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Fremont student honored with President’s Environmental Youth Award

Experience the land of the hobbits at New Zealand culture event

Butterflies at Oliveira

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

April 23, 2013

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 12 No. 17

delicious snacks such as Kettle Korn, hot dogs, and beverages. The Kiwanis Club of Fremont organizes the race each year, providing assistance to participating non-profit organizations, inclusion of sponsors, event marketing and publicity, data management, and accounting for each nonprofit selling organization. In 2012, the event raised approximately $23,000 for participating organizations, assisting programs serving our community. Local groups that have joined the fun and raised critical funds for their operations include: Newark

BY STEVE TAYLOR PHOTOS BY WILLIAM MANCEBO

H

ere’s how you win the car of your dreams or one of a dozen other great prizes: pile the kids in the car and drive out to the

19th annual Ducks for Bucks Benefit Race Saturday, April 27 at Lake Elizabeth. Pay $5 and pick the fastest yellow plastic rubber duckie out of 10,000 racing webfooted speed demons and watch it float to victory. The Duck Race is intended to be great fun for participants as well as a chance to raise money

SUBMITTED BY GREG MAGEE Engines are encouraged to rev up and prepare for the no speed limit Tri-Cities Motor Rally at NewPark Mall on Saturday, May 4. Presented by the Newark Chamber of Commerce (www.newark-chamber.com) and Team District 10 (www.teamd10.com), this spring event is free to the public, filled with fun for the whole family. Special live musical guests Elona Santiago and Hwy 4A will be supplemented by a DJ spinning great music. Festivities include great food, prizes and a 50/50 Raffle, Mobile Dyno Testing will be available and a Kid Zone including face “Striping.” An Automotive Vendor Showcase Alley promises to provide items for every auto aficionado. All motor vehicles are welcome to compete and will be judged in categories including: Best Restoration / Wildest Custom / Best Import / Pure Muscle / Trick Truck / Best Female Ride / Best Team award.

In previous years, TGIF Auto Body has partnered with Mission Valley ROP on a Budget Restoration project. Again this year, the team will be participating by taking a “plain jane” 1996 BMW 318i and turning it into one clean street machine. The project finale will be presented at the Automotive Vendor Alley. Visit with students, instructors and TGIF owners – Cathy and Dan Mello - and TGIF personnel to see the result!

Tri-Cities Motor Rally Saturday, May 4 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. NewPark Mall 2086 Newpark Mall,(I-880 at Mowry Ave exit) www.newark-chamber.com Greg atnospeedlimit55@yahoo.com. Vehicle entry registration: $25 Pre-registration entries received by April 20th get a free event t-shirt.

Citizens for Better Community honor local warriors

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR Since 1992, Citizens for Better Community (CBC) has been serving the Asian American community in the East Bay. Located in Fremont, CBC is dedicated to improving the lives of Bay Area citizens and aiding other multi-cultural and non-profit organizations. Their vision is to be a “model of excellence in community service by facilitation and motivating Chinese American involvement in the community.”

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Community Bulletin Board . . 32

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

INDEX

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for many local nonprofit groups. Twenty organizations selling ducky entries and 11 sponsors have joined forces to offer many great race prizes including cash and a chance to win a new car from Fremont Automall; and best of all, the race is only part of the fun planned. Comedian Brandon Sass is once again the Race Marshal and master of ceremonies, which includes a free children’s carnival with games and a bounce house. Food concessions include

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Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

Portion Control

Washington Hospital Seminar Highlights the Benefits of Meal Planning

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ou are what you eat. While most of us have heard that before, it’s particularly true for people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, you know that everything you eat affects your blood sugar (glucose) level. But what if you are a vegetarian? How does eating a vegetarian diet affect diabetes? Is it safe? “There are a lot of health benefits associated with a vegetarian diet,” said Anna Mazzei, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Washington Hospital. “There is no reason people with diabetes can’t eat a vegetarian diet with proper meal planning.” She will talk about ways people with diabetes can ensure that they get enough nutrients while keeping blood glucose levels under control when she presents “Meal Planning: Peaks and Pitfalls of a Vegetarian Diet” on Thursday, May 2, from 7 to 8 p.m. The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series and will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use it properly. Insulin is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and

other food into energy. When this process doesn’t work properly, glucose levels in the blood can get too high.

Vegan or Vegetarian? Mazzei will first explain the different degrees of vegetarianism. Vegans don’t eat any animal products. That means they don’t eat meat, fish, seafood, poultry, dairy products, or eggs. “I don’t see a lot of people with diabetes who are vegans,” Mazzei said. “It is possible, but proper meal planning can be more of a challenge for vegans.” The second level of vegetarianism is the lacto-vegetarian. Dairy products are the only animal products they will eat, Mazzei explained. Next is the lacto-ovo vegetarian, who will eat both dairy products and eggs. “Some people who call themselves vegetarians will also eat fish or seafood,” she added. “It’s much easier to get sufficient levels of protein if you eat dairy, eggs, fish, or seafood.” Mazzei will talk about some of the benefits of eating a plant-based diet. For example, fruits and vegetables contain an abundance of phytochemicals like carotenoids and flavonoids that help to reduce the risk for cancer. They are also packed with vitamins and minerals.

“Vegetarians tend to get a higher percentage of their calories from carbs,” she added. “It’s imperative that you control portion sizes to help control blood sugar.” Most carbohydrates come from plant-based foods such as grains – rice, barley, oats, and wheat – as well as fruits and vegetables, she explained. In addition, dairy products such as milk and yogurt are also high in carbs. “You have to make good choices, which is why meal planning is so important,” Mazzei said. “Beans are probably the most nutritious high-carb food because they contain protein, fiber, B vitamins, and iron. Even though they are high in carbohydrates, they don’t spike blood sugar as much as other starchy foods like white rice or potatoes. Beans have a low glycemic index.” She said proper meal planning is imAnna Mazzei, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes portant not only for keeping blood glueducator at Washington Hospital, will talk about ways people with diabetes can ensure that they get enough nutri- cose under control, but also to ensure that ents while keeping blood glucose levels under control you get all the nutrients you need, includwhen she presents “Meal Planning: Peaks and Pitfalls of a ing protein. That is more difficult for vegVegetarian Diet” on Thursday, May 2, from 7 to 8 p.m. The ans because protein sources that aren’t seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series and will be held at the animal products are limited. It’s much easConrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Av- ier for vegetarians who eat dairy products, enue (Washington West), in Fremont. fish, or seafood, which are good sources of protein and other nutrients. Plant-based diets are naturally higher in “You really need to eat a variety of fiber and lower in saturated fat and cholesgrains, fruits, and vegetables to get a wide terol, she added. A high-fiber diet can help range of nutrients,” Mazzei added. “Foods you feel fuller longer and may help you eat that are fortified with vitamins and minerless overall. In addition, when fiber intake als can also help. I’ll show some examples is greater than 50 grams per day, it may of meals that provide a wide range of nuhelp to lower blood glucose levels, accordtrients. Being a vegetarian is doable and ing to the American Diabetes Association. even healthy if you have diabetes, it just Mazzei will also talk about some of the takes planning.” pitfalls of being a vegetarian. The number To learn more about Diabetes Matters one concern is that plant-based diets are and other diabetes programs at Washington often high in carbohydrates, which raise Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes. blood glucose levels, she said.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

4/23/13

4/24/13

4/25/13

4/26/13

4/27/13

4/28/13

4/29/13

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Living Well with Diabetes: Hip Pain in the Young and Overcoming Challenges Middle-Aged Adult

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Women's Health Conference: Food and Mood: How One Can Affect the Other

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

Wound Care Update Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Measles Resurgence

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types? Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Disaster Preparedness

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology

Center

Shingles

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The PreSchool Years Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Kidney Transplants

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat Keys to Healthy Eyes

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

Colorectal Cancer: Healthy Diet To Prevent Cancer

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The PreSchool Years

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

YInfluenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 10th, 2013

Your Concerns InHealth: A Good Night's Sleep

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Update: What's New? 2013

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Alzheimer's Disease Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease


April 23, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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National Healthcare Volunteer Week Recognizes Service

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ou may not realize it, but volunteers play a key role in supporting the staff at Washington Hospital. They can be found in nearly every corner of the hospital helping to ensure that patients’ needs are met, comforting loved ones, greeting visitors, cuddling babies, and much more.

their families, whether it’s providing comfort and support or helping them navigate hospital services. They are flexible and willing to assist wherever they are needed. We couldn’t do it without them.” Washington Hospital has more than 600 volunteers, including adults as well as high school and college students, who

Volunteers play a key role at Washington Hospital. They can be found in nearly every corner of the hospital helping to ensure that patients’ needs are met, providing comfort, greeting visitors, cuddling babies, and much more.

National Volunteer Week (April 21-27) is a special opportunity to honor volunteers who devote their time, energy and talent to serving the community.Washington Hospital is fortunate to have a diverse group of more than 600 dedicated people who volunteer their time throughout the year. To learn more about volunteering at Washington Hospital, visit whhs.com/volunteer or call (510) 791-3465.

Washington Hospital volunteers are being recognized for their commitment and dedication this week during National Healthcare Volunteer Week. About 200 hospital volunteers are expected to attend a celebration luncheon on Friday at the Marriott in Fremont. “Volunteers help out in so many ways,” said Denise Stones, assistant director of Volunteer Services at Washington Hospital. “They are there for the patients and

give their time to help the hospital provide the best care possible. Washington Hospital Service League members donated more than 45,000 hours of service alone last year. In addition to Service League volunteers, who perform a wide range of tasks, there are a number of other volunteer positions, including the following. • Chaplains, who represent several denominations and are on call 24 hours a

Today, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), most diseases in the U.S. are at record low levels, indicating that vaccines are doing their job of providing protection. This is good news, but it doesn’t mean parents no longer need to follow the recommended schedule of vaccines for children, including infants. “Vaccines protect children against serious and even deadly disease,” the HHS states on its Web site. Vaccinations are designed to prevent a wide range of diseases, including but not limited to whooping cough, tetanus, polio, chickenpox, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and cervical cancer, as well as various forms of meningitis, pneumonia and some respiratory illnesses. continued on page 10

Swetha Kowsik, M.D., a pediatrician with Washington Township Medical Foundation, recommends babies get the entire regimen of recommended vaccinations without skipping doses because infants don’t have the immune systems to fight off infections the way healthy adults often can. Visit www.mywtmf.com to learn more about Washington Township Medical Foundation pediatrics.

day, spend their volunteer time offering spiritual comfort to patients, families, friends, and staff. • Washington Hospital Employee Association Board members are hospital employees who organize special events for fellow employees and their families. They also offer scholarships to the children of employees, and have donated money to hospital departments for items ranging from wheelchairs to teddy bears. • Foundation volunteers raise funds to sup-

port the healthcare system. Gifts to the foundation have totaled more than $6 million toward healthcare services and equipment. • Mended Hearts volunteers are specially trained to talk with heart disease patients who are undergoing heart surgery or receiving angioplasty, as well as their families, friends, and caregivers. “It’s really a privilege to be a volunteer,” said Jeannie Yee, president of the Service League. “We share moments with the patients and their loved ones and our goal is to make them good moments. We try to improve the overall experience for patients and their families.” Yee has been volunteering at Washington Hospital for nearly 10 years. She got involved after attending an information session with her then 15-year-old daughter who was interested in volunteering. “I was just going to drop her off and then I ended up sitting through the entire session,” Yee said. “I couldn’t wait to get started.” She wanted to be a baby cuddler, but there weren’t any openings in the program at the time. So she started taking photos of newborns and has been doing it every Thursday for the past 10 years. A few years after she started, there was an opening in the baby cuddling program, and now she does that every Tuesday as well. “I get my baby fix,” said Yee, whose two children are now adults. “Both of my kids were born at Washington Hospital, so that makes it special.” continued on page 5


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ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Since mid-March, students of Oliveira Elementary School in Fremont have been bringing pennies and coins to school for “Pennies for Patients” to raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. All of their hard work is dedicated to the memory of nine-year-old Lynette Santos, a beloved student, who had passed away October 18, 2012, after several brave years fighting Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). Students are also honoring another former student, Steven Irvin, Oliveira Class of 2003, currently in remission from the disease. To thank and celebrate her students, Principal Linda Anderson planned a special surprise for the school’s students. On the afternoon of April 11, the entire school gathered on a grassy field near the play-

ground. Principal Anderson and a staff member addressed the students and dramatically unfurled a long scroll, to announce the grand total of $3,742.89 raised for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. A teacher from each classroom was positioned on the play structure, and when given the signal by Anderson, released the 24 butterflies into the air as a remembrance of Lynette who had loved butterflies. The sight of the fluttering butterflies in flight enthralled the youngsters who stood and watched, delighting in this spectacle of nature. Anderson told the students, “You should be so proud of yourselves, for giving back and doing so much. Education is critical to learning, to be able to think about and do these things. Work as hard as you can and soar, just like these butterflies.” As an additional tribute, a memorial bench is being installed, a gift from Principal Anderson to the Oliveira Staff. The plaque, with a picture of a butterfly, states, “In Memory of Lynette A Santos Always in Our Hearts.”

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April 23, 2013 continued from page 3

Something for Everybody Yee said there is literally something for everybody when it comes to volunteering at Washington Hospital because there is such a wide range of volunteer positions available. “Volunteers receive specialized training depending on what they are going to do,” she added. “They are also required to shadow someone before they work on their own. Volunteers play an important role in patient care, so it’s critical that they receive proper training.” According to Yee, there are more than 30 different areas of the hospital where volunteers provide support. For example, volunteers staff the lobby desk at the main hospital and at Washington West, where they greet patients and visitors when they arrive. They also help to discharge patients when they leave, wheeling them out to the curb where they can be picked up by friends or family. Volunteers provide emotional support to patients and their loved ones in the emergency room and those in the critical care unit. They serve as surgery liaisons, keeping patients’ family and friends updated during a surgical procedure. They make deliveries throughout the hospital and help to feed

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

patients. They cuddle special care babies and take photos of newborns. They coach joint replacement patients following surgery. Volunteers also staff the gift shop and library. And the list goes on. In addition to their regular assignments, volunteers also support a number of special projects like lectures, seminars, classes, and health screenings as well as community events like Think Pink. Every year the Service League also raises money to help fund equipment and other special projects. Last year the Service League donated $55,000 to upgrade the security system at Washington Hospital. The group also provided $10,000 to support the successful Measure Z campaign, a bond measure passed last November that will help Washington Hospital expand its emergency services and trauma care. “We do what we can to support the hospital,” Yee said. “We are very much appreciated by the hospital for our contributions, so it feels good. We need more adults who are willing to share their time and talent. I know there are a lot of baby boomers out there who are looking for ways to get involved. I hope they consider volunteering at Washington Hospital. It’s been a great experience for me.” Anyone interested in volunteering at Washington Hospital must be at least 16 years old and attend an information session, held each month. For more information about volunteer opportunities and dates and times for upcoming information sessions, visit www.whhs.com/volunteer/be-a-volunteer or call (510) 791-3465.

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Girls Softball League, Fremont American Little League, Ohlone Human Society, Fremont Symphony Guild, and the Tri-City Ecology Center. Along with the Kiwanis Club of Fremont, Fremont Auto Mall has been a major contributor to the event. Additional sponsors include Tereo Chiropractic and Fremont Bank. Ducks will be swimming for the “Great” Grand prize: a car of your choice, from any dealer in the Fremont Auto Mall (value of up to $30,000). A number for every 500 duck race entries will be preselected. If the first place winning duck entry number matches one of the preselected numbers, the Great Grand Prize is awarded. Otherwise, the first place duck entry number will win the Grand Prize of $1,500… not bad for a day at the lake.

First place is a year of massages at Tereo Chiropractic in Newark with a value of about $1,900. Eight other quality prizes ranging from a trip for four to Disneyland to a ride on the Napa Valley wine train await some lucky duck owners… and the always fashionable prize of cash - $500. You can buy tickets on race day for the opportunity to win one of 20 or more gift baskets. Learn more about the event at http://www.ducks4bucks.org/. Ducks for Bucks Saturday, Apr 27 11 a.m. Family Carnival 1 p.m. Race Time Lake Elizabeth Boat Ramp 40000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont www.ducks4bucks.org

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SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE The entire community is invited to take part in an unprecedented global health and healing event that will unfold across the globe on Saturday, April 27. Beginning in New Zealand, this event will spread, time zone by time zone, across

the globe through 60 countries and across six continents. Join the healing wave and gather at Ohlone College’s Newark Center for Health Sciences and Technology as we host our first Annual World Tai Chi and Qigong Day.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The event, free and open to the public, aims to communicate the health benefits of practicing Tai Chi and Qigong. Tai Chi and Qigong are health technologies, which have evolved over several thousand years of research in China, and are now growing in popularity worldwide. They are used in hospitals, businesses, schools, and numerous other institutions. Tai Chi and Qigong have been shown in research to reduce anxiety, depression, and chronic pain conditions. They boost the immune system, improve respiratory function, burn calories, dramatically improve balance, and provide cardiovascular benefit. Renowned martial artist, 2010 Tai Chi Master of the Year, and Ohlone College instructor Sifu May Chen heads Ohlone’s World Tai Chi and Qigong Day. The event will begin promptly at 10 a.m. with a warm up and popular Tai Chi and Qigong routines. This will be followed by an open house with a performance by Sifu Yuan Long, a 35th Generation Shaolin Warrior Monk, Exemplary Martial Artist, and over 40 of his students from the Dragon Rhythm Kung Fu School in Fremont. Later in the day, special guest and multi-time World Class Martial Arts Champion, a Secular Shaolin Disciple, Sifu Yan Fei will demonstrate free hand and weapons, and lead a session of Kung Fu for Adults.

April 23, 2013

Members of this year’s newly formed Ohlone College Tai Chi Qigong Club will assist Sifu May Chen at the event. Even though the club is new, Chen’s students have been participating in competitions and local events such as KungFuMagazine.com’s Martial Arts Championship, and the UC Berkeley Martial Arts Tournament (CMAT). Most recently the students received a gold medal as a group for the Five Animal Exercise in 2012 and will perform their award winning routine at the event. Lucy Olivia, President and founder of Ohlone’s Tai Chi Qigong Club, became interested in Tai Chi after attending one of Ohlone’s Tai Chi Qigong open houses in 2010. “Tai Chi has changed me physically, emotionally and spiritually… Tai Chi is truly the ultimate practice.” Lucy took Gold prize in 2012 last in KungFuMagazine.com’s Martial Arts Championship in Beginning Level Tai Chi. She will be transferring from Ohlone to Oregon State University in the Fall. Ohlone’s Tai Chi and Qigong event is sponsored by Ohlone College, KungFuMagazine.com, Tigerclaw.com, Arthritis Foundation, and Ohlone’s Tai Chi Qigong Club. For a complete schedule of performances and sessions visit www.ohlone.edu/go/globalwellness or contact Sifu May Chen at (510) 657-5893.

Following the variety of demonstrations, participants will have the opportunity to take part in 30-minute “learn & practice” sessions to try Tai Chi and Qigong for themselves. These sessions include: Sports Qigong, King Fu for Adults, Chen Style Tai Chi, Basic Staff Forms, and health Qigong styles, including Five Animal Exercises, Da Wu, and Eight Section Brocade.

World Tai Chi & Qigong Day Saturday, April 27 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry Street, Newark (510) 657-5893 www.ohlone.edu/go/globalwellness Free ($2 parking fee enforced after 11 a.m.)


April 23, 2013

One Child holds e-auction SUBMITTED BY BERNIE DUTRA OneChild (‘Clothing the Spirit’) is holding an email auction for one year’s service of Direct TV! This package retails for approximately $1300 and is an ALL INCLUSIVE package (installation, satellite dish, up to four receivers, DVR, one year of programming package, connection kit)… this includes complimentary monthly fee for one year. (The recipient must be a new residential customer—although this certificate is transferrable). This package makes a great wedding, graduation, Final Four, Father’s Day or birthday gift! YOU MUST ACT FAST! This service must be activated by JUNE 1, 2013 (your one year contract begins upon activation!). The bidding will close on April 30, 2013. Opening bid begins at $400. Please respond to Barbara at bbjhasfashions@comcast.net (510-657-0573) with your name, phone, email address, and bid amount. You will be contacted on May 1 to be advised if you have won this gift. Payment information will be obtained at that time. OneChild is a non-profit 501(c) (3) charitable organization (Federal Tax ID #94-3387553) which is committed to providing underprivileged children with the new clothes and school supplies they need to be successful in school. For more information, please visit our website at www.onechildca.org. THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

Development opportunity SUBMITTED BY CHRIS GILLIS The City of Hayward and the California Department of Transportation (CalTrans) are pleased to announce that they are seeking to discuss the development of two opportunity sites along Mission Boulevard, one of the East Bay’s major arterials, near the CSU East Bay Campus. The two sites, which can be developed together or independently, present a unique opportunity for innovative density, open space and reshaping neighborhood character. At a main entry point to CSU East Bay, these sites offer the right developer a chance to kick start a university district at the foot of the campus while also benefiting from the demographics of surrounding neighborhoods that would support a thriving commercial center. These properties (approximately 10 and 2 acres) have a proposed future zoning as part of a formbased code that provides for a wide variety of uses

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Get Help Applying for Citizenship LINETTE ESCOBAR

The International Institute of the Bay Area (IIBA) is partnering with the Fremont Family Resource Center (FRC) for their second annual Citizenship Day April 27th as part of the East Bay Naturalization Collaborative. At this event, people eligible for citizenship can receive assistance in filling out the naturalization application and fee waivers, if necessary. Translators will be available to assist with language capacity in Spanish, Chinese and Farsi. Last year over 200 people attended, so interested parties should call and pre-register at (510) 451-2846 ext. 315. When you call, you will be advised about what documents to bring. Additionally, participants must bring a $680 application fee (if 75 years or older, the fee is $595). Fees can be paid by check or money order, payable to ”Department of Homeland Security.” There are many benefits to becoming a citizen including the opportunity to apply to sponsor parents and siblings. U.S. Citizens have the right to vote which is a sure way to make your voice heard. The International Institute of the Bay Area has a 94-year history of providing services to immigrants and wants to make sure Tri-City residents receive trustworthy and low-cost legal advice. Countless immigrants have been exploited by those who claim to be immigration “experts” but who are actually scam artists interested in one thing; their own pockets. IIBA provides critical and accurate information about immigrant rights and responsibilities, and represents immigrants in applications for legal status. It helps people navigate the potentially complex world of immigration law. IIBA currently has offices in five counties in the Bay Area. They are partnering with the Family Resource Center to bring legal services to Fremont. Legal clinics are held every fourth Wednesday of the month from 1-4 p.m. Registration begins at 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome for a free overview presentation on immigration from 1:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. For those interested in individual legal consultations with licensed attorneys and accredited representatives, the cost is $30. To learn more about IIBA legal services or to register for citizenship day, please call (510) 451-2846 ext. 315.

and a streamlined entitlement process - ideal for innovative mixed-use and commercial development. Census tracts near the campus have twice the average household income as the rest of the City. While an appraisal has been completed, the City and Caltrans have not set a price for the sites, nor a bidding procedure. Currently, they are eager to discuss innovative concepts with talented and experienced developers. More information and a full information packet is available on the City’s website at http://bit.ly/hayreq2 or through Kelly McAdoo, Assistant City Manager, City of Hayward at (510) 583-4305 or Kelly.McAdoo@hayward-ca.gov

CHANGING INSURANCE THINK MELLO

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BART Police seek public’s help SUBMITTED BY LES MENSINGER BART Police has released a sketch of the suspect in the March 14th fatal Richmond Station shooting and is seeking the public’s help in identifying the suspect and his whereabouts. At around 6:04 pm, a shooting took place in front of the Transit Office at the Richmond BART station and continued to the top of the stairway leading into the BART station killing 34-year-old Raymond Harris, of San Pablo. The sketch of the suspect was provided by a witness. The shooter was described as a Black male in his early-mid 20’s, about six feet tall with a slender build, medium to dark complexion, wearing dark clothing with possible tan shirt underneath. The suspect may have also been wearing a gray baseball cap with “Buffalo Bills” printed on it written in red/blue. BART police also released surveillance images of

a woman who arrived at the station with the suspect, walked away momentarily right before the shooting occurred, but then returned after the victim was shot and fled on foot with the suspect. She is described as a Black female, about 5 feet 6 inches with a slender build, medium to dark complexion, with long hair past her shoulders with bangs, and wearing a gray long-sleeved top, blue jeans and carrying a large red or pink handbag. “Our top priority is safety in and around our system,” said BART Police Chief Kenton Rainey. “We need the public’s help in identifying the suspect and his associate to bring justice to the victim’s family and the community. This was a brazen crime, committed during the rush hour commute and we are committed to following up on every lead to solve this case and help keep the community safe.” The public is asked to call BART Police with any information about this shooting at 510-464-7000.

‘Hit’ men arrested SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On February 11, 2013, shortly after 9:00 a.m. a female victim was brutally attacked in front of her own residence by two male suspects (ad-

dress on Greenhills Way in Fremont, CA). The suspects viciously attacked the victim about her face causing multiple major lacerations. The victim was later transported to a local trauma center where she received numerous stiches to both side of her cheeks, neck and ears. The suspects fled prior to police arrival. However a citizen witness saw a male running away from the residence, quickly enter into a vehicle and drive off. The case was actively investigated by the Fremont Police Department CAP/Robbery Unit (Case Agent Det. Magana) and the Fremont Police Department Intelligence Unit. Investigative leads lead to the identification of the suspect vehicle which belonged to one of the

two suspects (Morris Kurtz; 52 years; San Jose resident). Through surveillance and other investigative steps the second suspect was identified as Donald Harbaugh (54 years old; San Jose resident). Harbaugh was found to have a prior felony conviction for ‘Kidnapping for Ransom’, had served 20+ years in Prison behind that case and was currently out on parole for that case. Other evidence (including mobile communications, witness statements and other evidence) also linked suspect Ricardo Rivera (27 years old; Sunnyvale resident) to the attack as one of the ‘organizers’ of the attack. Further, investigators were able to determine that the victim’s ex-husband (Rakesh Paul Singh; 54 years old; Milpitas resident) had communicated with the above three suspects and ordered the attack on his ex-wife in an attempt to “deface” her. On April 3, 2013 search and arrest warrants were served at three different locations simultaneously (residences in the cities of Milpitas, San Jose and Sunnyvale). SWAT teams from San Jose and Sunnyvale as well as members of the Alameda County Major Crimes Task Force and the Fremont Police Street Crimes teams assisted in the serving of those warrants. All four suspects were arrested and evidence linking all four to the attack was located. On April 5, 2013 all four suspects were charged with Aggravated Mayhem, Assault With Deadly Weapon, and Conspiracy. All four are currently in custody and are scheduled to be back in court in May, 2013. Anyone with information relating to this case is encouraged to contact Det. Magana (510-790-6943).

Homicide SUBMITTED BY SGT. ERIC MELENDEZ On April 20 2013 at 9:54 p.m., Hayward Police Department (PD) responded to a call to attend to a single-gunshot victim at an address on Franklin Avenue between Culp Avenue and Harder Road. On arrival, officers and Emergency Medical Personnel found the victim on the driveway of a residence on Franklin Avenue. This area is predominantly a residential neighborhood. The 26-year old male victim was taken to Eden Hospital for emergency medical treatment but died of his injuries on April 21, 2013 at 09:33 a.m. His name is being withheld, pending notification of next of kin. Hayward PD seeks witnesses who were present or in the area at the time of the homicide. Anyone with information about this incident should call Hayward PD at (510) 293-7000, Inspector Frasier Ritchie at (510) 293-7219 or Detective Zachary Hoyer at (510) 293-7172.


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Every year CBC hosts one primary fundraising event, the annual Spring Celebration. Funds from this event are used to sponsor community non-profit organizations such as ABODE Services, Fremont libraries, the Academy of Chinese Performing Arts, Feed the Homeless, Tri-City Health Center, and many more. This year, CBC is holding its 21st annual Spring Celebration with the theme “A Night in Xi’an: Honoring Our Local Warriors.” The evening will focus on two community nominated honorees: Steve Cho, for Citizen of the Year award, and Richard Li, for Volunteer of the Year. This gala event opens with a reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner, awards, and entertainment at 6:30 p.m. Preferred dress is black tie or suit for men, and long dress or traditional Cheong Sam for women. Tickets are available for $88 per person or $800 per table of ten, with an RSVP preferred in advance. CBC expects over 250 attendees at this year’s celebration. CBC’s Spring Celebration is considered by many as an annual highlight of cultural and festive activities. Each year, this event is focused on a different city in China; Xi’an, known for its flourishing nightlife, is the city celebrated this year in recognition of Chinese warrior spirit and the current display of China’s Terracotta Warriors at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. The night promises to be filled with lively entertainment and sumptuous treats. Previous

Letter to the Editor

years have featured martial arts demonstrations, casino games, dragon dances, and prominent Asian American figures such as Martin Yan from Yan Can Cook. Entertainment this year will include a Chinese martial arts performance, Chinese dance, as well as dancing for all attendees. CBC President, Ivy Wu, will speak about the importance of preserving the warrior spirit in the community. Steve Cho, Citizen of the Year nominee and president of the South Bay Chinese Club, is receiving this award for a second time. Richard Li serves as the vice chair for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce and president of the Milpitas Chamber of Commerce. Both men were nominated by the community for outstanding volunteer and community service. In addition to food and entertainment, attendees will have an opportunity to become acquainted with non-profit organizations helped by CBC through a non-profit showcase on display throughout the evening. Representatives from non-profit organizations will be present to answer questions about their work. Few tickets will be available at the door, so be sure to respond in advance. To purchase tickets or find out more information, contact Kathy Jang at (510) 790-0740 or via e-mail at kathyjang25@yahoo.com. Citizens for Better Community Spring Celebration Saturday, Apr 27 Reception: 5:30 p.m. Dinner: 6:30 p.m. Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-0740 www.cbcsfbay.org Tickets: $88

Pay, pay, pay

Reporter K. Eisenia may “applaud all electronic tolls with go, go, go.” Not me; I deplore them because now it’s pay, pay, pay. Pay to build the bridge Pay for routinely maintaining the bridge Pay to update the bridge Pay to cross the bridge (and have every move tracked). And, wait for it – undoubtedly soon to come: pay to use an express lane to approach any bridge Pay the cost of automatic toll technology Pay the cost of automatic toll bookkeeping, including forwarding tickets to out-of-staters Pay the hidden cost of now-unemployed toll-takers Pay the cost of lost tourist revenues (Oregon travel is less annoying) Oh, yes, and in one notorious instance, pay to celebrate a bridge Sharon Brown, Fremont

US Bank robbery suspect in custody SUBMITTED BY SGT. GENE SMITH, MILPITAS PD On March 5, 2013, at about 4:24 p.m., a robbery occurred at the US Bank located at 1535 Landess Avenue in Milpitas, and again on March 20, 2013 at 12:16 p.m. On both incidents an unknown male suspect walked inside the bank and handed the teller a demand note requesting money. After receiving the money, the suspect fled the area on foot and was described as a male, 6’0” to 6’2, approximately 25 years of age weighing 200 to 300 pounds. Milpitas Police Detectives investigated both incidents and identified Joshua Metoxen as the suspect involved in both robberies. Lake County Sheriff ’s detectives also identified Metoxen as a suspect in two bank robberies in their jurisdiction and issued a warrant for his arrest. On March 28, 2013, officers and detectives from the city of Novato Police Department located and arrested Metoxen for the outstanding arrest warrant. Milpitas Police Detectives were notified of the incident and referred the two Milpitas bank robbery cases to the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Cataract surgery can mean freedom from glasses! In the past, choosing the type of lens to implant was made by the cataract surgeon; few options were available. All lens implants were monofocal, providing excellent vision after cataract surgery, but usually only for seeing things at a distance such as distant signs when driving, going to a movie or a ballgame. Corrective glasses were necessary for near vision activity: reading, knitting, sewing, playing cards or keeping your golf score. Today, Dr. Shobha Tandon is able to offer a choice – a multifocal lens. This type of lens provides excellent vision after cataract surgery at a variety of distances. Multifocal lens implants correct both your distance and near vision. For the vast majority of patients, having a multifocal lens implant means that they will be able to see at distance and up close - drive, watch television, read or do crafts - without glasses.

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“Some of these illnesses are more well-known because of media coverage, especially whooping cough. Others are less well-known, seemingly ‘of the past,’ such as polio,” said Swetha Kowsik, M.D., a pediatrician with Washington Township Medical Foundation, who is also on the medical staff at Washington Hospital. “The important thing to remember about diseases we think of as being ‘of the past’ is that they can easily come back if people don’t continue to get vaccinated.” Helping infants fight infection Beginning at birth, babies should get started on a full regimen of vaccinations, as recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP). The ACIP is a group of medical and public health experts that develops recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the U.S. For a complete schedule of all recommended vaccinations, go online to www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules. “Infants are incredibly vulnerable to disease, with immature immune systems that are not equipped to ward off infection, so preventive care needs to be especially emphasized,” explained Dr. Kowsik. “Simply put, infants don’t have the immune systems to fight off infections the way healthy adults often can.” The same bacteria or virus that can feel like a minor illness to a healthy adult can result in severe illness requiring hospitalization in an infant, she went on to explain. Vaccines have been scientifically developed and formulated to prevent diseases that specifically affect infants. It is also important that babies get the entire regimen of recommended vaccinations without skipping doses. “The danger in skipping certain vaccinations is that the baby and those around him are made more susceptible to the disease,” stated Dr. Kowsik. “The vaccines have been scientifically researched to prove their efficacy when the entire series is completed. We can’t necessarily conclude that babies who have had half of a series will receive ‘half ’ the immunity.” Improved protection and safety Researchers continue to look for new and better ways to protect children from serious disease. In 2010, a new vaccine called “Prevnar 13” was approved and recommend for infants starting at two months of age until age 5. With this vaccine, young children build up immunity to 13 different types of pneumococcal bacteria, which cause pneumonia and some other diseases. The previous form of the vaccination only covered seven strains of the bacteria.

Although approved vaccines are continuously monitored for safety and efficacy, there remains some concern among the public about a link between vaccinations and autism in children. “Many of these concerns were due to a paper published in 1998, which has now been formally retracted,” reported Dr. Kowsik. “On further investigation, it was found that the physician who wrote the paper falsified his data, and no link has been found between autism and vaccines.” At the doctor’s office When parents bring their baby in for vaccinations, Dr. Kowsik recommends feeding them after the vaccinations to help calm them down and make them feel safe. Parents should stay calm and collected and can try distracting the infant during the shots to help her feel better. “It’s true that babies will cry during the vaccines, but parents are usually surprised at how quickly they calm down and get distracted by stickers and toys,” said Dr. Kowsik. After the immunization, the baby may be fussy, and there may be some pain in the area where the vaccine was given, which is usually the upper thigh for infants and the upper arm for older children. These symptoms should resolve in a few days. If the baby develops a fever over 100.3 degrees Fahrenheit after the vaccinations, Dr. Kowsik recommends giving a children’s medication intended to reduce pain and fever. “More serious reactions are very rare, but if difficulty breathing, hives, lips swelling or any other concerning symptoms occur, it’s best to take the child in for an immediate medical evaluation,” she recommended. Communication helps For parents, the number of visits for vaccinations, the variety of combined versus single vaccines and the number of diseases covered by the vaccinations can seem very intimidating. “The best way for parents to stay on top of this is to communicate with their pediatrician,” advises Dr. Kowsik. “Ask all the questions needed, and as often as needed. Be wary of information on the internet. Pediatricians can direct parents to the most reliable internet sites.”

Learn more Dr. Kowsik advises that the best Web sites about vaccinations are www.cdc.gov/vaccines (U.S. Centers for Disease Control), www.healthychildren.org (American Academy of Pediatrics) and www.who.int/en (World Health Organization—for a global perspective on vaccine-preventable diseases). To learn more about Washington Township Medical Foundation, go to www.mywtmf.com.

LIFE ElderCare video unveiling SUBMITTED BY TINA FERNANDEZ

TIRED OF ONE INSURANCE COMPANY - ONE AGENT THINK MELLO

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

The Leadership Fremont Class of 2013 invites the public to the unveiling of its LIFE ElderCare video, on Tuesday, April 30 from 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Leadership Fremont is a Fremont Chamber of Commerce program that guides a diverse group of individuals to understand the complex issues facing our community, how various governing bodies interact and affect solutions, and how to build personal leadership skills. The Class of 2013 has developed a video for LIFE ElderCare, a nonprofit agency that serves Tri-Cities seniors. LIFE ElderCare’s mission is to help at-risk older adults maintain their quality of life while living independently. The video will serve as a tool to help LIFE

ElderCare raise awareness of its many services, grow its donor database, and help attract volunteers. The unveiling event will feature a short program to view the video and to share information about the valuable programs that LIFE ElderCare offers to the community. Refreshments will be served. RSVP by Friday, April 26 by calling (510) 5742266 or e-mail tina@save-dv.org. LIFE ElderCare Video Unveiling Tuesday, Apr 30 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Washington Hospital’s Anderson Auditorium 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 574-2266 tina@save-dv.org www.lifeeldercare.org


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fremont student honored with President’s Environmental Youth Award SUBMITTED BY DAVID YOGI, EPA PHOTO COURTESY OF SHANTI BALARAMAN The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently announced that 12-year-old Pavan Raj Gowda, of Fremont is a recipient of the 2012 President’s Environmental Youth Award for his environmental stewardship work, which includes founding “Green Kids Now,

Inc.,” a non-profit organization focused on raising children’s awareness of environmental issues. “EPA is proud to honor Pavan’s extraordinary effort to engage children in environmental action and better the lives of those in his community and future generations,” said Jared Blumenfeld, Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Instilling a sense of environmental stewardship in our young people is critical in ensuring our environment is protected for years to come.”

Green Kids Now, Inc, a 501(c) (3) non-profit charity, strives to increase understanding of environmental issues among children through offering school programs, workshops, and online resources. The organization also hosts an annual “Green Kids Conference” in Mountain View, that serves as a forum for students and their families to learn about and explore environmental issues, such as climate science and air quality, and provides resources and opportunities for children to use in their communities. Pavan, a seventh-grader, has written two children’s storybooks, “Two Tales from a Kid” and “Geckoboy-The Battle of Fracking,” that raise awareness of the value of community involvement in environmental issues and the side effects of hydraulic fracturing. Pavan also serves as an international reporter for the Primary Perspective children’s radio program in Australia, and is active in the San Francisco Bay Area helping schools obtain the Green Star award, sponsored by the United Nations and nonprofit Green Star International. Established in 1971, The President’s Environmental Youth Award promotes awareness of our nation’s natural resources and encourages positive community involvement. One outstanding project from each of EPA’s ten regions is selected for national recognition. Projects are developed by young individuals, K12 school classes, summer camps, and youth organizations. This year’s winning Environmental Youth Awards all focused on environmental stewardship, ranging from analyzing and installing wind power in New England to restoring prairie land in Texas and reducing the use of disposable bags in Colorado. For more information about the winners visit: http://www2.epa.gov/education/presidents-environmental-youth-award-peya-winners. Program information is available at: http://www2.epa.gov/education/presidents-environmental-youth-award.

Half Pint Library book drive nets 18,000 books SUBMITTED BY EMILY BRUCE PHOTO BY STEVEN MAZLIACH Non-profit organizations from the Bay Area picked up free boxes of children’s books on April 4 at Half Price Books in Fremont. The local community donated the books during the company’s 15th annual Half Pint Library book drive. This special giveaway event invited any not-for-profit (L to R): Half Price Books’ District Manager Matt Dalton shakes hands with Angus Cochran, Executive Director of Washington Hosorganization that could use or distribute children’s pital Healthcare Fdn. books, to stop by. Half Price Books matched each book donated by the community during the helps make reading a priority for children by getting drive. More than 18,000 books were collected, to be more books into non-profits, schools and homes.” given away in the Bay Area and nationwide, the comAccording to the company’s District Manager Matt pany is distributing more than 300,000 books to orDalton, by the end of the afternoon, almost all 18,000 ganizations in need. books were given away; the few remaining were do“More children in need will now have books benated to the Children’s East Bay Literacy Project, cause of the generous Bay Area community,” said For more information, visit www.hpb.com/hpl Kathy Doyle Thomas, executive vice president of Half Price Books. “The Half Pint Library program

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California unemployment rate drops to 9.4 percent BY LAURA OLSON ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Apr California’s unemployment rate dropped in March to 9.4 percent as job growth in the state continued to outpace the nation, figures released Friday show. The rate represented a drop from 9.6 percent in February and from 10.7 percent during the same period a year ago. California has added 286,000 jobs in the past 12 months. The decrease in March put California’s unemployment rate at the lowest level since December 2008, a year after the recession began. However, California still has the third-highest jobless rate in the country. The state is tied with Mississippi, and ranks behind Nevada, at 9.7 percent, and Illinois, at 9.5 percent. The national unemployment rate decreased in March to 7.6 percent. California added 25,500 jobs in March, with the largest gains in professional and business services, which added 15,800 jobs, and information-based companies, with 11,700 positions. Construction, financial activities, educational and health services, hospitality and government also added jobs, according to the preliminary figures released by the state’s Employment Development Department. Trade, transportation and utilities posted the largest decreases, cutting a total of 8,400 positions. Mining, logging, manufacturing and other services also reported fewer jobs. Colusa County, a farming region north of Sacramento, had the state’s highest unemployment rate in March at 23.9 percent. Marin County was the lowest at 5.2 percent. California continues to add jobs faster than the national rate, wrote Stephen Levy, senior economist at the Palo Alto-based Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. Statewide, the number of jobs has risen by 2 percent during the past 12 months, compared to 1.4 percent nationally. Levy said strong gains were made in Southern California, particularly in the movie industry. “The California recovery remains led by coastal regions with the southern part of the state now joining the (San Francisco) Bay area in the recovery,’’ he wrote.

Sun-powered plane completes California test flight BY HAVEN DALEY ASSOCIATED PRESS MOUNTAIN VIEW, California (AP),A solarpowered plane that has wowed aviation fans in Europe took to the skies Friday over the San Francisco Bay area in a successful test flight. Considered the world’s most advanced sun-powered plane, the Solar Impulse took off from Moffett Field in Mountain View at first light for a two-hour practice run in advance of a planned multi-city, cross-country tour. “That’s a mythical step in aviation,’’ André Borschberg, one of the plane’s pilots and creators, said about flying cross-country. “We are something like between 1915 and 1920, compared to traditional aviation, when pioneers tried these non-stop flights.’’ He said a flight around the world could occur in two years. The Solar Impulse is powered by about 12,000 photovoltaic cells that cover massive wings and charge its batteries, allowing it to fly day and night without jet fuel. It has the wing span of a commercial airplane but the weight of the average family car, making it vulnerable to bad weather. Its creators say the Solar Impulse is designed to showcase the potential of solar power and will never replace fuel-powered commercial flights. The delicate, single-seat plane cruises around 40 mph and can’t fly through clouds. Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard, Solar Impulse co-founder and chairman, said the plane should be ready for the cross-country journey on May 1, depending on the weather. “We like nice weather. We like sunny days,’’ Borschberg said. Stops are planned in Phoenix, Dallas, Washington, D.C., and New York. Each flight leg will take 20 to 25 hours, with 10-day stops in each city. Between Dallas and Washington, the plane will also stop at one of three other cities – Atlanta, Nashville or St. Louis. Borschberg said the plane’s creators are close to being able to launch the non-stop flights needed to go around the world. Using solar power, “we are close to the notion of perpetual flight,’’ he said.

Union Pacific optimistic about 2013 after solid 1Q BY JOSH FUNK AP BUSINESS WRITER OMAHA, Neb. (AP), Apr 18 _ The sharp drop in coal demand that has weighed down railroad profits since last year appears to be slowly coming to an end. Many utilities turned away from coal last year as they switched to cheaper natural gas to generate electricity. But natural gas prices have doubled in the past year, and some power companies are finding it cheaper to burn coal again. That, and increased shipments of other goods, has railroad executives feeling more confident. After reporting an 11 percent increase in first-quarter profit Thursday, Union Pacific officials predicted a slight increase in shipping volume this year. Union Pacific was more confident about this year’s prospects than CSX, the other major freight railroad to report earnings this week. CSX said quarterly profit grew 2 percent. But officials said profit would barely grow this year before rising 10 to 15 percent in 2014 and 2015.

Union Pacific CEO Jack Koraleski told The Associated Press that everything looks good for the Omaha, Neb.,-based railroad this year, as long as normal weather patterns prevail and the economy continues growing. ``I love what I’m seeing at the moment, but I’m also cautious about whatever might cause consumer confidence to falter,’’ Koraleski said. Union Pacific officials said on a conference call that coal shipments appear to have bottomed out last year, so the railroad should see coal volumes improve through the rest of this year as long as the summer is hot. The company’s stock soared to new heights Thursday after its strong results. The stock gained $5.52, or 4 percent, to set a new closing record of $142.46. Rate increases helped Union Pacific generate net income of $957 million, or $2.03 per share, in the quarter. That’s up from $863 million, or $1.79 per share, a year earlier. Revenue rose to $5.29 billion revenue from $5.1 billion revenue. The results beat Wall Street’s expectations. Analysts surveyed by

FactSet expected earnings per share of $1.96 on revenue of $5.22 billion. Koraleski said he’s encouraged by the improvement in the housing and automotive markets. Builders have been starting houses and apartments at the fastest pace in 4 1/2 years. And March was the best month for auto sales since August 2007. The CEO said he’s even more excited that several European companies have contacted Union Pacific about looking at possible manufacturing sites along railroad lines, including a new steel plant in Louisiana. Citi Research analyst Christian Wetherbee said Union Pacific posted a strong quarter because coal profits were better than expected. Although coal shipments dropped 19 percent, coal revenue declined only 6 percent to $936 million. Overall in the first quarter, Union Pacific’s total shipping volume declined 2 percent. Besides coal, agricultural shipments were weak, as last year’s drought caused a 9 percent decline. continued on page 33


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SUBMITTED BY MUSIC AT THE MISSION Music at the Mission will be presenting its fifth annual Masquerade Ball, “Night of the Gypsy,” on Friday, April 26. The event in the Grand Ballroom at the Hilton Hotel in Newark, will feature a four-

course dinner, a silent auction and a live auction with Frank Bizzarro. NBC Bay Area News’s Mike Inouye will be Master of Ceremonies, and Kiko and Christina Rodriquez of Federicos Tapas and Wine Bar will serve as Grand Host and Hostess. Entertainment will include the gypsy swing band Beso Negro and a flamenco performance by Juan Moyoli and his group. Following the gypsy theme, a fortune teller will be available. While costumes are not required, they are encouraged. Masks will be provided. This will be the second year Music at the Mission will be presenting the Cultural Arts Recognition Award to an individual for outstanding contributions to the Tri-City Area’s arts community. Last year’s award was presented to the Tri-City

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Voice’s own Bill and Sharon Marshak. This year the honor goes to David Sloss, former Music Director of Fremont Opera and Fremont Symphony, and Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski of the 25th District will be in attendance to present a resolution for the honored guest. For thirty-two years, Maestro Sloss has helped to bring classical music to Fremont. As music director of Fremont Symphony, in addition to his duties as conductor, he worked to bring music education to the community, including an innovative program for student composers. He also helped found Fremont Opera, and brought numerous professional opera productions to Fremont. “I am so pleased to have this chance to recognize and thank David for all that he has done here in Fremont,” said Aileen Chanco, Music at the Mission’s founding Director, and a Fremont native herself. “His dedication to the performance of symphonic music, opera, and to young composers has made a huge difference to a whole generation of aspiring young musicians and music lovers who have grown up in the Tri-City Area.” All proceeds from the Mission Masquerade Ball will go to support Music at the Mission’s classical chamber music concerts and educational outreach programs. In its eighth season, Music at the Mission strives to bring bold classical chamber music programs to the Tri-City Area. They present three main concerts each year at Fremont’s historic Mission San Jose, in addition to numerous other events throughout the area. Recognizing the rising need to support arts education, Music at the Mission also produces outreach performances in junior high and high schools throughout the area, connecting students with professional musicians. Tickets for the ball are $80. E-mail info@musicatmsj.org or call Harriet Whitney at (510) 7937465 to see if there is space available. A Night of the Gypsy Friday, April 26 6:30 p.m. Hilton Hotel Grand Ballroom 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 793-7465 info@musicatmsj.org www.musicatmsj.org Tickets: $80

April 23, 2013

Hayward teacher is ‘California History teacher of the Year’

SUBMITTED BY KRISTEN YASUKAWA Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE) congratulates Tennyson High School teacher Miroslaba “Lili” Velo of Hayward for being named the 2013 Outstanding Senior High School History Teacher of the Year by the California Council for the Social Studies. The award recognizes Velo’s leadership in advancing social studies education through engaging activities for Hayward youth, and developing innovative history curricula and teaching techniques for social studies educators across the state. As the Social Studies Department Chair at Tennyson High School, Velo leads the school’s social studies teaching practices and works with students of all levels, including advanced placement and English Learners. Velo shares her teaching techniques with middle and high school history teachers through ACOE’s countywide social studies initiatives and presents at statewide conferences. “ACOE is committed to fostering our teachers as leaders in history and social studies and in the education profession,” said L. Karen Monroe, Alameda County Associate Superintendent of Education. “Lili is a shining example of the dedicated teachers in Alameda County who innovate education to meet the needs of our diverse students and address today’s new standards and assessments.”


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Ohlone Humane Society

BY NANCY LYON On March 26, Ohlone Humane Society (OHS) received a call from the Fremont Animal Shelter that a 5-week-old Chihuahua mix puppy had been brought in that had been abandoned in a mall parking lot and was too young to be kept at the shelter. She was in a temporary foster home but could be there for only two more days. The tiny pup, now named Lena, had been examined by a vet and found that she was a very special needs baby – Lena had been born with birth defects - one eye missing and the other semifunctional, plus her skull had not yet completely closed and there was the possibility of some neurological damage The options were to immediately find the best resource for her needs or put her down. Our first thought was the wonderful BrightHaven Sanctuary in Sebastopol and we reached out to Susan Hoffman, their rescue coordinator. OHS had successfully worked with Susan on number of special cases in the past and was Lena’s best and only hope.

We gathered up Lena at the shelter and took her to ACE veterinary hospital for additional care and board her for a week or more where OHS would pay all costs. This was the first real opportunity we had to get to know Lena... all 1.1 pounds of her. Thankfully, aside from infected ears and an eye that will need care for the rest of her life, her other bodily functions appeared to be working well – including her sweet puppy voice. In her darkness, all she

wanted was to be held close 510-792-4587 and comforted, 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont, Ca. 94538-1304 and to give www.ohlonehumanesociety.org kisses. Susan posted Lena on the of BrightHaven message board and calls the Mia Foundation, to a new life and started coming in. The throw-away puppy name – Meme. had touched many hearts. Susan carefully Meme’s foster mom is just crazy about screened offers of help and we discussed her; she has a special needs kitty ‘Bo’ that what would be the best option for Lena to was born without the upper bones in his heal and thrive. We agreed that the amazfront legs and walks on his elbows. Bo is ing Mia Foundation in Las Vegas that deals scared of everything and everyone and exclusively with dogs with birth defects likes to keep to himself; she reports that was her best chance. Lou Hendon, Meme had him charmed in less than five founder of the Mia Foundation, didn’t hes- minutes… he’s actually PLAYING with itate a second and said “bring her to us.” her. Our feisty miracle girl is indeed a Transportation was the next on the charmer and is described as a happy little agenda. An attorney on the BrightHaven monkey SO full of life and the will to live. message board volunteered to use her freIs one little creature with so much quent flyer miles and travel with Lena. She working against her worth all the effort? was delivered to the attorney in San FranYou bet she is! cisco and that evening, a tired puppy departed SFO travelling in 1st Class and BrightHaven – brighthaven.org; The sleeping on her lap the entire flight. Lena Mia Foundation – http://www.themiarrived in Las Vegas to the welcoming arms afoundation.com

Auto Review

Buick Encore: seeking youthful customers Over the past 21 years, Steve Schaefer has tested more than 1,000 cars and published a weekly story on every one. As a teenager, he visited car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models as they first rolled off the transporter. He is a founding member of the Western Automotive Journalists. Contact Steve at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

grocery bags (or my two amplifier bags) behind the second seats when they’re up. The second-row rears fold down neatly after you pull up the bottom cushions to provide a nice carpeted load floor. Even the front passenger seat folds, so you can carry that surfboard or ladder. There’s lots of storage for small items, too, including two glove boxes, a small bin to the left of the steering wheel, a console bin, and two cubbies in each door. Styling, inside and out, is definitely aimed at premium buyers,

wipers, lane departure warning, and a Forward Collision Warning system. The latter sounded a repeated tone and flashed a message if I appeared to be closing in too fast on a car in front (even if I was driving attentively). One other little warning told me when I left my turn signal on too long; this is surely a Buick feature from the list designed for the elderly, although I did find it useful. The Encore has lots of electronic goodies, accessible from dash buttons and a seven-inch

BY STEVE SCHAEFER The Buick Encore is something new for the brand — a compact crossover; but it is not the first small Buick. Following in the footsteps (wheels?) of the Special from the 1960s, Apollo from the 1970s and Skyhawk from the 1980s, this new small car is a carefully devised strategy to reduce the average age of Buick shoppers. The new little Buick is just 168 inches nose to tail, and weighs about 3,200 pounds. Based on a car made in Korea (by the Daewoo company that GM quietly acquired a number of years ago), it is nothing like any Buick you’ve seen recently. Powered by a 1.4-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine through a six-speed automatic, Encore exhibits surprising spunkiness, accelerating uphill on freeways and dashing determinedly around crowded city streets. There are only 138 horses under the hood, with 148 lb.-ft. of torque, but with the right gearing, you get off quickly in first and save gas while cruising with a tall sixth gear. All-wheel drive is available. EPA fuel economy numbers are 25 City, 33 Highway and 28 Combined. I averaged 25.4 mpg. Green numbers are “6” for Smog and “7” for Greenhouse Gas, putting the Encore in the desirable SmartWay category. The Encore’s short length makes parking easier in town, and the high 65-inch stance makes you feel more in control. Four people will be comfortable in the car, although a center rider in back might not be happy for long. The little Buick gives you 48 cubic feet of hauling room behind the front seats — and room for six

Out of the Darkness Walk for Suicide Prevention SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE As the third leading cause of death among young adults and teens and the second leading cause for college students, suicide is a huge concern on college campuses. Ohlone’s Out of the Darkness Walk will contribute funds to “vital research, education, advocacy, suicide prevention initiatives, and programs to support those impacted by suicide” through the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Originally, the walk began as a way to honor Ohlone staff member Stewart Dawson, who fell victim to suicide in December 2010. It has evolved into a mechanism to help the nearly 1 million Americans who attempt suicide, the 34,000 individuals who die by suicide, and the 20 million people who suffer from depression every year. The walk will begin at Building 7 at noon on Tuesday, April 23 on the Ohlone College Fremont Campus and will continue around its perimeter. For two hours prior to the start of the walk, participants can visit the Mental Health and Wellness Fair, where several communitybased organizations will exhibit educational materials and resources. This event is sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention— Northern California Chapter, the Ohlone College Student Health Center, STEP Up Ohlone, and the Associated Students of Ohlone College (ASOC). To register for this event or donate, please visit www.ohlone.edu/go/campuswalk. Out of the Darkness Walk for Suicide Prevention Tuesday, Apr 23 10 a.m. Mental Health and Wellness Fair 11 a.m. Check-in 12 p.m. Walk Begins 1 p.m. Closing Ceremony Ohlone College—Quad 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont Free event parking from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Lots O and P

and materials are rather nice. The boldly stitched leather steering wheel, carefully fitted metallic accents, attractive gauges, and designer color combinations keep the mood lavish. One way to make a car feel luxurious is to make it quiet, a Buick specialty. The brand’s QuietTuning not only keeps noise out, but counteracts it with Buick’s first application of Bose noise cancelling technology. Microphones in the car detect the wavelength of noise and send the opposite waves to speakers. Baby Buicks come in the plain but well equipped Encore model, ascending through Convenience, Leather and Premium. My top-level Premium tester, in a handsome Cocoa Silver Metallic, had a Saddle interior with Cocoa accents that mixed warm reds and browns on the seats and doors with matte black in the control areas in a way that seemed well suited to an upscale brand. The wide swaths of plastic artificial wood resemble a LeSabre or Electra sedan from days of yore. As the top-level model, my car had a premium Bose seven-speaker audio system, Rainsense automatic

color display. The home screen’s five selections help you zero in on music now playing, navigation, phone, music tone, and other “quick info.” However, the Intellilink system, which uses voice commands, didn’t always understand me, and incoming phone calls sometimes got dropped. Of course, there are lots of electronic safety features in this car of today. Blind spot warning is very handy, especially with the fat window pillars, and Stabilitrak keeps the four wheels going where you intend them. Pricing begins at $24,950 for the Encore and runs up to $28,940 for the Premium. My tester, a front-wheel-drive Premium model with optional chromed 18-inch wheels and navigation system, came to $30,730. Buick is taking a chance, presenting such a small car to its customers, but the MINI and Fiat brands have pioneered the idea of a premium small hatchback in the U.S., so perhaps the timing is right. The biggest challenge is going to be getting prospects to step into a Buick dealership in the first place.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Brian Wetzel, an award-winning professional speaker and comedian, will perform his musical comedy, “Depression The Musical,” on Saturday, April 27 at Fremont Congregational Church. Wetzel’s career and personal life became absorbed with an ongoing battle with depression. In this unique musical comedy show, he takes his audiences on a unique journey through mental health and talks about the many factors that contribute to depression and recovery. With eight original songs and plenty of laughs in between, including a visit from rapper D-PRESHUN, “Depression The Musical” will leave you laughing and inspired. Following Wetzel’s lighthearted but poignant and deeply

personal look at a very important issue, Rev. Barbara Meyer, Community Minister of Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Church whose ministry focuses on issues of mental health, will respond. Light refreshments afterwards will provide an opportunity to continue the conversation. There is a suggested donation of $10 - $15, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. For more information, call (510) 793-3970 or visit http://fremontucc.net/depression_musical.pdf or www.wetzelproductions.com. Depression The Musical Saturday, Apr 27 7:30 p.m. Fremont Congregational United Church of Christ 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 793-3970 http://fremontucc.net/depression_musical.pdf www.wetzelproductions.com Suggested donation: $10 - $15


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SUBMITTED BY KAREN MCCREADY Members of the Friendship Force of the San Francisco Bay Area intend to become as steeped in New Zealand culture as possible before club members from Horowhenua, on the North Island of New Zealand, visit their Bay Area homes in May. The general public is invited to join on April 27 when they will present an afternoon of New Zealand culture and dance. To fulfill their goal of breaking down barriers that separate people, this international organization encourages its members to learn about their guests’ culture before they host them and about their hosts’ culture before they travel to stay in members’ homes abroad. The New Zealand program will feature indigenous Maori culture, which flourished particularly on the North Island. The Maoris are well represented in their traditional ceremonies and meeting houses to this day, as well as in the dramatic and colorful haka, an introductory ritual that the players perform to strike fear into the opposing team at all New Zealand rugby games. This rich folk culture is bound to have influenced the fanciful adventures of “The Hobbit” and Tolkien’s other tales of Middle Earth, all set against the stunning scenery that was the backdrop of their lives. Guest speaker Craig Stokes is vice president of the New Zealand American Associ-

SUBMITTED BY BRYAN DESSAURE

A

pril, 2013 is the 107th anniversary of the devastating 1906 earthquake that shook the San Francisco area. To ensure the continued delivery of Hetch Hetchy water to the region, construction is underway at the I-

ation of San Francisco, which provides a social and networking forum for Kiwis and their American friends in the Bay Area. Stokes will describe their work to promote New Zealand—the people, the culture, the food, the wine, the sport, the place (and the hobbits!). Their mission is to promote good relations between New Zealand and the U.S. through a variety of social and cultural events in the Bay Area.

Guest performers, members of Maori Mo Ake Tonu (“Maori Forever”), will perform traditional Maori songs and dance and introduce us to the language. Performing throughout the Western U.S., they have captivated their audiences with skillful poi dances, story-telling action songs, and, of course, the haka. Everyone will have a chance to join in one dance number and also to ask questions.

The public is invited to immerse themselves in the land of hobbits and Kia Ora! An Afternoon of New Zealand Culture and Dance Saturday, Apr 27 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Cole Hall at the First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0857 Free

680/S. Mission Blvd. interchange in Fremont where large diameter pipelines cross the Hayward earthquake fault. It has been over 140 years since the last major earthquake on the Hayward fault, and some geologists say that we are overdue for the next one. The Seismic Upgrade of Bay Division Pipeline Nos. 3 & 4 (BDPL3&4) in Fremont involves a cutting-edge engineering system which will allow a new pipe to withstand up to 6.5 feet of movement on the fault. The system will employ a segmented concrete box designed by URS Corp. and tested at Cornell University. Each segment of the concrete box will have the ability to rotate

Some work will take place at night in order to reduce the project’s effects on commuters. Photograph by Katherine Du Tiel.

and move individually while protecting the pipe inside. The pipe inside the concrete box will have specially designed joints that will allow the pipe to compress, move and rotate without breaking. The system will allow water to be delivered across the Hayward fault following an earthquake. I-680 commuters will notice lane realignments on Mission Boulevard between I-680 and Paseo Padre. These traffic diversions are needed to allow workers to safely access and replace the pipes. Residents living adjacent to work areas may also notice temporary fencing with black material attached to minimize sound and dust from the worksite. Workers are also taking preThe project site as seen from the I-680 overpass. Photograph by Jack Beale.

cautions to ensure the safety of local wildlife by installing exclusion fencing around all work areas. The Water System Improvement Program is designed to deliver water within 72 hours following a catastrophic event to more than 2.6 million people throughout the Bay Area. “To date, construction teams have completed more than two thirds of the projects between California’s Central Valley and San Francisco,” says SFPUC general manager Harlan Kelly. The project in Fremont is expected to complete construction in late 2014. For more information about our project visit www.sfwater.org/seismicupgrade or call our 24-hour answering service at 866973-1476.


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WANT TO PROTECT YOUR HOME THINK MELLO

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

SHARENE GONZALES

SUBMITTED BY DIANNE LAYFIELD From our nation’s beginning citizens have defended our freedoms, beliefs, and ideals. Many have stepped up, and many have paid the ultimate price.

Marine LCpl Travis Layfield was, and is, one of those America Heroes. He was killed in action on April 6, 2004 in Ramadi, Iraq. Travis was a son, brother, father, grandson, uncle, friend, and Hero. Respected by all, unselfish and concerned for his fellow Marines, always willing to step up and never afraid to be the first “thru the door.” We need to

keep his name and memory alive, along with all those that have made the ultimate sacrifice. The 4th Annual Marine LCpl Travis Layfield Memorial Golf Tournament and Fun(d)raiser is being held Friday, May 3 in order to do just that. The shotgun start begins at 10:45 a.m. with a dinner and awards presentation at 4:30 p.m. The event is a fundraiser for the Gold Star Reception. The Marines Memorial Club (www.marineclub.com) in San Francisco hosts an annual reception and dinner to honor our California fallen and to support Gold Star families left behind. During these two days families are comforted, and their children are honored. These events constitute an extremely moving and necessary two days in the families’ lives. Wounded Warriors playing with us are from our current conflict. At least one is a recent graduate of the GTXtreme Golf Academy – partnering with Eagles Up to bring our Wounded Warriors back into both team and individual sports. You can either sponsor them or sponsor and play with them. Some are here only for the dinner and ceremony where they will be honored. A singe golfer package cost $175 and includes green fees, cart, memorial shirt, lunch, dinner, goody bag, and personal thank you. A foursome package costs $700. Attendance at the guest dinner only costs $50. Reservations and sponsorships can be made by contacting Doug Lyvere at (415) 3092510 or EaglesUP@Lyvere.com. Marine LCpl Travis Layfield Memorial Golf Tournament Friday, May 3 8 a.m. (tee time at 10:45 a.m.) Sunol Valley Golf Course 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (415) 309-2510 EaglesUP@Lyvere.com

The Alameda County Water District (ACWD) is partnering with the Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition to bring back the Natives Garden Tour this spring in Alameda County. Gardens featured contain California native plants that require less water, reduce the need for pesticides, and attract a variety of wildlife. Once established, native plant gardens require little to no maintenance, making them an ideal option regardless of gardening experience – green thumb or not. No matter how large or small the space, a landscape can be created that best suits individual needs. Tour participants will have the opportunity to learn how to select and care for native plants; lower water utility bills by reducing outdoor water use and irrigation; design lowmaintenance gardens; and attract butterflies, birds, bees, and a host of other beneficial wildlife without the use of pesticides. “Garden tours provide Tri-City residents an opportunity to see first-hand the beauty of low water use gardens. The less water and fewer resources required in the garden, the better for our environment,” said Stephanie Nevins, ACWD Water Conservation Supervisor. “Nearly 50 percent of the water used in a typical home is for irrigation,” Nevins added. This self-guided tour of residential properties features a variety of gardens, created using similar gardening techniques. Registration is required as well as the purchase of a guidebook ($10) with garden descriptions and directions. Entrance tickets can be shared. Electronic guidebooks are available for $5. Bay-Friendly Garden Tour Sunday, Apr 28 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (510) 859-8026 x2 www.bayfriendlycoalition.org


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Monday, Feb 12 - Sunday, Apr 30

Tuesday, Apr 23

6:30 p.m.

8 a.m.

Children read to trained therapy dogs

Summer enrichment program

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Registration begins April 1 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304

Durba Sen Exhibit

5 a.m. - 9 p.m.

1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Mission Coffee 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 623-6920 www.durbasen.com

Paintings of Fremont-based artist

Thursdays, Apr 11 - May 30

Newark Police Department

Monday, Mar 12 - Friday, Jun 14

Citizen Police Academy 5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Apocalypse & Adaptation: How Catastrophes Shape Society

Participants learn about local law enforcement

Exhibit exploring the relationship between humans & catastrophes

Cal State East Bay University, C.E. Smith Museum of Anthropology Meiklejohn Hall, Rm. 4047 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-7414 Wednesdays, Mar 13 - Jun 12

Walk this Way: Ages 55+

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon Program integrates walking, flexibility & strength

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 574-2053 Thursday, Mar 14 - Saturday, May 3

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Newark City Council Chambers 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4352 www.newark.org Wednesday, Apr 17 - Sunday, May 5

Spring Showcase: Nature’s Footprints

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Exhibit of nature photography

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Thursday, Apr 18 - Saturday, Apr 27

The Wedding Singer: The Musical Comedy $

7 p.m. Jilted wedding singer meets the girl of his dreams

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702

Offerings from member artists

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Tuesday, Apr 23 - Friday, Apr 30

San Leandro Art Association Spring Show

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Monday, Mar 18 - Thursday, May 16

Photo Exhibition

Mon: 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Tues & Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Exhibits by local artists

San Leandro Public Library 300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro (510) 577-7990

Over 200 pictures from patrons & students

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org Monday, Mar 29 - Friday, May 30

Mark Mertens Pastels

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Pastel work of Castro Valley artist

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Tuesday, Apr 23

Bird Walk Monday, Apr 9 - Sunday, Apr 30

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

San Leandro Art Association 300 Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 635-5129

Mon – Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. & Sat – Sun: 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Foothill Arts of the Bay Gallery 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

Learn about estate & gift tax law Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Pastel art works

Read-to-a-Dog

Offerings from member artists

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Estate Planning Seminar

Ohlone for Kids $R

Thursday, Mar 7 – Friday, May 3

Sunday 10:00 AM

Spring Art Display

Monday, Jun 24 - Friday, Aug 8

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5328

Unity of Fremont

Tuesday, Apr 23

Tom Cain Memorial Photography Exhibit

Winning entries from the annual photography contest

A positive path for spiritual living

Monday, Apr 1 - Sunday, Apr 28

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. Bring water, sunscreen & binoculars

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 544-3220 Tuesday, Apr 23

Finding the Right Health Insurance

10 a.m. - 12 noon Information for children, adults & seniors

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (800) 963-7070 Wednesday, Apr 24

Job Fair for Educators

11:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Learn about careers in education

Alameda County Office of Education 313 West Winton Ave., Hayward (510) 670-4267 ksinegal@acoe.org Wednesday, Apr 24

Hidden Costs of College Sports

7 p.m. Presentation by college athletics activists

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3050 Wednesday, Apr 24

Encaustic Painting – R

10 a.m. - 12 noon Hot wax painting demonstration

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org Thursday, Apr 24 - Saturday, Apr 27

Spring Show

12 noon - 8 p.m. Explore spring though artists’ eyes

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Wednesday, Apr 24

Tuesday, Apr 23

Coffee with Cops

Out of the Darkness Walk

5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Meet and mingle with Fremont Police

Suicide prevention awareness

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.stepupohone.org

Suju’s Coffee 4949 Stevenson Blvd., #B, Fremont www.fremontpolice.org


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Wednesday, Apr 24

Friday, Apr 26

Saturday, Apr 27

Garden Workshop

Trashion Show

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

12:50 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.

A Night in Xi’An: Honoring Our Local Warriors $R

Learn to save, plant & grow seeds

Fashions made from recycled materials

5:30 p.m.

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980

Sunol Glen School 11601 Main St., Sunol (925) 862-2026

Dinner, program & entertainment

Wednesday, Apr 24

Saturday, Apr 27

Mudpuddle Shop Concert $

What’s Up Big Band

7 p.m.

2 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 27

Featuring Randall Lamb

Live music of legends Glenn Miller, Count Basie & more

Ducks for Bucks $

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 742-2326 mikeodee@yahoo.com

Benefit for Tri-City nonprofit groups. Enter to win prizes

Mudpuddle 34733 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 Wednesday, Apr 24

Jazz night

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Ginger Bar Hilton (Fremont/Newark) 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390 Thursday, Apr 25

Aging Education Seminar – R

2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Ohlone College Giant Garage Sale $

11 a.m.

Fremont Central Park 4000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-5541 www.ducks4bucks.org

8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 27

Support Ohlone College programs

“MOPS” Rummage Sale

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285

7 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sponsored by Mothers of Preschoolers

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223

Saturday, Apr 27

Fremont Hills Assisted Living 35490 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-4200

9 a.m.

Saturday, Apr 27

Dance competition featuring Bollywood music

Experience the Land of Hobbits An afternoon of New Zealand Culture & Dance

12 noon - 1:30 p.m.

India Community Center 525 Los Coches Street, Milpitas 408-934-1130 www.IndiaCC.org

Learn about domestic violence support services

Saturday, Apr 27

SAVE “Open Doors” Event

Youthsava $

Nakamura Center 33077 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 487-4147

Taking Back Unwanted Prescription Drugs

Thursday, Apr 25

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

First United Methodist Church of Fremont 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0857

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Saturday, Apr 27 - Sunday, Apr 28

Fremont Police collect medications for disposal

Niles Main Street Association Spring Fling

10 a.m.

Call to schedule an appointment. Use sponsor code: HAYWARD

Fremont Centerville Farmers’ Market Bonde Ave & Fremont Blvd, Fremont (925) 551-6995 www.DEA.gov

Saint Joachim Catholic Church 21250 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward

Saturday, Apr 27

Saturday, Apr 27

Depression - The Musical! $

Thursday, Apr 25

7:30 p.m.

Healthy Kids Day 5k Fun Run/Walk

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation $R

Comedian Brian Wetzel performs

9 a.m.

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 656 2348 www.wetzelproductions.com

Benefit for Fremont/Newark YMCA

American Red Cross Blood Drive – R

2 p.m. - 7 p.m.

People with Purpose Event

11:00 a.m. - 1:30 a.m. Recognition of honorees & luncheon Sheraton 1801 Barber Lane, Milpitas (408) 943-0600 www.herspeoplewithpurpose.org Thursday, Apr 25 - Saturday, Apr 27

Southern Comfort: A Sentimental Journey $

8 p.m. Student dancers perform

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Friday, Apr 26

A Night of Improv with Shades of Grey and Gray Matter $

8 p.m. Comedy from Bay Area troupes

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

Saturday, Apr 27

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-0740 www.cbcsfbay.org

Learn about physician orders for life-sustaining treatment

Thursday, Apr 25

THINK MELLO - WHEN IT COMES TO INSURANCE

April 23, 2013

California Conservatory Theater 999 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org Friday, Apr 26

History Awards $R

5:30 p.m. Dinner, silent auction & raffle honoring historic preservation

Stonebrae Country Club 27900 Fairview Ave., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Friday, Apr 26

Music at the Mission Masquerade Ball “Night of the Gypsy” $R

6:30 p.m. Dinner, dancing, silent & live auction

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390 www.musicatmsj.org Friday, Apr 26

Cartooning Program for Tweens –R

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Learn to draw mythological characters

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Saturday, Apr 27

Estate Planning Seminar

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Learn to avoid estate planning mistakes

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Shops offer discounts, drawings & refreshments

Niles District Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-9868

DeVry University Campus 6600 Dumbarton Cir, Fremont (510) 657-5200


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Saturday, Apr 27

Saturday, Apr 27

Saturday, Apr 27

Sunday, Apr 28

Sunday, Apr 28

DeVry University Open House

World Tai Chi & Qigong Day

Citizenship Day $R

Tri-City Young Life Fundraiser $

Nature Yoga – R

11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

5 p.m.

10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Tour the Fremont University campus

Martial arts demonstrations

DeVry University Campus 6600 Dumbarton Cir, Fremont (510) 791-8639

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6191 www.ohlone.edu/go/globalwellness

Low cost assistance with citizenship applications

Banquet & celebration

Enjoy yoga outdoors. Bring a mat & wear comfortable clothes

Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 451-2846 x 301

Saturday, Apr 27

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 505-1750

SF Bay Wildlife Refuge 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222 x 363

Sunday, Apr 28

Movie Night $

Saturday, Apr 27

Saturday, Apr 27

Live Jazz

Wednesday, May 8

7:30 p.m.

CBC Spring Celebration $

4 p.m. - 8 p.m.

“Smouldering Fires,” “Koko’s Conquest,” “The Tryout”

5:30 p.m.

Community Emergency Response Team Classes

Emergency Shelter Program Awards Ceremony $R

Dinner, program & entertainment

9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-0740

Learn how to prepare & respond in a disaster

Spin-A-Yarn Restaurant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-9141

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

City Hall 34009 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5401

Local music groups perform

12 noon 24773 Mission Blvd., Hayward 1180 B Street, Hayward (510) 581-5626 www.espca.org RSVP by April 30

Make ‘Gardening Gold’ Compost SUBMITTED BY JEANNE NADER Compost greatly improves the health of your soil and plants. Join Master Composter and Bay-Friendly Educator Lori Caldwell for a “how to” talk on worm and backyard composting. Lori will share fundamentals and troubleshooting tips to be a successful composter. No preregistration is required. Each participant will receive a copy of the Bay-Friendly Gardening Guide and 20% discount nursery coupons. There will be a drawing for garden gifts at the end of the talk, including a compost bin. This talk is made possible by Regan Nursery, the Bay-Friendly Landscaping & Gardening Coalition and StopWaste.Org.

SUBMITTED BY CURTAIN CALL PERFORMING ARTS Curtain Call Performing Arts is teaming up with Shades of Grey and Gray Matter for an evening of Improvisational comedy. Troupe members of the renowned Leela Improve Theatre Company of San Francisco, Shades of Grey and Gray Matter, have performed their unique brand of comedy to audiences around the country. By exploring slice-of-life situations, their shows are often plagued by hilarity and pathos. The show will explore universal characters living in a world that is not black and white.

Join us for a night that will tickle your funny bone and warm your heart.

Shades of Grey

Friday, Apr 26 8 p.m. California Conservatory Theatre 999 E. 14ht Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperofrmingarts.org Tickets: $10 online, by phone or at the door

Job Fair features positions in education SUBMITTED BY KRISTEN YASUKAWA The Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE) will host the annual Education Job Fair on Wednesday, April 24, 2013 in Hayward. The Job Fair is a one-stop resource for Bay Area professionals to connect with the 200 job openings at Alameda County school districts and education agencies. Positions range from teachers, school administrators, counselors, therapists, administrative assistants and IT professionals.

Make ‘Gardening Gold’ Compost Saturday, Apr 27 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Regan Nursery 4268 Decoto Rd., Fremont (510) 891-6500 jnader@stopwaste.org

Job seekers are invited to get a resume review and interview tips from human resources experts; attend professional development workshops on personal branding and career management; and meet with an advisor for a credential consultation. Job Fair Wednesday, Apr 24 11:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Alameda Office of Education 313 W. Winton Ave., Hayward www.acoe.org/jobfair Free admission and on-site parking

National Day of Prayer In 1952, by a joint act of Congress, the National Day of Prayer was signed into law. The National Day of Prayer is always held on the first Thursday in May; this year, Thursday, May 2. Millions will unite in prayer at thousands of events from coast to coast: in Washington, DC, state capitols, county court houses, on the steps of city halls, and in businesses, churches and homes. Local events include: Thursday, May 2 12:00 p.m. Newark City Hall (by the flag pole) 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark Thursday, May 2 7 p.m. First Baptist Church Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark All are welcome to come and pray for our country and our leaders Pastor Raymond Meyer http://www.fbcnewark.org/ (510) 793-4810

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org.

1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School, 34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY 4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY 5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT

Times & Stops subject to change

Tuesday, April 23 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT

Tuesday, April 16 9:45–10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT Wednesday, April 17 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, April 18 10:00–10:30 Daycare Center Visit SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:30 Daycare Center Visit CASTRO VALLEY 1:00 – 2:00 Fame Charter School 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 2:25 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD Monday, April 22 9:30–10:05 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:25–10:55 Daycare Center Visit - City UNION CITY

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, April 17 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

(from far left:) Dan Nitescu, Chelsea Siebenrock, Leo Capili, Genevieve Su, Peggy Su, Master Park, Rajnesh Prasad, Dr. James Morris, Mayor Bill Harrison, and Grand Master Choi present the Choi’s Martial Arts students’ donations to Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland.

Breaking boards for breakthroughs SUBMITTED BY PEGGY SU On April 13, 2013, Choi’s Martial Arts hosted its 15th annual Break-a-thon fundraiser benefiting Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. Over a hundred young martial artists gathered at Centerville Junior High School to break 800 boards. Together, the Tae Kwon Do students collected over $10,000 in donations for their charity. 100% proceeds will be directed to life-saving pediatric research. Grand Master Alexander E.J. Choi is committed to teaching his students to use their mind, body, and spirit daily in all aspects of their lives and to continually give back to the community through this annual fundraiser and participating in local community events. The children received moral support from their guest of honor, a representative from Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, and local VIP guests including Mr. Rajnesh Prasad, Mayor Bill Harrison, FUSD School Superintendent Dr. James Morris, Board of Education Members Mrs. Lara York and Mrs. Lily Mei. Local corporate sponsors, such as The Hillman’s Cloverleaf Family Bowl and Bay Aerials Gymnastics, donated gift certificates to the highest fundraising students: Aleena Mehdi, Marcos Jung, Vinay Sudharsanam, Lawrence Yaep, Amit Kannan, and Darren Kuboyama. Other local corporate sponsors included Kumon-Fremont North @ Thornton Avenue, Best in Class Education Center, Fridaze, Aloki Inc., Aximsoft, and Altaflex. Aximsoft donated on behalf of the Aarna and Aanya Foundation for TTTS (Twin-toTwin Syndrome) in honor of twin babies lost by parents of one of the martial arts students. The event was heavily supported by parent volunteers: Peggy Su, Stacey Hall, Fen Dai, Michael Raviotta, Heather Merrell, and Hua Su.

Fred Biletnikoff Hall of Fame Golf Classic SUBMITTED BY DEREK PEREZ NFL Hall of Famer and Oakland Raiders legend Fred Biletnikoff returns to the Bay Area on April 29, 2013 to give back to the area that supported him throughout his Raider career. Now in its ninth year, the annual Fred Biletnikoff Hall of Fame Golf Classic/Oakland Raider Tournament continues to support youth in the Bay Area; this year’s proceeds will be used to rebuild the Koinonia home into the new Tracey’s Place of Hope. This 18-hole, fun-filled, celebrity-studded event will be held at Ruby Hill Golf Club in Pleasanton, California for a day of golf, dinner and a live auction, highlighted by the 19th Hole Reception, which includes Entertainment by Top Shelf, Silent Auction and $100,000 Shoot Out. This year’s celebrity line-up will include new and returning celebrity athletes. In addition, to the golf tournament, there are a number of other events including the Grid Iron Great Autograph Show, being held Sunday, April 28 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Stone Ridge Mall in Pleasanton, CA. Founded in 2000, Tracey’s Place of Hope is a residential program for adolescent girls in crisis with mental health and substance abuse problems. Funds raised from the golf tournament will go towards rebuilding a new Tracey’s Place of Hope. For tickets and information, contact the Biletnikoff Foundation, 7080 Donlon Way, Suite 126, Dublin, CA 94568, and (925) 556-2525. Donations and tickets may be ordered online at www.biletnikoff.net.

Men’s Golf Moreau Catholic v John F. Kennedy Submitted by Dave Baptist April 16, 2013 Moreau Catholic 206, Kennedy 233 Mission Valley Athletic League Golf Lake Chabot, par 36 37—Blake Ramos (MC) 38—Jake Malone (K) 40—Pranav Mohan (MC) 42—Chris Condeff (K), J.R. Montes (MC) 43—Justin Herrera (MC) 44—Jonathan Landavazo (MC) 46—Jordin Smith (K) 51—John Ruiz (K) 56—Peyton Smith (K) MVAL records: Moreau Catholic 5-1, Kennedy 2-4

Men’s Baseball Logan v Irvington April 18 James Logan Colts 11, Irvington Vikings 1 In a Mission Valley Athletic League contest that highlighted the power of Logan bats, Colt runners scored in four out of five innings two runs in the first inning and six runs in the second inning - in a game shortened by the Mercy Rule. Irvington could only muster one run in the bottom of the fourth inning to avoid a shutout. The Vikings managed only four hits, coupled with four errors, more than enough to open the door for the 15-hits barrage by the Colts. Logan Stats:

(W) Garza, R — P; Pelland — P; Bonansea -? C; Burpee -? C; Goulart -? 3?3, 2 R; Mattos -? 0-?3, R, HBP; R Garza -? 2-3, RBI; Sanchez (CR) -? R; Pelland -? 0?1; Bonansea -? 0-2, 3 RBI; Salangsang (CR) — R, RBI; Burpee 0-0, HBP; Rodriguez -? 2?3, R, 2 RBI; Blaquera -? 2?2, RBI; Sanchez 1?2, R; Peters -? 0-2; Salangsang -? 2-2; D Garza -? 2-4, 2 R, 1 ROE; Salazar -? 1-2, R; Bailado -? 0-1, ROE

Badminton James Logan Badminton Submitted by Coach Nguyen April 16 James Logan 5, Mission San Jose 12 April 18 James Logan 17, Moreau Catholic 0 James Logan is currently 11-2

Vikings face Colts and finish on top SUBMITTED BY DENNY MARTINEZ AND MAXPREPS The Irvington Vikings defeated a determined James Logan team 4-2 on April 19th. After five lead changes, the Vikings pulled out the win thanks to a strong sixth inning during which a wild pitch scored Isaac Cruz to give them the lead for good. Dustin Golobic got it done on the hill on the way to a win - two runs over 4 1/3 innings, one strike-out, two walks and eight hits. Jake Doty threw out two runners to shut down the Colts’ running game.


April 23, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

Coaching icon remembered BY KENNY JACOBY PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW On April 21, legendary Washington High School football coach Jim Ingram was remembered by those he coached, mentored, and inspired. His memorial

service was held in the main gymnasium at Washington, where he coached football for forty years. Ingram died of heart failure on March 5, 2013, at the age of 80. He first moved to Fremont in 1960, where he taught and coached football at Washington. He was the head football coach from 1960 to 1975, and

again from 1979 until his retirement in 2002. He amassed 11 Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) Championships, with an overall record of 230-151-16 and an MVAL record of 134-84-16. Ingram was a true leader he embraced his position. He not only coached the Varsity team, but the entire program and was committed to fostering success in his student athletes on the field, in the classroom, and in life. Dozens of Ingram’s former players were in attendance at the memorial. Ingram’s brother Bob, son Michael, and grandson Aaron, all gave remembrances at the memorial. Fremont Mayor Bill Harrison - Washington High School Class of 1988 - led the ceremony. The celebration concluded with the dedication of a bust of “Coach I” at Tak Fudenna Stadium. Donations can be made to complete Coach I’s

Husky bats subdue Cougars

statue through Washington High School Alumni Foundation, c/o Bill Harrison, 37272 Maple Street, Fremont, CA 94536.

Coach Ingram had a true passion for the game and life in general, and touched countless lives along the way.

Tri-City Thunder qualifies for Cal State games SUBMITTED BY ARAVINDAN RAMAN The Tri-City Thunder U13 Blue Elite squad traveled to San Jose to compete for a spot in the Cal State Games this summer. The Thunder finished the event with a 2-1 record, good for second place and eligible for the Cal State Games in San Diego. Thunder players include: Akshay Aravindan, Atmar Mundu, Devonte Johnson, Hekili Jordan, Isaiah Washington, Kyle Pruhsmeier, Ramon Barragan, Richard Pabalate, Tyler Lynch, Koby Silva. For more information, visit Thunder Blog spot: http://tricitythunderbasketball.blogspot.com/

Lady Colts control their destiny Women’s Softball

Men’s Baseball SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Washington Huskies showed they are a force to reckoned with in the Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) as they handled the Newark Memorial Cougars 10-4 on April 19 to hold on to first place. The Huskies and Cougars started the day in a three-way tie with James Logan for first place. Washington, after a impressive day on the diamond, now holds the top baseball spot in the MVAL. Friday’s game started as a tight battle; the Huskies scored fast and early, showing hitting power as they scored three runs in the second inning, but Newark responded with four runs in the third when Brandon Sewell walked three and Newark’s Tommy Gallagher’s came back with a two-run triple to keep the cougars in the game. With two outs in the fourth, Washington’s Nick Quejado outran an infield single after a ground ball got by first base. Washington’s Jacob Call added to the Washington offensive show as he singled, stole two bases and scored in the fourth to tie the game. He also walked, stole a base and scored in the five-run sixth inning that put the game out of reach. The final blow to bury the Newark Memorial Cougars came in the sixth inning when Brandon Sewell hit a two-run homer to left field, followed by Nick Quejado with a two-run triple. Washington outfielder Latrell Harris walked and scored on a sacrifice fly, completing the Husky rally. In the bottom of the sixth inning, Harris went airborne to make a terrific diving catch in center field, denying a hit from Newark’s Edgar Gonzalez

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The James Logan women’s softball team is again in control of it own destiny this year. If all goes as planned, they will face a championship rematch with Amador Valley. Currently they hold a one-game lead over Newark and Washington in Mission Valley Athletic League play. In a varsity game with the Irvington Vikings on April 18, the Lady Colts took control right from the start. A great day at bat with 15 hits to open a lead in the first inning with two runs and never looked back. In the second inning, an opportunity to slow the onslaught was missed by the Vikings when a dropped center field fly blew the game wide open. The result was six more runs that put the game out of reach.

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Throughout the game, aggressive base running by the Lady Colts resulted in numerous scoring opportunities as runners were often in scoring position. The Colt victory was a team effort but big-hitting stars for the day were Cyntia Salangsang (2-2), Clarissa Blaquera (2-2) and Kimberly Goulart (3-4).

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Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. GH13671005 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Airalee Tan, Airalee and Joel on behalf of Jace Tan-Wong, a minor for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Airalee Tan, Airalee and Joel on behalf of Jace Tan-Wong, a minor filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Airalee Noreen Tan to Airalee Studley Jace Robin Tan-Wong to Jace Robin StudleyWong The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: March 13, 2013 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2474661# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13675673 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Maria Rebecca Posadas Monta for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Maria Rebecca Posadas Monta filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Maria Rebecca Posadas Monta to Rebecca Posadas Monta The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: June 28, 2013, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri City Voice Date: April 16, 2013 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2474427# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13668670 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Paul Tershuren for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Paul Tershuren to Paul Terschuren The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Friday May 31, 2013, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: February 25, 2013 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473509# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13674451 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Raghunatha Balaji Krishnamurthy for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Raghunatha Balaji Krishnamurthy filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Raghunatha Balaji Krishnamurthy to Raghunatha Krishnamurthy Balaji The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 07/05/13, Time: 8:45am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What Happening Tri-City Voice Date: Apr. 05, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2472025# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13674457 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Badrinarayana Shwetha Alampalli for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Badrinarayana Shwetha Alampalli filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Badrinarayana Shwetha Alampalli to Shwetha Badrinarayana Alampalli The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 07/05/13, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri City Voice Date: April 05, 2013 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2472017#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476974 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Everything Green, 44268 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Chantal Vuong, 2086 Danderhall Way, San Jose, CA 95121 Lacey Tran, 1765 Landess Ave., #37, Milpitas, CA 95035 This business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chantal Vuong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 8, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473760# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477196 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Palm Dental, 43625 Mission Boulevard, Suite 208, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587, Alameda County Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., a Professional Corporation, 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 04/18/2008. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 15, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473532# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477199 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Palm Dental Associates, 43625 Mission Boulevard, Suite 208, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587, Alameda County Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., a Professional Corporation, 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 15, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473519# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477198 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Palm Dental Group, 43625 Mission Boulevard, Suite 208, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587, Alameda County Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., a Professional Corporation, 2701 Decoto Road, #4, Union City, CA 94587; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Herbert Chiu, D.D.S., President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 15, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473513# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476610 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Nina’s Bode LLC, 1037 B Street #B, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Nina’s Bode, LLC, 1037 B Street, #B, Hayward, CA 94541; California This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Melody Baca, President/CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 27, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/23, 4/30, 5/7, 5/14/13 CNS-2473503# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477106 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Pameer Gem and Jewelry, 47978 Warm Springs Blvd., #G, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda, P.O. Box 276, Fremont CA 94537 Abdullah Azizi, 37950 Fremont Blvd., #67, Fremont, CA 94537 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 4/11/13 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Abdullah Azizi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 11, 2013

NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2472311# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476742-43 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Omex Office Maintenance Experts & Reven Facility Services, 45268 Industrial Drive, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Reven Management Corporation, California, 7438 Inverness Street, San Ramon, CA 94583 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 3/27/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Alex Prasad, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 7, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2471680# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477051-52 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Eilasor, (2) Ducy & Luey’s, 36724 Cedar Blvd., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Rosalie Duinistra, 36724 Cedar Blvd., Newark, CA 94560. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rosalie Duinistra This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 10, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2471656# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477054 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cabrillo Mom’s Family Restaurant, 4949 Stevenson Blvd., Ste. L, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Esperanza Bermlidez Ureno, 4949 Stevenson Blvd., Ste. L, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Esperanza B. Ureno This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 10, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2471644# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 477003 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Jims Music, 40919 Fremont Blvd., #8, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Jims Music James P. Silva, 40919 Fremont Blvd., #8, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6-1-1998 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ James P. Silva This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 9, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2471165# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476321 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sweet Essence, 4747 Mildred Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Vanessa Alicia Holmes, 5865 Central Ave., Newark, CA 94560 Amy Elizabeth Steinert, 4747 Mildred Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a General Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Vanessa Alicia Holmes, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 20, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2471162# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476886 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BR, 26369 Gading Rd. #5, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda

Remedios Borja, 26369 Gading Rd. #5, Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Remedios Borja, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 4, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2469792# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476246 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mocama’s, 925 B Street, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Farid Cazares Garcia, 38850 Bell ST. Apt. 2, Fremont, CA 94536 Francisco Moreno, 20057 Topaz Ct., Castro Valley, CA 94546 This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 03-15-13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Farid Cazares Garcia, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 18, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2469671# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476885 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Neucut Hair & Nails Spa, 40900 Fremont Blvd. #C1, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Giangthuy C. Nguyen, 1916 Commodore Dr., San Jose, CA 95133 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Giang Thuy C. Nguyen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 04, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30/13 CNS-2469261# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476470 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: J R Service Co., 22455 Western Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Josefina Angelmira Valderrama, 22455 Western Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 8/1/94 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Josefina Angelmira Valderrama This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 22, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30/13 CNS-2469255# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476611 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: B Street Studio, 37641 Iron Horse Ln, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Jude S. Silva, 37641 Iron Horse Ln., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jude Silva This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 27, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30/13 CNS-2467490# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476169 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ruby Land Construction, 42836 Gatewood Street, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Tun Tun Lin, 42836 Gatewood Streeet, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tun Tun Lin This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 15, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).

continued on page 31 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30/13 CNS-2467253# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 464313 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Punjabi Royalty, 4541 Bartolo Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536 The fictitious business name statement for the partnership was filed on 04/23/2012 Puja Verma, 4541 Bartolo Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536 This business was conducted by: S/ Puja Verma This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 27, 2013. 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2465604# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476442 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Auto Mall Smog Test Repair, 43026 Christy St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Thu Nguyen, 1641 Tierra Buena Dr., San Jose, CA 95121. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Thu Anh Nguyen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 22, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2465595# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476474 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: JR Heating & Cooling Systems, 22455 Western Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Andrew R. Valderrama, 22455 Western Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Andrew R. Valderrama This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 22, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2465008# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476002 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AAA Cleaning Service, 2844 Romagnolo St., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Sylvia Moore, 2844 Romagnolo St., Hayward, CA 94541 Diane Wade, 355 Joaquin Ave. #463, San Leandro, CA 94577 This business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sylvia Moore This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 12, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2465003# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476554 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Diamond Spa, 43446 Grimmer Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 39918 Lindsay McDermott Ln., Fremont, CA 94538 Sherry B Qi, 39918 Lindsay McDermott Ln., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 3-26-2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shery B. Qi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 26, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2464921# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476031 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fremont Unified Student Store (FUSS), 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #266, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Fremont Unified Student Store (FUSS), 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #266, Fremont, CA 94539; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ivy Wu, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 13, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2464919#


April 23, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

Courage of conviction slowly Harvey begins to understand the fallacy and frailty of vaporous lines drawn between layers of humanity.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

I

t is often said that the mark of government is compromise and when such agreements are reached between dissenting parties, all come away a bit disgruntled, yet with a tinge of victory as well. In this country, usually, such understandings are not met with violence or, hopefully, physical or mental bullying. Admiration is reserved for those who persevere and move forward with the assets at hand and a determination to succeed. Courage of conviction in the “right” way to do things is a worthy quality, although without room for other points of view, it can quickly turn sour. In the 1897 novel by Rudyard Kipling, followed by an Oscar Winning 1937 film performance by Spencer Tracy, Captains Courageous tells the tale of a spoiled child, Harvey, living a privileged life, who is suddenly removed from high society and a condescending environment to experience hard, honest work, wholly focused on the basic values of life. Although the lessons learned are filled with fear, belligerence and intransigence,

In the same way, our communities are bound together by one constant theme, creating the best environment through efficient and meaningful efforts. Divisions and virtual lines of demarcation between citizens and their government are detrimental to our community health. Separation and isolation is contrary to the very idea of community, often the result of great intentions that have either been left unsupervised to institutionalize and harden into a brittle, unyielding behemoth. When government becomes estranged from the people it serves either through physical isolation, personal life or emotional detachment, a shock to the system is inevitable. In order to moderate this tendency, at least in cities and towns, elections of well-known neighbors determine who sits atop the pyramid of bureaucracy. In the purest sense, local government is closest to the people. As the group of constituents broadens, responsibility to the electorate becomes less clear. Less populous towns and cities have an advantage as the connection between elected officials and voters is short and direct. Use of collective resources are typically more exposed to view although there have been some egregious exceptions (i.e. Bell, CA). In all communities, commissions and boards are used to strengthen the bond between citizens and government. It is here that motivated and civic-minded citizens are able to bring common sense and practical input, a role of giving advice and consent. Although such meetings may not

Irvington puts on a show

be dramatic, they serve an important purpose and should not be dismissed by either bureaucrats or elected officials. When such bodies advise, there is usually wisdom in their actions that should not be dismissed. Councilmembers have selected these folks to guide them and without their efforts, a tendency to become removed from voters can become disastrous. Other elected bodies have something to offer as well – Board of Education, ACWD, Union Sanitary District, etc. City Councils and Staff would be well served to revisit their own convictions and summon the courage to re-examine what led to public service. In the case of a recent distribution of Human Relations funds for social organizations, the community appeared united behind a recommendation by a City commission. Did the council have the courage to listen? Just as when they were faced with a difference of opinion between the Art Review Board and Staff, the ultimate decision should rest with the people. In Captains Courageous, spoiled and isolated Harvey learned his lesson through a major reality check. Too much separation from constituents is an artificial gap that will ultimately betray the community. Harvey learned his lesson, so can we.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Steve Taylor Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby

Men’s Baseball

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Irvington put on offensive hitting display against the Moreau Mariners, 7-1 in seven innings on April 18. The Vikings appear to be dialed in on Moreau pitching, picking just the right pitches to hit. Irvington’s Justin Weightman had an impressive game as his fast ball and change-up were working to keep the Mariner lineup off balance; they could only manage one hit. The Viking attack started early, taking the lead in the third, scoring two runs when a Moreau outfielder could not handle a sacrifice fly hit by Cameron Cabigas. That allowed the Vikings to score three in the third. The hitting combination of and Devin Martinez, and Daniel Parsons sealed the day for the Vikings in the sixth when Devin Martinez started thing off with RBI single followed by a sacrifice fly by Daniel Parsons. Tommy Bass was the hitting star of the day for Irvington as he drive in two RBIs on three hits.

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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April 23, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

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Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info

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ENVIRONMENTAL TEST ENGINEER Conduct environmental tests using electrical, various methods. BS-Electrical Engineering, FT DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR Analyze, maintain database system for a testing lab. Bachelor’s Degree, 2 years experience, FT Fax Quanta Labs, Santa Clara 408.988.0762

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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“Places of Worship” is published on the first Tuesday of every month. Faith-based organizations that have agreed to distribute Tri-City Voice to their congregations are included. A complete list of all greater Tri-City faith-based organizations can be found at: www.tricityvoice.com under “Community Resources.”

April 23, 2013

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Washington Hospital New Haven Unified achieves National Board of Education Breast Center Accreditation update SUBMITTED BY CLAYTON WARREN Washington Hospital announced on April 16, a three-year full accreditation designation of its Breast Health Program from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), a program administered by the American College of Surgeons. In 2009, The Washington Women’s Center Breast Health Program was the first in Northern California, and only the third in the state, to be fully accredited by the NAPBC. “This latest recognition is a testament to the hard work of a truly talented and dedicated group of physicians, nurses and support staff who, working together, here at Washington Hospital are creating a facility that not only serves the needs of our residents, but does so at a level second to none,” said Nancy Farber, CEO. “We’re extremely proud of this achievement because of what it means to the level of care we provide our community,” said Dr. William Dugoni, medical director of Washington Hospital’s Women’s Health

SUBMITTED BY JOANNE BURKMAN Up-to-date information of critical importance and/or interest to the Hayward community is now available to all registered participants of Nixle through the use of the latest technology. Our new Nixle Community Information Service includes a weekly “police blotter” and allows the City to send important, valuable information directly to the community when circumstances warrant. Messages can be instantly delivered to subscribers via cell phone text messages and e-mail notifications, and made available online at Nixle’s web site at www.nixle.com. Subscribers can specify multiple zip codes from which they can get regular “police blotter” information

SUBMITTED BY NEHA KOTHARI The most popular annual dance competition is just around the corner. On Saturday, April 27 the India Community Center will host the annual Youthsava. This annual competition is named for the Sanskrit word Uthsava, meaning celebration, and youth, and helps participating Indo-American kids and teens develop a strong sense of pride in Indian heritage and culture. Youthsava draws over 1,500 spectators who come to watch the 500-plus participants and encourages youth to show off their teamwork skills and creative abilities by planning and performing a dance routine to Indian folk and Bollywood music. The event gathers the greater Indo-American community in support of the youth dancers, who receive awards for the top performances in each category. The competition encourages youth to connect directly with Indian culture by wearing colorful costumes and dancing to carefully chosen music, representing specific regions of India. For more information, call (408) 934-1130 or visit www.IndiaCC.org. Youthsava Saturday, Apr 27 9 a.m. India Community Center 525 Los Coches St., Milpitas (408) 934-1130 www.indiacc.org Tickets: $20 adults, $8 kids (3-13)

Program and co-chair of the Breast Health Committee. “Our team approach to the treatment of breast disease is resulting in the highest standards of care being provided to our patients. We are committed to providing patients with quality care close to home and this accreditation confirms that patients with breast disease are receiving the full spectrum of treatment and followup care at our facility.” Accreditation by the NAPBC is only given to those centers that have voluntarily committed to provide the highest level of quality breast care and that undergo a rigorous evaluation process and review of their performance. “This accreditation means that women treated at Washington Hospital have access to state-of-the-art services and comprehensive breast care,” said Dr. Vandana B. Sharma, medical director of Washington Hospital’s Cancer Genetics Program and cochair of the Breast Health Committee. To learn more about the programs and services offered at the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

to keep up-to-date with what is happening in their neighborhood. The City will use the technology to send messages ranging from crime prevention information to community events to alerts on critical health and safety incidents affecting a specific geographical area. This will be incredibly useful for situations such as an at-risk missing juvenile or an Alzheimer’s patient who has wandered away from home. Subscribers can choose to receive messages by text to their smart phone or through e-mail or both. Signing up for text messaging is as easy as texting the word HAYWARD to 888777. To receive e-mail notifications, simply go to www.Nixle.com and click on the “Sign Up Free” button to get started. Subscribers can unsubscribe just as easily or change the geographical areas of interest.

Alameda County schools named California Distinguished Schools SUBMITTED BY KRISTEN YASUKAWA, ACOE Sheila Jordan, Superintendent of Alameda County Schools, congratulates six public middle and high schools in Alameda County recognized as 2013 California Distinguished Schools by the California Department of Education. The schools were among 218 in the state honored for their innovative approaches to narrowing the academic achievement gap between higher-performing and lower-performing students. In the Greater Tri-City area, William Hopkins Junior High and Canyon Middle School were honored. “In today’s challenging education environment, it is especially important that we recognize schools that continue to model success, building a culture of collaboration and partnerships that foster high achievement for all students,” said Superintendent Jordan. “I commend these Alameda County schools for their hard work and commitment to a quality education that acknowledges and welcomes diversity and champions the assets of all students.” The schools selected as California Distinguished Schools will be honored with a plaque and a flag during regional award ceremonies in May. For more information, visit www.acoe.org.

SUBMITTED BY NEW HAVEN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT The Board of Education, on April 16, approved the renaming of Alvarado Middle School to Itliong - Vera Cruz Middle School, effective September 2015. The name change honors the memory of Filipino-American labor leaders Larry Itliong and Philip Vera Cruz. The Board instructed District staff to formulate an implementation plan and secure funds to cover costs before the name change takes effect. Community groups have pledged to cover the costs, estimated at approximately $15,000. Contemporaries of Cesar Chavez, after whom the District’s other middle school is named, Itliong and Vera Cruz helped lead the 1965 Delano Grape Strike that led to the formation of the United Farm Workers. It is believed Itliong - Vera Cruz Middle School will be the first school in the nation named after Filipino Americans. Also, the Board: Received an update on the adoption of Common Core State Standards, a nationwide initiative to establish consistent and clear education standards for English/language arts and mathematics. Chief Academic Officer Dr. Arlando Smith outlined the District’s efforts to build CCSS awareness, provide professional development for staff and help parents know how the standards will affect their children’s education. Dr. Smith provided examples of “shifts” that will occur, such as reading as much non-fiction as fiction in English/language arts and focusing on depth, as opposed to breadth, in math. Recognized students from Pioneer Elementary School who have participated in an after-school writing/journalism enrichment class to produce the “Pioneer Pathways” newspaper.

Join SAVE and see how we Open Doors! SUBMITTED BY TINA FERNANDEZ SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) will hold its next Open Doors community education and outreach event on Thursday, April 25. This free group presentation is an opportunity for the public to meet SAVE staff, learn about all the vital services SAVE provides for domestic violence survivors, hear a SAVE client share her story, and meet other SAVE supporters. Open Doors guests will be inspired as they discover all the ways SAVE helps abuse survivors step away from violence and cross the threshold to lives that are safe and peaceful. For more information or to reserve your space, call Tina at (510) 574-2266 or e-mail tina@save-dv.org. You may also register for this free event by visiting: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4122093292. SAVE Open Doors Thursday, Apr 25 12 Noon to 1:30 p.m. (lunch is provided) Nakamura Clinic 33077 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 574-2266

LGBT students face unsafe school environments SUBMITTED BY ANDY MARRA California middle and high schools are hostile places for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, according to School Climate in California, a research snapshot of the experiences of LGBT students in California schools released today by GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network. The findings based on California students who participated in GLSEN’s 2011 National School Climate Survey, show that LGBT students in California schools face high levels of harassment based on their sexual orientation or gender expression and regularly hear antigay slurs from students and staff. The research snapshot also shows that while most students could identify at least one supportive educator, very few had access to any LGBT-inclusive resources or curriculum at school. More than a decade of findings from the GLSEN’s National School Climate Survey have shown consistently that school-based supports – such as anti-bullying/harassment policies, supportive staff, LGBT-inclusive curricular resources, and Gay-Straight Alliance student clubs (GSAs) – can positively affect LGBT students’ school experiences. “While we have seen some progress nationally in the 14 years since we started our National School Climate Survey, much work remains to ensure that all California schools are safe and affirming environments for LGBT students,” said Dr. Eliza Byard, GLSEN’s Executive Director. “We look forward to working with our California Chapter partners to ensure that every LGBT student has equal access to a quality education.” For information on GLSEN’s research, educational resources, public policy advocacy, student organizing programs and educator training initiatives, visit www.glsen.org.


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PUBLIC NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476459 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MTL, 4200 Bay St. Apt. 205, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Gurjit S. Mann, 4200 Bay St. #205, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gurjit S. Mann This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 22, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2463674# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476356 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Arise Church, 42828 Albrae Street, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Fremont Chinese Evangelical Free Church, California, 42828 Albrae Street, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Thomas To, Vice President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2463610# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475600 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: JJSHRI, 2090 Warmspring Ct, Suite 280, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Aryna Chetal, 45319 Whitetail Ct., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Aryna Chetal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 05, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2463589#

GOVERNMENT Notice Inviting sealed proposals for Custodial Services City of Union City Department of Public Works Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: Custodial Serviceswill be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until Thursday, May 2, 2013, at 2:00 P.M. at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans, specifications and proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call (510) 675-5308 for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $20.00 PER SET WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $30.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED Call Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request bid packages to be mailed. All questions should be emailed to Richard Sealana at RSealana@unioncity.org, or call (510) 675-5337. All bids shall be accompanied by a bid bond, cashier’s check, or certified check made payable to the City of Union City in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the aggregate amount of the bid. Successful bidders shall supply fidelity insurance coverage. See General Specifications regarding “Insurance” and Bonding.” All insurance will be required before the contract is awarded. All bids shall be incompliance with Labor Code Section 1060 – 1065. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: April 23, 2013 4/23/13 CNS-2474420# CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS CITY PROJECT NO. 13-01 NOTICE TO CONTRACTOR

Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: UNION CITY 2013-14 CITYWIDE OVERLAY, will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 AlvaradoNiles Road, Union City, California, until TUESDAY, MAY 07, 2013, 2:00PM PST, at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. Project is funded by the Local Sales Tax (Measure B) and State Gas Tax Funds. The Contractor shall possess a Class A or C-12 California contractor’s license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans specifications and proposals forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call (510) 675-5308 for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $ 10.00 PER CD WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $ 20.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, consists of grinding/milling of existing asphalt concrete pavement, asphalt concrete spot repairs on various roadways, hot mix asphalt paving, provide associated traffic control measures, lane & crosswalk striping, iron adjustment and other such items indicated and required by the plans, Standard Specifications, and these technical specifications. Call Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request bid packages to be mailed. All questions should be emailed or fax to Travis Huang of City of Union City, email: travish@unioncity.org or fax to (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: APRIL 23, 2013 4/23/13 CNS-2474397# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #901049 Contractor Bonding Assistance Program South County – Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 2:00 PM at Castro Valley Library, Chabot Room, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, CA and North County – Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 10:00 AM at General Services Agency, Conference Room 222, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on May 29, 2013

County Contact: Ryan DeCoud at (510) 2089619 or via email: ryan.decoud@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 4/23/13 CNS-2474042# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Technical Services Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, 9th Floor, Suite 900, Oakland, CA 94612 MANDATORY PRE-BID SITE VISIT AND MEETING: PROJECT #CPPADA09017172A Las Vistas 1 Accessibility Monday, April 29, 2013 at 3:00 PM at Las Vistas 1, 2130 Fairmont Drive, San Leandro, CA Responses Due by 3:00 pm on May 14, 2013 County Contact: Rahman Batin at 510.208.3993 or via email: rahman.batin@acgov.org Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 4/23/13 CNS-2473396# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSATechnical Services Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, 9th Floor, Suite 900, Oakland, CA 94612 MANDATORY PREBID SITE VISIT AND MEETING: PROJECT #CPPADA10017040A San Leandro Veterans Memorial Building Passenger Elevator Friday, April 26, 2013 at 10:00 AM at 1105 Bancroft Avenue, San Leandro, CA Responses Due by 3:00 pm on May 13, 2013 County Contact: Rahman Batin at 510.208.3993 or via email: rahman.batin@acgov.org Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 4/23/13 CNS-2473217#

PROBATE

istration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on May 21, 2013 at 9:30 AM in Dept. Probate/201, Second Floor located at 2120 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner/Attorney for Petitioner: Nicholas K. Jay - SBN 264760, Law Offices of Gilbert Y. Jay, 210 Post Street, Suite 208, San Francisco, CA 94108, Telephone: (415) 788-7300 4/23, 4/30, 5/7/13 CNS-2473796#

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JULIA BARRON CASE NO. RP13675425 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Julia Barron A Petition for Probate has been filed by Eunice Andrade in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Eunice Andrade be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent admin-

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES /NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 26th Day of April 2013 at or after 10: 30 a m pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Joseph Villalobos AA4052C 1/29/13 Christian Gipson B129 12/30/12 Rosa Arreola B242 2/10/13 Edalberto Martinez B303 12/1/12 Brenda Rossi C231-32 12/9/12 4/16, 4/23/13 CNS-2469755#

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Swinging on the porch, drinking sweet tea, and catching fire flies; what could be better than childhood memories of the South? Journey through Alabama, Georgia, Texas, and Louisiana where life is simple and time stands still as 75 Ohlone College dance students captivate their audience in Ohlone College’s Theatre and Dance Department Production “Southern Comfort: A Sentimental Journey.” Ohlone College dance professor and choreographer Janel TomblinBrown is the creative force behind the original theatrical dance performance. “This dance production is loosely based on my memories as a child traveling to the Southern states to visit my family,” says Tomblin-Brown. The production includes a wide array of dance styles including jazz, tap, lyrical, contemporary, hip-hop, and ballet, with choreography not only by Tomblin-Brown but also by dance faculty and selected student choreographers. Preparation for the performance, which began in early February, also includes the work of Ohlone faculty and staff including set and sound designer Fred Alim, lighting design by Matt O’Donnell, and costume design and production by Tamara Cooper. “I was raised as a California girl, but my heart is Southern and ‘Y’all’ has always been part of my vocabulary. I’m excited to share warm memories of my southern relatives and the southern hospitality instilled in me with my California community,” comments Tomblin-Brown. For tickets and more information, call (510) 659-6031 or visit www.smithcenter.com. Southern Comfort: A Sentimental Journey Thursday, Apr 25 – Saturday, Apr 27 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $12 - $15 Event Parking: $2

Irvington High treats seniors to the ‘Red Carpet’ SUBMITTED BY MERRILL GARDENS Seniors at Merrill Gardens in Fremont enjoyed the interaction of high school students at a “Red Carpet Event” on March 23. The Hollywood-themed evening was put on by Irvington High School’s Associated Student Body with the leadership of group planners Kavitta Ghai, Melanie Tsoi, and Brandon Truong. Students sat and visited with the residents and performed several times with a male dance performance, a cappella trio, and numerous other fun acts including the chicken dance and Macarena. Smiling faces prevailed as seniors flapped their arms and tweeted their fingers to the chicken dance. “The students are wonderful. They took pictures with our Merrill Gardens folks in the star shaped balloon arch. I am always impressed with the younger generation and their thoughtfulness with our seniors,” says Merrill Gardens Active Living Director Jane Miceli. “From the beautiful and elaborate decorations they set up and took down to their gentleness in seating and welcoming our group, they were top notch.” Merrill Gardens felt privileged to host the “Red Carpet Event.”

Kiplinger’s best values in public colleges SUBMITTED BY JESSICA WEEG Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has named the 100 best values in public colleges, ranking four-year schools that combine outstanding education with

Signups for Santacruzan SUBMITTED BY MADIE RAMOS The Filipino Community of St. Joseph Church/ Old Mission San Jose in Fremont would like to invite interested parents to sign-up their child/children for the upcoming Santacruzan event to be held on Saturday, May 18 at St. Joseph parish. Ages 4-18 are encouraged to participate. Santacruzan (Holy Cross) is one of the most celebrated religious Filipino catholic traditions in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary and to commemorate the finding of the Holy cross by Queen Helena and her son, Emperor Constantine. All are welcome. Please contact Madie Ramos at (650) 796-1078 or email madie428@gmail.com for details.

economic value. The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill again takes top honors, a spot it has held consistently since Kiplinger’s first analysis in 1998. However this year, five California schools landed in the top 20 despite a 72 percent rise in tuition fees since 2007-08. Northern California boasts the following honorees from Kiplinger’s list: University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Santa Cruz From Southern California the honorees are: University of California, Los Angeles University of California, San Diego

UC institutions charge the five highest total amounts for instate students (and the six highest total amounts for out-of-staters) among Kiplinger’s top 100 public schools. For UC schools, academics are key. Sixth-ranked UCLA ($26,888 in-state) admits just 25 percent of applicants, with 44 percent topping 700 on the math portion of the SATs and 22 percent exceeding 700 on the verbal portion. Fortunately, most students don’t pay the shocking sticker prices. UC schools offset their high cost with liberal financial aid. To find out more details about what makes these schools among the best value colleges in the country and to see what other schools made the list, please visit: kiplinger.com/links/college.


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April 23, 2013

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You’ll find valuable information about your community & voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are nonpartisan & free to the public

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Fremont Cribbage Club

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

American Legion Auxiliary We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters

Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

First United Methodist Church Music Series

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

benefit local humanitarian charities.

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

T.O.P.S. Weight Support Group Take Off Pounds Sensibly Real People! Real Weight Loss! Wednesday Nights 6:30 - 8:00 27303 Sleepy Hollow Ave S Kaiser Building 1st Floor Hayward RLTOPS0336@yahoo.com 207-651-0565

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English 7pm-9pm Tuesdays - Free 36054 Niles Blvd. 650-556-6428 Meditation, discussion, Q&A with David De Young, American Buddhist teacher in Ajahn Chah Thai Forest Tradition. All are welcome.

Call for Art San Leandro Art Assoc. Festival of the Arts Receiving Sat., June 8 10-3pm at Casa Peralta 384 West Estudillo Festival June 29 & 30 Interested artists can apply www.slartassoc.org or slartassoc@yahoo.com

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Mission Trails Mustangs

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Free concerts the first Sunday each month, 4pm. 30 minute organ & piano recitals & occasional guest artists. Free-will offering opportunity to

Shout out to your community

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon Fri SAVE Office 9 am - noon Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

FREE Taxes Done & E-Filing WHY PAY Let VITA do your taxes! IRS-certified Tax Preparers $51,000 or less income. Restrictions may apply Fremont Family Resource Ctr 39155 Liberty St., Fremont M-W 4p-8p F 10a-1p Open Jan 23-April 15 2013 More Info 510-574-2020

Community Seder Welcomes All! March 26th

Serious Mental Illness Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Mar 7, 2013 from 6:30-8:30pm in Union City. Registration required. Contact: Barb St. Clair 415-879-0399 or Email Stclair.barb@gmail.com NAMIacs.org/F2F/mar2013

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area

Drivers for Survivors Need Volunteer Drivers!

Monthly meetings; interesting cultural programs. Stay in members’ homes abroad. We need home and day hosts for members from New Zealand visiting us May 17-24. www.ffsfba.org 510-794-6844

Volunteers to be companion drivers for ambulatory cancer patients to transport & accompany our clients to their life saving medical appointments. We work with your schedule. Please email volunteer@driversforsurvivors.org or call 510.579.0535

Ford F-100 Elite of Northern CA East Bay Chapter

Tri-Valley Arthritis Walk

All owners of 53-56 FORD 1/2 ton pick-up and panels are invited to join our club. Pick-ups up to 65 are welcome also. Newsletters, shows, fellowship Call Ken, 510-782-7312

Saturday, May 4th at LifeStyleRx 1119 E. Stanley Blvd., Livermore Registration 8:00 a.m. Walk 10:00 a.m. 1 or 3 mile options, Tailgate Extravaganza, Raffle Prizes, Refreshments, Kids Activities, www.TVArthritisWalk.Kintera.org or Call (800) 464-6240

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

join us to celebrate Passover! RSVP req for the seder by 3/15.Night of Illusion (for all ages) 3/16 Family Shabbat services 5:30pm & 7pm on 3/22 Inclusive Reform community. 510-656-7141 or visit www.bethtorah-fremont.org

Live Big Band Music

Fremont Area Writers

Celebrate Recovery

April 27-Sat-2pm-4pm What’s Up Big Band At NewPark Mall, Newark Music of Big Band Legends such as Glenn Miller, Harry James, Perez Prado, Count Basie & More (Free admission) e-mail: mikeodee@yahoo.com

Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Rik at (510) 791-8639

Free yourself from any hurt, hang-ups or habit join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursday, 7pm-9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Spring Gear & Equipment Sale Saturday 4/20 8:30-12:30 Tri-City Mothers of Multiples Open to the public, free entry. Best deals on everything for baby and kids. 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark www.tricitymoms.org

Tri-City Garden Club Plant Sale Friday, May 3rd 9AM-2PM Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pky Fremont

www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

The Union City Historical Museum 3841 Smith St. Union City Open Thurs.-Sat 10am-4pm Visit our Museum. You’ll find valuable information about our community, past history and current happenings. www.unioncitymuseum.com 510-675-9501

Cougars Summer Basketball Camp Girls 8-15 Years of age Mon-Fri, June 24-28 9:30am - 2:30pm Full & Half Day Options Silliman Activity Center Gym 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark www.newark.org 510-578-4620 Sign-Ups Now Being Accepted!

Palma Cela Baptist Church Juneteenth Festival Sat June 15 10am-4pm 28605 Ruus Rd, Haywardd Food, Music, Vendors and other activities. Benefits education scholarships Call for info 510-786-2866

Assembly Natural Resources Committee approves AB 7 The regulation of fracking is overdue SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA The Assembly Natural Resources Committee approved Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski’s (D-Fremont) bill to expand public disclosure on hydraulic fracturing in California on April 15, 2013. The bill passed with bipartisan support. It will next be heard in the Assembly Appropriations Committee. “AB 7 requires oil operators to provide the Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources a complete list of every chemical used, the maximum concentration, the purpose for the chemical, how much water was used, what kind of water was used and what they did with the fluid once the fracking was complete,” Wieckowski said. “The regulation of fracking is overdue. The most important first step to addressing and mitigating our environmental concerns is to require that all the information is placed in the correct hands.”


April 23, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 33

continued from page 12

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 05 Highest $: 1,225,000 Median $: 380,000 Lowest $: 363,500 Average $: 599,700 ADDRESS

ZIP

18251 Apricot Way 17106 Roberto Street 4349 Shamrock Way 5345 Willow Glen Place 25505 Crestfield Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

$375,000 $380,000 $363,500 $1,225,000 $655,000

3 3 3 5 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1230 1330 1491 5180 1893

1953 1958 1963 1992 1998

02-28-13 03-04-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-08-13

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 26 Highest $: 1,326,000 Median $: Lowest $: 250,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

5332 Burnside Court 35224 Cornish Drive 38272 Eggers Common 38880 Glenview Drive 35933 Helm Court 4313 La Cosa Avenue 36710 Matiz Common 48 Montalban Drive 3096 Surry Place 39755 Bissy Common 3814 Carol Avenue 4613 Fanwood Terrace 3575 Gilman Common 39224 Guardino Drive #115 39059 Guardino Drive #211 39680 Iolani Court 5012 Yellowstone Park Drive 43765 Abeloe Terrace 42262 Forsythia Drive 1464 Lemos Lane 49097 Tomahawk Place 950 Yakima Drive 3300 Darwin Drive 34325 Eucalyptus Terrace 4423 MacBeth Circle 34225 Whitehead Lane

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

$624,500 $650,000 $670,000 $621,000 $750,000 $590,000 $360,000 $657,000 $675,000 $301,000 $385,000 $250,000 $595,000 $252,500 $363,000 $464,000 $450,000 $785,000 $1,326,000 $990,000 $943,000 $877,000 $656,000 $825,000 $711,000 $505,000

3 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 3 1 2 3 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 4 5 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1424 2228 1722 1344 1986 1579 1474 1627 1980 1067 1026 1242 1637 693 1077 1067 1285 1428 2284 1902 2162 2843 1650 1830 1717 1390

1963 1972 2004 1960 1995 1962 1971 1984 1972 1980 1974 1971 1998 1990 1987 1961 1960 1987 1962 1964 1978 1978 1969 1992 1984 1969

03-06-13 03-05-13 03-07-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 02-28-13 03-07-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-05-13 03-04-13 03-04-13 03-08-13 03-05-13 03-04-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-04-13 03-04-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-04-13

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 25 Highest $: 830,000 Median $: Lowest $: 155,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

20748 Angus Way 22755 Bayview Avenue 260 Flint Court #11 684 Kingsford Way 20905 Montgomery Avenue 25111 Oakridge Court 1213 Richard Place 21759 Rio Vista Street 19430 Royal Avenue 547 Solano Avenue 290 Carrick Circle 25912 Hayward Boulevard 26112 Evergreen Drive 24490 Groom Street 26170 Hickory Avenue 26473 Hickory Avenue 32240 Payne Street 27810 Pompano Avenue 11 Raintree Court #22 27505 Tampa Avenue #52 61 Trestle Drive 31954 Trevor Avenue 2140 Florida Street 27559 Ponderosa Court 27534 Portsmouth Avenue

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545

ZIP

699 Ann Place 1441 Big Basin Drive 532 Glenmoor Court 392 Lynn Avenue 1125 Starlite Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

$346,000 $520,000 $158,500 $240,000 $285,000 $280,000 $205,000 $463,500 $230,000 $292,000 $830,000 $254,000 $178,500 $301,000 $320,000 $340,000 $250,000 $228,000 $200,000 $155,000 $360,000 $290,000 $348,500 $285,000 $380,000

938 2071 1010 1381 1069 1365 840 4320 1156 1279 3412 1203 1610 1112 1059 1081 820 1000 1100 910 1585 1228 1040 1474 1128

1946 1983 1991 2003 1941 1973 1935 1965 1951 1951 2008 1983 1952 1950 1952 1953 1951 1954 1986 1981 1991 1955 1959 1970 1957

03-06-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-07-13 03-05-13 03-05-13 03-07-13 03-07-13 03-06-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-01-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-07-13 03-04-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-05-13

3 3 2 3 2 3 2 8 3 3 5 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 4 3

SOLD FOR BDS

$1,430,000 $180,000 $685,500 $360,000 $590,000

6 2 3 3 3

ZIP

5337 Edgewater Drive 36212 Indian Wells Drive 7863 Inverness Drive 37031 Mulberry Street 35941 Orleans Drive 36861 Port Sailwood Drive

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

BUILT

CLOSED

4453 840 1452 1122 1247

1987 1971 1986 1972 1970

03-21-13 03-26-13 03-21-13 03-26-13 03-22-13

455,000 422,750

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

$530,000 $315,500 $455,000 $280,000 $456,000 $500,000

2181 1196 1381 1042 1126 1450

1966 1963 1968 1923 1962 1975

03-04-13 03-08-13 03-08-13 03-05-13 03-07-13 03-08-13

4 3 3 2 3 3

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 547,000 Median $: 352,000 Lowest $: 170,000 Average $: 347,188 ADDRESS

ZIP

35 Cornwall Way 455 Oakes Boulevard 2257 Transom Way 2601 Vistagrand Court 477 Nabor Street 1618 Oriole Avenue 2111 Sol Street 1352 Drake Avenue

94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

$365,000 $453,500 $230,000 $547,000 $280,000 $170,000 $352,000 $380,000

1723 1486 1062 1924 1256 873 1502 1720

1979 1937 1978 1958 1947 1950 1942 1951

03-07-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-06-13 03-08-13 03-06-13 03-05-13

2 2 2 3 2 2 3 5

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 385,000 Median $: 225,000 Lowest $: 129,000 Average $: 260,375 ADDRESS

ZIP

1040 Bockman Road 1337 Via El Monte 17330 Via Estrella 17946 Via Valencia

94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

$302,500 $129,000 $225,000 $385,000

1531 1450 1157 1077

1948 1951 1948 1951

03-05-13 03-06-13 03-07-13 03-07-13

3 3 2 2

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 808,000 Median $: Lowest $: 139,000 Average $: ADDRESS

4185 Asimuth Circle 4425 Canterbury Way 4570 Carmen Way 1052 Green Street 32719 Gustine Street 4218 Remora Drive 2172 Skylark Court #4 34805 Starling Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

365,000 439,125

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

$270,000 $670,000 $450,000 $365,000 $576,000 $808,000 $139,000 $235,000

1584 2070 1659 1431 1554 2708 798 798

1974 1997 1972 2007 1985 1993 1972 1972

03-04-13 03-07-13 03-04-13 03-06-13 03-05-13 03-07-13 03-04-13 03-07-13

4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2

But strong growth in crude oil shipments and intermodal containers, and a core rate increase of 4 percent on most shipments made up for coal and agriculture. Stifel Nicolaus analyst John Larkin said Union Pacific proved more nimble than he expected in responding to the drop in coal and grain shipments. It also limited growth in expenses to only 2 percent, he said.

CSX officials predicted Wednesday that its domestic coal volumes will decline 5 to 10 percent this year because many utilities are still burning off significant coal stockpiles. But generally all the utilities CSX serves that can switch to natural gas have done so. So CSX expects coal demand to stabilize in 2014, because utilities will still need to burn some coal to meet electricity demand.

SUBMITTED BY BARRY ZEPEL Patricia Smith – poet, playwright and performance artist – will recite some of her latest poetry when she appears Thursday, April 25 at Cal State East Bay as a featured reader of the Distinguished Writers Series presented by the university’s English Department. The event will be held in the Biella Room of the University Library on CSUEB’s Hayward Campus. Admission is free, and the public is invited. A book signing and question and answer session will follow. Smith has published six books of poetry, including “Blood Dazzler,” a National Book Award finalist, and “Teahouse of the Almighty,” a National Poetry series winner. The Chicago native is a four-time National Poetry Slam individual champion. A poetry slam is a fast-paced competition where poets – using the techniques of storytelling, songwriting, theatre and stand-up comedy – have a limited amount of time to impress judges randomly selected from among the event’s audience. Smith has performed her work on many international stages and on film, CDs, and in the HBO series Def Poetry Jam. Her work has received two Pushcart Prizes and been published in numerous literary journals, including Poetry, Tin House, The Paris Review and Granta. “Patricia Smith is a poet equally at home on the page and on the stage,” said Susan Gubernat, Eng-

CSX operates over 21,000 miles of track in 23 eastern states and two Canadian provinces. Union Pacific operates 32,400 miles of track in 23 states from the Midwest to the West and Gulf coasts. Online: Union Pacific Corp.: www.up.com CSX Corp.: www.csx.com

lish professor and director of the Distinguished Writers Series for 2012-13. “We’re fortunate to celebrate April, National Poetry Month, with a reading by one of the nation’s foremost writers and performance artists.” Smith is a professor of English at City University of New York and a faculty member of the Sierra Nevada MFA program and Cave Canem Foundation. Before Smith begins her presentation, the three top prize winners of the university’s eighth annual Helen “Jackie” DeClercq Poetry Contest will read their winning poems. First prize of $250 went to Gabrielle Brown-Wing of Oakland, followed by second prize ($100) winner Samantha Kennedy of Livermore, and third prize ($50) winner Britney Hill of Oakland. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodation upon request. Please notify event sponsor in advance at (510) 885-3151 if accommodation is needed. Campus parking is $2 per hour – payable at kiosk machines located in campus parking lots. Poetry reading Thursday, Apr 25 7 p.m. CSUEB Library 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3151 Parking $2 per hour

590,000 649,100

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 530,000 Median $: Lowest $: 280,000 Average $: ADDRESS

285,000 309,600

SOLD FOR BDS

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 05 Highest $: 1,430,000 Median $: Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: ADDRESS

624,500 626,000

Union Pacific optimistic about 2013 after solid 1Q

Union Sanitary District proposes new rates MICHELLE POWELL Union Sanitary District (USD) recently mailed letters to all property owners in the Tri-Cities with information about rates for 2014 - 2016. In order to continue to provide high levels of service and maintain and replace aging infrastructure, it will be necessary for the District to increase rates over the next three years. For 2014, rates will increase about $18 per year ($1.52 per month) for single family residences. Increases for multifamily residences will be slightly less. In 2015 and 2016, similar increases of $19 and $20 per year will occur. The total of the increases over three years will average less than $20 per year, or $1.61 per month. The increases are needed in part to offset lost revenue from large industries that have ceased business or left the service area, including NUMMI, Solyndra, Borden Chemical, and SF Newspaper Group, historically some of the District’s largest customers. USD’s mission includes protecting public health and the environment through its stewardship of wastewater infrastructure in the Tri-Cities. The District is responsible for maintaining over 780 miles of sewer pipelines, and operating and maintaining seven pump stations and its wastewater treatment plant. The plant, located in Union City, currently receives an average of over 25 million gallons of sewage daily, which is treated to state and federal standards before being pumped to the deep waters of the Bay. “The cost of operating and maintaining these facilities continues to rise year after year, often outpacing inflation,” says General Manager Richard Currie. “In particular, the cost of electricity, chemicals and petroleum products continues to rise. Our annual PG&E bill alone exceeds $2,000,000. Labor costs are also increasing, especially the cost of health care benefits.” “USD’s rates are within the lowest 12 percent of the 27 Bay Area Wastewater agencies and communities we survey, yet we provide some of the most extensive and reliable services,” continues Currie. “We understand that our customer’s budgets are tight, and we try to keep rate increases to a minimum. Even with the proposed increases, our rates will remain well below those of other Bay Area agencies.” USD is projecting to spend over $180 million for improvements to the Tri-City sewer and treatment system infrastructure over the next 10 years. “Some of our pipelines date back to the early 1900s, and the current treatment plant was first constructed in 1978,” explains Currie. “Replacement of aging facilities is critical to reliable service and continued protection of public health.” USD will receive written comments from property owners regarding the proposed rate increase until June 3, 2013. Comments should be addressed to “Rates – USD Boardroom,” P.O. BOX 5050, Union City, CA 94587-8550, or e-mailed to contactUSD@unionsanitary.ca.gov. There will be a public hearing on June 10 at 7:00 p.m. during the District’s regular Board meeting at its offices in Union City. For more information about USD, visit the District’s website at www.unionsanitary.ca.gov, or call (510) 477-7500.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S

Reuben Peraza

Anna D. Bogdanowicz

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 8, 1943 – April 20, 2013

RESIDENT OF LINCOLN April 2, 1938 – April 15, 2013

Shuye-Ching Chao

John A. Garden

RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE August 7, 1923 – April 17, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 29. 1928 – April 15, 2013

Anita Gaoiran

Arnesh H. Mudaliar

RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 23, 1916 – April 19, 2013

RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON September 15, 1992 – April 15, 2013

Ya-Hou Tsai

Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease. Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Susan R. Lathrop

RESIDENT OF SUNNYVALE September 1, 1917 – April 17, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 15, 1947 – April 15, 2013

Rizalino C. Noriesta RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 30, 1942 – April 13, 2013

Glenn M. Swartout

Lana August Puchta

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY May 19, 1924 – April 18, 2013

Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Santiago Steve Ornelas, Sr.

Lena O. Zeiher

RESIDENT OF SAN LORENZO March 24, 1976 - April 19, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 6, 1923 – April 19, 2013

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com

David A. Super

Gary H. Scott

RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 16, 1937 – April 19, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 1, 1941 – April 14, 2013

Diolinda J. Preciado RESIDENT OF UNION CITY November 8, 1938 – April 16, 2013

Angie Leon Vega RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 1, 1928 – April 17, 2013

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD April 5 2338 Hours: Officer Katz investigated a residential ransack burglary that occurred on Lake Blvd. between 7 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Entry was gained into the residence via the rear sliding glass door and the loss was jewelry. April 6 At 3:58 p.m. Officer Jackman arrested Dana Rodrigues for Assault on a Child. Dana and the victim were in an argument when Dana struck the victim repeatedly in the face with an open hand. Fearing for the victim’s safety a family member called 911. Dana was taken into custody without incident and booked at Fremont Jail. Officer Slater arrested Berena Franco for Grand Theft at 4:16 p.m. Berena was arrested by Macy’s Loss Prevention after she was caught stealing over $1000 women’s clothing. Berena was caught as she exited the store failing to pay for the merchandise hidden in her bags. Berena was taken into custody and transported to Fremont Jail where she was booked. Loss prevention at Raley’s called at 8:29 p.m. for assistance in taking a shoplifter into custody. Officers Taylor and Smith arrived in time to assist with the apprehension as one of the suspects ran out of the store. Subsequent investigation revealed Roxanne Louis of Hayward and Regina Meekins of Hayward both entered Raley’s with the intent to commit various crimes (i.e., theft, forgery, etc.). They had just committed similar crimes at the Trader Joe’s in Fremont less than two hours earlier. Castillo was arrested for burglary and Meekins was arrested for various charges related to the forged checks she had in her possession and the check she had just forged at Trader Joe’s. Officer Katz responded to a fight in progress at Madeira’s Liquors on Thornton Ave. at 11:37 p.m. An intoxicated Frank Garcia of Hayward tried to pick a fight with an unsuspecting customer and according to witnesses, ended up getting himself knocked out. Garcia was transported to Washington Hospital with a bloody nose. April 7, 2013 At 10:13 a.m., Officer Ramos investigated an interrupted residential

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

burglary in the 6200 block of Lido Ct. The victim who rents a room at the residence was asleep in his room when he heard some banging down stairs. Thinking it was his landlord, the victim ignored the noises until his bedroom door was kicked open. The victim was surprised to see a Hispanic male juvenile 13-16 years old, wearing dark clothing staring at him. The victim watched as the suspect turned and fled down the stairs and out the front door. A witness spotted two suspects run to an awaiting vehicle. The vehicle was described as a late model 4-door sedan black in color. The witness said the car was 15 to 20 years old. She also described the suspects as male and female both in dark clothing. Officer Nobbe arrested Felipe Ponce Union City at 2:10 p.m. for Drunk in Public, Possession of a Dirk or Dagger, and Possession of a Drug Paraphernalia. Felipe was harassing the EZ8 Motel cleaning ladies offering them money to let him into a room. It was discovered that Felipe was registered to room 212 and had not paid for the remainder of the day. Felipe was found to be on probation with a search clause. A search of his property yielded an illegal knife and a hypodermic needle. Felipe was arrested and booked into Fremont Jail. April 8 Officer Eriksen handled a stolen vehicle case at 12:45 p.m. from the 6700 block of Thornton Ave. A gray 1995 Pontiac Bonneville license # 5PMA248 was stolen from the front of the auto dealer while the owner was inside. The owner had left the keys in the vehicle and the car running. At 6:21 p.m., a citizen reported that he was robbed at gunpoint on Sycamore Street near Carter Avenue. The incident reportedly occurred at 6 p.m. when he stopped his vehicle to trouble-shoot a strange mechanical noise. He was accosted by three men, one of which brandished a silver semi-automatic pistol. They demanded cash. The men fled south on Sycamore Street in a black Lexus sedan with gold trim/emblems. Suspect 1 (gunman): Hispanic Male Adult, 25yrs, 511/200, slickedback hair, red t-shirt, blue denim pants, white shoes. Suspect 2: Black Male Adult, 30yrs, 601/260, fade-style haircut, goatee beard, white t-shirt, blue denim pants. Suspect 3: Black Male Adult,

25yrs, black hooded sweatshirt, gold bottom teeth. April 10 Officer Katz investigated a theft at Pick-N-Pull, 7400 Mowry Ave. at 11 a.m. The suspect/s cut a hole in the perimeter fence, entered the yard, and stole 22 catalytic converters. The theft occurred between 04/09 at 3 p.m. and 04/10 at 5:10 a.m. Officer Horst accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from Sears of Andrew Manu of Newark at 4:06 p.m. for theft. He was issued a citation and released. April 11 Officers responded to the area of Thornton Ave. and Sycamore St. at 9:46 a.m. for a subject yelling at passing traffic. Officer Clark arrested Kevin Hoffmaster, Transient for possession of a Billy club. Hoffmaster was booked at Santa Rita. At 2:47 p.m., Officer Horst investigated a residential burglary in the 35100 block of Blackburn Dr. Entry was made through a rear window. Loss was cash. It occurred between 1 a.m. and 2 p.m. At 3:33 p.m.,Officer Fredstrom investigated a residential burglary in the 36800 block of Spruce St. The resident returned home to find his doors unlocked. The loss was a document safe containing jewelry and cash. It occurred between 7 a.m. and time of call. April 12 Officer Neithercutt responded to Moores Ave. and Margurite Dr. at 4:07 p.m. for an abandoned vehicle, which turned out to be a stolen vehicle out of Hayward. April 13 At 6:54 p.m., Officer Taylor investigated a residential ransack burglary that occurred on Chapman Dr. The loss included a safe containing $10,000 in jewelry. April 14 At 11:17 p.m., an investigation into a cell phone that went missing at the Chuck E. Cheese restaurant led Officer Hogan to two residences on Cotton Ave. A Find-My-Phone type application put the location of the phone directly in between both houses. A parole search at one of the residences resulted in the arrest of Michael McDonald of Newark for possession of Methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia and a parole violation. The missing phone was located next door to McDonald’s residence. McDonald was booked at FPD Jail.

April 15 At 3:29 a.m., Officer Norvell investigated a window smash (large rock) burglary of Oliveira’s Liquors, 5650 Thornton Ave. Loss was cigarettes. April 17 Officer Geser responded to a theft at 7151 Gateway Blvd. (formerly InVision Technologies) at 4:16 a.m. Security yelled at two suspects in a full size, white 4-dr, Chevrolet pickup with 4 yellow lights on the roof at about 4:10 a.m. after observing them pull open a gate to a chain linked fenced in area with the truck. Security later found missing electronic equipment and copper cables/wire from the area that was secured by the gate and then contacted NPD. April 18 Officers responded to an automobile burglary just occurred at 4:40 a.m. on the 36800 block of Newark Blvd. The victim observed a male subject with a mask over his face, wearing blue jeans inside his vehicle. The subject fled prior to police arrival. A possibly associated vehicle described as a small, dark colored pick up with cardboard covering the passenger side rear window was observed leaving the area about the same time. The loss is unknown at this time and Officer Norvell is following up with the investigation. April 18 At 6:38 a.m., Officer Jackman investigated the theft of a vehicle from the Comfort Inn, 5977 Mowry Ave. that occurred overnight, the vehicle, a 2002 white Ford F550 flatbed truck, CA 6W78533, with a blue tool box and welder, was taken from the parking lot. At 3:30 p.m., Officers responded to Sears, 100 Newpark Mall for a theft that had just occurred. The suspect had assaulted the Loss Prevention Agent as he fled with merchandise. Ray Ross of Oakland was located in the BJ’s parking lot (by SET Detectives), where he was identified by the Loss Prevention Agent. Ross was arrested for Robbery and booked at the Fremont Jail. At 8:30 p.m., Officer Kovach investigated a commercial burglary at Victoria’s Secret involving (9) suspects; 8 females and 1 male. The group entered the store, opened up their bags and purses and proceeded to empty multiple display racks within seconds before fleeing the store. Newpark Mall Security was alerted. Once the group had seen the

security guards a majority ran back inside of the store and returned some of the goods they had just stolen. All individuals fled prior to NPD being called. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Residential burglar arrested

SUBMITTED BY SGT. ABBIE SERRANO, MILPITAS PD On April 7, 2013, at 2:10 P.M., an astute community member contacted the Milpitas Police Department to report a suspicious person jumping the fence into the backyard of a nearby home. Officers arrived within three minutes of the call and immediately set up a perimeter around the residence. The suspect, Milpitas resident Floyd Packer, was confronted by Milpitas officers as he attempted to jump over a fence of the home and runaway on foot. Officers chased Packer and eventually arrested him on Berryessa St. He was in possession of stolen property taken from the victim’s home. Packer was booked into jail for residential burglary, possession of stolen property, prowling, and resisting arrest. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Mayor Nagy expresses optimism, Chamber CEO announces retirement At a meeting of civic leaders, Newark Mayor Al Nagy expressed “cautious optimism” about the fiscal future of Newark. His address was tempered by the announcement

by Newark Chamber CEO Linda Ashley of her retirement at the close of Summerfest festivities on July 14, 2013. A search for a new President/CEO has resulted in the appointment of Judy Mooney who will serve as “Interim” immediately, becoming permanent upon Ashley’s retire-

ment. Linda has served since 2004 when asked to resurrect the ailing organization – an accomplishment that has been a “huge challenge” but successful. Now she feels it is time to tackle the rest of her “to do” list. Mayor Nagy expressed confidence in the City of Newark and spoke of the challenges it has faced in his first term of office. He noted that although Measure U funds have allowed the City to close the budget gap created during the difficult economic recessionary times, these funds will sunset in 2015 and economic recovery, although beginning to appear, is far from certain. The combination of Measure U funds and an uptick in hotel tax revenue is estimated to build City Uncertainty Reserves to $5 million. At this time, the City’s budget is projected to balance with a small surplus. Aging assets, however, have put significant financial pressure on Capital Reserves, an area of concern that must be addressed in the near future. Although Newark has suffered through financial hardship, the Mayor argued that the quality of life remains high, citing a plethora of recreational facilities and the “real hidden treasure” of “our people and their willingness to give of their time to support a variety of causes.” Volunteerism and coordination with a wide variety of ethnic and religious groups is at the heart of Newark as well as active

Fremont City Council April 16, 2013 Consent Calendar: Service Grant recommendations for Senior Service Grant Funding for FY 2013/14. Remove LIFE ElderCare’s Meals on Wheels (MOW) program from the competitive process and fund it separately - $68,157 in Paratransit funds at the FY 2012/13 level as a “sole source” provider. Grant a minimum of $10,000 and maximum of $100,000 for administrative and budgetary reasons. Three organizations were funded in this cycle: Tri-City Health Center – Senior Screening, $23,500; Legal Assistance for Seniors, $13, 396; BACS Adult Day Care, $29, 426. Mid-Pen Senior Care Coordination was not funded. Award crack seal project to Graham Contractors, Inc. in the amount of $375,974. Reject protest of Crackfiller Sealant, Inc. Appropriate funds for Walnut Avenue/Argonaut Way/Parkhurst Drive lane reduction and roundabout project. Use an additional $95,000 in Measure B funds to complete design. Authorize application for Transportation Development Act funds in the amount of $181,273 for Emilia Lane Sidewalk Improvement Project. Ceremonial Items: Proclamation of support for the Tri-Cities Ducks for Bucks race sponsored by Kiwanis Club of Fremont on April 27 at Lake Elizabeth. Recognize the 150th anniversary of the Mission Peak Odd Fellows Lodge #114. Public Communications: Request for cleanup of 28 Palms neighborhood; palm fronds present visual blight and safety hazard. Developer has not made material changes to Northgate area Gateway Project. Community is not satisfied with “cosmetic” changes. Objections to density have not been met.

Parolee at large arrested

Scheduled Items: Industrial General Plan amendment and Industrial floor area ratio/building height. This is an attempt to clarify City intentions in Light Industrial zoned land. Final resolution will be presented at a later date. Human Service Grant recommendations for FY 2013/14. Discussion of setting a $100,000 cap on grants and $70,000 gap between budget and requests, especially top two rated organizations: Abode and SAVE. Proponents indicated that some of the funds from dissolution of Redevelopment could be used for this purpose. City manager initially indicated that finding the extra funds would not present a problem, but as discussion continued, Council decided to “split the difference” and allocate an additional $35,000 - $25,000 to Abode and $10,000 to SAVE – with further review in the future. Funding was approved for (in order of proposal rating): Abode – 47.2, SAVE – 44.9, Bay Area Women Against Rape – 43.0, Tri-City Free Breakfast 43.0, Kidango - 42.4, Family Paths – 40.6, Afghan Coalition – 40.6, Tri-City Volunteers - 39.1, Deaf Counseling, Advocacy and Referral – 38.6, Child Assault Listening, Interviewing & Coordination (first time) – 38.0, East Bay Agency for Children – 36.9, Carnales Unidos Reformando Adictos (first time) – 36.9, Bay Area Legal Aid (first time) 36.8, Eden I&R (first time), Community Resources for Individual Living – 36.6. First time agencies were awarded grants of $10,000 each. Mayor Bill Harrison Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Suzanne Lee Chan Vinnie Bacon Raj Salwan

engagement with education facilities and programs – public and private. Development of Transit Oriented Development, NewPark area, Cherry Logistics Center and Pacific Research Center were a few of the economic stimulants noted in the Mayor’s speech. In conclusion, Mayor Nagy said that even though Newark has not been immune to a “down economy,” he believes the City remains a “special place.”

Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

SUBMITTED BY SGT. FRANK MORALES On March 27, 2013, at about 10:43am, a Milpitas Police sergeant assigned to residential burglary suppression noticed

Nestor Agustin

a suspicious vehicle in the 387-Blk of N. Temple Dr. and conducted Michael Cota an enforcement stop for a vehicle code violation. The driver was identified as Nestor Agustin and the front passenger was identified as Michael Cota. During the course of the investigation, it was determined that Nestor Agustin and Michael Cota were driving to a residential neighborhood at the north end of Milpitas to commit a burglary. Additionally, Cota had an outstanding felony arrest warrant for being a parolee-at-large. Cota and Agustin were arrested and booked into Santa Clara County Main Jail for various, charges including being under the influence of a controlled substance. Cota was also booked for the felony warrant. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other criminal activity occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 5862500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Assault suspect arrest update SUBMITTED BY OFFICER W. QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On June 9, 2012, at about 11:19 PM, a 32-year-old male victim walked into the Regional Medical Center in San Jose and reported that he had been stabbed in Milpitas. Responding officers determined the stabbing occurred in the 100 block of Casper Street, in Milpitas. The victim was rushed into surgery with life threatening stab wounds. Fortunately, the victim survived. During the investigation, officers dis-

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD April 11 At 2:31 p.m., Officer Geldermann stopped a vehicle with a defective brake light on Dyer Street. Officer Geldermann smelled marijuana as he contacted the two occupants of the vehicle. A search of the vehicle yielded marijuana, cocaine, as well as a loaded and stolen Glock 22 handgun. The stolen handgun had a round loaded in the chamber and a 22 round high capacity magazine.

covered that the victim and suspect knew each other and had been involved in an argument. The suspect, later identified as Khet Luangphonh, stabbed the victim in the chest and eluded police attempts to locate and arrest him that evening and throughout the days immediately following the assault. Milpitas detectives obtained a warrant for Luangphonh’s arrest. On March 26, 2013, Milpitas detectives conducted surveillance in the City of San Jose in an attempt to locate Luangphonh. Luangphonh was located within

The driver and passenger were both arrested and transported to a local Jail. A great proactive stop by Officer Geldermann! April 12 At 8:45 p.m., Officer DeJong was patrolling on 9th Street, when he noticed a bicyclist. The bicyclist was riding down the middle of the street with no lights on his bicycle. The bicycle rider decided to throw something from his person as he saw the officer. The bicyclist was obviously attempting to get Officer DeJong’s attention, and he succeeded. Officer DeJong stopped the bicyclist and lo-

the 1700 block of McKee Road, and taken into custody without incident. Luangphonh was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail Anyone with any information regarding this incident is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

cated a baggy of methamphetamine on his person. The littering bicyclist was transported to a local jail. April 14 A male victim just finished using the bathroom at the Shell Gas station on Mission Blvd. at 8:40 p.m. A female suspect contacted the male as he exited the bathroom. The female suspect demanded the victim provide her with the key to the bathroom. The suspect proceeded to bite and hit the victim when he told her to obtain the key from the station attendant. The victim received a laceration on his head as a result of being attacked

by the suspect. Arriving officers were unable to locate the suspect. Later in the shift, an anonymous caller reported seeing the suspect on 2nd Street. Officers responded to a residence on 2nd Street and located the suspect from the incident. The victim responded to the location and identified the suspect. Thanks to an anonymous caller, the suspect was arrested and the case is closed. April 15 Officers were dispatched to investigate an armed robbery at Dominos Pizza on Alvarado Niles Road at 10:49 p.m. Two suspects entered the

business and pointed handguns at the employees. The suspects jumped over the counter and demanded employees open the safe. The suspects took the victim’s cellular phones and the available currency. Responding officers were unable to locate the suspects. The victim’s cellular phones were located outside of the business. Anyone with information about this incident is encouraged to contact the Investigations Unit.


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Eagle Scout recognition SUBMITTED BY SUSAN TULEE-DRING On April 14, 2013 Alexander S. Dring was honored at Troop 143’s Court of Honor at the Elks Lodge 2121 in Fremont as its latest Eagle Scout. He received his Eagle Scout rank on August 21, 2012, the

San Francisco Bay Area Council in the Scout Troop’s Court of Honor. To become an Eagle Scout, a Scout must earn a minimum of 21 merit badges, of which 12 are required. After achieving the rank of Life Scout, which immediately precedes that of Eagle, he must serve actively in a Troop leadership position for at least six months. While a Life Scout,

(left to right) Matthew, Alexander and Chris

(left to right) Chris, Steve (father with personalized license plate), Matthew and Alexander

“100th Anniversary of the first Eagle Scout Rank” awarded! The Eagle Scout Award is the highest award available to youth members of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). It is recognized by the National Court of Honor through the

and in working toward the rank of Eagle Scout, each young man must plan, develop and undertake a service project helpful to a religious institution, school or community. He must demonstrate, through the testimony of character references and otherwise, that he lives by the principles of the Scout

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD April 12 Ofc. Richards was dispatched to a suspicious person on Fremont near Beacon. A transient male was seen displaying a large knife while walking down the street. Capt. Petersen, working uniformed patrol, covered Ofc. Richards. An adult male transient was contacted and had a very large knife concealed. He was arrested by Ofc. Richards and Capt. Petersen documented her actions in a supplemental report. Officers were dispatched to the 4200 block of Stevenson Blvd. for what was originally reported as a promiscuous shooting. Upon arrival, it was learned that two dogs had gotten into a fight and an adult male shot and killed one of the dogs with an AR15. Ofc. Wright handled the investigation with assistance from Animal Control. Officers were dispatched to Styles for Less at the Hub on a reported theft. Two black females entered the business, gathered clothing, and fled out of the store. The suspects fled in a white sedan. Ofc. Hollifield handled the investigation. The suspects were described as: #1 – a black female adult, 20’s, with facial piercings and wearing a beanie. #2 – a black female adult, 2030’s, heavyset, wearing a white t-shirt and pink tank-top. April 13 Victim reported that he was physically assaulted at Fremont/Darwin last night by two juvenile males. Suspects struck victim in the face and took his cell phone and car keys. Suspects described as one 17-18 Hispanic male juvenile and 17-18 black male juvenile. Suspects fled the area on bicycles. Officer Kindorf investigating. At approximately 9:00 p.m., we received a call of a derailed Amtrak passenger train on the Union Pacific railroad tracks in the area of the Mowry Ave. and Mission Blvd. junction. There were approximately onehundred-forty passengers on the train when the lead locomotive derailed. There were no reported injuries. Amtrak authorities are working to detach the lead locomotive so that the passengers could continue to Seattle, Washington. Mowry Ave. between Mission Blvd and Overacker Ave. was closed for several hours while cranes were used to lift the derailed locomotive. April 14 Officers were dispatched to Lucky’s Charter Square to investigate a female who tried to steal a shopping cart full of groceries. The suspect, a 28 year old adult female, fled from employees when contacted. Sgt. Russell located the suspect vehicle parked in front of her address. He contacted the suspect and detained her without incident. She was arrested by Ofc. Ceniceros for commercial burglary and booked at FPD Jail.

Ofc. Singleton, Ofc. Dias, and Ofc. Hartman were dispatched to an address at the end of Mill Creek Rd on a possible burglary in progress. A caretaker of the residence entered and heard what she thought was someone walking around upstairs, although the residence was supposed to be vacant. Turned out to be a bird flying around the inside of the house. Ofc. Dias responded to Kohl’s at Pacific Commons and arrested Reginald Nunn for petty theft. At approximately 11:25 p.m. a caretaker at a church on Driscoll Rd. was taking out the garbage when he was knocked unconscious. Loss was a wallet. Units remained in the area clearing several buildings and fields as the suspect might have been transient. Case investigated by Ofc Meredith/FTO Austin. Theft of a free standing ATM machine inside of a closed gas station at Blacow/ Mowry. Suspects smashed window, looped cable around ATM, and pulled it out through the front doors with a vehicle. Case investigated by Ofc Wilson. A suspicious van parked on Thornton Ave turned out to be a recently stolen vehicle off of Cabral. Case investigated by Ofc Blass. April 17 Initially occurred at Fremont/Alder when a citizen observed two subjects fooling around with a handgun and then pointing it at her. Officers checked the area and two males ran from them. Ofc. Samayoa and Ofc. Francisco caught a male juvenile and an 18-yr-old male probationer. A handgun was recovered after it had been discarded. Ofc. Dooley and FTO Mahboobi investigating. #41: Petty theft and battery arrest. Citizen called about a fight in progress inside Lucky Brookvale. We soon learned it was store security fighting with a theft suspect. Received into custody was a 50 yr old male. Ofc. Roberts and FTO R. Smith investigating. April 18 Assault with a deadly weapon (a firearm) at Peralta/Maple. Victim called us saying a male in a white older Honda 4door shot at him several times while the victim was walking on the sidewalk. Several spent casings were located in the roadway. SACMCTF was called out and took over the investigation. Ofc. Roberts and FTO R. Smith handled the initial investigation. Residential burglaries: 40708 Canyon Heights, 4809 Seneca Park, and 34444 Shendandoah Pl, and 38424 Garway Dr. April 19 Ofc. Fuellenbach was contacted by a citizen who reported three men causing a disturbance near the Donut Store located on the 4300 block of Thornton Ave. It was also reported that one of the men stole a beverage. Ofc. Fuellenbach contacted store employees and confirmed that one suspect stole a soda from the store. Ofc. Fuellenbach contacted the men and

Oath and Law in his daily life. Finally, he must appear before a Board of Review. Alexander’s Eagle Project benefited his high school, Washington High School in Fremont. His project consisted of planning and building an outdoor volleyball court, bench and installing a shade tree. The volleyball court expanded outdoor activities for students during lunchtime and will serve as a lasting asset to the school. Alexander became the third Eagle Scout in his family, all members of Troop 143! He was joined at his Eagle Scout Court of Honor by his brothers, Chris and Matthew. Chris received his Eagle Scout

they became verbally abusive and aggressive. Additional police units responded for assistance “code 3” due to the group’s hostility. The victim identified one male as the person who stole the beverage. The other two men refused to identify themselves and continued to yell and scream at the officers. A citizen’s arrest was conducted and Aaron was booked into FPD jail. Citizens reported two males “tagging” in the area of Bartolo Tr/Coronado Dr. Officers flooded the area and with the assistance of the neighborhood, officers were directed to the suspects. Two male juvenile gang members were contacted. Both had evidence of “tagging” and vandalism on their persons. Both were arrested. Ofc. Lambert conducted the investigation. While stopped at Fremont & Ferry for a red light, a Black male adult, 6’0”, skinny with dreads under his beanie, pointed a black handgun at the driver and stole his vehicle. The stolen vehicle, a 2002 silver Subaru WRX sedan with a black hood and trunk lid (Lic#6XZJ074), was last seen NB Fremont Blvd. Ofc S. Hill & FTO Rodriguez investigating.

Hayward Police Log SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD PD April 8 1:46 a.m.: HPD and Hayward Fire responded to a vehicle on fire in the 31000 block of Chicoine Ave. The owner of the vehicle had no idea why someone would set fire to his vehicle. The incident is being investigated as an arson. 11:43 a.m.: A strong arm robbery occurred in the 700 block of B St. when a female suspect approached the victim and asked to use a cell phone. The victim provided a cell phone and the suspect took it and fled. The victim chased and caught the suspect but was pushed to the ground and the suspect got away. The victim was not injured and the suspect is not known at this time. April 10 3:40 p.m.: A strong arm robbery occurred in the bus loop at Chabot College. The victim was talking on her cell phone when she was approached from behind by the suspect. The suspect ripped the cell phone from the victim’s hands and fled on foot. 6:35 p.m.: Officers responded to the 400 block of Rousseau St regarding a brandishing a firearm incident. The victim and several young children were standing in front of a residence when a car occupied by 3-4 subjects drove by slowly. An occupant pointed what was believed to be a shotgun at the victim. The address is known to HPD as associated with gang activity and the suspects are believed to belong to a rival gang. No one was injured and the case is under investigation. 8:18 p.m.: HPD units went to the Lucky store at 25151 Santa Clara St to investigate a theft that just oc-

award on February 17, 2005. His project included planning and building a threetiered planter box garden for the 4th and 5th classes at his previous elementary school, Mattos Elementary to study the growth of native California plants as part of their science program. Matthew received his Eagle Scout award on December 21, 2006. His project included planning, building and placement of a light pole at the swimming pool of Washington High School. He was actively involved with both the Swim and Water Polo teams which benefit from the improved lighting during their respective seasons.

curred at the store. As officers arrived, they spotted the suspect fleeing in a vehicle. The vehicle yielded to a traffic stop but the driver then threw a lit cigarette and hit an officer in the face. The suspect then became combative with officers and bit one officer on the hand. Words and actions by the suspect revealed that this incident was actually a robbery and the suspect was taken into custody and charged accordingly. 9:24 p.m.: HPD went to an apartment complex in the 600 block of Shepherd Ave for a man with a gun call. Upon arrival, officers saw the suspect flee over fences. Officers searched and ultimately found the suspect nearby. An article search revealed that the suspect dropped a handgun when he saw the police. The suspect was also connected to an earlier auto theft and was taken into custody with another firearm taken off of the street. April 11 2:36 p.m.: A resident in the 27700 block of Tyrrell Ave notified police of an auto burglary in progress. When officers arrived, they located the suspect who violently resisted arrest but was taken into custody. 9:35 p.m.: A strong arm robbery occurred in the 24000 block of Mission Blvd where the victim agreed to meet a potential buyer for a cell phone the victim advertised on Craigslist. The victim was confronted by two suspects who took his cell phone and fled on foot. The victim was not injured and the suspects are unknown. ***Crime Prevention Note*** This is the third time in three weeks that similar robberies have occurred as a result of a wouldbe buyer who steals the victim’s property after the victim advertised on Craigslist. 5:20 p.m.: An armed robbery was reported in the 1600 block of D St. The victim and a friend were walking on the sidewalk when the robber approached them and demanded the victim’s cell phone. The suspect pulled up his shirt to reveal a handgun. The suspect took the victim’s phone and fled on foot. The victim was uninjured and the suspect is not yet known. April 13 6:15 a.m.: HPD and Hayward Fire went to the 24000 block of Silva Ave regarding a car that was on fire. The incident was deemed to be an arson based on evidence at the scene. The victim believes an acquaintance may be responsible in response to an earlier argument. 4:00 p.m.: A strong arm robbery occurred in the 800 block of C St when a juvenile male reached over the victims shoulder and grabbed her iPad out of her hands. The victim tried to hold onto the suspect but he was able to get away and is still at large. 4:00 p.m.: HPD investigated a carjacking in the 400 block of A St. The victim was selling her vehicle and agreed to meet a potential buyer. While her back was turned away from the vehicle, the buyer pointed an unknown object into her back and

demanded her car keys. The suspect took the car and fled. The victim was not injured.

Illegal marijuana cultivation SUBMITTED BY OFFICER QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On April 18, 2013, at approximately 1:00 PM, Milpitas Police Department detectives, with the assistance of the Milpitas Police Department SWAT team, executed a search warrant at a residence on the 700 block of Tramway Drive for an illegal marijuana cultivation investigation. The residence had been converted into a marijuana grow operation. A search of the residence revealed over 100 marijuana plants, grow lights, ventilation equipment and other growing accessories. The seized marijuana has a street value of more than $100,000.00. The suspects bypassed the PG&E meter and were stealing electricity to support their operation. Tinh Truong of Milpitas, and Hiep Ha of San Jose were arrested by officers when they returned to the residence. Both suspects were later booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for illegal marijuana cultivation, theft of utilities and possession of marijuana for sales. The Milpitas Police Department would like to provide the following tips to landlords/neighbors regarding homes possibly being used for the cultivation of marijuana: 1) Tenant paying rent in cash only, 2) Tenant changing locks and not providing access to your property, 3) Tenant doing interior construction work, 4) Tenant is never home, 5) Alteration to utility equipment at the property, 6) Additional ventilation added to the structure, and 7) Odor of marijuana, or sound of fans emitting from the residence. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation, other marijuana cultivation locations, or other criminal activity occurring in this jurisdiction is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 5862500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/gov ernment/police/crime_tip.asp


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Down 1 Weather prediction (8) 2 Bring to memory (8) 3 After a lot of contemplation (12) 4 Desert sight (5) 5 Clothing worn on top of one another (6) 6 Little people (5) 8 Own meaning to a literary piece (14) 11 Items for cooking something (11) 13 Features (15) 14 Senior citizens (7)

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B 209 Pricker (5) Secretarial department (14) Bell to enter the hoise (8) Fires (5) Watch and pay attention to details (9) Agrees (with) (5) Walking on four legs (5) Annual foursome (7) For a short period of time (7) Desk item (6)

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Across 1 Place ready to move with furniture (9) 3 Aggravation (7) 7 Hilly areas (11) 9 Contraction for 'you have' (5) 10 Chinese political system (9) 12 Hand movements to communicate (7) 13 Smoke ______ (10) 16 Potatoes and rice contain _____ (6) 18 Curved (7) 21 Thick oatmeal dish (8) 23 40A/34D topping (6) 25 Administrative assistant (9) 26 Cooked well in water (6) 27 In very short supply (6) 29 Onus (16)

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4 9 7 5 1 8 2 3 6

Tri-City Stargazer APRIL 17 – APRIL 23, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Both Mars (the Warrior) and Venus (the Lover) are being challenged by Saturn, the god of time, practical reality, and authority figures. It is likely that numerous sun signs will feel the pressure of rules and requirements, which interfere with personal relationships. These aspects often reflect a tendency toward accidents. It is like driving with the gas pedal and the break on at the same time. Be aware that this time is reasonably short, no more than two weeks. Use special care if you are driving, handling tools, or resolving conflicts in a relationship.

Aries the Ram (March 21April 20): You are entering a new phase of attention which will continue until end-May. Issues of money and resources, or matters of personal values will be prominent as motivators. Be aware of the temptation to identify with things that you deem important, whether it is a material object or an idea. Do not confuse your individual identity with these things of the world. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): Mars, the warrior, enters your sign this week and will be traveling with you for seven weeks. This energy is especially helpful in defining our boundaries. Periodically we need to examine who we are and also who we are not. Often something is eliminated. In general, it increases your courage and physical strength. Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): This month, and in particular, this week, is loaded with surprises. Issues around debt, your estate, and your connection to community are in some way bringing up secrets that are enlightening. You might not have been ready for that, but here it is. Use your wits to

come up with good solutions. Don’t let others press you to conclusions before you are ready. Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): We are approaching an eclipse season again. It begins roughly now and continues for the next six weeks. Your emotional antennae will be much more acute during this period. Avoid brooding. If you find this happening, get up and move around. Do something so that your attention shifts. Concerns about love life and children are highlighted. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Your general attention is shifting for the next month into the arena of your career and overall life direction. Whatever you have created thus far will be noticed and perhaps applauded. As a talented leader, you may attract an invitation to manage an upcoming project. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): A sudden revelation concerning joint resources, debt, taxes, or insurance matters may cause you to reel wildly for a bit. There could be a certain amount of drama in

this department, such as a sudden need to access a large sum of money. Hold onto your natural caution. Think about this before you accept the drama at face value. Is it your drama or that of someone else?

larger framework. Circumstances on the romantic front are favorable with one who shares intellectual interests. Activities involving teaching/learning are favored, along with good aspects for travel.

Libra the Scales (September 23-October 22): Necessary expenses (those not of the "fun" type) may develop this week. If not that, you could be just having a little blue mood. It is one of those times when we operate better in solitude. This is an existential dilemma that everyone encounters now and then. It will pass quickly.

Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): There may be sudden developments concerning your home, your property, or your family. For a time things will feel out of control and maybe difficult to understand on any rational level. This struggle may be internal and of the ego. Go with the deepest truth for the best outcome.

Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): Your partner may take on an uncharacteristic manner of self-assertion. He or she is not so likely to back down from a fight. Life will be generally more harmonious if you stay off the hot topics. If it is important to tackle them, seek a counselor, a trusted friend, or a negotiator to keep things fair.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): Information is hard to gather. Contracts may be stalled or de-

layed. Even your car may fail you temporarily. Avoid the blame game because it serves no real purpose. These are just a collection of circumstances and probably not really preventable, given the same factors in repetition. Next week it will be all over. Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): Sometimes we are pressed to see the flaws, even in those things and people we love the most. You are not at fault in this situation, though you may be looking for what you "coulda/ would-a/, should-a/" done. You did the best you could at the time.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy Sagittarius the Archer (Novemor astrology appointments ber 22-December 21): You (fee required). have a desire to reach outward to others. You want to share ideas and express yourself in a

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 23, 2013

Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) Board meeting report ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH The following are highlights from the Fremont Unified School District Board meeting held on April 10, 2013. Community Leadership Superintendent’s Report: Winners of the 2013 Young Composer’s Competition were recognized during the School Board meeting. The competition is

submitting an original musical composition. The Young Composer winners are: Aileen Chen, Mission Valley Elementary; Irene Geng, Hirsch Elementary; Tony Ma, Patterson Elementary; Rahul Swaminathan, Ardenwood Elementary, and Sasha Tang, Gomes Elementary. Also during the Board meeting, a group of students from Irvington High School donated a check in the amount of $1,140 to the Fremont Education Foundation.

Young Composers Competition winners: (Left to right): Rahul Swaminathan, Tony Ma, Aileen Chen, and Sasha Tang. (Not present, Irene Geng).

Irvington High Camaraderie Concert donation: (Left to right): Christian Setiawan, Hezekiah Valdez, Bekky Shin, Angela Chen, and Gerard Diesta. (Not present, Edwin Yang-Cabebe and Eric Liu).

co-sponsored annually by FUSD and the Fremont Symphony Orchestra. Students in grades 4 – 6 were eligible to participate by

The funds were raised from the school’s Camaraderie Concert, an annual musical showcase event held March 28.

Agenda Item – Resolution on Reduced Classified Work Days: This item stirred emotions and comments from representatives of the Classified Employees Union as well Board members and the public. The item involved reducing workdays in certain positions, due to a “lack of work.” Many disagreed with this assessment. Board President Larry Sweeney suggested that the item be tabled until the next Board meeting, so Staff and Classified representatives could work together to bring about an equitable result.

Action on other Agenda Items: The Board unanimously adopted a resolution urging the Governor and Legislature to develop a plan/formula to enable Districts to have local control of school funding and set community priorities. The Board unanimously approved developer fees to expand/remodel/add classroom space as needed at Warm Springs, Mattos and Hirsch elementary schools and Horner Junior High School, based on projected increases of student enrollment. This is considered a short-term fix. To work on a more lasting solution, FUSD is proceeding with long-range Facilities Planning.

(Left to right): Kelsey Ichiwawa, 3rd Place; Ann Nguyen, 2nd Place; Rishab Ramapriyan, 1st Place

Helping friends realize their value ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY DENISE FULLERTON At the April 10 morning meeting of the Newark Optimist Club held at the Newark IHOP Restaurant, members welcomed winners of their 2012 2013 Essay Contest. The topic was, “How Can I Help My Friends Realize their Value?” Students read their essays, received a monetary award, and an Official Optimist International Medallion; they then told members of their plans for the future. The audience was impressed by the insight and maturity of the essayists. Winners of this year’s contest are: 1st Place: Rishab Ramapriyan, Ardenwood Challenger School, Newark

2nd Place: Ann Nguyen, Logan High School, Union City 3rd Place: Kelsey Ichikawa, Irvington High School, Fremont The essay of First Place winner, Rishab, has been sent to the Pacific Central District, Optimist International Essay Contest; the winner will receive a $2,500 college scholarship. The Motto of Optimist International is, “Friend of Youth,” and its goal is “To Bring out the Best in Youth.” To find out more about an Optimist Club near you, please go to: www.optimist.org and click on visitor.

Girl Scouts bring Easter cheer SUBMITTED BY VICTOR BACKER Girl Scouts from Fremont troop 31005 visited Sunrise Village with handmade Easter baskets for children living at the complex. This is the second year that the girl scouts brought Easter cheer to residents of the transitional living facility. Ten girl scouts Brownies and Juniors were on hand to give out the baskets and socialize. Troop 30115 has chosen Sunrise Village as one of their community projects. Funds generated by the Girl Scout cookie drive are used to provide the baskets.

SUBMITTED BY BARRY ZEPEL Three outspoken writers and activists on collegiate athletics will speak on “The Hidden Costs of College Sports” Wednesday, April 24 as part of a Center for Sport and Social Justice presentation on the Hayward Campus of Cal State East Bay. The event, co-sponsored by CSUEB’s Department of Kinesiology, will feature authors Murray Sperber and Billy Hawkins as well as noted sports physician Cindy J. Chang. Admission is free and the public is invited. Sperber, author of “Beer & Circus: How Big-Time College Sports is Crippling Undergraduate Education,” is a former chair of the Drake Group, a national faculty committee advocating reform of college sports. He has been interviewed about college sports by CBS-TV’s 60 Minutes, ABC-TV’s Nightline and Good Morning America, three different National Public Radio programs, and Public Broadcasting’s Leherer Newshour. He has published seven books on college athletics and the NCAA. Sperber also writes Op-Ed articles for The Chronicle of Higher and the New York Times. A visiting professor of cultural studies of sport in education at the University of California, Berkeley, since 2008, Sperber previously taught English at Indiana University. Hawkins, author of “The New Plantation: Black Athletes, College Sports, & Predominantly White NCAA Institutions,” is a professor in the Kinesiology De-

partment’s sport management and policy program at the University of Georgia. His teaching and research work has concentrated in the sociology of sport and cultural studies, sport management, and sport for development. He is co-author of “Sport, Race, Activism and Social Change: The Impact of Dr. Harry Edwards’ Scholarship and Service.” Dr. Chang, the chief medical officer for Team USA at the 2012 Olympics in London and head team physician for the athletic program at UC Berkeley from 1995 to 2008, is recognized as one of the leading primary care sports medicine physicians in the country. She has published articles and contributed to textbooks on sports medicine and is a frequent presenter at national medical conferences. “The panelists will provide a range of perspectives on issues and problems within commercialized college sport,” said Rita Liberti, director of the Center for Sport and Social Justice and a CSUEB kinesiology professor. “Whether advocating for the rights of student-athletes, challenging our assumptions about the place of sport in American higher education, or offering insight about physical injury and trauma resulting from University sanctioned athletic events, the evening promises to be provocative and engaging.” The goal of Cal State East Bay’s Center for Sport and Social Justice is the encouragement and dissemination of political discussion and action around sport, including race, class, gender and disability. Further information about the April 24 event as well as the Center for Sport and Social Justice is available by contacting Liberti at rita.liberti@csueastbay.edu or (510) 885-3050. “The Hidden Costs of College Sports” Wednesday, Apr 24 7 p.m. Cal State East Bay – University Theatre 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3050 rita.liberti@csueastbay.edu


April 23, 2013

SUBMITTED BY MARVIN BOWERMAN Hayward La Honda Music Camp celebrates its 52nd anniversary in 2013 and looks forward to welcoming students in grades 6-12 to a challenging and fun experience devoted to developing fine musicianship. The camp mission is to inspire young people to achieve their best musically, to enjoy a great social/recreational experience and take home memories that will last a lifetime. Camp highlights include Band (concert band and wind ensemble), Full Orchestra and String Orchestra, Small Ensembles (all combinations), Jazz Bands (five levels), Jazz Improvisation (three levels), Jazz Piano, Vocal Majors, Music Theory, Vocal Music (all-camp chorus, jazz choir), Master Classes (all instruments), Conducting, Composition, Latin Jazz and Electronic Music.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Participants will have the opportunity of studying under music directors from the most successful colleges, universities and schools in the Bay Area. The residential camp runs from July 20 to July 27, 2013 and is located in La Honda at the San Francisco YMCA camp Jones Gulch. “Hayward La Honda Music Camp changed my life. I first attended two years after I started playing the oboe and it was the first opportunity I had for one-on-one oboe lessons. I learned to make reeds at this camp. These opportunities helped me enter college as a music major. This camp offers many different opportunities for the young musician. Hayward La Honda was the first chance I had to sing in a choir, take a jazz improvisation class and play in an orchestra. Every ambition I had was encouraged. Being in an atmosphere where I was surrounded by people with like interests and passions made my teen years such an enjoyable time,” reflects a former participant. Recreational activities will include arts and crafts, swimming, equestrianism, canoeing, softball, archery, climbing tower, dances, zip line and hiking. Enrollment: registration before May 1 is ($695); sibling discount ($25) and Honor Band or Honor Orchestra Discount ($65). Some Scholarships available for families with financial need. The camp is a non-profit organization and donations can be made to the Memorial Scholarship Fund that helps low income families send their children to camp. For more information, videos, and registration, visit www.lahondamusiccamp.org, email lahondamusiccamp@yahoo.com or call (510) 537-4871.

SUBMITTED BY PHILIP WILDER The Moreau Catholic Class of 2013 is sponsoring the “Rock the Wave” concert in the festival area of the school on Sunday, April 28 and the whole community is invited to join in the fun. The concert will feature great music performed by Moreau students, both past and present, with groups: 3 Simple Words, Mission Peak Band, Across Party Lines, Fleetwood Mask, and Andrew Castro. Barbecue meat and veggie items, drinks, frozen dessert items, and watermelon will be available for purchase (no alcohol and no outside food or drink allowed), T-shirts will be screened on site, and a 50/50 raffle will also be held. This is the first concert of its kind and serves as a fundraiser for the class of 2013. Tickets are only $5 (presale) and $7 (day of the event). For more information and ordering tickets online go to www.moreaucatholic.org or e-mail pwilder@moreaucatholic.org. Visit on Facebook at www.facebook.com/events/577176982306052/. Rock the Wave Sunday, Apr 28 12 Noon – 5 p.m. Moreau Catholic High School Festival Area 27170 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-4301 ext. 209 www.moreaucatholic.org Tickets: $5 presale, $7 at the door

SUBMITTED BY DR. RAMESH KONDA Bay Area Telugu Association (BATA) celebrated “Ugadi” (Telugu New Year) festival in a grand style on April 6th, 2013 at Chabot College Auditorium, Hayward. The daylong program of cultural programs, political debate, dances, singing and a grand musical concert by Tollywood singers Deepu and Sravana Bhargavi, was sold out attended by more than 1500 guests. Talent show competitions allowed youth to showcase their prowess in classical, folk/ film singing and dance. In addition, competitions were held in Essay Writing, Art, Science Olympiad, and Chess. In addition, a political debate was conducted to raise awareness of Andhra Pradesh elections in 2014. A spectacular fashion show, presented by Nalli Silks, presented colorful designer sarees was followed by powerful energetic fusion of folk hip-hop and traditional dance

forms “The Power of Dance” performed by the youth. The much anticipated hilarious comedy play, “Bhoolokam Lo Yamudu” was well received. A grand finale 2-hour concert by popular Tollywood singers Deepu and Sravana Bhargavi completed the entertainment. The BATA executive committee team for the year 2013 includes: Kamesh Malla (President), Kalyan Kattamuri (Vice president), Dr. Sireesha Battula (Secretary), Yaswanth Kudaravalli (Treasurer), Sumanth Pusuluri (Jt. Secretary), Veeru Vuppala (Advisor), Vijaya Aasuri (Advisor & Cultural Chair), Sridevi Pasupuleti (Cultural Team), Srilu Veligeti (Cultural Team), Kiran Vinnakota (Cultural Team), Taraka Deepthi (Cultural Team) Over 50 volunteers put in countless hours during the past month to make this event a grand success. BATA Committee would like to thank all volunteers, sponsors, well-wishers and the guests at the event for the great support and encouragement.

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April 23, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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TCV 2013-04-23  

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