such deep subjects. They were so knowledgeable and passionate; it was truly inspiring to see. Although there were many serious moments at HSD, there were just as many fun ones. We had multiple dance parties, crazy dress up days, and awesome activities like karaoke and mock Olympics. I can’t count the times I laughed so hard I cried, and I can’t tell you how hard it was to leave at the end of the ten days. I had learned so much and made so many memories and best friends, both in America and across the ocean. All 80 of us still communicate regularly, despite the multitude of time differences. I strongly encourage all high school sophomores and juniors to apply to this incredible program. It’s a full scholarship

in statistics from San Jose State University and served two tours in Vietnam as a naval officer. Diridon began his presentation stating that cars, busses and planes contribute greatly to pollution, carbon, and global warming. The clean electric-powered 220 mph High-Speed Rail would substantially reduce the need for these modes of transportation. He said that a trip to Los Angeles from the Bay Area would take approximately two hours, faster than flying and going through the airports. Voters approved the project in 2008. California’s HSR corridor ranges from San Diego to Sacramento and to San Francisco including Los Angeles, Bakersfield, Fresno, Stockton, and San Jose. The first leg to be built will run from Madera in the Central Valley to Bakersfield. This route will expand to Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento, and San Jose. The extension from San Jose to San Francisco is expected to be completed in 2026. The project is 790 miles long with 26 stations. Convenient, accessible, high density, multi-story housing is expected to be developed near many of these stations, reducing the need for autos.

program, so cost isn’t an issue. The application is available online and must be postmarked by Jan. 8, 2014. Applicants will be notified about interviews in March, and will hear about their final status in April. The 2014 HSD program will take place Jul. 30-Aug. 9. Sponsored by AIU Insurance in Japan and the Freeman Foundation, affiliated with National Association of Japan-America Societies, the High School Diplomats Program is a cultural enrichment experience that brings together high school students from Japan and the United States. To apply, visit www.highschooldiplomats.com. For more information, contact Celine Zapolski at celinezapolski@highschooldiplomats.com.

Union City man to mark 50 years at Kraft SUBMITTED BY JOYCE HODEL Cipriano Pina (“Cip”) celebrated 50 years of work at the Kraft San Leandro beverages plant on Oct. 23. The San Leandro plant roasts and packages Maxwell House, Gevalia, and Yuban coffee, and also produces Tang, Kool-Aid, and Country Time powdered soft drinks. Cip has worked in a variety of departments and positions at the manufacturing facility during his half-century at the site, but for about the past 14 or so years, he has been roasting coffee. To mark this achievement, Kraft will be featuring Cip as a “Master Roaster” on cans of their Maxwell House and Yuban coffees beginning this December – to honor his milestone anniversary. Congratulations Cip!


October 29, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

Milpitas Rotary selects Leo B. Murphy honoree SUBMITTED BY SANDIP SHAH Experience Diwali! Also known as the festival of lights, Diwali is just around the corner. The five day Indian celebration is recognition of the triumph of good over evil and light over darkness. On the first day of the festival, November 2nd this year, people pray to goddess Laxmi for prosperity and wealth. The third day of festivities gives the celebration its nickname. Oil lamps are placed around people’s homes and on Puja Thalis, trays used to place offerings for the deities. Diwali is the most important holiday in India and for millions of Indians throughout the world. This year, a festival of lights celebration will be held at Milpitas’s Shreemaya KrishnaDham. Last year more than 5,000 people participated in the local festival. Diwali festivities at Shreemaya KrishnaDham: Rangoli Competition 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 Traditional decorative folk art of India Goddess of Education (Saraswati) and Wealth (MahaLakshmi) Pooja 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3 MahaLakshmi pooja: conducted once a year to rec-

oncile financial and spiritual books Saraswati pooja: for children of all ages New Year Celebrations 7:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Monday, Nov. 4 Early morning prayer followed by a meet and greet program with tea and light snacks Govardhan Pooja (Worship of Cow) and Annakut Darshan 1:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10 A unique traditional celebration (dating back 500 years) done only at this temple. Tulsi Vivah 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 Ceremonial marriage of the Tulsi plant (holy basil) to the Hindu god Vishnu or his Avatar, Krishna; signifies the end of the monsoon and beginning of the Hindu wedding season. Diwali at Shreemaya KrishnaDham Nov. 2 - 17 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas (408) 586-0006 www.bayvp.org

Milpitas Rotary’s Leo B. Murphy honoree Nathan Dixon from Milpitas High School

SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT On Tuesday, October 22nd, the Milpitas Rotary Club recognized Milpitas Unified School District Teacher of the Year, Nathan Dixon, of Milpitas High School as the 2013 Leo B. Murphy honoree. Dixon teaches Algebra 1 and 2, a support class, “Math Connections,” for Algebra 1 students, coaches basketball, golf, and advises the Robotics Club. Mr. Dixon is known for his innovative approach in the classroom. Nathan Dixon was also honored as one of 36 outstanding teachers by the Santa Clara County Office of Education at its 44th annual teacher recognition celebration held September 26, 2013. The ceremony was held at the Milpitas Library. Dixon was presented with his award by Milpitas Rotary President Mark Tiernan, Rotary Vocational Service Director Frank De Smidt, MUSD Superintendent Cary Matsuoka, Board of Education Clerk Danny Lau, and Milpitas Librarian Linda Arbaugh. Leo B. Murphy was a teacher, the first principal of Milpitas Unified’s then-Samuel Ayer High School, and a highly regarded Milpitas Rotarian.

(L-R) Milpitas Librarian Linda Arbaugh, MUSD Board of Education Clerk Danny Lau, MUSD Superintendent Cary Matsuoka, Honoree Nathan Dixon, and Milpitas Rotary President Mark Tiernan.

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