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Girls rule at Math & Science Discovery Day

Experience an unusual Halloween

Perceptions Works in Photography

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

October 22, 2013

Vol. 12 No. 43

BY ISABELLA OHLMEYER PHOTOS COURTESY OF OAKLAND ZOO Dress up as your favorite princess, goblin, or zoo animal and stroll through a thrilling “Boo at the Zoo” event. Co-hosted by the Bay Area Science Festival, the “spooktacular” two-day Halloween and science-themed adventure will occur Saturday and Sunday, October 26 and 27 at the Oakland Zoo. Since 1982, the East Bay Zoological Society has managed the Oakland Zoo to continuously support visitor interaction with over 600 animals, including fun and educational events such as Boo at the Zoo. “Our ‘Boo at the Zoo’ event is a great way for children and families to celebrate Halloween, while interacting with the zoo animals up-close,” said Nicky Mora, Senior Manager of Marketing and Public Relations at the Oakland Zoo. continued on page 20

BY STEVE TAYLOR Feel like one person can’t make a difference in this crazy world? Saturday, October 26th is national “Make A Difference Day” and your chance to see just how much impact an individual can make. Join your neighbors who are taking part in dozens of projects to help transform the greater Tri-City area. “Make A Difference Day” claims to be the largest national day of community

service in the United States. Sponsors say millions of volunteers gather around the world in a common mission to improve the lives of others. USA WEEKEND Magazine and Points of Light, an international nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to engaging more people and resources in solving serious social problems through voluntary service, have sponsored the event for more than 20 years. Thousands of projects are planned each year involving corporations, communities, continued on page 7

INDEX Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

SUBMITTED BY JULIE DIBBLE PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAY AREA SCIENCE FESTIVAL Dozens of events will enlighten future scientists, families and curious geeks during 10 days of science and technology activities across the Bay Area, from October 24 - November 2. The Bay Area Science Festival (BASF) is creating a myriad of interactive events and experiences that connect aspiring scientists and curious local residents with the region’s preeminent educators and experts in science and

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Community Bulletin Board . . 32

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

technology. Local astronomers, professors, engineers, health professionals and researchers will engage, entertain and educate participants of all ages throughout the festival. The largest free science educational event in the Bay Area, BASF provides residents from San Jose to Santa Rosa with a glimpse into the world behind space travel, robot engineering, genetics, volcanoes, earthquakes, and creepy nightlife creatures – even the reasons why humans crave touch, creativity and chocolate. continued on page 7

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Washington Hospital Focuses on Exceeding Core Measures

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hen you walk into a hospital, you want to know you or your loved one will receive the highest quality care possible. Washington Hospital continues to meet or exceed quality measures set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The CMS core quality measures are based on established quality improvement principles and measure how well a set of diagnoses are treated. “Everyone in health care wants to provide the best care possible to each patient every time he or she is admitted to the hospital,” said Barbara Eusebio, associate administrator of Quality and Resource Management at Washington Hospital. “The CMS core quality measures offer a uniform way for hospitals to measure and report on the quality of care they provide.” The core measures are also an evaluation tool for Washington Hospital administrators and ultimately the Board of

October 22, 2013

Washington Hospital is dedicated to providing the highest quality of care in the safest possible environment for every patient. For more information about Washington Hospital and its Quality initiatives, visit www.whhs.com/quality.

Directors, charged with assuring quality care, to determine how well the hospital is performing and whether changes need to be made in existing policies and practices to improve the quality of care. “We operate in a culture of continued quality improvement,” Eusebio added. “Washington Hospital has a multidisciplinary team led by physicians who are striving for 100 percent compliance on all measures. We are continually reviewing treatment plans to determine whether practices are in place to meet the highest standards of care.” The five core diagnoses include heart failure, heart attack or acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, stroke, and surgical care. These diagnoses affect large numbers of people and are associated with high costs and increased rates of morbidity and mortality, according to Eusebio. Heart failure occurs when the heart is not working to full capacity and can’t sup-

ply the cells with enough blood. Every year heart failure accounts for nearly 600,000 hospitalizations, she said. A heart attack happens when the flow of blood to a section of the heart suddenly becomes blocked and the heart can’t get enough oxygen. Heart attacks are a leading killer of both men and women in the United States. According to Eusebio, about 1.1 million Americans have a heart attack every year, and two out of three of those don’t make a full recovery. Pneumonia is a serious lung infection that can restrict the ability to breathe. Most people recover from it, but pneumonia can be deadly for babies and older adults. Eusebio said pneumonia accounts for nearly 600,000 hospitalizations and 500,000 emergency room visits among Medicare patients each year. With a stroke, the flow of blood to the brain is obstructed either by a blockage in an artery or a breakage in a blood vessel. It is the fourth leading cause of death in the

United States and a leading cause of disability in adults, according to the American Stroke Association. Surgical care measures are focused on reducing complications from surgery such as infection. About 500,000 surgical site infections occur in the United States each year, according to Eusebio. Patients who get an infection are 60 percent more likely to go to the Intensive Care Unit after surgery and five times more likely to be readmitted for further care, she added. “Quality care is the top priority at Washington Hospital,” Eusebio concluded. “To ensure that the hospital is offering the highest quality of care possible, we must continue to evaluate how we are doing and modify our care practices to improve on that quality. There is always room for improvement. We can never be complacent when it comes to the care and safety of our patients.” For information about Washington Hospital and its quality initiatives, visit www.whhs.com/quality.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

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1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

10/22/13

10/23/13

10/24/13

10/25/13

10/26/13

10/27/13

10/28/13

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Diabetes Matters: Vacation or Travel Plans?

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Minimally Invasive Surgery Reduce the Risk of for Lower Back Disorders Cancer?

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Deep Venous Thrombosis Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Wound Care Update

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Skin Cancer

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Shingles

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 11th, 2013

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Sidelined by Back Pain? Get Back in the Game

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 9th, 2013

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Shingles

Lunch and Learn:Yard to Table

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Disaster Preparedness

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Sidelined by Back Pain? Get Back in the Game

Disaster Preparedness

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Skin Cancer

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Diabetes Matters: Key To A Healthy Heart with Diabetes

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself Alzheimer's Disease


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Free foot screening will help residents identify problems early and get on the road to healing.

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y the time most Americans are 50 they have walked an amazing 75,000 miles, the American Podiatric Medical Association reports. During our lifetime, our feet withstand a tremendous amount of wear and tear. Yet, most of us take healthy feet for granted. It’s important that everyone take good care of their feet, and this is even more crucial for people who have foot problems that may be related to diabetes, poor circulation, or both. “Many people can have early or undiagnosed problems with their feet,” said Prasad Kilaru, M.D., a Fremont plastic surgeon and medical director of the Washington Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine. “These problems need to be identified and treated as soon as possible.” “Tiny ulcers or injuries left untreated can increase to larger wounds and ulcers, and this can eventually lead to hospitalization and even amputation of the foot or leg,” continued Dr. Kilaru. “A high percentage of people who require amputation have foot wounds.” In one recent year, more than 90,000 non-traumatic lower limb amputations were performed in the U.S., according to the American Diabetes Association. Sixty percent of these were in people with diabetes. You can get your feet checked out at a free Foot Screening and consultation sponsored by the Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine on Saturday, November 9 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Preregistration for the screening is required. Call (510) 248-1518 to make your appointment. The screening will be held at the Center, which is near Washington Hospital, at 39141 Civic Center Drive, Suite 106, in Fremont. “The free Foot Screening is our way of giving back to the community and educating residents about proper foot care and how to treat potential or early problems before they become major difficulties,” Dr. Kilaru explained. At the screening, members of the wound care clinic’s highly trained clinical team, including physicians and nurses, will check for problems with a patient’s feet or lower legs.

tory problems will also benefit from this service.” He recommends foot screening for anyone who has problems with their feet, such as diabetic ulcers or neuropathy associated with diabetes. With neuropathy, nerves are damaged and people don’t have full sensation in their feet. They may feel a tingling sensation or a feeling of pins and needles pricking the skin. Other conditions that would benefit from foot screening include: • poor circulation; • venous stasis ulcers, which are wounds that may occur when the valves in the veins of the legs don’t function properly; and • arterial ulcers that can occur when arteries in the legs are partially or completely blocked. “Diabetes is the most common problem involving the feet,” observed Dr. Kilaru. “But poor circulation, which may or may not be related to diabetes, can also affect wound healing. Neuropathy can make an injury more likely.”

Community Open House To provide people in the community over the age of 14 with free evaluations of chronic wounds, the Washington Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine will be offering a screening clinic on Saturday, November 9 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Preregistration is required. Please call (510) 248-1518 to make your appointment.

The screening is not a full physical examination and no treatment, such as prescriptions or dressings, will be provided. If foot problems are detected, the doctors and nurses will offer advice and referrals for follow-up care. Depending on the type of problem, patients may need to see a podiatrist or vascular surgeon, or they may need to seek treatment at the wound care clinic. “Whenever possible, we will co-ordinate with the patient’s primary care physician,” Dr. Kilaru added. Physicians, nurses and ancillary staff who will be at the screening are trained in wound

Respiratory Care Week Salutes Those Who Help People Breathe Easier You may not think about every breath you take, but thankfully respiratory care professionals do. They provide care to millions of Americans, from newborns to the elderly, who are having difficulty breathing, whether it’s due to an illness, accident, or surgical procedure. “We work in the entire hospital 24/7 assisting people of all ages,” said Matt Ybarra, respiratory therapist and Respiratory Care Coordinator at Washington Hospital. “When a patient is having trouble breathing or can’t breathe on their own, respiratory therapists provide care.” To recognize these dedicated professionals and their commitment to helping people breathe easier, Respiratory Care Week was created by the Association of Respiratory Care in 1982. This year it was held October 20-26. In California, only licensed respiratory care practitioners like Ybarra can provide respiratory care. They are one of three types of licensed health care professionals who work at patients’ bedsides most often. The other two are physicians and registered nurses. continued on page 9

Washington Hospital respiratory therapists are dedicated professionals that are committed to helping people breathe easier.To recognize the important role of respiratory therapists, Respiratory Care Week is being celebrated from October 20-26.

care and have been with the clinic for at least two years. A history and examination of the feet and lower legs will be performed, as well as limited testing with equipment in the clinic. There will be no invasive tests. The staff will also provide people at the screening with a private, personalized lesson in how to care for their feet. “Anyone who has an open wound on their foot or lower leg that is not healing or has been present for more than four weeks should make an appointment and come to the screening,” advised Dr. Kilaru. “All people with diabetes or circula-

The Washington Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine is having an Open House on Tuesday, October 22 from 5 to 7 p.m. Drop by and tour the facility, meet our staff and learn about when you should see a wound care specialist. For more information about the Washington Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine, visit www.whhs.com/wound.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013


The City of Fremont was ranked as the tenth happiest mid-size city in America, according to a recent survey by CareerBliss, a popular online career community. Thousands of employees from cities around the nation submitted independent company reviews evaluating their work culture. Fremont wasn’t the only city in the Golden State with a workforce singing happy tunes. Sacramento, Costa Mesa, Irvine and San Jose also made the cut. With BART extending its tracks toward a Warm Spring/South Fremont station, local employees will have yet another reason to smile. And, with spectacular plans underway for a totally redesigned downtown district – featuring a new Whole Foods Market, as well as new fitness uses in Central Fremont including newly-opened 24 Hour Fitness Super Sport, and City Sports Club – Fremont will truly be the Bay Area’s happiest nexus of work and play. Speaking of play, many local employees take advantage of Fremont’s amazing recreational amenities including the trails up to Mission Peak, Quarry Lakes, and Coyote Hills, as well as the 1,200 acres of City of Fremont park land which includes Fremont’s crown jewel, Lake Elizabeth in Central Park. RANK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

CITY Sacramento Albuquerque Plano Richmond Costa Mesa Atlanta San Jose Irvine Tempe Fremont

STATE California New Mexico Texas Virginia California Georgia California California Arizona California

More information about the survey can be found on the CareerBliss website at http://bit.ly/1b8mX8q.

Upcoming Free Small Business Workshop Grow Your Business with Email and Social Media Many businesses find themselves seeking the right strategies, tools, and tactics to make their marketing efforts as effective as possible. Between Facebook and Twitter, email and mobile, deals, and new social network tools there’s a lot to keep up with. To help you reach your marketing goals, attend this free business workshop, which is hosted by the Fremont Main Library and co-sponsored by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce and City of Fremont. Thursday, Oct. 24 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Fremont Main Library, Fukaya Room 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont To register for the workshop visit the Alameda County Small Business Development Center website at www.acsbdc.org.

Join us for Make a Difference Day on Saturday, Oct. 26 Join the City of Fremont Environmental Services Division as we do our part for Make a Difference Day at Sabercat Historical Park. Sabercat Historical Park is one of the City’s newest attractions and runs along Sabercat Creek slot canyon in the Mission San Jose district. The park features a walking trail that runs east to west from Pine Street (beneath Paseo Padre Parkway) toward Interstate 680. For the Make a Difference Day – Sabercat Habitat Restoration Project, we are looking for volunteers to help us weed, remove dead plants, reconstruct protective plant barriers, apply mulch treatments, and plant new native vegetation. We already have a great show of support from various community groups, including the City’s

Tri-City Animal Shelter to Offer Free Pet Adoptions in October In celebration of the fall, the Tri-City Animal Shelter is offering free pet adoptions for cats, kittens, dogs, puppies, and rabbits every Wednesday and Saturday throughout October. The shelter is currently full of animals waiting to find new forever homes. Each pet will either be spayed or neutered before going home with their new family (included with the free adoption). Fremont residents may be required to pay City licensing fees. To view animals available at the shelter, visit www.petharbor.com. The Tri-City Animal Shelter is located at 1950 Stevenson Blvd. behind the Police building. The Shelter is open Tuesday through Friday, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., and on Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Don’t delay. There’s never been a more “purrfect” time to adopt a pet!

Environmental Sustainability Commission, Niles Rotary, Green Club, and Azevada Elementary School. Would you like to join us? Come check out this great natural wonder and help us “Make a Difference.” Plants, tools, rubber gloves, water, and pizza will be provided for all volunteers. Please bring sunscreen, hats, and gardening gloves. The Sabercat Habitat Restoration Project takes place on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The meeting location is at Paseo Padre Parkway and Quema Drive. For more information, contact the City’s Barbara Silva at bsilva@fremont.gov or (510) 494-4575.

Fremont’s Charlie Chaplin mural in Niles, voted one of the best murals in the East Bay by CBS San Francisco Bay Area website, is just one of more than 40 beautiful art pieces located in public places throughout the city. Want to know where you can find these hidden yet very public treasures? Check out our interactive map that the Fremont Cultural Arts Council developed. It will take you on a virtual tour of more than 40 pieces of art located throughout the city. Visit www.Fremont.gov/ArtMap to point you in the right direction.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

Auto Review

Kia Cadenza: A New Kind of Flagship BY STEVE SCHAEFER

FILTERING CABIN AIR

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early every vehicle sold in North America is outfitted with a cabin air filter, which was first introduced to protect passengers from pollen and dust. Today, many cabin air filters have absorptive filter systems that utilize activated carbon to remove odors, diesel soot, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen sulfide. However, many vehicle owners are not even aware that their automobiles have cabin air filters, let alone that they need to be replaced regularly. If not changed, cabin air filters can become blocked and become a source of breeding bacteria and allergens. Moreover, blocked filters can compromise the working of the HVAC system due to airflow restriction. For these reasons, most manufacturers rec-

ommend two-year replacement intervals. Is your cabin air filter more than two years old? If so, you need to bring your car into BAY STAR AUTO CARE right away. Our experienced technicians are ASE certified, which means we have the experience and expertise to provide the best maintenance for your car. We can change filters and fluids and check to make sure that wear and tear isn't going to make a small part turn into a big repair bill. Please call today for an appointment today. And remember, we do smog inspections! HINT: If a vehicle’s AC system is not cooling properly, a blocked cabin air filter may be the culprit.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

Caution Buyers Traps To Avoid Free Report reveals what you need to know before you buy a home. www.HomeBuyerGotchas.com Free recorded message 1-800-597-5259 ID# 1018 Realty World Neighbors BRE#01138169

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f you’ve followed Kia over the last 20 years, you remember those first cars. The 1994 Sephia I tested was pretty basic. It had everything you needed, but

absolutely nothing extra. It felt like a knock-off previous-generation Toyota Corolla. However, unlike the Hyundai Excel a decade earlier, it wasn’t really bad, just plain. Of course, we all know the story. Over the years, Kia’s models have not only proliferated, but improved significantly with each generation. Now, it’s time for Kia to introduce their “Lexus.” It’s called the Cadenza, and a fine flagship it is. There’s no compromise here. There is exactly one model — Premium. It’s big and it’s beautiful. And, it comes with all the good stuff, standard. You get a navigation system and a 550-watt Infinity stereo with 12 speakers, including subwoofer. You sit on leather seats and hold a beautiful leather and wood wheel, bask in full climate control, and much more. The Cadenza is motivated by a 3.3-liter V6 that puts out 293 horsepower and 255 lb.-ft. of torque under the shapely hood, all driven through a six-speed automatic with SportMatic manual paddle shifters. Yet, it drinks regular gas. The EPA gives it ratings of 19 City, 28 Highway, and 22 Combined. I averaged 19.5 mpg. The EPA Green scores are 5 for Smog and Greenhouse Gas. It’s a great thing that Peter Schreyer, the former Audi designer, is in charge of how Kias look. When I parked my Smokey Blue Cadenza test car next to my wife’s Liquid Blue Metallic Audi, you could see some similarities. The proportions are just right, neither boring nor overstyled. While the German brands today are abandoning their formerly conservative, handsome look for something more exuberant, the Cadenza wears the look of a classic BMW, Audi or Mercedes. It looks expensive. Inside, the car lives up to its impressive body, with the right look and feel. The heated steering wheel has the top third of wood, the rest leather. It’s always fun to turn a steering wheel and have a different-feeling handful. It is definitely a luxury touch. Everything is there, including an illuminated console bin, sumptuous leather seating, and the perfect blend of textures and materials.

My tester featured both of the two available option packages. In case the standard amenities aren’t enough for you, order the Technology Package and get Advanced Smart Cruise Control, where you can follow the car in front at a set

distance (and automatically slow down when that driver does). You also get Blind Spot Detection, a popular feature that probably prevents hundreds of accidents every day. This package includes “Hydrophobic” front door windows, which stay clear when the rain hits them. I wasn’t able to test that feature, thanks to some fine late summer weather. The Luxury Package fills in what the standard package lacks. Get a panoramic sunroof, upgraded leather trim, a ventilated driver’s seat with electric seat cushion extension, and an electric rear sunshade. The Supervision meter cluster performs a little light show when you turn on the car. Number dividers for the speedometer shoot out from the center of the gauge and assemble

along the ring of the meter. I never got tired of watching the show. An image of the car winks its headlamps at you, as if to say “Hi.” There’s a little musical tune, too. It wouldn’t be a great car if, with all that equipment, it was a bore to drive. Luckily, it’s not. The 3,668-pound car drives like it is lighter, yet sails happily along the freeway in cruise mode. The

Over the past 21 years, Steve Schaefer has tested more than 1,000 cars and published a weekly story on every one. As a teenager, he visited car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models as they first rolled off the transporter. He is a founding member of the Western Automotive Journalists. Contact Steve at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

sport-tuned suspension, along with 19-inch wheels and tires from the Technology Package made the car feel planted and ready for anything. My tester, as a benefit of containing these packages, had the optional white leather interior at no extra cost. You don’t see those every day, and I’m sure you’d have to take care of it, but it illuminated the cabin and felt very posh. With the packages, this car really has everything you could want. I was sure there must be some flaw, and I did find one tiny problem. I set the otherwise divine audio system to NOT change volume with road speed, but it insisted on doing it anyway, so I worked the knob a bit when commute traffic speed varied. But that’s it. The price is $35,900, including shipping, for the base model.

Add in the two packages and you’ll be at $41,900. That may be the only problem the Cadenza will have to solve. Are there enough buyers for a $42,000 Kia? I think if enough people actually sample the car, after their disbelief fades, they may see their way to signing some papers and participating in the remarkable Kia success story.


October 22, 2013 continued from page 1

nonprofit organizations, entire states, and individuals like you. Regardless of age, location, or resources, every volunteer can accomplish amazing things. “Newman’s Own” supports Make A Difference Day by awarding $10,000 to charities of 10 National Honorees and three City Awardees. In 2012, the City of Fremont won one of the City Awards, highlighting the impact of engaging its citizens in service. Calling Fremont “one of the most diverse cities in the country” where 167 languages are spoken but united in community service, Mayor Bill Harrison said, “Make A Difference Day allows people of all backgrounds to work together to improve our city.” Last October, a record number of 1,339 volunteers, led by Fremont’s Human Relations Commission, formed a virtual army of good to help their neighbors. Volunteers weeded a community garden, painted schools, cleaned up a creek, fixed code violations at seniors’ houses, collected 200 pounds of peanut butter and jelly for the homeless on top of 76 other projects. Fremont has even bigger plans for 2013. Fremont: A sample of the 20 major projects already registered on the Make A Difference Day website is the Sabercat Historical Park Revitalization project. Azevada Elementary school and the Environmental Sustainability Commission & Environmental Services will lead volunteers on habitat restoration by weeding, planting trees and plants, applying mulch, and more. Meet at the corner of Paseo Padre Parkway and Quema Drive at 9 a.m.; bring gloves, water, labeled tools, sunscreen and a great attitude! Other opportunities around the city include graffiti removal, stuffing envelopes, cereal and food drives, writing letters to local heroes, and several beautification projects. For more information, visit www.makeadifferenceday.com, call (510) 5742099 or e-mail makeadifferenceday@fremont.gov. Hayward: California State University, East Bay students are teaming up with Hayward Shoreline and Keep Hayward Clean and Green by cleaning the parks and shorelines and putting together kits for Alternative Family Services. Come to the campus at 7 a.m. to register, have a short breakfast and kick off, then disperse into the community. Lunch will be served at noon back on campus. Or you can help the “Mixed Roots Foundation” in Hayward raise awareness at their inaugural Adoptee Day with the San Jose Earthquakes; a very special day for all who have

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE been touched by adoption and foster care. Mixed Roots Foundation teamed up with the San Jose Earthquakes and local community sponsors and partners like Just Desserts, Bay Area Mentoring, African Cradle, and the Post Adoption Center for Education and Research (PACER) to recruit volunteers to give of their time and resources including hosting a free basic 101 soccer clinic for youth (ages 5-17) with a goal to ultimately help promote health, fitness, and cross cultural skills. The event begins at 10 a.m. at 25555 Hesperian Boulevard on the soccer field behind the tennis courts. For more information, call (415) 889-7522 or email hbachman@mixedrootsfoundation.org. Milpitas: The Milpitas Executive Lions are once again holding their annual event at Seasons MarketPlace, 1535 Landess Avenue. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attendees can get health screenings, recycle e-waste, donate used glasses for the Lions’ “Sharing the Vision Campaign” and learn about available services and places they can volunteer and make a difference. This year there will also be a car show. For more information, call (408) 430-7830, (408) 772-1432 or e-mail milpitaslions@gmail.com. The Community Advisory Commission is looking for 50 volunteers to be trained by City arborists to help plant trees around the boundary of Milpitas. This is an ongoing project throughout the winter and spring, with training possibly starting in November, as dictated by the number of responses. Training will be held at the Milpitas Community Center on weekends and planting will be done on weekends as well. For more information or to sign up, call Ray Maglalang at (408) 262-8425. Newark: Several Newark and multi-jurisdiction projects are registered at www.makeadifferenceday.com. For City volunteer opportunities, contact Maintenance Superintendent Robert Costa at (510) 578-4806 or Community Engagement Specialists Tim Jones (510) 578-4209 or Donna Shearn (510) 578-4379. Union City: Seven projects were registered in Union City with volunteer opportunities ranging from tree planting on Appian Way to graffiti abatement at San Andreas Park. Sample projects include painting over graffiti along the sound wall on the Union City Trail system under Highway 880 between Almaden Boulevard and San Andreas Park. Volunteers should wear old clothing, shoes, hat and gloves for painting purposes. Painting, painting tools and water will be provided, but restrooms are not available. To learn more or register for projects, call (510) 675-5373, e-mail nelsonk@unioncity.org, or visit http://www.union-city.ca.us/. The best way to get involved is to visit www.makeadifferenceday.com and use the “Search Projects” button to find projects in your community and beyond. Please note some activities have registration deadlines. Choose the project that best suits you and get out there –you will make a difference.

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The third annual BASF, presented by Chevron and organized by UC San Francisco, features more than 50 complimentary events, culminating with free Discovery Days at AT&T Park on Saturday, November 2nd from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. AT&T Park will transform into a science wonderland with hundreds of interactive exhibits, hands-on activities, and electrifying performances. “There are so many important innovations in science and technology developing every day, right here in the San Francisco Bay Area,” says Kishore Hari, BASF’s director. “The Bay Area Science Festival provides a fantastic opportunity for residents to learn about the vast resources and expertise for which the region is known the world over, and hopefully spark a passion among a future generation of scientists.” Here’s a sampling of what’s in store during the 2013 Bay Area Science Festival: Discovery Days: FREE, exhibition-packed Discovery Days offered in the North at Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa and East Bay at CSUEB in Hayward (both on October 26). Families are encouraged to “unleash their inner scientists” with more than 150 interactive opportunities to discover the inner workings of their environment. Thousands of curious participants are expected to turn out to observe the surface of the sun telescopically, learn how to cast fossils, enjoy a chemistry magic show and delve into the life of a forensic criminalist. The AT&T Park event will also feature a Robot Zoo in partnership with Silicon Valley Robotics, filling Willie Mays Plaza with engineering wonders, including Project Skye – The Omnidirectional Spherical Blimp – all the way from Switzerland. The Chevron STEM Zone brings even more activities this year as Chevron offers 10,000 free science kits with an attached family science guide. Life Science Alley will double in size with numerous local biotech companies showcasing activities. Open Labs: On Sunday, October 27, more than 20 different tours, explorations and presentations will be offered throughout the Bay Area. From a bicycle tour along the levees of the Don Edwards SF Bay Refuge and hikes along the San Andreas and Hayward Faults, to a tour of the west coast’s wetlands

and a “Hawk Talk” in the Marin Headlands, there is something to bring virtually anyone closer to their inner scientist. The Moth: The Discovery Channel’s MythBusters host Adam Savage joins other scientists for a special storytelling night with the Moth, discussing creation and chaos and eruptions within the laboratories of the mind and spirit with The Moth’s signature flair for bringing stories to life onstage. Nerd Nite at Sea: Due to the overwhelming interest in this sold out event last year, this October 30, BASF has chartered a bigger boat: the USS Hornet aircraft carrier! The vessel itself is a floating museum of space and military history and technology, having picked up the Apollo 11 capsule from the Pacific. The evening will also be packed with expert lectures, demos and, of course, science beer. Over 1000 are expected. The Bay Area Science Festival has collaborated with several esteemed leaders in the corporate and academic worlds to present these and many more events. Featured sponsors include the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, First Tech Federal Credit Union, the Clorox Company, ThermoFisher Scientific, Autodesk, Bayer and Agilent Technologies. For more information on the festival or more details on specific events, please visit the BASF website at http://www.bayareascience.org. Bay Area Science Festival Thursday, Oct. 24 – Saturday, Nov. 2 California State University East Bay Saturday, Oct 26 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Science Buildings 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd, Hayward (Parking in lots D,E,F,&G, closest to the Science festival activities in the North & South Science Buildings) (510) 885-3441 http://www.bayareascience.org/festival/d iscovery-days-at-cal-state-east-bay/ Discovery Day finale Saturday, Nov. 2 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. AT&T Park, San Francisco http://www.bayareascience.org


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Local Police Departments welcome female police officers from Tajikistan SUBMITTED BY FREMONT POLICE DEPARTMENT The police departments of Fremont and Hayward, California hosted a contingency of female police officers from the central Asian nation of Tajikistan. The officers arrived in the Bay Area to participate in and attend the Women Leaders in Law Enforcement Training Symposium October 6-8, 2013 in San Jose. Following the Training Symposium and in partnership with the California Police Chiefs Association and The Emergence Group, a consulting agency working to reform policing in Tajikistan, Fremont PD and Hayward PD partnered with the Tajik officers and their translators with female officers from the diverse East Bay communities.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY PIO GENEVA BOSQUES, FPD Friday, October 11 After releasing video surveillance of the Walmart gold chain robbery that occurred on October 4th, a tip was received Friday morning that led to the arrest of an 18 year old adult male. The female counterpart is still outstanding. Fremont Fire Dept. requested assistance at an address on Canfield Drive after responding to a report of an explosion at the residence. The residence is very well known for drug use and probation violations. Today a resident attempted to extract “hash oil” using butane canisters in a closed room. The room also housed the water heater and it appears that the flame from the water heater ignited the butane gas in the room, causing an explosion. The adult male was transported to a trauma center for burns. A female juvenile teen who was also slightly injured was transported to a local hospital for treatment. The Major Crimes Supervisor was notified and Agent Young assumed the investigation. A residential burglary was reported on the 39900 block of Stevenson Common where five bowling balls were stolen from the garage. The suspect from last night’s robbery at Washington/680 (#131011005) was at it again tonight. The suspect targeted another Asian female, this time at Aberdeen Café located on the 46800 block of Warm Springs Blvd. The female victim was visiting from out of the country and had a large amount of cash in her purse. The victim was having dinner with a group of friends. The suspect, a 41 year old adult male, walked in and sat down at a table behind the victim. He then took the opportunity and grabbed the victim’s purse and ran out the front door to his gray 2001 Toyota Camry. When he tried to drive away however, friends of the victim blocked the parking lot exit. He then parked his vehicle and fled on foot. Ofc. Taylor arrived and located the suspect vehicle in the lot. Ofc. Sasser arrived and located the suspect walking on Mission Blvd. The suspect was identified by witnesses and placed under arrest. The purse from tonight’s victim was located inside the vehicle and returned to her. Ofc. Wilson recognized the similarity from this case to his robbery from the prior night (680/Washington) so he picked up his victim and the suspect and his vehicle were positively identified for last night’s incident. Several officers are following up on additional cases that the suspect may be responsible for. Saturday, October 12 An adult male is sitting in his vehicle after playing badminton at United Badminton Club at Pacific Commons when two masked subjects came up to his vehicle demanding his belongings. One of the suspects has his hands in his pockets and victim believes he is armed with a gun. Victim is relieved of his backpack, wallet containing his identification and various credit cards. The suspects fled on foot. Follow up for video surveillance to be conducted. Investigated by Ofc. Hollifield. Ofc. Taylor was detailed to the Bijan Restaurant regarding a fight. Upon arriving he located a male bleeding from the head who had been struck by a beer bottle. The male sustained a cut on his forehead, but refused medical treatment. The

The Tajik officers toured local departments, spent time talking with local female police officers, had lunch together and participated in ride-a-longs with Fremont or Hayward police officers. Female police officers in Tajikistan have been traditionally assigned to administrative duties only, very similar to the beginnings of law enforcement in the United States. This visit to the U.S. was designed to allow the Tajik officers to watch American female police officers handle crime alongside their male counterparts. Tajikistan is moving toward having their female police officers handle crimes against women and children, a progression that mirrors the evolution of female police officers in America.

suspect fled prior to police arrival. This is the second assault with a deadly weapon incident at this restaurant in the last two weeks, staff will be following up with management to determine what may be contributing to the increase in incidents of this nature. Ofc. Taylor was detailed to Cloverleaf Bowl for a fight between two men, in which one had been knocked unconscious. Upon arriving both men advised they were good friends and denied a fight. One male was transported to the hospital due to the extent of his injuries. The other was arrested for public drunkenness. Ofc. Piol was detailed to the Saddle Rack regarding a battery to the security staff. Officers locate two involved parties and one was arrested for battering the security staff and the other was arrested for public drunkenness. Sunday, October 13 Officers were dispatched to rear of a business (47000 block of Bayside Pk) on a report of a male on fire. Officers arrived and through witnesses learned that the male had parked his car at which time the vehicle exploded. An employee from inside the business pulled the male from the vehicle and used a fire extinguisher which ceased the flames. The male was transported to a trauma center with life-threatening injuries. A propane tank was found in the right front passenger seat of the vehicle. Monday, October 14 A caller reports that she went out to her car parked on Chrisholm Pl. and found her car burglarized. There was a purse and other stuff laying around her car on the street, but none of it was her loss. A neighbor’s vehicle was also stolen during the night and the two cases are probably related. The stolen vehicle is a green and white 1993 Ford Bronco with CA license plate 6BUD066. Handled by CSO Baca/FTO CSO Aguirre. Officer Zargham was dispatched to a stolen vehicle where the victim witnessed his 1999 black Honda Civic (6DDG136) being stolen from the Walmart parking lot on Osgood Rd. With the help of a citizen, the victim pursued the stolen vehicle but lost it near the Shell Gas Station on Automall Pkwy. Officers were dispatched to 3rd St Park in Niles on the second-hand report of a stabbing. Witnesses reported to police that the victim appeared to be stabbed in the arm and fled the scene in a green Honda Accord. Minutes later, the victim checked into a local ER with a stab wound to the arm. Officer Valdes is leading the investigation. Tuesday, October 15 At approximately 8:10 a.m., Officer Fuellenbach investigated a residential burglary on the 35000 block of Cabrillo Drive where part of the loss was an iPad. The find-my-iPad app led Officer Fuelllenbach to a residence on the 4700 block of Portola. Through follow-up Officer Fuellenbach learned that a resident at the home on Portola had an active felony residential burglary warrant out of Sonoma County. Officer Fuellenbach made contact at the residence and learned that the adult male had fled out the back door after learning that police were there. The victim’s iPad was located inside the residence. A perimeter was established and a search was conducted with the assistance of Officer Romley and his K9 as well as CHP’s helicopter. After an extensive search the adult male was not located. Officers continued to check the area and Officer Roberts eventually located the adult male near the intersection of Portola/Coronado. The 21 year old

adult male was taken into custody for possession of stolen property, obstructing/resisting arrest and for the warrant. We highly recommend installing the find my iPad, iPod Touch, Mac, iPhone app on your devices if you haven’t already. Our Traffic CSO followed up on a number of abandoned vehicles that were recently called in or reported via the online complaint form. Many of the vehicles received 72 hour warning notices. The following streets received service: Langhorn Drive, Sauvignon Court (2 vehicles), Barton Way, Central, Merrill, Kahlua Ct (3 vehicles), Blackstone, Azul Ct, Loma Drive, Argyle, Darwin, Philadelphia, Philadelphia/Monmouth Pl. and Loma/Mission. At approximately 1:20 a.m., Officer Little investigated a commercial burglary window smash at 7-Hills Foods. At approximately 4:55 a.m., Officer Piol investigated a window smash at Fremont Gas & Food. Unknown loss at this time but evidence recovered from the scenes indicates the same suspect(s) were involved in both. Wednesday, October 16 At approximately 5:00 a.m. a citizen called to report a shooting at the intersection of Auto Mall and Technology. The victim pulled up behind a grey Honda Civic that was stopped at a traffic light. The light happened to be green so the victim honked at the driver of the Civic. The driver took off, but did not take the “Honk” all that well and decided to shoot at the victim’s tire once the victim’s vehicle approached. The driver then casually drove away after the single shot. The driver was described as a male wearing a hoodie. The victim could not see the driver’s face. Several officers searched the area, but the suspect was not located. Officer Settle is investigating. At approximately 8:35 p.m., Officer A. Gonzalez responded to the area of “5 corners” to investigate a suspicious person at Mountain Mikes Pizza restaurant. The reporting party stated that the suspicious person was asking her teenage daughter for money and then asked on two occasions if she would come to his house. Officers searched the area and found the intoxicated man in front of Irvington Liquor and Grocery Store on Fremont Blvd. He was sitting with a newly purchased 24 ounce can of beer. The 45 year old adult male transient was arrested for annoying/molesting a child and for being drunk in public. Thursday, October 17 Officers respond to Advanced Cellular on the 46200 block of Warm Springs Blvd in regards to a strong-armed robbery that had just occurred. Two Hispanic male adult suspects in their early 20’s enter the business and take two iPads. They were last seen getting into a black 4door Nissan. Initially, it was reported that the reporting party fought with the suspects. Further investigation revealed, the incident was a grand theft. Case investigated by Ofc. Stone. Officers respond to a possible kidnapping near Calypso Terrace. The reporting party stated that she observed two males, both wearing hoodies, grab a 12 year old girl and take her into a house. Officers Lobue and Perry become suspicious about the story. The homeowner of the alleged house arrives home and is concerned. The homeowner gives the officers consent to enter the house to check on the girl. Officers Lobue and Perry discover marijuana grow house continued onpage 35


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Respiratory Care Week Salutes Those Who Help People Breathe Easier Respiratory care practitioners routinely perform a variety of duties, including: • Use mechanical ventilation for patients who need it • Administer medications in aerosol form • Monitor equipment and patients’ responses to therapy • Obtain blood specimens and analyze them to determine levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and other gases. • Maintain artificial airways (tracheostomy or intubation) • Measure the capacity of patients’ lungs to determine if there is impairment • Obtain and analyze sputum specimens and chest X-rays • Assess vital signs and other indicators of respiratory dysfunction • Perform stress tests and other studies of the cardiopulmonary system • Study disorders of people with disruptive sleep patterns • Conduct rehabilitation activities • Lead asthma education and smoking cessation programs Critical Care “We work everywhere – pediatrics, the emergency department, intensive care – where there are lungs and problems with lungs, we are there,” Ybarra said. “We are also an integral part of the critical care team.” Critical care specialists treat the most gravely ill patients in the hospital. These patients are generally clinging to life due to a medical condition like cancer, stroke, or lung disease, or are victims of a serious accident. “Washington Hospital uses a multidisciplinary approach to critical care,” Ybarra explained. “We work together as a team.” In addition to respiratory therapists, the critical care team includes physicians who are specially trained in critical care medicine called intensivists, critical care nurses, pharmacists, nutritionists, physical therapists, speech therapist, social workers, case managers, physician specialists and spiritual care staff.

“The goal is to get these critically ill patients off the breathing machine as soon as possible,” he said. “The team does rounds together. We go from patient to patient and evaluate where the patient is at, what the goals are for their care, and what needs to happen so they are well enough to move out of the intensive care unit. How they are breathing is a huge part of that.” Reducing Readmissions “Respiratory therapists also spend a lot of time on education,” Ybarra added. “We educate patients in the hospital setting so they know how to manage their condition after they go home. That really helps to avoid readmissions.” He said Washington Hospital has started a pilot project to help reduce hospital readmissions among lung disease patients, particularly those with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). A specially trained respiratory therapist works to get patients enrolled in Washington Hospital’s pulmonary rehabilitation program before they leave the hospital. “We are looking to close the gap between inpatient and outpatient care when it comes to people with COPD,” Ybarra explained. “The pulmonary rehabilitation program requires a referral from a physician and there is a lag between when a patient leaves the hospital and when they start the program. Often they get sick again before they can start the program. So the goal is to have them start the program soon after they are discharged so they can get the support and education they need to stay healthy right away.” Through the pulmonary rehabilitation program, respiratory therapists provide one-on-one counseling to people with lung diseases like COPD, asthma, and emphysema. They help people learn how to manage their disease with medications and lifestyle changes. For more information about pulmonary rehabilitation services offered at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/pulmonaryrehabilitation.

WANT TO PROTECT YOUR HOME THINK MELLO BY NED MACKAY Halloween activities continue at Ardenwood Historic Farm with Halloween Hijinks with naturalist aide Mindy Castle from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 26. At 11 a.m. its time to roast pumpkin seeds in a wood-burning stove and at noon, apple cider pressing. Halloween crafts are at 1 p.m. and Halloween games at 2 p.m. A pumpkin-carving clinic is scheduled from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, October 27 led by naturalist aide Andrew Staley. Bring your own pumpkin or purchase one from the farm; the staff will provide some tools and guidance for your jack-o-lantern creation. For information on admission fees and programs, call (510) 544-2797.

SUBMITTED BY FUSS 4 SCHOOLS Students, are you interested in representing your school by participating in the 2nd Annual FUSD’s Got Talent show? This year’s event takes place on Saturday, December 7. Check with your school to see if you can be the representative. Deadline for registration is November 8. Last year, over 300 students from 20 FUSD (Fremont Unified School District) elementary, junior high and high schools participated, and about 800 people came to the show. Beautiful perpetual trophies and valuable cash prizes were presented to the winning students and their schools.

Halloween Activities at Ardenwood Saturday, Oct 26 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct 27 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org Admission: Sat.: $3 adults/seniors, $2 children (under four years - free) Sun.: $6 adults, $5/seniors, $4 children (under four years - free)

Due to popular demand and because of all the talent in our school district, this year FUSS (Fremont Unified Student Store) will increase the awards by including a category for administrators, staff, and faculty members currently employed by FUSD, in addition to the existing student category. Again, the judging criteria will be based on creativity, technical skills, and showmanship. We hope to see all FUSD schools participate in FUSD’s Got Talent. To register, or for updated information, visit www.fuss4schools.org or email fuss4schools@gmail.com.

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

#OB84518


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

Free virtual legal assistance at local libraries Costly Homeseller Mistakes You Need to Avoid When You Sell Your Home! Tri-City – A new report has just been release which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today’s market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers don’t get what they want for their home and become disillusioned and – worse – financially disadvantaged when they put their home on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled “The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top Dollar”. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-228-3917 and enter ID #1000. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

SUBMITTED BY SANTA CLARA COUNTY PUBLIC AFFAIRS Legal assistance is expensive and if money is an issue, Santa Clara County might be able to help. To assist individuals who may not be able to afford the expenses associated with seeking professional legal advice, the Santa Clara County Library District, in partnership with the Pro Bono Project, are offering eight free virtual legal advice clinics at select Santa Clara County locations through Oct. 25. “Finding reliable legal advice can be a daunting task,” said Santa Clara County Supervisor Mike Wasserman. “These legal clinics may be able to assist residents in making better informed legal decisions.” The Pro Bono Project is coordinating these free twenty-minute consultations with the assistance of volunteer attorneys from local corporations and commercial law firms. For their virtual meetings, individuals will use laptops, a printer/scanner, and video conferencing

software provided by the Pro Bono Project to meet with a volunteer attorney over the Internet. Individuals will have the capability to scan and send documents to the volunteer attorney, who will give legal advice and further referrals in return. Library personnel will be available to help navigate the computer system should assistance be needed. The virtual consultations will be conducted via a video conferencing program, and individuals must register in advance for their sessions. Individuals can register online sign up at participating locations. Short waiting lists will be maintained at each location after available sessions have been booked. Virtual legal advice clinic in Milpitas Wednesday, Oct. 23 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Milpitas Library 160 N. Main St., Milpitas Register online at: www.probonoproject.org/virtual-clinics.

This report is courtesy of Capital Realty Group. Not intended to solicit properties currently listed for sale.

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Bay Area Showcase Chorus presents ‘We’re Having a Luau!’ #OB84518

SUBMITTED BY DONNA LOU MORGAN Bay Area Showcase Chorus is off to Hawaii to strut their stuff on the international stage, having won the Pacific Shores Region 12 Competition in 2012. Before they make it to their hotel, they end up at the wackiest luau ever! The “Aunties” of Lipschtick, Inc. will amuse and delight the audience with their antics while introducing the many wonderful singers and performers who will be there to make it a memorable afternoon. The “We’re Having a Luau!” show will feature performances by Canzonet Quartet, With a Twist Quartet, the Kapalakiko Hawaiian Band, and several small choruses. Be sure to join us for an afternoon of music and laughter, but be sure NOT to come hungry. I have a feeling that the luau feast will not go as planned…

Join Union City Leisure Services and a city full of ghosts and goblins for a safe, spooky, and fun-filled afternoon at the “Halloween Carnival.” Tour our haunted house, play ghoulish games, win wicked prizes and have some tasty treats. Sponsored by Chapel of the Chimes Hayward, the “Halloween Carnival” is open to children age 3-12 (and their parent, of course) and is a fun and safe alternative for fami-

The Bay Area Showcase Chorus members share a love for music and singing barbershop harmony. As a member, you too can experience the exhilaration of performing and singing with us! Any woman of average singing ability, with or without vocal training, will find a part that fits her voice range with the help of the chorus’ musical leaders and director(s). Bay Area Showcase Chorus performs regularly throughout the community, offering its talent for entertainment at civic events and charitable functions since 1956. Members of the chorus come from all over the Bay Area to enjoy the singing, fun, and friendship offered by the chorus. Bay Area Showcase Chorus was the 2012 Regional Champions and will be honored to represent the region at the 2013 International Competition. The chorus will be competing for the title

lies to celebrate the holiday. Thanks go to sponsors Carol J. Vernaci, EA, Jazzercise, Toppings Too, Velu Couture, Traci Lyn Fashion Jewelry, Dr. Chong DDS Inc., and donor Texas Road House. Tickets are $7 at the door, $5 if purchased in advance at Holly Community Center, Kennedy Community Center, and the Mark Green Sports Center.

again in April 2014. To find additional information about the chorus, visit www.SingHarmony.org or contact (408) 202-9400. Tickets are available at www.SingHarmony.org or at the door. We’re Having a Luau! Saturday, Oct 26 2:30 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (408) 973-1555 www.SingHarmony.org Tickets: $15 adults, $10 children under 12 Parking permits are available online or from permit vending machines located in the lots at the college. Parking is $2 per day.

Halloween Carnival Sunday, Oct 27 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5276 www.unioncity.org Tickets: $7 at door, $5 in advance.


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE SIMONE Residents of Acacia Creek Retirement Community will celebrate their third annual “Fall Fashion Show and Harvest Lunch” on Saturday, October 26. The date of the show holds special significance; National Make a Difference Day is a national day of community service and October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Mary Jane Hodges, community outreach manager at Acacia Creek, explains, “The Fashion Show is a way for Acacia Creek residents give back to the local community.” Each year, proceeds from the Fashion Show support local charities. This year’s beneficiaries are the New Haven Schools Foundation and HERS Breast Cancer Foundation. Representatives from both organizations will join Acacia Creek residents in modeling clothing donated by local Chico’s and Men’s Warehouse stores. Acacia Creek resident Elizabeth O’Donnell, one of this year’s models, explains, “As a former teacher, I’m so glad to be able to support our local schools.” Executive Director of HERS Breast Cancer Foundation Dr. Vera Packard will join O’Donnell on the runway. Packard says, “We applaud Acacia

SUBMITTED BY DONALD WILSON Kids can have a magical Halloween filled with tricks, treats, and sweets at the “Halloween Kids Festival” held at NewPark Mall on October 31 on the Lower Level near JCPenney. The festival includes: • A Monster Mash Dance-off. • DJ playing tunes and spinning a prize wheel loaded with giveaways making everyone a winner. • A raffle for prize packs from NewPark Mall stores for new and existing Our Place members. • A live show by Dan Chan the Magic Man and Kat the Acrobat (www.danchanmagic.com). • Costume Contest for kids 12 years old and younger in various age categories. Registration is required to participate (open from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and masks are not allowed on teens and adults for safety and security reasons).

Creek for supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month with this beautiful event. We are grateful to be one of the beneficiaries for the second time and I am so delighted to be one of the models this year.” Rebecca Venable, president and CEO of New Haven Schools Foundation adds, “The New Haven Schools Foundation is very grateful to the Acacia Creek community for their continued support and we are honored to once again be a beneficiary of this year’s Fashion Show. I’m excited to see what they have planned for this year’s festivities.” Reservations are requested. Learn more about Acacia Creek’s active, purpose-driven lifestyle at: acaciacreek.org.

Fall Fashion Show and Harvest Lunch Saturday, Oct 26 11:30 a.m. Acacia Creek Retirement Community 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 441-3717 acaciacreek.org mjhodges@acaciacreek.org Tickets: $35

• Spooky Photos where parents can take photos of their “little monsters” in front of a spooky backdrop. • Trick-or-treating throughout the mall where select retailers will be passing out candy from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. (non-participating retailers will have a sign posted at the store’s entrance). NewPark Mall will also be hosting an online Halloween Costume Photo Contest for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Red Robin. Entrants must simply tag the Facebook or Instagram costume photo with the hashtag #NPMHalloween to enter. Photos must be tagged no later than November 2. From November 3 – 8 “like” NewPark Mall on Facebook for a chance to vote. The winner will be announced on November 11. NewPark Mall’s “Halloween Kids Festival” is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.newparkmall.com. Halloween Kids Festival Thursday, Oct 31 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.newparkmall.com Free

be demonstrating pumpkin drawing and design techniques at Fremont’s new Whole Foods Market on Oct. 26. Join in on the fun and come in costume! Kids who march in the Halloween parade through the store will receive a goodie bag. Face painting will also be available during the free event. Pumpkins are sold separately.

SUBMITTED BY LISA MARIE WILSON Kids! Grab a pumpkin and tap into your creative side. Young Rembrandts, a weekly afterschool enrichment drawing classes, will

Whole Foods Pumpkin Design Saturday, Oct. 26 12 p.m. - 3 p.m. Parade starts at 1 p.m. 3111 Mowry Ave., Fremont Information or registration: FremontEvents@wholefoods.com

Warehouse space needed for holiday gifts SUBMITTED BY BARBARA LEWIS Family Giving Tree is in urgent need of warehouse space from November 18, 2013-January 10, 2014 to process donations to this year’s 24th annual Holiday Wish Drive. The drive will serve approximately 67,000 Bay Area children this holiday season. “With the Holiday Wish Drive gearing up and gift delivery from host organizations beginning on December 7, the need to acquire warehouse space now is very urgent,” says Family Giving Tree Chief Operations Officer David Bratton-Kearns. “We need 100,000 square feet with a lot of open floor space” The needed warehouse space must also include restrooms (two per gender), lighting, electrical outlets, one loading dock and streetlevel, drive by access for loading and unloading. According to Bratton-Kearns, any location within Silicon Valley is suitable. “In past years, we have relied on the generosity of companies like Cisco Systems, NVIDIA, Wells Fargo, Juniper Networks and iStar Financial that have provided temporary warehouse space for us during our Holiday Wish and Back to School drives. We urge any company with sufficient empty space to contact us as soon as possible. Contact David Bratton-Kearns, at davidbk@familygivingtree.org or (408) 946-3111, extension 200 or Program Manager Al Galan at: al@familygivingtree.org or (408) 946-3111, extension 228. Visit Family Giving Tree at: www.familygivingtree.org.

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Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

What are the ‘work rules’ that caused BART strike? BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS OAKLAND, Calif. (AP), After six months of negotiations and a four-day strike in July, San Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid Transit system and its workers had all but agreed on the typically contentious contract issues of wages and benefits. Then a deal fell apart, and workers went on strike Friday for a second time. The main sticking point: “work rules.’’ WHAT ARE WORK RULES? They cover everything from how schedules are made and how grievances are handled to how paychecks are distributed and whether

More Americans exercise while they work BY SAM HANANEL ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Glued to your desk at work? Cross that off the list of excuses for not having the time to exercise. A growing number of Americans are standing, walking and even cycling their way through the workday at treadmill desks, standup desks or other moving workstations. Others are forgoing chairs in favor of giant exercise balls to stay fit. Walking on a treadmill while making phone calls and sorting through emails means “being productive on two fronts,’’ said Andrew Lockerbie, senior vice president of benefits at Brown & Brown, a global insurance consulting firm. Lockerbie can burn 350 calories a day walking 3 to 4 miles on one of two treadmill desks that his company’s Indianapolis office purchased earlier this year. “I’m in meetings and at my desk and on the phone all day,’’ he said. “It’s great to be able to have an option at my work to get some physical activity while I’m actually doing office stuff. You feel better, you get your blood moving, you think clearly.’’ Treadmill desks designed for the workplace are normally set to move at 1 to 2 mph, enough to get the heart rate up but not too fast to distract from reading or talking on the phone comfortably. It’s been a decade since scientific studies began to show that too much sitting can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even going to the gym three times a week doesn’t offset the harm of being sedentary for hours at a time, said Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic. “There’s a glob of information that sitting is killing us,’’ Levine

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reports are written electronically or in longhand. For workers, stricter rules create stability in their assignments and how they do their jobs. For managers, they limit how flexibly and efficiently they can run the system. HOW DO THEY FACTOR ON THE BART TALKS? Some of the biggest work rule changes BART sought relate to work shifts and worker protections. For example, BART wants to be able to change work schedules with greater ease; the unions want to preserve schedules such as a 4-day, 10-hour week, saying this helps workers with child care

and other obligations. Other proposed changes would affect the handling of worker claims of discrimination or harassment by managers. The unions say they are willing to submit work rule changes to an arbitrator, but that BART declined. ARE WORK RULES USUALLY SUCH A BIG DEAL? They are not typically a dealbreaker for negotiations. Disagreements over wages and benefits such as health care and pensions are usually the kinds of issues that provoke a strike. In some negotiations, unions trade work rules for a better economic package.

said. “You’re basically sitting yourself into a coffin.’’ More companies are intrigued by the idea of helping employees stay healthy, lose weight and reduce stress – especially if it means lower insurance costs and higher productivity, said Levine, an enthusiastic supporter of the moving workstations. “Even walking at 1 mile an hour has very substantial benefits,’’ Levine said, such as doubling metabolic rate and improving blood sugar levels. ``Although you don’t sweat, your body moving is sort of purring along.’’ Sales at Indianapolis-based TreadDesk are expected to increase 25 percent this year as large corporations, including Microsoft, Coca Cola, United Healthcare and Procter & Gamble have started buying the workstations in bulk, said Jerry Carr, the company’s president. At LifeSpan Fitness, based in Salt Lake City, sales of treadmill desks more than tripled over 2012, said Peter Schenk, company president. “We don’t see the growth slowing down for several years as right now we are just moving from early adopters, which are educated and highly health conscious, to more mainstream users,’’ Schenk said. With bicycle desks or desk cycles, workers can pedal their way through the day on a small stationary bike mounted under their desk. Treadmill desks can range from about $800 to $5,000 or more, depending on the manufacturer and model. Desks cycles start as low as $149 for models that can fit under an existing desk but can run $1,400 or more for those with a desk built in. Standup desks can run as low as $250 for platforms that can rest on an existing desk. Some workers have opted for lower-profile – and lower-cost – ways to stay fit at work, such as sitting on giant exercise balls instead of chairs. Using the inflatable balls can help improve posture and strengthen abs, legs and back muscles. “I’ve got nurses in my operating room who will use one of those balls instead of a chair,’’ said Michael Maloney, a professor of orthopedics and sports medicine specialist at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Maloney said anyone trying an exercise ball, treadmill desk or moving workstation should approach it with common sense. Those who have not been exercising regularly

should start using the equipment in small time increments to avoid injury, he said. “They have to just do it with some common sense and not overdo it,’’ Maloney said. “Just pay attention to how their body is responding to the new activities.’’ Georges Harik, founder of the Web-based instant messaging service imo.im in Palo Alto, Calif., bought two treadmill desks for his 20-person office to share three years ago. Employees tend to sort through email or do other work while using the treadmills. “I do it when I can,’’ he said. “Sometimes it’s not possible if you’re really thinking hard or programming a lot. But this sort of lowgrade activity that keeps people from being sedentary probably helps extend their lives by a few years, and we’re big fans of that.’’ The office has also purchased standing desks for most of its employees. The desks can be raised up or down with the touch of a button, and Harik says at least three or four workers can be seen standing at desks to stretch their legs at any one time. But not everyone wants one, Harik said. Some workers find it too distracting to incorporate standing or walking into their work, and some feel they are just not coordinated enough to multitask as they exercise. Levine said he was at first skeptical that a standup desk would offer improvements in health comparable to treadmill desks or other moving workstations. “It appears I was completely wrong,’’ he said. “Once you’re off your bottom, it’s inevitable that you start meandering around. Within two minutes of standing, one activates a series of metabolic processes that are beneficial. Once you sit, all of those things get switched off.’’ Denise Bober, director of human resources at The Breakers, the resort hotel in Palm Beach, Fla., said having a treadmill desk in her office has made a big difference in how she feels after work. “The more movement and interaction I have, the more energy I have at the end of the day,’’ she said. Bober spends one to three hours walking when she’s in the office, usually at 2 mph. “If I go faster, then I make too many typing errors, but if I’m just reading a report I can go faster,’’ she said.


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

dents throughout the Fremont Unified School District. Whether you are a walker, runner, or spectator, go out for a day of fun and fitness to support Fremont student athletes. For more information or to register for the run, go to www.fremontrun4education.org.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT EDUCATION FOUNDATION The 9th Annual Fremont Run 4 Education will take place on Sunday, October 27 at Lake Elizabeth in Fremont, and is anticipated to be an exceptionally fun event. All proceeds benefit the Fremont Education Foundation’s Guy Emanuele Sports Fund (GESF). GESF supports after school sports for stu-

Fremont Run 4 Education Sunday, Oct 27 5K and 10K begin at 9:00 a.m. Kids’ runs begin at 10:30 a.m. Lake Elizabeth at Central Park, Fremont www.fremontrun4education.org fefrun4education@gmail.com 5K Run/Walk & 10K Run: $35 Kids’ Runs: $25 Registration fees include: race bib, official Fremont Run 4 Education tech-shirts, drawing ticket for entry to race giveaways, and goodie bag.

(L to R): Joseph George, Amaris Gatchalian, and Josh Nuestro are amazed by Spot (ball python snake) owned by Ms. Celia Vollov (grade 7 teacher).

ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY CICI SUSBILLA St. John the Baptist School celebrated the blessing of animals in honor of the patron saint of animals, St. Francis of Assisi. Families, students and staff brought live and stuffed animals to be blessed by Fr. Ritche Bueza (parish pastor) during a morning assembly on October 4. At St. John the Baptist School, we believe every creature is important. Each year our students enjoy the opportunity to take their pets to school on this special day. St. John the Baptist School is located at 360 S. Abel Street in Milpitas. For more information, visit www.sjbs.org.

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Since Hayward is the fifth largest city in the Bay Area, you’d think the city’s main library would be just as large. According to Hayward’s government website, it’s not. When the current library was built in 1951, the city’s population was around 14,000. Now, with about 150,000 residents, the library is bursting at the seams. To help alleviate this issue, the city is gathering to discuss plans for a new building. The League of Women Voters Eden Area will be holding a “hot topic” informational meeting to discuss the potential plans for constructing a new main Hayward library building. The meeting will inform attendees about how construction would be funded and if other public buildings in the city need to be included in that funding plan. The meeting will be held on Oct. 25, at Hayward City Hall. The “hot topic” discussion will inform attendees about the pros and cons of the project. Presen-

ters will lead the discussion and open the floor to community members who have questions or comments. Hayward conducted a recent community survey on the subject and those results will be shared at the meeting. “Our speakers are our resource people,” said Evelyn Cormier, chair of the League committee that planned and is putting on the event. “We hope interested community members will ask questions and give their opinions on this important subject,” she said. Light refreshments will be available for attendees. An RSVP is required to attend the free discussion. This League informational meeting is co-sponsored by the Friends of the Hayward Library and American Association of University Women Hayward/Castro Valley Chapter. A new library for Hayward? Friday, Oct. 25 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Hayward City Hall, Rm. 2A 777 B St, Hayward (510) 471-0475 ev.cormier@comcast.net

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Newark Chamber looking for a new President The Newark Chamber of Commerce is currently accepting resumes for the position of President/CEO that reports directly to its Board of Directors. The President/CEO will be responsible for taking the vision of the Board of Directors and help make it reality through the implementation of a Strategic Plan. Contact Linda Ashley at 510-744-1000 to obtain a copy of the President/CEO Job Announcements which includes Education/Experience Requirements, Primary Functions, and About Newark. To apply please send a resume with an introductory letter describing your interest in the position, including a detailed description about your qualifications as detailed the in Job Announcement. Resumes must be received by September 30, 2013. Send to: Linda Ashley, Consultant Newark Chamber of Commerce 37101 Newark Blvd Newark, CA 94560


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

T

yme For Tea & Co. will be hosting “Halloween Witches Brew Ball” October 26 and 27 with sittings at 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Sip a Black Cauldron Champagne Cocktail or Sparkling Pomegranate Juice, Spiced Apple Grog Tea or Coffee with Pumpkin Spice Scones served with honey walnut butter. Enjoy an assortment of five devilishly delicious sandwiches: Cucumber and Bird Eye Olive, Chicken Claw Pecan, Brie Pinwheel with Raspberry Chipotle Sauce, Pumpkin and Sage ball with Balsamic Creme Fraiche Sauce, and Corn and Cheese Crostini. Temptingly tasty pastries follow including Halloween Petit Fours, Witches Finger Cookie, and Pumpkin Fudge and Red Velvet Cupcake. Wear your scariest costume! Sittings are by reservation only; call (510) 790-0944. Tickets are $34 per person, including tax and gratuity.

Did you love Bob Wilkins, John Stanley and “Creature Features” on KTVU, Channel 2 during the 1970s and ‘80s? For 14 years “Creature Features” was one of the most popular TV shows in San Francisco Bay Area television history. Bob Wilkins’ wit and unusually droll personality and John Stanley’s celebrity interviews and satiric short subjects are all part of “Watch Horror Films, Keep America Strong” a full-length documentary journeying back through those years. This Special Edition is a brand new HQ edit of the original 2008 film, now in 16:9 widescreen with sharper clips, many new clips, photographs, back-ground music and added story. John Stanley and Tom Wyrsch will present the film on the big screen with Q&A to follow and a free Halloween raffle with lots of great prizes.

Halloween Witches Brew Ball Saturday, Oct 26 and Sunday, Oct 27 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Tyme For Tea & Co. 37501 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-0944 Tickets: $34 per person

Watch Horror Films, Keep America Strong Sunday, Oct 27 4 p.m. Edison Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org Tickets: $6 museum members, $8 non-members

Ivan the Terrible and Jack the Ripper are brought to life by director Paul Leni in “Waxworks” with stars Emil Jannings, Conrad Veidt and Werner Krauss. Film is opened by shorts “The Red Spectre,” “Dreams of a Rarebit Fiend: Bug Vaudeville,” and “The Thieving Hand.”

Kick off your Halloween with “Kiddie Cartoon Halloween Cavalcade” Thursday, October 31. Come on your own or bring the gang to see silly and slightly spooky vintage cartoons, retro commercials and funky film shorts before you take the kids trick-or-treating.

Waxworks Saturday, Oct 26 7:30 p.m. Edison Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org Tickets: $5

Kiddie Cartoon Halloween Cavalcade Thursday, Oct 31 4 p.m. Edison Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org Tickets: $2 suggested donation, party of three for $5

SUBMITTED BY KATHY SUPER

Come and help clean up your community. As always, everyone is welcome and kids under 18 need adult supervision. Community service hours are also available. If you’re interested, you can register on site or go to the City of Hayward website and look for the KHCG logo. To participate, please contact: Blytha Bowers at (510)-303-7924 or blytha@aol.com.

Meet new people, get fresh air, and help Hayward in its effort to preserve its beauty. The city’s residents and surrounding community members are welcome to participate in this month’s Keep Hayward Clean and Green Clean-up event. The litter pick-up and graffiti removal event will be held on Oct. 26. The KHCG Task Force was formed by the City Council to assist Council and City staff in addressing issues that impact community appearance. Its mission is to preserve the environment and enhance the visual appearance of the City of Hayward through the joint efforts of individuals, volunteer groups, businesses, and municipal resources.

Keep Hayward Clean and Green Clean-up Saturday, Oct. 26 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Palma Ceia Elementary School 27679 Melbourne Ave., Hayward (510)-303-7924

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SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM KELLER PHOTOS BY MARY LYNN PELICAN The American Association of University Women (AAUW), Fremont Branch, proudly sponsors their twenty-ninth Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day, on Saturday, November 2. This session is for 5th and 6th grade girls only [another session will be held in March for 3rd and 4th grade girls]. Students and their moms can select five classes from nine offered. Classes include a show in the Hopkins Planetarium, Build the Tallest Tower, Lego Robotics Mania, Origami Cubes, Engineering a Better Bridge, CSI: Fingerprints, Bubbling Potions (Mad Science), Healthy Creeks: Healthy Watersheds, and Kitchen Chemistry. Registration is $22 per student/mother (grandmother, aunt, etc.) pair. ($12 for each additional 5th or 6th grader). Send check, payable to Fremont Branch AAUW, to: JoAnn Houk, 3152 Rowe Pl., Fremont, CA 94536. Include your list of five classes, student’s name and grade, mother’s name, home address, phone number and email address. Registration will not be processed without payment. Registration deadline is Monday, October 28. For questions regarding space availability after that date, email JoAnn Houk at joannhouk@aol.com or call (510) 796-1320. Classes will be assigned in the order received, so don’t delay. Dress warmly and comfortably. AAUW will provide beverages, snacks, and a folder with fun stuff to take home.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

For a morning of fun, hands-on math and science adventures, sign up for the Mother/Daughter Math/Science Discovery Day! Reservations required by October 28. Math & Science Discovery Day Saturday, Nov 2 8:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 683-9377 miriamkel@comcast.net Registration: $22 per mother/daughter pair ($12 additional participant) Mail payment to: JoAnn Houk, 3152 Rowe Pl., Fremont, CA 94536. Include class choices, participant names and requested info.

SUBMITTED BY SULPHUR CREEK NATURE CENTER Come to Sulphur Creek Nature Center and experience Halloween with an unusual twist. Meet superheroes and super animals and find out how these animals help to save the day. Let Spiderman, Cat Woman, Batman and their friends show you how their wild animal partners help them conquer evil! Make your way through the Unhaunted House and meet an owl, tarantula, opossum and other super hero critters at this very special Halloween event. Enjoy the rest of the evening with Halloween crafts, storytelling, and campfire (no charge) with great Halloween games and tasty treats (small fee). So, bring the family for an evening or afternoon of Halloween fun. Tickets are $8 per person; children under three are free. There is limited availability, so buy tickets early for your preferred date and time. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please contact the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District at (510) 881-6700. The Unhaunted House: Super Heroes Friday, Oct 25 & Saturday, Oct 26 Friday: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday: 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D St., Hayward (510) 881-6700 Tickets: $8 (children under 3, free)


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

Unitek College awarded 2012-2013 School of Excellence

E

ver since our first graduating class walked across the stage in 2002, Unitek College has strived to achieve high student graduation and graduate employment rates. This past June, we received our highest honor: Unitek College was officially recognized by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges, with the 2012-2013 School of Excellence award. Why are Unitek College students so successful? There is one simple answer: our students are our number one priority. Our healthcare training programs encourage collaboration and comprehension, allowing students to retain what they learn and apply it within their careers. Unitek College chooses instructors who are passionate about what and who they teach. Unitek College equips its facilities with modern simulation labs (SIMS labs), that offer students the hands-on training required in today’s workforce. Unitek College’s clear

commitment to education instills in our students confidence that they have chosen a quality program, and will be empowered through the support of their peers, instructors, and faculty. Most importantly, the relationship between Unitek College and its students doesn’t end upon graduation. Unitek College graduates enjoy the benefits of a diligent Career Services Department dedicated to Unitek College alumni success. While enrolled, Medical Assisting and Pharmacy Technician students are placed in externships that provide valuable experience. Alumni make the most of externship relationships with the help of the Career Services Department through employment assistance and valuable occupational information. We believe our students’ success is our greatest measure. “We are extremely excited and honored to be recognized by ACCSC for our hard work and commitment to both our stu-

dents, alumni and the community,” stated Navraj Bawa, Unitek College School President, “The key metric measured and reviewed by ACCSC is student success, which is of utmost importance to us. This award is a testament to the commitment to education and career success that our students and faculty have made.” One such student with a commitment to education is Rochelle Padama of Fremont, CA. Rochelle graduated from college 17 long years ago, but returned to Unitek College to pursue her dream of becoming a Pharmacy Technician. As a gainfully employed mother with two daughters to care for, she was understandably nervous about returning to school. But she took a chance and enrolled. Ultimately, Rochelle excelled and graduated as Valedictorian of the Pharmacy Technician program. Rochelle credits her success to those who supported her while at Unitek College. She offered her heartfelt thanks; “Dr.

continued from page 1

Embrace your sweet tooth by visiting trick-or treat stations and search for clues in a scavenger hunt to gather yummy treats from Ghirardelli Chocolate, American Licorice Company, Annabelle Candy Company and more. Guests can dance to a beat with Kinderwise Music Company

in the Wildlife Theater and experience close encounters with millipedes and other creepy crawly animals zoo residents. “We at the Oakland Zoo refer to millipedes as a ‘zoombie’ animal that breaks down soil and is, in fact, friendly,” Mora said. Join guinea hogs on their walk around the

zoo and watch meerkats search for worms inside pumpkins. Make sure to stop by the treat table to create Halloween goodies for the animals. Visitors will also experience a memorable moment with the Oakland Fire Department, get

Dizon, thank you for being a great teacher and friend throughout my academic career at Unitek College. You are best teacher I have ever had. You have made me hopeful that my children will have a teacher like you in their own academic careers.” Unitek College staff also played a vital role in her success by helping her process board paperwork and licensing requirements, affording the time needed to focus on her education. Rochelle also appreciates her classmates, and sings their praise, “...for making me feel young again, for making my tenure at Unitek College a great experience and exciting time.” Unitek College has received tremendous support from the community over the years and is pleased to be able to give back, providing healthcare and nursing training to local residents. To learn more about healthcare training opportunities at Unitek College, please visit: www.unitekcollege.edu or call (888) 446-1450.

festive with facepainting, and learn about safe trick-ortreating with Safe Kids and Fed Ex. And don’t forget to show your Halloween spirit; kids ages two to fourteen who dress up in a costume will receive a free ride ticket. Other highlights of “Boo at the Zoo” include meeting the Valley Children Zoo’s mascot, Roosevelt, and participate in a costume parade held at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. both days. Sponsors of the event include Safeway, Sysco, Oakland Fire Department, Ghirardelli, and Green Halloween.

Admission prices are $11.75 for children/seniors and $15.75 for adults. “Boo at the Zoo” activities are included with general admission. Parking is $8 per car. For more information about “Boo At the Zoo,” visit www.oaklandzoo.org or e-mail Nicky Mora at nmora@oaklandzoo.org. Boo at the Zoo Saturday, Oct 26 & Sunday, Oct 27 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Costume Parade: 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Oakland Zoo 9777 Golf Links Rd., Oakland (510) 632-9525 x100 www.oaklandzoo.org Tickets: $11.75 for children/seniors, $15.75 for adults Parking: $8 per car


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Fridays, Jul 19 thru Oct 25

Saturdays, Sep 28 thru Nov 16

Tuesday, Oct 22

Teen/Senior Computer Gadget Help

A Kinder Divorce

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Learn about options, resources & assistance

Older adults learn to use cell phones & iPads

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Tuesday, Oct 22

Fremont Street Eats

Monday, Oct 1 -Sunday, Oct 31

Dinner and a Movie $

Mary Sullivan and Father Jun Manalo

5 p.m.

No smoking & no alcohol Downtown Fremont Capital Ave. between State & Liberty St., Fremont www.fremont.gov/Calendar

5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Ages 11 – 16 Union City Teen Center 1200 J St., Union City (510) 675-5600 www.UnionCity.org

Thursdays, Fridays & Sundays, Aug 22 thru Oct 27

Monday, Oct 1 -Friday, Nov 26

Wednesday, Oct 23

Ray McGinnis Paintings

“Tape & Spray Watercolor”

Train Rides $

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

10 a.m. - 12 noon

10:15 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Art display

Artist demonstration by Zoya Scholis

Climb aboard for a ride back in time

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Thursday,Oct 3-Sunday, Oct 26

Wednesday, Oct 23

Noises Off! $

Dharma: The Basic Teachings

Thurs - Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m.

7 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Comedic melee

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-2581 sacbc@sbcglabal.net

4:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Food Truck Mafia offers variety of culinary treats

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org Thursday, Oct 27

Sep

5-Sunday,

Patterson House Museum Tours $

Various times Docent led tour of farmhouse

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org Wednesdays, Sep 25 thru Nov 13

Newark Police Department Citizen Police Academy – R

5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Local artists share oil & acrylic paintings

California Conservatory Theater 999 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org

Pizza, drinks & movie

Presentation & discussion session

Thursday, Oct 25 - Sunday, Nov 30

Wednesday, Oct 23

“Perceptions”

Virtual, Free Legal Assistance – R

12 noon - 5 p.m.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Photography show

Use video conferencing to meet with an attorney

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171 www.probonoproject.org/virtualclinics

Participants learn about local law enforcement

Monday, Oct 28-Friday, Nov 8

Register by Sept. 9th Newark City Council Chambers 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4352 beverly.ryans@newark.org

Mon., Wed., & Fri: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Tues., & Thurs: 8 a.m. - 12 noon

Wednesday, Oct 23

Donate clothes for babies in need

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

East Bay Spinal Decompression 40000 Fremont Blvd. Ste. H, Fremont (510) 790-1000 www.lovedtwice.org

Learn about alternative charter school

Mondays, Sep 9 - Thursdays, Dec 20

10th Street After-School Program

Loved Twice Donation Event

Sports, arts-n-crafts, games & special events

Drop-in program, no day care 10th Street Community Center 33948 10th Street, Union City (510) 675-5276 wwwUnionCity.org Tuesdays, Sep 11 & Thursdays, Nov 13

Grizzly Youth Academy Presentation – R

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 677-2940 Thursday, Oct 24

4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct 22

Meditation: The Power of Stillness

Halloween Chamber Mixer 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Learn to cultivate your inner silence

Food, prizes & costumes encouraged

Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. India Community Center 525 Los Coches Street, Milpitas 408-934-1130 www.indiacc.org Thursday, Oct 24

Tuesday, Oct 22

SAVE “Open Doors” Event – R

Water Main Replacement Meeting

12 noon - 1:30 p.m.

9:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Learn to become a docent

5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 733-1189 www.musicforminors2.org

ACWD discusses projects

Music for Minors II Training

Saturdays, Sep 21 - Dec 28

Farmers’ Market

9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Food, music & entertainment

MEDICAL INSURANCE RATES INCREASING - THINK MELLO

Produce from local farmers East Plaza 11th Street & Decoto Rd., Union City http://pcfma.com/EastPlaza

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

Saturdays, Sep 21 - Sundays, Dec 29

#OB84518

6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

San Leandro Art Association Member Exhibit

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Variety of art work on display

Casa Peralta 384 West Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 357-4650 Monday, Sep 23-Friday, Nov 11

Photography Display

8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Works by David Steffes

Hayward Senior Center 22325 N Third St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Parkmont Elementary School 2601 Parkside Dr., Fremont (510) 668-4208 www.acwd.org/PipelineUpgrades

Learn about domestic violence support services

Lunch included Nakamura Center 33077 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 574-2266 www.save-dv.org


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Farmers’ Markets FREMONT: NEWARK: Centerville

October 22, 2013

Thursday, Oct 24

Friday, Oct 25

Saturday, Oct 26

MVROP Open House

Make a Difference Day – R

6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Halloween Craft & Not-SoScary Story

Enrollment information & tours

4 p.m.

Mission Valley ROP 5019 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 795-2244 www.mvrop.org

For school age children

Volunteers help with beautification projects

Thursday, Oct 24

Friday, Oct 25

Grow Your Business with Social Media – R

The Red Shoes $

9 a.m. - 12 noon

Fiddle, cello & vox music

Tips to connect with your market

Mudpuddle 34733 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 info@michaelmcnevin.com

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Newark Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Bonde Way at Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 909-2067 www.fremontfarmersmarket.com Kaiser Permanente Fremont Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Sundays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org SAN LEANDRO:

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 http;//ascbdc.org/events2

8 p.m.

Friday, Oct 25

Year-round 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com Irvington Farmers’ Market

Sundays 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round Bay Street and Trimboli Way, Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

San Leandro Downtown Farmers’ Market

Thursday, Oct 24

Friday Night Hang Out!

Rick Allen’s Magic Show – R

Wednesdays 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

6 p.m.

Play pool, video games & more

Enjoy an evening of illusion

April 10 – October 16 Parrott Street Between E. 14th St. and Washington Ave., San Leandro 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Carlton Plaza 3800 Walnut Ave., Fremont (510) 505-0555

Ages 12 -17 Union City Teen Center 1200 J St., Union City (510) 675-5600 www.UnionCity.org

Bayfair Mall

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

HAYWARD: Hayward Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Fairmont and East 14th St., San Leandro (925) 465-4690 www.cafarmersmkts.com SAN LORENZO:

Year-round Hayward City Plaza 777 B. St., Hayward 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org

San Lorenzo Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Kaiser Permanente Hayward Farmers’ Market

Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

May 4 – Oct 19 Hesperian and Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com UNION CITY:

Year-round 27400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Kaiser Permanente Union City Farmers’ Market

South Hayward Glad Tidings

Tuesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Year-round W. Tennyson Rd. between Tyrell Ave. and Tampa Ave., Hayward (510) 783-9377 www.cafarmersmarkets.com

Milpitas Farmers’ Market at ICC

Year-round India Community Center 525 Los Coches St. 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com Great Mall

Saturdays 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

May - November Great Mall Pkwy. and Mustang Dr., Milpitas (559) 250-2674 www.cafarmersmarkets.com

Union City Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

MILPITAS:

Sundays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices 3553 Whipple Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Year-round Old Alvarado Park Smith and Watkins Streets, Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com East Plaza Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round East Plaza 11th and Decoto Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 12:30 pm

1351 Driscoll Rd, Fremont (at Christian Science Church) www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Friday, Oct 25

9 a.m. - 12 noon

Union City Public Works Department 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 675-5373 laurier@unioncity.org Saturday, Oct 26

Make a Difference Day – R

9 a.m. Volunteers help beautification projects

Fremont City Hall 3300 Capitol Ave., Fremont (510) 574-2099 makeadifferenceday@fremont.gov Saturday, Oct 26

Fashion Show and Luncheon $R

11:30 a.m. Benefit for New Haven Schools & HERS Breast Cancer Foundation Acacia Creek 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 441-3717

Girls in Mathematics Education Seminar – R

Saturday, Oct 26

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

2 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, Oct 26

Tackle engaging math problems

Authors discuss murder mysteries

Grades 7 – 8 Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 www.library.hayward-ca.gov

“We’re Having a Luau” $

Friday, Oct 25 & Saturday, Oct 26

Saturday, Oct 26

Patterson House Candlelight Tours $R

10 a.m. - 12 noon

Saturday, Oct 26

Discover insects, spiders & reptiles

7:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 8:00 p.m. & 8:30 p.m.

Ages 7+ Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

Tour the historic home decorated for fall

The Patterson House 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4196 www.fremont.gov

Sisters in Crime Mystery Panel

Habitat Exploration – R

2 p.m. Bay Area Showcase Chorus presentation

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.singharmony.org

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Responsible way to dispose of unwanted medications

Kaiser 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 248-5250


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Saturday, Oct 26

Games & food booths

Volunteer Day Ohlone Village Site – R

Our Lady of Guadalupe Church 40382 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-1674 www.olgweb.org

12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Clean, weed & renew the structures

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org Saturday, Oct 26

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m. “Waxworks,” “The Red Spectre” & “The Thieving Hand”

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Oct 26

Bruno Groning “Miracle Healer”

Sunday, Oct 27

Habitat Under Construction Bike Ride

10 a.m. - 12 noon

Sunday, Oct 27

Story Hunters – R

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

9 a.m. 5K run/walk & 10K run

Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-5683 www.fremontrun4education.org Monday, Oct 28

SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222

Eden Garden Club Fall Bazaar $

Saturday, Oct 26

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 327-2757 www.ebparks.org

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Hike from Sunol to Mission Peak with your dog

Help clean up the community Sunday, Oct 27

Halloween Quarter Auction $

5 p.m. Dinner, drinks, raffle & auction

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Historical lesson about refuge lands

Canine Capers Dog Walk – R

Harvest Festival

Horror film documentary

Fremont Run 4 Education $

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont (650) 515-7842

Saturday, Oct 26

4 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 27

Sunday, Oct 27

Palma Ceia Elementary School 27679 Melborne St., Hayward (510) 293-8512

“Creature Features” $

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513

Documentary film

8:30 a.m. - 12 noon

Sunday, Oct 27

Learn about conversion of salt ponds

3 p.m.

Keep Hayward Clean and Green

www.lov.org

Newark Community Center 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-5683

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Plants, garden items & more

Hayward-Castro Valley Moose Lodge 20835 Rutledge Rd., Castro Valley (510) 723-6936 Saturday, Nov 2

Mother/Daughter Math & Science Day $R

8:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Reservation required by October 28

Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 683-9377 miriamkel@comcast.net

Through Saturday, Nov 2

Pirates of Emerson $

7 p.m. – 11 p.m. Six haunted attractions and nightly entertainment

Alameda County Fairgrounds Corner of Bernal and Valley Ave., Pleasanton info@piratesofemerson.com www.piratesofemerson.com Through Saturday, Nov 2

Fear Overload $ Through Thursday, Oct 31

Through Sunday, Oct 27

Perry Farms Pumpkin Patch $

Haunted Railroad $

Monday – Friday: 12 noon – 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Fri, Sat & Sun 7 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Frightfully fun ride through forests of Ardenwood Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (866) 417-7277 www.ebparks.org

Pumpkin patch, kids maze & tire maze

Perry Farms 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-6658

7 p.m. – 10 p.m. 7 p.m. – midnight Oct 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26, and 31 Two horrifying haunted houses

Bayfair Center 15555 E 14th St., San Leandro www.fearoverload.com

Page 23


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Thursday, Oct 31

continued from page 23

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE

Pumpkin Patch Party

5:30 p.m. Carnival games, face painting & food

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030 www.bridgesfremont.com Thursday, Oct 31

Halloween Celebration

4 p.m. – 7 p.m. Games, prizes & treats Wear a costume; no masks please

Through Wednesday, Oct 30

Saturday, Oct 26

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

Halloween Mini Carnival

Wednesday and Thursday: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Friday: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday: 2 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. – 9 p.m. Oct 28 and 29: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.

11 a.m. – 12 noon

Family friendly ghost house and games

Chadbourne Carriage House Fremont Hub Fremont Blvd. (between Mowry Ave and Walnut Ave. by Chili’s), (510) 796-0595 www.candlelighters.com Through Tuesday, Oct 29

Milpitas Rotary Community Pumpkin Patch

Weeknights: 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. 1331 E Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (Parking lot in front of Milpitas Sports Center) http://www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/Home.aspx?accountid=6028

Wear costumes, play games, collect goodies

Weekes Branch Library 27300 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-2155 www.library.hayward-ca.gov Saturday, Oct 26

Halloween Dance $R

1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Celebrate the holiday with a spooky dance event

Sorensdale Recreation Center 275 Goodwin St., Hayward (510) 881-6778 www.haywardrec.org

Halloween Baby Boogie $

12 Noon – 3 p.m.

Select a pumpkin from the lazy river

Family dance party with games, snacks and activities

Friday: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday: 4 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Tools & guidance to create a jack-olantern

Meet the animals, crafts, campfire & treats

Bring your own pumpkin or purchase one at the farm

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Trick or Treat on Safety Street $

Sunday, Oct 27

5 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Trick or Trunk!

Visit Halloween town; trick or treat in a safe environment

Visit Halloween-Fun decorated cars for prizes or candy

Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Dr., Fremont (510) 791-4324 www.RegeRec.com

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Sunday Oct 27

Chadbourne Carriage House, Fremont Hub Fremont Blvd. (between Mowry Ave. and Walnut Ave. by Chili’s) (510) 796-0595 www.candlelighters.com Saturday, Oct 26

Fun Tricks and Healthy Treats

11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Bounce house, costume contest & prizes

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 797-1111 www.whhs.com Saturday, Oct 26

Halloween Twilight Hike $R

5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Wear a costume, enjoy a hike, campfire & treats

Harvest Festival Carnival $

Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont (650) 278-2521

Thursday, October 24 10:00–10:30 Daycare Center Visit SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:45 Daycare Center Visit CASTRO VALLEY 1:20 – 1:50 Daycare Center Visit HAYWARD (unincorporated) 2:15 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD (unincorporated) Monday, October 28 9:30–10:05 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:25–10:55 Daycare Center Visit - City

Saturday, Nov 2

Holiday Boutique Tea & Treasures

9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Handcrafted decorations, jewelry & gifts

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 793-3575 Saturday, Nov 2

Tuesday, October 29 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, October 30 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, October 30 1:45-3:00 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 3:15-3:45 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas

Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont www.harborlight.com/harvestfestival Tuesday, Oct 29

NHBA/NHSF Halloween Carnival $

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Sunday, Nov 3

Saturday, Dec 7

Holiday Gift Fair

Holiday Boutique

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Unique holiday gifts, food & homemade latkes

Proceeds benefit Grad Night/Senior Activities

Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-1543

Holiday Crafts Faire

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. One of a kind handmade crafts & gifts

Union City Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495

Holiday Fine Art, Pottery & Crafts Fair

Saturday, Nov 23 – Sunday, Nov 24

Holiday Boutique

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Dominican fruitcakes, mission olive oil & homemade goods

MSJ Dominican Sisters 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont www.msjdominicans.org

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Handmade pieces at affordable prices

Kenneth Aitken Senior & Community Center 17800 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley (510) 881-6778

Saturday, Dec 7

Christmas Crafts Boutique

10 a.m. Arts & crafts, bake sale, raffle & Santa

Bridges of Faith 27343 Whitman St., Hayward (510) 886-7551 Saturday, Dec 7

Christmas Craft Fair

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. All items are handcrafted

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-4062 www.newarkpavilion.com

Carnival games, costume contest, live performances and more

James Logan High School 1800 H St., Union City rvenable@newhavenboosters.org Tuesday, Oct 29 – Wednesday, Oct 30

Boo at the Zoo $

10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Costume parade & treat bags

Oakland Zoo 9777 Golf Links Rd, Oakland www.oaklandzoo.org

Leitch Elementary 47100 Fernald St., Fremont (510) 490-9500 ext. 112

Free class; pumpkins sold separately Whole Foods Market 3111 Mowry Ave., Fremont FremontEvents@wholefoods.com

Games, prizes & trick-or-treating

Games, jump house, prizes, food & treats

Saturday, Oct 26

Learn to design & draw on a pumpkin

2 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, Nov 2

Thursday, Oct 31

12 noon, 1 p.m. & 2 p.m.

Wednesday, October 23 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Trunk or Treat

4 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Coyote Hills 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

Design Your Own Pumpkin Class - R

Tuesday, October 22 9:45–10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT

1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Friday, Oct 25

Costume parade for prizes

Saturday, Nov 2

Times & Stops subject to change

UNION CITY 1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School, 34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY 4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY 5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT

Sunday, Oct 27

Pumpkin Carving Clinic

1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall Rd., Newark www.newparkmall.com

Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org.

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

The Unhaunted House: Super Heroes $

Candle Lighters Ghost House Children’s Parade

Dance-off, costume contest & trick-ortreating

Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City www.UnionCity.org

5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday, Oct 26

4 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Haunted house, games, prizes & treats

Sunday, Oct 27

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1808 D Street, Hayward (510) 881-6700

Halloween Kids Festival

Halloween Carnival $

Great Floating Pumpkin Patch $

Friday, Oct 25 – Saturday, Oct 26

Thursday, Oct 31

Sunday, Oct 27

Friday, Oct 25

Silliman Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 578-4620

Southland Mall 1 Southland Mall Dr., Hayward www.southlandmall.com

October 22, 2013

Trunk or Treat

4 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Games, activities, prizes, food and candy galore

Thursday, Oct 31

Haunted House

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Free & open to trick or treaters

Blacksand Manor 5008 Blacksand Rd., Fremont (510) 651-9507

SUBMITTED BY CALIFORNIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF The first annual “Sip, Savor and Support” gala, presented by the Association of Parents, Teachers and Counselors (APTC) at Fremont’s California School for the Deaf (CSD) will raise funds to provide educational and technology necessities, such as new iPads for use by students in classrooms. Proceeds also help fund programs such as International Studies trips, the Tilden Art Club, elementary spelling bee competitions, and other after school programs. An oversight committee will help APTC allocate the funds. Gala festivities are scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel in San Francisco. Community members are encouraged to purchase tickets to the event in support of CSD, recognized for its academic excellence, fully-accredited programs, American Sign Language instruction, family partnerships, and positive learning environment.

In addition to dinner, the program includes a silent auction, live auction and a cake auction. More than 150 items will be auctioned including: photography and hair salon services, jewelry, themed baskets, art pieces, cabin vacations and even a culinary vacation to Spain! Voice interpreters will be on hand to interpret for non-signers. “For a long time, APTC has always been in the wings, helping CSD students here and there,” says Event Chairperson, Melinda Harrison Jones. “Now with budget cuts CSD has been facing the past several years, APTC decided it was time to step up to the plate by hosting a fundraiser gala. We have so many wonderful things up for auction, and truly look forward to a fabulous and fun-filled evening. Come join us!” Deadline for reservations is October 27. The following generous sponsors have provided donations and assistance: Convo Communications, Purple Communications, Parodi Charitable Foundation, Sorenson Communications, Partners In Communication Interpreting Agency and ZVRS. Sip, Savor & Support Saturday, Nov. 2 5 p.m. – 10 p.m. Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel 55 Cyril Magnin St., San Francisco www.csdaptc.org General tickets: $85 Patron tickets: $125 Tickets: http://csdaptcgala.doattend.com


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Obituaries

Marriage

LANAS ESTATE SERVICES Estate Sales, Complete or Partial Clean out, Appraisals and more

Sister Mary Lehmann

Margaret H. Silva RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 16, 1922 – October 13, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 9, 1926 – October 14, 2013

Greg A. Brower

Edward L. Bettencourt

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD August 13, 1962 – October 13, 2013

Whether you're closing a loved one’s Estate or your own, it is an overwhelming task. Lana provides solutions for quick completion allowing you to move through the process with ease.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 11, 1942 – October 14, 2013

Manuel R. Bulcao

Larry R. Kerns

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 2, 1930 – October 13, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 3, 1947 – October 15, 2013

Clyde S. Hobbs

Thomas L. McGhee

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 15, 1923 – October 14, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 5, 1948 – October 16, 2013

Paul E. Gallegos

Vandanaa Sisodiya

TAKE A DEEP BREATH, DON'T THROW ANYTHING AWAY, Call direct or contact Lana online

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

510-657-1908

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY November 30, 1963 – October 15, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 17, 1928 – October 16, 2013

www.lanas.biz

Ashok K. Jain

Benita F. Quintong

lana@lanas.biz

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD February 14, 1944 – October 18, 2013

RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO May 6, 1930 – October 17, 2013

Dolores G. Lasseter

Huu Thanh Tran

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 21, 1932 – October 20, 2013

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD May 5, 1943 – October 19, 2013

Dorothy H. Brasesco RESIDENT OF MENLO PARK February 25, 1923 – October 20, 2013

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Elizabeth J. Parker RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON October 17, 1921 – October 20, 2013

www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont www.fremontmemorialchapel.com

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Obituary

Edward Leroy Bettencourt September 11, 1942 – October 14, 2013

Edward Leroy Bettencourt, a life-long resident of the Warm Springs District of Fremont lost his courageous battle with cancer at the age of 71. Eddie was one of the three sons of Joe and Emily Bettencourt of Warm Springs. He was raised on a walnut ranch in Warm Springs and graduated from Warm Spring Grammar School and Washington High School in 1959. He worked for Fremont School District, had a boat and camper supply store in Centerville, and managed computer businesses in Silicon Valley. He is survived by his partner, John Dodge; brothers Jess (Joan) Bettencourt of Fremont and Richard (Ruth) Bettencourt of Crows Landing, and step-sister Louise (Frank) Delia of Los Osos. He is also survived by a niece, Emily S. Bettencourt and daughter, Samantha; and nephews: Jess (Liesl) Bettencourt, Jr., sons, Kyle and Tyler; and Michael (Alison) Bettencourt, sons, Ryan and Erik. Eddie is preceded in death by his parents, Joe and Emily Bettencourt. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to The American Cancer Society or The American Lung Association. Berge-Pappas-Smith Chapel of the Angels is in charge of the arrangements. A private family service will be held on October 22nd.

Prescription Drug Take-Back Day SUBMITTED BY NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT Our medicine cabinets are full of them. Sometimes we leave them there for years and forget they’re even there. Whens the last time you checked your prescription pill bottles? Kaiser Permanente is partnering with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and area police departments to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible way to dispose of unwanted prescription medications with no questions

asked — and free of charge. It’s free, safe, fast, and easy. Save lives, protect the environment from unused or expired medications and clean out your medicine cabinet in the process. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Saturday, Oct. 26 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Kaiser Permanente Fremont Medical Center 39400 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont

Help end domestic violence SUBMITTED BY SANTA CLARA COUNTY PUBLIC AFFAIRS Domestic violence. Although the topic is taboo, Santa Clara County focuses its efforts to end it by hosting the 20th Annual Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council Conference. The yearly event will feature best practices and emerging programs that tackle the complexities of domestic violence among those most vulnerable – children and youth. In 2011, there were 4,655 domestic violence related calls for assistance to the police, and authorities identified 9 domestic violence related deaths in 2012. Emergency shelter and transitional housing was accessed by 755 victims and children with over 20,000 bed nights provided. County agencies and community-based organizations continue to collaborate to provide emergency shelters, around-the-clock crisis hotlines, legal assistance support, and protection services for victims. This event offers important networking and educational opportunities. Nationally recognized experts will be featured in keynote presentations and professionals from local

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Do you have unused and/or unwanted prescription medication lying around your home? In coordination with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Fremont Police Department is partnering with Kaiser Permanente to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible way for our community to dispose of unwanted prescription medications with no questions asked. The free event will be held at the Kaiser Permanente Fremont Medical Center, located at 39400 Paseo Padre Parkway from 10: 00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. on October 26th. Kaiser staff is requesting that participants enter from the Stevenson Blvd. entrance and follow the directional signs.

government, courts, law enforcement, domestic violence shelters, and service providers, will address the topic. The goal of the event is to provide attendees with exposure to new interventions and strategies, including those currently underway at demonstration sites nationally or locally in the Bay Area. There will be both morning and afternoon workshops designed around the subject. You can choose which workshops you’d like to attend when you register. Lunch will be provided. Domestic Violence Council Conference 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25 Santa Clara Marriott Hotel 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara (408) 294-0006 ext. 2 nmarshall@dvintervention.org. Registration fee: $110 before Oct. 22 or $150 at the door. Register online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/459537 or by mail. Mail the complete form and your check (payable to DVIC, Trust for Domestic Violence Conference) to: Nancy Marshall, P.O. Box 1839, San Jose, CA 95109. Prescription drug disposal drop off at Praises of Zion Missionary Baptist Church On October 26th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the San Leandro Police Department’s Crime Prevention Unit will be at a health fair, hosted by the Praises of Zion Missionary Baptist Church located at 1395 Bancroft Ave. San Leandro Police, in conjunction with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), will give the public an opportunity to assist in preventing pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous prescription drugs. Community members are encouraged to bring their expired, unused, and unwanted medications for disposal to the San Leandro Police Department’s Crime Prevention booth. This service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Save lives and protect the environment by turning in your unused or expired medications!

Meeting for new charter school in New Haven District SUBMITTED BY NH NEWS October 15 - More than 30 people spoke to the Board of Education during a public hearing last Tuesday night on a petition calling for the creation of a charter school within the boundaries of the New Haven Unified School District. About 20 people, mostly members of the Sikh community, spoke in favor of the proposed Dashmesh Charter Academy School. About a dozen speakers expressed opposition, citing potential negative impacts. The Board will vote on the matter in November.

At the meeting, the Board approved a new District policy on equity, committing itself “to achieving equity and excellence for each and every student, preparing them for citizenship, higher education, and the workforce.” The Board also approved a new District policy on employee use of technology and revised policies on use of technology in instruction and student use of technology. The next New Haven Unified School District Board Meeting will be held on Nov. 19. For more information, visit www.nhusd.k12.ca.us


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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 23 – OCTOBER 29, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: This month may have everyone reeling, to one degree or another, after the changes precipitated by the Full Moon eclipse of Oct. 18. The answering, new moon eclipse, will occur on Nov. 3. This eclipse season is also complicated by

Aries the Ram (March 21-April 20): Take every precaution not to abuse your body during this period. Drugs or alcohol could have peculiar side effects that you don't understand. You are in a low physical cycle and will be unable to push yourself as hard as normal on any physical task. If you are affected emotionally, try not to worry about it. Your body/feelings will right themselves after the 26th. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): This is a vaguely uncomfortable week. It is hard to move forward right now. Financial concerns may be holding you back. You may need to tend to your vehicle, which threatens to stop going forward, too. Your relationship to partner(s) may feel askew, but it isn’t clear what or how to address the issue at this time. Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): The current Mercury retrograde is really messing with you now and through the end of this month. Nit-picky issues and minor annoyances slow down your forward motion. You may be searching everywhere for a particular piece of paper that is

Mercury changing directions on Oct. 21. The chances are high that you and everyone you know are scrambling to adapt to altered circumstances. It likely will be mid-November before the dust settles. Do the best you can to recognize and understand

totally elusive. Remember that whatever is lost during a Mercury retrograde will turn up again before it goes direct on Nov 10. Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): Your energy level is good. Positive outcomes related to your career, or work in the world, are reflecting well upon you. Almost anything you set out to accomplish is handled in unusually quick time. You have what it takes to be a warrior on behalf of yourself or others. People will listen to you. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Your attention shifts toward home, health, and family as it often does at this time of year. You may have a strong need to clean out debris, get out in the yard, and generally make things ready for winter. This will require three or four weeks, after which you will shift to the holiday preparations. It is your natural solar rhythm. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): It is possible you will be feeling angry and disappointed over a situation with a loved one. No matter how much you want someone to listen to

you, sometimes they just do what they want. Mechanical objects are not cooperative right now. They may break down. There are better times to come. Libra the Scales (Sep 23-Oct. 22): This period may be difficult for those on a diet or other selfimprovement programs. You are prone to self-indulgence right now. Perhaps the best thing to do is accept that is so and find a new solution that is satisfying without sabotaging your good intentions. Too much of a good thing is just too much. Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): Your overall attitude is serious and purposeful at this time. Even so, there is likely to be improvement in romance, love life, or in relation to your children. One part of your mind will be considering your spiritual direction and how you can direct your energies to fulfill it. Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): You may be feeling stress related to your lover or a partner, maybe even a child. Underneath it all, the issue is tied to your internalized sense of the role of woman in our cul-

that almost everyone is disturbed in some way and may not be operating at top level.

ture. The West has always struggled with images of the feminine. Is she a caretaker-mother type, or a seductress? Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): Aspects suggest that your attention may be called to teach or educate one or more people. It is possible that you are the student in a seminar. Short range travel and communications are also favored. If there is need for an emotional healing between you and a sibling or a roommate, now may be the perfect time. Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): The odds are high that you are going “backward” in some way. Use any

verb you wish and put the prefix “re” on it, such as reviewing, revising, or rethinking a decision. The territory is related to your career or life focus. It may be time to “revise” a decision made in the last few weeks. Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): This is a powerful time to consider your spiritual purposes. It is all too easy for the Maya, the things of the world, to overwhelm every waking minute, leaving no time for higher goals. If you notice fatigue, disappointment, or depression at this time, stop. Be still and listen for the voice deep within your soul.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Ratings more existential desires of love/belonging, esteem and self-actualization.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

I

am used to ratings, polls and experts telling me what I should eat, where I should live, what television programs are good and what I think about the political landscape. Traditional media gurus have now been augmented by internet sites, blogs and articles that often have little provenance except a web address. Communities and cities can become the happiest, healthiest, wisest or whatever else is promoted through commercial surveys that may or may not be valid indicators. However, good marketers know that everyone wants to be the best, brightest, top 10 or any superlative adjective even if they have to pay for it. Whatever measurements are used, proof of these accolades can be found in the value placed on the product, service or location by those intimately involved. For communities, citizens ultimately determine their worth through attitude and support of the environment, from basic services, education, recreation and artistic expression. Abraham Maslow expressed this as layers of human needs and wants, beginning with basic physiological and safety concerns, progressing to

In the greater Tri-City area, external recognition has become commonplace as industries recognize the possibilities of our cities as singular role models rather than adjuncts to nearby locations. For example, recently, Cleantech Open, a competition of innovative clean industry entrepreneurs selected Fremont as the site of their annual gathering. Internally, public and nonprofit agencies have recognized and are meeting the challenges of maintaining infrastructure, providing safe environments and developing our landscape in a responsible manner. While our communities struggle with the basic needs of Maslow’s hierarchy, we also have embraced the higher levels of esteem and self-actualization. Parks and family-friendly environments coupled with healthy recreation and sports activities expand our focus beyond our immediate families. We address the desire for love/belonging and creativity through educational resources and, at the peak, fine arts. Opening of Fremont Symphony’s 50th year was a source of pride and achievement for the entire area. The program, a representation of everything we are, evoked images of our heritage, ethnicity, joys and sorrows. From a plethora of instruments, voices and rhythms, Maestro Gregory Van Sudmeier wove a musical fabric that encompassed the entire range of human emotions, history and experience.

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

all of us, our highest community aspirations; from those cheering for or playing on sports teams, meeting with friends at home, dancing in different venues, playing with the kids or whatever. Moving beyond pure physiological needs, community group efforts in clubs, sports, community bands, orchestras and theater production groups not only provide creative outlets, but allow us to express pride in shared accomplishments and possibilities. The epitome of an internal rating system is a shared vision and commitment to progress from single “instruments” creating a single tone and element to one that combines strength and supplements where weakness is found. Our Innovation Corridor cities need to join together to promote and facilitate development of commercial centers, convention facilities, performing arts centers, sports facilities and the like. While accolades are welcome, the value of our Southeast Bay Innovative Corridor is not created from external polls or ratings. Recognition of our unique status should simply be a reflection of how we think of ourselves. Each city has developed its own General Plan, how about creating an areawide General Plan?

Whether you were among the sold out audience or not, this event represented

William Marshak PUBLISHER

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec Britney Sanchez OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch M.J. Laird Gustavo Lomas Isabella Ohlmeyer Medha Raman Mauricio Segura Britney Sanchez Steve Taylor INTERN Nicole Ellis

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman

Letter to the Editor

Funds to fight forest fires How presumptuous of me to suggest how billionaires should spend [their money] on charity. C’mon Ellison and Zuckerberg, and all you “lesser” mega-rich Californians mentioned in Forbes Richest Americans. Has it ever occurred to you to fund planes and helicopters to put out California forest fires? Just think, it would be a way to benefit every person, every animal and so many trees plus improving the air quality of our state. In addition, you would have the gratification of seeing aircraft overhead christened “Larry” and “Mark”! I know the air is rarified up in your [income] brackets, but you could help clear the air for all of us, including yourselves.

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

If you California billionaires won’t fund replacements for our woefully inadequate fleet, then who will? Bill Gates, our Croesus neighbor to the north is charitable, but he has his own forests he could take care of in Washington. Obviously our state won’t budget for planes here in California; high speed rail takes precedence. Sharon Brown Fremont

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Ste. B Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

October 22, 2013

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Retail Space for Lease Union City 1,068sf - 2,300sf Available Large shopping center, centrally located in Union City, across the street from BART station and Marina Supermarket, high school nearby. Current tenants include Safeway, Rite Aid, Starbucks, Citibank, Chase Bank. Suitable for Restaurant, Health Care, and other Retail Business. Call: 650-938-1888 x 103

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COMPUTER/INFO SYSTEMS Company: ECalix, Inc. Job Location: Fremont, CA Position Type: Full Time Multiple openings, all levels: Business Systems Analysts, QA Systems Analysts, Programmer Analysts, Software Engineers, and Project Managers. Travel and/or relocation required to unanticipated locations throughout U.S. Fax resume: 510-687-9016 or mail it at 42840 Christy Street, Suite 108, Fremont, CA 94538

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Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

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October 22, 2013

Are you a writer?

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Page 29

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Soccer Cal State

Soccer Report SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM October 11 Men’s Soccer Suffers Setback to No. 17 Cal State Los Angeles Cal St. Los Angeles 4, CSUEB 2

October 22, 2013

with Cal State Dominguez Hills. The host Toros built a 3-0 halftime lead and held on for a 5-3 result behind the hat trick of Aaron Salazar. Late Goal Salvages Draw with Toros Cal State Dominguez Hills 1, CSUEB 1 For the fourth straight game a women’s soccer match involving Cal State East Bay has reached the end of regulation tied. A late score by Pioneer freshman Megan Ravenscroft forced the extra sessions on the road against Cal State Dominguez Hills on Sunday afternoon, eventually ending in a 1-1 draw. October 18

Early in the second half Cal State East Bay was on the road leading the nation’s No. 17 ranked squad 2-1. The Golden Eagles soared back to score three unanswered goals and hand the Pioneers a 4-2 loss. Arthur Ethel assisted on the team’s first goal scored by Chris Lara to tie the game 1-1. Ethel later scored the go-ahead goal in the 47th minute. Cal State L.A. tied the game less than two minutes later, and took the lead for good just before the hour mark. Women’s Soccer Secures Tie with Golden Eagles CSUEB 1, Cal State Los Angeles 1 Cal State East Bay and Cal State Los Angeles played to a 1-1 draw on Friday. Megan Ravenscroft gave the visiting Pioneers a 1-0 lead early in the second half. Golden Eagles forward Andrea Lammers tied just over 10 minutes later to cap the scoring. Pioneers goalkeeper Donna Williams made nine saves in the tie. Yi Du stopped three East Bay shots. October 13 Pioneers on Short End of Scoring Frenzy State Dominguez Hills 5, CSUEB 3 Steffen Sauer, Javier Martin, and Arthur Ethel each scored second half goals in Sunday’s California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) road tilt

Second Half Spurt Secures ‘Battle of the Bay’ Sweep CSUEB 3, San Francisco State 0 Trey James, Chris Franco, and Kellen Crow scored in succession during the men’s soccer’s California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) road contest with San Francisco State to provide the margin of victory in a 3-0 result at Cox Stadium. Friday marked the largest margin of victory for the Pioneers in a CCAA contest since joining the league in 2009. Pioneers Fall in Double Overtime to Gators San Francisco State 1, CSUEB 0 Cal State East Bay played in its fifth straight California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) overtime game on the road Friday inside Cox Stadium against San Francisco State. Gators freshman Kelsey Wetzstein scored her first collegiate goal mere seconds into double overtime to break a scoreless tie. A scoreless tie through 100 minutes was ended mere seconds into the second period overtime by San Francisco State’s Kelsey Wetzstein. Andrea Hernandez led Cal State East Bay with three shots against the Gators. Cal State East Bay’s Donna Williams and San Francisco State’s Allison Land made five saves.

Warriors remain undefeated in Cross Country dual meets Women’s Volleyball

Cal State Volleyball report SUBMITTED BY STEVE CONNOLLY October 11 UC San Diego 3, Cal State East Bay 1 The Cal State East Bay volleyball team dropped its fifth straight match on Friday night, losing in four sets on the road to UC San Diego, the 11th-ranked team in the nation. The Pioneers (6-10, 2-6 CCAA) got a match-high 16 kills from Suzy Ni Xu and nine kills each from Samantha Bruno, Kitona Offord, and Hannah Bell. The Tritons (14-2, 6-2 CCAA) out-hit East Bay .275 to .199 for the match and posted a .474 team attack percentage in the clinching fourth set. October 12 CSUSB 3, CSUEB 0 (25-23, 25-18, 25-17) The Cal State East Bay volleyball team was bested by Cal State San Bernardino, the No. 16 team in the nation, in straight sets on Saturday night. It’s the sixth straight loss for the Pioneers (6-11, 2-7 CCAA), who will return home next weekend after four matches in Southern California. The Coyotes (13-4, 9-0 CCAA) out-hit East Bay .254 to .120 and notched 44 kills to the Pioneers’ 33. Tori May had 14 kills for CSUSB, and Brenna McIntosh added 13. Samthan Bruno paced the Pioneers with 10 kills. October 18 CSUEB 3, Sonoma State 2 (25-19, 13-25, 25-21, 17-25, 15-12) The Cal State East Bay volleyball team (7-11, 3-7 CCAA) broke its six-match losing streak with a thrilling five-set victory over 11thranked Sonoma State (15-3, 8-2 CCAA) on Friday night. Katie Allen had 19 kills to lead the Pioneers.

Women’s Volleyball

Ohlone Report SUBMITTED BY JEREMY PENAFLOR Ohlone College vs. Skyline College October 16 Ohlone defeats @ Skyline, 3-2 (25-22, 19-25, 20-25, 2512, 15-11)

SUBMITTED BY JOHN HOTCHKISS The Mission San Jose Cross Country remained undefeated in dual meets this season by winning all five races against Washington High School on October 16 at Lake Elizabeth, Washington’s home course. Washington had some talented individual runners, but Mission prevailed with superior depth.

Scores (low score wins) were: Boys Varsity MSJ 21; Washington 36 Girls Varsity MSJ 19; Washington 39 JV Boys MSJ 19; Washington 41 JV Girls MSJ 18; Washington 43 Frosh/Soph Boys MSJ 21; Washington 40


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

NEW HAVEN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Track and field standouts Cheri Craddock and Carla Estes and brothers Giliat and Yosef Ghebray are among six former James Logan High School student-athletes who will be inducted Nov. 2 into the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame. Craddock, who graduated in 2002, was a 10-time North Coast Section champion in track and field and won a scholarship to the University of Washington. Also a four-

year letter winner in basketball, she later coached Logan’s girls’ team. Estes, who graduated in 1997, was a national champion in the 400 meters and went on to win All-America honors at the University of Southern California, and she represented the United States in the PanAmerican Games. The Ghebrays, who graduated in 2002 and 2005 respectively, starred in both cross country and track while at Logan. Both later won All-America honors at the University of California, and both qualified for

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the Olympic trials. Others being indicted this year are wrestler Paul Kanazeh, who compiled a career record of 117-30 and won a North Coast Section championship before he graduated in 1995; Stanford University football coach David Shaw, who starred in football, basketball and track before graduating in 1990; and the school’s longtime athletic medical consultant, Dr. Arthur Ting, who also has served as team physician for the San Jose Sharks, San Jose Earthquakes, and San Jose Sabercats.

The 1996 wrestling team, which won the North Coast Section championship, finished third in the state and was ranked No. 14 in the nation, will also be honored at the sixth annual Hall of Fame Banquet. Logan Hall of Fame Banquet Saturday, Nov. 2 5:45 p.m. Union City Crowne Plaza 32083 Alvarado-Niles Rd, Union City (510) 471-2520, ext. 60118 smuse@nhusd.k12.ca.us

Letter to the Editor

Making food safe It is possible that the Costco Foster Farms chicken epidemic has been caused by contamination of personally owned, reusable bags mandated by law. Oregon investigators have already traced a past outbreak of norovirus (stomach flu) to a reusable grocery bag. For consideration:

BY NED MACKAY If you’re looking for a different activity this Halloween season, take note of the “Halloween Twilight Hike” for all ages at Coyote Hills Regional Park. Put on your costume and join naturalists Dino Labiste and Kristina Parkison on Saturday, October 26 for a hike through Coyote’s haunted hills, while learning the origins of Halloween traditions, ancient and modern. After the hike there’s a campfire with toasted marshmallows, Ardenwood’s delicious popcorn, and Halloween treats. The program is designed for ages five and older. Registration is required and there’s a fee of $4 per

person. Parking is $5 per vehicle. For registration and information, call 888-327-2757. Select option 2 and refer to program 3465. Halloween Twilight Hike Saturday, Oct 26 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont 888-327-2757 www.ebparks.org Cost: $4 per person Parking: $5 per vehicle

Division races still close in Fremont Football League

- Improper handling after purchase of a large amount of chicken bought by many separate individuals is being suggested. Are we consumers willing to have that blame shifted to our shoulders? Yet, it does appear Costco has indeed followed proper safety procedures. - Perhaps blame for contamination should be placed on our trustees, our elected politicians who passed the reusable bag mandate into law. - Alameda County Waste Management Authority (ACWMA) appointed members who proposed this Fremont law for adoption in the first place are “supposedly” experts in Waste Management—NOT experts in food safety! - Unfortunately, “experts” serving on the Boards of an Authority are sometimes merely political appointees. - It appears our elected trustees who sit on our Fremont City Council “opted in” automatically to this law by doing nothing to “opt out.” It is my understanding this “opt in” by an elected body was required in order for the Alameda County Waste Management Authority’s proposal to become law. Centers for Disease Control, hospital staff, and other food safety experts have warned of the dangers presented by norovirus (stomach flu). It can grow exponentially from a single chicken juice stain on a reusable bag stored in a hot automobile. It can be transferred to a shopping cart, conveyor belt, or other surfaces by contact and can live on those surfaces for quite some time. If I may use a quote from this very newspaper on 3/19/2013: “What’s Growing in Your Reusable Grocery Bags?” Faye McKay, Fremont

Swimming

Cal State Swimming Report SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM October 11 Women’s Swimming Dominant in Season Opener CSUEB 181, @Mills 65 The Cal State East Bay women’s swim team opened its 2013-14 season with a resounding 181-65 road win over Mills College on Friday afternoon. The Pioneers won all 14 events en route to the victory.

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW As of play through October 19, the American Division Bears beat the Patriots 55-30 with an offensive explosion late in the game. The win allows them to stay close to the undefeated Vikings with the Broncos within striking distance. So far, no team has been able to slow the Viking juggernaut. In the National Division it is a different story with a three-way tie at the top of the standings. The Falcons could be the team to watch as their offense is blossoming with a late season surge. So far, the Colts offense is running away with the Continental Division The action is always exciting with Fremont football league. Visit www.fremontfootball.org for schedules and information.

Huskies remain undefeated overwhelm Mariners SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Washington Huskies remained undefeated in Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) football at 4-0 as they met the Moreau Catholic Mariners and were never in danger of losing their spotless record. Early on, the Mariners found the Huskies ready, willing and able to defend their ground as Washington’s Mark Colbert’s started the offensive power display with impressive moves. With 2.45 left in the first quarter, he moved the ball 33 yards to put up the first score of the day. Nate Woudstra also had a great day as he opened the Huskies lead with two TDs of his own - one of 4 yards and a 70 yard interception run. Washington’s Emory Simmons also made a great interception and followed a block into the end zone. Huskies defense had their best game of the year as they held the Mariners to just 176 yards of offense for the whole game and racked up three interceptions in the first half. The only bright spot of the day for the Mariners a Brandon Tieu 45-yard pass reception. This game appeared to be a taste of things to come for the Huskies and showed why the rest of the MVAL is playing catch-up this year. Washington beats Moreau 40-0.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES

PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Planning Commission of the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following: Municipal Code Amendment (AT-13-002)

or to give counsel time to prepare. The court may appoint counsel to represent the minor whether or not the minor is able to afford counsel. If any parent appears and is unable to afford counsel, the court shall appoint counsel to represent each parent who appears unless such representation is knowingly and intelligently waived. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your pleading, if any, may be filed on time. Date: September 11, 2013 CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT /s/ K. CHHAY, Deputy 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2540698#

The City of Union City is proposing to modify Title 5, Business Licenses and Regulations, Title 7, Health and Sanitation, and Title 18, Zoning, of the Municipal Code to: • • • •

Prohibit the establishment and operation of medical marijuana facilities, such as dispensaries and cooperatives; Regulate the cultivation of medical marijuana; Prohibit the establishment and operation of e-cigarette bars/lounges, vapor bars/ lounges, and hookah bars/lounges; and Regulate the packaging and display of e-cigarettes, flavored cigars or other tobacco products, and cigarillos in retail establishments.

The proposed amendments are exempt from environmental review in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3), the general exemption for projects with no potential for significant effect on the environment. For further information regarding this project, contact Avalon Schultz, Senior Planner, at (510) 675-5321. Written comments regarding this project should be received by the Planning Division by 5:00 p.m.on Thursday, November 7, 2013. PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING November 7, 2013 The hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. The Planning Commission meeting packet, which includes the meeting agenda and staff report for this project, can be accessed on-line on the City’s Agendas and Minutes webpage which is located at http://www.unioncity.org/gov/agendas.htm Meeting packets are generally available on-line the Friday before the meeting City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. JOAN MALLOY Economic & Community Development Director 2185948.2

CIVIL SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): CV176923 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): JOSHUA BENTON HERSH, an individual, DAVID STEPHEN COY, an individual, DOES 1-10, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MARK REALMONTE NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) , the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (w ww.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT, SANTA CRUZ, 701 Ocean Street, Santa Cruz, California 95060 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): JOHN A. COLISTRA, ESQ., 1565 The Alameda, San Jose, CA 95126. 408-293-4747 DATE (Fecha): May 15, 2013 ALEX CALVO, Clerk (Secretario), by EILEEN R. GOODWIN, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2548109# SUMMONS (Family Law) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO): AF13690893 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name) AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): MARIO VALES You are being sued. Lo están demandando. Petitioner’s name is Nombre del demandante: MARIA IBARRA You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelp california.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado.

CNS#2547784

Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawh elpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. 1. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son): Superior Court of California, County of Alameda, 2233 Shoreline Drive, Alameda, CA 94501 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Cary Schneider, Esq., SB# 288949, 400 Montgomery St., Suite 505, San Francisco, CA 94104, (415) 781-6500 Date (Fecha): August 7, 2013 Johnine Polk-Snell, Deputy (Asistente) (SEAL) 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546934# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13696629 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Prasant Vadlamudi Venkat Yesu, Rachana Rajendra Wankhade for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Prasant Vadlamudi Venkat Yesu, Rachana Rajendra Wankhade filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Rian Vadlamudi Kumar to Rian Kumar Vadlamudi The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12-6-13, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Sep. 24, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544060# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. RG13697220 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sonny Lam Nguyen for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sonny Lam Nguyen filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sonny Lam Nguyen to Son Lam Duc Nguyen The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: December 13, 2013, Time: 9:30 a.m., Dept.: 31 The address of the court is US Post Office Bldg., 201 - 13th St., (2nd Fl.) Oakland, CA 94612 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: September 27, 2013 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2542692# NOTICE CITATION FOR FREEDOM FROM PARENTAL CUSTODY AND CONTROL CASE NUMBER: A 59215 IN THE MATTER OF: Yulisa Mia Torres Macias, a minor Date of Birth 6/28/09 To: Hector Vega You are advised that you are required to appear in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of San Diego, in Department One at the court location indicated above on November 08, 2013, at 9:00 A.M., to show cause, if you have any, why Yulisa Mia Torres Macias minor should not be declared free from parental custody and control (*for the purpose of placement for adoption) as requested in the petition. * Strike this portion of not applicable. You are advised that if the parent(s) are present at the time and place above sated the judge will read the petition and, if requested, may explain the effect of the granting of the petition and, if requested, the judge shall explain any term or allegation contained therein and the nature of the proceeding, its procedures and possible consequences and may continue the matter for not more than 30 days for the appointment of counsel

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483684 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: FD Gas, 36974 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. 10106 Linda Ann Pl., Cupertino, CA 95014. Hong Hai Wang, 10106 Linda Ann Place, Cupertino, CA 95014. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hong Hai Wang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2547185# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483597 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Splat-Tek, 1010 D St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Jacques Lefrancois, 1010 D St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1-1-94. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jacques Lefrancois, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 9, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546784# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483651 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Relaxing Massage, 2086 Newpark Mall Sp #018, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda 2522 Barclay Ave., Union City, Alameda, CA 94587 Wen Wei Gu, 2522 Barclay Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/5/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wen Wei Gu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 10, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546385# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483560 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The ESA Company, 40824 Townsend Ter, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Sijie Wong, 40824 Townsend Ter, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sijie Wong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 8, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12/13 CNS-2546343# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483592 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: E Beauty Hair & Nail Spa, 40900 Fremont Blvd., #C1, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda, 202 Chama Way, Fremont, CA 94539 Shao Hong Huang, 202 Chama Way, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shao Hong Huang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 08, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2545776#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483588 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ProActive Physical Therapy and Fitness, 39420 Liberty St., Suite 173, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Genaro A. Jimenez, 4269 Marie Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Genaro Jimenez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 8, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2545609# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483362 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dynamic Solutions Realty, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Amanda Renae Chun, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07/01/08 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amanda Renae Chun This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 02, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544820# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483137 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sansar Transport, 33604 4th St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Mandan Lal, 33604 4th St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mandan Lal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 26, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544819# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483370 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Transformation Home Repair, 704 San Carlos Ct., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Robin Moy Mar, 704 San Carlos Ct., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Robin Mar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544058# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483335 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Disceli Construction, Co., 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Adriana Yadira Discua, 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560 Ervin Discua, 36857 Newark Blvd., Unit A, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by Married Couple The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Adriana Discua This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 01, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5/13 CNS-2544056# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483122 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AK Badminton & Tennis, 7691 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Alan Kakinami, 137 Llewellyn Ave., Campbell, CA 95008. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Alan Kakinami This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 25, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before

the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2543007# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 482743 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fremont City Family Dental, 4949 Stevenson Blvd. Ste. #J, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Matthew J. Teramura DMD Inc., California, 326 Via Rosario, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Matthew J. Teramura DMD Inc. /s/ Matthew J. Teramura, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 13, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/13 CNS-2541823# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483135 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bay Area Paint Protection Film, 41556 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Donn P. Gomes, 41556 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-26-13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Donn P. Gomes This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 26, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2540495# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 483136 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kidzpot, 3878 Village Terrace, Apt. 125, Fremont, CA 94536. Mildred Quintero Ibarra, 3878 Village Terrace, Apt. 125, Fremont, CA 94536. Gabaela Monroy Ozuna, 4823 Delores Dr., Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mildred Quintero Iharra This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September. 26, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2540487# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 482742 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: NeoCutie, 3880 Decoto Rd. #122, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Neo Luxe LLC, CA, 3880 Decoto Rd. #122, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mei Huei Liu, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 13, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2537990# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 462752 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Stars Day Spa, 46819 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539 The fictitious business name statement for the Partnership was filed on 3/17/2012 in the County of Alameda. Danping Yang, 15153 Swenson St., San Leandro, CA 94579 This business was conducted by: S/ Danping Yang, individual This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 17, 2013. 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2537980#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Health Care Services Agency, 1000 San Leandro Blvd., Suite 300, San Leandro, CA, 94577 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #900044 Healthy Retailer Program Development Mandatory–Tuesday, October 29, 2013, 1:30 PM at Health Care Services, 1000 San Leandro Blvd, Room 325, San Leandro OR Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 1:30 PM at Public Health, 1000 Broadway, Room 5000C, Oakland Response Due by 2:00 pm on December 2, 2013 County Contact: Kristel Acacio at (510) 618-1910, Kristel.acacio@acgov.org Attendance at one conference is Mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/22/13 CNS-2547247# City of Union City Department of Public Works City Project No. 12-16


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council October 15, 2013 Consent Calendar: Make conforming changes to Fremont Municipal Code with 2013 California Building Standards Codes. Clarify nuisance conditions timing of abatement in Neighborhood Preservation Ordinance. Ceremonial Items: Proclaim October as HinduAmerican Awareness Month Recognize “A song for Peace” creator, George Avila, and its objective Proclaim Rotary International World Polio Day on October 24 Scheduled Items: Consider reallocation of 2013/14 Community Development Block Grant funds Deferral of $269,375 to Allied Housing (Natarajan – recuse) Remove from consideration conversion of closed fire station for use as emergency winter relief shelter due to accessibility issues. Funds for surveillance cameras on public streets deferred for further investigation and discussion regarding appropriate use of CBDG funds. Public comments received regarding privacy issues. Council comments supported use of appropriate surveillance but questioned CBDG fund use. Other Business: Presentation of “Fortifying the

Fremont Brand” by the Hoffman Agency regarding public relations efforts for the City of Fremont October 2012-2013. Created website: www.ThinkSiliconValley.com featuring “Advancing Business in Silicon Valley” targeting “business ecosystem.” An underlying tenet of the communications campaign is to “associate Fremont with the Silicon Valley.” Presentation by Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District explained the role of the agency, citizen services, West Nile Virus and new, invasive “Yellow Fever” mosquito, Aedes aegypti now found in Madera, Fresno and San Mateo counties. Control of larval stage is the primary focus through elimination of standing water, biological control including mosquito fish and treatment of known sources. Service requests for insect identification, mosquito bites and infestation, standing water and poorly maintained pools and dead birds (especially crows) can be made at: (510) 783-7744. Adjourn in memory of Fremont IT Analyst Beth Turnipseed. Mayor Bill Harrison Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan (1 recusal) Suzanne Lee Chan Vinnie Bacon Raj Salwan

Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

Hospitals risk losing tax-exempt status SUBMITTED BY BOB JIMENEZ Jerome Horton, Chairman of the Board of Equalization, which oversees the welfare exemption for hospitals and other organizations, has announced that the Internal Revenue Service has issued temporary and proposed regulations for charitable hospital organizations on how to report any excise taxes for failing to meet the community health needs assessment requirements of the Affordable Care Act. The temporary regulations state that a charitable hospital organization, liable for the excise tax under Section 4959 of the Tax Code, must file a return on Form 4720, Return of Certain Excise Taxes under Chapters 41 and 42 of the Internal Revenue Code. The form must be filed by the 15th day of the fifth month after the end of the charitable hospital organization’s tax year, during which the liability was incurred. Under the Affordable Care Act, hospital organizations that want to remain or become tax-exempt are required to periodically perform a community needs health assessment, and adopt an implementation strategy, at least once every three years. They also need to establish a written financial assistance policy and emergency medical care policies. They are expected to limit the charges for emergency room visits or other medically necessary care for individuals who are eligible for assistance under the hospital’s financial assistance policy. They also are expected to make reasonable efforts to determine whether an individual is eligible for assistance under the hospital’s financial assistance policy before engaging in extraordinary collection actions against the individual. The proposed regulations provide that written or electronic comments and requests for a public hearing must be received by Nov. 13, 2013.

Proposed Hayward ordinances schedule change SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD CITY CLERK The date that the following proposed ordinances will be considered by the Hayward City Council has been changed to Oct. 29. The proposed City ordinances that will be considered at this Special Hayward City Council meeting include the: continued from page 32 Notice to Contractor Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: 2012-13 Sidewalk Repairs Project, City Project No. 12-16 will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until 2:00 P.M. , Thursday, October 31, 2013,at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. This project is partly funded by Measure B and VLF Funds. The Contractor shall possess a Class C-8 California contractor’s license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans, specifications and proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be viewed at the various Builders’ Exchange in the Bay Area but can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California. To request a bid package to be mailed to you or for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List call (510) 675-5308. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $10.00 PER CD (CONTAINING PROJECT DETAILS AND SPECIFICATION IN PDF FORMAT) WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $20.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED General Work Description: The work

Hayward Summary October 15, 2013 Work Session: Review Community Preservation and Improvement (Illegal Dumping) Ordinance designed to make a Safe, Clean, and Green Community, an inviting place for residents and guests, maintain property values and direct staff resources. There has been a 25% reduction of cubic yards picked up in the last nine months compared to a similar period last year.

Milpitas City Council October 15, 2013 Presentations • Proclaim Hindu American Month for the month of October 2013. • Approve revised Memorandum of Understanding to extend the relationship with sister city Huizhou Municipality, China until October 15, 2018. The city’s vice mayor Liu Guanxain was on hand to sign the agreement along with Mayor Esteves and Vice Mayor Polanski. • Special presentation by student delegation from Sister City Dagupan, Philippines. Consent: • Consider mayor’s recommendations of re-appointments to commissions. •Approve city council meeting schedule for 2014, which will be the first and third Tuesday of every month, with a hiatus in July. • Consider request from Milpitas Rotary Club to waive all fees for

Consent: “Pay as You Save” (PAYS®) Pilot On-Bill Conservation and Efficiency Financing System Memorandum of Understanding and Concept Paper Authorize Advanced Metering Infrastructure Feasibility Study with TritonAMI Resolution to establish City contribution for active and retiree medical premiums set by the California Public Employee Retirement System (CalPERS) for Calendar Year 2014

Legislative Business: Refinance Eden Shores Community Facilities District (CFD#1) special tax bond. Initial financing of $9.965M at 6.42%; current loan a bit over $9M. Refinancing will result in a lower rate of 4.5% with a savings of over $1M for the life of the bond. Mayor Michael Sweeney Aye Barbara Halliday Aye Greg Jones Aye Al Mendall Aye Marvin Peixoto Aye Mark Salinas Absent Francisco Zermeno Aye

its annual pumpkin patch October 17-31, 2013. • Adopt a resolution approving agreement with Office Max for citywide purchase of supplies not to exceed $95,000 annually through May 2016. • Adopt a resolution approving amendment to letter of understanding between city and Association of Milpitas Battalion Chiefs. • Approve amendment to consultant services with RMC Water and Environment for additional $300,000 for support on Milpitas and Beryessa BART station projects. • Approve amendment to the consultant agreement with Schaff & Wheeler for an additional $20,000 for services on Milpitas and Beryessa BART station projects. As Successor to the Redevelopment Agency and Economic Development Corporation: Consider adoption of resolution removing 10.89 acres from standstill agreement with Milpitas Oversight Board, establishing a way to fund construction of new school.

Reports of Officers: Consider appointment of one councilmember to advisory board of Santa Clara County’s expressway plan 2040. The board selected Armando Gomez. New Business: Consider approval of amended design plan for new city park to be located at Great Mall Parkway and S Abel St. The new plan came about after a PG&E easement lead to challenges to the approved design. Council also considered naming it after local historical figure Jerry Arnold. Resolutions: Adopt a resolution approving the letter of understanding with Milpitas Police Officers Association, to reduce or eliminate furloughs effective October 20. This will increase overall police salaries by $418,000 for the remainder of 2013 and $1,180,000 for 2014. (3-1-1 Esteves, Nay) Mayor José Esteves 3 ayes, 1 nay Vice-Mayor Althea Polanski 4 ayes Debbie Indihar Giordano 4 ayes Armando Gomez 4 ayes Carmen Montano Absent

New app simplifies county shuttle service SUBMITTED BY: GUY ASHLEY Caleb Kim and Stephen Ou have ended their summer internships with Alameda County’s Information Technology Department and are returning to school. But the two technologically-adept teen-agers have left a lasting legacy that will boost public transportation and mark a major new step toward meeting the transportation needs of County employees. Caleb and Stephen, both 17 and friends from Castro Valley High School, spent much of their summer creating and perfecting ALCO Shuttle App, a new web and mobile-phone application that aims to make an innovative County shuttle service easier to use for people seeking to travel from the office to public transportation hubs and/or within the large network of County facilities. Caleb and Stephen first came onto the County radar last December when they earned Second Place in the County’s first-ever Hackathon. The two teen-agers earned the distinction with an app called ACPR Finder, which sifts through County Parks and Recreation Data to provide user-friendly information about local parks. The app includes a map interface listing all park locations and a filter that allows the user to organize parks by specific features like playgrounds, hiking trails and basketball courts. Their latest innovation, ALCO Shuttle App, provides schedules, maps and a “trip planner” that integrates scheduled shuttle stops and BART service options to help find the best time to get from Point A to B. Caleb, who is about to enter his freshman year at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, said the App also addresses concerns expressed by County staff, including restrictions on signage that have led to some confusion among County employees about the exact location of shuttle stops. The solution: the App features Google “street view” pictures of each shuttle stop, which should resolve any questions about where the Shuttle will be making its next scheduled stop.

1. Food Sharing Event Ordinance: A municipal ordinance that will regulate the time, place, and manner in which outdoor food sharing events can occur on City property. 2. City Park Hours Ordinance: A municipal ordinance that will close City owned and managed open space between sunset and sunrise each day. 3. Social Nuisance Ordinance: A municipal ordinance requiring property own-

ers to prevent and abate public nuisances connected to their property such as use and/or dealing of illegal drugs, prostitution, gang activity, chronic unruly behavior, and other public nuisances. The Council agenda and staff reports related to these items are scheduled to be available to the public on Friday, Oct. 25 at: www.hayward-ca.gov. For more information, contact the of-

fice of the City Clerk at: (510) 583-4400, or CityClerk@hayward-ca.gov. Proposed Hayward ordinances Tuesday, Oct. 29 7 p.m. Hayward City Hall, City Council Chambers, 2nd Floor 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4400 CityClerk@hayward-ca.gov

PUBLIC NOTICES to be done, in general, consist of removing and replacing approximately 12,000 SF of sidewalk, 1,500 LF of Curb & Gutter and performing other work items indicated and required by the plans, Standard Specifications and project specifications. The Engineer’s Estimate is $250,000. All questions should be e-mailed to Farooq Azim, City of Union City, at fazim@union city.org or via fax at (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates and appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: 10/9/2013 10/15, 10/22/13

CNS-2544994#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WINTON SINCLAIR TURNER CASE NO. RP13696684 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Winton Sinclair Turner A Petition for Probate has been filed by Soojung Ko Hobi in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Soojung Ko Hobi be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative

to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on November 6, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of

letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Clare H. Springs, Diane J. Fong, Springs & Associates, 601 California Street, Suite 1001, San Francisco, CA 94108, Telephone: (415) 675-1090 10/8, 10/15, 10/22/13 CNS-2542560#


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10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club of Fremont We meet Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at Spin-a-Yarn Restuaruant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, 510-656-9141 Service through Fun http://the/ fremontrotaryclub.org Please come visit our club We wlecome new members

Dawn Breakers Lions Club Our Motto is: WE SERVE Meetings -1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:45am-8am El Patio Restaurant 37311 Fremont, Blvd., Fremont We welcome Men & Women with desire to serve our community 510-371-4065 for Free Brochure

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You'll find valuable information about your community and voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are non-partisan and free to the public.

Help with Home Repairs from Alameda County No cost or favorable, low interest loans are available for home remodeling for qualified homeowners in Fremont, Union City, Sunol and Newark. Call (510)670-5399 for an application and more information. http://www.acgov.org/cda/nps/

Gamblers Anonymous Has gambling taken over your life or the life of someone you know? Thursday night 7:30pm Grace Lutheran Church 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Helpline (855)-222-5542 or www.gamblersanonymous.org

Mission San Jose Chamber Meets1st & 3rd Wednesdays Dominican Sisters of MSJ Dining Room @7:30 am Find businesses and fun In Fremont’s historical Mission San Jose District info@MSJ Chamber.org or visit our website at www.MSJChamber.org

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area Want to experience a country and its culture with local hosts and promote global goodwill? Clubs in 56 countries. Upcoming local programs on Burma and Norway. www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org Call 510-794-6844 or 793-0857

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society, Inc. Meetings: Third Saturday 5:30pm in member homes Call: 510-793-8181 for location Email: contact@aachisi.com See web for Speical Events www.aachis.com We welcome all new members Celebrating 40th anniversary

Tri-City Ecology Center Your local environmental leader! Eco-Grants available to Residents & Organizations of the Tri-City area working on Environmental projects. For info see www.tricityecology.org Office open Thursdays, 11am-2pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-783-6222

Take Off Pounds Sensibly An affordable, non-profit Weight loss support group Meetings Thurs. 10am Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark For more information, call Diane 510-657-4403 Come and check up out We’ll be weighting for you.

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Seabreeze Community Forum of Union City Be a part of a group of neighbors working towards the improvement of our community. Visit: groups.yahoo.com/group/SCFUC To join, send email to: SCFUC-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

American Legion Auxiliary We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

KIWANIS CLUB OF FREMONT We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 a.m. Fremont/Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark www.kiwanisfremont.org Contact Elise Balgley at (510) 693-4524

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:Accgr43@gmail.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

NARFE National Assoc of Active and Retired Federal Employees Meet 4th Friday of Month Fremont Senior Center Central Park @ Noon All current or retired Federal Employees are welcome. Call Ellen 510-656-7963

Steps Along the Way The Journey to Healing and Wholeness from hurts and hangups using the 12 steps Wednesday nights 7pm New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.newhopefremont.org 510-739-0430

Troubled by someone’s drinking? Help is Here!

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Unity of Fremont A Positive Path for Spiritual Living 12:30 am Sunday Service 1351 Driscoll Rd (at Christian Science Church), Fremont 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org “The Church of the Daily Word”

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Caring, Sharing, Serving God 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont Sun Worship:8:45am 11:00am Child-care provided.Education for all ages: 10:00am. Nacho Sunday: First Sunday of every month. (510)793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Maitri Immigration Program

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm

Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening.

Dominican Sisters Holiday Boutique November 23 & 24, Saturday and Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

We Need Volunteers!

Celebrate Recovery

Sparkpoint FRC Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) needs volunteers. No experience necessary. Need Greeters, Translators & Ambassadors. Information Information Meetings Thurs 9/26 & Wed10/16 6-8:30pm Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2003

Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th street Union City Thursdays 7pm -9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont enter off Mission Tierra Pl. Dominican Fruitcakes Olive Oil from Mission Trees Variety of Homemade Goods www.msjdominicans.org

Serious Mental Illness Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness. Starting Jan 11 From 9am-11:30am in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

MEN & Women South Hayward Wed & Fri 9:00 - 10:15 am 121 Ranchero Way Hayward (Clubhouse) Gentle Aerobics, Hand weights Stretch bands & Floor work 510-304-5492 suziejo@pacbell.net

New DimensionChorus Men’s 4 Part Vocal Harmony In the “Barbershop” style Thursdays at 7pm Calvary Luther Church 12500 Via Magdelena SanLorenzo Contact: ncchorus@Yahoo.com 510-332-2489

First United Methodist Church Music Series 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont Free 30 min. organ, piano & guest artist recitals. Generally first Sunday each month 4pm. Check website for exceptions www.fremont-methodist.org Free-will offering benefits humanitarian charities

Messiah Lutheran Church Church Service - Sunday 10 a.m. Bible Study - Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday School 2nd & 4th Sunday each month @ 11:15am and community events 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Phone: (510) 782-6727 www.MessiahHayward.org

Serious Mental Illness

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Senior Exercise Class

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Free courses and presentations for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness and those with a mental illness in Alameda County. For details, confidentially contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

Fri SAVE Office 9 am - noon Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

The “NO” List:

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups A no cost program of support for people suffering from effects of alcoholism in a friend or loved one. Call 276-2270 for meeting information email: Easyduz@gmail.com www/ncwsa.org You are not alone.

Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

First United Methodist Church Music Series 2950 Washington Blvd.,Fremont Free 30 min. Organ, Piano & Guest Artist Recitals. Generally first Sunday each month 4pm Check website for exceptions www.fremont-methodist.org Free-will offering benefits humanitarian charties

The Bridge of Faith Christmas Crafts Boutique 27343 Whitman, Hayward December 7, 8am-4pm Starts 10am Santa presents Bring own cameras Arts-CraftsRaffle-Bake Sale! Contact: Priscilla For Details 510-861-2680 Kauaistar59@yahoo.com

Little Lamb Preschool Open House Saturday, March 15 1pm-4pm. Drop in and visit the class rooms ad meet the teachers. Registration information will be available. Free ice cream sundaes. Everyone invited!

Writers Open Mic Share your creativity with an audience! 7-9 p.m. fourth Mondays BookSmart, Lower Level, NewPark Mall, in Newark Tony Pino (510) 857-6722 www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org


October 22, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank Invigorate your spirit & volunteer. Drop ins welcome Mon - Fri. Work off your Traffic violation by giving back to the community in need. Students 14 years & older welcome. Email Erin: ewright@tri-Cityvolunteer.org

AARP Newark Meetings Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Drive., Newark last Monday of each month at 10:00 am. All seniors (50+) are welcome to attend Contact 510-402-8318 http://aarp-newark-californiawebs.com/

Fremont Wood Carvers Visit our friendly carving group! We help you get started. No need to buy supplies at first. There are no fees or dues. Adults of all ages are welcome. Drop in Wednesdays 7-9pm Fremont Senior Center 40204 Paseo Padre Pdw., Fremont bazlberry@hotmail.com

Mission Trails Mustangs Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

Fremont Repair Cafe Are you interested in Joining this group Team of Fremont residents want to start a Repair Cafe. Non-Profit organization. Want to encourage people to bring in old items and get them repaired by volunteers. Please respond to repaircafeeastbay@gmail.com

Fremont Area Writers Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Carol at (510) 565-0619

The Union City Historical Museum

www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

3841 Smith St. Union City Open Thurs.-Sat 10am-4pm Visit our Museum. You’ll find valuable information about our community, past history and current happenings. www.unioncitymuseum.com Call Myrla 510-378-6376

Looking for a place to DISPLAY YOUR ART?

Help with Math & Reading

All Mediums welcome Oils, Watercolors, Ceramics, Etc. Eontact the Fremont Art Assoc. 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org $40 Membership required

You can make a difference by helping Newark children with Math and reading. If you can give one hour a week, you can give a life-long gift of learning to a child. Contact 510-797-2703 dia aarp 4486@yahoo.com

Saint Edward School celebrates with community outreach SUBMITTED BY ROSANNE LYON

I

n celebration of Saint Edward School’s 50th Anniversary, the students and their families gave gifts to children in need. Following in the footsteps of the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose, who serve the poor, the vulnerable and youth, Saint Edward School participated in the Sleep Train Foster Kids New Clothing Drive. With over 60,000 foster children in California, this birthday outreach helped students show compassion and generosity for children just like them. For two weeks, kindergarten through 8th grade students donated new clothes for children from their particular grade. Then several students were invited to deliver the birthday boxes of clothing to the local Sleep Train store at the Fremont Hub. As the school grows rich in blessings and gratitude for 50 years of Dominican education, students are learning that true birthday gifts received each day are lessons

Students from Saint Edward School delivered gifts of new clothing to the Sleep Train Store at the Fremont Hub to support their Foster Kids Program.

It was an honor to have Assemblymember, Bob Wieckowski, present Principal Greg Fonzeno with a Resolution to Celebrate!

rooted in Gospel values, a strong sense of family and community, and an opportunity to build lasting friendships in a faithfilled environment where each person is valued and loved as a child of God. As students reflected on what the “birthday outreach” meant to them, the following responses were typical: I would like to help children in need and make them happy. (Jillian, Grade 2)

Normally for your birthday, you get gifts. This was a nice way to give back to our community and celebrate our school. (Lauren, Grade 8) It shows our acts of service as a Catholic school. It helps us to keep our tradition in service and live up to the year’s motto: faith, knowledge, service and community. (Emmanuel, Grade 8) I wanted to help foster children feel special. (John, Grade 2) I chose to donate to other children because I realized it could happen to anyone. My friend could’ve been a foster child. I could’ve been a foster child. God really blessed me, and I felt the need to give

back. Plus, what a better way to celebrate our 50th birthday? (Catherine, Grade 6) I wanted to participate and help other children have something to celebrate. (Lauren, Grade 8) Donating new clothes made me feel helpful and loving to those kids. (Samantha, Grade 2) It made me feel happy inside my heart. (Janette, Grade 2) It made me feel great when I donated clothes to foster children because I’m a disciple of Jesus. (Nicholas, Grade 3) For more information on Saint Edward School please visit our website: www.stednewark.org.

continued from page 8

Fremont Police Log and freeze the scene. The kidnapping investigation is obviously unfounded. Major Crimes is notified and take over the investigation. A male called 9-1-1 claiming he was inside the restroom at Los Dos Amigos. He told dispatchers that he had witnessed another male brandish two handguns. The suspect was described as a male adult with long hair wearing a dark shirt. As officers arrived to check the bar, they witnessed three males exit the back door, one of whom matched the suspect description. Officers attempted to make contact, however all three males failed to comply and re-entered the bar. Moments later, one of those males (later identified as a 31 year old adult male) ran out the front door and attempted to escape. Officers pursue on foot and catch the adult male near Bay St. and Papazian. Officers re-contact Los Dos Amigos security and they confirm a male matching the description of the possibly armed suspect is still inside. Security was unable to identify how many other associates the male had inside the bar. Mutual aid is requested from Union City and Newark. The bar was evacuated and all the patrons were identified. In the end, no guns were located, no victims, and no crime. The adult male who ran was found to have a felony warrant for narcotics. Ofc. Luevano arrested the 31 year old adult male for resisting and for his warrant.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Wednesday, October 9 Officer Cerini investigated a stolen vehicle on Darvon Street of a Nissan Altima, which occurred overnight between 7:30 p.m. and 6:25 a.m., and was recovered by CHP later in shift in Castro Valley. Officers noticed a running 1998 Nissan Sentra across the

Newark Police Log street and recovered that stolen vehicle out of Fremont. At 9:23 a.m., Officer Coffey investigated a commercial burglary window smash at Best Nail located at 36601 Newark Blvd. Loss was cash. Officer Coffey also investigated an attempted commercial burglary at an adjacent business. 0949 Hours: Officer Coffey investigated a burglary that occurred at Shell Gas on Jarvis Avenue on 10/04/13. Loss was Lottery tickets, cash, and cigarettes. The store clerk was distracted while theft occurred. Officer Coffey is continuing the investigation. At 12:03 p.m., Officer Katz investigated a theft of a purse off of a woman’s chair while dining at a Lion Center restaurant on Mowry Avenue. Thursday, October 10 At 1:10 p.m., Officer Coffey investigated a shoplift at Macy’s. Hong Zhu of Fremont was cited. Officers were dispatched to the area of Newark Boulevard and Fair Avenue at 12:46 a.m. for an injury accident. Upon arrival officers located a solo vehicle severed in half. One half of the vehicle was resting in the #2 S/B lane of Newark Boulevard and the other half came to rest against a wooden fence of a residence in the Foxwood Townhomes. The driver of the vehicle was located in the driver seat, unresponsive but had a pulse. ALCO Fire was summoned and extracted the driver using the “Jaws of Life”. An odor of alcohol was present at the scene and Paramedics Plus transported the driver to Eden Hospital. The driver of the vehicle has been admitted into Eden Hospital and is considered to be in serious condition. The investigation is under investigation. Friday, October 11 NPD Patrol responded to the Pashmina Festival located in the NewPark Mall south west lot at 1:28 p.m. ALCO fire requested as-

sistance with citing the event promoter for violating his fire permit which states that they are not to have open flames inside the event tents. Open flames are acceptable outside 20 feet away from the tents only. Event Promoter Bibek Das of Pleasanton was aware that he had violated his permit and was cited for administrative penalties. At 6:56 p.m., Officer Homayoun contacted Ronald Reed of Oakland at NewPark Mall. During the contact, Officer Homayoun learned Reed was restrained from the female inside of the car with him. Reed was arrested for domestic violence restraining order violation and booked at Fremont Jail. An alert neighbor from Olive Street called to report a Black Male and a White Female were seen walking into a residence located at 36758 Olive Street at 7:15 p.m. This is the same residence, CDC Parole Agent Languerand asked for our assistance on Thursday 10/10/2013. Agent Languerand left a signed copy of his Parole Hold in the event we contacted Charles Monroe of Newark. With this information, a perimeter was set around the listed address. Charles Monroe was located inside of a vehicle parked in the driveway and he was taken into custody without incident. Officer Hogan booked Monroe at Santa Rita Jail. Agent Languerand was contacted expressed his appreciation for our efforts the past couple of shifts. Officer Slater was dispatched to a possible kidnapping investigation in the parking lot of WorldPac on Hickory Street at 8:55 p.m. Initial reports from employees at the business indicated a female was involved in a verbal argument with a male in the parking lot. The male then pushed the female into his truck and the two drove away. At 10:55 p.m. a co-worker of the female called 9-1-1 to state the associated

vehicle was occupied by the male and female on Olive Street at Thornton Avenue. Officers arrived and determined the kidnapping was unfounded. Saturday, October 12 As Officers were cleaning up at the Tip-A-Cop event at 9:49 p.m., the victim of a domestic violence incident ran over to report her boyfriend had just damaged her car and assaulted her in the parking lot. Officers located the suspect on Balentine Dr. as he attempted to flee the area on foot. Officer Losier subsequently arrested Taunuutasi Utuga of Stockton) for domestic violence battery and vandalism. Utuga was booked at Fremont PD Jail. Sunday, October 13, 2013 At 2:02 a.m., Officer Arroyo investigated a domestic violence incident where the victim went to the Emergency Room at Washington Hospital for treatment after having been assaulted by her husband with the wooden leg from a table. The suspect was identified as Jeffrey Deleon of Newark and was not located during the initial investigation. Monday, October 14 Officer Khairy continued Officer Arroyo’s investigation by attempting to locate the suspect, Jeffrey Deleon, who had struck his wife in the head with a wooden table leg. Officer Khairy developed a plan to contact the suspect at work on Boyce Rd in Fremont which involved three Newark officers, two Fremont officers and a Fremont K9. Officer Khairy placed Deleon under arrest without incident. Deleon was booked at Fremont Jail for Domestic Violence, assault with a deadly weapon criminal threats. Thank you to Fremont PD for the assistance. Great follow up by Officer Khairy! Tuesday, October 15 While at Bridgepoint High School at 10:53 a.m., Officer Revay

was given information about a male selling marijuana on school campus. Jayln Daniels of Oakland was arrested for possession of marijuana on a school campus. Thursday, October 17 Officer Katz accepted the arrest of Maneja Latify of Union City at 2:07 p.m. for petty theft. She was cited and released. Officer Neithercutt located an unreported auto burglary (window smash) in the parking lot of Hometown Buffet during a security check at 2:51 p.m. The victim was contacted and the loss was a purse. Officer Fredstrom investigated a stolen Red 2007 Yamaha R6 Motorcycle (CA license 20D4896) from 36826 Cherry St. that occurred between 12:30 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Fremont PD advised at 4:30 p.m., they had the victim of an assault with a weapon at Washington Hospital. The victim had been beaten by a co-worker with a full can of “Monster” energy drink, loss consciousness, and fell to the ground where he was kicked in the face. This had occurred earlier at 38507 Cherry St. Officers responded to 38507 Cherry St. and contacted the suspect, David Soria of Fremont who admitted his involvement in the assault. The CCTV surveillance video confirmed an assault with a deadly weapon and Soria was placed under arrest. Officer Fredstrom investigated with the assistance of Officer Taylor. Officer Neithercutt investigated a stolen Gray 2001 Saturn SL 4 door (Ca License 4RKL341) reported at NPD. The vehicle was stolen overnight from the parking lot of Gubera’s Pub. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-5784000, extension 500.


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 22, 2013

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 900,000 Median $: 610,000 Lowest $: 410,000 Average $: 603,778 ADDRESS

ZIP

21102 Ashfield Avenue 18759 Carlton Avenue 18188 Carmel Drive 19019 Gliddon Street 4077 Greenacre Road 18956 Patton Drive 7768 Coolidge Court 5953 Highwood Road 22125 West Lyndon Loop

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

448,000 565,000 475,000 610,000 630,000 410,000 900,000 774,000 622,000

3 3 3 4 6 3 4 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1308 1443 1440 1528 2258 994 2697 1901 2379

1955 1962 1962 1953 1952 1952 2001 1963 2000

09-12-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-12-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-13-13

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES:31 Highest $: 1,850,000 Median $: Lowest $: 125,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

38715 Adcock Drive 94536 670,000 35840 Alcazar Court 94536 585,000 4864 Balboa Way 94536 350,000 4538 Bartolo Terrace 94536 209,000 1086 Canyon Creek Terrace 94536 1,055,000 4765 Driftwood Drive 94536 685,000 37687 Fremont Boulevard 94536 700,000 38899 Helen Way 94536 680,000 37050 Meadowbrook Common #10394536 341,000 37531 Mission Boulevard 94536 510,000 38228 Paseo Padre Parkway #3394536 216,000 35858 Plumeria Way 94536 725,000 37348 Spruce Terrace 94536 125,000 1980 Barrymore Common #V 94538 339,000 5736 Birch Terrace 94538 304,000 5366 Coco Palm Drive 94538 575,000 39199 Guardino Drive #175 94538 305,000 39109 Guardino Drive #240 94538 299,000 4463 Hyde Common #111 94538 554,000 43364 Montrose Avenue 94538 450,000 4893 Regents Park Lane 94538 652,000 4303 Sacramento Avenue #22494538 260,500 44039 Geddy Court 94539 1,750,000 41951 McKay Street 94539 1,100,000 44975 Naragansett Court 94539 1,850,000 2805 Olive Avenue 94539 862,000 49055 Woodgrove Common 94539 713,000 49103 Woodgrove Common 94539 535,500 3583 Johnson Court 94555 708,000 3689 Lake Ontario Drive 94555 650,000 3234 Mountain Drive 94555 1,010,000

3 2 2 4 4 3 5 2 1 4 1 2 2 7 2 2 3 4 4 1 4 3 3 3 3 2 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1508 1484 1033 988 2807 1930 1580 1624 990 386 750 1863 593 991 945 1610 844 857 1402 1340 1552 1221 3112 1702 3929 1132 1584 1119 1603 1409 2677

1977 1965 1982 1971 1991 1955 1937 1963 1984 1910 1970 1955 1986 1981 1970 1962 1987 1987 2009 1954 1961 1974 1989 1960 1986 1954 2004 2004 1980 1976 1988

09-11-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-12-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-10-13 09-12-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-10-13 09-13-13

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 32 Highest $: 2,279,500 Median $: Lowest $: 150,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

22139 Castille Lane #60 2087 D Street 2304 D Street 24023 Edloe Drive 23627 Fuller Avenue 23805 Madeiros Avenue 789 Memorial Way 1775 Panda Way #112 641 Paradise Boulevard 2051 Parkhurst Street 100 Sonas Drive 25796 Spring Drive 31088 Chicoine Avenue 28639 Cole Place 31191 Faircliff Street 1636 Folsom Avenue 672 Janice Avenue 24682 Lyell Way 355 Murray Drive 683 Newbury Lane #374 27806 Ormond Avenue 27740 Pistachio Court 26337 Regal Avenue 518 Teasdale Place 1886 Welford Lane 623 Woodland Avenue 2044 Aldengate Way 2387 Arf Avenue 2054 Continental Avenue 3639 Depot Road 2421 Homer Lane 21228 Gary Drive #110

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

302,500 400,000 200,000 370,000 355,000 470,000 640,000 245,000 405,000 500,000 862,000 410,000 410,000 380,000 452,000 365,000 335,000 360,000 330,000 195,000 391,000 355,000 415,000 410,000 620,000 275,000 150,000 150,000 480,000 2,279,500 570,000 288,000

1171 2543 1092 1052 1041 1948 2645 900 1665 1888 3452 1449 1078 1050 1228 1000 1175 1082 1215 906 1000 1457 1059 1546 1873 1501 1050 1254 1723 1703 1047

1982 1946 1975 1953 1950 1984 1963 1980 1942 2010 2010 1951 1955 1952 1956 1954 1955 1952 1950 1988 1954 1973 1952 1957 1994 1960 1968 1970 1991 2012 1982

09-10-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-12-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-12-13 09-11-13

2 4 2 3 3 3 6 2 3 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 2

ZIP

663 Folsom Circle 340 Gerald Circle 344 Gerald Circle 1723 Golden Hills Drive 482 Holly Way 317 Junipero Drive #3 1745 Lee Way 1792 Lee Way 680 Mente Linda Loop 38 Moon Dance 1238 Nestwood Way 1242 Nestwood Way 1071 North Abbott Avenue 820 North Abbott Avenue 1080 Ridgemont Drive 1101 South Main Street #235 1164 Stardust Way 561 Wool Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

630,000 883,000 916,000 619,000 532,000 200,000 585,500 582,500 670,000 636,000 492,500 588,000 320,000 420,000 800,000 431,500 630,000 570,000

3 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3

ADDRESS

ZIP

39887 Cedar Boulevard #152 35255 Farnham Drive 37896 Goldenrod Drive 6226 Jarvis Avenue 6926 Jarvis Avenue 8561 Peachtree Avenue 35673 Sheridan Court 37162 St. Matthew Drive 6225 Wilma Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

290,000 690,000 400,000 480,000 400,000 585,000 740,000 480,000 440,000

2 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

585,500 583,667

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1698 1459 1047 882 1810 1528 863 1345 1953 977 1190 1550

1983 1971 1963 1971 2007 2000 1979 1981 1989 2007 1969 1987

09-20-13 09-23-13 09-19-13 09-20-13 09-24-13 09-20-13 09-20-13 09-25-13 09-23-13 09-19-13 09-20-13 09-23-13 09-20-13 09-24-13 09-24-13 09-24-13 09-20-13 09-20-13

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 740,000 Median $: Lowest $: 290,000 Average $:

480,000 500,556

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1071 1514 1166 1574 1331 1856 2182 1469 1187

1986 1970 1969 1986 1982 1994 1971 1978 1953

09-11-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-11-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES:22 Highest $: 880,500 Median $: 385,500 Lowest $: 272,000 Average $: 417,750 ADDRESS

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579

388,000 320,000 410,000 460,000 880,500 340,000 510,000 473,000 295,000 385,500 650,000 300,000 442,000 310,000 400,000 364,500 272,000 505,000 350,000 365,000 395,000 375,000

CLOSED

3 3 3 4 4 2 3 3 3 2 5 3 3 3 5 3 2 4 2 3 3 3

1210 950 1308 1386 3235 832 1643 1577 1317 1162 2989 1298 1745 883 2422 1000 864 1667 956 1081 1114 1096

2004 1942 1940 1962 1967 1942 1925 2000 1951 1946 1964 1942 1946 1947 2009 1949 1947 2007 1920 1951 1951 1953

09-11-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-12-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-11-13 09-10-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-13-13 09-11-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 396,500 Median $: 380,000 Lowest $: 275,000 Average $: 350,500 ADDRESS

ZIP

33 Paseo Grande #C 17024 Via Alamitos 15802 Via Nueva

SOLD FOR BDS

94580 94580 94580

275,000 396,500 380,000

2 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

1056 2053 1571

1985 09-10-13 1947 09-10-13 1955 09-13-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES:06 Highest $: 875,000 Median $: Lowest $: 250,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

34236 Arizona Street #15 32664 Brenda Way #4 5708 Del Monte Court 4620 Empire Street 32334 Jean Drive 35580 Monterra Terrace #202

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

395,000 250,000 875,000 680,000 457,000 291,000

3 2 5 4 3 2

CLOSED

395,000 491,333

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1684 798 2766 1719 1340 1018

1982 1973 1998 1986 1973 2001

09-13-13 09-13-13 09-10-13 09-11-13 09-12-13 09-12-13

California home prices cool in September BY ELLIOT SPAGAT ASSOCIATED PRESS

380,000 449,063

SOLD FOR BDS

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 18 Highest $: 916,000 Median $: Lowest $: 200,000 Average $: ADDRESS

585,000 637,677

621 Bixco Street 881 Donovan Drive 183 Lexington Avenue 14333 Maracaibo Road 1876 Marineview Drive 864 Martin Boulevard 392 Maud Avenue 3461 Monogram Road 2321 Sitka Street 861 Sybil Avenue 1406 View Drive 1466 Wayne Avenue 1696 140th Avenue 1427 153rd Avenue 1830 Bali Court 15950 Carolyn Street 472 Olive Street 506 Sugar Maple Lane 1594 Thrush Avenue 14315 Bradley Street 15023 Costela Street 1574 Sagewood Avenue

SAN DIEGO (AP), California housing prices cooled in September as inventories grew and investor interest waned, a research firm reported Thursday, offering fresh evidence that the market is taking a breather after a torrid spring and summer. The median sales price for new and existing houses and condominiums was $355,000 last month, up 23.7 percent from $287,000 during the same period

last year, research firm DataQuick said. It was the 10th straight month of annual gains above 20 percent, but the median fell by $6,000 from August. The 36,027 homes sold in the state – up 5.9 percent from a year earlier – was the highest September sales tally since 2009. Fewer homeowners find themselves owing more than their properties are worth as prices have soared, prompting many to put their homes up for sale. The California Association of

Realtors said there was a 3.6-month supply of unsold single-family homes in the state last month, up from 3.1 months in August. A normal supply is considered to be five to seven months. Housing inventories have grown steadily since May, though supplies remain tight for lowerpriced homes, said Don Faught, president of the brokers association. The median sales price in the San Francisco Bay Area was $530,000 in September, up 23.5 percent from $429,000 the same period last year, DataQuick said. It was the 11th straight month of annual gains above 20 percent but the second consecutive decline from the previous month. Prices peaked at $562,000 in July. The September figure was also the smallest annual percentage gain since March. The median sales price in Southern California was $382,000, up 21.3 percent from $315,000 the same period last year, DataQuick reported Wednesday. It was the 14th straight month of double-digit annual increases but the median fell from the previous month for the first time since February, dropping by $3,000 from fresh five-year highs set in June, July and August. Some of the price increase reflects a shift in sales to more expensive homes. In the San Francisco Bay Area, there were 7,141 homes sold in September, up 3.6 percent from a year earlier. Sales for less than $500,000 plummeted 19.5 percent, while sales above the half-million dollar mark surged 30.9 percent. In Southern California, there were 19,112 homes sold, a 7 percent increase from last year. Sales of at least $500,000 soared 42.1 percent. Absentee buyers, mostly investors, purchased 20.7 percent of San Francisco Bay Area homes last month, down from 23.9 percent a year earlier and a peak of 28.7 percent in February. Absentee buyers accounted for 26.3 percent of Southern California sales, down from 27.7 percent a year earlier and a peak of 32.4 percent in January.

California property values climb SUBMITTED BY JAIME GARZA The total value of state- and county-assessed property increased for a third straight year. For 2013-14, values rose to $4.636 trillion, an increase of $191.5 billion (4.3 percent) from the previous year, the Board of Equalization announced on October 14, 2013. The statewide value of property assessed by county governments increased $187.9 billion (4.3 percent) to $4.545 trillion. The value of property assessed by BOE staff, mainly privately owned public utilities and railroads totaled $90.8 billion, an increase of $3.7 billion (4.2 percent). Year-to-year percentage changes ranged from a high of an 8.3 percent gain in Santa Clara County to a low of a 4.1 percent decline in Inyo County. The surge in Santa Clara County values was largely due to changes in ownership and new construction. In all, fifty-one counties posted year-to-year increases in assessed value, the majority of those increases

above two percent. Ten counties grew in excess of five percent. Six counties experienced a year-to-year decline in value, however the combined assessed values of those six counties comprise less than one percent of the entire statewide roll. The percentage change in Mono County’s values remained unchanged. Values jumped 4.9 percent in the North San Joaquin Valley, and increased by 3.7 percent in the Central Valley as a whole. In the Greater Sacramento Area, assessed values rose 4.1 percent, led by a real estate market recovery in Placer County (up 6.0 percent). The assessed valuation in California’s 15 coastal counties (which account for more than 60 percent of total assessed valuation) gained 4.1 percent, while valuations in the 43 inland counties rose 4.6 percent. San Francisco Bay Area values increased 5.5 percent, influenced by the growth in Santa Clara County. Southern California assessed values grew by 4.0 percent. All 12 counties with rolls exceed-

ing $100 billion posted higher assessed values. Increases occurred in the counties of Santa Clara (8.3 percent), San Mateo (5.7 percent), Alameda (5.0 percent), San Francisco (4.5 percent), Riverside and Sacramento (4.1 percent), Orange (3.6 percent), Contra Costa (3.4 percent), Ventura (3.3 percent), San Diego (3.2 percent), and San Bernardino (3.0 percent). Los Angeles County, with the largest assessment roll at $1.153 trillion, increased by 4.7 percent, up $51.3 billion over 2012-13. Each year, the 58 county assessors in California are required to report their total assessment roll to the BOE. The totals reported for 201314 represent property values on January 1, 2013. This value is used to calculate dollar amounts homeowners or commercial property owners owe their respective county governments in property taxes. These bills are generally sent in the fall. For more information on other taxes and fees in California, visit www.taxes.ca.gov.

High school students help prepare seniors SUBMITTED BY MONIKA SIU Senior Personal Emergency Preparedness, or SPEP, began as an Eagle Project for local student Louis Leung. Having been involved at the Fremont Senior Center while in high school, Leung had a vision: to educate as many senior citizens about emergency preparedness as possible. Knowing he couldn’t do this alone, he recruited his first team member and best friend Darshan Bagivalu to help with marketing. The two built and trained a team of high school students to make their tri-lingual (Hindi, Mandarin, and English) presentations a success. Months of hard work paid off. Over 200 senior citizens showed up to their three presentations this past April. The positive feedback from this project made Leung and Bagivalu realize the potential of their project. It prompted them to expand their mission and branch out around the Bay Area.

Since their first couple presentations in April, the team has been hard at work revamping the curriculum and gathering resources. SPEP recently affiliated itself as an outreach branch under Fremont CERT/PEP, and they’re currently working on raising funds to buy emergency prep essentials that can be distributed at presentations. The team of students in charge of SPEP is hoping to hold more presentations in neighboring cities. In the meantime, they’re working on a more pervasive marketing strategy, comprehensive curriculum, and potential sponsorships. Having already helped the seniors in Fremont, the SPEP team hopes to spread their message and tips to seniors throughout the Silicon Valley. For more information visit SPEP’s website at www.seniorpep.com


October 22, 2013

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Debbie Blythe-Caravalho and Raymond Rodriguez

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS Photography, as a practical process, began in the 1820s when French inventor Nicephore Niepce made the first permanent photograph from nature with a camera obscura in 1826. His photographs required eight hours for exposure. Louis Daguerre developed the daguerrotype in 1837, taking the first photograph of a person in 1838. Experimentation continued throughout the 19th century, and in 1884, George Eastman developed film. Technology has continued to advance bringing color, movement, and in the late 20th century, digital photography. Olive Hyde Art Gallery’s Curator, Sandra Hemsworth Petrich, has selected the work of three digital photographers for Olive Hyde’s next exhibit “Perceptions.” She feels nature can be experienced through their work, transcending the camera. “Not many times since I first saw the work of Ansel Adams have I had an experience looking at nature photography where it takes me to a place that I can understand and feel the same things the photographer experienced on site, documenting it so accurately, as if the camera never existed or got in the middle.” Berkeley artist Hagit Cohen works primarily with digital images, constructing visual scenes. Cohen has a BFA in Photography and Art History from State Art Teacher Training College in Israel, and an MFA in Imaging Arts from Rochester Institute of Technology, where she also taught photography for several years. Cohen explores the subject of nature and the environment in her current work. She has exhibited work in Tel Aviv; Toronto; Rochester, NY; Los Angeles; Berkeley; Oakland; and San Francisco. Her photographs have appeared in several publications. As a self-taught photographer, TJ Thorne’s early love of nature led him to the Pacific Northwest, where he currently lives. His work affords the viewer an opportunity to experience nature intimately. Each image is a moment in time, which remind us that the majesty of nature is out there for all of us. J. Alan Constant has been a photographer in the Bay Area for 24 years. After studying Photography at Monterey Peninsula College, he earned a BA in Art History with a minor in Photography at SFSU. His work has appeared in Architectural Digest and Arts & Antiques many times. In the late ‘90s, he began working only with art photography. He looks for interesting combinations of color and composition that catch the eye. Constant is more interested in how color and composition influence the two dimensional plane than in depicting a particular place and time. “Perceptions,” an exhibit of works in photography, will open at the Olive Hyde Art Gallery with a reception from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, October 25, and run through November 16. Perceptions - Works in Photography Friday, Oct 25 – Saturday, Nov 16 Thursday – Sunday: 12 noon - 5 p.m. Opening reception: Friday, October 25 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/

Marriage - October 5, 2013 They finally said their “I do’s” on October 5, 2013. After 23 years of dating, Ray popped the question and Debbie, daughter of Newark icon Viola Blythe, said “yes.” In an “old school” ceremony, complete with “zoot suits” and dresses reminiscent of the days of Marilyn Monroe, attended by over 400 of their closest friends, Pastor Ed Moore performed the service at Newark Community Church. To honor a shared passion for motorcycles, Debbie asked for a Harley-Davidson emblem to be sewn into the belt of her wedding dress.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FURRY FRIENDS RESCUE The coolest humans and dogs will unite at the grooviest of events in an effort to save homeless animals when Furry Friends Rescue (FFR) presents their annual “Woofstock” event. Fremont-based FFR is a non-profit, all-volunteer companion animal rescue organization which has saved over 12,000 animals since 1998. They are dedicated to fostering and placing animals in

permanent, loving homes, and depend solely on donations to make this happen. “Woofstock” allows animals lovers and canines of all kinds to enjoy a great day out and help FFR continue their good work. The outstanding Mountain Winery location offers beautiful views of the Silicon Valley, and attendees will enjoy wine tasting, browsing vendor and artist booths specializing in all things animal, Dog Adop-

A veritable “A-List” of Newark joined the couple and, with the pre-planning help of Mayor Alan Nagy, Councilmember Luis Freitas and various Newark dignitaries, the ceremony was flawless. Debbie’s grandchildren, Indiana, age 5 and Montana, age 2 were joined the wedding ceremony. Following the nuptials, members of the Bay Bombs Car Club drove the couple to the Newark Pavilion for a party, themed “At Last.” Italian and Mexican food was plentiful, complimented by a 5tier cake celebrating the mixed heritage wedding. The couple enjoyed a brief honeymoon in Lake Tahoe and hopes to extend it next year in Italy.

tion Showcase, silent auction and raffle, and live music from Tin Man from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and West Grand Boulevard from 2 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Diane Dwyer of NBC Bay Area News will serve as emcee for the Howl-loween Dog Costume Contest from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. where dogs can win titles such as Grooviest, Cutest, Unique, Funniest, and Group; Best Dog will be awarded the grand prize. Tickets are $15 online and $20 if purchased at the door (33 percent of cover charge goes to Furry Friends Rescue). Ages 16 years and under are free. Admission includes taste of four Reserve Wines or soft drink. To learn more about FFR, how to become a foster home, donate, or purchase tickets for “Woofstock” visit www.furryfriendsrescue.org. Woofstock Sunday, Oct 27 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. The Mountain Winery 14831 Pierce Rd., Saratoga (510) 794-4703 www.furryfriendsrescue.org Tickets: $15 online, $20 at door Free parking


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LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

Fremont Briefs SUBMITTED BY CHERYL GOLDEN Credit Repair Class Do you need to fix your credit report and improve your credit score? If so, the SparkPoint Fremont Family Resource Center’s Credit Repair Class can help. This class will teach you the basics of fixing your credit. In this class, you will learn: • The importance of credit reports and credit scores to you. • Credit bureaus and credit report basics. • How long information stays on your report. • Who can see your report? • How to obtain a free report. • Common errors and how to correct them. • Process to dispute and fix errors. • What can be negotiated with creditors? • What increases or decreases your score. • Avoiding identity fraud. This class is one of many financial services available through the SparkPoint program. To attend this particular class you do not need to be a SparkPoint customer. Class will be held Wednesday, Nov. 6: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. at the Fremont Family Resource Center, 39155 Liberty St., in the Millennium Room. To register, call (510) 574-2020 ext. 3. Trick or Treat on Safety Street If things that are creepy, crawly, and go bump in the night are just not your thing, yet you still like to celebrate the Halloween season with your little ones, then Trick or Treat on Safety Street is for you! On Friday, Oct. 25, the gentle holiday spirit of scarecrows, pumpkins, ghosts, and fanciful creatures will take over Centerville Community Center. For a couple of hours, par-

ents and their children can venture to various rooms and play. At this festive family-friendly event, you can visit a trick-or-treat wonderland where children can travel to miniature houses in Halloween Town gathering goodies without the worries of being out in the streets. Your family can also enjoy snacks at “Alice’s Wonderland Tea Party,” create crafts at the “Radiator Springs Auto Repair Shop” craft corner, toss beanbags at the “Super Hero City Carnival,” or play in the “Where the Wild Things Are” Rumpus Room. Bring your camera for family “photo-ops” located throughout the building. Join us Friday, Oct. 25 at the Centerville Community Center, located at 3355 Country Dr. There are two-hour time slots, begin-

ning at 5 p.m., and every half hour. For more details, and to register, visit www.RegeRec.com. (Advanced Search Keyword: Treat) The cost for advance tickets is $9, while tickets at the door, if available, are $15. For more information contact the City’s Katie Fox at (510) 494-4349 or kfox@fremont.gov. ‘Hocus Pocus – Abracadabra’ for Ages 4 to 6 Attend the Class on Saturday, Oct. 28 In “Abracadabra Kids,” students ages 4 to 6 are introduced to magic through simple ‘self-working’ magic tricks that junior magicians will take home to dazzle their

family. This is an introduction to simple magic tricks that will help develop fine motor skills, self-confidence, and encourage creativity. Students will learn new tricks and have fun while the instructor entertains the class with magic tricks. Each child will also receive a magic wand and official Magician’s Assistant Certificate. This is a parent participation class and the cost is $19 per parent/child pair. For more details, and to register, visit www.RegeRec.com. (Advanced Search Keyword: Magic). Check out our Recreation Guide for more events and activities, or visit us online at www.RegeRec.com. For more information contact the City’s Irene Jordahl at ijordahl@fremont.gov or (510) 494-4322.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right) Most Cars and Trucks

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

Exp. 11/30/13

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

$24.95+ FREON Easy Service we will check for leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only.

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 11/30/13

Exp. 11/30/13

TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

$79.

$89.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 11/30/13

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 11/30/13

RADIATOR FLUSH

$29.

95

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 11/30/13

$19.

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 11/30/13

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.95 6-CYL. $49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp. 11/30/13

Tcv 131022  

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