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Moon Festival brings community together

Event honors 9/11 heros

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

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September 10, 2013

Vol. 12 No. 37

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE

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fiesta of colorful dancing and vibrant music representing the magnificent variety that Mexican culture has to offer will transform the stage at Ohlone College as Ballet Folklorico Mexicano (BFM) presents a full mariachi band and a lively continued on page 18

SUBMITTED BY BOLDLY ME Boldly Me is excited to present our first “Water Gala” at Aqua Adventure Water Park in Fremont on Saturday, September 14. Aqua Adventure is the perfect place for Boldly Me, with a semi private area that will be sectioned off for people who would like to enjoy the warmth of the sun, relax, play, and be who they naturally are. The “Water Gala” is meant to be a critical part in the healing process of building self-esteem and public awareness around physical differences. The event allows people to share and educate others on different conditions from which people silently suffer. One of the most active members of the community has professed that fear of judgment and rejection due to psoriasis has stopped him from swimming and enjoying the water. This is a problem we can fix as a community from the inside out and the outside in. The “Water Gala” is intended to: educate oneself, educate the public, and practice letting go of fear. As a community, we can show support for those who silently struggle for acceptance; to let them know they are loved and accepted. “Many people are terrified to get in a bathing suit and play publicly at a pool because they fear judgment, ‘I’m too big, too small, too bald, too hairy, too freckled,

SUBMITTED BY SHERYL KNUDSON Music, Food and fun are on the menu of Taste of Union City Food Blues & World Music Festival Saturday, September 14. Offering three stages of musical headliners and cultural entertainment, the festival also includes a job fair for Veterans. Festival producer E.C. Scott says, “No longer will we just keep the blues alive but give comfort food to the soul.” A highlight of the festivities will be a municipal cooking challenge pitting local leaders in a spirited competition. Dignitaries will use their culinary skills to win the coveted Golden Skillet Award. Cooking classes, family game area with rides for children, car show and chance to win a new 2013 Chevy Volt, round out the day’s activities. continued on page 39

continued on page 40 INDEX Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Community Bulletin Board . . 34

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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any of us feel the onset of aging with the stiffening of our joints. Knees, hips, hands and other joints may show signs of arthritis as we age. There are several different forms of arthritis but the most prevalent types include Osteoarthritis (OA), Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Gout. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common type of arthritis that mainly affects middle-aged to elderly population. Osteoarthritis can occur together with other types of arthritis. We commonly refer to osteoarthritis as “wear and tear” of our joints but osteoarthritis is not limited to just wear and tear but is a disease of the entire joint, involving the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments and bone, according to Dr. Vani Velkuru, a Fremont Rheumatologist and member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. About 27 million Americans are living with osteoarthritis, Dr. Velkuru notes. The lifetime risk of developing OA of the knee is about 46 percent and the hip is 25 percent, according to long-term studies sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

The other common form of arthritis is Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own defense system does not work properly and starts attacking the lining of the joints. Gout is a painful and potentially disabling form of arthritis. Gout affects more than 3 million Americans. Gout occurs when excess uric acid (a normal waste product) collects in the body, and needle-like urate crystals deposit in the joints. To learn more about the impact of arthritis, how to live with it and to explore the management options to relieve some of the symptoms, bring your lunch and join Dr. Velkuru at a free “Lunch and Learn” seminar from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, September 18. The program, “Living with Arthritis”, will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Since arthritis is one of the leading causes of disability in our population, the purpose of the luncheon program is to educate participants about arthritis. The discussion will cover topics like identifying the red flags of arthritis, when to seek medical help, medications for arthritis, and how to prevent longterm disability from the disease.

September 10, 2013

Severe forms of arthritis can affect a person’s ability to perform simple activities like walking or dressing. To learn more about the impact of arthritis, how to live with it and to explore the management options to relieve some of the symptoms, bring your lunch for a free “Lunch and Learn” seminar from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, September 18. The program, “Living with Arthritis”, will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Register at whhs.com/event or call (800) 963-7070.

“It is important for individuals to understand what they can do to manage the effects of arthritis, and to keep active since it is easy just to slow down and not move because of the discomfort and pain,” Dr. Velkuru said. “The more severe forms of arthritis can affect a person’s ability to perform simple activities like walking, dressing and other activities of daily living.” In managing arthritis it is essential to keep moving to keep the discomfort or pain under control. Walking and other

forms of regular mild exercise often are beneficial. If one is overweight, losing weight can help. Osteoarthritis can’t be cured, Dr. Velkuru noted, nor can joint damage be reversed. The goal of treatment is to reduce pain and improve the function of the affected joints. Most often, this is possible with a mixture of physical measures (exercise, for example) medications and sometimes, surgery. Physical measures can include weight loss and exercise. Excess weight places stress on one’s knee joints, hips and lower back. Exercise improves muscle strength, decreasing joint pain and stiffness and lowering the chance of disability from osteoarthritis. Support or “assistive” devices, such as braces or a walking cane, also can be helpful in daily activities. Heat or cold therapy can relieve symptoms for a short time. Other alternative treatments, such as massage, acupuncture and chiropractic manipulation can relieve pain for a short period of time. However, they can be expensive and require repeated treatments. The long-term benefits of these alternative treatments are unproven but are under study. Drug therapy depends on the type of arthritis. Treatment can vary from simple over the counter medications like topical creams and gels, oral pain relievers and prescription medications that can suppress the immune system from attacking the joints. Corticosteroids (“steroids”) help reduce inflammation and may be injected into painful joints. Also available are injectable joint lubricants. Other widely used supplements are glucosamine/chondroitin sulfate, calcium with vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids. continued on page 9

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

9/10/13

9/11/13

9/12/13

9/13/13

9/14/13

9/15/13

916/13

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer? Women's Health Confer-

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Sun Protection

Deep Venous Thrombosis

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Disaster Preparedness Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Kidney Transplants

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Shingles

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Heart Healthy Eating After Surgery and Beyond

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting August 14th, 2013

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Shingles Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Shingles

Raising Awareness About Stroke

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Skin Cancer

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings Do You Have Sinus Problems?

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Sun Protection

ence: Aging Gracefully

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Meal Planning Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Inside Washington Hospital: Meal Planning Patient Safety Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Dietary Treatment to Treat Celiac Disease

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself Alzheimer's Disease

Kidney Transplants Keys to Healthy Eyes

Wound Care Update


September 10, 2013

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ast February, when Washington Township Medical Foundation held the first meeting of a new support group for people with restless legs syndrome (RLS), the community responded enthusiastically. “We wanted to help people learn about this troublesome condition, which affects about 10 percent of the population but is not well known or understood,” said Nitun Verma, M.D., the Bay Area’s leading sleep medicine physician and medical director of the Medical Foundation’s Center for Sleep Disorders. “There was a great turn-out for the first meeting, with more than 100 people in attendance.” “Ours is the only support group of its kind in the Bay Area, and people came from all over, including the East Bay and the Peninsula,” he continued. “We are pleased to be meeting a huge need by enabling people to get together face-to-face and talk about their experiences with RLS, which can significantly diminish a person’s quality of life.” Dr. Verma is board certified in Adult and Pediatric Sleep Medicine. The second meeting of the Restless Legs Syndrome Support Group, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 17, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. The gathering will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D., Auditorium in the Washington West Building located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register for the session, call (510) 744-6726. RLS is a condition affecting the nervous system. People who have it can experience symptoms of creeping, crawling, tingling or aching mostly in the legs and sometimes in the arms. These symptoms tend to happen more often when the individual is resting in the evening. Moving around can bring some relief. RLS affects people of all ages, but it becomes more common as people age. The uncomfortable symptoms of RLS often make it difficult to sleep, and this can make someone excessively tired and sleepy during the day. The condition can be difficult to diagnose, but once it is pinpointed, there are multiple treatment

options, including lifestyle changes and medication. “Besides medical strategies, I like to focus on the non-medical things people have found to be effective in managing their symptoms,” explained Dr. Verma, who presented at the last meeting and will speak again on Sept. 17. “This approach was very well received at our first meeting, with people sharing many helpful ideas and tips—what worked and what didn’t. We had a really lively discussion.” The upcoming meeting will focus on medications for RLS: what are they, how they work, and what are the positives and negatives for patients. “We hope some people will learn about medications they may not be aware of,” added Dr. Verma. “We will also reinforce some of the non-medical treatment options, as we did during the first session.” If you think you or someone you know may have RLS, you are welcome to attend the support group meeting to learn more. “Many people who have the symptoms of RLS often don’t see a doctor because they assume nothing can be done,” Dr. Verma continued. “Others go to the drug store seeking over-the-counter medications. If people do see a doctor, they may not get the help they need because not all doctors are familiar with the condition. Patients run the risk of getting prescriptions for sleep medications or muscle relaxants that don’t work or can even make symptoms worse.” Common symptoms of RLS include: • Restless, nervous, or creepy-crawly sensations in the limbs and upper body that may be relieved by moving the arms and legs • Greater severity in the evening, at night or during periods of inactivity • Involuntary jerking of the limbs during sleep and, sometimes, during wakefulness • Difficulty staying or falling asleep, which leads to feeling tired or fatigued during the day. For people who suspect they have RLS, Dr. Verma recommends one of the first things you can do is to avoid alcohol, caffeine and tobacco, which can contribute to or aggravate the problem.

When we consider the health care experts who treat and care for people in the hospital, we usually think of doctors, nurses, technicians and therapists. Another essential member of the health care team who sometimes goes unrecognized is the social worker. “Our role is important because we are often able to relate to patients and their families in ways that are helpful for doctors and nurses,” explained Sophia Singh, MSW, SCSW, a social work case manager and crisis coordinator at Washington Hospital. Singh has been a social worker for seven years. “We connect with people to help them at times when they are most vulnerable,” she added. “Social work is a beautiful, yet challenging, profession—and very rewarding.” The National Association of Social Workers, the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world, states: “Social workers are highly trained and experienced professionals. Only those who have earned social work degrees at the bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral levels— and completed a minimum number of hours in supervised fieldwork—are professional social workers.” continued on page 9

At Washington Hospital, social workers are available to patients and their families in every patient care unit, including the Emergency Department. They offer help, counseling and support to a diversity of people with wide ranging needs, and are able to connect them to community resources they may not know about. To learn more about Washington Hospital, go online to www.whhs.com.

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People who have Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) can experience symptoms of creeping, crawling, tingling or aching mostly in the legs and sometimes in the arms. It can often disrupt sleep, causing excessive tiredness during the day. Nitun Verma, M.D., medical director of Washington Township Medical Foundation’s Center for Sleep Disorders, is leading the second meeting of a new support group for people with RLS on Tuesday, Sept. 17, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. The gathering will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D., Auditorium in the Washington West Building located at 2500 Mowr Avenue in Fremont. To register for the session, call (510) 744-6726.

Learn More About Sleep Medicine To find our more about restless legs syndrome or the RLS Support Group, go to www.bayarea@rlsgroups.org. To learn about the Washington Township Medical Foundation and its Center for Sleep Disorders, go to www.whhs.com/sleep


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013


Improving Fremont’s Streets: Polishing the Pavement The City of Fremont is working on the 2013 Cape and Slurry Seal Project. The City contracts each year for a cape and slurry seal project, a pavement maintenance project that is dedicated to preserving City streets. The 2013 Cape and Slurry Seal Project is funded primarily through gasoline tax, Alameda County Measure B funds (one-half percent sales tax) and vehicle registration fees. Also, the remainder of a $250,000 grant received in 2012 from the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) is being expended. The City’s Engineering and Street Maintenance divisions utilize a system that tracks the pavement condition of each street and from there provides recommen-

dations on the appropriate maintenance or rehabilitation treatment. Now you may be asking, what exactly is a cape and slurry seal? Slurry seal is a mixture of finely crushed rock and asphalt emulsion that is applied to the pavement surface. For selected streets in good condition, the project will only apply a slurry seal. For streets that require a little more help, the project will apply what is known as a “rubber cape seal.” A cape seal requires two steps – a chip seal followed by a slurry seal. A chip seal embeds crushed rock “chips” in an asphalt rubber binder material. Then the chips are covered with a slurry seal to help lock in the chips and provide a smoother riding surface.

Fremont has always valued its small businesses. That’s why the City has created a new point of contact for everything smallbusiness related. Enter Jackie Hall, the City’s new Small Business Ally. Jackie will be serving as the City’s Development Services “concierge.” With more than 17 years of experience serving the City of Fremont, she is certainly an excellent fit for the position.

The 2013 Cape and Slurry Seal Project includes a total of 340 segments of the City’s arterial, collector and residential streets, covering nearly 1,100,000 square yards of pavement surface or approximately 160 lane miles!

In her new role as the City’s Small Business Ally, Jackie will assist small businesses with the following: • Facilitating project reviews and permits • Helping businesses with internal City/outside agency contacts and resources • Tailoring and streamlining permit processes • Coordinating with the City’s Office of Economic Development, the Fremont Chamber of Commerce and other business organizations The Small Business Ally programs will commence with a series of meetings and events hosted by the City and the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. These meetings will be with the Irvington, Centerville, Niles, Mission San Jose, Warm Springs and other Business Associations to introduce both Jackie and the program. Feel free to share any suggestions and ideas on how to best meet the needs of businesses. If you’d like to reach Jackie Hall, you can contact her at (510) 494-4487 or jhall@fremont.gov.

In honor of the 30th annual California Coastal Cleanup Day, the City of Fremont will be hosting cleanup events at seven different locations on Saturday, Sept. 21 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. What is Coastal Cleanup Day? Every year, on the third Saturday in September, people join together at sites across California to take part in the State's largest volunteer event, California Coastal Cleanup Day. In 2012, over 65,000 volunteers removed nearly 770,000 pounds of trash and recyclables from California's beaches, lakes, and waterways. Families, friends, coworkers, scout troops, school groups, service clubs, and individuals come together to celebrate and share their appreciation of California's fabulous coast and waterways.The event is part of the International Coastal Cleanup, organized by the Ocean Conservancy, which is the largest volunteer event on the planet. If you are interested in participating, please pre-register at www.Fremont.gov/CoastalCleanupDay to guarantee a spot. Drop-in participants are also welcome; however, some locations may be full at the time of arrival. Please note the City does not allow anyone under the age of 6 to participate in this event. For more information please contact the Coastal Cleanup Day Coordinator at environment@fremont.gov or (510) 494-4570.

Construction is expected to be completed by fall 2013. If you have questions or would like to find out more about the 2013 Cape and Slurry Seal Project, please contact the City’s Engineering Division at (510) 494-4700 or visit www.Fremont.gov/CapeandSlurry.

Help Us Help You: Building Division Survey The City of Fremont’s Building and Safety Division has made some significant improvements in its processes and is looking for feedback on its progress so far. The Building and Safety Division reviews plans and issues permits for construction projects within the City of Fremont. It provides periodic inspections throughout the construction process to ensure that the project is in general compliance with the approved plans, specifications and codes. But the City understands that there is always room for improvement - and that’s where you come in. If you have recently pulled a building permit in the last year, please take a moment to complete our brief survey at www.Fremont.gov/BuildingDivSurvey so that the Building and Safety Division can improve its services. For more information about the Building and Safety Division, please visit www.fremont.gov/BuildingandSafety.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

When You Bundle? Make Sure You Have Options! INSURANCE - THINK MELLO

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

#OB84518

Set in a brooding Victorian mansion high on a remote bluff above the Pacific Ocean, the play centers on the rich and eccentric Minerva Osterman, who has called together her potential heirs for the advance reading of her will. She knows that it will please some and disappoint others—unless they take the sinister steps necessary to protect their interests. Murder ensues, the will disappears, and a diabolic plot is revealed. Performance times are 8 pm on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees: Sept 29 and Oct 6 matinee performances begin with a continental brunch (included in price of ticket) at 12:15 pm, and the show begins at 1 pm. The October 13 performance starts at 1 pm with refreshments during intermission (included in price of ticket). Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont presents the suspense-filled murder mystery “Web of Murder” September 20 – October 19 For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218, or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org.


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY BRITNEY SANCHEZ

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ll U.S. interstate and highways have a set numbering system in which help designate the type of road it is and where it goes. There are three different categories: U.S. Highways, Interstate Highways, and State/Provincial Routes. The highway numbering movement began in 1902 with growing tourism promoted by the automotive industry that influenced more people to travel long distances. There was no cohesive structure to highways until, in 1914, the American Automobile Association (AAA) created the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) with the help of federal legislation. More funding from the federal government in 1916 improved roads and a fundamental numbering system for highways was created in 1925. All highways are numbered by the direction of the route. Highways running North/South are marked with odd numbers and East/West routes are given even numbers. U.S. Highways or “Federal Highways” are assigned a number ranging from one to three digits. U.S. Highways ending in “0” designate a route that stretches from coast-to-coast (with the exception of US 2). U.S. Highways running North/South, however, end in either a one or five. On North/South routes, the number begins to

grow larger traveling from East to West (US 1 on the east coast and US 101 in the west), while East/West running route numbers grow larger going from North to South (US 2 being in the north and US 98 in the south). Spur routes, smaller freeways off of larger routes, have three digits. These are usually marked with a black and white shield-shaped sign. In 1956, the National Interstate of Defense Highways was created under the Federal-Aid Highway Act in order to produce the Interstate network numbering system. One or two digit numbered Interstate highways are known as primary Interstates and major interstates. Interstate routes are numbered by multiples of five and extend across most of the country such as I-5 or I-95. Routes of three digits are connected to a two digit highway that designates a city. The numbering for the three digit route comes from the major Interstate of two

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digits. An example of this is how I-880 forms a junction with I-80 in Oakland. The first digit represents the purpose of the highway. An odd number will lead to a city and an even number will go around the city. State or Provincial Highways are routes that follow the numbering system for highways in states such as California. Though significantly shorter than their Federal and Interstate counterparts, they share the same odd/even numbering scheme as the US Highway system. Smaller and single digit numbers are most often reserved for main roads and local city areas. Numbers are divided by Northern and Southern locations, with each grouped by twos. For example, California State routes 22 and 23 are in

Northern California, while 24 and 25 are in the south. Route 1 travels across the state from north to south. California State Highway signs initially displayed a black and

white sign with a bear taken from the state flag. The design was changed in 1959 and the bear removed. Today’s sign designs still display the same “minor’s spade” shape, but are now green. Route numbers for State or Provincial Highways correlate with County route schemes. County routes have a specific numbering system for their road in which the first digit is a letter and the second to third digits are numbers. Dividing the state by Northern and southern, the County numbering system uses the first letters of the alphabet (e.g. A) to identify a northern portion of the state. Higher numbers and letters are indicative of routes located or headed towards southern California. Therefore, an Alameda County road could be designated as Route J2 and Santa Barbara, Route S20. Confusing? It can be, but the number system allows traffic control and planners to follow an established order that eliminates potential confusion in a complex world filled with highways, byways and roads. References: 1. Richard F. Weingroff. Federal-Aid Act of 1956: Creating the Interstate System, 2011. 2. Daniel P. Faigin. California Highways, 2013. 3. Hamish Reid. California Driving: Roads Traffic, 2012. 4. Community Manager of AAA Today. Birth of the U.S. Numbered Highway System, 2013. 5. AARoads blog contributor, California “S” County Roads, 2013.

Be a Girl Scout SUBMITTED BY ANGELA CHANG KUMAR If your daughter has ever wanted to be a Girl Scout, now is the time to find out more about this 100 year-old, girl-led program. Girl Scouts enjoy a wide variety of activities that support the development of leadership skills, establish lasting friendships, encourage new adventures and build strong character. The Coyote Hills Service Unit (serving Fremont, Union City, and Newark) of Girl Scouts of Northern California will be hosting four information nights in the local area for girls and their parents. Wednesday, September 25 at Niles Elementary in Fremont: 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 1 at Chadbourne Elementary in Fremont: 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Thursday, October 3 at Leitch Elementary in Fremont: 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Monday, October 7 at Pioneer Elementary in Union City: 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. For more information, or if you cannot attend one of the meetings, please contact Shawun Anderson at the Girl Scouts of Northern California office at 510-562-8470 ext. 3003 or sanderson@girlscoutsnorcal.org.

WARNING 10 Questions to Ask Before You Hire an Agent. Do not hire an agent before you read this Free Special Report Free recorded message 1-800-597-5259 ID#1006 Realty WorldNeighbors DRE#01138169


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Photos released of ‘Snake Lady’ SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD The Fremont Police Department has obtained video surveillance photos of the primary snake scam suspect and associated vehicle. These photos were obtained from a recent burglary attempt. Please share these photos with your friends, neighbors and family members. If you recognize the woman or vehicle in these photos, please contact Detective Jacob Blass at 510-790-6900. You can also send us a Nixle Tip or go to www.fremontpolice.org/tip to send us anonymous information about this case. We believe that these suspects are still attempting this scam in other communities around the Bay Area. Please stay vigilant and never allow someone you don’t know to enter your home unless you are expecting them. From a previous press release: The victim told dispatchers that a woman came to her house and stated that she was looking for a poisonous snake that had gotten loose and had bitten a little girl on the street. She realized today that it had been a scam and her home had been burglarized. When the female suspect knocked on the door, she stated that she was from Animal Services and that she needed to take measurements of the home and yard. When they went out into the backyard, the suspect required that everyone in the house come out to assist with the search. While they were out back an un-

known suspect(s) entered the home and removed cash and jewelry. The suspect was traveling with one or two adult men also posing as animal service employees during this incident. The adult female is described as white or Hispanic, wearing a hat, about 5’ tall, with a medium/heavy build. The female had a pierced tongue with a ball on it. She wore dark colored gloves and was wearing a tan/brown short-sleeved button down shirt with patches on the sleeves that stated “Bay Area Animal Control” or “City Animal Control.” The associated male suspects are described as being Hispanic and approximately35-40 years old. In a possibly linked incident, a suspicious woman who appeared to

be going door to door, asked a homeowner if her older model vehicle was for sale. She told the family that she was a single mom in a bad relationship. When informed the vehicle wasn’t for sale, the female left in a grey or silver Land Rover, with a magnetic sign on the back. A similar silver vehicle was seen during the burglary on Moore Drive. The City of Fremont Animal Services Division is not currently investigating snake infestations or snake related problems anywhere in Fremont. City of Fremont employees are required to carry a City issued picture ID card (a business card is not sufficient ID) and most field employees drive clearly marked City of Fremont vehicles. If anyone comes to your door posing as a City employee, ask for their official City picture ID card. If they do not have one or you feel something is not right, please call the Fremont Police Department’s nonemergency number at 790-6800 and select option 3. If you believe you see these suspects in your neighborhood, please call us right away. Stay vigilant and please talk to your neighbors, especially the elderly or those who may be more susceptible of being targeted as a victim. If you have information about this crime please contact the Fremont Police Department’s Investigative Unit at 790-6900, send us an email at fremontpolice@fremont.gov or utilize one of our tip lines.

Home Invasion Robbery Update SUBMITTED BY LT. HENRY KWONG, MILPITAS PD On August 17, 2013 at 2:45 a.m., Milpitas Police Department officers responded to a robbery at a home on Pinard Street. The officers learned two male suspects were armed with

Brian Anthony Victor FOSSELMAN

Bianca PEDEMONTE

guns, entered the home, tied up the victims, and stole property from the home between 1 a.m. and 2 a.m. The victims were eventually able to free themselves and call for help. Earlier, at 2:18 a.m., a vigilant Milpitas Police Department officer stopped a vehicle on Devon Place near North Park Victoria Drive, and two males ran from the vehicle while two females remained in the vehicle. Based on the subsequent information from the report of the robbery on Pinard Street, the officers on scene surmised the occupants of the

stopped vehicle were possibly associated to the robbery. Milpitas Police Department detectives were summoned to assist with the investigation while other officers continued the extensive search for the two males who fled. The detectives later concluded the two females, Ms. Bianca Pedemonte of Bay Point and a juvenile, resident of Stockton, were involved in the robbery and arrested them. Ms. Bianca Pedemonte was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail, and the female juvenile was booked into the Santa Clara County Juvenile Probation Department. As the investigation continued, our detectives determined Mr. Brian Fosselman and Mr. Lejon Mabon were also responsible for the robbery. Extensive surveillance was conducted at different locations throughout the bay area in an attempt to apprehend them. On August 22, 2013, our detectives located and arrested Mr. Brian

Lejon Dominic MABON

Fosselman, transient, at a residence in San Jose with the assistance of personnel from the San Jose Police Department. He was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for robbery. On August 28, 2013, our detectives located and arrested Mr. Lejon Mabon at a residence in Stockton with the assistance of personnel from the Stockton Police Department and from the U.S. Marshals Service. He was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for robbery and a parole violation warrant. All of the suspects involved in the home invasion robbery in Milpitas on August 17, 2013 have been arrested, and detectives are continuing the investigation and working with other law enforcement agencies in order to determine if the suspects are also responsible for other similar crimes in the bay area.

Robert Wasserman Fremont Police Center Dedication Ceremony SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On Friday, September 13, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. the Fremont Police building will be dedicated and re-named as the Robert Wasserman Fremont Police Center. Robert Wasserman began his civil service career in 1954. In 1976 he was hired as Fremont’s Chief of Police and served until his retirement in 1992. Later that same year he became a Fremont City Council member and in 2004 was elected as Mayor. He was reelected as Mayor in 2008 and served until December 28, 2011, when he passed away. Robert Wasserman was a compassionate leader who was dedicated to serving our community. The dedication and unveiling ceremony will be held in the front parking lot of the Fremont Police Department,

located at 2000 Stevenson Blvd. Guest speakers will include Mayor Bill Harrison, City Manager Fred Diaz, Chief of Police Richard Lucero, Retired Police Captain Michael Lanam, Retired Police Captain Sandra Cortez and members of the Wasserman family. The event is open to the public and refreshments will be served at the conclusion of the ceremony. The Fremont Police Department front lobby will close at 2:00 p.m. on the day of the event. Citizens may obtain vehicle releases between 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the Fremont Police Property Storage Facility, located at 1980 Stevenson Blvd., directly behind the main Police Building and adjacent to the Jail Facility. Please join the City of Fremont and the Wasserman family in celebrating this momentous occasion.


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Surgical treatment becomes an option for severe cases and can include arthroscopy (repair of the joint through small incisions), and ultimately joint replacement. Dr. Velkuru has been affiliated with Washington Hospital since 2011 and is a member of the hospital’s medical staff as well as seeing pa-

tients in her own private practice. As a Rheumatologist, she works with patients to diagnose and treat arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bones. Learn More For more information about living with arthritis, join us on September 18, when Dr. Velkuru will discuss issues related to arthritis and also answer questions from attendees. Space for this program is limited and advance reservations are encouraged. To reserve your space or for more information, visit whhs.com/event/classregistration or call (800) 963-7070. For more information or to learn about other services offered at the Washington Women’s Center, please visit whhs.com/womenscenter.

continued from page 3

Currently, more than 650,000 women and men hold social work degrees in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Social workers make a vital contribution in many parts of the community, including schools, hospitals, mental health clinics, senior centers, prisons, military institutions and corporations, as well as public and private agencies serving those in need. In the health care field, social workers can specialize in certain areas of care. For example, before becoming a social work case manager at Washington Hospital, Singh worked with people needing mental health care. She has also provided services to people on kidney dialysis and those who have had a kidney transplant. Other social workers assist people and families in coping with chronic, acute or terminal illness. In hospitals, they help to meet patients’ needs after they are discharged, arranging for at-home services such as home care or meal delivery. At Washington Hospital, social workers are available to patients and their families in every patient care unit, including the Emergency Department. All of the Hospital’s social workers hold master’s degrees and some are licensed, while others are working towards their license, so all are able to provide clinical therapy. In the Emergency Department, crisis intervention is an essential service available through the Hospital’s crisis coordinators. “We are a relatively small group within the Hospital, but we offer help, counseling and support to a diversity of people with wide ranging needs,” explained Singh. “We collaborate with the doctors and nurses, and we talk with patients and families to find out what they need and how we can help. We are able to connect them to community resources they don’t know about. “Sometimes, we are there in a crisis or at a very difficult time, and we can sit with people and help them work through hard decisions. The support we offer has an impact on the overall quality of care our patients receive at Washington Hospital. Sometimes, we can even help save a life.” When someone is admitted to Washington Hospital, a social worker can perform an assessment of their personal and support needs, much as a doctor or nurse does for a patient’s

medical needs. As a member of the interdisciplinary health care team, the social worker’s goal is to assist patients and families in coping with the situation they face and solving problems. As they help people identify the issues more clearly, social workers draw on their own in-depth knowledge and understanding of available resources to meet whatever the need may be, from transportation, food, and insurance coverage, to chemical dependency programs, mental health services, skilled nursing facilities and more. When a person comes into the Emergency Department having thoughts of harming themselves or others, or has a history of mental health problems, a social worker who is also a crisis coordinator can be brought in to help evaluate the patient. The crisis coordinator helps to provide interventions that can include medications and counseling. If needed, transfer to a psychiatric hospital can also be facilitated. “Each individual we help is unique and every family is in a different situation, so we have to be adaptable,” said Singh. “Our work involves educating, counseling, researching, networking, and advocating. We are especially good at networking to make the right connections that will meet an individual’s needs.” In the community, social workers are adept at working with some of the most needy people—homeless individuals, veterans, and people struggling with chronic substance abuse and other serious problems. In hospitals, people tend to think of the social worker as a “fix-it” person, but it’s not always that simple, Singh pointed out. There are times when even the social worker runs into barriers or problems with availability of a service or eligibility of a patient to receive services. “But, other times, we find a solution, and this can really make someone’s day,” she added. “When that happens, it’s all worth it.” Learn more. To learn more about Washington Hospital, go online to www.whhs.com. To find out more about the social work profession, visit the Web site of the National Association of Social Workers at www.naswdc.org.

Meeting scheduled to discuss proposed food-sharing ordinance SUBMITTED BY CITY OF HAYWARD City staff will be presenting a proposed ordinance pertaining to outdoor food sharing activities in City parks in Downtown Hayward to the Hayward City Council on: October 1, 2013 at 7 p.m. in Hayward City Hall, City Council Chambers – located at: 777 B Street, Hayward, California. Prior to the October 1 City Council meeting, members of the public can learn more about, and provide comments about, the proposed ordinance. A meeting will take place at City Hall on the 2nd Floor in Room 2A on Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. A copy of the staff report and draft ordinance will be available online by 5 p.m., Friday, September 27, 2013 at: www.hayward-ca.gov. Public comments pertaining to the proposed ordinance may be submitted via: • Email: foodsharing.ord@hayward-ca.gov • Mail: Hayward City Hall – Office of the City Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, CA. 94541-5007 • Call: (510) 583-5333 – Public Comments Voice Mail Box re: Proposed Food Sharing Ordinance • Fax: (510) 583-3601 – Attention: Proposed Food Sharing Ordinance – Public Members of the public are also encouraged to attend the October 1, 2013 City Council meeting at which time the public will also have an opportunity to share comments pertaining to the proposed ordinance.

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Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

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ecently, my husband and I found ourselves scrambling to come up with ideas for a science fair project. Nothing too complex, as this was for our Kindergartener. At first we tried to encourage her to figure out for herself what concept she wanted to explore. When that didn’t work, the lobbying began. Water is my profession, so I attempted to steer her in that direction. My husband worked on the energy angle. Needless to say, my poor child became overwhelmed. Then, one day, while we were out in the back yard, the kids were playing with water – kids love to play with water. They placed a few full buckets on the edge of the deck; all three tipped over like dominoes sending a gush of water down the side of the patio toward a discarded pinwheel. The pinwheel started spinning, and voila! We had our project – a homemade water wheel. Of course, building a model that could be demonstrated at school was something else entirely. It took many failed attempts (which, unfortunately, failed to amuse our Kindergartener) before we met with success. In the end, it was a nice combination of two interests: water and energy. The water wheel, a simple yet profoundly important device, embodies the intrinsic link between water and energy. The movement of one generates the other and the generation of the other yields modern comforts like that hot shower you took this morning. We can’t ignore this connection, we must embrace it. It takes a lot of energy to move and purify the water we use every day. We can reduce some of that energy use by reducing the amount of water we use. Saving water means saving energy. Remember that hot shower? If you shorten that shower by a minute or two, you double your savings - using less water means using less energy (gas or electricity) to heat that water. But it doesn’t stop there. By reducing your water use you help reduce the amount of energy that would have been needed to treat, pump,

Couldn’t get out of town for an exotic getaway this summer? The alluring culture and food of the Middle East and Greece can be experienced close to home thanks to the 8th annual “Middle Eastern & Greek Food Fest.” St. James Orthodox Church in Milpitas will treat the community to a traditional marketplace, Arabic and Greek folk dancing, arts and crafts, and plenty of fun for the kids with games, jump house, face painting and more. Foodies will delight in various meat and vegetarian options native to the regions, and one lucky raffle participant could drive off in a new 2013 Mercedes C250! Take a day off from the ordinary and enjoy the rich Middle Eastern and Greek culture with family and friends. For more information, visit www.sjorthodox.org/festival.html, or call (408) 934-1794.

and distribute that water. And in the process you’ll reduce your carbon footprint! For quite a while now, ACWD has recognized the water and energy connection. For example, we generate hydropower from the water we receive from the South Bay Aqueduct and use it to run one of our treatment plants. In addition, we’ve been partnering with Pacific Gas & Electric Company on several water conservation programs that have an energy/water savings link. These include high-efficiency clothes washer rebates, a home energy and water audit program, and incentives for businesses to upgrade to water and energy efficient equipment. We also offer other programs that will get you that combined savings, such as our water conservation device distribution program (showerheads and faucet aerators) and our water-efficient landscape rebate program (less water coming out of automatic sprinkler systems saves energy too!). Our new Water Savings Assistance Program is a water survey and fixture/device retrofit program geared toward our low income customers. Stay tuned, as you are likely to see many more programs like these in the future. Governor Brown also publicly recognized the water/energy connection and took it statewide in a campaign this past summer. At www.savewaterandenergycalifornia.org you can find out even more about this connection and what you can do to save. From spilled buckets of water and a discarded pinwheel to a water wheel that makes bubbles (as our Kindergartener’s project did), the water/energy connection is a concept we should all take time to reflect upon. For more ideas on how to save both water and energy, please visit ACWD’s website at www.acwd.org or call one of our water conservation staff at 510-668-6534 or 510-668-4207. We’d love to hear from you. Oh, and don’t worry, no water was wasted in the making of the science fair project. All water, including that which spilled from the buckets, was in the end used for water landscaping. And if you’re wondering whether or not we won the science fair, I am happy to report that we did! In Kindergarten, every student submitting a project is a winner!

Middle Eastern & Greek Food Fest Friday, Sept 13 – Sunday, Sept 15 Friday: 6:30 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday: Noon – 10 p.m. Sunday: Noon – 8 p.m. St. James Orthodox Church 195 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 934-1794 www.sjorthodox.org/festival.html Tickets: $2, kids 12 and under free Free parking


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ohlone College hosts annual golf tournament at Castlewood SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Breakfast and Bloody Marys, putting contests, golfing on a “member’s only” course, prize-packed “Holein-One” and longest drive contests, cocktails, awards reception, raffles, silent auction, and more are all part of Ohlone College’s 29th Annual Golf Tournament at Castlewood Country Club. The 2013 Founding Sponsor, Fremont Bank, developed the tournament 29 years ago to raise funds for Ohlone Renegades Athletic teams, and has provided support for the tournament and to Ohlone College for many years. This year’s 29th Annual Ohlone College Golf Tournament, presented by FORM (Fremont Orthopaedic & Rehabilitative Medicine), is held on both the hill and valley courses of the Castlewood Country Club in Pleasanton on Monday, September 23, 2013. “This is our signature athletic event of the year,” said Chris Warden, Dean of Kinesiology, Athletics, and Newark Campus. “Our teams and coaches are gearing up for a great event. It’s an opportunity to thank the community for their strong support of our programs.” Proceeds benefit the Ohlone College student athletic programs. The tournament is packed with entertaining activities and prizes including longest drive, “closest to the pin”, most accurate drive, and multiple Hole-in-One contests featuring prizes such as a $10,000 CD from Fremont Bank. In addition to a tasty lunch provided on the course, hospitality tents will keep players refreshed throughout the day. The tournament is followed by the College’s Athlete of the Year awards at a special reception with an athletic basket raffle and silent auction opportunities. To register or for more information, please visit: www.ohlonecollegegolf.org. The tournament sold out last year and registration is now underway.

Are you a wiz with words? Can you tell a great story in a short form? Fremont Cultural Arts Council and Half Price Books are teaming up for a Flash Fiction Writing Contest that calls for a writer’s very best in 300 words or less – title included! All ages can enter and stories can use any subject matter (please keep it clean and community appropriate). Entries must be presented in English in 12-point type on a single page with the entrant’s name on the back or included on a separate sheet. If no title is given, organizers will provide a three-word title including a number. On Saturday, September 28 entries will be on display at Half Price Books for People’s Choice judging from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with prizes awarded at 5 p.m. People entering the store will be given a survey form to select their five favorites. Cash and gift card prizes will be awarded to the top submissions: 1st Place: $65 cash award 2nd Place: $55 cash award 3rd Place: $45 award (including a $25 gift card to Half Price Books) 4th Place: $35 award (including a $25 gift card to Half Price Books) 5th Place: $25 gift card to Half Price Books Get to work; entries are being accepted now! The deadline for stories is midnight on Sunday, September 22. Email entries to FCACwriters@gmail.com or mail to Fremont Cultural Arts Council, 3375 Country Dr., Fremont, CA 94536. Rules and details are available at www.fremontculturalarts.org. Call (510) 793-6060 for more information. Winning entries will be submitted to Tri-City Voice for publication. Flash Fiction Writing Contest Entries due: Sunday, Sept 22 People’s Choice Judging: Saturday, Sept 28 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (prizes awarded at 5 p.m.) Half Price Books 39152 Fremont Hub, Fremont (510) 793-6060 www.fremontculturalarts.org

Local girl scouts receive top award A Silver Award approval notice has been sent to members of Troop #31315 of Newark for completing requirements for one of the most prestigious honors in Girl Scouting. This is the highest award a “Cadette” scout can earn. Troop members created and produced a guidebook for girls entering junior high school. In preparation for this project, troop members toured Transcontinental printing facilities in Fremont with a Tri-City Voice representative in April. Olivia Kerkula, Administrator for the Girl Scouts of Northern California Council, wrote, “Your Silver Award Project titled, A Girl’s Guide to Middle School, has been reviewed and accepted by the Girl Scouts of Northern California. Congratulations on completing your Silver Award!” Recipients of the award notice included: Mikayla Cree, Julia DeLipski, Jordan Ebarle, Katie Forrest, Shelby Maloney, Jiana Riguera, Alyana Taylor.

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27 Tips to Drive Up the Sale Price of Your Home Tri-City - Because your home may well be your largest asset, selling it is probably one of the most important decisions you will make in your like. And once you have made that decision, you’ll want to sell your home for the highest price in the shortest time possible without compromising your sanity. Before you place your home on the market, here’s a way to help you to be as prepared as possible. To assist homesellers, a new industry report has just been released called “27 Valuable Tips That You Should Know to Get Your Home Sold Fast and for Top Dollar.” It tackles the important issues you need to know to make your home competitive in today’s, aggressive market. Through these 27 tips, you will discover how to protect and capitalize on your most important investment, reduce stress, be in control of your situation, and make the most profitable possible. In this report you’ll discover how to avoid financial disappointment or worse, a financial disaster when selling your home. Using a common-sense approach, you get the straight facts about what can make or break the sale of your home. You owe it to yourself to learn how these important tips will give you the competitive edge to get your home sold fast and for the most amount of money. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-228-3917 and enter ID #1023. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This report is courtesy of Capital Realty Group. Not intended to solicit properties currently listed for sale.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

Newly elected county supervisor on VTA Board SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHIDRESS The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) Board of Directors welcomed back newly elected Santa Clara County Supervisor Cindy Chavez. In her role as County Supervisor for District 2, Cindy will serve as the County’s appointee to the VTA Board. “It’s great to be back amongst my colleagues whom I have worked side by side with for many years in various roles and efforts,” said Director Chavez. “During my previous nine year stint on the VTA Board and eight year tenure as Councilmember for the City of San Jose, having a valuable and well-run public transit system has always been a priority for me. I’m glad to once again be a part of the great organization and staff of VTA during a time when there is such a healthy opportunity to deliver important transit improvements and provide a great service to our customers.”

Quality products for pets and owners A new online retailer based in Fremont, specializes in premium pet products for cat lovers. Five Pet Place produces high quality, stylish, and functional pieces to blend with a home’s decor. The privately held company in Mission San Jose is owned by Michael Ostrofsky who created Five Pet Place by Ostrofsky’s desire for a better way to feed his family’s five cats and wouldn’t interfere with the decor of his newly built and furnished home. Following a futile search for attractive, quality products to serve his needs, Ostrofsky, with the help of his father, created his own. This series of products received so many compliments, he decided to start a company and make them available to others. The debut collection includes a Food & Water Server, Litter Tray, Litter Cabinet, Scratching Pad, Scratching Post, and Window Bed. The name Five Pet Place pays homage to Ostrofsky’s cats — Napa, Sabrina, Lucy, Sparky, and Paint – who inspired the products and help make his house a home. “Cats are my passion – and the idea of helping thousands of them live long, happy and healthy lives is the greatest feeling in the world,” says Ostrofsky. To learn more about Five Pet Place or purchase products, call 1-877-348-3738 or visit www.fivepetplace.com.

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Looking for full or part-time work, or need a second job? Ready to move on to the next level in your career? Opportunity knocks at the Alameda County Regional Job Fair, Tuesday, September 17 at the San Leandro Library. For the first time, five One-Stop Career Centers in Alameda County, including the Tri-Cities One-Stop at Ohlone College, join forces to bring over 45 employers to the regional career fair. The employers represent job offerings in a wide range of industries including: Health Care, Transportation and Logistics, Manufacturing, Retail, Biotech, Staffing Firms, and Community Resources. Many of these employers are recruiting for positions at all levels, such as entry level (retail clerks, customer service agents, and administrative support), mid-level (home appliance technicians, assembly technicians, and engineers), and management level positions. For more information on the job fair or a list of participating employers and positions visit www.tricitiesonestop.com. Alameda County Regional Job Fair Tuesday, Sep 17 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. San Leandro Library 300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro www.tricitiesonestop.com

Contractor Workshop SUBMITTED BY JAMES L. MCGHEE On Thursday, September 12, 2013, at the Carpenters’ Union Local 713, 1050 Mattox Road, Hayward, CA, from 7:00 am – 9:30 am, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) and its Small Firm Advisory Committee will hold a “Tips and Tricks for Success” Workshop to offer technical assistance for small construction firms seeking contracting opportunities with SFPUC. The workshop will also promote new Local Business Enterprise (LBE) legislation, which now ex-

pands contracting opportunities 70 miles beyond the jurisdictional lines of the City and County of San Francisco on SFPUC regional projects. Contractor Workshop Thursday, Sep 12 7:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Carpenters’ Union Local 713 1050 Mattox Rd., Hayward (415) 554-3297 or mbarry@sfwater.org (415) 554-3222 or ilopez@sfwater.org

Vacancy on County Recycling Board SUBMITTED BY JEFF BECERRA The Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board has a vacancy in the category of “Solid Waste Industry Representative.” The appointee must live in Alameda County. Term of the appointment is two-years, and Board Members are eligible for re-appointment to one additional two-year term. The Recycling Board administers the voterapproved Waste Reduction and Recycling Initiative, which levies an $8.23 per ton landfill disposal fee that generates approximately $8.0 million per year for waste reduction and recycling programs in Alameda County. Fifty percent of the money is returned to local jurisdictions on a per-capita basis. The balance is appropriated by the Board for countywide source reduction and recycling programs, public education, recycled product procurement, market development and grants to community organizations. To be considered for appointment to the Recycling Board as “Solid Waste Industry Representative” please submit a resume and cover letter stating qualifications to: Kevin Jenkins, 1221

Oak Street, Suite 536 - Oakland, CA 94612, faxed to 510-271-5151 or emailed to Kevin.jenkins@acgov.org with the subject line “Recycling Board Vacancy.” The deadline for application is October 11, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. Minority and female candidates are urged to apply. Questions regarding the application process may be addressed to Kevin Jenkins at 510-2685376. Questions regarding the Recycling Board may be addressed to Tom Padia or Gary Wolff at (510) 891-6500 or email at tpadia@stopwaste.org or gwolff@stopwaste.org. The Recycling Board normally meets on the second Thursday of each month. Seven of the monthly meetings are at 4:00 p.m., at the StopWaste.Org office in Oakland (BART accessible). Under the charter, the Board meets at other transit-accessible locations around the county five times a year at 7:00 p.m. – one meeting in each Supervisorial district. Attendance at Board meetings is mandatory. Two consecutive absences or more that three absences in a calendar year are grounds for dismissal from the Board. Recycling Board members are paid $150 per meeting.


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

Pat Kite’s Garden

BY PAT KITE I finally got to visit historic Luther Burbank Home & Gardens in Santa Rosa. For readers who are not garden lovers, “Who, What, Why?” may be a thought. But for plant enthusiasts, this is almost a sacred spot. Why? Luther Burbank created 113 plums and prunes, 10 straw-

fell off a flower, he once tried, with chubby toddler fingers to put it back on again. When his father died, 21-yearold Luther inherited a bit of money. He set about finding his own garden where he could do plant experiments. In the interim he worked in a factory, did odd jobs and saved a little money. In 1871, he developed a new type of

His continuing goal: making plants more useful for mankind. Over the years, Luther worked on 2,500 plant species. When an experiment failed, sometimes people made fun of him. Onward. Three thousand experiments at once. Onward. “I love flowers, trees, animals, and all the works of Nature as they pass before us in time and space. What a joy life is

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Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

Sons In Retirement is a nonprofit public benefit corporation for retired men. SIR Branch 59 is one of over 100 SIR branches located throughout Northern California meets at noon on the third Thursday of each month at the Newark Pavilion. Every meeting features a guest speaker from the community. Speakers have included college professors, police officers, retired SF Giant and 49er players, and even the editor of TCV. Twice a year the meeting is open to spouses – the May sweetheart luncheon and the December Holiday Luncheon. The goal of Branch 59 and all other SIR branches throughout Northern California is to provide an avenue for men to have fun in their retirement years. Activities include golf, bowling, walking, computer club, sports, bridge, reading, and much more. Two of the more popular activities are bowling and golf. Members bowl once a week and participate in about 20 tournaments a year. Tournament days usually begin with a breakfast meeting followed by travel to the tournament, sometimes as far as Reno. Some branches allow women to join them in bowling. SIR branch 59 is NCGA certified and plays golf weekly at Sunol. They attend state tournaments about seven times a year. To find more information about the SIR golf group, visit their website at www.sirstategolf.com. The golfers travel to Reno, Las Vegas, Solvang, and the Monterey area for their tournaments. The standard format is scramble, but there is also individual play and 2-man best ball. Ladies (with NCGA handicaps) have a separate tournament at the state tournament, always a scramble format. The average handicap for the SIR golfers statewide is mid-20s.

berry types, 13 raspberries, 16 blackberries, four grapes, ten apples, eight peaches, 26 vegetable types plus 91 flowering plants, etc. The plums included the now ever-present Santa Rosa plum. The peaches: freestone. The flowers include the Shasta daisies that thrive in our gardens. It took 17 years of crossbreeding small field-type daisies to get the beautiful flower, largesnow white daisy, he wanted. But when it came to plant creation, Luther was patience personified. He had been a plant lover since his Massachusetts childhood, smiling at plants even in the cradle. The thirteenth of 15 children, it is told that when a petal

potato, one not susceptible to the potato fungus that killed the mainstay Irish potato. At least a million people in Ireland died in the “Great Famine.” Luther’s potato? The Russet-Burbank or “Idaho”, which helped revive Ireland’s potato fields. Today’s French fries often hark from Luther Burbank’s work. However, while experimenting with potato plants, Luther developed severe sunstroke. This led him to California, with its mild climate. Being a stranger in a strange land didn’t slow him down. If he had to sleep in a chicken coop to conserve money for his dream farm, then he would… and he did. He settled in Santa Rosa.

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

when you have made a close working partnership with Nature, helping her to produce for the benefit of mankind new forms, colors, and perfumes in flowers which were never known before; fruits in form, size, and flavor never before seen on this globe….” Luther Burbank Home & Gardens Home, Greenhouse, Museum and Gift Shop Tuesday – Sunday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 204 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa (Santa Rosa Ave at Sonoma Ave)

(707) 524-5445 www.lutherburbank.org Tours available

Local Masonic communities support American Cancer Society

SIR branch 59 is always looking for new members If interested, visit the SIR websit www.sirinc.org or call 510-794-1184 Residents and staff of Acacia Creek and the Masonic Home at Union City participate in the Relay For Life to support the American Cancer Society.

SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE SIMONE

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Residents and staff of Acacia Creek continuing care retirement community and the Masonic Home at Union City recently donated $1,000 in support of the Relay For Life in Union City, which took place on Aug. 24, 2013. Additionally, 16 residents and staff members of Acacia Creek and the Masonic Home at Union City joined the relay with their “Walk 2 Wellness” team. The average age of teammates was 82, but residents as old as 96 joined in the festivities. Three Walk 2 Wellness team members were cancer survivors. The Masonic Home at Union City and Acacia Creek are committed to a vibrant culture of successful aging, which emphasizes healthy, active living at every stage of life. Learn more at acaciacreek.org and masonichome.org.

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Attorney General Kamala D. Harris released the first report, on July 1, 2013, detailing the 131 data breaches reported to her office in 2012, showing that 2.5 million Californians had personal information put at risk through an electronic data breach. “Data breaches are a serious threat to individuals’ privacy, finances and even personal security,” Harris said. “Companies and government agencies must do more to protect people by protecting data.” In 2003, California was the first state to pass a law (AB 700, Simitian) mandating data breach notification, which requires businesses and state agencies to notify Californians when their personal information is compromised in security breach. In 2012, companies and state agencies subject to the law were required for the first time to report any breach that involved more than 500 Californians to the Attorney General’s Office. (SB 24, Simitian). For more information, visit http://oag.ca.gov


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fremont rabbi donates stem cells in painless procedure he term “bone marrow donor” use to invoke images of pain. Now, with the innovation of the peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation, being a bone marrow donor can be virtually painless. Moshe Fuss, a local Fremont rabbi, has recently experienced a PBSC donation. “It’s really, really an amazing procedure,” said Fuss about the alternative donation process. PBSC donation and marrow donation are similar; both methods extract healthy liquids from the donor. The PBSC process removes blood through one arm of the donor, separates the blood-forming cells, and then the remaining blood is returned to the donor through the other arm. A marrow donation is a surgical procedure where doctors use a needle to extract liquid marrow from the donor’s pelvic bone. “Anyone that I meet, they tell me ‘it must have

of their relatives were killed during the Holocaust. “Then I get the phone call and find out I’m a possible match for someone,” Fuss explained. After completing physical exams, Fuss found out the procedure was cancelled. “I thought, forget it I’m never going to be a match for someone because it’s a once in a lifetime thing.” A few months ago, he received another call. All he knew was that this patient was a 49-year-old woman with Hodgkin lymphoma. That’s all Fuss had to know. That same day he went in for his blood work and found out that his brother, too, was a match for the same recipient. After the lab results we in, Gift of Life chose Moshe to be the donor. “They asked me to go forward with this and we scheduled something right away,” Moshe explained. Shortly after the go-ahead, Fuss flew to Washington D.C. to complete his physical exams. He was only on the East Coast for a few hours. A few weeks

been painful,”’ Fuss shared. “Its four hours lying down and the only pain that I had, I really didn’t feel any other, was keeping my arm straight for four hours.” Fuss joined the international bone marrow database seven years ago when his neighbor talked him into signing up on the registry. “When he spoke to me about it for the first time I was hesitant because I knew it was a very hard procedure to go through and I was thinking, do I really want to do this,” Fuss shared. “I would love to save someone’s life and it’s something that is amazing— to save someone’s life.” Fuss explained that Jewish recipients have a harder time finding donors because a large number

later his exam results were in and a procedure date was scheduled— August 13. The four days leading up to the procedure were uncomfortable. Fuss was given four injections of filgrastim which increases the number of blood-forming cells in the bloodstream. “For those few days, it’s painful in the bones. It’s manageable, but it’s definitely painful in your whole body,” Fuss shared. “It’s interesting because on different days I’ll feel pain in different parts of my body.” Once the injections were completed, it was time for Fuss to, again, travel. His PBSC donation procedure took place at Inova, a surgery center just outside of Washington D.C. “It was a four hour procedure,” Fuss described. “It’s unbelievable. You go in, lay down on the bed, a needle is put in one arm and another in the other arm.” The most painful part about the procedure was keeping his arms straight for four hours; other then that, the donation was pain-free. “I left the hospital bed after I finished the procedure and within 25 minutes, I was out,” Fuss said. Once the donation process is over, the stem cell bag is sent immediately to the recipient. Fuss has to wait about five months to hear if the patient’s body accepted his cells. After a year, Fuss and the recipient have an option to meet each other. “I’m really excited,” Fuss said about the potential meeting. “It’s like a part of me, sort of. I would love to meet the recipient.” According to Be the Right Match, a national marrow donor program, 1 in 540 members will go on to donate marrow or PBSC to a patient. Fuss hopes to have the chance again. “We moved to Fremont to bring more Jewish awareness and kindness to others,” Fuss shared. “My whole life is given over to kindness and helping others. And to save someone’s life, I think, is the epitome of kindness.” Just recently the Gift of Life foundation contacted Fuss. They want Fuss to help them hold a drive in the Tri-City community. “There are times when we can save one life, like I did here, but hopefully, by putting this out, I think it could save many more lives. I think many more people will be willing to join the database.”

BY NICOLE ELLIS

T

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For the new Robert Wasserman Fremont Police Center, the short version would be - fortitude, honesty and integrity. But there is much more to the story… When 18 year-old Mary Linda Galantine, working at the switchboard of the City of Montebello, had any interaction with the “older” (age 24) Juvenile Officer, she says, “he would get me all fluttered.” Bob Wasserman swept his future bride off her feet and

they married in 1958 even though the combination of his Jewish background and her Catholic family was controversial in those days. Flaunting traditional barriers was nothing new for the young man since Bob had battled asthma as a child, signed up for the National Guard in high school, then joined the military at age 15 to serve as a Military Policeman in Japan and Korea. He turned age 16 in Japan and observed his 17th and 18th birthdays in Korea. As a result of his experiences, Linda says, “He matured very young.” A man of character, fortitude, integrity and honor, Bob Wasserman epitomized the Yiddish term “mensch.” He lived a life of purpose and service that extended to his family, community and humankind. His honesty and integrity were always beyond question. For example, while serving in Korea, Bob twisted his ankle playing basketball and was treated at an infirmary. During his treatment, a general visited, awarding all injured in a battle zone, including Bob, the “purple heart” medal. Honesty prevailed and Bob returned it.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Bob always had a genuine respect for people,” says Linda. “He overcame adversity and bigotry through his intellect; he was always the top performer so it was pretty hard to disregard his efforts. He was focused on achieving his goals.” When he returned from military service without a high school diploma, Bob focused on a career in law enforcement and regained lost momentum in education. He studied to receive a California

High School Equivalency Certificate and then attended LA City College, graduated from Los Angeles State College with a degree in Law Enforcement Administration and received a Masters degree from the University of Southern California in Public Administration. “He always was

pushing himself, whether in his career, his education or whatever,” says Linda. “He truly felt he could make a difference as a police chief.” Wasserman’s career path brought him through the ranks and specialties of police work in Montebello, then on to San Carlos, Brea/Yorba Linda and Fremont as Chief of Police. During that time, he and Linda raised a family including two children, Dan and Jill, and tried not to allow police work to intrude on family life. However, police work does intrude on personal life. Linda recalls some fearful times when the infamous Zodiac Killer was active and other periods as respect for law enforcement waxed and waned. “I remember when we lived in San Carlos and our son came home from school very upset because a classmate said his father was ‘the fuzz.’ Indignant, he replied that his father was not ‘fuzzy!’ “Bob never ‘hardened’ as a police officer,” says Linda. He loved sports and playing cards; outlets to put the police work aside and relax. His kids always thought of their father as a “regular guy” who, did not always have to be right. If shown a better way, he would accept that. Even in his later years when illness wracked his body, Bob’s character remained steady. When Linda and Bob moved to Fremont, the city was young. Linda says, “I loved the rural aspects of Fremont.” The Wasserman family and City of Fremont grew together with mutual affection. As with other moves, the family easily adapted to their new surroundings. Social connections at the Police Department and Mission San Jose Rotary Club became lifelong friendships. Linda was also an active participant in community activities such as Meals on Wheels. Bob received many forms of recognition in his profession, but was especially proud of his ap-

September 10, 2013

pointment by the Governor of California to the Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST) and federal Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). He also served as president of the California Peace Officers’ Association. Among many accolades, Bob received a commendation for outstanding public service by resolution of the California Senate and the Law Enforcement Executive of the Year Award, a prestigious award given to only one law enforcement executive in the State of California each year.

firmly attached. Faced with the same infraction, Chief of Police Wasserman went back to his office, dictated a reprimand for himself and sent it to the City Manager to be placed in his own personnel file! Following retirement from the Fremont Police Department, Bob was twice appointed as interim Police Chief for the City of Tracy while they searched for a permanent replacement. He remained a committed citizen of Fremont, serving as a councilmember from 1992 until 2004 when elected mayor. His

Those who knew and worked with Bob during his career in law enforcement echo the accolades he received. Steve Clark, Fremont Police Department Lieutenant (ret.) who worked with him for 16 years says, “He was the wisest man I have ever known. He had great intuition and fairness in dealing with all members of the Department and Community. He was one of a kind!” Keith Jackson, Fremont Police Department Captain (ret.) who also worked with Bob during those years, notes that Chief Wasserman “was one of the

strong presence and character “brought harmony” to City politics during a critical time in the Tri-City area. He knew that a solid infrastructure, including basic services for citizens, would allow a calm and reasonable approach to future challenges. Robert Wasserman passed away December 29, 2011 but leaves a legacy of strength, character and integrity for the future of our region. As his name is inscribed on the Fremont Police Building that includes many innovative design features incorporated at his direction - natural lighting for work spaces and

brightest, most articulate, honest and forward thinking individuals I have every met. Integrity was something he not only cherished, but embraced daily.” With a chuckle, he remembers an incident at the old Police Building. A gas pump was located at the rear of the building. On a rare occasion, someone would forget to remove the hose from a police car before driving off, resulting in the need for repair. Although a minor infraction, a reprimand was placed in the personnel file of those who were at fault. Once, Bob was distracted and inadvertently drove off with gas hose

room for expansion and changing police personnel demographics it is a fitting honor for an outstanding iconic representation of what the City hopes to achieve: a solid foundation looking toward a flexible future filled with high hopes and aspirations. Dedication of Robert Wasserman Fremont Police Center Friday, Sept 13 4 p.m. 2000 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6800 Reception to follow in lobby of building


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Director Santos Speaks on water issues SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT Milpitas Rotary’s August 19 featured speaker, Richard Santos, 3rd District Director of the Santa Clara Valley Water District, discussed early 20th Century valley activities, primarily agriculture that used well water, lowering water levels and causing the valley floor to sink. Santos said leaders saw the need for a plan and the Santa Clara Valley Water Conservation District was formed in 1929 to build 17 large reservoirs to capture rain water. Meanwhile the South Santa Clara Water District was formed to build percolation facilities and manage creeks and groundwater. Later the Central Santa Clara Valley Water Conservation District was established to manage groundwater in the Morgan Hill region. Flooding became a serious issue in the ‘30’s and ‘40’s so in 1952 the county board of supervisors formed the Santa Clara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. Its goals were to protect the county from flooding and supplement local water supply with water imported from outside the valley. The “Christmas Week” floods of 1955 left thousands homeless; the Guadalupe River alone flooded 8,300 acres, the worst flood of that river in recorded history. In 1960’s the state of California began delivering water to Santa Clara County via the 72inch South Bay Aqueduct, which brings water about 40 miles from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to the county. Santos said that in 1968 the Santa Clara Valley Water Conservation District and the Santa Clara County Flood Control and Water Conservation District merged, forming one agency to manage the water supply and flood programs for most of the county. By 1969 the addition of imported water to the local recharge

efforts halted more than 40 years of land subsidence. The Santa Clara Valley Flood Control and Water District changed its name to the Santa Clara Valley Water District in the ‘70’s Santos said. In 2000, county voters endorsed the Clean, Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection Plan (Measure B) and approved a special tax to ensure continuity of flood protection and stream stewardship services for 15 more years. And in 2009 the District Board called for 15% mandatory conservation in response to continuing water shortage; the recession caused significant District budget reductions. Alviso resident Director Santos was first elected to the Water District in 2000 and has been reelected over the years with his current term ending in 2016. He retired as a Fire Captain from the San Jose Fire Department with 33 years of service. During his tenure at the San Jose Fire Department he was elected vice chair for 12 years on the San Jose Police and Fire Retirement Board and was a labor representative of the San Jose Firefighters local union. Richard earned his Bachelor’s degree in public administration from Farelston and Nova Colleges and Associate’s degrees in police science and fire science. He also has a lifetime teaching credential from the California Community College system, where he taught fire science at Mission College.

SUBMITTED BY MICHELE MARTINEZ My aunt, Antonia Martinez, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2008, and after a nine-month battle, succumbed to this aggressive disease. To bring awareness and much needed research money to eradicate this disease, my cousin and I wanted to participate in a charity event, but found there were no local events to support. We decided to partner with Lustgarten Foundation and establish a walk to honor my aunt and all those affected by this disease. In four years, we have raised nearly $100,000 with the help and support of about 150 walkers. We have also been blessed with support from local Fremont businesses in the form of gift cards, water, snacks, etc. to provide for the walkers, keeping this event truly grassroots. This year, we are hosting the 5th annual “Pancreatic Northern California Walk” at Lake Elizabeth on Saturday, September 14. There will be a barbecue lunch, silent auction, and raffle in addition to the exercise, and anyone who would like to come out and join the walk is welcome. We still need as much support as we can get to be able to provide the walkers with water, snacks, and a free barbecue after the walk. Please consider donating a case of water, bananas, bagels, or whatever possible to help us surpass the success of last year’s walk. Any donation is much appreciated! For more information, please contact Michele Martinez at (408) 234-2759 or Leticia Martinez at (408) 203-4082. Pancreatic Northern California Walk Saturday, Sept 14 8 a.m. Registration 9 a.m. Walk Lake Elizabeth 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy. Picnic Area C (Nearest Sailway Dr. Entrance), Fremont (408) 234-2759

California launches statewide paint recycling program SUBMITTED BY TYLER TRONSON October 19, 2012 marked the first day of the California Paint Stewardship Program established by a new law, AB 1343 (2010) by Assembly Member Jared Huffman, that requires paint manufacturers to develop a take back system for leftover paint from household and commercial consumers. The new program will be the second and largest of its kind in the United States. Oregon’s pilot program started two years ago. Connecticut and Rhode Island are planning similar programs. Paint manufacturers, through the American Coatings Association, created PaintCare, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization to administer the state programs. The non-profit will arrange for recycling and proper disposal of unused paint and conduct public education about proper paint management. More than 700 million gallons of architectural paint is sold each year in the U.S., and about 10 percent is available for recycling. Until now, leftover paint has been handled primarily by governmentrun household hazardous waste programs — many with strained budgets and limited days of operation. Assembly Member Huffman believes that this California PaintCare program will be particularly helpful to consumers and local governments: “This is an important program that will make paint recycling more convenient for Californians, reduce the financial burden on local governments, and protect the environment. It allows industry to take the lead in developing a safe and reliable system for the recovery and proper management of leftover paint. It’s a win win win.” “This program will make proper paint management more convenient for the public by setting up hundreds of new paint drop-off sites at retailers throughout the state,” said Marjaneh Zarrehparvar, Executive Director of PaintCare. “It will also help local governments that partner with PaintCare by paying for the paint they already accept through their household hazardous waste programs.” Funding for the program will come from a Recovery Fee that will be applied to the purchase price of paint sold in California and paid to PaintCare. Fees are based on container size as follows: Container Size Fee per unit 1/2 Pint or Less $0.00 More than 1/2 pint to 1 gallon $0.35 1 Gallon $0.75 More than 1 Gallon to 5 Gallons $1.60

PaintCare will use the fees to pay for the transportation of leftover paint from partnering drop-off sites to processors for recycling and energy recovery. These fees will also assist PaintCare in its efforts to educate consumers on the importance of buying the correct amount of paint, using up leftover paint, keeping paint out of the trash, and recycling remaining unusable paint. For more information about the California Paint Stewardship Program or to find out where you can recycle your own paint, visit www.paintcare.org.

Alameda County Collection Sites: Kelly Moore 20 969 San Pablo Ave Albany 94706 510-525-3162 Kelly Moore 20 3090 Castro Valley Blvd Castro Valley 94546 510-690-9249 Dunn-Edwards 20 20923 Redwood Rd Castro Valley 94546 510-881-0313 Sherwin-Williams 5 6309 Dougherty Rd Dublin 94568 925-551-8355 Kelly Moore 20 40778 Fremont Blvd Fremont 94538 510-623-9034 Kelly Moore 20 28722 Mission Blvd Hayward 94544 510-538-8590 Sherwin-Williams 5 20911 Foothill Blvd Hayward 94541 510-569-3347 Kelly Moore 20 3981 First St Livermore 94551 925-606-7048 Glidden Professional 5 3356 Piedmont Ave Oakland 94611 510-547-4924 Kelly Moore 20 4156 Telegraph Ave Oakland 94609 510-652-4970 Kelly Moore 20 4917 International Blvd Oakland 94601 510-533-7700 Sherwin-Williams 5 559 66th Ave Oakland 94621 510-569-3347 Kelly Moore 5 4877 Hopyard Rd Pleasanton 94588 925-225-0224 Kelly Moore 20 15611 Hesperian Blvd San Lorenzo 94580 510-276-6492


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September 10, 2013

A Pig & A Poke is Better Than A Farmer With No Farm THINK MELLO INSURANCE

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

#OB84518

Great Beer, Music & Dancing, Food, German Made Car Show, Kids Zone, Silent Raffle & lots more! Entry fee is just $5 or free for children under 12. $15 ticket includes admission, commemorative mug, and a beer. Or get your ticket in advance for just $13 at the Chamber, Swiss Park, or from a Chamber Board Member or Ambassador. Special Bratwurst Meal is $10. Kids Hotdog Meal is $5. Event sponsors are Newark Recycles and Washington Hospital Healthcare System. Music sponsor is Washington Township Medical Foundation. For more information and to order tickets go to www.newark-chamber.com or call 510-744-1000. continued from page 1

cast of twirling, spinning dancers. Make this event part of a weekend-long celebration of Mexico’s independence by joining us for our season opener on Saturday, September 14. Directed by Carlos Moreno, Ballet Folklorico Mexicano will mesmerize the audience with their intricate footwork, precision and flair with music from Jalisco, Sinaloa, Veracruz, Oaxaca, Chihuahua, Tamaulipas, and Durango. BFM has developed a repertoire of over 180 dance pieces, drawing on the artistic variety of Mexico’s diverse regions. Many elements are represented in traditional form, while others have been “restaged to include diversity of artistic elements.” For example, “sensuous African movements that typify dances from the Gulf of Mexico region in the south are juxtaposed by Mexican polkas that mark the influences of eastern European ancestors in the north.” Founded in 1967 to promote Mexican culture and folklore in

the United States, BFM is one of the oldest live Mexican dance companies in the United States. The group has a reputation for excellence from Mexican authorities and artists and among other traditional and ethnic dance companies. Enjoy this artistic tour of Mexico’s varied regional dance customs, and celebrate the country’s Independence Day (two days early!) at Ohlone College. For more information on Ballet Folklorico Mexicano, the 2013-2014 Season of the Arts offerings, or to purchase tickets, please visit www.smithcenter.com. Ballet Folklorico Mexicano Saturday, Sept 14 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $20 general admission, $18 senior, $15 student Event Parking: $2


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Thursday, Sep 29

Sep

5-Sunday,

Walk This Way R

Animal Feeding $

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon

3 p.m.

Walking & strength exercises for ages 55+

Learn to feed the livestock

Continuing Events Fridays, Jul 19 thru Oct 25

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparkonline.org

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 574-2053

Thursday, Oct 27

Some Assembly Required

Thursday, Sep 12 - Sunday, Oct 12

Fremont Street Eats

4:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Food Truck Mafia offers variety of culinary treats

No smoking & no alcohol Downtown Fremont Capital Ave. between State & Liberty St., Fremont www.fremont.gov/Calendar Thursday, Aug 15 - Saturday, Oct 18

New Members & Emerging Artists Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Variety of artworks

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Thursdays, Fridays & Sundays, Aug 22 thru Oct 27

Train Rides $

10:15 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Climb aboard for a ride back in time

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org Thursday, Aug 29 - Sunday, Sep 22

Anything Goes: The Member Show

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Artist’s works in painting, multi-media, photography & sculpture

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Sep

5-Sunday,

Shinn Park and Arboretum Art Display

12 noon - 5 p.m.

Patterson House Museum Tours $

Artwork using common & recycled objects

Various times

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org

Docent led tour of farmhouse

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparksonline.org Wednesdays, Sep 25 thru Nov 13

Tuesday, Sep 10

Newark Police Department Citizen Police Academy – R

Living the American Dream Seminar

5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Participants learn about local law enforcement

Learn to prepare for life’s financial challenges

Register by Sept. 9th Newark City Council Chambers 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4352 beverly.ryans@newark.org

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 www.aclibrary.org Tuesday, Sep 10

Mondays, Sep 9 - Thursdays, Dec 20

PEP: Personal Emergency Preparedness Class

10th Street After-School Program

7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

4 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Fremont Fire Training Tower 7200 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-4244 FirePubEd@fremont.gov

Sports, arts-n-crafts, games & special events

Drop-in program, no day care 10th Street Community Center 33948 10th Street, Union City (510) 675-5276 wwwUnionCity.org Tuesdays, Sep 11 & Thursdays, Nov 13

Music for Minors II Training

9:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Learn to become a docent

Sunday, Sep 1 thru Saturday, Sep 30

Wednesdays, Sep 11 - Dec 18

Learn to prepare & respond to a disaster

Wednesday, Sept 11

Community Meeting

7 p.m. – 8 p.m. Discuss outdoor food sharing ordinance

Hayward City Hall (Room 2A – 2nd floor) 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 583-5333

Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 733-1189 www.musicforminors2.org

5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Painting exhibit by local artists

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 Monday, Sep 3-Sunday, Sep 30

Cultural Corner Art Display

3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Exhibit by photographer Tim Charles

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 Thursday, Sep -Sunday, Sep 29

The Woman in Black $

Fri & Sat: 8 p.m. Sat & Sun: 2 p.m. Ghost play about the exorcism of demons

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

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Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Wednesday, Sep 11

Saturday, Sep 14

Saturday, Sep 14

Music for Minors II Orientation

McConaghy Open House $

7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

Taste of Union City - Food Blues and World Music Festival $

Training orientation for docents

Gates open at 9 a.m.

Niles Elementary School 37141 2nd St., Fremont (510) 733-1189 www.musicforminors2.org

Music, car show, cooking demonstrations & vendors

Wednesday, Sep 11

Searching for Your Ancestors?

1:30 p.m. Learn to use resources & create a family tree

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change

10:25–10:55 Daycare Center Visit City UNION CITY 1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School, 34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY 4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY 5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT

Tuesday, Sept 10 9:45–10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT

Tuesday, Sept 17 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT

Wednesday, Sept 11 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Wednesday, Sept 18 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Thursday, Sept 12 10:00–10:30 Daycare Center Visit SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:45 Daycare Center Visit CASTRO VALLEY 1:20 – 1:50 Daycare Center Visit HAYWARD (unincorporated) 2:15 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD (unincorporated) Monday, Sept 16 9:30–10:05 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Sept 18 1:45-3:00 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 3:15-3:45 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas

September 10, 2013

Program for older adults Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 Wednesday, Sep 11

Milpitas Historical Society

7 p.m. PBS film screening “The Forgotten Journey”

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 945-9848 Wednesday, Sep 11

Flight 93 Memorial Service

10 a.m. Remember and honor heroes of 9/11

Sugar Mill Landing Park Alvarado-Niles Rd. and Dyer St., Union City (510) 247-0777 www.93Memorial.com Thursday, Sep 12

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 487-5692 www.TasteofUnionCity.com Saturday, Sep 14 - Sunday, Sep 15

Fall Festival

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Entertainment, arts & crafts, wine & food

Castro Valley Village Norbridge Ave. Redwood Rd. & Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley Saturday, Sep 14

Dry Creek Cottage and Gardens history tour

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Tour led by Tim Swenson

Dry Creek Pioneer Regional Park End of May Road, Hayward (Free parking: Mission Blvd. and May Rd.) (510) 371-1311 Saturday, Sep 14

Fremont Atheist Forum

10 a.m. - 12 noon Thought-provoking talks

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6248

“Family Perspective” a Provider Education Workshop $R

Saturday, Sep 14

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

8 p.m.

Healthcare services program for wellness

Music & dance featuring a mariachi band

Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 746-1700

Ballet Folklorico Mexicano $

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Explore flight with paper planes, helicopters & gliders

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Sep 14

Nectar Garden Fun Day 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Learn to create a butterfly & hummingbird habitat Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Sep 14

Mission Gold Jazz Band $

6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Buffet dinner, music & dancing

Macro Event Center 37720 Bonde Way, Fremont (415) 602-3511 www.jazzdance.org/missiongold Saturday, Sep 14

Fuzzy Sheep and Friendly Goats $

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Visit livestock & feed them a snack

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Sep 14

9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Special Saturday Matinee $

Spice up an old farm staple with exotic spices

Discuss supply, pricing, reliability & development

2 p.m.

Aquarium of the Bay, Pier 39 The Embarcadero, San Francisco (510) 768-8310

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Friday, Sep 13

Saturday, Sep 14

Dedication of Robert Wasserman Fremont Police Center

Movie Night $

11:30 a.m. Golf, BBQ lunch, dinner & awards ceremony

Sunol Valley Golf Club 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (510) 793-5683 http://fremotrodentsociety.com Friday, Sep 13-Sunday, Sep 15

Middle Eastern & Greek Food Fest $

Fri: 6:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Sat: 12 noon - 10:00 p.m. Sun: 12 noon - 8:00 p.m. Food, live entertainment, kid’s corner & raffle

St. James Orthodox Church 195 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 449-7534 www.sjorthodox.org/festival.html Saturday, Sep 14

Tennisfest

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. BBQ, music, games & prizes

Mission Hills Athletic Club 10 E. Las Palmas Ave., Fremont (510) 703-5559 www.eaglefustar.com/ef/fremont Saturday, Sep 14

Plein Air Paint Out $R

9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Artists paint outside

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Flyin’ in the Wind

The Energy and Water Nexus Summit 2

Fremont Rodent Society Golf Tournament $R

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

Saturday, Sep 14

Thursday, Sep 12

“The Cliff House”

7:30 p.m. “The Night Bird,” & “Stupid but Brave”

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Sep 14

Sunday 10:00 AM

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Saturday, Sep 14

Friday, Sep 13

Unity of Fremont

Docent led & self-guided tours of historic home

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

4 p.m. 2000 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6800 Reception to follow in lobby of building

A positive path for spiritual living

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Ages 18+ Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-4939 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

“Bully” a Documentary Film

1:30 p.m. Film details affect on victim, perpetrator & bystanders

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

Gourmet Popcorn $

1 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Sep 14

Earthquake Walk

9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Tour the Hayward Fault (Under 14 must be accompanied by an adult)

Fremont Central Park Behind Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-5546 www.RegeRec.com


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 23

Newark Chamber looking for a new President The Newark Chamber of Commerce is currently accepting resumes for the position of President/CEO that reports directly to its Board of Directors. The President/CEO will be responsible for taking the vision of the Board of Directors and help make it reality through the implementation of a Strategic Plan. Contact Linda Ashley at 510-744-1000 to obtain a copy of the President/CEO Job Announcements which includes Education/Experience Requirements, Primary Functions, and About Newark.

Monday, October 7

4:30- 7:30pm

St. Rose Hospital Grand White Tent 27200 Calaraga Ave., Hayward Booth Fee $250 Chamber Members $395 Non Members Entry Free to Chamber Members $10 Non Members

Restaurants Prizes New Cars Networking Local Business Fine Wines

www.hayward.org Hayward Chamber of Commerce 510-537-2424

To apply please send a resume with an introductory letter describing your interest in the position, including a detailed description about your qualifications as detailed the in Job Announcement. Resumes must be received by September 30, 2013. Send to: Linda Ashley, Consultant Newark Chamber of Commerce 37101 Newark Blvd Newark, CA 94560

Saturday, Sep 14

Sunday, Sep 15

Pancreatic Northern California Walk

There’s Gold in Them Thar Hills! $

8 a.m. Registration 9 a.m. Walk Lake Elizabeth 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy. Picnic Area C (Nearest Sailway Dr. Entrance), Fremont (408) 234-2759

11 a.m. - 12 noon

Sunday, Sep 15

Monday, Sep 16

Padmashri Hariharan Live in Concert $

Monday Birding

6 p.m.

Stroll a flat trail while bird watching

Hindi, Tamil, Bengali & Malayam music

Chabot Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (408) 579-9426 Sunday, Sep 15

Celtic Celebration Featuring SF Scottish Fiddle Club

1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Music & art in the park Bring a blanket, lawn chair & picnic

No alcohol Hayward Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward Sunday, Sep 15

Sunday Jazz Brunch

10:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Learn about the gold rush & pan for gold

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

9 a.m. - 12 noon Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Tuesday, Sep 17

Alameda County Regional Job Fair

11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Over 45 employers will attend

San Leandro Library 300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro www.tricitiesonestop.com Tuesday, Sep 17

Weekday Bird Walk

Sunday, Sep 15

Tuesday, Sep 17

Canine Capers Dog Walk – R

Earthquakes

10 a.m. - 12 noon

7:00 p.m. – 7:45 p.m.

Explore open space with your four-legged friend

Recommended for elementary age children; families are encouraged to attend.

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (888) 327-2757

Make-and-take activities. Fremont Main Library – Fukaya Room 2400 Stevenson Ave., Fremont (510) 790-6284

Hotshot Hummingbirds – R

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Photographer Don Jedlovec shares his photos

Ages 12+ Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (888) 327-2757

Saturday, Sep 14 Dry Creek Cottage and Gardens history tour 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Tour led by Tim Swenson Dry Creek Pioneer Regional Park End of May Road, Hayward (Free parking: Mission Blvd. and May Rd.) (510) 371-1311

Bring binoculars. All levels welcome

Kenkoy’s Adobo Restaurant 24973 Santa Clara St., Hayward (510) 782-8884

Sunday, Sep 15

With over 200 native and exotic plants, something is always blooming. Enjoy flowers blooming in the garden and historic tours of the cottage and garden grounds of Dry Creek Cottage and Gardens, built in 1900. The site is eligible as a National Historic District. Learn about the history of the cottage and gardens with tours provided by local historian, Tim Swenson. Also, learn how to preserve the four-acre garden site and agricultural land fronting the cottage and gardens from representatives of Save Our Hills. Cottage and Gardens are free and open to the public Thursday through Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Ages 12+ Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

The Darlyn Pearl Trio

SUBMITTED BY TIMOTHY SWENSON

Wednesday, Sep 18

Turning Rumi

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 pm Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7974

Experience a unique concert with living legend Padmashri Hariharan at “Soul India.” Joined by a band of 14 musicians the awardwinning singer will deliver a night of Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada, and Malayam melodies. A pioneer of Indian fusion music, Hariharan has performed in concert, on TV, and his singing has been featured in numerous movies. He has over thirty ghazal albums to his credit and garnered many accolades for his paring with Leslie Lewis as the band Colonial Cousins. Presented by Instant Karma and Rasika along with Desi1170am, “Soul India” takes the stage on Sunday, September15 at the Chabot College

Performing Arts Center in Hayward. Tickets are $35, $45, $55, $65, and $75 for levels 1 - 5 with VIP, Gold, and Elite seating available for $100, $150, and $250. Purchase tickets at www.desiclub.com/Hari or for more information, call Bhavini at (408) 579-9426. Soul India Sunday, Sept 15 6 p.m. Chabot College Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (408) 579-9426 www.desiclub.com/Hari Tickets: $35 - $250


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 2,140,000 Median $: 510,000 Lowest $: 280,000 Average $: 626,706 ADDRESS

ZIP

3514 Arcadian Drive 21111 Ashfield Avenue 22505 Charlene Way 5143 Crane Avenue 19179 Garrison Avenue 3620 Juniper Street 4075 Meadowview Drive 19700 Michaels Court 5018 Ray Avenue 17236 Rolando Avenue 17081 Sabina Court 17899 Sorani Court 4292 Veronica Avenue 19380 Buren Place 19811 Laurelwood Drive 34355 Palomares Road 22240 West Lyndon Loop

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

750,000 448,000 465,000 640,000 435,000 280,000 510,000 675,000 470,000 390,000 495,000 660,000 476,000 665,000 530,000 2,140,000 625,000

2277 1308 1676 1766 844 825 1124 3037 982 1011 1200 1689 1126 2251 1350 3333 2379

1956 1955 1948 1961 1949 1948 1952 1978 1949 1946 1960 1965 1952 2000 1986 2003 2000

07-30-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-31-13

3 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 4 2 2 4

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 76 Highest $: 2,660,000 Median $: Lowest $: 242,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

4114 Alder Terrace 94536 4866 Balboa Way 94536 37489 Briarwood Drive 94536 3839 Burton Common 94536 36488 Cabrillo Drive 94536 35965 Carnation Way 94536 36050 Caxton Place 94536 36827 Cherry Lane #81 94536 35771 Conovan Lane 94536 3475 Deerwood Terrace #304 94536 4416 Elaiso Common 94536 38659 Glencoe Drive 94536 38426 Granville Drive 94536 4513 Guiso Common 94536 581 Lambert Terrace 94536 37351 Lantana Common 94536 35563 Linda Drive 94536 37843 Los Arboles Drive 94536 5010 Mattos Court 94536 4685 Mayfield Drive 94536 4807 Mayfield Drive 94536 36627 Oak Street 94536 35418 Purcell Place 94536 37835 Ralco Road 94536 38547 Royal Ann Common 94536 36139 San Pedro Drive 94536 128 Santos Court 94536 4319 Bidwell Drive 94538 3545 Braxton Common 94538 40231 Davis Street 94538 4551 Deerfield Terrace 94538 3513 Ellery Common 94538 4920 Everglades Park Drive 94538 4074 Fennel Terrace 94538 3538 Fitzsimmons Common 94538 42466 Grand Teton Park Street94538 39149 Guardino Drive #155 94538 39199 Guardino Drive #370 94538 41686 Meiggs Street 94538 4942 Nelson Street 94538 42940 Parkwood Street 94538 4831 Phelan Avenue 94538 4001 Ralston Common 94538 3660 Ronald Court 94538 39382 Sutter Drive 94538 4120 Twin Peaks Terrace 94538 4520 Val Street 94538 40625 Verne Street 94538 2502 Abaca Way 94539 46920 Bodie Terrace #3 94539 41902 Camino Santa Barbara 94539 48497 Cereus Court 94539 44958 Cougar Circle 94539 2626 Grapevine Terrace 94539 179 Indian Grass Terrace 94539 46977 Lundy Terrace 94539 41812 Mission Cielo Court 94539 2535 Monet Terrace 94539 1379 Ocaso Camino 94539 44659 Parkmeadow Drive 94539 41927 Paseo Padre Parkway 94539 901 Pebblewood Court 94539 46951 Shale Common #10 94539 43643 Skye Road 94539 43964 South Moray Street 94539 48976 Ventura Drive 94539 47112 Warm Springs Blvd #21294539 845 Wisteria Drive 94539 34689 Anchor Drive 94555 34146 Audrey Court 94555 34339 Bodkin Terrace 94555 4155 Horatio Way 94555 34225 Kenwood Drive 94555 34593 Pueblo Terrace 94555 33733 Whimbrel Road 94555 34205 Whitehead Lane 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

535,000 390,000 525,000 360,000 592,500 952,000 869,000 253,000 942,000 325,000 338,000 620,000 600,000 290,000 319,500 815,000 426,000 610,000 820,000 682,500 870,000 679,000 775,000 1,210,000 242,000 525,000 1,050,000 657,000 550,000 400,000 436,000 505,000 570,000 324,000 600,000 580,000 250,000 368,000 786,000 572,000 770,000 500,000 360,000 766,000 621,000 500,000 520,000 553,000 900,000 380,000 918,000 651,000 1,260,000 2,660,000 645,000 412,500 1,670,000 850,000 851,000 1,420,000 850,500 1,900,000 385,000 1,260,000 1,200,000 1,363,000 360,000 1,465,000 640,000 930,000 690,000 720,000 713,000 415,000 1,002,000 680,000

1565 1330 1119 1400 2272 2499 1858 1101 2927 936 988 1813 1612 1166 1591 1980 840 1583 1902 1338 2023 1686 1942 3289 1180 1148 3149 1938 1637 1169 1242 1174 1285 1097 1448 1466 693 1053 1387 1628 1877 996 1189 2082 1322 1582 1036 1158 1583 1018 1582 1091 2258 6035 1303 1045 3230 1854 1780 3803 1434 3674 936 2071 2071 3452 970 2526 1376 2168 1755 1532 1354 840 3214 1390

1995 1982 1954 1979 1954 1955 1971 1974 1987 1986 1971 1955 1960 1971 2008 1997 1953 1971 1986 1954 1954 1962 1971 1963 1970 1956 1980 1962 2000 1959 1971 1999 1961 2010 1997 1963 1987 1987 1956 1963 1965 1959 1980 1957 1959 1978 1959 1960 1971 1980 1964 1980 1988 1997 2008 1981 1999 2011 1979 1979 1960 1992 1987 1988 1989 1993 1982 1960 1977 1986 1987 1987 1988 1988 1987 1969

07-30-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-29-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-30-13 07-29-13 08-01-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-29-13 08-01-13 07-29-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 07-30-13 08-01-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 08-01-13

3 3 3 2 4 4 4 3 4 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 4 4 6 3 3 5 5 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 1 2 3 3 4 3 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 4 5 2 2 5 4 3 3 4 2 4 4 4 2 5 3 6 3 3 3 2 3 3

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 67 Highest $: 830,000 Median $: Lowest $: 100,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1815 170th Avenue 94541 605 Arcadia Drive 94541 22721 Atherton Street 94541 20671 Blossom Court 94541 20030 Camden Avenue 94541 425 Cherry Way 94541 1816 Dahill Lane 94541 370 Falgren Avenue 94541 20926 Haviland Avenue 94541 23019 Kingsford Way 94541 691 MacAbee Way 94541 3066 Madsen Street 94541 1291 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1293 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1295 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1311 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1313 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1321 Martin Luther King Drive 94541

621,000 723,612

SOLD FOR BDS

320,000 400,000 385,000 345,000 705,000 340,000 480,000 410,000 310,000 390,000 400,000 575,000 416,500 437,500 444,000 446,000 461,500 460,500

5 3 3 2 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 -

410,000 412,672

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2999 1381 1224 1030 2444 1092 1175 1184 1333 1516 2506 -

1948 2005 1997 1952 1940 1950 1957 1940 2005 2011 2009 -

07-31-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 07-29-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 08-01-13

1323 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1327 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1343 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 1345 Martin Luther King Drive 94541 200 Old Oak Lane #4 94541 900 Old Oak Lane #4 94541 344 Oxford Street 94541 18720 Ricardo Avenue 94541 558 Shirley Avenue 94541 3449 Augusta Court 94542 25843 Bel Aire Drive 94542 25793 Bryn Mawr Avenue 94542 27081 Call Avenue 94542 1077 Central Boulevard 94542 3055 Chronicle Avenue 94542 28250 Fox Hollow Drive 94542 26151 Parkside Drive 94542 3221 Round Hill Drive 94542 4180 Star Ridge Road 94542 32167 Amelia Avenue 94544 669 Barron Way 94544 28679 Etta Avenue 94544 611 Gleneagle Avenue 94544 24352 Groom Street 94544 158 Lafayette Avenue 94544 31117 Meadowbrook Avenue 94544 27671 Medlar Drive 94544 27716 Medlar Drive 94544 26218 Mocine Avenue 94544 24486 Park Street 94544 31829 Potsdam Street 94544 29626 Red Oak Court #17 94544 1338 Thais Lane 94544 26568 Underwood Avenue 94544 30861 Vanderbilt Street 94544 3590 Baumberg Avenue 94545 26764 Calaroga Avenue 94545 2671 Cryer Street 94545 1393 Denton Avenue 94545 2735 Driftwood Street 94545 23537 Eden Avenue 94545 1451 Linfield Lane 94545 27676 Miami Avenue 94545 27423 Ponderosa Court 94545 23606 Saklan Road 94545 2720 Ships Road 94545 26760 Wauchula Way 94545 1415 West Street 94545 1865 West Street 94545

456,000 478,000 490,000 433,000 400,000 391,000 410,000 324,000 278,000 425,000 425,000 320,000 700,000 501,000 650,000 830,000 411,000 600,000 635,000 450,000 450,000 445,000 489,000 290,000 310,000 340,000 240,000 267,500 380,000 300,000 260,000 172,000 410,000 360,000 466,000 156,000 431,000 407,000 625,000 800,500 100,000 415,000 225,000 168,000 300,000 480,000 435,000 275,000 319,000

3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

1303 1303 1090 1646 1090 1872 1604 1050 2008 2706 3653 1111 1927 2357 1164 1532 1924 1540 1262 1031 1231 1549 1340 1040 1015 1221 579 1210 1040 1175 720 1354 1152 2891 3031 922 1285 1119 1474 1665 1867 1128 1227 1252

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 18 Highest $: 750,000 Median $: Lowest $: 266,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

464 Cascadita Terrace 496 Coelho Street 2250 Cuesta Drive 452 Dempsey Road #255 295 Dixon Road 1443 Edsel Drive 238 Evening Star Court 1190 Fallen Leaf Drive 909 Fire Walk #251 1392 Highland Court 877 Inspiration Place 1816 Lee Way 1832 Lee Way 277 North Temple Drive 1505 Sonoma Drive 1101 South Main Street #118 1181 Stardust Way 1206 Sun Court

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

610,000 600,000 712,000 266,500 340,000 420,000 525,000 750,000 430,000 378,000 685,000 538,500 491,000 328,000 628,000 390,000 565,000 688,000

3 3 3 1 3 3 5 4 2 3 4 2 3 1 3 5

ZIP

36621 Bishop Street 94560 39821 Cedar Boulevard #303 94560 5406 Chapman Drive 94560 37360 Cherry Street 94560 6149 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #B94560 35122 Lido Boulevard #L 94560 35478 Provance Street 94560 5712 Rose Court 94560 6288 Truckee Court 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

480,000 243,000 481,000 315,000 425,000 230,000 535,000 550,000 635,000

3 1 4 4 3 2 3 3 3

08-01-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 07-30-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-30-13 07-29-13 07-25-13 07-29-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-29-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-30-13 07-25-13 08-01-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 07-29-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 08-01-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-26-13

525,000 519,167

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1547 1198 1528 676 1483 995 1647 2210 1353 1165 1764 976 1249 926 1247 2110

1992 1965 1993 2007 1958 1955 1969 1969 2000 1971 2000 1970 1966 2007 1969 1969

08-13-13 08-13-13 08-09-13 08-12-13 08-09-13 08-14-13 08-07-13 08-07-13 08-13-13 08-13-13 08-12-13 08-08-13 08-06-13 08-07-13 08-07-13 08-08-13 08-08-13 08-09-13

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 635,000 Median $: Lowest $: 230,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2010 2011 1951 1951 1951 1978 1951 1950 1950 2006 1995 1918 1968 1967 1955 1960 1955 1958 1950 1951 1955 1979 1973 1952 1950 1951 1985 1956 1952 1955 1935 1957 1958 1979 2003 1949 1956 1955 1970 1948 2010 1957 1956 1979

480,000 432,667

SQFT

BUILT

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1779 777 1866 1275 1456 1076 1320 1754 1742

1957 1986 1964 1962 1981 1984 1960 1963 1979

07-26-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 08-01-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-25-13 07-25-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES:35 Highest $: 817,000 Median $: 425,000 Lowest $: 134,500 Average $: 429,471 ADDRESS

204 Accolade Drive 733 Arbor Drive 13480 Aurora Drive 1639 Benedict Drive 2241 Estabrook Circle 1011 Greenbrier Court 48 Harlan Street 2695 Lakeview Drive 373 Lexington Avenue 1049 Martin Boulevard 1036 Minerva Street 782 Sybil Avenue 1975 Thomas Avenue 2014 West Avenue 136th 643 Woodland Avenue 1276 135th Avenue 1650 138th Avenue 1613 139th Avenue 1555 159th Avenue 595 Begonia Drive 592 Cape Cod Drive 755 Crocus Drive 14101 East 14th Street #115 600 Heather Glenn Lane 3718 Mortensen Road 16705 Rolando Avenue 1500 Thrush Avenue 473 Violet Street 644 Beatrice Street 1146 Bodmin Avenue 2225 Charter Way

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SOLD FOR BDS

470,000 450,000 695,000 490,000 390,000 550,000 325,000 817,000 249,500 350,000 238,000 484,000 425,000 236,000 202,000 400,000 350,000 480,000 600,000 425,000 500,000 535,000 134,500 445,000 240,000 614,000 420,000 351,000 393,000 390,000 645,000

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2000 1930 1956 1955 1941 2007 1930 1964 1941 1942 1946 1942 1944 1924 1949 1947 1946 1960 1978 1978 1978 1986 2007 1978 1984 1926 1947 1948 1950 2000

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continued on page 33

Mass. girl, 9, becomes youngest US chess master AP WIRE SERVICE BY GRANT WELKER THE SUN

CHELMSFORD, Mass. (AP), Only three years or so since first picking up the game of chess, 9year-old Carissa Yip can already look down at 93 percent of the more than 51,000 players registered with the U.S. Chess Federation. She has risen so far up the rankings that she has reached the expert level at a younger age than anyone since the chess federation began electronic record-keeping in 1991, a new level she reached in recent weeks. Her father, Percy, who taught her until she began beating him within a year, said she could reach master level in as soon as a year. “Some never reach master level,’’ he said. “From expert to master, it’s a huge jump.’’ But Carissa, who will be a fifth-grader at McCarthy Middle School this fall, has improved by leaps and bounds. She first played competitively at the MetroWest Chess Club and Wachusett Chess Club, at the latter of which she’s the topranked player. Last fall, she competed in an international competition in Slovenia, and in December, she’ll play the World Youth Championships in the United Arab Emirates. Carissa is hesitant when asked about her accomplishments, saying she doesn’t spend much time thinking about them. But she also set a goal for herself this year to reach 2,100; an expert is anyone over 2,000. Anyone at 2,200 is a master. She also wants to one day become the first female to win the overall championship – not just in the female category, her father said. “It’s not like the rating matters,’’ Carissa said. She later demonstrated her ability by playing with her back to the board, reading her moves to her father and keeping track of the whole board in her head. She has been called an intimidating player in an ironic way, because she’s far short of even 5 feet tall. Her U.S. Chess Federation ranking places her in the top 7 percent of all players registered with the group and the top 2 percent of female players. Closer to home, Carissa has impressed others who have been playing chess for far longer than she has been alive. “This was not a record she won by a few days,’’ said Nathan Smolensky, the president of the Massachusetts Chess Association. “It was a significant margin. So it’s very impressive.’’ Among other younger stars at the Boylston Chess Club in Somerville, where Yip has played, most are in their teens and are boys, Smolensky said. “Even they say they were nowhere near this strength when they were that young,’’ he said. Carissa also has three years to reach the next level, that of master, in time to set the record for youngest to reach that step as well, Smolensky said. Five-time U.S. women’s winner Irina Krush has the record for becoming a master at age 12. George Mirijanian, program director for the Wachusett club and past president of the Massachusetts Chess Association, said Carissa and Percy Yip, both Wachusett members, both got a standing ovation when they arrived at the club last week after Carissa reached expert level. “In my more than 50 years with the club, I had never witnessed such an exuberant outburst from club members,’’ Mirijanian said. “They are really proud of Carissa and what she has accomplished.’’


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Obituaries

Special Life Events

Marriage

LANAS ESTATE SERVICES Karen L. Simpson RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 12, 1957 – August 17, 2013

Harry J. Meyer, Jr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 21, 1927 – August 22, 2013

Rajendran Thangasamy RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE May 25, 1960 – August 25, 2013

Jane Kwan Lee RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 1, 1930 – August 29, 2013

Raymond Ocon RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE July 19, 1935 – August 24, 2013

Vasudevan Ganapathy RESIDENT OF INDIA July 9, 1942 – August 25, 2013

Eleanor R. Bernardo RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 10, 1925 – August 29, 2013

Rita L. Slater

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 7, 1991 – August 30, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 22, 2013 – August 30, 2013

Danilo A. Mendoza

Rajeesh Padmanabhan

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 18, 1946 – August 30, 2013

RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON April 26, 1975 – August 30, 2013

Robert “Bob” A. Carothers

John W. Kelly

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 31, 1940 – August 31, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 26, 1919 – September 1, 2013

Wai Lum Chin

Madeline H. Soto

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 2, 1917 – August 31, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 5, 1943 – September 2, 2013

Cristina Deleon Castro

Laila H. Damon

RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE March 13, 1951 – September 2, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 29, 1918 – September 2, 2013

Janet Gail Culwell

Robert E. Anberg

RESIDENT OF NEWARK March 9, 1957 – September 2, 2013

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 7, 1936 – September 3, 2013

Rose G. Enciso

Carmela S. Delgado

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 30, 1914 – September 2, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 19, 1927 – September 9, 2013

Harold D. Daly RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON June 8, 1928 – September 3, 2013

Helen May Hursey

Deborah J. Mansour RESIDENT OF MILPITAS May 26, 1958 – September 4, 2013

Whether you're closing a loved one’s Estate or your own, it is an overwhelming task. Lana provides solutions for quick completion allowing you to move through the process with ease.

Jing Gong RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 4, 1974 – August 28, 2013

Lorelani H. Fernandez

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY April 25, 1920 – September 4, 2013

Estate Sales, Complete or Partial Clean out, Appraisals and more

TAKE A DEEP BREATH, DON'T THROW ANYTHING AWAY, Call direct or contact Lana online

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

510-657-1908 www.lanas.biz

lana@lanas.biz

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

New rule bans Ga. toll booth charity AP WIRE SERVICE

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Emma N. Russomanno RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 10, 1933 – September 4, 2013

James J. Podczerwinski RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 26, 1950 – September 5, 2013

Faye Bernice Altstatt RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 24, 1936 – September 6, 2013

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

ATLANTA (AP), No more paying it forward for the driver behind you at the Georgia 400 toll plaza. A new rule from the State Road and Tollway Authority bans drivers from paying the toll for the person behind them in line. That became something of a local tradition over the last 20 years. But The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (http://bit.ly/14Pgm4n) reports that some drivers had recently complained that cashiers were pocketing the extra 50 cents when they didn’t see their money being tossed into the coin basket for the driver behind them. The deputy executive director of the State Road and Tollway Authority, Bert Brantley, says a driver might not see the extra money being thrown into the change basket because the next motorist sometimes declined the money, allowing it to be passed to another driver. ––– Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont www.fremontmemorialchapel.com

Rose Gomez Enciso August 30, 1914 – September 2, 2013 Resident of Newark

Hospital visit ends in same surgery for 2 brothers AP WIRE SERVICE ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP), Two Minnesota brothers ended up having emergency gallbladder surgery after visiting the hospital. LeRoy Hanson, 65, of Sartell says he offered to give his 63-year-old brother Bruce a ride to the hospital Sunday after his brother called complaining of pain. LeRoy says his brother was told he would have to have his gallbladder removed. While LeRoy sat in the waiting room, he began experiencing the same symptoms as his brother. LeRoy tells the St. Cloud Times (http://on.sctimes.com/18GDddR ) that by next morning he was in so much pain that he asked his wife to take him to the hospital. Doctors told LeRoy he’d have to have his gallbladder removed, too. That’s not too unusual for the Hansons. Both brothers had their tonsils removed at the same time when they were children. ––– Information from: St. Cloud Times, http://www.sctimes.com

“A Legacy of Love” Rose turned 99 years old on August 30th. She received the precious gift of final perseverance to celebrate a planned birthday party on September 1st surrounded by her loving family and friends, in her home, in joyful Enciso tradition. The following day, Our Lord called her to her true home. Rose entered peacefully into eternal life on September 2, 2013. Rose will always be remembered for her joyful love, her tender caring, her generous hospitality, and her smile for everyone! She was always there for her family with unconditional love. Born in San Martin, Jalisco, Mexico, Rose immigrated to the U.S. with her sister, Beatris in the early 1920's. She met her husband in LA and all came to Fremont in 1926 to make a living in farming. Always hardworking, Rose's family survived through the depression and labored in love into the early 60's raising and picking corn, vegetables, apricots, and strawberries. Rose also worked in the canneries and nursing homes. The last farm was in Newark on Baine Ave. which later became the home of Newark's City Hall. She moved to her home on Chapman Dr. in Newark where she lived the rest of her life until her passing. Rose endured her courageous battle with Alzheimer's for 20 years. A faithful Catholic, she had a strong love and devotion for Our Lord and Our Lady of Guadalupe. She is preceded in death by her husband Felipe, her sister Beatris, her daughter Theresa, and grandson John. Reunited with long departed family and friends - what a joyful reunion that will be! She leaves behind her son Phillip; 6 grandchildren: Phil (Erlinda), Tom (Becky), Cathy (David), Ellie (Mike), Veronica, and Tony; 11 great-grandchildren: Nathan (Meghan), Natalie, Max (Monica), Jojo, Alex, Adam, Michaela, Josten, Lolly, Tula, and

Marcy; 2 great-great grandchildren: Ella and Cruz; and many extended family members. Much love and thanks to Maria Arteaga for her loving care of Rose in her final years, her beloved daughter Theresa and son Phil, Ellie, Tom, Veronica, Tony, and Les, and all those for making it possible for her to remain in her home and be near to the family she loved with all her heart. Visitation will be held on Monday, September 9, from 5-8pm with a Vigil at 7pm at Fremont Chapel of the Roses, 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536. Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Tuesday, September 10, 10:30am at St. Edward's Catholic Church, 5788 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560. Burial will follow at Holy Spirit Cemetery in Fremont, CA.


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September 10, 2013

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Tri-City Stargazer SEPTEMBER 11 – SEPTEMBER 17, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Saturn, the teacher/taskmaster, is meeting the North Node of the Moon on the 17th. This energy has been in effect since Oct. of 2012, but increasingly more serious as this date approaches. They are traveling in the sign of Scorpio, which rules any type of shared resources, such as Aries the Ram (March 21-April 20): Forward motion is achingly slow through Sat. morning. You may not feel well, or you encounter a roadblock after detours. Then suddenly things perk up in your love and social life. Your point of view will complement your partner’s (whether business or personal). Problematic negotiations or contracts give way to a solution on the 17th. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): Venus, your ruling planet, enters the 7th house of relationships and will be there until Oct. 11th. She brings improvements in clientele, social life, and partnerships. This is a good time to ask for a professional consultation if you need it. You are especially able to balance with others during this period in order to gain win-win solutions. Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): This month, and in particular, this week, is loaded with surprises. Issues around debt, your estate, and your connection to community are in some way bringing up secrets that are enlightening. You might not have been ready for that, but here it is. Use your wits to come up with good solutions. Don’t let

stocks, partner’s income, or inheritances. Banks or other places where people park money are also ruled by Scorpio. This sign is related to passion about anything, but specifically has to do with intimacy, sexuality, and money. Their joining in the zodiac represents a karmic moment, the consequences

others press you to conclusions before you are ready. Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): Please note the lead paragraph because it applies especially to your sign. The subject matter appears to be related to your children or maybe a lover. A “karmic moment” is here. Avoid the tendency to be a critic. Each must be his or her own person. However, you do not have to participate or watch if a behavior repels you. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You have a lot on your plate this week. At the beginning you are pressed to defend yourself by finding and organizing details of previously finished business. A fleeting virus may be slowing you down. Repairs of property may be on the agenda. Saturday evening the cosmic sky clears, you will feel better. Then travel and/or educational activities are favored. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): It may seem that every time you attempt to concentrate on any sort of detail, someone or something begins to interfere. Bitsy parts will not cooperate or can't be found. It may take 2 to 3 trips to the hardware store or the grocery market to

collect what you need to complete the task. Relax. Some days are like that. Libra the Scales (September 23October 22): Today your ruling planet, Venus, enters the second house of income and self-worth. She will remain there until Oct. 11th. Your concerns about finances will feel lightened. Work opportunities increase. This is a good time to start a gratitude journal. Remember that what you think may not necessarily work for others in your life. Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): Please note the all signs paragraph above. The prominent Saturn/North Node conjunction is in your sign. You may be playing both the role of teacher and the role of recalcitrant student this week. If you have held to your integrity, rewards will follow. For goodness’ sake, take care of yourself! Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): There is no planetary activity that compels the Archers to act at this time. It is possible that your mind is nursing an old wound from the past, possibly related to the father history in your life.

of any misbehavior or mistakes related to resources, time, and money. This period may bring news related to misdeeds in the public sector. It is not only collective but also personal. Saturn rewards that which is “good,” socially acceptable, conservative behavior and punishes that which is not.

Move your focus beyond that. The ego is prone to bring up old worries when you are not busy. Get some exercise to feel better. Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): There may be sudden developments concerning your home, your family, or your career. For a time things will feel out of control and maybe difficult to understand on any rational level. This struggle may be internal and of the ego. Go with integrity for the best outcome. Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): The lead paragraph is specifically related to you. It appears that your work in the world is coming to a turn in the road. If you have been unhappy with your life direction, now is the time that you

may feel compelled to change. If, on the other hand, you are pleased with your work, an opportunity may arise that will expand your territory. Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): For the next several weeks you will be pondering a question: Who or What do you serve? What is the priority that has always kept you going, regardless of the situation? You are experiencing a reality check here. You often walk a fine line between devotion and sacrifice. If it feels sacrificial you may have gone overboard.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

Homes for sale… cheap! District, who value conservation of the works of prior generations and the historical foundation of the area, many, sometimes the same people, see little or no value in what previously was viewed as worthy of protection.

WILLIAM MARSHAK A public notice from East Bay Regional Park lists the following homes for sale: The Brown House: 2-story, 3 rooms The Bettencourt House: 2-story, 4 bedrooms, Living Room, Dining Room, brick fireplace The Mowry Schoolhouse: 1-story, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, Living Room, Dining Room The price of each of these structures is the munificent sum of $1. The only catch is these homes are old, in poor condition and must be relocated. There is, however, another “catch” to this story. At one time, they were considered valuable historic buildings that were slated to be preserved as physical artifacts of the mid-19th Century farm period of Washington Township. It is ironic that while valiant efforts are made by some, including the East Bay Regional Park

According to the Notice of Preparation for the Environmental Impact Report prepared by the East Bay Regional Park District regarding sale or possible demolition of these structures, they have now become a “public safety hazard.” Known by family names of early Washington Township residents, the Bettencourt and Brown Houses along with the Mowry’s Landing Schoolhouse are said to be “of potential historic significance.” Those who now consider these structures worthless – okay, not quite true, on sale for $1 – moved them from development sites in 1984-85, hoping to create an “educational center with a historic farming village theme within Ardenwood.” Ownership of The Mowry Schoolhouse was transferred to the City of Newark for restoration but now these dreams are being set aside due to financial concerns. Another bit of our history is about to be discarded. Much of the preparation for demolition and sale has been quietly processed and time is running out for the acceptance of “Letters of Intent” by those able and willing to preserve any or all of the structures. According to a public notice, September 30 is the deadline to disclose

Officer involved shooting

a desire to remove any of these buildings that subsequently must be removed from Ardenwood by December 31st. The dilemma of preservation or destruction is an interesting problem since once historic structures are demolished, there is little except photos and reproductions, to remind us of the past. Why are shows such as Antique Roadshow and Pawn Stars so popular if no one really cares about old items? It is ironic that while in some locales large amounts of money are spent to preserve and maintain historic relics, while in others they are easily discarded. Many communities promote historic sites, buildings and artifacts; some use them as significant attractions for residents and visitors alike (i.e. Charleston, New Orleans, Auburn, Columbia and the Gold Country and “Old Towns” in many other locations). How many of the buildings (and their history) in those areas are being sold for $1? Can’t beat the price… but is it worth it?

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec Britney Sanchez DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Union City PD welcomes new Deputy Police Chief

SUBMITTED BY CMDR. BEN HORNER, UNION CITY PD

SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN

On Saturday, August 31 at about 2:30 p.m., Union City Police Officers were involved in an officer involved shooting. Officers were dispatched to the area of Medallion Drive and Kenita Way after dispatch received multiple 911 calls of an armed subject who reportedly fired several shots from a firearm. When officers arrived at the scene they were confronted by a subject who had multiple weapons. Officers provided commands to the subject but he did not comply. Fearing for their safety, officers shot the subject and the subject was pronounced deceased at the scene. The Alameda County Sheriff/Coroner will attempt to identify the subject and notify next of kin. The officers involved in the shooting will be placed on administrative leave, following department policy after an officer-involved shooting. The incident will be investigated by both the Union City Police Department and the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office. Authorities are asking anyone with information in regard to this incident to please call the Union City Police Department. (510-471-1365) The Union City Police Department also has a tip line for citizens that want to leave anonymous tips for the police department at 510-675-5207 or tips@unioncity.

The City of Union City has named Darryl McAllister as the new Deputy Police Chief, effective September 6. He will be introduced at the City Council meeting on September 10. In his new role, McAllister will work closely with Chief Brian Foley, who was appointed in 2012. This newly created position will help relieve Command staff of several administrative tasks and move forward with various planning initiatives and new projects. McAllister will also assume the duties of Acting Police Chief in the Chief’s absence. McAllister is currently a Captain for the Hayward Police Department. He has served that department for over 30 years, having started his career as a police cadet. Darryl is known as a very qualified and experienced police professional who is active in the community and dedicated to the concept and practice of community policing. According to Chief Foley, “Darryl possesses the skills, knowledge and personality necessary to be very successful in this new position. He is community oriented, approachable and well respected by his colleagues. The positive relationships he has built with other agencies in our region will prove beneficial as the Union City Police Department works to meet the challenges facing law enforcement today and into the future.” McAllister holds a Masters of Arts degree in Law Enforcement Administrative Development from Alliant International University (Center for Forensic Studies) and a Bachelors of Science in Occupational Studies from California State University, Long Beach.

Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Britney Sanchez Steve Taylor

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2013® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

September 10, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS Become a hospice patient CARE VOLUNTEER! Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Job Resources Fair for underserved populations On Monday, September 23, from 11:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., join East Bay Career Link for the Underserved at Hayward City Hall along with Community Resources for Independent Living, the Alameda County Commission on the Status of Women and several Alameda County organizations for the Job Resources Fair co-sponsored by the City of Hayward. The 2nd Annual Job Resources Fair in Hayward will be serving low income, the re-entry population, veterans, single parents, persons with functional limitations, seniors, former foster youth and English language learners to provide a path to employability and self-reliance for underserved communities throughout the Bay Area. This is the mission of its collaborative organizing group: the East Bay Career Link for the Underserved (East Bay CLU). Keynote speaker Mike May’s story is depicted in the best-selling book “Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See.” Mr. May will be available to autograph copies of his book after our opening ceremony from 11:30-12noon. Among many accomplishments as an entrepreneur, Mr. May also holds the world record as the fastest blind down-hill speed skier! You can reserve your copy of Mike May’s book with The Book Shop in Hayward by calling (510) 538-3943. Attendees will receive free childcare services on site (rsvp required for reservation), vision screening, resume development, financial literacy, webbased application training, participation in mock interviews with local business owners and education on the various resources available to job seekers. Panel discussions will be available in English and Spanish. We welcome and encourage local businesses to attend as panel speakers, as potential job opportunities or as interviewers for mock interviews on site. For more information, contact Dr. Jennifer Ong at ongforcommunity@gmail.com or 510-397-9006. For exhibitors, please contact Michael Galvan of CRIL at Michael.Galvan@crilhayward.org or 510881-5743. Sign Language interpreters will be available for the attendees courtesy of DCARA (Deaf Counseling, Advocacy and Referral Agency). Job Resources Fair Monday, Sep 23 11:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward Dr. Jennifer Ong at (510) 397-9006 Exhibitors contact Michael Galvan at (510) 881-5743

Pax Christi Fremont calls for peace SUBMITTED BY TONI SHELLEN Pope Francis called for a Worldwide Day of Prayer for Peace in Syria, in the entire Mideast region, and throughout the whole world on Saturday, September 7, 2013. A group of concerned citizens of all faiths gathered on the steps of Mission San Jose to express their commitment to non-violence. Pax Christi joins with religious leaders around the world in calling for dialogue and negotiations as the only solution to the crisis in Syria. The gathering was done in the spirit of a prayerful vigil for peace, not a protest.

SUBMITTED BY CHABOT COLLEGE Chabot College will kick off International Democracy Day celebrations with its Third Annual Law and Democracy Day Lecture by Tirien Steinbach, Executive Director of the East Bay Community Law Center, “Justice, Not Just Us: Improving Access to Legal Services,” on Thursday, September 19. The lecture series is sponsored by the Chabot College Law and Democracy Program, Student Senate, and the Office of the President. The event is free and open to the public. Temporary parking permit is $2. Ms. Steinbach’s lecture is the third in Chabot College’s new Law and Democracy Lecture Series. One of Chabot’s collegewide learning goals is civic responsibility. A primary goal of the Law and Democracy

Lecture Series is to expose students and the broader community to a wide range of ideas and policy issues that impact our communities. Ms. Steinbach’s lecture will focus on the problems with access to lawyers, judges, and the courts, what that limitation means for people with limited access, and what it means (more structurally) for democracy. Justice, Not Just Us Thursday, Sep 19 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Problems with access to the legal system Chabot College Reed L. Buffington Visual and Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6641 Parking $2


September 10, 2013

Are you a writer?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

Diamond stars win Ohlone College awards Ohlone sophomore baseball player, outfielder L.J. (LeeJun) Kalawaia. As a sophomore in 2013, Kalawaia was a California Community College Baseball Coaches Association (CCCBCA) first team All-Coast Pacific Conference player and a CCCBCA All-American. In Kalawaia’s freshman year, 2012, he also was named to the same All-Coast Pacific Conference first team and to the CCCBCA All-Northern California Team. Kalawaia took and passed 70 credits at Ohlone and ended up with a 3.1 GPA.

Katelin “Katy” Weger

BY BIFF JONES PHOTOS BY DON JEDLOVEC Every year Ohlone College Renegades choose one female and one male as their athletes of the year. Recipients are chosen from the eleven team sports Ohlone fields over the fall, winter and spring seasons: men’s and women’s soccer and water polo and women’ volleyball in the fall; men’s and women’s basketball in the winter; and men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s baseball and women’s softball in the spring. Female athlete of the year for 2012-2013 is Katelin “Katy” Weger of the women’s softball team. “Loo,” as her teammates affectionately call her, was a sophomore center fielder who often was the team’s leadoff hitter. Weger was the team’s MVP and a first team All Coast Conference North outfielder. She was selected as a first team Academic All State player by the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) and awarded an athletic/academic honor from the “Girls Got Game” Foundation. Weger had a GPA over 3.5 all four semesters at Ohlone and ended up with a 3.77 GPA. On the field, Weger played in all of the team’s 39 games, had 49 hits, scored 37 runs, stole 27 bases and hit one home run. She had a batting average of .441, an on base percentage of .500 and added 12 outfield assists on defense. Weger is the daughter of Carla and Kevin Hewitt of San Leandro. She is a graduate of San Leandro High School where she played four years of varsity softball and also played basketball. Weger credits her parents and Ohlone Head Softball Coach, Donna Runyon with most of her success. At Ohlone, Weger received an A.A. Degree in Kinesiology and will be attending NCAA Division II Chico State University on an athletic scholarship. She wants to continue her education in Kinesiology as she hopes to become a physical education teacher. Male athlete of the year for 2012-2013 goes to

L.J. (Lee-Jun) Kalawaia

In the field, Kalawaia batted .405 in 2013, had 51 hits, 7 doubles, 6 triples, a home run and stole 5 bases in 33 games. He also had a slugging percentage of .579, an on base percentage of .462 and in 2012 batted .330. Kalawaia is the son of Mark and Lisa Ann Kalawaia of Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii. He attended Lahainaluna High School on Maui freshman through junior years then finished his prep career at Saint Louis School on Oahu where he played second base and led his team to the Interscholastic League of Honolulu Championship. Kalawaia intends to continue his education and play baseball at NCAA Division I North Carolina Greensboro. UNC Greensboro baseball coach, Link Jarrett says, “L.J. Is a very athletic player that can fill several needs for us. He has good speed and a strong arm which will play well at our field. Offensively, his well rounded approach makes him a great addition to our lineup.” Kalawaia also wants to major in Kinesiology. Players will be given their awards certificates and a check for $500 to further their education at fouryear schools. Awards will be given at the banquet following the 29th Annual Ohlone College Golf Tournament at Castlewood Country Club in Pleasanton on Monday, September 23; banquet starts at 5:30 p.m. Chris Warden is the Athletic Director at Ohlone College.

Gridiron action begins for 2013 Fremont Football SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Fremont Football is known as a great starting point for serious athletes and many who just want to have fun. For some, this action is a chance to be mentored by dedicated coaches prior to moving on to high school, collegiate and even professional careers. As the first day of full league play started on Saturday September 9, the action was fast as teams worked hard during the off season to understand offense and defense. All three divisions are up for grabs this year; the outcome is much too early to predict but two teams to watch in the National Division are the Bills and Steelers, each with a new passing attack this year. In the American Division, the Vikings and Patriots are starting strong. The Vikings beat the Bears 30-6, controlling the line with impressive defense. Keeping pace, the Patriots won big over the Jets 28-6. This promises to be another good year of football in the Fremont Football League. Come out and watch local football action. More information can be found at: http://www.fremontfootball.net/


September 10, 2013

HIGH SCHOOL MEN’S WATERPOLO Livermore at James Logan SUBMITTED BY LANCE GREEN

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

COLLEGE WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Ohlone Women’s Volleyball Report

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Cougars dominate Arroyo in impressive win

September 4, 2013

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW

SUBMITTED BY JEREMY PENAFLOR James Logan - 17 Livermore – 7 James Logan Goals: Eric Lee - 3 Dustin Lam Ali Mukaled Gio Graham - 4 Ivan Miskic - 4 Jacob Nelson - 2 Matin Alamzai - 2 Livermore Goals: Max Federie - 3 Nat Kratchcull Andrew Ketten-Hoffen 3

September 5, 2013

It didn’t take long for the Newark Memorial Cougars to give other football teams notice that this would be a tough year to face them. On the first play of the game against the Arroyo Dons of San Lorenzo on September 6, the Cougars marched down the field and never looked back. The Dons spent the evening trying to catch up with Cougar speed, especially Marty Leggett, and defending against incursions into their backfield when on offense. Four turnovers by the Dons spelled the end of any hopes for an even contest. Newark’s offensive line cleared the way, allowing Cougar runners to move at will resulting in a lopsided Cougar win 64-12.

Ohlone defeats College of the Siskiyous 3-0 (25-16, 25-13, 25-23) September 6, 2013 Ohlone splits double match at Butte Ohlone defeats Lassen College, 31 (25-14, 25-18, 17-25, 26-24) Butte College defeats Ohlone, 30 (25-19, 25-16, 25-21)

Thunder closes season with championship SUBMITTED BY ANTHONY LYNCH The 8th grade Tri-City Thunder Blue Elite squad closed out the AAU season by going 3-0 to claim a hard-fought championship at the prestigious MVP Flight Labor Day Challenge. In the opening game of the tourney, the Thunder, led by Hekili Jordan’s 20 points, rallied from 13 points down to upend the powerful Olympic Club squad from San Francisco, 54-45. In the championship game, the team had to dig deep to overcome tournament host MVP Flight Black squad, 51-50. Tyler Lynch sank the game-winning free throw with three seconds left to secure the win, while Isaiah Washington paced the Thunder scorers with 16 points. Other Thunder contributors included Akshay Aravindan, Ramon Barragan, Devonte Johnson, Atmar Mundu, Richard Pabalate, & Monty San Juan.

Soccer leagues kick off 2013 season NEWARK - PHOTOS BY BILL MARSHAK UCYSL/UC Premier kicked off its 2013 Fall soccer season with a carnival style celebration Friday, September 6th at Contempo Park in Union City. 68 recreational and competitive soccer teams and approximately 850 players participated in the team parade as families and guests looked on. Newark Soccer Club hosted its 2013 soccer season opening ceremonies on Saturday, September 7th at Newark Sports Field.

UNION CITY - PHOTOS BY MICHAEL GUZMAN


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/3, 9/10, 9/17, 9/24/13 CNS-2528034#

CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City Council of the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following: Extension of Temporary Moratorium on Establishment of Vapor Lounges, Ecigarette Lounges, and Hookah Lounges The City of Union City is considering adoption of an extension of the urgency ordinance imposing a temporary moratorium that would prohibit the establishment and operation of businesses that provide “lounge” environments for e-cigarettes, vaporized nicotine, and smoked tobacco products (e.g., vapor lounges, e-cigarette lounges, and hookah lounges). The extension of the moratorium would allow Planning Division staff and the Planning Commission to study and prepare appropriate regulations for these establishments. The moratorium was adopted at a noticed public hearing on August 27, 2013 for an initial period of 45 days, and may be extended for a period of 22 months and 15 days in accordance with Government Code section 65858. Following the public hearing, the City Council may take such action on the ordinance extending the temporary moratorium as it deems appropriate CITY COUNCIL MEETING September 24, 2013 The hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. For further information, contact Carmela Campbell, Planning Manager, at (510) 675-5316. The City Council meeting packet, which includes the meeting agenda and staff report for this project, can be accessed on-line on the City’s Agendas and Minutes webpage which is located at http://www.unioncity.org/gov/agendas.htm Meeting packets are generally available on-line the Friday before the meeting. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. JOAN MALLOY Economic & Community Development Director CNS#2531765

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13690036 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Robbins, Layla Nicole for Change of Name and Gender TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Layla Nicole Robbins has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing petitioner’s name to Lanedin Nigel Robbins. The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for should not be granted. Notice of Hearing: Date: 11-15-2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri-City Voice Date: Aug. 1, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10/13 CNS-2523491# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13691185 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sarbjit Singh Multani for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sarbjit Singh Multani filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sarbjit Singh Multani to Jasvinder Singh The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 11/22/13, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Aug 9, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10/13 CNS-2521221#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481442 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Black Bird Networks, 3939 Monroe Ave., #250, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Abdul Ahad Moghul, 3939 Monroe Ave., #250, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Abdul Ahad Moghul This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 7, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1/13 CNS-2530511# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481948 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: LaborMax Staffing, 3907 Washington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda.

P.O. Box 900, Kearney Clay, MO 64060. San Gabriel Temporary Staffing Services, LLC, CA, 300 S. Platte Clay Way, Kearney, MO 94060. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/23/2008. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael S. Ingham, Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 22, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1/13 CNS-2530449# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 439234 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Oldroyd Financial, 36416 Sereno Cmn., Fremont, CA 94536, 36055 Turpin Way, Fremont, CA 94536 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on 06/04/10 in the County of Alameda. Ryan Todd Oldroyd-Trustee of the Oldroyd, Family Trust, 36416 Sereno Cmn., Fremont, CA 94536 LeeAnn Oldroyd-Trustee of the Oldroyd Family, 36416 Sereno Cmn., Fremont, CA 94536 This business was conducted by: Trust S/ Ryan Oldroyd This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 8, 2013. 9/3, 9/10, 9/17, 9/24/13 CNS-2529832# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 482112 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dandan Music Studio, 21250 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Hayward, 14675 Locust, San Leandro, CA 94579, County of Alameda Julieta Cadorniga, 14675 Locust, San Leandro, CA 94579 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 8/8/13 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Julieta Cadorniga This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 28, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/10, 9/17, 9/24, 10/1/13 CNS-2529828# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481955 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Detail Workx, 42400 Boyce Road, Unit B, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda; 2157 Santa Clara Ave., Apt. B, Alameda, CA 94501; Alameda Erwin Roy Reyes, 2157 Santa Clara Ave., Apt. B, Alameda, CA 94501 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Erwin Roy Reyes This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 23, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481562 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shokee’s 4187 Eggers Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Ashok Venkataramana, 4187 Eggers Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ashok Venkataramana This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 12, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/27, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17/13 CNS-2526342# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481174 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Revere Tattoo Studio, 214 Harder Dr., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda. Tony Ancheta, 947 Las Palmas Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95051. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/31/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tony Ancheta This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 31, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/27, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17/13 CNS-2525820# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481065 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Complete 180 Healing, 28 Silk Oak Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. P.O. Box 2829, Fremont, CA 94536. Mehul Gandhi, 28 Silk Oak Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mehul Gandhi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 29, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/27, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17/13 CNS-2525298# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481537 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Decordeaux, 37950 Fremont Blvd., Apt. 74, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Christine Kuo, 37950 Fremont Blvd., Apt. 74, Fremont, CA 94536. David Kim-Hak, 37950 Fremont Blvd., Apt. 74, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by married couple The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Christine Kuo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 12, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/27, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17/13 CNS-2525289# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481788 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magic Nails & Spa, 3909 Stevenson Blvd., #G, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Phuong Dang, 935 Thornton St., #B, San Leandro, CA 92577 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Phuong Dang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 19, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/27, 9/3, 9/10, 9/17/13 CNS-2524487#

project, can be accessed on-line on the City’s Agendas and Minutes webpage which is located at http://www.unioncity.org/gov/agendas.htm Meeting packets are generally available on-line the Friday before the meeting.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481671-72 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Eurothentic Parts, (2) www.Eurothenticparts .com, 1570 Atlantic St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; 373 Westlake Ave., Daly City, CA 94014; San Mateo Aquariuz LLC, CA, 1570 Atlantic St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jonathan Chuvessiriporn, Founder/CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 15, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10/13 CNS-2523525#

JOAN MALLOY Economic & Director 9/10/13

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481659 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fuqiau Service, 34229 Myrtle Ln., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Ying Sun, 34229 Myrtle Ln., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ying Sun This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 15, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10/13 CNS-2523498# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 481343 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Action Advertising 44, 4387 San Juan Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. James Morton Herget, 4387 San Juan Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7-30-13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ James Morton Herget, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 5, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/20, 8/27, 9/3, 9/10/13 CNS-2521897#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications: Site Development Review (SD-13-004) The property owner, Hung and Lin Leung Trust, is applying for Site Development Review, SD-13004, to rebuild a portion of a fire-damaged shopping center and upgrade the existing façade of the remaining portions of the building. The project scope also includes the installation of new trash enclosures on the rear of the building and minor parking lot upgrades to accommodate Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements.The project site is located at 31845-31887 Alvarado Blvd. (APN: 483-0076-012-02 & 483-0076-004-02), which is located in the Community Commercial (CC) Zoning District. Notice is also given that this project is considered exempt under Section 15301, Class 1, Existing Facilities, of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Planning Commission reviewed the project at its September 5, 2013 meeting and recommended approval to the City Council with some minor modifications to the draft conditions of approval. Interested persons are invited to submit written comments prior to, and may testify at, the Public Hearing. Details regarding the Public Hearing are listed below. For further information, contact Carmela Campbell, Planning Manager, at (510) 675-5316. City Council Meeting Tuesday, September 24, 2013 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. The City Council meeting packet, which includes the meeting agenda and staff report for this

City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. Community

Development

CNS-2531820# ORDINANCE NO. 777-13 AN URGENCY ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY ESTABLISHING A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF E-CIGARETTE LOUNGES, VAPOR BARS, AND HOOKAH BARS TO BECOME EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on August 27, 2013. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was read and adopted on August 27, 2013, is available on the City’s website at: http: //lf2.unioncity.org/weblink8/0/fol/112/Row1.aspx. A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on August 27, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Gacoscos, and Navarro, Vice Mayor Duncan, Mayor Dutra-Vernaci NOES: None ABSENT: Councilmember Ellis ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Carol Dutra-Vernaci CAROL DUTRA-VERNACI, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 9/10/13 CNS-2530254# ORDINANCE NO. 776-13 ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 15.85 INTO THE MUNICIPAL CODE ESTABLISHING GRADING AND EROSION CONTROL REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on August 27, 2013. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was read and adopted on August 27, 2013, is available on the City’s website at: http: //lf2.unioncity.org/weblink8/0/fol/112/Row1.aspx. A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on August 27, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Gacoscos, and Navarro, Vice Mayor Duncan, Mayor Dutra-Vernaci NOES: None ABSENT: Councilmember Ellis ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Carol Dutra-Vernaci CAROL DUTRA-VERNACI, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 9/10/13 CNS-2530249# ORDINANCE NO. 775-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY AMENDING TITLE 12 OF THE UNION CITY MUNICIPAL CODE PERTAINING TO PUBLIC PARKS, PLAZAS, PROMENADES AND PLAYGROUNDS The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on August 27, 2013. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was read and adopted on August 27, 2013, is available on the City’s website at: http: //lf2.unioncity.org/weblink8/0/fol/112/Row1.aspx. A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on August 27, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Gacoscos, and Navarro, Vice Mayor Duncan, Mayor Dutra-Vernaci NOES: None ABSENT: Councilmember Ellis ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Carol Dutra-Vernaci CAROL DUTRA-VERNACI, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 9/10/13 CNS-2530210# NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #901143 Transactions (Sales) and Use Tax Audit Services South County – Monday, September 16, 2013 at 2:00 PM, Castro Valley Library, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Chabot Room, Castro Valley, CA and North County – Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 10:00 AM, General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, Oakland, CA Response Due by 2:00 pm on October 17, 2013 County Contact: Nicholas Roberts at (510) 208-9616 or via email: nichola s.roberts@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 9/10/13 CNS-2529845#

Ohio man revives 45 mins after heart stops AP WIRE SERVICE WEST CARROLLTON, Ohio (AP), A man who was declared dead when his heart stopped beating for 45 minutes suddenly revived, said his stunned doctors, who can’t find an explanation. The man, though, credits his faith. The presumed-dead diesel mechanic, Tony Yahle, was being prepared by nurses to be seen by his family Aug. 5 when he

began to show signs of life, the doctors said. He fully awoke at the hospital five days later, they said. Yahle, a 37-year-old West Carrollton resident, has been a topic of conversation since, said his cardiologist, Dr. Raja Nazir. ``In the last 20 years, I’ve never seen anybody who we have pronounced dead ... and then for him to come back, I’ve never seen it,’’ Nazir told the Dayton Daily News (http://bit.ly/1516ptK) for a story

published Tuesday. “Actually, I’ve never heard of it.’’ Yahle said at Christ’s Church in Bellbrook that a “miracle happened’’ when he revived. He said doctors couldn’t find any defects in his heart. He said his doctors’ last guess was that it was all the result of a possible viral infection. Yahle’s teenage son, Lawrence Yahle, said he spoke to him shortly before he revived, the newspaper reported.

“I pointed at him and said, ‘Dad, you’re not going to die today,’’’ the 18-year-old said. “I stood there for a few more seconds. I was about to walk back to comfort the family, and that’s when he started showing signs of a heartbeat.’’ The teen said he ``went from hopeless to hope in an instant.’’


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 24 1236 Drake Avenue 15244 Inverness Street 1747 Lawndale Avenue 1491 Vining Drive

94579 94579 94579 94579

437,000 478,000 420,000 402,500

3 5 3 3

1081 2287 1392 1281

1951 1952 1957 1957

ADDRESS

ZIP

1080 Bockman Road 566 Empire Street 1349 Jacqueline Place 1523 Via Barrett 15972 Via Cordoba 15710 Via Esmond 15763 Via Nueva 18066 Via Rincon 16026 Via Sevilla

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

300,000 430,000 285,000 370,000 220,000 450,000 425,000 425,000 350,000

3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1031 1378 1188 1683 1024 1683 1400 1712 1024

1948 1950 1972 1955 1951 1955 1955 1944 1950

07-25-13 07-30-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-29-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES:27 Highest $: 965,000 Median $: Lowest $: 165,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

33846 14th Street 33847 7th Street 33228 9th Street 113 Aurora Plaza 2849 Blossom Court 4756 Cabello Street 35113 Clover Street 34354 Corum Court 4319 Delores Drive 4524 Delores Drive 4585 Delores Drive 33332 Depot Road 35014 Lilac Loop 2210 Mann Avenue 357 Monaco Avenue 32925 Monrovia Street 32436 Nancy Court 32421 New Harbor Way 110 Pepper Lane 35144 Perry Road 34222 Red Cedar Lane 34226 Red Cedar Lane 3019 Risdon Drive #4 2331 Royal Ann Drive 4248 Solar Circle 2135 Swan Court #2 30643 Union City Boulevard

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

391,500 420,000 450,000 250,000 558,000 635,000 590,000 208,500 515,000 502,000 550,000 545,000 580,000 475,000 565,000 675,000 580,000 965,000 725,000 492,000 830,000 870,000 296,000 400,000 400,000 255,000 165,000

4 3 3 2 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 6 4 3 5 5 2 3 4 2 1

New app for Union City residents and businesses

07-31-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-30-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 450,000 Median $: 220,000 Lowest $: 220,000 Average $: 361,667

Page 33

SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN Union City residents and businesses now have a much easier way to report graffiti or a street light out – there is an app for that. The City of Union City has unveiled a smartphone app to allow residents to conveniently communicate non-emergency requests to the City. The FREE application is called Service UC and is available in the iTunes/App store and Android market. Once the app is open, it allows the customer to take a photo of the issue – whether it’s trash on the street, faded street signs, clogged storm drain, etc. – describe the request, and the photo is sent with the exact location to the proper City department. Just point, click and submit requests and feedback directly to the City! This new technology improves our community by yielding improved information from our customers and also helps keep the City informed on issues of importance to residents and businesses. The application is easily downloaded from the Apple and Android App Stores, simply search Service UC.

515,000 514,370

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1594 966 1200 897 1781 1544 1787 1389 1907 1907 1960 1560 1378 1479 1797 1340 2814 1914 1627 2604 2604 908 1630 1584 903 714

1925 1954 1960 1985 1990 1971 1975 1974 1972 1972 2005 1978 1977 1965 1985 1974 1999 1999 1965 2000 2000 1987 1981 1974 1972 2007

07-26-13 08-01-13 07-25-13 07-29-13 07-30-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-29-13 07-25-13 07-31-13 07-31-13 07-25-13 07-26-13 07-29-13 07-25-13 07-25-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 08-01-13 07-26-13 07-30-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-31-13 07-26-13 07-29-13

Assembly approves bipartisan Smart Growth Bill SUBMITTED BY SERGIO REYES Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-East Bay) announced September 3, 2013, that SB 359 passed from the Assembly with strong bipartisan support. This bill encourages locating businesses and services closer to the day-to-day needs of local residents by supporting eligible projects in communities throughout California.

SB 359 allows a mixed-use project that includes neighborhoodserving goods, services and retail uses—primarily small businesses and local projects—in up to 25% of the total building square footage of the project to be eligible for the California Environmental Quality (CEQA) residential infill exemption, as long as the project meets all other requirements. “By helping situate day-to-day services such as stores, banks or coffee shops close to where local

residents actually live, SB 359 will help improve overall air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California,” Senator Corbett said. “Clearly, walking or biking to the corner store or coffee shop is a cleaner and greener alternative to traveling by car. I thank my legislative colleagues for supporting the smart growth principles promoted by SB 359 and am hopeful that Governor Brown will also appreciate the importance of this bill.”

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Milpitas City Council Meeting SUBMITTED BY FRANK ADDIEGO September 3, 2013 Presentations The mayor proclaimed September, 2013 National Preparedness Month, and presented certificates to members of Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service, Strategic Actions For Emergencies and other disaster preparedness groups. Recognized the 10th anniversary of Milpitas Youth Soccer League and presented certificates to members thereof. Unfinished Business Received update on the Strategic Plan Effort and authorized phases II and III of the program. The presentation focused on inter-departmental cooperation and stressed realistic planning. Mayor José Esteves: No Vice-Mayor Althea Polanski: Yes

Councilmember Debbie Indihar Giordano: Yes Councilmember Armando Gomez Jr.: No Councilmember Carmen Montano: Yes Ordinance Considered an amendment to increase maximum payout from bingo games from $250 to $500 per game. This was first suggested during the public forum of a prior meeting. The council approved this amendment unanimously. Contracts The council was to approve request from the Milpitas Chamber of Commerce for a short-term loan in the amount of $20,000 for the international BBQ at the end of the month. However, the Chamber postponed the event due to budget problems, and a lack of interest from potential Barbeque contestants. Councilmember Gomez voted to bring it back next week without the $20,000 figure.

Alameda County wins first place for best government websites SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Alameda County has been named a first-place winner in the annual rankings of the best state and local government websites. Alameda County topped the County Portal category in the nationwide Best of the Web awards contest judged by the Center for Digital Government, which cited the County’s Web offerings as “a good example of how a significant amount of information can be presented cleanly and intuitively within a main website, mobile website and mobile apps.’’ Susan S. Muranishi, Alameda County Administrator, said the award validates the County’s focus on establishing a website that addresses the public’s many needs and is user-friendly, an effort that is consistent with the County’s broader commitment to civic engagement and community outreach as well as its ongoing push to provide government services as efficiently as possible. Navigation of the website, according to Government Technology magazine, “is clean, logical and simplified,’’ while the County’s mobile website “boils down the content into just seven categories, which streamlines the experience even further.’’ Website: www.acgov.org

Mayor José Esteves: No Vice-Mayor Althea Polanski: Yes Councilmember Debbie Indihar Giordano: Yes Councilmember Armando Gomez Jr.: Yes Councilmember Carmen Montano: Yes Consent Calendar Received the August 2013 odor control report. Most were unconfirmed. Approved Christina Maria Driggers for the Arts commission. Adopted a resolution establishing fair market value of an acre of land for calculating fees for areas outside of transit area and midtown-specific plans, in the amount of $51 per square foot or $2,221,560 per acre. Approve a permit to replace a patio deck and install a patio cover, walls, a sixfoot wooden/wire fence and landscaping to a home on Pinehurst. Approved agreement with BFGC Architects Planners, Inc. in the amount of

Alameda County Fairgrounds seeks candidates for board SUBMITTED BY ANGEL MOORE The Board of Directors for the Alameda County Agricultural Fair Association announced its intent to fill two vacant positions on the Fair Board, due to recent retirements. All interested parties are required to complete and submit a formal application by Friday, October 11, 2013. Formal Applications are available by calling the CEO’s office at (925) 426-7501 or downloading it from the website: www.alamedacountyfair.com. Applicants should include information on their community involvement, as well as brief detail on how their experience and professional expertise would be of benefit to the Fair Association. Applicants must reside within the County of Alameda and be at least 18 years of age. Submissions should be addressed: Alameda County Agricultural Fair Association Attn: Nomination Committee 4501 Pleasanton Avenue Pleasanton, CA 94566 The Board of Directors is responsible for policy oversight and general operation of the 276-acre Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton. The Fairgrounds is home to more than 300 events each year, with an annual attendance in excess of 3,000,000 patrons. Since the Fair Association is a 501(c)3 Nonprofit Corporation, no compensation is provided to its Board Members. Board Members are required to attend monthly Board and Committee meetings, as well as, the Annual Alameda County Fair.

$62,000. Approved agreement with Center Stage Performing Arts Authorized City Manager to execute an agreement with PredPol Inc. for Predictive Policing Software for the Not-To-Exceed Annual price of $12,500 for a total threeyear contract value of $37,500. Mayor José Esteves: Yes Vice-Mayor Althea Polanski: Yes Councilmember Debbie Indihar Giordano: Yes Councilmember Armando Gomez Jr.: Yes Councilmember Carmen Montano: Yes Public Forum Rob Marini criticized the lawsuit Councilmember Indihar-Giordano filed against the city. A member of the public asked the city council to consider lowering the speed limit in her area.

Alameda County Leadership Academy SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Alameda County is accepting applications for its 13th Leadership Academy. This free, six session interactive forum is for people who live, work, or own a business in Alameda County. Through presentations from top County leaders and small group exercises, the Leadership Academy provides an excellent opportunity for the community to increase their knowledge of local government. Participants learn about the wide range of services provided by Alameda County, the mission and strategic visioning initiative, and the budget development process. Participants are able to practice leadership and communication skills such as public speaking and participate in public policy exercises while acquiring knowledge on how to increase their civic involvement and networking with other community members. This is also a great opportunity for County officials to hear from residents. The Academy begins October 2, 2013 and continues through March 5, 2014. Sessions are typically held the first Wednesday of each month from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at facilities located throughout the County. To graduate from the Academy, participants are required to attend at least five of the six sessions. Space is limited. Interested applicants can obtain additional information and complete an online application at www.acgov.org/adultleadership. The application deadline is September 11, 2013. Participants will be selected on a first-come, first-served basis and in an effort to have countywide representation, we may consider geographic location.


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 10, 2013

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club of Fremont We meet Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at Spin-a-Yarn Restuaruant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, 510-656-9141 Service through Fun http://the/ fremontrotaryclub.org Please come visit our club We wlecome new members

Dawn Breakers Lions Club Our Motto is: WE SERVE Meetings -1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:45am-8am El Patio Restaurant 37311 Fremont, Blvd., Fremont We welcome Men & Women with desire to serve our community 510-371-4065 for Free Brochure

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You'll find valuable information about your community and voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are non-partisan and free to the public.

Mission San Jose Chamber Meets1st & 3rd Wednesdays Dominican Sisters of MSJ Dining Room @7:30 am Find businesses and fun In Fremont’s historical Mission San Jose District info@MSJ Chamber.org or visit our website at www.MSJChamber.org

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area Want to experience a country and its culture with local hosts and promote global goodwill? Clubs in 56 countries. Upcoming local programs on Burma and Norway. www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org Call 510-794-6844 or 793-0857

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

KIWANIS CLUB OF FREMONT We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 a.m. Fremont/Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark www.kiwanisfremont.org Contact Elise Balgley at (510) 693-4524

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Take Off Pounds Sensibly An affordable, non-profit Weight loss support group Meetings Thurs. 10am Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark For more information, call Diane 510-657-4403 Come and check up out We’ll be weighting for you.

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

NARFE National Assoc of Active and Retired Federal Employees

Steps Along the Way The Journey to Healing and Wholeness from hurts and hangups using the 12 steps Wednesday nights 7pm New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.newhopefremont.org 510-739-0430

Troubled by someone’s drinking? Help is Here!

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Maitri Immigration Program

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm

Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening.

Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon

Fri SAVE Office 9 am - noon Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Senior Exercise Class

Be a part of a group of neighbors working towards the improvement of our community. Visit: groups.yahoo.com/group/SCFUC To join, send email to: SCFUC-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

MEN & Women South Hayward Wed & Fri 9:00 - 10:15 am 121 Ranchero Way Hayward (Clubhouse) Gentle Aerobics, Hand weights Stretch bands & Floor work 510-304-5492 suziejo@pacbell.net

We Need Volunteers!

Looking for a place to DISPLAY YOUR ART? All Mediums welcome Oils, Watercolors, Ceramics, Etc. Eontact the Fremont Art Assoc. 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org $40 Membership required

First United Methodist Church Music Series Free concerts the first Sunday each month, 4pm. 30 minute organ & piano recitals & occasional guest artists. Free-will offering opportunity to

Meet 4th Friday of Month Fremont Senior Center Central Park @ Noon All current or retired Federal Employees are welcome. Call Ellen 510-656-7963

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Sparkpoint FRC Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) needs volunteers. No experience necessary. Need Greeters, Translators & Ambassadors. Information Information Meetings Thurs 9/26 & Wed10/16 6-8:30pm Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2003

The “NO” List:

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Your local environmental leader! Eco-Grants available to Residents & Organizations of the Tri-City area working on Environmental projects. For info see www.tricityecology.org Office open Thursdays, 11am-2pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-783-6222

Seabreeze Community Forum of Union City

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

Meetings: Third Saturday 5:30pm in member homes Call: 510-793-8181 for location Email: contact@aachisi.com See web for Speical Events www.aachis.com We welcome all new members Celebrating 40th anniversary

Tri-City Ecology Center

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Shout out to your community

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Fremont Cribbage Club

Has gambling taken over your life or the life of someone you know? Thursday night 7:30pm Grace Lutheran Church 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Helpline (855)-222-5542 or www.gamblersanonymous.org

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society, Inc.

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:Accgr43@gmail.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Gamblers Anonymous

American Legion Auxiliary

Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups A no cost program of support for people suffering from effects of alcoholism in a friend or loved one. Call 276-2270 for meeting information email: Easyduz@gmail.com www/ncwsa.org You are not alone.

42ND HOMECRAFT FAIR Wed Oct 2 - 11am-4pm Thurs Oct 3 - 10am-6pm Fri Oct 4 - 10am-6pm Sat Oct 5 - 10am-4pm Homemade Crafts and Artist Toys, Jewelery, Holiday Stuff Gifts, Vests, Ceramics & more 1608 Via Sarita, San Lorenzo (Follow signs on Bockman Rd)

New DimensionChorus Men’s 4 Part Vocal Harmony In the “Barbershop” style Thursdays at 7pm Calvary Luther Church 12500 Via Magdelena SanLorenzo Contact: ncchorus@Yahoo.com 510-332-2489

benefit local humanitarian charities.

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont

Mariner Summer Camps 2013 Camps are offered in the sports of Girls and Boys Basketball Non Contact Football Baseball, Girls Volleyball MCHS Website for information www.moreaucatholic.org/athletics or call 510-881-4314

Olive Festival Car Show Saturday, Oct 5 Historic Mission, Fremont Mission Trail Mustangs Club Entry $25 9am-4pm All Fords Only Event Call Rick 510-493-1559 missiontrailmustangs.org

F.U.N in Recovery Saturday, August 24 9-7 Yoga, Zumba, Food, Workshops, Fellowship, Laughter! Speakers at 3:30pm, Headliner at 5:30pm Calvary Chapel 42986 Osgood Rd., Fremont Contact: easyduz@gmail.com Suggested donation$20 No one will be turned away Hosted by Al-Anon District 17

Fremont Art Association 48th FINE ART SHOW Open to all artist Various mediums Application Due 9/13 Available on-line or at Gallery Reception/Awars Sept 29th 37697 Niles Blvd. 510-792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org

First United Methodist Church Music Series 2950 Washington Blvd.,Fremont Free 30 min. Organ, Piano & Guest Artist Recitals. Generally first Sunday each month 4pm Check website for exceptions www.fremont-methodist.org Free-will offering benefits humanitarian charties

Washington High Class of "69" and Friends-Reunion and Boomer Bash Sept 27,2013 to Sept 29,2013. Contact information: whsclassof69events.com or Willow Sibert 520-237-7211 or Greg 510-659-9473.

Messiah Lutheran Church Church Service - Sunday 10 a.m. Bible Study - Sunday 9 a.m. Bring your own lunch Monthly guest speaker & other community events 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Phone: (510) 782-6727 www.MessiahHayward.org

THE FALL JEWISH HOLIDAYS ARE HERE! Rosh Hashana 9/5 and Yom Kippur 9/14 & many more services:activities this month. We welcome you to explore our inclusive Reform community. For more details: 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org 510-656-7141

12th Annual Olive Festival Saturday, Oct 5 @10-5 Behind Mission San Jose Live Music, Craft Beer, Wine Tasting Food Demos Olive Vendors, Kids Area Arts/Crafts Call for ARTISTS Limited spots available info@msjchamber.org

Craft Fair Saturday, Oct 12 - 9-4pm Hayward Veterans Bldg. 22373 Main St. Hayward Hosted by American Legion Axiliary If you would lke to take mart in this event Contact: Dorothy Castillo 510-581-1074


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank

Fremont Wood Carvers

Mission Trails Mustangs

Fremont Area Writers

Visit our friendly carving group! We help you get started. No need to buy supplies at first. There are no fees or dues. Adults of all ages are welcome. Drop in Wednesdays 7-9pm Fremont Senior Center 40204 Paseo Padre Pdw., Fremont bazlberry@hotmail.com

Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Carol at (510) 565-0619

AARP Newark Meetings

Unity of Fremont

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Drive., Newark last Monday of each month at 10:00 am. All seniors (50+) are welcome to attend Contact 510-402-8318 http://aarp-newark-californiawebs.com/

A Positive Path for Spiritual Living 10:00 am Sunday Service 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org “The Church of the Daily Word”

Fremont Repair Cafe Are you interested in Joining this group

Invigorate your spirit & volunteer. Drop ins welcome Mon - Fri. Work off your Traffic violation by giving back to the community in need. Students 14 years & older welcome. Email Erin: ewright@tri-Cityvolunteer.org

The Bookworm The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

The Buy Side: A Wall Street Trader’s Tale of Spectacular Excess by Turney Duff

Your bankbook feels fatter these days, and you sleep better at night. The market’s back up. Stocks seem healthier. Investors are trading again, and they say that everything you lost in the Great Recession is back where it belongs. That’s not entirely true, though. You lost a lot of courage over those years, and that may never return. In the meanwhile, you spend your money with fingers crossed – and if you read “The Buy Side” by Turney Duff, you’ll keep ‘em that way. Turney Duff fell into Wall Street by accident. Hoping to be a journalist, Duff moved to New York City to find a job after college. When no one would talk to him, he turned to his uncle, who used business contacts to set up job interviews at ten Wall Street firms. Duff ’s instructions: to say he wanted to be in sales. Not completely aware of the nature of the jobs for which he was interviewing, Duff loved what he saw when he toured each workplace: attractive, cool people in big rooms filled with energy and big money. He was hooked and, within days, had a job as a Private Client Services assistant at Morgan Stanley. At first, he floated between trading groups, answering phones, writing down information, ordering lunch, and trying to get along with “crazy” brokers. He worked his way up to a permanent assistant position, then to office trader. There, he learned industry shorthand, and how to do the paperwork, figure out averages within seconds, and how to utilize his networking skills. Later, at another position with

a different firm, he was allowed to trade and learned to make money. He also discovered the perks that came with the job: lavish dinners, parties, alcohol. At his next job, he learned to accept free tickets, vacations, and cocaine. Loving his single life, Duff spent his nights partying and his days making billions of dollars for his firm. Sometimes, he didn’t bother to go home except to change clothes – even when he eventually fell in love and became a father. For some thirteen years, Duff led the kind of life he’d never imagined, making the kind of money he’d only dreamed about. Then, the stock market crashed. And then, so did Duff. Much like the proverbial wreck in the road, it’s hard not to keep looking at “The Buy Side.” Throughout much of his book, author Turney Duff makes life on The Street seem fun, almost like a real-life frat movie with real-life fortunes that anyone with guts can grab. We’re invited to a party here, at which excess is almost mandatory. Throughout this wild-andwooly frenzy, though, readers will feel an undercurrent of something out-of-control and dangerous. We see the headlights. We know what’s coming. We can’t do anything but read. I was very bullish on this book, and I think that anyone with investments will like it, too. If you’ve ever traded or wondered what life on The Street is like, “The Buy Side” is a book you’ll be in the market for. c.2013, Crown Business $26.00 / $31.00 Canada 320 pages

www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

Team of Fremont residents want to start a Repair Cafe. Non-Profit organization. Want to encourage people to bring in old items and get them repaired by volunteers. Please respond to repaircafeeastbay@gmail.com

The Union City Historical Museum 3841 Smith St. Union City Open Thurs.-Sat 10am-4pm Visit our Museum. You’ll find valuable information about our community, past history and current happenings. www.unioncitymuseum.com Call Myrla 510-378-6376

Help with Math & Reading You can make a difference by helping Newark children with Math and reading. If you can give one hour a week, you can give a life-long gift of learning to a child. Contact 510-797-2703 dia aarp 4486@yahoo.com

Chamber postpones Milpitas BBQ SUBMITTED BY FRANK ADDIEGO The Milpitas Chamber of Commerce has postponed its fundraiser barbeque that was to be held at the end of September. Lately, the Chamber has had to make deep budget cuts, including the termination of CEO Carol Kassab. “We got a note from our CFO that we did not have enough money in the bank,” said Chamber president Elizabeth Ainsworth, who summed up the lack of progress on the event saying, “As of this moment, we have two contestants for the international barbeque competition… [whereas] the intention was to have a professional contest on one day and a mom and pop contest the other day.” Last week, the city council had planned to approve a $20,000 loan for the event, but City Manager Tomas Williams pulled the item from the consent calendar, recommending an interest accrual after two years if it’s not paid off. The loan, however, has been

taken out of consideration, at least until plans for the event become more concrete. “We did get a call from a couple of members of the board,” said Councilmember Debbie IndiharGiordano, “they were considering cancelling the barbeque unless some certain things happened… it was my idea to actually front the chamber with some money.” Giordano hoped that the Chamber would use the loan for things like generators in the context of the barbeque, but withdrew her support for the loan when it appeared that the event would be postponed or even cancelled. Members of city council seemed open to the idea of postponing the event until next year, possibly during late spring/early summer. “When I read this agenda item, I had some discussions and thoughts, and one of them was to request tonight that the chamber postpone the barbeque and make it part of the 60th anniversary,” said Vice Mayor Polanski, “we want to do a year-long celebration and we

thought this would fit in good.” On top of other financial difficulties the Chamber of Commerce currently faces, their landlord has raised the rent. The Chamber of Commerce plans to leave their current office and the City Council discussed allocating space in City Hall or elsewhere on city property for a lower rate. “The current space that we’re in is about 1500 square feet; we’re paying something around 90¢ per square foot,” said Thomas Valore, Chief Financial Officer for the Chamber of Commerce, “so if we get something approximating that, or something just slightly less than that at 55¢, there’s further savings that can accrue.” The city council will bring this issue up for action at the next meeting. Valore also mentioned the need for a “strong membership drive,” with which Councilmember Carmen Montano agreed, saying, “I know a lot of businesses and I’ve asked them, ‘are you a member of the chamber,’ and they say, ‘No, we’ve never been approached.’”

Newark and Fremont form paratransit partnership SUBMITTED BY DAVID ZENDER Effective September 3, the cities of Newark and Fremont embarked on a new partnership to deliver high-quality and affordable paratransit services to seniors and disabled adults. Under a contract for services agreement, the City of Fremont will provide service to Newark Paratransit riders through a contract with MV Transportation. The City of Fremont has contracted paratransit services through MV Transportation since 2004. Newark Paratransit riders will benefit from enhanced services including: • Expanded hours of operation. Rides can be scheduled Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. • Expanded service area now includes all of Fre-

mont, Union City and Newark. 888888 Expanded reservation and dispatch system. Reservation can be made anytime Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Paratransit trip vouchers are now available for purchase at the Newark Senior Center, Silliman Activity and Family Aquatic Center and Fremont Human Services. Trip voucher books are $20 and contain 8 one-way tickets ($2.50 per one-way ride). Qualified seniors and disabled riders may purchase up to 26 books per fiscal year (July 1-June 30). Funding for local paratransit programs is provided through Measure B. For further information about the Newark and Fremont paratransit programs, please contact the Fremont Paratransit Program Office at (510) 574-2053.


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September 10, 2013

THEATRE REVIEW

BY JANET GRANT PHOTOS BY TERRY SULLIVAN A good old-fashioned ghost story tenses the body in fearful anticipation, raises the hair on the back of the neck, and gets a heart to beating just a little faster and pounding a little louder. Douglas Morrisson Theatre’s presentation of “The Woman in Black” manages to employ all these ele-

ments in a chilly, spine-tingling night of pure entertainment, courtesy of the talented direction of Marilyn Langbehn. “The Woman in Black,” adapted by Stephen Mallatratt from Susan Hill’s book, is probably best known in the 2012 movieform starring Daniel Radcliffe (of Harry Potter fame). However, this play is definitely not the movie. It more faithfully resembles Hill’s book, yet with a few twists of its own. The play takes place in a small Victorian Theatre where Arthur Kripps (C. Conrad Cady) attempts to exorcise his haunted past by recounting certain tragic events from his life to a hired actor (Mark Frazier). He hopes

with the help of the actor to tell his story to an invited audience. C. Conrad Cady’s performance as Kripps is wonderful from the start, where he gingerly begins with a lackluster reading from his memoirs. But his real brilliance shines with his portrayal of every other character from his past in his desperate effort to act out his story. From the sniffling partner in his law firm, to Sam Dailey the landowner, Jerome the solicitor, the village innkeeper, and finally Keckwick, the taciturn carriage driver, Mr. Cady effectively and believably moves the play forward. Mark Frazier as The Actor, is equally effective as the perfect foil to Kripp’s shy and halting performance as he rather annoyingly and incessantly interrupts with verbosity and constructive criticism. In an interesting twist of the play within the play, The Actor portrays Kripps himself and he shows true empathy for the real Kripps as the story unfolds. And Mr. Frazier abounds in energy and flexibility. From bombastic-to-jovial-to completely terrified, he expertly runs the gamut of expression throughout the play. Both actors blended well together and with very convincing British accents of various dialects, I might add. And then there’s The Lady in Black herself, artfully rendered by Cynthia Lagodzinski. Though not a speaking part, Ms. Lagdzinski’s Woman was powerful, ominous and really, really, creepy! With amazing acting coupled with minimal props, staging, lighting, and recorded sound effects, DMT did an exceptional job of convincing the audience that low tech works even when left to an audience’s imagination. How else can you believe that a trunk and a chair can equal a carriage, or

that with a simple change of coat and hat you are a completely different character? And let’s now forget Kripp’s dog companion - Spider, the invisible dog!

And of course chills abound with a creaking rocking chair, a locked door that opens itself, a veiled graveyard, a pale visage looming everywhere, and disembodied screams….. Well deserved kudos go to Tom R. Earlywine (Technical Director and Prop Master), George F. Ledo (Set Designer), Will McCandless (Sound Designer), Matthew O’Donnell (Lighting Designer), John Lewis (Costume Designer), Terry Sullivan (Production Manager), and Susan E. Evans (Artistic Director). If an atmospheric, spooky, good oldfashioned story of tragedy, revenge, mystery and gloomy specters is your cup of tea, then DMT’s “The Woman in Black” is the play to see. “The Woman in Black” Friday, September 26 - Sunday, September 29 8 p.m. (Sunday matinee at 2 p.m.) (Saturday, Sept 21: 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.) Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22331 N. 3rd Street, Hayward (510) 881-6777 (Tuesday-Friday: 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.) www.dmtonline.org. Tickets: $10 - $29

Turning Rumi: Singing verses of love, unity and freedom

SUBMITTED BY C. VIVEK Sneha Vivek, her Guru, and seven visiting artists will be presenting a special dance recital at the Fremont Main Library on Sunday, September 22, 2013. This free event is sponsored by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce and the Fremont Main Library. The dance recital will showcase the Bharathanatyam dance form, folk dances of India, and a unique dance fusion of different Indian classical dance forms. On Saturday, September 28h, Sneha Vivek and her local team along with the visiting artists from India will be performing a spectacular Classical Dance Ballet at the SmithWick Theater in Los Altos. Sneha Vivek is the Artistic director of Natya Ninada Performing Arts Foundation which was established in Fremont to preserve and promote ancient Indian classical dance forms. Smt. Sneha has to her credit more than 250 dance recital in India and U.S and has won numerous competitive awards. Sneha Vivek has invited her Guru, “Kalashree” Vidwan Chandrashekar Navada and seven talented Bharathanatyam artists from India for a performance tour. Visiting Indian classical dance guru Vidwan Chandrashekar Navada is a classical singer, a chande instrument performer, a dance composer and director; and above all, master in two classi-

cal dance forms: Bharathanatyam and Yakshagana. His relentless work as a teacher, a choreographer and dance director, has helped revive interest in classical dance along the South Western coast of India. The Indian government conferred him the title of “Kalashree”(meaning “The Talented One”) in recognition of his lifelong contribution to the field of Bharathanatyam. The other accompanying young artists have spent their entire lives learning this extraordinary art form and have acquired master degrees in the field. Bharathantyan Dance Recital Sunday, Sep 22 2 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont (510)745-1401 www.aclibrary.org FREE EVENT Indian Classical Dance Ballet Saturday, Sep 28 5:30 p.m. SmithWick Theater, Foothill College 12345 El Monte Rd Los Altos Hills (510) 668-1381 www.Natyaninda.org/tickets

SUBMITTED BY HEIDI ONTIVEROS Meet local author Salma Arastu and listen to her discuss her new book, “Turning Rumi; Singing Verses of Love, Unity and Freedom.” In her book she features 52 poem-paintings inspired by the universal poems of Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi, a 13th century Sufi poet from Konya, Turkey. The powerful words of this great poet will start a dialogue and, hopefully, foster new understanding between Muslim and non-Muslims. No registration required. Free admission. Turning Rumi Wednesday, Sep 18 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 pm Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7974


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hears a single gunshot then notices a large hole in the front door. The bullet also goes through a bedroom wall. A round is recovered along with the shell casing. Investigation on-going. Saturday, August 31 At approximately 10:00 a.m., officers responded to a report of a robbery near the 33000 block of Great Salt Lake Drive (Lowry Park). The suspect reportedly took the victim’s puppy by force prior to fleeing the area. The dog was eventually released, but the suspect kept the leash. Officers arrived and quickly located a suspect matching the description. The male ran into his residence and officers set up containment. The man exited the home via his garage and did little communicating with officers and began exhibiting strange behavior. Officers learned from neighbors that the man suffered from a mental disorder. Armed with this information, officers were able to speak to the man in a way to safety convince him to obtain medical treatment. A friend also responded who assisted with communication. He was transported to a local hospital for a mental evaluation. The robbery report was unfounded. Sunday, September 1 At approximately 12:20 p.m. Dis-

patch received a call informing them that a buildingon Encyclopedia Circle had a possible marijuana grow. Ofc. Chan located the grow with several plants. Major Crimes responded and took over the investigation. At 5:15 p.m. officers were dispatched to a possible road rage incident near the intersection of Ardenwood Blvd. and Highway 84. Officers arrive and learn that three suspects attacked one victim. The victim was punched and struck with a bat and sustained a broken arm. The suspects fled prior to police arrival. A partial plate was given on the suspect vehicle. Sgt Miskella was able to locate the correct license plate which led officers to the34000 block of Frederick Ln. (Fremont). Three suspects (two adults and one juvenile) were identified and arrested. Monday, September 2 Officers were detailed to a residence on Holly St where a cat-burglary occurred on August 12th of this year. The suspect from that incident was confirmed to still be in custody. Tonight, an unknown male suspect removed the screen from a window outside the fenced yard. No suspects are located. Officer Paiva handled the case. Tuesday, September 3 At approximately 11:00 p.m. offi-

cers responded to a robbery that had occurred on Howe Court at approximately 10:30 p.m. The reporting party stated that he was walking near Howe and Robers when he was approached by four suspects who were driving a late model black sedan. The suspects asked the victim for directions and as he began to respond, one suspect produced a gun. As the one suspect held the victim at gunpoint they ordered him to empty his pockets. The victim complied and walked away. The suspects are described as: Suspect # 1 - Hispanic male adult, 21-22 years old, 5’8” tall, medium build, with a long brown pony tail. Last seen wearing a black shirt and dark jeans. The suspect was armed with a black semi-automatic pistol. He was sitting in the front right passenger seat of the suspect vehicle. Suspect # 2 - Hispanic male adult, 21-22 years old, 5’8” tall, medium build. Last seen wearing a black shirt and dark jeans. Suspect #3 - Possible Hispanic male adult. Suspect #4 – Possible Hispanic male adult Approx. one hour after the above noted robbery, identically described suspects robbed another male victim in the area of Guardino/Walnut. Investigated

by Ofc. Meredith & FTO Austin. Wednesday, September 4 At approximately 8:50 p.m., a female victim was battered and had her phone stolen at Walmart on Osgood Rd. by a male who fled in his vehicle. Investigation ongoing. At approximately 1:05 a.m. officers responded to an alarm activation of a possibly commercial burglary. A suspect described as possibly Hispanic or South Asian Indian, light skinned, approximately 25-35 years old, 5’9” – 6’, with a full beard, wearing a hooded sweatshirt and orange tshirt, used a river rock to smash out a window of Charter Square Liquors on the 34100 block of Fremont Blvd. Loss was California lottery tickets. Investigated by Officer Soper. Thursday, September 5 Officer Meredith and FTO Austin located and arrested a 59 year old adult male after he stole toiletry items from Safeway at 5-corners in Irvington and fled down Union St. There have been multiple calls from Safeway regarding the same man in recent days. A petty theft of beef jerky at Chapel 7-11 escalated into a robbery when the suspect punched the clerk as he fled the store. Investigated by Officer Paiva and FTO Taylor.

BART Police Log

Hayward Police Log

SUBMITTED BY BART PD

SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD PD

Fremont Station Tuesday, September 3 A victim reported the theft of his white/black/red Specialized Hardrock 21 speed mountain bike (no serial numbers) at 2:02 p.m. The victim secured his bike to the bike rack using a cable lock on 9/1/13 at 1900 hours. The victim returned on 9/2/13 at 6 a.m. hours and discovered the theft of his bike. Loss was estimated at $500. The investigating officer requested station video. Wednesday, September 4 An officer detained a man and a woman for fare evasion at 10:42 p.m. A warrant check on the man revealed an outstanding $4,000 arrest warrant out of San Jose for theft and stay away order from the woman. The man was cited for fare evasion, and placed under arrest on the warrant and for violation of a court order. A warrant check on the woman revealed an active stay away order from the man. The woman was placed under arrest for violation of a court order. A sergeant responded to the scene to approve the arrest.

Tuesday, August 27 A stabbing occurred in the Spanish Ranch Mobile Home Park on Granada Ave. at 2:19 p.m. The victim was stabbed in the leg and arm, and his injuries are non-life threatening. The victim was uncooperative with the investigation. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. A shooting occurred in the area of D St. and First St. at 9:10 p.m. An unknown suspect fired several rounds from a rifle; however there was no report of injuries or property damage. Officer investigating did find several .30 caliber shell casings in the area. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. Thursday, August 29 An armed robbery occurred at the Bank of America Bank, located at 24700 Hesperian Blvd. at 6:58 a.m. The victim had just withdrawn money from the ATM when a vehicle pulled into the parking lot. As the victim was walking back to her car, Suspect #1 blocked her path. Suspect #2 approached the victim from behind and pointed a handgun at her. Suspect #2 took the victims, wallet, cellular telephone and car keys. Suspect #1 is described as an unknown race male, 5’10”, heavy build; and wearing a black

hooded sweatshirt, black mask and black baggy pants. Suspect #2 is described as an unknown race male, 6’0”, heavy build; and wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, black ski mask, black gloves and black baggy pants. The driver of the vehicle is described as a Hispanic female, 40-50 years old, medium complexion, black hair pulled back and dark brown eyes. The suspect vehicle is a 1990’s gold sedan. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. A stabbing occurred at Fairway Park Shopping Center on Mission Blvd. at 10:33 a.m. The victim was walking near Fairway Shops when a vehicle pulled up and two suspects approached him. The two suspects claimed “LND” and began to assault the victim. During the assault the victim was stabbed in the facial area; however his injury is non-life threatening. Suspect #1 is described as a Black male, early 20’s, 6’2”, 180-190 lbs, thin build, black shoulder length dreadlocks with blonde tips and clean shaven. He was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, blue jeans and black and white shoes. Suspect #2 is described as a Black male, 18-19 years old, 5’8”, 200 lbs, chubby build and goatee. He was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, camouflage jeans and black and white Nike Airmax shoes. The suspect vehicle is described as an older model, Toyota Camry, 4-door and black or navy blue. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police

Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. Friday, August 30 A bank robbery occurred at California Bank located at 785 Southland Dr. at 3:55 p.m. The suspect gave a bank teller a demand note and simulated a handgun in her pocket. The teller gave the suspect the money from her cash box, and the suspect fled out the bank eastbound. The suspect is described as a Hispanic female, late 20’s, 5’6”, heavy build, long black hair and acne. She was wearing brown sunglasses, black hooded sweatshirt, grey sweatpants and white athletic shoes. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. A robbery occurred at Sushi Ichimoto located at 888 W. A St. at 9:18 p.m. The suspect entered the business and demanded money from the cash register while threatening to have a gun. After getting the money the suspect fled on foot in an unknown direction. The suspect is described as a White male, late 20’s, thin build; he was last seen wearing a black baseball cap, black t-shirt and faded denim shorts. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. Sunday, September 1 A strong arm robbery occurred at Hesperian Blvd. and Sueirro Ave. at 3:29 p.m. As the victim was leaving church the suspect approached her

and ripped a gold chain from her neck. The suspect fled eastbound on Sueirro Ave. and got into a red Honda Prelude. The suspect is described as a Black male, 18-20 years old, 5’6”-5’9” and 150 lbs. He was last seen wearing a red baseball hat and dark colored jacket. Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Hayward Police Department Investigations Bureau at (510) 293-7034. Thursday, September Hayward Police Department initiated a Synchronized Multi-Agency Safe Housing (SMASH) operation at an apartment complex in the 24000 block of O’Neil Ave in response to numerous community complaints and police calls for service regarding criminal activity and blight issues at the location. The operations resulted in two arrests for warrants and drug-related charges. The property owner was cited for multiple fire, health and safety code violations. The District Command Unit will work with city officials and the property owner to abate the blight, crime and unsafe living conditions. The Hayward Police Department District Command Unit and Special Response Unit would like thank the following city and law enforcement partners for their participation in this successful action: Assistant City Attorney Office, Hayward Fire Department, City of Hayward Code Enforcement, Youth & Family Service Bureau, Housing Authority and Alameda County Probation.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Friday, August 30 At approximately 5:12 p.m. family arrived home on Tule Lake Ln. to see a suspect fleeing their residence and jumping the fence in their back yard. During the subsequent search an unrelated adult male matching the description of the suspect saw the police and took off running. He fled into a home and officers forced entry into his residence. Officers with the assistance of witnesses determined he was uninvolved and he was released. The suspect was not located. Investigated by Ofc. Lobue. What originally came out as a beer run at approximately 7:10 p.m., from a business on Thornton turned into a resisting arrest case. Officers tracked the suspects to a residence on Alexander St. Upon contacting several suspects in front of the residence, one of the men, a 47 year old adult male, began challenging three officers. He decided to fight with them and was arrested for resisting arrest. Investigated by Ofc. Manrique. At 12:50 a.m. Officers were dispatched to Bosworth Ct. for a shooting into a dwelling incident. At approximately 12:40 a.m., the victim

Heroic efforts mark early morning house fire SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Officers and Firefighters are being recognized this morning for their heroic life saving efforts. Fremont Police and Fire responded to a fully engulfed house fire on the 38600 block of Farwell Drive at approximately 4:30 a.m. on Monday, September 9, 2013. Three residents were extracted from the home and transported to local hospitals in various states of condition. The rescue did not come without complications. One police officer strategically positioned his patrol vehicle under a window, allowing firefighters to utilize the roof of the car to make entry into the home. Together, first responders pulled the three residents out to safety. Two officers were transported and subsequently released from local hospitals where they were treated for smoke inhalation. Two firefighters were also transported to local hospitals where they are being treated for non-life threatening burns. We are so proud of the life saving efforts performed by the brave men and women of the Fremont Police and Fire Department this morning. Our thoughts go out to the family and we wish them well during their recovery.

Community safety actions recognized, new personnel welcomed SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Chief James Leal proudly recognized several officers and other department personnel for their contributions at a ceremony August 27, 2013. Chief Leal also expressed his appreciation for a citizen who bravely assisted in the apprehension of knife wielding suspect in a crowded coffee shop. He also publicly thanked the Alameda County Fire Department with their assistance in updating technology. Two new officers were also welcomed to the Newark Police Department. Officer Taylor ~ Medal of Valor Newark resident Steve Rodrigues Certificate of Appreciation On March 22, 2013, Officer Taylor was dispatched to the Starbucks on Thornton Avenue regarding a report of a man brandishing a weapon. The individual in question was asked to leave by an employee and he instead pulled out a knife. When Officer Taylor arrived on scene, the subject advanced toward him while still clutching the knife in his hand. Officer Taylor drew his service weapon and ordered the subject to drop his weapon, but he did not heed his commands. In a matter of seconds, Officer Taylor decided he had to physically disarm and control the suspect because there were innocent citizens in the line of fire. After a brief struggle, Officer Taylor was able to disarm the combative man, but had difficulty fully controlling him enough to place handcuffs on him until Mr. Rodrigues offered his assistance. Mr. Rodrigues’ willingness to get involved despite obvious physical risk is commendable

and possibly prevented Officer Taylor, the subject, and other bystanders from sustaining injuries during this highly volatile situation. It takes a special person to be willing to get involved, especially in a situation where physical harm is a real possibility. Officer Sandoval ~ Gold Award Officer Warren ~ Silver Award As the primary investigator, Officer Sandoval worked with the victim’s cellular service provider and directed Officer Warren to a possible location of the stolen phone. DNA and partial fingerprints recovered from the victim’s vehicle were inconclusive, so Officer Sandoval’s quick thinking as it relates to the tracking of the cell phone was instrumental in the identification of the suspect. Officer Warren was tasked with observing the suspect and he eventually made consensual contact. The suspect initially provided a false name, but Officer Warren was able to determine his true identity and discovered he was a parolee-atlarge. He also located the victim’s cell phone and the clothing the suspect wore during the commission of the crime. Both officers’ testimony at trial helped to convict the suspect of numerous charges and he was sentenced to 30 years to life in prison. Alameda County Fire Division Chief Brian Caminada ~ Certificate of Appreciation Alameda County Firefighter David Nguyen ~ Certificate of Appreciation After replacing the electrode pads in the Automated External Defibrillators housed in our patrol vehicles, we discovered that the machines’ software also needed to be updated. We were in the process of procuring the services of an outside vendor until Chief Caminada offered his department’s assistance. Your

staff, led by Firefighter David Nguyen not only updated the software on each machine, which would have been quite costly, but also relabeled the overlay instructions, inserted new batteries, and offered training to our officers. We appreciate you going above and beyond to ensure that our needs were met and that the citizens of Newark have this technology available when it is needed in the future. New Officers: Conrad Rodgers was hired as a Newark Police Officer on December 17, 2012. Conrad transferred to our department as a lateral deputy from the Sacramento Sheriff ’s Department. Conrad has spent time in Atlanta, Salinas, Washington and San Diego but was raised mostly in Sacramento. He graduated from Elk Grove High School. He has a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice/Forensic Science from Weber State University (Ogden, Utah). Conrad began his career in law enforcement as an intern with the West Valley City Police Department Forensic Unit (West Valley, Utah) and with the Sacramento Valley High Tech Crimes Task Force (Sacramento County Sheriff ’s Department). Steven Losier was hired as a Newark Police Officer on April 1, 2013. Steven was hired as an academy graduate and had his first taste of law enforcement as a Cadet with the Richmond Police Department. Steven grew up in Fremont and Brentwood. He graduated from Liberty High School in 2007. He has attended college courses at Sacramento State University and Los Medanos College. He has an AS in Fire Science. In May of 2011, Steven joined the United Sates Marine Corps. He is currently on reserve status with an infantry unit based of out of San Bruno.


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BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Though summer fun has ended, good times are far from over. The Castro Valley/Eden Area Chamber of Commerce delivers live entertainment, arts and crafts, food, wine, and children’s activities at the 41st annual “Castro Valley Fall Festival.” The two-day event features 170 booths manned by local and statewide crafts people as well as community and non-profit representatives. It is the largest annual event in Castro Valley, drawing over 60,000 people. The “Fall Festival” first began in 1972 in Castro Village and then moved to Castro Valley Boulevard. It relocated once again and is now in its third year on Norbridge Avenue, which provides more distance and space to handle the festivities. The event was established as a time for the community to come together to enjoy fall weather, listen to local music, celebrate with neighbors and enjoy diverse local talent. Wine lovers will be treated to samples of wine from Chouinard Winery and snackers can nibble on goodies from Central Valley Gourmet Nut Company; the Bend Oregon Soap Company is sure to have something to keep you clean and smelling great. Jewelry lovers will welcome the sight of Backstage Boutique and audio fanatics are sure to want to stop by Big Toe Audio. For hungry visitors, food booths and beer on tap will be available. The “Castro Valley Classic Car Show” is held in conjunction with the “Fall Festival” for one day only, Saturday, September 14 at the Castro Valley BART parking lot on Redwood Road from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Always a huge draw, the show is presented by the Hayward-Castro Valley Moose Lodge 1491 and will benefit the Automotive, Culinary, and Criminal Justice programs of Eden Area Regional Occupational Program (ROP). The Castro Valley Library is also taking part, hosting kid’s activities such as rides and bouncing houses in their parking lot (3600 Norbridge Ave.). The library will be open during most festival

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

hours, providing a great opportunity to stop by and learn about the resources they provide. Celebrate the return of fall in fun and festive style and see what treasures and discoveries await at the “Castro Valley Fall Festival.” Castro Valley Fall Festival Saturday, Sept 14 - Sunday, Sep 15 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Norbridge Avenue (between Redwood Rd. and Castro Valley Blvd.), Castro Valley (510) 537-5300 www.edenareachamber.com/fall-festival

http://castrovalleycarshow.com/ Free admission and parking Entertainment schedule: Saturday, Sept 14 Main Stage (Norbridge Ave. and Redwood Rd.): 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.: Opening Ceremonies Noon – 1:30 p.m.: Last One Picked 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Hibbity Dibbity 4 p.m. - 6 p.m.: The Bautista Band Community Stage (Castro Valley Blvd. and Norbridge Ave.): 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.: TBD 3:15 p.m. – 4 p.m.: Zumba Sunday, Sept 15 Main Stage: Noon – 1:30 p.m.: In Full Swing 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Honeydust 4 p.m. – 6 p.m.: Jay “Buckaroo” Bonet Community Stage: 10 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.: Sinatra Tribute 11 a.m. – noon: B*Dazzled Dance Studios Noon – 1p.m.: Center for the Dance 1:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.: Gravity Plus 2 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.: Castro Valley Performing Arts 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.: The Ballet Folklorico Costa de Oro 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.: TBD

September 10, 2013

Moon Festival brings community together BY SARA GIUSTI Celebrate the arrival of mid-autumn and the full moon with Citizens for Better Community’s first Moon Festival, “Fly Me to the Moon,” co-sponsored by Fremont Rotary. The Moon Festival, also known as the Mid-Autumn Festival, is celebrated on the 15th day of the eighth month of the Chinese calendar during a full moon, sometimes in September and, at times in October of the Gregorian calendar. These celebrations of harvest and the moon can be traced to the Shang Dynasty in 16th century BC. Chinese mythology also surrounds the Moon Festival; one story is of Chang’e, Chinese goddess of the moon, who flew to the moon after swallowing an elixir of immortality. Citizens for Better Community (CBC), a local Chinese-American organization, seeks to represent, bring awareness to, and build community for Chinese-Americans of the Tri-City area. CBC has promoted intrinsic connections between Chinese-American and Tri-City communities since its founding 23 years ago, when Fremont had little Chinese representation. Fremont Rotary, part of a world-wide service organization is committed to serving the community through sponsorships, donations, and community service since 1963. Traditionally, Moon Festival celebrations are private gatherings; families spend time together sharing stories, eating mooncakes and simply enjoying each other’s company. CBC and Fremont Rotary decided to broaden the celebration this year. “We wanted to have a big party for everybody and promote growing friendships,” said CBC President Ivy Wu. “People think they know about a certain culture, but you don’t really know until you share experiences,” explained Wu. “Fly Me to the Moon” promises to put a unique spin on Moon Festival celebrations. The party will be held in Fremont’s Senior Center with plenty of entertainment indoors and outside – under the moon. Don’t miss the Mooncake Sampling Contest.

These traditional Chinese pastries are tasty delicacies reserved for this special time of year. Mooncakes will be available in a variety of flavors including green tea, red bean, date, and many more. The first person to guess the sample flavors will win a prize; all participants are guaranteed to satisfy their sweet tooth. “Fly Me to the Moon” will host a Moon Walk Competition, open to personal interpretations that will provide Oohs and Aahs and guffaws. Show your best moon walk moves Michael Jackson-style, ballroom twirls á la Frank Sinatra (the party’s naming inspiration), or whatever you think a moon dance entails! All ages are welcome to participate. To enter the competition, contact CBC’s Lena Zee at lenazee@att.net. The Dream Achievers, a band of performing artists with special needs, will be performing live music as attendees enjoy a light dinner and refreshments. The Dream Achievers have been performing since 2009 as part of Friends of Children With Special Needs, a non-profit organization in Fremont and San Jose. “Fly Me to the Moon” promises to be a grand example of the best Fremont has to offer: a fun night full of dancing, good food, and camaraderie. Tickets are available at: http://thefremontrotaryclub.org/frc/ or www.cbcsfbay.org/ and must be purchased by Monday, September 16. Send reservation request with check to: CBC, Attn: Ms. Kathy Jang, P.O. Box 1, Fremont, CA 94537. Pick up purchased tickets at the door; no tickets will be sold at the door. Fly Me to the Moon Friday, Sept 20 7:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-0740 www.cbcsfbay.org/ http://thefremontrotaryclub.org/frc/ Tickets: $25 adults, children under 10 free


September 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Event honors 9/11 heros SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL EMERSON The City of Union City will be holding a special event to honor and remember heroes of September 11, 2001. Elected officials and Union City staff will be attending; surviving family members of those being honored are expected to attend as well. This event is free and open to everyone.

9/11 Memorial Event Wednesday, Sept 11 10 a.m. Flight 93 Memorial Sugar Mill Landing Park Corner of Alvarado-Niles and Dyer St., Union City www.93Memorial.com

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Advance ticket sales are $15 for adults and $10 for kids seventeen years of age and under. Tickets at the gate are $20 for adults and $12 for children.

For those who want to get a jump on the fun, famed Blues guitarist Deborah Coleman and local bluesman Chris Cobb and his band will perform Friday Night at the Kickoff Party at the Crown Plaza Hotel (32083 Alvarado-Niles Rd.) in Union City. Showtime is 8 p.m. and the $15 admission includes a buffet.

Taste of Union City Food Blues & World Music Festival Saturday, Sep 14 Gates open at 9 a.m. Kennedy Park 1333 Decoto Rd, Union City (510) 487-5692 www.tasteofunioncity.com

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September 10, 2013

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SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS Using objects both commonplace and sometimes recycled, each artist participating in Olive Hyde Art Gallery’s “Some Assembly Required” assembles art that is unique and often fun. They bring the influences of their youth and life experiences in combination with the materials at hand to create art which tells their story to the viewer. The exhibit features the 3-D work of five Bay Area artists and runs from Friday, September 13 through Saturday, October 12. Influenced by the rebellious years of the ‘60s, Peter Langenbach of Fremont creates work which relates a social narrative. On his website Langenbach states, “Given the absurdity of the

world we live in, I have taken on as my singular task that of providing a bit of irreverence. I expect that when you view my pieces you might think that this guy has a pretty self-indulgent sense of humor.” Berkeley’s Katie McCann is influenced by her studies at the London College of Fashion as she creates collage art. Piecing her work together like a tiny jigsaw puzzle, McCann creates paper creatures made up of insects, birds, shells, bones, plants, and fashion images. She says her figures are “part science fiction and part fairy story.” Karen Balos cherishes the beauty and history in everyday

materials. In her work she “seeks to view the common with an uncommon eye.” For this exhibit Balos will be showing art quilts and torsos. Created with transparent packing tape, she calls these torsos “Transparent Selves.” They are cast from her family and friends with what Balos considers a variety of “normal” rather than “model” shapes. Designing her own Halloween costumes at an early age has led Shawn Rowland to costuming whimsical and colorful assemblage figures. Her current series “Molding Lives” was inspired by the trim shapes found in moldings of older homes and reused in her figures.

Also exhibiting will be artist Zona Sage. In addition to “Some Assembly Required” there will also be an exhibit area dedicated to the recent Serra Center Art Project. Featured will be Best of Show: “Family” by Laura Santos, Second Place: “Somewhere Under the Rainbow” by Todd Lorenzo, Third Place: “Hello Dear Friend” by Linda Hollowman, and work by Merit Award winners Cary Bell, Gary Heur, and Rachel Bowker. “Some Assemble Required” opens with a reception from 7

p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, September 13. Some Assembly Required Friday, Sept 13 – Saturday, Oct 12 Thursday – Sunday: noon - 5 p.m. Opening reception Friday, Sept 13 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/

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too pale, too dark, too wounded’ are some of the reasons we have witnessed,” says Boldly Me Founder Alanna Powell. “So we created this exciting event where everyone can be free to swim, sunbathe, watch entertainers, dance, and just enjoy the sun in a loving, accepting environment. Fear is the greatest issue: fear of judgment, rejection, and ridicule. Boldly Me wants to wipe that fear out of people’s minds. We invite everyone to join us. If finances are an issue, please tell us so we can help you attend the event.” Enjoy a picnic lunch, watch entertainers, play in sparkling pools, drop down awesome water slides, play fun games, or simply bask in the sun at this lively, fun-filled water celebration! The amazing entertainers include fire

twirler Kurtis Hubbell, our baton twirling team led by Karla Hubbell, Boldly Broadway Show led by Molly Rosen and Tracy Travis, singer Taylor Kennedy accompanied by guitarist/drummer Josh Kennedy, Janice Sung and hula dancers from the City of Fremont Parks and Recreation Dance Program.

Event sponsors include the Boldly Me Board of Directors; Fremont Bank Foundation; Fremont Flowers; Washington Hospital; Kymberlee Bateni of Realty Experts; and Bernard, Balgley & Bonaccorsi, LLP. Jewelry designers from Gold N Time have designed beautiful custom jewelry to help raise awareness and build confidence for the people we serve. Funds raised from the “Water Gala” will help pay for our School Projects Program. Starting this fall, we will teach the Boldly Me Self Esteem & Communication Class to K-12 classes throughout the Bay Area including Fremont, Newark, Union City, Pleasanton, Livermore, and Santa Clara. These funds are critical to execute this program that will help students and their families learn how to positively assert themselves in non-violent ways and how to deal with disappointment, fear, and anger. Simply attending this event or making a donation of time, talent, or money will help us bring safety to our schools. Boldly Me partners with other nonprofit organizations including the Downs Syndrome Connection, Drivers For Sur-

vivors, Samuel Merritt University, and Lara Calvert York of the Fremont Education Foundation. If you are interested in volunteering, partnering, or coming to any of our events and classes, please contact us. Fall classes include baton twirling with self esteem and communication, ballet and tumbling, theater and voice, staff twirling for boys, basketball, drawing and art, relaxation and massage, and hip hop dancing. Tickets for the “Water Gala” include a “hot off the grill” meal, admission to the park, and the Boldly Me experience. Adult tickets are $35.99 per person and $30.99 for children (3 - 10 years old). Tickets may be purchased in advance or at the door. For more information, call (408) 7689257 or go to www.boldlyme.org. Water Gala Saturday, Sept 14 11 a.m. to closing Aqua Adventure Water Park 40500 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (408) 768-9257 http://www.boldlyme.org/ Tickets: Adults $35.99, children $30.99


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