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‘I Hate Hamlet’ hits comedy heights

Fremont students sweep Alameda County Spelling Bee

Disney’s “Camp Rock” on stage

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

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Vol. 12 No. 13

March 26, 2013

www.tricityvoice.com

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE

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e entertained and educated as professional paranormal claims investigators, Bryan & Baxter kick off the next installment of Ohlone College’s Psychology Speaker Series, Monday, April 1. If there is a polar opposite to the Ghostbusters, it’s these two “urban myth and legend busters,” investigating and exposing pseudoscientific and paranormal claims as either a hoax intended to extract money from your wallets or just something scary designed to raise the hackles on the back of your neck. The two investigators use sound scientific methods to investigate everything from phony claims of people “in touch with the other side,” to ghosts, poltergeists and UFOs. They have verified the absolute normalcy of such sacrosanct haunted sites as the Stanley Hotel, known worldwide as the site of Stephen King’s film “The Shining,” with a “reputation” of its own as being haunted. continued on page 16

The many faces of Easter BY MAURICIO SEGURA Though symbolically linked to the Jewish passover, Easter or Pasch as it’s known among the Eastern Orthodox, is a Christian celebration commemorating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on the third day after his crucifixion. However, the approach to its celebration and customs vary from country to country and religious denomination. Easter is the culmination of what termed the Passion of the Christ. A 40-day period of prayer, fasting, and penance known as Lent, ends with Holy Week, culminating in three final days. These days are known as Easter Triduum, Holy Triduum, Paschal Triduum, or quite simply “The Three Days.” Maundy Thursday (the vigil of Good Friday) begins on Thursday evening to commemorate the Lord’s Supper, where Jesus broke bread with the disciples and revealed that one of them continued on page 5

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS “Five Palettes,” featuring the watercolors of five Bay Area artists opens with a reception at the Olive Hyde Art Gallery on Friday March 29. Five women, all members of the California Watercolor Association and accepted into numerous CWA member art shows, have gathered weekly for six years to paint, critique, share techniques, and experience the joy of working together. Each artist expresses herself in her own style. continued on page 14

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 26


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f you have diabetes, you know how important it is keeping it under control. The chronic disease causes blood sugar (glucose) levels to rise, which can damage blood vessels and other organs in the body causing serious health issues, including heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and eye disease. ‘There are a number of factors that increase the risk for these complications,” said Dr. Prasad Katta, a local endocrinologist and member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “People with diabetes have to keep these risk factors under control with a combination of medications, diet, and exercise.” He will discuss some of those risk factors when he presents “ABCs of Diabetes” on Thursday, April 4, from 7 to 8 p.m. The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series and will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont. “The ABCs include the A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol,” Dr. Katta ex-

plained. “I also like to talk about D and E – diet and exercise.” Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use it properly. Insulin is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy. When this process doesn’t work properly, glucose levels in the blood can get too high. The A1C is a test that measures the average amount of glucose in the blood over a three month period. According to Katta, it is the best way to determine how well diabetes is being controlled over time. “People with diabetes need to check their blood sugar every day,” Dr. Katta explained. “That helps you to know how your blood sugar is reacting to what you are doing. The A1C is important for knowing whether your diabetes is under control.” Risk Factors Blood pressure and cholesterol are critical because when their levels get too high, they dramatically increase the risk for coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, and narrowing of arteries. In fact, the

March 26, 2013

At an upcoming Diabetes Matters seminar, Dr. Prasad Katta, a Washington Hospital endocrinologist, will present a comprehensive overview of diabetes management for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. He will discuss risk factors for complications and how to keep those risk factors under control when he presents “ABCs of Diabetes” on Thursday, April 4, from 7 to 8 p.m. The seminar will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont.

death rate from heart disease is two to four times higher for people with diabetes than for people without the disease, according to the American Heart Association. “We treat patients with diabetes who have these risk factors as aggressively as we would treat patients who have had a heart attack,” Dr. Katta said. “We want blood pressure to be less than 130 over 80. Bad cholesterol should be less than 70. Good cholesterol should be over 40 for women and over 50 for men.” He will talk about some of the medications that are available to control these risk factors as well as some of the new medications on the market to treat diabetes. “Most patients need more than one medication to control blood pressure,” Dr. Katta explained. “The most important medications for lowering cholesterol are called statins.

They inhibit an enzyme that is involved in the production of cholesterol.” Dr. Katta said there are newer diabetes medications that act on the pancreas to produce more insulin or make insulin work betters. Others reduce the amount of glucose released from the liver. “Many of these medications work in combination with others,” he added. “You need to work with your physician to determine the right treatment plan for you.” Diet and Exercise While medications are critical for keeping diabetes and the associated risk factors under control, diet and exercise are also part of the equation. What you eat affects blood glucose levels as well as blood pressure and cholesterol. continued on page 10

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

3/26/13

3/27/13

3/28/13

3/29/13

3/30/13

3/31/13

4/1/13

George Mark Children's House - A New Way Home?

12:30 PM 12:30 AM

Inside Washington Hospital: Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy?

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Hip Pain in the Young and Diabetes Matters:Vacation Middle-Aged Adult or Travel Plans?

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Disaster Preparedness Do You Have Sinus Problems? Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013

Keys to Healthy Eyes Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Shingles

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Raising Awareness About Stroke

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13, 2013

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources (New)

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat (New)

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer Alzheimer's Disease

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

Heart Healthy Eating After Surgery and Beyond

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13, 2013

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13, 2013

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Resources (New)

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Diabetes Matters: DiabetesResources (New) Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat (New)

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat (New)

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Brothers Share an Uncommon Life Experience with Hip Replacement

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any siblings share a variety of characteristics, interests and experiences. Brothers Glen and Mike Lenhart are no exception. Both brothers are nearly life-long residents of Fremont, moving here as young children with their parents in 1967. Following in their father’s footsteps, each brother now runs his own deli in San Jose: father Michael owns The Sourdough Eatery, Glen owns The Freshly Baked Eatery, and Mike owns California Sourdough. Glen and Mike also share a love of soccer, having played the sport competitively throughout childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. That mutual love of soccer and the physically demanding work at their delis may have contributed to their latest shared experience of painful, chronic hip arthritis. They even shared the same cure – minimally invasive hip replacement surgery at the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research (IJRR) at Washington Hospital. Their surgeries were performed on the same day by the same orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Alexander Sah. “I don’t think we’ve ever performed hip replacement surgery on brothers on the same day before,” says Dr. Sah. “It’s also not terribly common to do hip replacements in men who are so young – Glen is 52 and Mike is 49. I encouraged them to wait as long as possible, and they were hesitant to take time off work for surgery since they run their own businesses.” Serving as Co-Medical Director of the IJRR with Dr. John Dearborn, Dr. Sah joined the Center for Joint Replacement at Washington Hospital in 2008 after completing a five-year orthopedic residency and a one-year fellowship in minimally invasive hip and knee surgery. Younger brother Mike became one of Dr. Sah’s patients that year. “My symptoms started in my right leg about five years ago, with intermittent, sharp pains in my thigh,” Mike says. “As the pain increased, I decided to see a doctor. The first doctor I saw told me I needed back surgery. I wasn’t sold on her diagnosis, and I definitely was not eager to have back surgery.” Mike decided to try chiropractic treatment first, going through a six-week treat-

ment program with no improvement. Fortunately, the chiropractor refunded Mike’s payments when the treatment did not work. He subsequently made an appointment at Stanford Medical Center, where they took new X-rays and told him he had arthritis and needed a hip replacement. Rather than seek treatment at Stanford, though, Mike decided to go to the IJRR at Washington Hospital. “Dr. Sah and Dr. Dearborn have wellknown reputations in the Bay Area for being the best at what they do, specializing in knee and hip replacement,” Mike says. “I wanted to see the best. I went to Washington Hospital because they have state-ofthe-art equipment and the new joint facility associated with them. It also is five minutes from my house, which made it convenient. Once I found Dr. Sah, I didn’t consider any other doctors or hospitals.” Dr. Sah examined Mike and his X-rays and agreed that he needed a hip replacement, but encouraged him to postpone surgery for a while. “After meeting with Dr. Sah, he told me that because of my age, I should put it off until I couldn’t take the pain any more,” Mike recalls. “His first concern was for me, not about getting to do surgery. He said I would know when it was time to have surgery. That impressed me. After seeing other doctors who wanted to do surgery right away for the wrong reasons, I finally got a doctor whose main job is performing surgery, and he wants me to wait. How many times do you hear a surgeon say, ‘Hold off on surgery?’ That’s unheard of!” Dr. Sah proceeded to treat Mike with cortisone injections to provide relief from the pain. Mike also would see Dr. Sah occasionally at the ice rink where their two sons played hockey together. ”I would talk with Dr. Sah at the ice rink, and he was always very personable and approachable,” Mike says. “He always answered any and all questions and just told me to wait it out as long as I could. I took his advice.” In the meantime, Glen was developing symptoms of hip problems, too, and he began seeing Dr. Sah in November 2010. “The pain would move around,” Glen explains. “Sometimes it was in my hip; sometimes it was in the groin area. When

Recovery from Stroke—Rehab Is the Key There’s a good reason why the Stroke Program at Washington Hospital dedicates resources and energy to educating the community and working to help the public prevent stroke, according to program Medical Director Ash Jain, M.D. At an upcoming stroke education session, Washington Hospital clinicians will discuss stroke rehabilitation and care after stroke. Chronic problems that stroke survivors must overcome and the toll stroke takes on caregivers will also be addressed. To learn more, plan to attend the Free Stroke Education Series seminar next Tuesday, April 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, (Washington West building) located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

“Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability and a top-four killer in the United States,” he says. “If we can help community members prevent this truly devastating disease process, that is always the ideal outcome.”

continued on page 10

Brothers Mike (left) and Glen (right) Lenhart both had minimally invasive hip replacement surgery at the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research (IJRR) at Washington Hospital. Their surgeries were performed on the same day by the same orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Alexander Sah (center).

it kept getting worse, I went to my regular doctor, who took X-rays and diagnosed arthritis in my left hip. I had heard about Dr. Sah and Dr. Dearborn from Mike, as well as one of my deli customers who had gone through a hip replacement. So I took my X-rays to Dr. Sah, and he said I was a candidate for hip replacement, too. Then he told me just what he had told Mike – that I would know when it was the right time to have the surgery. He was right.” Glen put his surgery off for two years. “I got several massages, and they didn’t help,” he says. “Exercising didn’t make it any better. I ate ibuprophen like candy, and ended up with stomach ulcers. Then I got a few cortisone injections that provided temporary relief, including one injection last July just before my wife Victoria and I went on vacation to Montreal – where my parents had lived years ago and where I was born. The relief from that injection lasted only for the week we were in Montreal. “It got so that I had trouble lifting my leg, and I had a severe limp,” Glen continues. “Nothing relieved the pain, and I got tired of having people ask me why I was limping. I considered trying surgery to have the hip joint resurfaced, but I figured it would just postpone the need for a hip replacement. I didn’t want to go through surgery twice.” For arthritic damage to the hip joint, Dr. Sah and his colleague Dr. Dearborn believe total hip replacement is a less invasive and more effective option than “resurfacing” procedures that involve grinding

down the surface of the thighbone and inserting an implant. Resurfacing implants, they note, are not as durable as total hip implants. Also, today’s techniques for minimally invasive hip replacement surgery dramatically reduce the amount of postoperative pain and significantly shorten the hospital stay and recovery period. Glen and Mike both finally reached the point Dr. Sah had predicted: They knew it was time for hip replacement. Part 2 of the Lenhart Brothers’ Story Learn how the brothers fared after their hip replacement surgeries. In part 2, to be published in an upcoming issue of the TriCity Voice, Mike and Glen discuss how they prepared for their surgeries and the impact of total hip replacement on each of their lives.

Do You Have Achy Knees? To help people in the community learn more about osteoarthritis and the latest advances in knee replacement surgery, Washington Hospital is sponsoring a free Health & Wellness seminar featuring Dr. Sah and his fellow orthopedic surgeon and medical co-director of the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research, Dr. John Dearborn. The seminar is scheduled for Friday, April 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium in the Washington West Building at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com/event/class-registration.


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continued from page 1

would eventually betray him. This is followed by Good Friday, a remembrance of Jesus’ passion and death by crucifixion at Calvary according to the Gospels of the New Testament of the Bible. Holy Saturday commemorates the day Jesus spent lying in his tomb, also regarded as Black Saturday in the Philippines. Finally, Easter Sunday celebrates the resurrection and transformation into the savior. The dates of Easter and its holidays are known as movable feasts, meaning that they do not fall on any fixed date on the Gregorian or Julian calendars. The first Council of Nicea (a council of Christian bishops who convened in 325 A.D.) established the date as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March Equinox. In Western Christianity, this Sunday can fall on any date between March 22 and April 25. Just as Christmas is celebrated throughout the world by non-Christians, Easter has taken secular significance as well. People color eggs, organize egg hunts, and have inserted springtime icons including the Easter Bunny with a basket of eggs. Why eggs… why rabbits? Hundreds of years ago, it was believed that rabbits were hermaphrodites. The idea that they could reproduce without loss of virginity was associated with the Virgin Mary. Rabbits were often depicted in paintings of Mary and Child, an additional association to the Trinity. Perhaps, this prompted Georg Franck von Frankenau’s 1682 children’s book depicting the Easter Hare bringing eggs to all the poor children. Easter eggs are given to celebrate Easter or springtime, common during Eastertide symbolizing the empty tomb of Jesus. Like a tomb, the shell appears solid yet a living bird emerges from it. Similarly, for Christians, it serves as a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave. Originally the eggs were colored red to symbolize the blood of Jesus. Easter has many faces, but whether celebrated in prayer and meditation or with colorful eggs, it is a joyous occasion.

Easter Musical Outreach Mar 28 – 30 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Neighborhood Church 20600 John Dr., Castro Valley (510) 537-4690 www.3crosses.org Egg Olympics Saturday, Mar 30 10 a.m. – noon Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont (510) 490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Free Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, Mar 30 9:30 a.m. – noon Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030 www.bridgescc.org Free Easter Egg Hunt and Bonnet Parade Saturday, Mar 30 9 a.m. Kennedy Park 19501 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 888-0211 www.haywardrec.org Spring Egg Hunt Saturday, Mar 30 9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Kennedy Community Center and Park 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5329 www.unioncity.org Tickets: $10 advance, $13 at the door Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, Mar 30 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas (408) 240-7920 www.cccmilpitas.org Free (please bring bag of individually-wrapped candy)

SUBMITTED BY JULIE MACHADO The Alameda County Arts Commission invites artists from the nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area to apply for potential inclusion in the 2013 Artist Registry, a prequalified artist pool that will be used for upcoming public art opportunities. The opportunities may include exterior and interior projects, be appropriate for artists working in a variety of materials and styles, and have a range of project budgets. Many of the opportunities will be for artists to make a new series of smaller artworks in the studio, therefore, artists who make two-dimensional, low-relief, or wall sculptural artwork are encouraged to apply. Specific project sites include: San Lorenzo Library Expansion Project, East County Hall of Justice (Dublin), Highland Hospital (Oakland), and other sites to be determined. There are public art opportunities for a wide range of artists such as: making artwork which contributes to healing environments, artists interested in collaborating with diverse communities, artists working in a variety of durable materials, emerging artists creating small to mid-sized framed artworks, and established artists who have completed major public art commissions. This opportunity includes artists in Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties. Additional eligi-

bility restrictions apply. Review the full application for complete eligibility requirements. Complete application information is available at www.acgov.org/arts (click on “Opportunities”) or call (510) 208-9646 to receive the information by mail. To be considered for these opportunities, artists must register and submit an application through the CaFÉ website, www.callforentry.org (search for “Alameda County” in the list of current calls). The application deadline is April 30 (10:59 p.m. Pacific Time). Artists may attend a meeting to learn more about the Alameda County Arts Commission’s Public Art Program, the project opportunities associated with the Artist Registries, and to receive general information about submitting an application through CaFÉ. Attendance is optional. The next meeting will be held Monday, April 1, from 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at the San Lorenzo Library, located at 395 Paseo Grande in San Lorenzo. Alameda County Arts Commission’s Public Art Program Monday, Apr 1 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. San Lorenzo Library 395 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo (510) 208-9646 www.acgov.org/arts www.callforentry.org

Survey Parking fee collection SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority is researching parking fee collection technology for the Berryessa Extension Project to ensure campus and garage designs support the extension from an operational, financial and passenger experience perspective. As part of this research, VTA seeks input from existing and future BART riders regarding parking experiences. From Monday, March 25 to Friday March 29, 2013, a link to the survey (available in English, Spanish, Chinese and Punjabi) is available at www.vta.org/bart/index_survey.html. The survey will also be administered at the Fremont and West Dublin BART stations during peak commute times, 6 a.m. - 8 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 25 and Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The first 300 participants to complete the entire survey at the two stations will receive a $5 Peets Coffee card.


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March 26, 2013

THEATRE SUBMITTED BY BOB MILLER The Douglas Morrisson Theatre (DMT) is excited to introduce the second production in the 2013-2014 “Bare Bones” staged reading series, “Time Stands Still,” by Donald Margulies, a keenly observed drama exploring the complex relationship between two couples. “Time Stands Still” tells the story of Sarah, a photojournalist recuperating from injuries incurred while covering the war in Iraq, and her partner James, a foreign correspondent shellshocked from the horrors of the war and guilt-ridden from having returned to the United States shortly before Sarah’s accident. Sarah and James work to reestab-

lish a bit of normalcy in their lives but are moving inescapably in two different directions, and discovering how difficult it is to erase the past. Margulies’s drama cleverly contrasts Sarah’s and James’s relationship with that of their good friend Richard, a news magazine editor, and Mandy, his much-younger, very naïve, and slightly dopey new girlfriend. “What I tried to do with this play,” said Margulies, “is capture a sense of the way we live now, to dramatize the things that thinking, feeling, moral people are thinking about and struggle with the issues of how to be a citizen of the world, how to show compassion, how to be involved, how to be true to yourself and your immediate loved

Union City Transit Seeks Public Comment SUBMITTED BY CITY OF UNION CITY The Draft 2013-2022 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) is now ready for public review and comment. The SRTP includes a review of Union City Transit and Paratransit and its service area, an analysis of system performance compared to adopted goals and objectives, service and fare recommendations, as well as capital improvement and financial plans for a 10-year planning horizon. The public comment period will end with a public hearing tentatively scheduled for the May 14, 2013 City Council Meeting. The Draft Plan is available for review at community centers and on our website www.uctransit.org. A copy of the draft plan will also be delivered to Mayor and each Councilmember.

ones.” The title of the play comes from the idea that photographs capture a specific moment, that they freeze time. “Time Stands Still” was commissioned and given its world premiere by the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles in February 2009. The play was produced on Broadway in January 2010 by the Manhattan Theatre Club, directed by Daniel Sullivan with a cast featuring Laura Linney, Brian d’Arcy James, Eric Bogosian, and Alicia Silverstone. Donald Margulies is a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and adjunct professor at Yale University. His plays “Sight Unseen” and “The Model Apartment” received Obie Awards, and “Dinner with Friends” won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in

2000. In 2005 he was honored by the American Academy of Arts and Letters with an Award in Literature and by the National Foundation for Jewish Culture with its Award in Literary Arts. An award-winning director, theatre maker, and theatre educator, Susannah Martin has directed for Shotgun Players, A.C.T., Aurora Theatre Company, Boxcar Theatre, Mugwumpin, Playwright’s Foundation, Porchlight Theatre Company, Sonoma County Rep, TheatreFIRST, and Town Hall Theatre Company, among others. She has taught for the California Shakespeare Theater for the past eleven years and directed several productions for their five-week summer conservatory. Martin has also taught for

St. Mary’s College, UC Davis, Los Medanos College, Marin Theatre Company, and a variety of high schools throughout San Francisco and the East Bay. The play (appropriate for ages 16 and up) will have one performance, Tuesday, April 2 at 8 p.m. at the Douglas Morrisson Theatre. Tickets are $10 (open seating), and are available through the Box Office at (510) 881-6777 or online at www.dmtonline.org. Time Stands Still Tuesday, Apr 2 8 p.m. Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Tickets: $10 Open seating

School bus drivers who make an extra effort SUBMITTED BY KIM JARMER Every day, yellow school buses perform a heroic achievement: they provide access to education for millions of children across the United States and Canada. They do this while maintaining a safety record unequalled in the transportation industry. By itself, the bus driver’s job of delivering students to and from school safely is an important one, yet some have found ways to go above and beyond on behalf of their young passengers. Thomas Built Buses, a leading manufacturer of school buses in North America, wants to hear about those special drivers. Does your driver help you feel safe on the bus? Does she know your name or start each day with a smile? Or encourage a spirit of sharing by organizing food, toy or book drives? Does he celebrate special occasions? Now in its eighth year, students in kindergarten through sixth grade are invited to submit essays of at least 90 and no more than 200 words to nominate their favorite school bus

drivers. Students can describe just what makes their drivers so special. The winning essays will be featured on the Thomas Built website when the judging is complete. Entries must be postmarked by May 31. The child who nominates the grand prize winner will receive a laptop computer, and the nominated driver will receive a $1,000 Visa® gift card. Grand prize winners and top finalists also will receive Thomas Built Buses jackets. Winners will be announced on the website by September 16. To enter the contest, visit www.thomasbus.com/contestfor complete rules and an entry form. Completed forms and typed or legibly printed essays should be mailed to: Children’s Choice Essay Contest, HMH, 1435 W. Morehead St., Suite 140, Charlotte, NC 28208. To nominate your driver for School Bus Driver of the Year, visit www.thomasbus.com/contestfor complete rules and an entry form. Learn more at www.thomasbus.com or at http://www.facebook.com/thomasbuiltbuses.


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Social Security

March Madness at Social Security BY MARIAELENA LEMUS SOCIAL SECURITY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST IN SAN JOSE It’s that time of year! Basketball fans are gearing up for March Madness — a time when the final four teams in the NCAA fight for the title of national champion. While basketball fans are excited about March Madness, Social Security already has a winning “final four” of online services to cheer about: our new my Social Security service, the Retirement Estimator, online Benefit Application, and online Extra Help application! Let’s take a look at the lineup: 1. My Social Security is an online account that allows you quick access to your personal Social Security information. During your working years, once you create your online account, you can use my Social Security to obtain a copy of your Social Security Statement to check your earnings record and see estimates of the future retirement, disability, and survivor benefits you and your family may receive. If you already receive Social Security benefits, you can now sign into your account to view, save, and print your benefit verification letter, check your benefit payment information, and even change your address and phone number in our records. You also can start or change your direct deposit information. Check it out at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount. 2. The Retirement Estimator is an easy way to get an instant, personalized estimate of your future Social Security benefits. Just key in some basic information and the Estimator will use information on your Social Security record, along with what you input, to give you a benefit estimate on the spot. You even can experiment with different scenarios, such as changing your future earnings and retirement date. Check it out in English at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator or in Spanish at www.segurosocial.gov/calculador. 3. The online Benefit Application is the most convenient way to apply for Social Security retirement benefits. You can apply from the comfort of your home — it’s fast, easy, and secure. It’s so easy, in fact, it can take you as little as 15 minutes to apply online. In most cases, once your application is submitted electronically, you’re done. There are no forms to sign and usually no documentation is required. Social Security will process your application and contact you if any further information is needed. Try it out when you’re ready to retire at www.socialsecurity.gov/applyonline. 4. The online Extra Help application is an easy way to save about $4,000 a year on your Medicare prescription drug costs. To qualify for the Extra Help, you must be on Medicare, have limited income and resources, and live in one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia. Learn more about it at www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp. Social Security’s online services continue to hold the top spots for customer satisfaction. In the recent American Customer Satisfaction Index quarterly report, Social Security continued to score higher than the best private online services, including Amazon. To learn more about our winning online services, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/onlineservices. Go Social Security!

Nominations invited for Arts Leadership Awards SUBMITTED BY RACHEL OSAJIMA The Alameda County Arts Commission invites County residents to submit nominations for the 2013 Alameda County Arts Leadership Awards. This annual program enables the Alameda County Arts Commission to recognize five individuals, one from each of the five districts of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, for their outstanding achievements and contributions impacting the arts community and the residents of Alameda County. Award recipients will be presented to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors by the Arts Commission. Nominees must be residents of Alameda County. Nominees can be involved in any arts discipline including, but not limited to, music, dance, visual arts, literature, theater, film and video, traditional crafts and folk arts, and new media. Nominees may participate in a wide range of activities with an Alameda County based arts organization such as an artist, staff or board member, volunteer, donor, supporter, advocate, etc. This award is open to all individuals, including youth, who live in Alameda County regardless of race, color, national origin,

physical challenge, religious or political affiliations. Nominations must be submitted by Alameda County residents. Each individual may submit one nomination. Nominations must include a description of the nominee’s major achievements contributing to the arts in the community and the residents of Alameda County; the impact and results of the achievements; and other background information about the nominee’s contributions to the Alameda County arts community such as what distinguishes the nominee from his/her peers or colleagues. Nominations are due on Wednesday, May 29 and must be submitted online at www.acgov.org/arts/awards The Members of the Alameda County Arts Commission will review the nominations in July. Award recipients will be recognized in early October in conjunction with the County’s celebration of California Arts Day and National Arts and Humanities Month. For more information, or to request the official nomination instructions, contact the Office of the Arts Commission at email: artscommission@acgov.org or phone: (510) 208-9646.

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Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 26, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD March 16 Walmart received a short phone call threatening that there was a bomb in the store. Apparently Walmart in Union City had one a couple of weeks ago. Walmart evacuated per their policy and we assisted with a search. Units cleared there after about 45 min. Units responded to a report of a fight and a stabbing at Best Western 5400 Mowry at approximately 9:50 p.m. Apparently an argument over a romantic issue broke out between members of a large party of funeral attendees. One male was stabbed and was transported to a local trauma center. Police are still actively working the case and searching for the suspect. Sgt Epps is supervised this incident. The uncooperative victim sustained non-life threatening injuries. Saddle Rack security stops some women after one steals a purse & places it in the larger purse of an associate. The battery occurs when the unknowing female is detained by Saddle Rack security. The purse is recovered and left unattended, only to be lost again. The loss is still outstanding and no arrests were made. Alarm call at Mojo’s turns out to be a patron who probably hid during closing, only to break into the cash register and cash drawer after closing. Suspect fled out the east door, activating the alarm. Investigated by Officer Allsup. March 17 Officers responded to a commercial burglary in progress near Boyce Rd/Automall Pkwy. The investigation revealed that the suspect stole a large forklift from a nearby car dealership and drove it to the PG&E storage yard (42105 Boyce Rd). The suspect drove the forklift through a fence and picked up a large spool of copper wire. Using the forklift, the suspect loaded the copper into a truck and fled the scene. Case investigated by Officer Chan. Suspect description: white male adult, mid 30’s, black hair. Suspect vehicle: ‘95-96, commercial truck, F350 or F450, white with an open black flat bed. Officer S. Hunt suspected the two brothers were involved in a liquor theft from Lucky Brookvale and checked around for their car. He found it driving with several occupants and made an investigative stop at Nicolet/Gibraltar. An 18 year old adult male in the car had a felony warrant for assault with a deadly weapon and two others were positively ID’d as the thieves from the Lucky’s theft, so they got burglary charges. 42800 block of Albrae St. Suspect and suspect vehicle on video, described as: white male adult, late 20’s, shaved head wearing the ubiquitous hoody. Vehicle is a teal Honda, early to mid - 2000’s model, right front tire is a spare and there is a bike on a bike rack on the roof. This vehicle should stand out. CSO Aguirre investigating. Officers dispatched to Sundale South Apartments for two suspects seen jumping over a wall into the rear yard of a house on Porter. A perimeter was established and Officer Singh located both suspects walking near Stevenson & Sundale; a 19 year old adult male and a 17 yr old juvenile

were identified and arrested for prowling. There was no residential burglary on Porter but they did confess to some auto burglaries in the area. Case investigated by Dooley/Leopardi. March 18 Officers were dispatched to an interrupted burglary on View Point Circle. The caller said three black males tried to open the rear slider at the residence and ran when they saw him. Witnesses in the area described the suspect vehicle as a red, newer model Cadillac Escalade. Investigated by Officer Peters. A victim on St. Nicholas Ct came home for lunch and found their front door blocked by a chair. The victim kicked his door in and saw a suspect running from the residence. Suspect was described as an Asian male, approximately 18 years old, wearing a white t-shirt and black gloves. Suspect was last seen jumping the fence from the back yard. Investigated by Officer Chinn. Thornton Jr. High received an additional threatening call today around 2:00 p.m. School staff and police recognized the call as possibly being the same outstanding suspect from last week. Police coordinated a response to the campus without disrupting the school. Detectives are continuing to follow up this ongoing case. Officer N. Johnson investigated a late reported robbery that had occurred at the Northgate Plaza Apartments. A fifteen year-old victim was confronted by the suspect near the vending machines. The suspect was wearing a mask and armed with a knife. The suspect robbed the victim of cash and his cell phone. March 19 Officers responded to a residential burglary attempt on the 40100 block of Canyon Heights Drive at about 11:00 a.m. The victim received a phone call from a neighbor saying the home alarm was sounding. When the victim arrived home 10-15 minutes later, she found the rear slider had been pried open. The suspect never made entry into the home. Neighbor described a possible suspect as a black male, 5’10, wearing a red hoodie. The attempted burglary took place between 10:20 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Investigated by Officer Ceniceros. Residential burglary at the Waterstone Apartments occurred within the last two days. Mostly jewelry. Case investigated by Ofc Sanchez. March 20 A resident on Isle Royal St. reported he arrived home to find his house had been burglarized. The victim stated some of the loss was in a neighbor’s yard. Officers arrived and contacted the victim’s juvenile neighbor who admitted to being involved in the burglary. Part of the loss was an outstanding firearm. The investigation led officers to a second and third suspect as well. Officers made contact with suspect #2 (a male juvenile) in the area of Tamayo west of Fremont Blvd where he was detained and found to be in possession of the firearm taken during the burglary. Suspect #3 (a male juvenile) was also contacted and arrested. In the end, three juvenile suspects were arrested for residential burglary and the majority of the loss, including a firearm, was recovered. The case agent was Officer Torrico. Sergeants McCormick and Miskella supervised this incident. Officers were dispatched to the 300 block of Becado Dr. at approximately 11:20 p.m. The reporting party stated that a residential burglary had occurred between 8:00 a.m.

and 5:00 p.m. A pry tool was used to force open double french doors. Several rooms were ransacked and loss was jewelry, iPad’s and other small electronics. At approximately 3:10 a.m. officers responded to the Sundale South Apartments regarding tampering with mailboxes. Officers contacted a security guard who stated that all mailboxes were secured at 2:00 a.m. during his next round, he found one bank of mailboxes in the front foyer had been pried open and there was mail on the ground. The security guard attempted to secure the mailbox and put the dropped mail back into the appropriate boxes. No leads or suspects at this time. March 21 An employee responded to an alarm call on Centralmont Ave and was struck by a white/brown pickup fleeing the area with its headlights off. Ofc’s responded and found that the business had been burglarized. The suspect pickup may have been driven by the burglary suspect(s). An estimated $5000 in copper wire was stolen. Investigated by Ofc. Austin. March 22 On Friday, we responded to the 34600 block of Winslow Tr. when the homeowner called saying a male was in his backyard with a flashlight after pounding on his door multiple times. Homeowner did not answer until a few minutes later and saw a subject exiting his backyard via the side gate. A few hours later and 2 blocks down we investigated a residential burglary on the 5900 block of Roxie Tr where entry was via a shattered rear slider and the house was ransacked. The common link between both houses up in Ardenwood, was that they had not yet pulled their garbage cans from the street after garbage pick up. Suspects may be looking for curbside garbage cans as an indicator that no one is home. Please remember to bring your cans in and coordinate with neighbors if you work late or are going to be out of town. March 22 B.A.R.T. PD requested assistance with a reported robbery at the Fremont B.A.R.T. Station. Fremont PD officers flooded the area. Ofc. Eric Marcelino located and detained the suspect walking away from the scene. Initial investigation revealed that a man was sleeping on an inbound train and awoke to find the suspect going through his pockets. They began to fight and the suspect fled once the train arrived in Fremont. B.A.R.T. PD responded to the scene and took over the investigation. Ofc. Eric Marcelino documented FPD’s response to the incident. Motel 6 North - An adult male claims two black male adults entered his unlocked room, pushed him down and robbed him of $500. Ofcr Piol investigating. March 23 Burglary at AER Worldwide on Boscell. This is the second burglary at this electronics recycling business in the last four months. Alarm tripped at 11:00 p.m. and video shows two males, one wearing a ski mask cutting the fence of the high value property enclosure. Ofcr Chahouait investigating. March 24 A “john” called an “escort” who met him on Stevenson Blvd. As they conversed, he gets pushed to the ground & a black male adult with a 45 semi auto robs him of his $100. The “john” vehemently denies calling for services, despite his repeated phone calls to her number prior to the robbery. Ofcr Taylor will be following up.

BART Police Log Submitted by BART Police March 18 The victim reported at 5:44 p.m. that both of the catalytic converters from his 2004 Toyota Sequoia, which was parked in the Fremont Station lot F-1, between the hours of 6 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. had been stolen. It appeared that the unknown suspect(s) possibly used a grinder to remove the converters. The victim estimated the loss at $2,000. March 22 A patron called to report a scuffle between two adult males on a train approaching Fremont Station. Both parties off boarded the train at the station. The victim went to the agent’s booth to report that he had fallen asleep and awoke with the suspect leaning over him, pushing him. The victim was not injured. The suspect exited the station and was contacted by Fremont PD officers in the area. The victim identified the suspect as the person who had been pushing him and wanted to place him under citizen’s arrest for battery. Officers determined that the suspect was a danger to others and in need of psychiatric evaluation. The suspect was placed on a psychiatric hold and transported to John George Pavilion for evaluation. He will be booked for the battery after being treated.


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ohlone Humane Society

Pleasures of the literary kind BY NANCY LYON

I

Cats Seized Control of Our House and Made It Their Home by Bob Tarte - Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. This is another of Tarte’s delightful chronicles of life in the country and the cats that own him and his wife Linda. Whether you absolutely love cats or are simply curious about their fascinating ways, this is a great chance to gain insight into their world and behavior. Each of Tarte’s cats is a master of manipulation but with feline style and individual personalities as they deal with the human world on their own terms. Unspoken by Angela Hunt – WestBow Press Unspoken was a given to me by a friend and came highly recommended and rightfully so. This extraordinary story revolves around a young woman researcher named Glee Granger who raises a western lowland gorilla named Sema. Over an eight year period, Sema is the center of Glee’s life and during that time, she not only raises her like her own child but she teaches Sema sign language. Unfortunately, Sema is legally owned by the zoo where she was born and it now wants her returned so they can exploit her abilities. “A love unlike any other...a story of sacrifice and the unspoken connections that bring us together…”they live together, play together, eat together, and “talk” together. Though Sema isn’t the first gorilla to use sign language, Glee has pushed their interaction to breakthrough levels… Glee’s only option for continuing her work and to be with Sema is to join the zoo staff. At first reluctant, Glee begins to see real possibilities in their new arrangement...until the unthinkable happens. One event overturns everything Glee thought she knew about humans and animals, the seen and the unseen, the spoken...and the unspoken. She taught a gorilla to talk. Now can Glee learn to listen?” All books are available in paperback and Kindle editions.

f you’ve ever stolen a few moments away with a good book and given yourself over to the delights of encounters with other worlds and other creatures while tucked away from the pressures of everyday life…you understand what I mean. I’d like to share a few captivating books that have come my way, some hilarious and filled with laughter, and others of a more thought provoking nature filled with love and loyalty, sometimes poignant. All, of course, deal with critters and their humans. From Baghdad, With Love: A Marine, the War, and a Dog Named Lava by Jay Kopelman and Melinda Roth - First Lyons Press This is the heartwarming true story of Jay Kopelman, a Marine Lieutenant Colonel stationed in Baghdad during the war, and Lava an Iraqi pup who stole the hearts of many good people, civilians and Marines alike; people who went to great ends, often bending regulations to save a dog’s life and bring him safely to America. It’s honest and courageous and not about politics. Kopelman takes full responsibility for directly disobeying a General Order to save Lava and while some may not hold Kopelman highly for his actions...it’s a time of war and disorder and a very human reaction to challenges that test people’s humanity. “…From hardened Marines to wartime journalists to endangered Iraqi citizens, Baghdad, With Love tells a true unforgettable story of an unlikely band of heroes who learn unexpected lessons about life, death and war from a mangy, flea-ridden refugee.” Show more Enslaved By Ducks by Bob Tarte – Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. I kept seeing this oddly titled book in a catalogue and thought if they kept offering it, it must be something special…I wasn’t disappointed. Bob Tarte’s book chronicles his adventures as a city-dweller who moves to seemingly peaceful rural Michigan and acquires a wife...a rabbit…ducks and a growing menagerie of countless types of animals who take over their lives. The result is a hilarious, sidebursting journey that includes some touchingly beautiful tales. It’s a must-read for animal lovers who have always fantasized 510-792-4587 about that ‘place in 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont, Ca. 94538-1304 the country’ with the caveat – be careful www.ohlonehumanesociety.org what you ask for. Kitty Cornered: How Frannie and Five Other Incorrigible

SUBMITTED BY KIMBERLY CARL The issue of human trafficking is staring us in the face every day. Unfortunately, most of the developed world neither sees nor hears the cries for help. The Bay Area, specifically Alameda County, has become known as an area of activity for child sexual exploiters and abusers. Join us as we create a network of individuals in the Bay Area dedicated to fighting modern-day slavery. Whether you are just learning about the commercial sexual exploitation of children in your community, or are already involved in the fight, come mobilize around this issue and learn of practical ways you can combat child abuse. All proceeds will benefit an Oakland non-profit, MISSSEY (Motivating, Inspiring, Supporting & Serving Sexually Exploited Youth). MISSSEY’s mission is to respond to the specialized and complex needs of sexually exploited children through advocacy, specialized treatment and recovery services, professional training and data reporting, juvenile justice case management, and mentorship. An Awareness Symposium on Human Trafficking will be held April 6, 2013 to benefit MISSSEY Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides services to survivors of commercial sexual exploitation. Human Trafficking Symposium Registration: 8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Symposium: 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. First Presbyterian Church of Newark, Fellowship Hall 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark Register online at: http://www.brownpapertickets .com/event/349904 $20.00 Registration Fees: $20/ $10 high school students Students with I.D. – community service hours Includes brunch

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“It’s best to eat three meals a day with snacks well spread out,” Dr. Katta said. “Portion control is very important. People with diabetes shouldn’t overeat at one meal.” People with diabetes need to stick to a heart healthy eating plan that is rich in nutrients and low in carbohydrates, sodium, and saturated fat with an emphasis on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, he added. “I recommend that people with diabetes work with a certified diabetes educator and a dietitian to develop a meal plan and learn how to manage the disease, particularly those who are newly diagnosed,” Dr. Katta said. “It has been shown that when patients get this kind of support in the initial part of the disease, it can help with long-term success.” Exercise is also important. It can help with weight management and lead to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Dr. Katta recommends 30 to 45 minutes every day of the week. “Diabetes is a significant health issue in this country,” Dr. Katta added. “More than 26 million people have the disease and with the rising obesity rates, it will continue to increase. We need to help people better manage the disease so they can avoid the serious complications of diabetes.” To learn more about Diabetes Matters and other diabetes programs at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes. continued from page 3

Striving for the best possible outcomes Unfortunately, strokes—the vast majority of which are caused when a blood clot travels to the brain and cuts off oxygen to the affected areas—are still one of the common causes of patients arriving in the emergency room, according to Dr. Jain. Therefore, top-notch care inside the hospital, particularly at a certified Primary Stroke Center like Washington Hospital’s, is critical to mitigating the damage done when a patient suffers a stroke. This is why medical professionals who work in stroke care must stay at the forefront of research in order to best serve patients, and why Dr. Jain and Stroke Program Clinical Coordinator Doug Van Houten, R.N., are interested in developing a research program that brings the latest modalities of acute stroke management to Washington’s patients. “To best serve our patients, our program must go above and beyond and stay up-to-date on the latest stroke research in a way that many community hospitals cannot,” Dr. Jain says. “Techniques for acute management of stroke are always advancing, and we need to stay ahead of the curve, which is exactly what we will continue to do.” Next Tuesday, April 2, community members are invited to attend a free seminar focusing on Acute Management of Stroke/Chronic Care and Stroke Rehabilitation. Why attend? Because patients play a pivotal role in timely stroke care. “Our primary goal is to treat stroke as quickly as possible once a patient reaches our Emergency Room, because time is everything when it comes to effective management of stroke,” according to Dr. Jain. “Even small delays can have heavy costs, and research has shown that outcomes are better when people can properly identify signs of stroke and they seek help immediately.” Essentially, the more community members understand about stroke, the more likely they will be to recognize it and take action. In fact, most often it is a family member—not the stroke victim—who recognizes stroke and calls 9-1-1. Although, perhaps most importantly, many of the acute management techniques for stroke are only viable for a certain window of time, which means that a patient must reach the ER within a certain window of time. “It is in our power to improve our times, which will maximize the number of patients who benefit from advanced treatment options, including interventional techniques in our Cath Lab,” he explains. “However, it is very much up to community members to understand stroke so that they know how imperative it is to call 9-1-1.” Rehab is the key So, what happens after stroke professionals have done all they can to mitigate the damage of a stroke? This is when the road to rehabilitation be-

gins, according to Stroke Program Clinical Coordinator Doug Van Houten. “Stroke can have a disastrous affect on those who survive it,” he points out. “It is quite clear, however, that almost all stroke survivors can get better. Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Speech Therapy are the key components for recovering from stroke.” This means hard work, knowing where to look for resources—and optimism, says Van Houten. “Somebody who’s had a stroke, who gets good advice and good outpatient rehab—hopefully they’re going to get as close to ‘normal’ as possible if they put in the work,” he says. “A few examples of the resources out there for stroke survivors include free education classes here at the hospital, our free Stroke Support Group, as well as the National Stroke Association Web site, which has a whole book you can download about recovery that contains exercises, how to get your insurance straightened out, and explains the importance of seeing your physician regularly.” “And if stroke survivors come to the Stroke Support Group at the hospital, we talk about these things all the time, and we have a social worker who can point them in the right direction for different resources.” Van Houten says it comes down to being your own advocate on the road to recovery—and not giving up. “The message to stroke survivors is to keep learning all you can to improve your stroke outcome,” he says. “Know who to ask for help. Learn what resources are available. Finally, if you have exhausted opportunities for outpatient rehab, plan on providing for your own rehab. Schedule time every day to do the exercises you were taught in your hospital rehab program. Learn new exercises online. Continue to be your own advocate.” Essentially, there are two roads to take when it comes to stroke recovery. One is sitting on the couch and giving up. The other is striving for whatever improvement is possible. “Studies indicate that stroke survivors who continue to maintain hope and optimism and who continue to work hard can improve their outcomes,” Van Houten says. “Why not learn all the available resources to get all the help you can?” To learn more about acute management of stroke inside the hospital, as well as how rehab can aid in the recovery process, plan to attend the Free Stroke Education Series seminar next Tuesday, April 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, (Washington West building) located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

A voice for people who stutter SUBMITTED BY GREG WILSON The Stuttering Foundation, www.StutteringHelp.org celebrates its 65th anniversary this year, marking more than six decades as the world’s foremost non-profit dedicated to helping those who stutter. Founded on December 27, 1947, with an initial bank deposit of $2,500 by the late auto parts magnate Malcolm Fraser, himself a stutterer, the Stuttering Foundation has been run by Fraser’s daughter, Jane for more than 30 years. Over the decades, the Foundation has provided help and support to persons who stutter in a number of ways. “Our goal is simple, to provide effective and accurate materials, up-to-date training and hope to those who stutter, their families, and the dedicated

therapists who help them,” said Foundation President Jane Fraser. The Stuttering Foundation provides a list of famous people who stutter on its website. Many of the statesmen and celebrities listed have served the stuttering community as spokespeople to raise awareness about the disorder and its treatment. “We remain dedicated to the vision my father, Malcolm, had in 1947 – giving a voice to people who stutter and continuously working to update the means by which we reach out to the stuttering community and the public with our messages of hope and inspiration for the nearly 70 million people worldwide who stutter, and their families,” added Jane Fraser. For more information about the Stuttering Foundation, please visit www.StutteringHelp.org.


M March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Letter to the Editor

Dear Fremont community, The Fremont Education Foundation’s 2013 Excellence in Education Gala, “Night on Broadway, held February 22, was a success as we honored the School Resource Officers and Nina Moore. Thanks to our attendees and others in the community, we raised over $23,000 for Innovative Education Grants for teach-

ers in the Fremont Unified School District. These grants will reach many, many students in our school district. We are currently accepting grant applications from teachers and will be approving grants in the next few months. You can read more about our grant program by visiting www.fremonteducation.org.

Once again, thank you for your support and I hope to see you at the 2014 Gala! Sherea Westra Fremont Education Foundation Vice President Innovative Education Grant Program

New Haven Board of Education report SUBMITTED BY NEW HAVEN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT On March 19, the Board of Education approved the second interim budget for 2013-13, as well as budget projections for 2013-14 and 2014-15 that maintain austerity measures implemented during the past few years. Passage of Proposition 30 last November provided no new revenue, only kept the state from making further cuts. Federal funds from the $29.4 million Race to the Top grant must be spent only on programs outlined in the grant. Interim budget and projections approved at the Board meeting are consistent with the reductions the District hoped to avoid by placing Measure H on the ballot last June. However, voters rejected the Parcel Tax measure. Under the 2013-14 and 2014-15 projections, the instructional year will remain at 175 days; students will continue to be in school five days fewer than they were as recently as two years ago and employees will continue to make sacrifices that include nine furlough days, a freeze on step and column wage increases, and an ongoing one percent cut in pay. State and federal funding continues to fall short of amounts needed to maintain the very programs that the state and feds require districts to provide. The District also must plan for the possibility that the federal sequester could reduce funding by as much as $500,000. Also, the entire instructional budget may be required to fund implementation of Common Core Standards, creating additional fiscal impact of $350,000. Current budget and future projections are tentative; Gov. Brown’s proposed Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), for example, could restore significant funding reductions made during the past seven years. Also, the Board: Discussed the renaming of Alvarado Middle School (AMS). Several community members spoke in favor of renaming the school in honor of Filipino-American labor leaders Larry Itliong and Philip Veracruz; a letter was read from the AMS School Site Council requesting that the Board suspend or postpone action, citing the cost and community attachment to the current name. Board President Linda Canlas told the audience that the Board already has made the decision to rename the school and that the only question is what the new name will be. A decision is expected at the Board’s next meeting, scheduled April 16. Recognized students from James Logan High School and Alvarado and Cesar Chavez middle schools who were selected to the California State Honor Band. Recognized the Alvarado Middle School team that finished third in the recent Mathcounts competition. Received a presentation from Mission Valley Regional Occupational Program Superintendent Pete Murchison regarding Career Technical Education services being provided for James Logan High School, Alvarado Middle School and Cesar Chavez Middle School students. Superintendent Murchison reported that law enforcement and auto technology are among the new courses to be offered at MVROP in 2013-14. Approved the Board meeting schedule for 2013-14, including the following dates: Aug. 13, Sept. 10 and 17, Oct. 1 and 15, Nov., 19, Dec. 10, Jan. 21, Feb. 4 and 18, March 4 and 18, April 15, May 6 and 20, June 3 and 17.

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Green Clean Technology Park planned in Fremont In a report by David Wang of the World Journal (March 21, 2013), Fremont entrepreneur and State Economic Development Commissioner Henry Yin outlined a plan to create an eight square mile section of Warm Springs district of Fremont into a “green/clean technology park.” He is quoted saying, “20 to 30 green technology companies are in the planning.” Identified as Fremont Advanced Sustainable Technology (FAST), the project will include “The four major green industries – LED, solar, energy storage.” Termed a “Glean Green Technology Cluster,” Yin told the World Journal that “the annual U.S. Green Technology Open (Green Tech Open) in October will be held in Fremont this year.” Yin has been invited to share his ideas with the Chinese Institute of Engineers (CIE) / Clean Tech Group on April 10, 2013 in San Jose.

Solar Solar development industry absorbing grapples with Calif. hazardous farmland wastes BY TRACIE CONE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BY JASON DEAREN ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRESNO, Calif. (AP), Feb 02 – There’s a land rush of sorts going on across the nation’s most productive farming region, but these buyers don’t want to grow crops. They want to plant solar farms. With California mandating that 33 percent of electricity be generated from renewables by the end of the decade, there are 227 proposed solar projects in the pipeline statewide. Coupled with wind and other renewables they would generate enough electricity to meet 100 percent of California’s power needs on an average summer day, the California Independent System Operator says. And new applications for projects keep arriving. Developers are flocking to flat farmland near power transmission lines, but agriculture interests, environmental groups and even the state are concerned that there is no official accounting of how much of this important agricultural region’s farmland is being taken out of production. ``”We’ve been trying to get a handle on the extent of this for quite a while now,’’ said Ed Thompson of American Farmland Trust, which monitors how much of the nation’s farmland is absorbed by development. The California Department of Conservation, which is supposed to track development on privately held farmland, has been unable to do so because of staff and funding reductions, officials say. ``I’d love to say we have all of that information, but we really don’t,’’ said Molly Penberth, manager of the land resource protection division. ``We’re going to play catch up getting that information, particularly in the San Joaquin Valley.’’

SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Homeowners on the hunt for sparkling solar panels are lured by ads filled with images of pristine landscapes and bright sunshine, and words about the technology’s benefits for the environment – and the wallet. What customers may not know is that there’s a dirtier side. While solar is a far less polluting energy source than coal or natural gas, many panel makers are nevertheless grappling with a hazardous waste problem. Fueled partly by billions in government incentives, the industry is creating millions of solar panels each year and, in the process, millions of pounds of polluted sludge and contaminated water. To dispose of the material, the companies must transport it by truck or rail far from their own plants to waste facilities hundreds and, in some cases, thousands of miles away. The fossil fuels used to transport that waste, experts say, is not typically considered in calculating solar’s carbon footprint, giving scientists and consumers who use the measurement to gauge a product’s impact on global warming the impression that solar is cleaner than it is. After installing a solar panel, “it would take one to three months of generating electricity to pay off the energy invested in driving those hazardous waste emissions out of state,’’ said Dustin Mulvaney, a San Jose State University environmental studies professor who conducts carbon footprint analyses of solar, biofuel and natural gas production. The waste from manufacturing has raised concerns within the industry, which fears that the problem, if left unchecked, could undermine solar’s green image at a time when companies are facing stiff competition from each

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Ailing San Onofre nuke plant eyes summer restart BY MICHAEL R. BLOOD ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES (AP), The operator of the shuttered San Onofre nuclear power plant in California disclosed Friday it might push for a rewrite of the facility’s operating rules as part of its effort to convince federal regulators that one of the twin reactors is safe to restart. Southern California Edison hopes the move could open the way for the Unit 2 reactor to be back in service by summer, when power demand typically soars in the region. San Onofre has been shut down since January 2012, after a small radiation leak led to the discovery of unusual damage to hundreds of tubes that carry radioactive water. Edison has been trying since October to convince the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that it’s safe to run Unit 2 at no more than 70 percent power. Company engineers believe the reduced level will limit vibration and friction that can cause excessive wear to tubing. The tentative proposal Friday amounts to Edison’s third attempt to answer a thorny question raised by the NRC: Is the plant that hasn’t produced electricity in more than a year capable of running at full power? In earlier filings, Edison argued that its 70 percent restart target was, in effect, full power. It later submitted another analysis showing the re-

actor could run at 100 percent power, but the research found the risk of a tube break could reach unacceptable levels after 11 months. The new proposal could essentially eliminate the debate over the full power threshold. It calls for capping the plant’s power output at 70 percent in the plant’s technical operating rules, rather than the now-required 100 percent. It also argues that running the reactor at 70 percent capacity would pose no significant safety risk. The proposal, known as a license amendment, came as a surprise since Edison has long argued such a revision was unnecessary to restart the plant. If approved by federal regulators, the move could offer a potentially quicker way to a restart. “We want to do every responsible thing we can do to get Unit 2 up and running safely before the summer heat hits our region,’’ SCE President Ron Litzinger said in a statement. Anti-nuclear activists who have opposed the restart accused Edison of trying to circumvent a thorough NRC review of machinery with a history of trouble. “Edison is more focused on making profits than it is in assuring the safety of millions of Southern Californians living near these reactors,’’ Damon Moglen of the advocacy group Friends of the Earth said in a statement. Daniel Hirsch, a lecturer on nuclear policy at the University of Cali-

fornia, Santa Cruz, and a critic of the nuclear power industry, said Edison was trying to delay a substantive review until “long after it has already restarted.’’ “If it is subsequently determined it wasn’t safe to do so, it would be way too late,’’ Hirsch said in a statement. NRC spokesman Victor Dricks said the agency had not received the proposal from Edison. The problems at San Onofre focus on its steam generators, which were installed in a $670 million overhaul in 2009 and 2010. Last year, federal regulators blamed heavy tube wear in the generators on a botched computer analysis that they said misjudged how water and steam would flow in the reactors, along with manufacturing problems. The generators, which resemble massive steel fire hydrants, control heat in the reactors and operate somewhat like a car radiator. At San Onofre, each one stands 65 feet high and weighs 1.3 million pounds, with 9,727 U-shaped tubes inside that are each 0.75 inch in diameter. Overall, NRC records show investigators found wear from friction and vibration in 15,000 places, in varying degrees, in 3,401 tubes inside the plant’s four generators, two in each reactor. The plant is owned by SCE, San Diego Gas & Electric and the city of Riverside.


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Marilyn Miller characterizes her work as a combination of realistic and abstract. She sometimes paints in a semi-pointillist method, prefers to use bright colors

and bold contrasts, using figures to create patterns and moods. Leslie Wilson paints landscapes, still life and figures in an impressionistic style. She loves transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary and reminding people of the places they have been, the people they have met, and the truly remarkable light and color in our world. Iretta Hunter enjoys the unpredictability of watercolor in her work, which she feels is a reflection of humans and the natural world. Susan Johnson paints primarily in transparent watercolor but experiments with opaques. She enjoys painting realistically but adds touches of abstraction. Her “dinosaur” paintings to be shown at Olive Hyde were inspired by a trip to the Field Museum in Chicago.

Maggie Metcalf ’s work reflects her own interpretation and often emphasizes emotion or mood. She always has a camera or sketchbook handy with which to record fleeting images for future paintings. Her work reflects her fascination with shadow and light patterns. With a variety of both subject matter and styles, “Five Palettes” offers a unique selection of paintings to the Fremont community. Five Palettes Friday, Mar 29 – Saturday, Apr 27 Thursday-Sunday: 12noon - 5 p.m. Opening reception Friday, Mar 29 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/

March 26, 2013

Singer songwriter in concert at Newark Library SUBMITTED BY BRIAN EDWARDS In honor of Art IS Education month, the Alameda County Library is presenting a special series of free arts events for youth and families throughout the Library locations. As part of this program, accomplished singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Johnston brings her Stomp and Groove music to the Newark Library. Lisa describes her music as “what Sheryl Crow and Sublime would sound like having a jam in New Orleans.” Lisa Marie Johnston in Concert Saturday, Mar 30 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Newark Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark www.aclibrary.org www.stompandgroove.com

Fremont Elks support Abode Services SUBMITTED BY JOAN WHITE On Friday, March 1 and Saturday, March 2, members of the Fremont Elks Lodge 2121 delivered household items to Abode Services’ Sunrise Village Emergency Shelter for two families transitioning from the shelter into their own homes. Among the items the families received were dishes, silverware, bedding, pots/pans, microwaves, rugs, and cleaning products. Each family also received a generous gift certificate to purchase any remaining basic necessities or food items needed. Under the Lodge’s Community Special Projects program for 2012-2013, the Lodge has provided basic necessities, beds and furniture to five families transitioning from the shelter into their own homes. Community service and “paying it forward” are commitments Fremont Elks Lodge #2121 has made to our community.


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The Bookworm

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The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

“The Art of Doing” by Camille Sweeney and Josh Gosfield Your goals are just out of reach – as they should be. You’ll attain them someday, and that’s the day you’ll set more goals. It’s the best way you know how to operate and, looking back, you’ve been doing things that way for most of your life: set a goal, knock it down, and pounce for the next one. You know what success looks like from your office chair, but what’s it like in other industries? In the new book “The Art of Doing” by Camille Sweeney and Josh Gosfield, you’ll find out. In your field of work, you know what it takes to get to the next level, then to the top. You assume it’s the same in a lot of places, but what does it take to become a successful race car driver? How does one become a great major league ball player, a crossword puzzle creator, or a successful author? Sweeney and Gosfield call those people “superachievers” and, after “months of research and over 100 hours of conversations,” they noticed, despite the lack of similarity in jobs, that superachievers have ten strategies in common. Superachievers, the authors say, show dedication. They’re smart in their persistence. They know their community, they listen, and they know the power of story. They’re willing to test their theories, they never let their emotions run away from them, they’re patient, and they’re willing to evolve. Finally, they know that happiness and success are tied tight together. As for advice, from game show winner Ken Jennings: “… enjoy the crazy experience…” and follow your bliss.

“Instill the ‘WOW’,” says Zappos’ Tony Hsieh. From 30 Rock’s Alec Baldwin and Robert Carlock: “Good ideas come from anywhere, even from bad ideas.” Be a contrarian and grow old ungracefully. Know your values and focus on them. Love what you do. Seek out role models at every stage of your life. Be “a madman” when it comes to detail. Remember that you truly are what you eat. Work hard and devote yourself to that about which you’re passionate. Reward talented people for risk-taking and don’t let them leave. Challenge yourself and your brain. Be likeable. As business / motivational books go, “The Art of Doing” is a quirky little thing. Authors Camille Sweeney and Josh Gosfield say in their introduction that they enjoyed finding and interviewing their superachievers, which is abundantly clear in every bubbly chapter. I also thought their format was fun: a short bio, followed by advice, then trivia about the person and their industry, all in just a few pages per chapter. That makes this book a bit on the lighter (but very informational) side and, despite that there are some off-the-wall industries represented here, I think you’ll find it useful in many ways. This is the perfect book for those days when you wonder what it would be like to have a different job, because it gives you a peek, then a boost. So when you need exactly that, “The Art of Doing” is the book to reach for. c.2013, Plume $16.00 / $17.00 Canada 272 pages

THEATRE SUBMITTED BY KAREN SILVA Chabot College Spring Theater opens Tuesday evening, March 26 with “The Good Doctor” by Neil Simon, America’s most gifted comic writer. The play, directed by Bay Area award-winning director, Joel Mullennix, is an uproariously funny romp that looks

stage. “The Good Doctor” will feature Kel Rama and Marc Dellamorte. The play will run each evening through March 30; closing day will also include a matinee. Tickets will be available for purchase at the door prior to each performance. There is a $2 charge to purchase a temporary parking permit from meters in campus parking lots.

“Man of existential frustration is always unhappy, even enjoying social success. Man of existential fulfillment is always happy, even not enjoying social success.” Huberto Rohden at Anton Chekhov’s world through hilarious lenses and with a contemporary twist. You will be guaranteed an evening of laughter and enjoyment. This will be the first spring play to appear at Chabot’s Stage One, formally called The Little Theater. What a great opportunity to enjoy a night out on campus and see the brand new lobby and new public amenities Stage One has to offer. Enjoy this comedy where twists and turns, character distortions, and hilarious situations fill the

The Good Doctor Tuesday, Mar 26 – Saturday, Mar 30 8 p.m. (Mar 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.) Stage One: Chabot College 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-7473 (510) 723-6830 http://www.chabotcollege.edu/theaterarts/index.cfm

Tickets: $15 general, $10 seniors/students

Google to pay $7M to settle Wi-Fi case BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Google will pay a $7 million penalty to settle a multistate investigation into the Internet search leader’s collection of emails, passwords and other sensitive information sent over wireless networks in neighborhoods throughout the country several years ago. A person familiar with the matter says the resolution will close a joint investigation by more than 30 states. The person asked not to be identified because the settlement isn’t expected to be announced until early next week. The case dates back to 2010 when Google Inc. revealed that company cars taking street-level photos for its online mapping service also had been vacuuming up personal data transmitted over wireless networks that weren’t protected by passwords. Google has maintained it didn’t break any U.S. laws and has apologized for a breach of online etiquette.

Discover and mature your spirituality through meditation and intuition and learn the purpose and plan of God under a totally new perspective: www.CuoreFoundation.org/courses.htm


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On stage, the two are wildly entertaining and demonstrate their methods to expose fraud, revealing what paranormalists do to deceive their audiences. They will conduct a pseudo-exorcism, uncover secrets of the psychics, and “harness the power of the ideomotor response.” The duo has investigated multiple claims of paranormal activity and hauntings at numerous sites. Video clips from paranormal investigations illustrate fraudulent paranormal claims they have exposed. Known for being “scientific skeptics,” Bryan & Baxter often utilize a variety of individuals specializing in geology, medicine, video and audio production, linguistics, and even magicians, experts in misdirection. Come and enjoy this frighteningly fun presentation and learn what paranormal claimants do

not want you to know. For more information or tickets, call (510) 659-6031 or visit www.smithcenter.com.

Bryan & Baxter: Paranormal Claims Investigators “What THEY Don’t Want You to Know” Monday, Apr 1 7 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $15 General Admission; $10 Students with Valid ID; $2 Event Parking


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Goodnight, Moons?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The GRAIL mission made this gravity map of the side of the Moon that faces Earth. Red shows areas with higher local gravity, and blue show areas of lower local gravity. Image Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / MIT / GSFC

o outside when the Moon is full. Look up and imagine you see two Moons, instead of one. Some scientists think that long ago Earth may have had two Moons. When Earth was very, very young, scientists are pretty sure it did not have a moon at all. Then along came a

G

out sort of like a pancake on the larger moon’s surface and became the highlands and thicker crust now on the far side of our Moon. A NASA mission called GRAIL sent two spacecraft to make a gravity map of the Moon. A gravity map shows the parts of an object which are denser than other parts.

huge object—perhaps the size of Mars. This object slammed into Earth and knocked a huge amount of rocks, rubble, and dust into space. Earth’s gravity kept this stuff from traveling far, though. Instead, the rubble went into orbit around Earth. Before long, the rubble started to glom together into larger and larger chunks. So, here’s the question. Did the pieces just naturally all come together into one big piece, which is now our Moon? Or was there more than one Moon for a while? The reason we might wonder is that the Moon has some weird features that scientists can’t yet explain. The side of the Moon that faces Earth (always the same side) is low and flat. The other side that faces away from Earth is high and mountainous, with a much thicker crust. Some scientists think two different moons may have formed at first. They think maybe the smaller moon began to drift slowly toward the larger moon. The two moons finally collided in a low-speed “splat.” The smaller moon spread

Denser materials have stronger gravity, and that is what these spacecraft measured. So far, data from the GRAIL mission does not support the two-moon idea. However, the GRAIL data did reveal that the Moon’s crust has been battered by meteor impacts much more severely than previously thought. Science is very good at discovering the history and nature of the universe. In only a few thousand years of recorded history, we humans have found ways to investigate how our Moon formed more than 4.5 billion years ago. Visit The Space Place website to find out more about our Moon and do a fun Moon phases activity using Oreos. Go to http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/oreo-moon. This article was written by Diane K. Fisher and provided through the courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN Center Stage Performing Arts presents a classic story of rivalry and power set between the kids at Camp Rock and Camp Star. Watch the camp showdown in this fun spring musical based on a Disney Channel original movie. The story will be played out by a kids cast and a teen cast; the kids take the stage March 29, 30, and April 4 at 7 p.m. and April 6 at 2:30 p.m. The teens take over March 30 at 2:30 p.m., April 5 and 6 at 7 p.m., and April 7 at 2:30 p.m. The kids’ cast includes Nathan Stoeckle, Matthew Joseph, David Chang, Maria Mihaila, Cheyanna Jimenez, and Jessica Uyehara; the teen cast: Taylor Dunn, Alex Driggers, Julian Pascual, Christian Pascual, and Adrian Andal. The Center Stage Performing Arts 2012-13 Season is generously sponsored by KB Homes, Mission Peak Homes, and the Milpitas Police Officers Association. Tickets are $10 per person in advance or $12 per person if purchased at the door. Purchase at the Milpitas

Nathan Stoeckle, Matthew Joseph, David Chang, Maria Mihaila, Cheyanna Jimenez, and Jessica Uyehara.

Community Center Monday – Thursday, March 25-28, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. and 1 1/2 hours prior to each show (if tickets are available). Tickets are also available for purchase from cast members. All ticket purchases are cash only transactions. For more information, call (408) 707-7158. Camp Rock, the Musical Mar 29 – Apr 7 7 p.m. (Saturdays and Sunday at 2:30 p.m.) Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 707-7158 Tickets: $12 at the door, $10 in advance Taylor Dunn, Alex Driggers, Julian Pascual, Christian Pascual, and Adrian Andal.

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THEATRE REVIEW

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI PHOTOS BY DAN SPARKS

I

f the thought of Hamlet or Shakespeare makes you cringe, Broadway West delivers the ultimate balm with Paul Rudnick’s hilarious “I Hate

Hamlet.” What, you ask, can possibly be funny about anything having to do with Hamlet? Here the answer is clear: everything. TV actor Andrew Rally has arrived in New York with the not-so-welcome prospects of living in a dramatic, gothic apartment and performing the role of Hamlet in Shakespeare in the Park. Though his agent, girlfriend, and even realtor are on board with the idea, Rally resists: he hates Hamlet! When it is revealed that the apartment once belonged to the late John Barrymore, known as the greatest Hamlet of his time, it seems Rally is destined for the role. He is further strong-armed when the ghost of Barrymore arrives to help him prepare for the demanding part, unable to return to the great beyond until his task is accomplished and Rally plays Hamlet. The only one dissuading him is his director friend from LA who pitches an appealing TV offer, likening Shakespeare to “algebra on stage” and counseling Rally that “you don’t do art, you buy it.” Rally’s emotions are further wrought by his Shakespeare-loving and steadfastly chaste girlfriend who wants a love for the ages and is determined to make sure she has the right guy before taking things to the bedroom. Art versus fame, TV versus theatre, or as Barrymore labels the dilemma, “artist or lunchbox?” Will Rally face the Bard and his greatest career challenge and secure the affections of the girl he loves or take a lucrative

SUBMITTED BY LOLITA MORELLI The Castro Valley Adult School Community Band invites you to their Spring Concert, Wednesday, March 27. Under Conductor Kathy Maier the program will include “Danzon No. 2,” “St. Louis Blues March,” selections from “The Most Happy Fella,” “Midnight in Paris,” “Original Dixieland Concerto,” “Blue Tango,” “Shenandoah,” and more. The Community Band is a 60-piece, all-volunteer band and is a program of Castro Valley Adult

TV deal assuring high visibility and easy living? Broadway West delivers a great night of live theatre with laughs coming fast and thick from all quarters. From the opening announcement to the final bow, you’ll find your face set in an unshakable smile. The six-member cast is uniformly fantastic and funny, each contributing to the hilarity of the show and providing rock-solid entertainment. James Lucas is outstanding as the theatrical, champagne swilling John Barrymore who insists, “I don’t overact, I simply posses the emotional resources of 10 men.” Lucas himself has admirable resources and uses them all to great effect; each raised eyebrow, hand flourish, and booming pronouncement, a deliciously captivating and hilarious show. Adam Magill plays the conflicted Andrew Rally with infinite humor and skill, and pairs with Lucas to make an extremely engaging duo that can do no wrong. Melinda Marks pops with enthusiasm and passion as Rally’s smart, supportive girlfriend Deirdre, and the performances of Doll Piccotto (estate agent/psychic Felicia) and Matt Singer (LA director Gary Peter Lefkowitz) are lively and memorable and just too much fun. Shareen Merriam rounds out the crew as the more serious and grounded German agent Lillian, taking wonderful possession of the lady who once had a fling with Barrymore and can still throw off a little spark.

Shakespeare, a séance, swordplay, champagne, passion, and the greatest parting bow you’ve ever seen; Broadway West strikes comedy gold with “I Hate Hamlet” and delivers an outstanding night of entertainment. There is no wavering on this decision: get thee to the theatre! Tickets are $25 general admission and $20 for students, seniors, and TBA members. Thursday, March 28, April 11 and 18 performances are $17 for everyone, with a bargain Thursday on April 4 - all tickets $10 (no reservations: first come, first seat). There are three Sunday matinees; March 31 and April 7 performances begin with a continental brunch at 12:15 p.m. and the show starts at 1 p.m., and the April 14 performance starts at 1 p.m. with refreshments during intermission. Sunday matinees are $25 for everyone. All ticket prices include refreshments. For reservations and information, call (510) 683-9218, or purchase tickets online at www.broadwaywest.org. I Hate Hamlet Mar 22 - Apr 20 8 p.m. (Sundays at 1 p.m.) Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Tickets: $10 - $25

and Career Education. Refreshments will follow the free concert, compliments of CV Adult and Career Education. Spring Concert Wednesday, Mar 27 7:30 p.m. Castro Valley Center for the Arts 19501 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley (510) 886-1000 www.cvadult.org www.castrovalleyband.com Free

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SUBMITTED BY JEAN WITZKE The John O’Lague Galleria in Hayward presents Mark Mertens Pastels, March 29 through May 30. Mertens seeks to capture the effects of light on color and realism. His work is rooted in realist traditions, careful draftsmanship and observation. Beginning with a loose sketch done in warm colors of hard pastels, the final layer consists of rich, soft pastels that are directly applied. Mertens is the recipient of many local art awards, is a signature member of the Pastel Society of the West Coast, and studied landscapes with Duane Wakehan and Clark Mitchell. He resides in Castro Valley.

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The public is welcome to attend the reception on Friday, April 5 from 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 pm. Regular gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday. For more information, please call the Hayward Arts Council Office at (510) 538-2787. Mark Mertens Pastels Mar 29 through May 30 Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Reception Friday, Apr 5 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. John O’Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Drawings by students of COIL Charter School SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS Creative and inspiring drawings by students of COIL (Circle of Independent Learning) Charter School in Fremont will be on display at The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery in Niles-Fremont (corner of J St.). Elements of Art is a class taught by Barbara Cronin (an FAA member) at the charter school and the concept of Andrea Starkey, a teacher at COIL, to help students visualize and concentrate. For details, call (510) 792-0905 or visit fremontartassociation.org.

Special Students’ Exhibit Wednesday, Apr 3 – Wednesday, Apr 10 Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Reception Wednesday, Apr 10 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. Fremont Art Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Free

A young and successful television actor relocates to New York, where he rents a marvelous, gothic apartment. With his television career in limbo, the actor is offered the opportunity to play Hamlet onstage, but there’s one problem: He hates Hamlet. His dilemma deepens with the entrance of John Barrymore’s ghost, who arrives intoxicated and in fullcostume to the apartment that once was his.

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Monday, Mar 18 - Thursday, May 16

Photo Exhibition

Continuing Events Saturdays, Feb 9 thru Apr 20

Teen/Senior Computer and Gadget Help

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Teen volunteers help seniors with electronic gadgets & computer basics

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Monday, Feb 1 - Friday, Mar 30

Art: Believe/Achieve

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Art from the National League of American Pen Women

John O’Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Monday, Feb 12 - Sunday, Apr 30

Tom Cain Memorial Photography Exhibit

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Over 200 pictures from patrons & students

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org Monday, Mar 19 - Sunday, Mar 31

Easter Bunny

11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Visits and photos

I Hate Hamlet $

Thurs - Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 1 p.m. Comedic play about a young actor’s struggle

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

Musical production about kid’s camp rivalry

“Camp Rock” $

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 707-7158 Monday, Mar 29 - Friday, May 30

Mark Mertens Pastels

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Eleven Illustrators & sixteen books are featured

Pastel work of Castro Valley artist

1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Offerings from member artists

Foothill Arts of the Bay Gallery 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Monday, Mar 12 - Friday, Jun 14

Apocalypse & Adaptation: How Catastrophes Shape Society

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Exhibit exploring the relationship between humans & catastrophes

Cal State East Bay University, C.E. Smith Museum of Anthropology Meiklejohn Hall, Rm. 4047 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-7414 Wednesdays, Mar 13 - Jun 12

Walk this Way: Ages 55+

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon Program integrates walking, flexibility & strength

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 574-2053 Thursday, Mar 14 - Saturday, May 3

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Offerings from member artists

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Friday, Mar 15 - Sunday, Mar 29

Once Upon a Mattress $

Fri & Sat: 8:00 p.m. Sun: 2:30 p.m. Queen’s quest to find a suitor for her son

Newark Memorial High School 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org

5 p.m. - 6 p.m. School district fundraiser

Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538 www.fuss4schools.org

10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5328

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

FUSS Test Prep Camp $R

Thursday, Mar 22 - Sunday, Apr 20

Fri & Sat: 7:00 p.m. Sat & Sun: 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, Mar 7 – Friday, May 3

Monday, Apr 1 - Friday, Apr 5

Monday, Apr 1 - Sunday, Apr 28

Winning entries from the annual photography contest

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Register at Children’s Information Desk

Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 945-4022 www.greatmallbayarea.com

Friday, Mar 29 - Sunday, Apr 7

Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit

Math and Science Education Spring Break Camp – R

Mon: 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Tues & Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Mon – Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. & Sat – Sun: 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb 13 - Saturday, Apr 6

Monday, Apr 1 – Friday, Apr 5

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Sunday, Mar 31 - Saturday, Apr 6

Spiritual Discourse Series

Spring Art Display Pastel art works

San Leandro Art Association 300 Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 635-5129 Monday, Jun 24 - Friday, Aug 8

Ohlone for Kids $R

8 a.m. Summer enrichment program

Registration begins April 1 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 Tuesday, Mar 26 - Saturday, Mar 30

Newark Memorial High School Art Show

Tues & Thurs: 1 p.m. - 9 p.m. Wed, Fri, Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Photography, drawing, painting & graphic design

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627

Tuesday, Mar 26

BAYVP Holi

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Celebration of Hindu Festival

Shreemaya Krishnadham Temple 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas (408) 586-0006

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Organized by Chinmaya Mission San Jose

Washington High School 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 378-4137

Wednesday, Mar 27

Girl with the Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis

10 a.m. - 12 noon Lecture & slide show on the SF exhibit

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400


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March 26, 2013

Wednesday, Mar 27

Saturday, Mar 30

Saturday, Mar 30

Contractor’s Workshop – R

Free Electronic Waste Collection

Easter Egg Hunt

How to do business with Alameda County, BART & City of Hayward

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Kid’s songs, door prizes & Easter Bunny

Benefit for Milpitas Youth Programs

Marelich Mechanical 24041 Amador St., Hayward (510) 537-2424

Huntford Printing 275 Dempsey Rd, Milpitas (408) 263-3474

Thursday, Mar 28

Saturday, Mar 30

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas (408) 240-7920 www.ccmilpitas.org

Budget Reforms Meeting

“Let’s Go Outside”

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

9 a.m.

For parents, community members & staff

Coyote Creek Lagoon 4-mile walk

10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Fremont Unified School District, Board Room 4210 Technology Dr., Fremont (510) 659-2572 Thursday, Mar 28 - Saturday, Mar 30

Easter Musical Outreach

7:30 p.m. Celebrate the life, death & resurrection of Jesus Christ

Neighborhood Church of Castro Valley 20600 John Drive, Castro Valley (510) 537-4690 www.3crosses.org

Coyote Creek South Trail 48481 Fremont Blvd, Fremont (510) 792-0222 Saturday, Mar 30

Egg Olympics

10 a.m. - 12 noon Activities, games, egg hunt & more

Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont (510) 490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Saturday, Mar 30

Easter Egg Hunt

9:30 a.m. - 12 noon Thursday, Mar 28

Free egg hunt, games & activities

“On Top of the World” Fashion Show $

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030 www.bridgescc.org

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Benefit for Relay of Life & Abode Homeless Shelter

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 msj.community@gmail.com

Saturday, Mar 30

Easter Egg Hunt and Bonnet Parade

9 a.m. Egg hunt & prizes for decorated bonnets

Tuesday, Mar 26 - Thursday, Mar 28

“Art IS Education” Show

12 noon - 8 p.m. Student exhibitions

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

Kennedy Park 19501 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 888-0211 www.haywardrec.org

10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Saturday, Mar 30

Living with the Earth - $R

1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Springtime sprouts: share vegetable seeds

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (510) 544-3249 www.ebparksonline.org Saturday, Mar 30

Holi Celebration with Gujarati Cultural Association

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Hindu Festival of Colors

Central Park Lake Elizabeth 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont www.gcbayarea.com Saturday, Mar 30

Grand Reopening $

9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Play tennis & enjoy fitness classes

Mission Hills Athletic Club 10 E. Las Palmas Ave., Fremont http://tinyurl.com/MembershipInterest Saturday, Mar 30

Great Egg Hunt $

12 noon - 3 p.m. Face painting, games, egg hunt & Easter Bunny

Dunsmuir Hellman Historic Estate 2960 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland (510) 615-5555 www.dunsmuir-hellman.com

Thursday, Mar 28

Family Health Fair

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Games and activities to promote health & fitness

Cherryland Elementary School 585 Willow Ave, Hayward (510) 723-3810 www.acoe.org/nutritionmonth Thursday, Mar 28

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

State of the City Luncheon $R

12 noon - 2 p.m. Fremont Mayor Harrison discusses city issues

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 795-2244 Friday, Mar 29

American Red Cross Blood Drive – R

9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Schedule an appointment & use sponsor code: STROSE

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (800) 733-2767 Saturday, Mar 30

Spring Egg Hunt $R

9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Egg hunt, games, carnival & prizes. Ages 1 – 10

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 657-5329 www.unioncity.org

2013 State of the City Address & Showcase Mayor Al Nagy

Saturday, Mar 30

Black Oak Casino Trip $R

7:30 a.m. Viola Blythe Center Fundraiser

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 673-3016 Saturday, Mar 30

Eater Vigil with Fire

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Stories, music, Easter Proclamation & Holy Communion

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492 www.saintj.com Saturday, Mar 30

Electronic Gadget Addiction A Program for Parents

1 p.m. Constructive versus abusive use for your children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Thursday, April 18 Hilton Hotel, 39900 Balentine Dr, Newark 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Registration & Networking Showcase Open (lunch ticket not req.) 12:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. Welcome & Lunch 12:20 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. Gallery Seating Open (no charge) 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. State of the City Address

Reservations are required by April 16. You may pay online at our Chamber Store at www.newark-chamber.com or fax (744-1003) with credit card information or mail with a check payable to the Newark Chamber of Commerce, 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark 94560. For additional information call 510-744-1000. NEW SPONSOR OPPORTUNITES! (Ask about our specially priced annual sponsor opportunities!) Platinum Event Sponsorship: $1000: Includes table for 8, recognition at the event, full page ad or profile in the program & space for grand banner at the event. Gold Event Sponsorship: $750: Includes table for 8, recognition at the event, half page ad or profile in the program & space for large banner at the event. Table Sponsorship: $500: Includes table for 8, recognition at the event & quarter page profile in the program. Program Sponsor: $100: Includes lunch for 2, recognition at the event & quarter page profile in the program.


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Summer enrichment program SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Every summer Ohlone for Kids (OFK) offers a unique blend of academic and special interest classes to enrich your child’s summer, keeping them active, learning, and enjoying their summer experience. The courses are designed for students entering grades 4-11. Children in OFK gain new skills, develop confidence, and engage in hands-on learning activities, stimulating their interest and growth. Classes Include: LEGO Robotics, Video Game Design, PSAT and SAT Prep, Cooking, Computer Programming, Movie Making, and more. Four sessions of classes run from June 24 – August 8. Registration begins April 1. Classes are held at the Ohlone College Fremont and Newark campuses and at Newark Memorial High School. Visit www.ohlone.edu/core/mapsdirs for directions. For more information, call (510) 742-2304 or visit www.ohloneforkids.com.

106-year-old Ohio woman will get diploma AP WIRE SERVICE LUCAS, Ohio (AP), A 106-year-old Ohio woman is finally going to get her high school diploma. Reba Williams said she completed high school in Mount Vernon in central Ohio but was denied her diploma because she refused to read a final book assigned by a teacher. The Mansfield News Journal (http://ohne.ws/XcKGji) reports that the Mount Vernon Board of Education approved issuing Williams’ diploma earlier this month. She’ll receive it in the coming days. A retired English teacher at Mount Vernon High School had approached the board about giving Williams the diploma after reading about her earlier this year. Williams was a longtime cook at what is now the state’s only working farm and park, called Malabar Farm State Park. She still has a sharp mind and lives with her daughter in Columbus. Information from: News Journal, http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com

Milpitas Rotary sponsors E-Waste event SUBMITTED BY FRANK DESMIDT Help Rotary dispose of E-Waste the right way by diverting it from the landfills to a proper recycling process and help the youth of Milpitas. E-Waste is defined as any consumer electronic equipment that has reached its ‘end-of-life,’ ‘end-of-usage,’ whether in full or non-working condition. E-Waste includes most electronics or electronic equipments with a cord or circuit board such as: Computer Monitors, Television sets, Printers, PC Systems, Laptops, Copiers, Scanners, Fax Machines, Toner Cartridges, UPS & PDAs, Tower Supplies, Main Frame Units, Networking Equipment, Mother Board Systems, VCR/VCD/DVD Players, Home Entertainment Systems, Landline and Cellular Phones, & Small Portable Devices. Rotary receives a donation on a per pound basis from the recycling company. Money raised will benefit Milpitas Youth Programs. All items are recycled in the State of California; nothing goes to landfill or China. Our Recycling partner is recycle1234.com, a State certified e-waste processor.

E-waste event Saturday, Mar 30 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Huntford Printing 275 Dempsey Rd., Milpitas

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change Tuesday, March 26 9:45–10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT Wednesday, March 27 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, March 28 10:00–10:30 Daycare Center Visit SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:30 Daycare Center Visit CASTRO VALLEY 1:00 – 2:00 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 2:25 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD Monday, April 1 9:30–10:05 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:25–10:55 Daycare Center Visit City UNION CITY 1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School,

34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY 4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY 5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, April 2 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, April 3 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, April 3 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


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March 26, 2013

Contest asks teen golfers how teamwork fosters success SUBMITTED BY MARIANA PHIPPS Wells Fargo has announced the launch on March 15, 2013 of Succeeding TogetherSM, a video essay contest that celebrates the value of building relationships as a foundation for success in life. The contest was created by Wells Fargo specifically for participants (ages 13-18) in The First Tee®, a youth development organization that introduces young people to the game of golf and its inherent values at nearly 200 chapters across the U.S. The four winners and a guest will receive a four-day/three-night trip for two to Charlotte, N.C. to attend the 2013Wells Fargo Championship and experience up-close the excitement of a PGA TOUR event from inside the ropes. The grand prize winner will play in the tournament’s Pro-Am with defending champion Rickie Fowler on May 1, 2013. Contestants upload their videos to the Succeeding Together contest site, which are then posted to Wells Fargo’s YouTube channel. They can then share the videos through their social networks. The top 50 entries, based on the number of “thumbs up” the videos earn, will be reviewed by a panel of judges from Wells Fargo, The First Tee, and the Wells Fargo Championship tournament office. Only participants in The First Tee (ages 13-18 in the Birdie, Eagle or Ace program levels) can enter the Succeeding Together contest. Video entries must be uploaded between March 15 and April 1. Winners will be announced in mid-April. No entry fee or purchase is required to participate in the contest. More information about the contest is located at: www.succeedingtogether.wellsfargobank.com. Video entries will be posted to: www.youtube.com/wellsfargo.

John F. Kennedy Titans stand tall SWIMMING SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW A small team of J.F. Kennedy swimmers faced a Herculean task Friday, March 22 when they faced

the Logan Colts as visitors. This year, the Titan squad has gathered a dedicated group that have shown a lot of grit and determination and may be nurturing a few Mission Valley Athletic League stars in their midst. A good showing at the meet belied the meager aquatic training facilities on the J.F. Kennedy campus. Parents have rallied behind the school’s efforts and Coach Wun to improve the facilities to include a deep swimming pool, with the capability of holding diving practice. This season, Titan swimmers have received donations from the community to purchase new equipment including fins, pull buoys and a clock. Coach Wun has committed her time mornings and afternoons. With continued support, Titan students, parents and alumni are dreaming of a state-of-the-art pool to support a water polo team and larger swim team. Any help will be appreciated; contact Mr. McDermott, Athletic Director at (510) 657-4070.

BASEBALL PHOTO BY DON JEDLOVEC The Ohlone Renegade nine faced a tough Monterey Penninsula Lobos team on March 23 and were unable to recover an early barrage of runs and an 8-run outburst in the sixth inning by the visitors, losing 188. Although the hit total of both teams was even at 14 each, five Renegade errors were not helpful. Ohlone is now 7-4 in conference play.

Get ready to Curl The San Francisco Bay Area Curling Club is pleased to announce that Spring League schedules are now available at bayareacurling.com. At Sharks Ice in Fremont, Curling will be held for 12 weeks on Thursday evenings 7:45 p.m. – 9:45 p.m. beginning April 4. Registration at bayareacurling.com/register opens Monday, March 25th at 7 p.m. for Fremont Thursday League. Signups are open to individuals and teams. For those with little or no experience, a Saturday Instructional League will be held on Saturdays in Oakland.

James Logan defeats Washington Men’s Tennis SUBMITTED BY SHAWN DOLGIN Logan Boys Varsity Tennis defeats Washington 7-0 Singles Anson Tijing defeats Leon Eng: 6-1 6-3 JC Salamida defeats Zach Owyang: 6-2 6-4 Alvin Gao defeats Josh Bains: 6-0 6-2 Sahil Markandaya defeats Alex Peng: 6-0 6-0 Doubles Jason Sugino-Sue and Corey Sugino-Sue defeats Vid Basrukar and Ark Lu: 6-3 7-5 Derek Doe and Caleb Kang defeats Jonah Gacusan and Jason Edelson: 6-3 6-1 Brendan Chen and Jefferson Jiang defeats Nell Almelda and Nyle Almelda: 6-2 6-4 Logan Boys JV Tennis defeats Washington 7-0

Scoreboard SUBMITTED BY KENNY JACOBY AND LEAH MANALO

Men’s Volleyball March 12 Moreau Catholic Mariners3; College Prep Cougars- 1 (21-25, 25-21, 25-17, 29-27)

Men’s Baseball March 16 Mission San Jose Warriors12; Antioch Panthers- 2


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Sunday, Mar 31

Monday, Apr 1

Festive Easter Service

Alameda County Arts Commission’s Public Art Program

10 a.m. Music, Holy Communion, and Easter egg hunt

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492 www.saintj.com

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6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Learn about the program & how to apply

San Lorenzo Library 395 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo (510) 208-9646 www.acgov.org/arts

Sunday, Mar 31 Saturday, Apr 6 - Sunday, Apr 7

Holi Celebration

11:30 a.m.

Fremont Friend’s of the Library Book Sale $

Annual Festival of Colors

Fremont Hindu Temple 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont (510) 659-0655

Sat: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sun: 12 noon - 3 p.m. Bring your own bag

Fremont Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-1103

Monday, Apr 1

“What THEY Don’t Want You to Know” $

7 p.m. Paranormal investigation team of Bryan & Baxter

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Newark Memorial Cougar attack too Track & Field much for Moreau Mariners

US Bank robbery

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER W. QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On March 5, 2013, at about 4:24 p.m., a robbery occurred at the US Bank located at 1535 Landess Avenue, in Milpitas. An unknown male suspect walked inside the bank and handed the teller a demand note requesting money. The teller complied and gave the suspect cash. The suspect fled the area on foot and was described as a Hispanic Male, 6’0” to 6’2, weighing 200 to 300 pounds. He was last seen wearing a blue California Berkeley hooded jacket with “California” and an image of a bear printed in gold on the front, a black Pittsburgh Pirates baseball hat with a yellow “P” on the front, sunglasses and black pants. Officers searched the area but were unable to locate the suspect. We are asking anyone who can identify the suspect or possesses any information regarding this investigation to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

SUBMITTED BYE MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Tony Varesio and the rest coaching staff of Newark Cougar track team are looking forward to a good season as the girls team is ranked second in sectional competition. Their ranking is genuine and was evident very early in their dual meet event with Moreau Catholic High School. Newark was dominant, very strong in distances races and relay competition as well. The Lady Cougars set a good pace at the beginning of each race and ran away from Mariner pursuit although, even with a small team of mostly freshmen and sophomores, Moreau fought hard. Mariner Coach Enrique Henriquez has high hopes even with a relatively small, inexperienced team and says, “We the have the makings of good team in the future.” The Cougar men also have good speed and demonstrated dominance in the 100 yard dash and hurdles. Their longer distance runners were able to display finishing kicks that left the Mariners behind. Overall, it was a good day for the Cougars.

Ohlone March Madness PHOTO BY DON JEDLOVEC March Madness is not confined to hoops action. On St. Patrick’s Day weekend, the Lady Renegades of Ohlone College were unfazed by any mischievous loose Leprechauns as they left the tournament with a 3-2 record and very much alive in the hunt for postseason play in the Coast Conference. The Renegades posted victories over West Hills, Cabrillo and Merced Colleges with close losses to Shasta and

Hartnell. In April, seven scheduled conference games will determine if the Lady Renegades can continue their winning ways in May regional play. Visit http://www.ohlone.edu/org/athletics/docs/2012201 3/wsoftball-schedule2013.pdf for the Lady Renegade schedule and results.

Prowling suspects arrested SUBMITTED BY SGT. FRANK MORALES, MILPITAS PD On March 15, 2013, at about 12:08pm, Milpitas police officers responded to the 100-blk of Washington Dr. on a report of two Newark resident teenagers attempting to burglarize a residence. The first officer arrived on scene in about 70 seconds. Two teenagers matching the description were located and detained nearby, and the victim identified them as the same people attempting to burglarize the residence. During the investigation it was determined that the female suspect knocked on the front door of the residence to see if anyone was home. After no one came to answer the door, the male suspect attempted to open a side gate leading into the backyard. The victim yelled out to the suspects and they fled from the residence. Both juveniles were arrested and booked into Santa Clara County Juvenile Hall for conspiracy to commit a crime, prowling and providing false identification to a police officer. Additionally, the male suspect was charged with probation violation. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 26, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL

Happenings Tri-City Voice Date: Mar. 05, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2455300#

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13671934 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Iswar Dharapuram Ramamoorthy for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Iswar D Ramamoorthy filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Iswar Dharapuram Ramamoorthy to James Iswar Yisrael The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 06-14-13, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 36000 Fremont Blvd. #153, Fremont, CA 94536 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Inter-City Exrpess Date: Mar. 19, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/26, 4/2, 4/9, 4/16/13 CNS-2461452# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13670378 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran to Logesh Nathanael Kumaar The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 5-31-2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Mar. 8, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2457330# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13669870 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Shiva Swaminathan & Suganthini Shiva-Swaminathan parents, on behalf of Shaini and Abishayan minors for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Suganthini R. Shiva-Swaminathan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Suganthini Rajeswaran Shiva-Swaminathan to Suganthini Sugi-Rajeswaran Shiva Shaini Saras Shiva Swaminathan to Shaini SarasValli Shiva Abishayan Rajes Shiva Swaminathan to Abishayan Abi-Thamba Shiva The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 05/24/13, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amado Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13665777 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Chi Fong Yip for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Chi Fong Yip filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Chi Fong Yip to Francisco Yip The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Fri 4/26/2013, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice Date: Feb. 01, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2455295# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13669256 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Jacob A Paine for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Jacob Anthony Paine to Jacob Anthony Moller The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Fri 5/24/2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happening Tri City Voice Date: Feb 28, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2454359#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 476228 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Darling Design, 33308 Jamie Cir., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Darling Design, California, 27779 Pleasant Hill Ct., Hayward, CA 94542 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dan Fowler, C.E.O. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 18, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before th i ti

The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/26, 4/2, 4/9, 4/16/13 CNS-2461675# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475905 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Chutian International Culture & Arts Exchange Inc., 36359 Magellan Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Chutian Group Inc., 36359 Magellan Dr., Fremont, CA 94536; California #3430594 This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Min Song, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 11, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/26, 4/2, 4/9, 4/16/13 CNS-2460315# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475766 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bombay Pizza House, 4922 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda; 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 G & G Food Inc., 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587; California This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gursewak Singh Gill, CEO/Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 7, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2459091# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475932 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Virtual Associate, 2411 Jackson St., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 1033, Fremont, CA 94538 Navneet Pannu, 244 Jackson St., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on January 1, 2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Navneet Pannu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 11, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq Business and Professions Code)

3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2458304# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475274 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Amaran Consulting, 38524 Athy Ct., Fremont, CA 94836, County of Alameda Ami Jagdish Biligiri, 38524 Athy Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ami J. Biligiri This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 25, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2457465# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475437 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The One Construction, 2755 Country Dr. #135, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Brandon Hyok Lee, 2755 Country Dr. #135, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 02/26/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Brandon Hyok Lee This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 28, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2454358# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475414 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MZ Limousine, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555,County of Alameda Muhammad Z Rafique, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Sumreen Zafar, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by married couple The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 02/27/13 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Muhammad Rafique This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 27, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2452882# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS

File No. 437115 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Green Cleaning Solutions, 3963 Southampton Ter., Fremont, CA 94555 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on April 12, 2010 in the County of Alameda. Sonia Vazquez, 33030 Lake Mead Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business was conducted by: S/ Sonia Vazquez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 25, 2013. 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2451664# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475160 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kyrin International Trading Company, 46228 Warm Springs Blvd., #420, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Shaolong Qu, 46228 Warm Springs Blvd., #420, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shaolong Qu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2450425# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475143 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Realty One Group American, 42820 Albrae St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda American Realty & Business Corp., 42820 Albrae St., Fremont, CA 94538; CA This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mohinder Pal Singh, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2450423#

GOVERNMENT NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Alameda County Social Services Agency, Department of Adult, Aging, and Medical Services, 6955 Foothill Boulevard, Suite 300, Oakland, CA 94605 NON-MANDATORY NETWORKING/ BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP NS-2013 Nutrition Services Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM, Department of Adult, Aging and Medical Services, 6955 Foothill Blvd. Suite 300, Big Sur Room, Oakland, CA Response Due by 1:00 pm on April 19, 2013 County Contact: Lisa Ho at (510) 577-3531 or via email: lho@acgov.org Attendance at Networking/ Bidders Conference is not required. The RFP is available via the GSA website— www.acgov.org under Current Contracting Opportunities 3/26/13 CNS-2460862#

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY SHEILA REMOLAR-REDUTA

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

Parishioners of St. James the Apostle Catholic Church, Fremont, were presented with a special Christmas gift from their pastor, Fr. Antony Vazhappilly. His second book, “Songs for a Spiritual Journey,” was released in early December 2013 and perfectly complements his first, “A Marian Handbook,” published in 2010. “Songs for a Spiritual Journey” is a compilation of 52 poems and reflections by Fr. Antony to guide his readers through a weekly contemplation throughout the year. This book is intended to re-energize one’s spirit and soul in a journey back to basic Christian teachings that man needs God and forges ahead by living with this same belief and conviction. This book is a testament of Fr. Antony’s gift of poetry writing and 30 years of inspirational work as a priest, educator and counselor. A book-signing event was held at St. James the Apostle Church, Fremont, on December 23, 2012. Fr. Antony’s close friends and supporters and his parishioners graced the occasion. Union City Council member and St. James parishioner Jim Navarro was Master of Ceremonies. An opening prayer, led by Joe Parish, was followed by Fr. Antony’s introduction of the book and acknowledgement of all who shared their treasure, time and talent from the early stages of the book to its completion and publication. Fr. Antony’s guests wrote praises for the book and shared their personal reviews. Among them were Fr. Joseph Antony Sebastian SVD (St. Joachim Parish Hayward), Fr. Joseph Kalapurayil (Indian Orthodox Church), James Neiman (Information Systems Professional, Sensei at Shugyo Aikido Dojo, and St. James parishioner) and Edward Caron (Administrator, Stanford University and St. James parishioner). Sincere appreciation was also extended to Deacon Dick Folger of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary in Union City for publishing the book. Folger is the Founder & President of Folger Graphics, Inc. The event continued with Fr. Antony’s book signing as the God Our Father choir of St. James rendered beautiful Christmas music during the fellowship. Members of the Mary Our Mother ministry of St. James, led by Elmie Shahab, have generously shared their time to promote and help sell Fr. Antony’s book since its debut. “Songs for a Spiritual Journey” is available at $15. All proceeds will help construction of the Mother Teresa Children’s Education Center at St. James to provide for our children’s continuing religious education and youth programs. For more information, call (510) 792-1962, visit St. James the Apostle Catholic Church, 34700 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont, or www.sjapostle.net

March 16 At 9:02 a.m. Officer Cerini investigated a theft of copper at Newark Junior High. Electrical wires connecting one of the portable classrooms and the baseball field snack bar were cut and pulled out of the underground conduit. Officer Neithercutt located and recovered an unoccupied stolen vehicle (Gold 97 Corolla, CA: 3UIL393) on St. Isabel Ave. at 2:15 p.m. Vehicle had been reported stolen to Fremont PD on 2-20-13. Residents reported that vehicle was left in the area 2-3 weeks ago. Officer Slater handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Burlington Coat Factory at 5:17 p.m. Margarita Hall of Pittsburg was cited and released at the scene for petty theft. Officer Slater handled another citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s store at 5:20 p.m. April Coleman of Fremont was also cited and released at the scene for petty theft. March 17 Officer Neithercutt arrested Bradford Samuels of Fremont at 12:33 p.m. for an outstanding warrantpossession of drugs and a new charge of Possession of Burglary tools. After conducting a probation search of Bradford’s vehicle, Officer Neithercutt located a gas siphoning system built into the vehicle. The system was comprised of a hidden hose and pump system placed the trunk and wheel well of the vehicle. The design of the system and its hidden nature make it easy for the owner of the vehicle to steal gas for vehicle virtually

undetected. Bradford was booked was later booked into Santa Rita Jail. March 19 At 11:06 a.m., Officer Homayoun investigated a commercial burglary at Martin Auto Wholesale, located at 37310 Cedar Boulevard. The burglary occurred overnight and suspect(s) made entry by smashing a window to the business. Loss is computers and a safe. March 21 Officer Clark accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from Macy’s of Michael Tran of San Jose at 1:55 p.m. Tran was arrested for Burglary and booked at Santa Rita Jail. Officer Taylor accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from JC Penney of Kavyashree Thota [female] of Fremont was arrested for Petty Theft at 5:08 p.m. and issued a Notice to Appear. March 22 Officer Horst investigated a residential burglary at 8:41 a.m. that occurred at a residence in the 37300 block of Locust St. Entry was made through a back door. Loss was jewelry and cash. The burglary occurred between 8 a.m. and time of call. At 11:03 a.m., Officer Allum investigated a theft that occurred at Swiss Park, 5911 Mowry Ave. The reporting person stated someone had stolen four bar stools sometime this past week. The bar stools contain plaques on the back with the names Jan Sutter or Joe Bissing on them. Officer Katz handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall JC Penney Store at 4;24 p.m. Carlos Inguanzo of Newark was cited for petty theft. March 23 Officers responded at 2:25 p.m. to report of a subject who stole a

water meter from Shell Station construction site. Officer Fredstrom located the suspect and water meter, at the recyclers (on Redeker). Officer Nobbe investigated and arrested Jeffrey Barnett of Newark for theft. 1544 Hours: Officers responded to a residence in the 6100 block of Cotton Ave on a 911 hang-up (the caller disconnected before the dispatcher could talk with the caller) and contacted a female victim with cooking oil burns. She advised her brother Manuel Castro, a Hispanic Male Adult, 5’8”, 240 lbs. had burned her with cooking oil. The victim was treated at the scene for her injuries. March 24 1621 Hours: Officer Nobbe arrested Vittorio Benevento of Newark at 4:21 p.m. after he was arrested for Shoplifting. Raley’s caught Vittorio stealing food items from the store and took him onto custody. Vittorio was cited by Officer Nobbe for the theft and released on a citation. Officer Bloom handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Sears store at 7:07 p.m. Ashlie Dutra-Ochoa of Fremont was issued a notice to appear at the scene for petty theft. Officers responded to an audible alarm sounding at the Chipotle restaurant on Jarvis Ave. at 4:47 a.m. and located a front window smashed out. The loss is undetermined at this time. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

Great level of what Abraham Maslow called a “hierarchy of needs.” These include the less concrete aspects of “esteem” and “self-actualization.” Components of esteem involve the confidence that you and those around you have value and are worthy of respect, both by self and others. Just look through issues of Tri-City Voice and it is hard to doubt that our communities have plenty to be proud of and citizens who achieve great things. It is the highest level of Maslov’s pyramid of needs that is elusive, for this involves problem-solving, creativity and spontaneity; in other words… risk.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

T

here are cities and communities that always seem to receive extra accolades even amidst the usual problems of any gathering of people. In some cases, historical events or geography play a major role while in others, these attributes have been augmented by the efforts of citizens and leaders, catapulting them to wide recognition. What is it that causes others to gaze with admiration at these locations? While hard to define or copy, a common theme does seem to emerge: attention to form and function. The practical aspect of cities is a function of tangible assets that allow a majority of citizens to feel safe and comfortable in their habitat. Streets are functional, public safety is generally assured and other infrastructure concerns are met. Confidence in the continuation of this state is high. The second part of the equation is a bit less concrete, but fills a higher

The Bay Area accepts risky endeavors as its birthright, admiring the bawdy, audacious beginnings of San Francisco, Oakland’s East Bay manufacturing muscle and South Bay’s Silicon Valley. These locations along with others around the Bay Area epitomize the value of bold beginnings. Our section of the Bay now has the opportunity to not only join, but eclipse our well-known neighbors. It is in the Greater Tri-City area that innovation has room to grow and develop as a natural nexus of energy. Not only can this area shine and become “great,” but it has the obligation to its citizens to do so.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

funded museums, art galleries, singular shopping, fine art venues and fine dining. Are these simply empty words? I don’t think so but they take a commitment and local energy to make them happen. As the economy improves and resources become available, the challenge will be to use these to become great cities and a great community of cities. Fremont is about to make a bold statement with a sculpture at a major intersection of the city. Whether the art is acceptable to all or not, it has the “ring” of adventure and innovation and a step in the right direction. Our path to greatness begins with a critical look at what we have and what is necessary to fulfill Maslow’s hierarchy. Some of our cities have taken small steps in this direction, but still fall short when asked to consider the risk of greatness. A consortium of neighboring cities can be the catalyst for action. Our Mayors and Councilmembers, working as a team, can make it happen if they really believe in the unrealized potential of our area. We can be GREAT if we dare!

Many elements of greatness are already in place but we need to concentrate on some of the more creative aspects that shape perception. For instance our leaders should consider expanding our innovative footprint with convention facilities, well publicized and

One of the more interesting crimes that occurred the week of March 10-15 was the discovery of a PIN card reader illegally attached to the lobby entry doors at the CitiBank in Union City (Decoto Rd). This was a very sophisticated operation. Identity theft is the fastest rising type of crime and we must all remain vigilant. This scam was uncovered by a regular bank customer that noticed a small imperfection in the device and promptly reported it. While using a credit card at a gas pump, look into the area where you swipe the card in the event that a small device/card reader has been placed there. If you do that each time it becomes a habit. Make sure to pay attention to the details when using your ATM or credit cards. Criminals are known to place accessory devices over ATM machines, and even gas pumps. The criminals will commonly add an additional face plate to any machine that accepts a credit card or access card. The face plate might resemble an authentic part of an existing ma-

chine. However, the face plate is used to conceal a device that will store information associated with your card. Additional spy cameras are often used in conjunction with the face plate to obtain access codes as you enter numbers on the ATM keypad. It is a good idea to

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Be aware of PIN theft SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

use one of your hands to hide any “PIN” or access numbers you may enter when using ATM style machines.

Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2013® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

March 26, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

Mission San Jose For Rent: Professional Office in Bldg with other Professionals Ideal For Tax Service/Accounting/ Law/Real Estate/Insurance 1 large office, secretarial area, common use of conference room

510-490-1100

Become a hospice patient care volunteer! Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info

We want to buy empty Lot 25,000 sft to 100,000 sft empty or commercial, retail or school building. Built area may be 4000 sft to 15000 sft. Please contact Gary Grewal at 510-409-2049 Email at gary grewal@hotmail.com.

Estate Sale March 22,23 & 24th 9:00 to 5:00 Linens, clothes, kitchenware, home deco, lamps, furniture & more. Please park in visitors parking .No on street parking allowed. No earlies, cash only. No bills over $20.00. Basaro M.H. Park 4141 Deep Creek Rd. SPACE 168 Fremont

Systems Analysts level I and II in Fremont,C A, develop IT solutions. Fax resume 510-790-3301 HR SamePage Information Solutions, Inc.

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

Director of Engineering (Fremont, CA). Direct & coordinate s/ware engrs to dvlp scalable solutions through all strategies of the systms dvlpmnt life-cycle. Lead team to dsgn & implmnt projects based on business reqmts dvlpd in partnership w/the Project Manager & business owners. Reqd: Bachelor’s deg in Engg (inclu Comp, Communication, Electronics, or similar) or related/equiv. 5 yrs progressive post baccalaureate exp in the field. Exp managing teams of engrs. Exp w/Visual Studio, NET, TFS, Eclipse, IBM Visual Age for Java, PhotoShop, PL/SQL Developer, Erwin, Business Objecs, Brio, Ultimus, StarTeam, SVN, MagicDraw UML,Visio, & NUnit, as well as langs such as Java, C#.Net, WCF, PHP, UML, ADSI, XML, Java Script, CSS, SQL, & PL/SQL reqd. Send resume & cvr ltr to Monya Kemp (Code: SB-DoE) at The Men’s Wearhouse, Inc., 6100 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont, CA 94538.

Upon Naturalization dated 23rd May 2008, my name appears in my former Indian passport as Bala Murali Krishna Kanugula son of Rama Murty Kanugula, now appears as Bala Kanugula in my current US passport

BOOTH RENTALS

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Salon Both Rental Available First Month FREE Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Family fitness program

Sharing songs and kindness

SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER TAGALOG

SUBMITTED BY THERESA HO PHOTOS BY THERESA HO AND CHERYL GERARD Valentine’s Day was made extra special for residents of Bethesda Christian Retirement Center by first and second graders of Lea’s Christian School. Students gave up their daily story time for two weeks in order to learn love songs for the “grandmas” and

F

acing the prospect of a day without a well prepared, nutritious meal and limited ability to leave your residence to get it isn’t a pleasant thought. Many, especially elderly and disabled, face that prospect daily without fanfare. However, a stalwart group of volunteers of all ages, part of a national movement to alleviate the problem, wait every weekday morning in the parking lot behind Fremont City Hall for the Meals on Wheels truck that brings prepackaged meals from a central kitchen in Livermore. To underscore the importance of this program, Tri-City Mayors, Bill Harrison (Fremont), Al Nagy (Newark) and Carol Dutra-Vernaci (Union City) along with Fremont Councilmembers Sue Chan and Vinnie Bacon joined volunteers including past councilmember and LifeEldercare

“grandpas,” some of whom sang along with the children. For many years, the school’s kindergarten through fourth grade students, have been interacting with residents of Bethesda. They serenade at Halloween and Christmas, and share a smile and some kind words. This year, the younger students provided a special treat by singing for Valentine’s Day. Lea’s Christian School in Hayward is non-

Board President Judy Zlatnik on Wednesday, March 20 to deliver hot, nourishing meals. The Tri-City effort began in 1975 when Virginia Carlson of Fremont recognized the need for nutritional meals to the area’s elderly and founded LIFE Eldercare. During its first year, the program delivered about 300 meals to the homebound elderly in the Tri-City Area. Almost 40 years later, Meals on Wheels of LIFE Eldercare has grown, now depending on approximately 60 volunteer drivers who cover 24 separate routes in Fremont, Newark and Union City. Each day, new recipients are added and the list continues to grow. The most common misconception about Meals on Wheels is that it is a federally subsidized, free program. It is not. Life ElderCare Executive Director Patricia

denominational serving children from preschool through fourth grade. Lea’s celebrates its 35th anniversary this year, and it continues its mission to provide a strong academic program as well as placing great emphasis on teaching values. The residents of Bethesda certainly agree that one value the students have learned is to respect and appreciate our elders. After all, it does take a village to raise a child.

Osage says that Meals on Wheels is supported by volunteers, donations and grants, and contributions from recipients who pay on a sliding scale, based upon income level. Cost of the food is $3.50 but, even with volunteer drivers, the real cost considering transportation and overhead, is actually $7 per meal. LIFE Eldercare Outreach Coordinator Tammy Duran adds that both companies and individuals are welcome to join the ranks of volunteer drivers for Meals on Wheels. Volunteer drivers may commit to a few hours each month, each week or more often, depending on their schedule; some individuals and companies share route responsibilities between several drivers. As with any organization dependent on daily attendance, emergencies can create difficult vacancies; assistance and spon-

The Milpitas Sports Center is excited to offer Family Fitness Days to its members and their families. This program is designed to teach children and their families the benefits of exercise by doing various interactive games and interval circuits. This 90minute program is lots of fun for the entire family. Family Fitness Days is offered on April 6 and 20, May 4 and 18 from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person and is offered for parents and their children ages 6-15 years old. Take this opportunity to make exercise a priority for your family this year! Be Fit. Be Well. For more information on this program, call the City of Milpitas Sports Center at (408) 586-3225. Family Fitness Days April 6 & 20; May 4 & 18 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Milpitas Sports Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3225 $5 per person

sorship is always welcome. She notes that a $100 donation to Meals on Wheels is the equivalent of 30 meals, about a month of sustenance for a recipient. Although Meals on Wheels recipients receive a bill, if for some reason the person cannot pay the total, the remainder is found somewhere. This “somewhere” might be from a shrinking pool of federal and state funding or vital local donations.

LIFE ElderCare helps frail, homebound seniors in the Tri-City area through four services: Meals on Wheels, Friendly Visitors, VIP Rides and Falls Prevention. If you are interested in donating or becoming a volunteer, please visit www.lifeeldercare.org or call (510) 574-2090.

Local representative needed for international student exchange SUBMITTED BY NACEL OPEN DOOR

Nacel Open Door is a nonprofit high school student exchange organization headquartered in St. Paul, MN. Each year the Academic Year Program places about 500 students with volunteer American host

families for an academic year or semester. Nacel Open Door is a J-1 exchange program sponsor under the designation of the U.S. Department of State and has a full listing with the Council on Standards for International Education Travel (CSIET). Local Representatives act as

the primary link between our exchange students, host families, and local high schools. Local Representatives serve as the exchange student’s advocate and support system while they are in the United States. Local Representatives are required to maintain monthly contact with each

of the students and families and to address problems they bring to your attention. A qualified candidate should be interested in cross-culture education, be outgoing, and have a flexible and positive attitude. Local Representatives must feel comfortable approaching schools,

churches, organizations, and individuals in order to identify hosts. The ideal candidate is highly organized, resourceful, is a good judge of character, connected to the community, and has experience working with students. For more information, please visit www.nacelopendoor.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Places of Worship” is published on the first Tuesday of every month. Faith-based organizations that have agreed to distribute Tri-City Voice to their congregations are included. A complete list of all greater Tri-City faith-based organizations can be found at: www.tricityvoice.com under “Community Resources.”

March 26, 2013

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Happy Birthday Elsa Teddy Roosevelt was the U.S. President, Oklahoma became the 46th state of the Union and, in the state of her birth, Kansas, Charles Curtis became the first Native American US senator. Of course, Elsa Katherinia Thohoff doesn’t remember those occasions since her birthday on

March 25, 1907 in LeHarpe, Kansas was just the beginning of the first 106 years of her life. Her early years were spent in LeHarpe, at that time, a flourishing railroad town in southeast Kansas. Elsa graduated from Iola High School in the neighboring town of Iola, Kansas. Moving to St. Joseph, Missouri, she was able to use her skills as an accomplished seamstress to support herself during the Great Depression. In 1935, Elsa moved to Los Angeles, taught school and met her future husband, John Marshall Horn. Married on

January 25, 1941, John and Elsa Horn welcomed their daughter, Barbara late in the next year. Active as a school mom, Elsa became president of the local Parent Teacher Association (PTA). Her talent as a seamstress was in demand and she worked in Los Angeles until she moved to Fremont in 1978, following John’s death in 1977, to live with her daughter, a teacher in the Newark Unified School

Wanted

District. An adventurous soul, Elsa was seen horseback riding in her younger days at age 83! A large turnout at Aegis Assisted Living including daughter Barbara, celebrated Elsa’s birthday on Friday, March 22. Fremont Mayor Bill Harrison attended and read a proclamation of the City of Fremont in her honor.

Milpitas Fire Report SUBMITTED BY MILPITAS FIRE DEPARTMENT

SUBMITTED BY SGT. RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD On March 21, 2013 at approximately 2:15 P.M., Milpitas police officers located Jeramie Balmonte Posas in a black 1990 Ford Mustang on the 1000 Block of Junesong Way in San Jose, CA. Posas is a Milpitas resident with felony arrest warrants and is a parolee-at-large. Milpitas police officers attempted an enforcement stop on the vehicle and Posas fled on foot. Posas discarded a loaded firearm as he fled from the officers. San Jose police officers responded to the area and assisted Milpitas police officers in searching for Posas; however, Posas was not located. Jeramie Posas should be considered armed and dangerous. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or his whereabouts is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400 or their local law enforcement agency. Information regarding Jeramie Posas can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY POLICE March 15 At 2:20 p.m., an 88 year-old resident was in his backyard when he heard his dogs barking. The resident walked inside his home and encountered a suspect coming downstairs. The suspect was carrying a suitcase and a crowbar when he encountered the victim. The suspect used the suitcase to push the elderly victim to the ground as he fled the residence. The suspect got into an awaiting black two-door vehicle with a sunroof. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male, 20 to 25 years old, 5 foot 8 inches tall, with short black hair, and a muscular build. The suspect was wearing a San Francisco Giants tshirt during the incident. The driver of the suspect vehicle was described as a Hispanic male with dark hair. Anyone with information about this incident should contact the Union City Police Department. March 17 At 12:10 a.m., officers were dispatched to investigate a residential burglary on 8th Street. The 95 year-old resident went to bed around 1800 hours, and awoke to hearing her dog barking at 12:01 a.m. The resident then noticed damage to a door on her residence. Evidence at the scene indicated a suspect made entry into the residence. The victim did not see or hear anyone inside her residence. Officer Clubb investigated an attempt burglary on Cameron Dr. The

resident woke up and realized a window of her residence was broken and the screen had been removed during the night. The incident occurred between March 16 at 8 p.m. and March 17 at 9 a.m. No entry was made and nothing was taken from the residence. March 18 At 3:30 p.m., a 14 year-old Logan student was walking on G Street when she was approached by a Hispanic male adult. The suspect asked the victim if she liked what she saw and he exposed his genitalia. The victim ran home where she reported the incident. The victim described the suspect as a Hispanic male, 30 years old, 5 foot 7 inches tall, and 190 pounds. The suspect was further described as having black spiky hair, light brown eyes, and goatee style facial hair. The suspect was driving a white or pearl colored Lexus SUV (possibly an “RX” model), with tinted windows and custom rims. Anyone with information about the incident should contact the Union City Police Department. March 19 At 4 p.m., officers were dispatched to investigate an assault with a deadly weapon incident at Jamba Juice in Union Landing. The incident involved a suspect entering the business and throwing bottles and other items at the victims. One of the victims received a laceration on their head as a result of the incident. The suspect was arrested by arriving officers.

March 19 (Fire Battalion Chief Demetrious Kastros) Milpitas Fire Department was dispatched to a report of a vehicle over an embankment on Calaveras Road, two miles east of Highway 880. Firefighters arrived on the scene to find one heavily damaged passenger sedan in a small ravine with two female occupants inside. An adult female in the vehicle had sustained moderate to major injuries. A female child inside the vehicle appeared to have minor injuries. The child was securely strapped in a child safety seat. Firefighters took approximately 15 minutes to remove the adult female. The child was removed by firefighters immediately after their arrival. Fire personnel used a “Stokes” or “Basket Stretcher” and ropes to bring the female victim up the embankment to the nearby roadway. Bothe patients were transported to a local hospital of treatment. Milpitas Fire Department was on the scene with seven personnel responding on one engine, a ladder truck, rescue unit and one command vehicle. Milpitas Police Department closed the roadway during the rescue operations and is conducting an investigation into the cause of the accident. (Fire Marshal Albert Zamora) Milpitas Fire Department received a dispatch for a reported structure fire in a single family residence at 149 Rose Drive in Milpitas. Although smoke was visible from over 1 mile away, firefighters arrived on the scene to find exterior furniture burning in the backyard area. There was also some limited damage

to the building exterior. Telephone cable and power lines leading to the residence were also damaged. There were no injuries to either firefighters or citizens. Fire units remained on the scene for approximately one hour to assure complete extinguishment. The cause is under investigation. March 24 (Battalion Chief Rick Frawley) Milpitas Fire Department responded to a reported gas leak in the 1200 block of Lassen Avenue in Milpitas. Fire Department units arrived on the scene to find a residential gas line that had apparently failed during construction work. PG&E was on scene and requesting additional resources to secure the leak. Firefighters isolated and evacuated the immediate area and placed fire control measures in place. Additional Fire Department resources evacuated buildings in the vicinity of the lead. Milpitas Police units assisted with resident notifications and perimeter control. An Alert SCC notification was made to residents in the area. Eight residents were temporarily relocated to the Milpitas Sports Center while the Incident was stabilized. The Milpitas Fire Department responded three engine companies, two truck companies, one rescue and one command vehicle to the Incident. Mutual aid was requested from the San Jose Fire Department for city coverage. Additional resources included Santa Clara County Ambulance, Supervisor, Duty Chief, Red Cross and Fire Associates. Milpitas unites remained on the scne until approximately 4 p.m. while PG&E secured the gas line. At that time residents were notified that they could return to their homes.

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March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 31

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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March 26, 2013

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You’ll find valuable information about your community & voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are nonpartisan & free to the public

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Fremont Cribbage Club

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

American Legion Auxiliary We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

First United Methodist Church Music Series

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

T.O.P.S. Weight Support Group Take Off Pounds Sensibly Real People! Real Weight Loss! Wednesday Nights 6:30 - 8:00 27303 Sleepy Hollow Ave S Kaiser Building 1st Floor Hayward RLTOPS0336@yahoo.com 207-651-0565

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

FREE Taxes Done & E-Filing WHY PAY Let VITA do your taxes! IRS-certified Tax Preparers $51,000 or less income. Restrictions may apply Fremont Family Resource Ctr 39155 Liberty St., Fremont M-W 4p-8p F 10a-1p Open Jan 23-April 15 2013 More Info 510-574-2020

Community Seder Welcomes All! March 26th join us to celebrate Passover! RSVP req for the seder by 3/15.Night of Illusion (for all ages) 3/16 Family Shabbat services 5:30pm & 7pm on 3/22 Inclusive Reform community. 510-656-7141 or visit www.bethtorah-fremont.org

Teacher recognized for excellence SUBMITTED BY KRISTEN YASUKAWA PHOTO BY DAVID J. ERIKSON

at-risk and underrepresented youth, serving students who are pregnant or are parents and have been expelled or incarcerated. The program covers students in Fremont, Hayward, Newark, San Leandro and Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE) teacher Kim Boerner was named the recipient of the Union City. Boerner’s demonstrated commitment to all asannual Dennis Richmond Community Impact pects of education included serving as a mentor for Award by Ala Costa Centers. The award recognized new teachers, leading the teacher’s union, working Boerner’s life-long career as an outstanding educator to improve the curriculum for at-risk youth, and dewith an exceptional ability to empower and inspire veloping a program for teen parents. youth in the community. “Kim instills a strong work ethic in her students Boerner is a teacher at ACOE’s Quest Academy to help them build a foundation of academic excelin San Leandro, an independent study program for lence to pave the way for a better life,” said Sheila Jordan, Alameda County Superintendent of Schools. “Having worked as a special education teacher myself, I understand the commitment and spirit needed to inspire and empower students, and Kim embodies the very essence of excellence in education.” The Ala Costa Center presented the award to Boerner at a fundraiser gala on March 16 in Dublin. For more information, (L to R): Sheila Jordan,Alameda County Superintendent of Schools; with Kim Boerner, Quest Acad- visit www.acoe.org emy Teacher; and Joaquin J. Rivera,Vice President of the Alameda County Board of Education

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Mission Trails Mustangs

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Free concerts the first Sunday each month, 4pm. 30 minute organ & piano recitals & occasional guest artists. Free-will offering opportunity to benefit local charities. First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Serious Mental Illness Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Mar 7, 2013 from 6:30-8:30pm in Union City. Registration required. Contact: Barb St. Clair 415-879-0399 or Email Stclair.barb@gmail.com NAMIacs.org/F2F/mar2013

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area

Drivers for Survivors Need Volunteer Drivers!

Monthly meetings; interesting cultural programs. Stay in members’ homes abroad. We need home and day hosts for members from New Zealand visiting us May 17-24. www.ffsfba.org 510-794-6844

Volunteers to be companion drivers for ambulatory cancer patients to transport & accompany our clients to their life saving medical appointments. We work with your schedule. Please email volunteer@driversforsurvivors.org or call 510.579.0535

Ford F-100 Elite of Northern CA East Bay Chapter

Tri-Valley Arthritis Walk

All owners of 53-56 FORD 1/2 ton pick-up and panels are invited to join our club. Pick-ups up to 65 are welcome also. Newsletters, shows, fellowship Call Ken, 510-782-7312

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Saturday, May 4th at LifeStyleRx 1119 E. Stanley Blvd., Livermore Registration 8:00 a.m. Walk 10:00 a.m. 1 or 3 mile options, Tailgate Extravaganza, Raffle Prizes, Refreshments, Kids Activities, www.TVArthritisWalk.Kintera.org or Call (800) 464-6240

Spring Gear & Equipment Sale Saturday 4/20 8:30-12:30 Tri-City Mothers of Multiples Open to the public, free entry. Best deals on everything for baby and kids. 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark www.tricitymoms.org

Efforts to rename San Francisco International Airport SUBMITTED BY DAN RAFTER San Francisco supervisors are advancing legislation aimed at commemorating LGBT civil rights leader Harvey Milk by renaming the city’s airport in his honor. Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin released the following statement in support: “Harvey Milk made it his life’s mission to ensure that everyone - regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, gender, or socioeconomic status - was treated with the dignity and respect that all human beings deserve. Harvey Milk-San Francisco International Airport would serve as a powerful testament to the importance of Harvey’s pioneering work and selfless dedication to advancing equality for all. “Harvey Milk fought tirelessly to raise the visibility of LGBT people, and placing his name on San Francisco’s airport would bring awareness of his work to the 40 million travelers from around the world who pass through SFO annually. Harvey Milk’s legacy is what guides our work as we continue the fight for full equality, and HRC is proud to support this effort to honor his memory. The Human Rights Campaign is the largest national lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender political organization with members throughout the country. It effectively lobbies Congress, provides campaign support and educates the public to ensure that LGBT Americans can be open, honest and safe at home, at work and in the community.


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 05 Highest $: 706,000 Median $: 372,000 Lowest $: 216,000 Average $: 397,300 ADDRESS

ZIP

22050 Cameron Street 21339 Lake Chabot Road 4227 Omega Avenue 5346 Briar Ridge Drive 7574 Denison Place

94546 94546 94546 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

216,500 312,000 380,000 372,000 706,000

2 2 2 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

952 1100 1080 1619 2690

1947 1947 1947 1978 1999

02-08-13 02-08-13 02-11-13 02-08-13 02-08-13

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 24 Highest $: 858,000 Median $: Lowest $: 103,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

37997 3rd Street 94536 38051 Buxton Common 94536 3854 Dunbar Place 94536 4365 Faulkner Drive 94536 4805 Gertrude Drive 94536 340 J Street 94536 4843 Mayfield Drive 94536 38500 Paseo Padre Pkwy #30994536 4528 Portola Drive 94536 4631 Rothbury Common 94536 39395 Argonaut Way 94538 5616 Chestnut Common 94538 39976 Fremont Boulevard 94538 39206 Guardino Drive #304 94538 3665 Norfolk Road 94538 4587 Piper Street 94538 42743 Roberts Avenue 94538 5619 Salvia Common 94538 4593 Sloat Road 94538 45588 Bridgeport Drive 94539 40927 Cantare Place 94539 3762 Dryden Road 94555 34166 Duke Lane 94555 3718 Ferry Lane 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

430,000 210,000 575,000 804,000 670,000 315,000 700,000 103,000 475,000 230,000 535,000 275,000 222,500 185,000 488,000 500,000 488,000 322,000 550,000 450,000 858,000 510,000 580,000 575,000

3 2 4 4 2 3 1 3 2 5 2 2 1 3 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1415 900 1503 2276 1984 782 1852 750 1620 945 1689 945 1165 693 1314 1148 1000 1157 1456 2539 1514 1633 1380 1630

1910 1971 1977 1963 1960 1905 1954 1970 1953 1988 1961 1971 1972 1990 1960 1960 1958 1994 1960 1985 1965 1977 1986 1978

02-06-13 02-04-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-05-13 02-05-13 02-04-13 02-04-13 02-08-13 02-06-13 02-08-13 02-04-13 02-06-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-07-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-04-13 02-11-13 02-06-13 02-06-13 02-08-13 02-06-13

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 23 Highest $: 725,000 Median $: Lowest $: 94,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

25242 2nd Street 22943 Alice Street 401 Puerto Place 24257 Ridgecreek Lane 1275 Sandy Bridges Court 1255 Terrace Avenue 28831 Bay Heights Road 1025 Central Boulevard 27694 Dobbel Avenue 705 Canonbury Way #283 26382 Flamingo Avenue 27713 Pensacola Way 26555 Sunvale Court 29370 Taylor Avenue 24614 Traynor Court 31519 Trevor Avenue 2589 Arf Avenue 27447 Bahama Avenue 2533 Oliver Drive 2853 Seadrift Circle 25701 Seaver Street 1280 Stanhope Lane #237 28551 Starboard Lane

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

350,000 200,000 275,000 575,000 232,500 97,500 725,000 410,000 500,000 100,000 320,000 185,000 185,000 350,000 272,500 350,000 170,000 338,000 215,000 520,000 402,500 94,500 460,000

3 3 3 4 3 3 4 5 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 3 1 4

ZIP

1455 Ashland Drive 215 Boyd Street 293 Heath Street 214 Krismer Street 1915 Landess Avenue 230 Lynn Avenue 295 Rio Verde Place #4 1786 Snell Place 1795 Snell Place

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

382,000 325,000 425,000 465,000 380,000 325,000 272,000 511,000 510,000

4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

BUILT

CLOSED

992 1010 1412 3006 1532 948 2669 2601 2279 900 1047 1000 1200 1290 1138 1175 1440 1128 1254 2894 1181 748 1835

1952 1945 1980 2008 1988 1908 2000 1990 1987 1988 1952 1954 1926 1950 1955 1971 1957 1971 2006 1959 1989 2007

02-08-13 02-11-13 02-08-13 02-05-13 02-08-13 02-04-13 02-06-13 02-04-13 02-04-13 02-06-13 02-04-13 02-06-13 02-07-13 02-08-13 02-11-13 02-08-13 02-06-13 02-04-13 02-08-13 02-07-13 02-05-13 02-06-13 02-05-13

ZIP

36331 Indian Wells Drive 6148 Moores Avenue 37085 Olive Street 36731 Ruschin Drive 35216 Wycombe Place

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

552,000 489,000 435,000 325,000 635,000

3 4 5 5 4

382,000 399,444

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1154 1067 1160 1495 1216 1146 1030 1253 1253

1955 1954 1962 1958 1971 1970 1974 2010 2010

02-26-13 02-21-13 02-22-13 02-20-13 02-26-13 02-20-13 02-25-13 02-26-13 02-21-13

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 05 Highest $: 635,000 Median $: Lowest $: 325,000 Average $: ADDRESS

320,000 318,587

SQFT

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 511,000 Median $: Lowest $: 272,000 Average $: ADDRESS

488,000 460,438

489,000 487,200

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1319 1391 1755 1284 2182

1965 1969 1970 1955 1971

02-08-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-06-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 15 Highest $: 667,000 Median $: 345,000 Lowest $: 100,000 Average $: 375,100 ADDRESS

ZIP

316 Belleview Drive 2123 Benedict Drive 720 Callaway Street 949 Douglas Drive 309 Lexington Avenue 659 St. Marys Avenue 2494 State Street 707 Tivoli Street 1555 Fir Avenue 2018 Joan Drive 16348 Mateo Street 2213 Kingfisher Court 15361 Norton Street 2006 Pelican Way 1075 Tulane Avenue

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

300,000 385,000 520,000 285,000 330,000 310,000 415,000 560,000 100,000 275,000 345,000 400,000 333,500 667,000 401,000

2 3 6 2 2 2 5 6 3 3 3 3 3 4 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1077 1881 2814 832 1179 1261 2002 2814 1238 1131 1226 1471 1186 2820 1081

1939 1966 2004 1942 1941 1926 1950 2004 1954 1960 1947 1999 1951 1994 1951

02-08-13 02-07-13 02-08-13 02-05-13 02-08-13 02-06-13 02-08-13 02-08-13 02-06-13 02-06-13 02-11-13 02-06-13 02-07-13 02-05-13 02-08-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 365,000 Median $: 347,000 Lowest $: 310,000 Average $: 340,667 ADDRESS

ZIP

17390 Hesperian Boulevard 15850 Via Del Prado 17129 Via Pasatiempo

94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

310,000 365,000 347,000

3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

1000 1051 1068

1944 02-08-13 1947 02-06-13 1947 02-11-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 670,000 Median $: Lowest $: 220,000 Average $: ADDRESS

33823 14th Street 4181 Asimuth Circle 4298 Birmingham Way 213 Dutra Vernaci Drive 35028 Hollyhock Street 379 Monte Carlo Avenue 35414 Monterra Circle

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

368,000 250,000 670,000 640,000 467,000 550,000 285,000

6 3 4 4 3 3 2

CLOSED

460,000 453,273

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2574 1280 2200 2138 1382 1132 1294

1965 1974 1999 2004 1970 1965 2001

02-11-13 02-11-13 02-08-13 02-07-13 02-04-13 02-08-13 02-08-13

32210 Olney Court 34258 Red Cedar Lane 2122 Skylark Court #2 34871 Travertine Way

94587 94587 94587 94587

460,000 645,000 220,000 431,000

4 5 2 3

1708 2604 903 1492

1973 2000 1972 1997

02-05-13 02-08-13 02-07-13 02-11-13

Washington Township Men’s Club will host Roman Reed

Social Security Q&A SUBMITTED BY MARIAELENA LEMUS SOCIAL SECURITY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST IN SAN JOSE

SUBMITTED BY BOB SILVA

Question: I’m trying to figure out how much I need to save for my retirement. Does the government offer any help with financial education?

The Spring Meeting for the Washington Township Men’s Club will be held Wednesday May 8, 2013 at Spin-A-Yarn Restaurant (45915 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont). Our speaker will be Roman Reed who has worked tirelessly to pass the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act in California. As a result, more than $15.4 million in state funds has been awarded to scientists conducting research in spinal cord regeneration. An additional $85.6 million has been leveraged from outside sources. Roman has directly raised over $100 million in neurological medical research. He joined Stanford to promote research and awareness on behalf of all those with spinal cord injury and dysfunction. President Obama invited Reed to the March 9, 2009, ceremony commemorating the historic reversal of the government’s ban on the use of federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. In November 2011, Roman Reed partnered with Tory Minus, Senator Marc Keahey, and TJ Atchison to launch a similar research initiative as Roman’s Law in Alabama. With Roman’s assistance, the TJ Atchison Spinal Cord Injury Research Act passed with bipartisan support in the Alabama Legislature on May 16, 2012. Washington Township Men’s Club, established in 1918, is one of the oldest social clubs in the Tri City Area. For meeting information, email: rgsilva52@att.net or call (510) 468-1738.

Answer: Yes. For starters, you may want to find out what you can expect from Social Security with a visit to Social Security’s Retirement Estimator at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator. The Financial Literacy and Education Commission has a website that can key you in on the basics of financial education: www.mymoney.gov. Finally, you’ll want to check out the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which offers educational information on a number of financial matters, including mortgages, credit cards, retirement, and other big decisions. Visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau at www.consumerfinance.gov.

Wire thefts SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD

On Monday, March 18th at approximately 12:55 p.m., we were notified that a possible stolen truck had been abandoned in Hayward near the 2500 block of Hansen Road. The truck had a damaged ignition and was loaded with a large amount of red wire insulation, commonly used to insulate copper wire. The abandoned truck was dumped across the street from a construction site and near an elementary school located on Hansen Rd in Hayward. We were able to obtain video today from one of the businesses in the area and viewed the stolen

SUBMITTED BY HEATHER SAVAGE Building Peaceful Families (BPF), a Silicon Valley non-profit organization – in partnership with the San Francisco 49ers and the Santa Clara County Office of Education – has announced a call for entries for the annual Top Dads Award Essay Contest. Bay Area children ages 5 through 17 are invited to submit essays describing why their father or father figure should be selected for the prestigious Top Dads Award. Essays are due on or before April 22, 2013. Fifty winning essays will be selected from all entries received. The winners (50 kids and 50 fathers/father figures) will be invited to attend the Top Dads Award Luncheon on June 14, 2013. At the event, four first-place essay writers will receive a grand prize package that includes tickets to a San Francisco 49ers game, a Target gift card, and more. “This essay contest is a wonderful opportunity for kids to express how they feel about their father or father figure. It also opens the eyes of their male role models, who tend to underestimate the power of their love, support, encouragement, and presence in the lives of their children,” said Sharon Chatman, founder and chairman of Building Peaceful Families. “We look forward to this inspiring and heartwarming celebration of the 50 Bay Area Top Dads, along with their kids, on June 14th.” The Top Dads Essay Contest Entry Form, instructions, and more information are available now at www.buildingpeacefulfamilies.org/topdads. Essays must be written by children ages 5 through 17, typed or hand-written, in legible English. Contest prize categories are: ages 5 through 7; ages 8 through 10; ages 11 through 13; and ages 14 through 17. There is no fee to participate, and every young person who submits an essay will receive a Certificate of Excellence. The Top Dads Award Luncheon is open to the public. Held annually in June, this event celebrates the positive impact a father/father figure has on his family and the community. The festivities include a delicious luncheon, guest speakers, raffle prizes, health and wellness workshop, and more. Tickets are available now. For more information, visit www.buildingpeacefulfamilies.org/topdads.

truck driving up and parking on the road at about 10:40 a.m. on March 17th. Once the vehicle parked, an adult male was observed exiting the driver’s side of the truck. As he exited the truck, a second vehicle described as a 1996-99 orange Dodge Ram 1500, (short bed, possibly lifted with chrome rims) drove by and picked up the driver. The outstanding orange truck is shown in the attached photos and the abandoned truck can also be seen. We have reason to believe that suspects used the abandoned vehicle to haul away approximately 5600 lbs of copper wire from the 42100 block of Boyce Rd in Fremont on March 17th around 7:00 a.m.. Suspects took the wire to an unknown location and used a sophisticated machine or cutting tool to remove the insulation from the copper wire. The large amount of insulation was left in tact in the back of the abandoned vehicle and the wire was carefully removed. Due to the weight and volume of the wire, multiple people were likely involved in this operation. Witnesses to the burglary on Boyce Rd in Fremont described the driver as a white male adult, mid-30’s, with black hair. The truck was stolen from the 5700 block of Boscell Rd. We are asking for the public’s help to identify this orange Dodge truck and provide us with information that will help lead us to the recovery of the copper wire stolen earlier this week. Call 790-6800 and select option 3 if you have information about this vehicle or send us a tip via Nixle or by visiting www.fremontpolice.org/tip.


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 26, 2013

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S John D. Miner RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 15, 1942 – March 17, 2013

Donna M. Swift RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON May 7, 1937 – March 5, 2013

Dona M. Geer RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 14, 1956 – March 18, 2013

Lillyan Widman RESIDENT OF SUNOL May 25, 1922 – March 20, 2013

Betty Jo Rice RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 28, 1925 – March 18, 2013

Aurea P. Lising RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 4, 1923 – March 20, 2013

Robert “Bob” Weinreich RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 2, 1923 – March 18, 2013

James D. Ingram RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 8, 1933 – March 5, 2013 RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 17, 1923 – March 21, 2013

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease. Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Lana August Puchta

John Tom RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 17, 1950 – March 19, 2013

Suzanne Carmen Peter

Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

510-657-1908

Margaret G. Perrich RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 10, 1920 – March 19, 2013

Theresa Roderick-Alderete RESIDENT OF NEWARK May 17, 1945 – March 21, 2013

www.lanasestatesales.com

Carol D. Stotts RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 4, 1929 – March 20, 2013

Katherine E. Fletcher RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 10, 1934 – March 20, 2013

Chapel of the Roses

Philip Galvan

(510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 18, 1926 – March 25, 2013

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Obituary

Nancy A. Albrecht April 29, 1946 - March 15, 2013

Coalition pushes for student centered reforms SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE ROMERO-CROCKETT, CAMPAIGN FOR COLLEGE OPPORTUNITY

A

Entered into rest on March 15, 2013 in Fremont, CA at the age of 66. Beloved wife of 28 years to Douglas Albrecht of Newark. Cherished mother of Gina Quaid and her husband Patrick Blum of Modesto, and Angela Avila of Newark. Loving grandmother of Brannon, and Marcello. Devoted daughter of Billie Calcagno of Fremont. Loving sister to Kristine McClanahan and her husband Ron of Newark. Caring aunt to Kim Cowan and her family, all of Fremont (her husband Rusty and their children: Michael Gary, Sean, and Michael Andrew). Also loved by many friends.Born April 29, 1946 in San Francisco, CA Nancy enjoyed baking. She was well known for her sense of humor.A Celebration of Life will be held for Nancy at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of Nancy to your favorite charity. (510) 797-1900 • FD1007 www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

broad coalition of education, business and civil rights organizations from across California have delivered to the incoming Chancellors of the California Community Colleges and California State University Systems an aggressive agenda for 2013 intended to overcome years of budget cuts and ensure that reforms are pursued and completed. In letters to Dr. Brice Harris, who took over the California Community Colleges system as Chancellor on November 6, and Dr. Timothy P. White, who was installed as California State University system Chancellor at the end of December, the coalition said the new chancellors must strengthen coordination and cooperation between the two systems and the state’s K-12 system. “We recognize that the Chancellors inherit the systems during a tumultuous time,” said Michele Siqueiros, Executive Director of the campaign for College Opportunity, which led the coalition. “In this era of budget cuts which have resulted in enrollment caps, impacted campuses, impacted programs and majors, heightened affordability challenges and unplanned tuition hikes, strong leadership is needed from you and each of us are ready to work hard alongside you.” The coalition specifically called on incoming CSU Chancellor White to expand and deepen efforts to implement the CSU Graduation Initiative requiring local campuses to improve graduation rates and close equity gaps for Latino, Black and Asian Pacific Islander students. The CSU Graduation Initiative is a part of a national effort to raise graduation rates, with special attention to underrepresented minority (URM) students. The CSU’s commitment is to raise the 6-year graduation rate for the whole system by eight percentage points—from 46 percent to 54 percent—and to cut the achievement gap between URM and non-URM students in half—from 11 percent to 5.5 percent—by 2015. “Given our demographics, California’s future prosperity will depend on the success of our higher education systems adequately serving our Latino and African American students,” said Arun Ramanathan, Executive Director of The Education Trust—West. “I am confident that under the leadership of both chancellors, a commitment will be made to graduate more students who will possess the meaningful skills and credentials necessary to join the workforce, have successful careers, and grow our economy.” At the Community College system, the coalition stressed the need for not just providing access but helping students achieve degrees, certificates or transfer to a four year institution by starting all incoming students with a common assessment linked to K-12 standards and accountability testing, mandatory orientation, education

plans, programs of study, and student success courses for under-prepared students. Thomas A. Saenz, President and General Counsel of MALDEF, said, “The predominant mission and challenge for both chancellors is to close the college completion gap and ensure that California is preparing all of its youth to contribute at a high level to the economy and community of tomorrow. We look forward to working with them to pursue policies to meet this challenge.” A priority for both systems, the coalition said, must be completing implementation of SB 1440, the Student Transfer Achievement Reform (STAR) Act. SB 1440 requires that California Community Colleges develop and offer Associate Degrees for Transfer and that California State Universities accept students who earn these degrees with a junior-standing. Students that earn Associate Degrees for Transfer would shorten their time to graduation on a pathway with fewer impediments. The Campaign for College Opportunity last month released a report — Meeting Compliance, but Missing the Mark – that found that although great progress has been made statewide by California Community Colleges and California State University system leaders, many individual campuses lag in creating the necessary pathways for students to transfer, and significant work remains to be done. “It is essential that these leaders work collaboratively to ensure college is accessible and to improve student completion rates, particularly through strengthening the transfer pathway from community colleges to the CSU, in order to provide California with a competitive workforce,” said Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Gary Toebben. The 20-member coalition includes the California, Los Angeles and Sacramento Chambers of Commerce, NAACP, MALDEF, The Education Trust – West, Los Angeles Urban League, Inland Empire Economic Partnership, Bay Area Council, Excelencia In Education, National Council of la Raza, San Diego Economic Development Corporation, Institute for College Access and Success, Advancement Project, Orange County Business Council, Public Advocates, Silicon Valley Leadership Group, Hispanas Organized for Political Equality, and California Competes. “We trust that like us, you will not be satisfied with preserving the status quo and will demonstrate a commitment to building the political will to move forward student centered reforms,” the coalition wrote to the Chancellors. The Campaign for College Opportunity is a California non-profit organization focused on a single mission: to ensure that the next generation of California students has the chance to attend college and succeed in order to keep our workforce and economy strong. For more information, visit www.CollegeCampaign.org.


March 26, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Comment on the Draft Plan Bay Area SUBMITTED BY MTC The Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has released the Draft Plan Bay Area and the Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for public review and comment. Plan Bay Area is the long-range plan that has been discussed and developed over the past two years. The following are being released for public review: Comment on the Draft Plan Bay Area (release date Friday, March 22, 2013; close of comment period, 4 p.m., Thursday, May 16, 2013). Comment on the Draft EIR, which examines the proposed plan and four alternatives and analyzes the range of potential environmental impacts that could result from the implementation of Plan Bay Area

(release date Friday, March 29, 2013; close of comment period, 4 p.m., Thursday, May 16, 2013). Comment on the Draft 2013 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), which implements Plan Bay Area by identifying surface transportation projects over the next six years that are regionally significant or will receive federal funds (release date Friday, March 29, 2013; close of comment period, 4 p.m., Friday, May 3, 2013). Comment on the Draft TransportationAir Quality Conformity Analysis for Plan Bay Area and the Draft 2013 TIP (release date Friday, March 29, 2013; close of comment period, 4 p.m., Friday, May 3, 2013). Plan Bay Area looks forward to the year 2040 and charts a course for the Bay Area’s first ever Sustainable Communities Strategy, accommodating needed housing growth within our nine counties while at

the same time decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks. Open houses and public hearings are offered in all nine Bay Area counties. Attend an open house to view displays and learn about the Draft Plan Bay Area. Provide oral comments on the Draft Plan at the public hearing or leave written comments at the comment station during the open house. No registration is needed. For transit directions, visit 511.org. For the full schedule of open houses/public hearings and venues in the Bay Area, visit www.onebayarea.org. Open Houses will last from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Public Hearings, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Comments may be submitted in any of the following ways: provide written or oral comments at any of the open houses or public hearings; email your comments to info@onebayarea.org by close of comment

period; participate in an online forum, Plan Bay Area Town Hall, at www.OneBayArea.org; or, send comments via mail to MTC-ABAG, Plan Bay Area Public Comment, 101 8th Street, Oakland, CA 94607. For more information or a copy of the Draft Plan, visit www.OneBayArea.org or email info@onebayarea.org Draft Plan Bay Area Wednesday, May 1 6-9 p.m. Mirage Ballroom 4100 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Draft Plan Bay Area Wednesday, May 1 6-9 p.m. Hilton Hotel 300 Almaden Blvd., San Jose

Fremont City Council March 19, 2013 Ceremonial: U.S. Congressman Eric Swalwell spoke via skype about his commitment to Fremont, citing two sponsored bills: Main Street Revival Act and Rare Earth Elements Bill. He is the representative of the 15th Congressional District. Consent: Approve sidewalk improvements on E. Warren Avenue and Alder Avenue. Award a construction contract to Sposeto Engineering, Inc. in the amount of $354,252.40. Award a contract for exterior wall repair at Fremont Main Library to Southland Construction Management, Inc. in the amount of $232,433. Approve FY 2013/14 Measure B Paratransit pass-through funding for VIP Rides program and Tri-City Walk clubs; paratransit; volunteer driver program, mobility management program, travel training program and Tri-City taxi voucher program. Renew contract with Alameda County Behavioral Health Services for reimbursement of mental health services FY 2012/13. Enter a service agreement with Willdan Financial Services to complete impact fee update at a cost not-to-exceed $178,006. Accept and submit annual report on General Plan and Housing Element to Governor’s Office of Planning and Research and the State Department of Housing and Community Development. Public Comment: rental rates in Fremont are too high when compared with income levels; Fremont is a gated community without the gates. Adopt resolution of application by Local Agency Formation Commission and Union Sanitary District to annex two City-owned parcels along Palm Avenue into USD service area boundaries. Other Business: Mid-Year budget review noted an increasingly bright economic picture as sales and taxes show moderate growth. Use of projected budget surplus will be reviewed later in the year - Budget Proposal to be submitted to Council in May. Home prices are increasing and unemployment rate is at 5.9%, below State average. Effect of Sequestration may be felt in Community Development Block Grants. Public Comment asked Council to consider reinstatement of Sunday hours at Fremont Main Public Library. Review development plan for Downtown by TMG Partners as master developer beginning with Capitol Avenue mixed use project. Approve 60-day extension to the evaluation period established in Memorandum of Understanding to assess feasibility of the project. Need for a time extension was questioned by Councilmember Salwan. Mayor Bill Harrison Aye Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Absent Suzanne Lee Chan Aye Vinnie Bacon Aye Raj Salwan Aye

Milpitas City Council March 19, 2013 Consent Calendar Consider Mayor’s recommendation for appointments to the Economic Development Commission and Library Commission. Currently, there are vacancies on the Arts Commission, Public Art Committee, Community Advisor and Economic Development Commission. Granted initial acceptance of Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) water, storm and sewer relocation at Piper Drive. Granted initial acceptance of and reduced the performance bond for Abel Street Transit Connection Project. Approved Park & Recreation donation policy to formalize acceptance of donations. Approved and authorized execution of a subdivision improvement agreement, Sewer Acquisition & Reimbursement Agreement, On-Site Private Utilities Covenant Agreement and Public Improvement Plans. This item included a resolution authorizing annexation of certain real property into Community Facilities District No. 2008-1 for Pace Development/Contour Trade Zone, LLC.

Authorized the purchase of a video imaging detection system by piggy-backing the City of San José Contract with Iteris, Inc. in the maximum amount of $73,600. Awarded Chrisp Company the contract for On-Call Pavement Striping and Marking at various sites for an annual, maximum amount of $100,000 and allowed the City Manager to approve annual increases, per agreement terms. Awarded JRR Construction, Inc. the contract for on-call sidewalk, curb and gutter repair for up to $150,000 per year. Authorized City Manager to execute an agreement with Contour Trade Zone LLC (Trumark) for free credit reimbursement for public facilities and improvements within the Transit Area Specific Plan. Approved and authorized the City Manager to execute an agreement with Bellinger Foster Steinmetz Landscape Architecture for Pinewood Park Renovation Project in the maximum amount of $250,000. Approved the purchase and installation of a telescoping boom for the Vactor Sewer Truck in the maximum sum of $25,000 and approved budget appropriation. Public Hearing VTA representative Carolyn Gonot delivered a presentation on the South Milpitas Boulevard Plan under which the City

SUBMITTED BY CITY OF FREMONT Fremont Mayor Bill Harrison will present the annual State of the City Address at a luncheon hosted by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, March 28, from noon to 2 p.m. at the Fremont Marriott Hotel, 46100 Landing Parkway. To buy tickets, call the Chamber at 795-2244 or visit www.Fremontbusiness.com. The State of the City Address will be rebroadcast on Cable TV Channel 27, as well as posted to the City website by the end of the following week. For more information, call the City Manager’s Office at 284-4000 or visit www.Fremont.gov/StateoftheCity.

SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM LENS Applications are now being accepted from students interested in serving on the Hayward Youth Commission. The City of Hayward is looking for students eager to represent the interests, needs and concerns of the young people in the Hayward community and to provide input to the elected officials of the City of Hayward, the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District and the Hayward Unified School District about services that affect youth. Youth Commissioner’s responsibilities include attending meetings the first and third Monday of each month from September to June, except holidays and working on special projects that address current issues. To be eligible, students must be between 13 and 20 years old at the time of appointment and live in the City of Hayward or within the boundaries of the Hayward Unified School District. All applicants under 18 years of age must have parental/legal guardian consent to participate in this program by completing the Parent Agreement and Contact Information form. Applications are available in the Office of the City Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, or by calling (510) 583-4400 between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Applications may also be obtained at http://bit.ly/ZK5Vsc. The deadline for submitting applications is 5:00 p.m., Thursday, May 16, 2013. Postmarks will not be accepted. Applicants will be notified by mail when an interview time is confirmed. Interviews will be conducted on Thursday, May 23, 2013. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/ZK5Vsc and http://bit.ly/ZkbTwy.

will pay $17M from transportation development fees. Council approved the plan unanimously but expressed concern about the rights of property owners throughout the presentation. Unfinished Business Gonot and other VTA representatives updated Council on the project’s progress. Construction of Milpitas BART station is scheduled for completion by mid-2016 with revenue service from 2017. After initially appearing to accept a contract renegotiation set out by city management, the firefighters union has rejected it citing layoff and cuts to overtime to accept a $2M SAFER grant from the federal government. Giordano moved to reject the SAFER grant and directed the Fire Department to adopt the budget cutting agreement; Council approved the motion unanimously. Report of Mayor and Commission Approved the Public Art Committee 2013-2015 Master Plan; projects include murals. The Public Art Fund has a budget of $166,000. There is a bid to move the Cartwheel Kids exhibit from City Hall to the library; the artist is considering $15,000 though the City is not bound by this amount. (4 YES votes; 1 NO vote (Gomez)). Ordinance Waived the second reading and adopted

Ordinance No. 284 which requires council members to inform the public if any developers or contractors involved in a given project contributed to their campaigns. The ordinance does not include penalties for failing to do so and is, therefore, an “honor system.” Public Forum Rob Maines disagreed with council that a certain rail project was unfeasible. Rob Marini stated that council members should be present during Public Forum as Gomez had briefly left the room. Giordano explained there is a screen in their chambers so, if they leave, they can still hear the speakers’ comments. Marini also took issue with the City keeping surplus money from certain projects. Garry Rude asked the City to address parking. Too many employees of car dealerships are parking in City parks. Frank DeSmidt announced that Milpitas Rotary Club will hold an event to honor the Police Officer and Firefighter of the Year on March 30, 2013. Mayor Jose Esteves - Yes Vice Mayor Althea Polanski - Yes Debbie Giordano - Yes Armando Gomez - Yes Carmen Mantano - Yes


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Solar Solar industry development grapples with absorbing hazardous Calif. wastes farmland Planning department records in four of the valley’s biggest farming counties show about 100 solar generation plants already proposed on roughly 40,000 acres, or about the equivalent of 470 Disneyland theme parks. Planners in Fresno County say their applications for solar outnumber the ones they received for housing developments during the boom days. Solar developers have focused on the southern San Joaquin Valley over the past three years for the same reason as farmers: flat expanses of land and an abundance of sunshine. Land that has been tilled most often has fewer issues with endangered species than places such as the Mojave Desert, where an endangered tortoise slowed solar development on federal land. Much of the solar development is proposed for Kern, Tulare, Fresno and Kings counties, which are home to more than 400 crops that pump $30 billion into the economy and help sustain U.S. food security. In January, the farmland trust released a report projecting that by 2050 more than 570,000 acres across the region could be lost to development as the Central California population explodes. Farmland losses due to housing, solar development, a warming climate, cyclical drought and ongoing farm water rationing to protect endangered fish, plus the state’s signature transportation project – the High Speed Rail – are all issues the trust is trying to monitor. ``These are things that don’t make headlines, but come under the category that you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone,’’ Thompson said. No statewide plan or policy exists to direct projects to areas where land is marginal for farming and power transmission lines exist or can be easily routed, though groups as diverse as the Defenders of Wildlife and the independent state oversight agency Little Hoover Commission have issued studies calling for one. Projects are approved by elected county boards of supervisors, or if larger than 50 MW, the California Energy Commission. ``There’s no consistent approach’’ county to county in deciding what gets approved on farmland, said Kate Kelly, a planning consultant who is studying the environmental impact of valley projects for Defenders of Wildlife. While one of the nation’s leading solar trade groups has not taken an official position on conversion of farmland to solar, Katherine Gensler of the Solar Energy Industries Association says more thought must go into location. The largest solar facility operating so far covers 500 acres 60 miles northwest of Bakersfield and produces enough electricity for 36,000 homes. Just three weeks into 2013, five valley farmers have told the Department of Conservation that they want to cancel low agriculture tax rate contracts to develop solar on their property. None takes advantage of a year-old law making it easier to cancel on marginal land, Penberth said. County boards of supervisors are attracted to the promise of clean energy construction jobs. Some of the projects are on prime land as small as 20 acres, some on habitat shared by threatened or endangered species such as the kit fox, Swainson’s hawk and blunt nose lizard. The 9,000-acre Maricopa Sun project in western Kern County is on prime land that the county says lacks a reliable water supply. Almost always developers chose sites because there’s a willing seller in the vicinity of existing transmission lines, experts say. Transmission is the biggest reason for the holdup of a massive project that energy planners, agriculture interests and environmentalists agree is perfectly situated – the Westlands Solar Park in remote Kings and Fresno counties. It’s planned for 47 square miles of farmland fallowed because of high levels selenium in the soil. Developers say the project ultimately could provide 2.7 gigawatts of electricity – enough for 2.7 million homes. But the wait for approval from the California Independent System Operator to tap into transmission lines for a large project proved too long so they got out. For now. ``We realized it would be a seven-to-10 year process,’’ said Joshua Martin, the solar company’s chief financial officer. ``We could easily have spent $7 million in fees to stay in line, but it doesn’t make good business sense. It’s a messy market right now and things need to calm down.’’ Ten years might be wishful thinking. An email the ISO sent to stakeholders on Jan. 18 said that it could be 12 years or longer before the needed upgrades in transmission infrastructure could be complete for solar projects currently waiting for transmission hookups in the Fresno area. Westlands Solar Park is betting that environmental obstacles and connection costs will force many of the projects in the pipeline statewide to be abandoned. But what they’re hoping in the meantime is that state regulators eventually will direct solar development away from prime farmland. Next month the California Energy Commission is set to make a move in that direction with adoption of a report that will recommend a coordinated approach placing solar in ``zones with minimal environmental or habitat value,’’ near existing or planned electric system infrastructure. The agency would also collaborate with the Department of Conservation to identify areas of the state with marginal land. Martin says the move likely is too late to help the projects that are stalled and in danger of missing out on federal tax incentives that expire in 2016. ``Someone needs to take a role and say what lines should be built and which aren’t in the state’s best interest,’’ said Martin. ``So far we have been underwhelmed.’’

other and from low-cost panel manufacturers from China and elsewhere. “We want to take the lessons learned from electronics and semiconductor industries (about pollution) and get ahead of some of these problems,’’ said John Smirnow, vice president for trade and competitiveness at the nearly 500-member Solar Energy Industries Association. The increase in solar hazardous waste is directly related to the industry’s fast growth over the past five years – even with solar business moving to China rapidly, the U.S. was a net exporter of solar products by $2 billion in 2010, the last year of data available. The nation was even a net exporter to China. New companies often send hazardous waste out of their plants because they have not yet invested in on-site treatment equipment, which allows them to recycle some waste. Nowhere is the waste issue more evident than in California, where landmark regulations approved in the 1970s require industrial plants like solar panel makers to report the amount of hazardous materials they produce, and where they send it. California leads the consumer solar market in the U.S. – which doubled overall both in 2010 and 2011. The Associated Press compiled a list of 41 solar makers in the state, which included the top companies based on market data, and startups. In response to an AP records request, the California Department of Toxic Substances Control provided data that showed 17 of them reported waste, while the remaining did not. The same level of federal data does not exist. The state records show the 17 companies, which had 44 manufacturing facilities in California, produced 46.5 million pounds of sludge and contaminated water from 2007 through the first half of 2011. Roughly 97 percent of it was taken to hazardous waste facilities throughout the state, but more than 1.4 million pounds were transported to nine other states: Arkansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Rhode Island, Nevada, Washington, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona. Several solar energy experts said they have not calculated the industry’s total waste and were surprised at what the records showed. Solyndra, the now-defunct solar company that received $535 million in guaranteed federal loans, reported producing about 12.5 million pounds of hazardous waste, much of it carcinogenic cadmium-contaminated water, which was sent to waste facilities from 2007 through mid-2011. Before the company went bankrupt, leading to increased scrutiny of the solar industry and political fallout for President Barack Obama’s administration, Solyndra said it created 100 megawatts-worth of solar panels, enough to power 100,000 homes. The records also show several other Silicon Valley solar facilities created millions of pounds of toxic waste without selling a single solar panel, while they were developing their technology or fine-tuning their production. While much of the waste produced is considered toxic, there was no evidence it has harmed human health. The vast majority of solar companies that generated hazardous waste in California have not been cited for waste-related pollution violations, although three had minor violations on file. In many cases, a toxic sludge is created when metals and other toxins are removed from water used in the manufacturing process. If a company doesn’t have its own treatment equipment, then it will send contaminated water to be stored at an approved dump. According to scientists who conduct so-called ``life cycle analysis’’ for solar, the transport of waste is not currently being factored into the carbon footprint score, which measures the amount of greenhouse gases produced when making a product. Life cycle analysts add up all the global warming pollution that goes into making a certain product – from the mining needed for components to the exhaust from diesel trucks used to transport waste and materials. Not factoring the hazardous waste transport into solar’s carbon footprint is an obvious oversight, analysts said. ``The greenhouse gas emissions associated with transporting this waste is not insignificant,’’ Mulvaney said. Mulvaney noted that shipping, for example, 6.2 million pounds of waste by heavy-duty tractor-trailer from Fremont, Calif., in the San Francisco Bay area, to a site 1,800 miles away could add 5 percent to a particular product’s carbon footprint. Such scores are important because they provide transparency to government and consumers into just how environmentally sustainable specific products are and lay out a choice between one company’s technology and another’s. The roughly 20-year life of a solar panel still makes it some of the cleanest energy technology currently available. Producing solar is still significantly cleaner than fossil fuels. Energy derived from natural gas and coal-fired power plants, for example, creates more than 10 times more hazardous waste than the same energy created by a solar panel, according to Mulvaney. The U.S. solar industry said it is reporting its waste, and sending it to approved storage facilities – thus keeping it out of the nation’s air and water. A coal-fired power plant, in contrast, sends mercury, cadmium and other toxins directly into the air, which pollutes water and land around the facility. “Having this stuff go to ... hazardous waste sites, that’s what you want to have happen,’’ said Adam Browning, executive director of the Vote Solar Initiative, a solar advocacy group. Environmental advocates say the solar industry needs greater transparency, which is getting more complicated as manufacturing moves from the U.S. and Europe to less regulated places such as China and Malaysia. The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, a watchdog group created in 1982 in response to severe environmental problems associated with the valley’s electronics industry, is now trying to keep the solar industry from making similar mistakes through a voluntary waste reporting “scorecard.’’ So far, only 14 of 114 companies contacted have replied. Those 14 were larger firms that comprised 51-percent of the solar market share. “We find the overall industry response rate to our request for environmental information to be pretty dismal for an industry that is considered `green,’’’ the group’s executive director, Sheila Davis, said in an email. While there are no specific industry standards, Smirnow, head of the solar industry association, is spearheading a voluntary program of environmental responsibility. So far, only seven of the group’s nearly 81 manufacturers have signed the pledge. “We want (our program) to be more demanding, but this is a young industry and right now manufacturing companies are focused on survival,’’ he said.

Knights of Columbus select Milpitas Citizen of the Year SUBMITTED BY LOU HORYZA Harriet McGuire has been selected as this year’s Knights of Columbus Council 5796 Milpitas Citizen of the Year due to her extensive civic volunteerism and dedication to and the love for the City of Milpitas. Harriett was Chairman of the City Arts Commission .serving since 2003, a member of the Public Arts Committee, President of the Historical Society for 2011 and 2012. She has served as Vice President and Program Chair of the Historical Society organizing programs, obtaining speakers, planning field trips and organizing the Community Tour in 2011 and 2012. To recognize her contributions, she was awarded an Honorary Life Membership in the Historical Society. The Milpitas Role Model Fashion Show at the Great Mall was the result of Harriett’s work with the Historical Society. As a Co-Founder of Golden Hills Art Association, she has served as Vice President, Program Chair and President of Golden Hills Art Association, and produced the history display for Veterans at City Hall in 2Oll. She currently serves as Vice President of the Association Harriett had a role in the creation of the Community Museum display at the Great Mall for the Historical Society. Harriett’s love of the arts includes membership in Olive Hyde Art Guild in Fremont and Gualala Art Guild. Harriett began working in the Milpitas Adult Education Office in 1978 on a part-time basis where she taught classes at night in Adult Education for the Milpitas Unified School District and East Side School District after receiving her Adult Education teaching credential. In 1992, Harriett retired from the Milpitas secretarial position and worked in Adult Education at East Side District during the day teaching arts and crafts to adults with disabilities until 2004. She also taught art and seasonal craft classes for Cupertino Recreation department at Quinlan Center in the 80’s. She assisted with vocational testing at Ford Plant when the plant in Milpitas closed. Harriett ran the NTSI Program (traffic school) of the Milpitas Unified School District and monitored GED testing at Elmwood and Adult Education in Milpitas. Harriett was the first President of Murphy School PTA, a room mother at Murphy School for six years with an Honorary Life Membership in the Murphy School PTA. She is also a member of the home school board at Rancho Middle School, a member of the Home School Board at Ayer High School and currently teaching Arts and Craft for the City of Milpitas She will be honored along with Police Officer of the Year Joseph Henley and Firefighter of the Year Jeff Frazzitta at the Knights of Columbus 39 Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday April 13th at Pavalkis Hall, St. John’s Catholic Church 279 South Main Street, Milpitas. Tickets to the event can be purchased for $30 by contacting Chairman Lou Horyza, 667 Escuela Pl. Milpitas,Ca 95035 or e-mail loupegh@aol.com or phone (408) 263-8779. Other nominees for Citizen of the Year including Joe Santoro, a prominent music instructor and volunteer, and Fire Chief Brian Sturdivant will also be honored.


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Tri-City Stargazer MARCH 27 – APRIL 2, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Both Easter and Passover are "scheduled" by the annual occurrence of the full moon in Libra, which is at 5:27 AM of Mar. 27th this year. Libra is the sign of relationship and the full moon represents the joint responsibilities of any partnership. Passover celebrates the promise of freedom offered by Yahweh to the enslaved Hebrews before the Exodus. It is celebrated for eight days. This year, the traditional Passover meal was celebrated on Tues., Mar. 26th. For Christians, the story of Jesus' resurrection is the symbol of God's promise of everlasting life for all those who would accept the responsibility of maintaining faith. Easter is always scheduled for the first Sunday following the full moon in Libra. This year it is March 31. Both religious celebrations are based on timing of the Libra full moon, so some years we celebrate the season well into April. Aries the Ram (March 21April 20): The major five-year Uranus-Pluto square is being heavily triggered in your sign at this time. You seek freedom from whatever Powers that Be in your life. If you have thought carefully about the next step, then now is the time you will probably make the leap. If you haven’t done your homework, sit on your hands. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): If you are allowing yourself the needed R&R, you likely will have unexpected revelations at this time. These are probably surprises that come to you from the past or secrets that you discover about yourself or those in your family of origin. Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): This is a very good time for you to take a serious look at your health routines. You need a renewal of attitude and fresh resolutions. The winter blahs have taken a toll on your body and thus your mental health. Aspects favor reviewing and discussing financial matters with your partner. Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): You are an observer as you

watch many others in your life who are playing out fairly important dramas. Your partner is struggling for a sense of footing due to significant changes in his/her life. The “other” fears annihilation of one layer of the ego’s life. As this evolves, it will prove a great relief for you.

in your life at this time. If not others, then it may be you, playing a unique and far out shift in your overall life. You want freedom but meanwhile have major fears about security, so your normally balanced approach to life is tipping wildly, searching for a foothold.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You may be itching for a getaway from the routine right now. However, problems related to aging property or people in your life are holding you back. Your mental health is important, so consider whether you might be able to hire someone to maintain your obligations for a time.

Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): If someone owes you money and cannot pay, now is the time to cease your services. You need a clear contract here. If it is you who owes the money or the service, then this is the time to pay it off or set up a specific plan to do so. Aspects have a “buck stops here” look and you must step up to your best self.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): This is an ideal time to mend fences in your primary relationship(s). Your mind is steady and looking for practical solutions to issues that may have created harm in the past. You are also more open to finding the creative and untried options. Relationship(s) to children and lovers is also favored. Libra the Scales (September 23-October 22): Weird circumstances and peculiar or unreliable people may be turning up

Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): Life in the relationship department is still on hold. Two problems are at core: shared resources, and old family of origin issues. The conflict may be totally within you rather than with the “other”. Playing together is one way to cross the bridge toward working things out. Then carefully examine the rest together or with a therapist.

Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): You feel pressured by multiple issues concerning home and family life. Both property and family are begging for your attention. The body is the ultimate “home” for each of us. Hopefully you have been taking good care of it. If not, you may be surprised by adrenalin or blood sugar issues.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): A new initiative or idea that began in late Oct. of 2012 has come to a point in which you can move no further without making adjustments. You may be required to wait on another factor before proceeding. While paused, you can pursue other activities that

require concentration and a steady mind. Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): You have favorable aspects in the areas of the law, business travel, business that comes from a distance or on the internet, publishing, and education. Keep track of new ideas that cross your mind because more than one will have promise. On the interior, you are making progress toward healing an abandonment issue from long ago.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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Dental Care Center celebrates 40 years of service SUBMITTED BY MEREDITH SODEN Nearly 40 years ago, ground was broken on the Union City Dental Care Center, a clinic that began with a goal of providing

Clinic Director Dr. Allen Wong

low-cost dental care to East Bay Area residents and still does to this day. As the clinic approaches a milestone anniversary, it is inviting East Bay residents to learn more about affordable dental care and services offered. One of the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry’s satellite clinics, the Union City Dental Care Center is home to one of the school’s Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) programs and has a full-time staff of twelve dental faculty ex-

perts. Fees average about 20-30% less than an average Bay Area private practice. The clinic treats patients of all ages and offers a range of comprehensive dental services including exams, X-rays, cleanings, dental implants, dentures, Caries Management by Risk Assessment (CAMBRA), extractions, root canal treatment, periodontal surgery, crowns, bridges, as well as a variety of cosmetic treatments and some orthodontic treatment. The Union City dental services page provides a complete list of care offered. In late 2012, Dr. Allen Wong was appointed as director of the clinic and the Union City AEGD program. Wong has been a faculty member at the Dugoni School for many years, and has previously held the roles of director of Highland Hospital’s Hospital Dentistry Program; assistant director of the school’s AEGD program; and others. He currently serves as the director of Pacific’s Hospital Dentistry program, a position he holds alongside his role of Union City clinic and AEGD program director. Wong emphasizes the medical and oral systemic connection and focuses on minimally invasive dentistry. Under Wong’s leadership the clinic will be offering the same high-quality, low-cost care it has since 1974. Plans are also underway to bring in new patients by raising the clinic’s profile in the community while also expanding services offered by adding new dental specialists to the clinic staff. Recently, Dr. Keivan Zoufan joined the

ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY FREMONT SUPERINTENDENT JAMES MORRIS Fremont students took home all four elementary school level trophies awarded on Saturday, March 16 at the Alameda County Spelling Bee Championship held at Canyon Middle School in Castro Valley. Throughout the grueling competition, Fremont students demonstrated their spelling skills and good sportsmanship, encouraging one another and cheering for other students each time a word was correctly spelled.

clinic staff, bringing many years of endodontic training and experience to the clinic and AEGD program. In his new faculty practice at the Union City Dental Care Center, Zoufan is able to offer patients complex endodontic treatment and retreatment, as well as endodontic microsurgery and treatment of dental injuries. He will also be responsible for endodontic training of AEGD residents. “We look forward to working with East Bay residents who may not be aware of the oral healthcare services in their own backyard through the Union City clinic,” said Dr. Wong. “We also offer special emphasis on cavity risk assessment as part of our comprehensive dental services.” Prospective patients and community members interested in making an appoint-

ment or learning more about the Union City Dental Care Center are invited to call (510) 489-5200 or visit the clinic web page at: http://dental.pacific.edu/Dental_Services/Clinics/Union_City_Dental_Care_C enter.html. The state of the art clinic is located at 1203 “J” Street (on corner of 12th and J Street) in Union City. The clinic is located within walking distance of the BART Union City station. University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry 1203 “J” Street, Union City (510) 489-5200 http://dental.pacific.edu/Dental_Services/Clinics/Union_City_Dental_Care_ Center.html

Fremont students sweep Alameda County Spelling Bee

The winners were: First Place (tie) - Anish Punaroor from Parkmont Elementary First Place (tie) - Sahir Qureshi from Niles Elementary Third Place - Ruhani Kapoor from Mission Valley Elementary Fourth Place - Timothy Brahan from Weibel Elementary The two top winners, Anish Punaroor from Parkmont Elementary and Sahir Qureshi, breezed through the entire list of words for the elementary school competition so the judges challenged them with words intended for the junior high school competition. After several rounds with the harder words, the judges declared the contest a tie and both Anish and Sahir were awarded 1st place trophies. Anish and Sahir will represent Alameda County at the State Championship on April 20 in Stockton. Good luck! Top four at Alameda County Spelling Bee: (L to R): Timothy Brahan, Ruhani Kapoor, Anish Punaroor and Sahir Qureshi

SUBMITTED BY TINA FERNANDEZ The Ladies Social Club of the Fremont Elks Lodge #2121 hosted “A Celebration of Women Through Fashion and Time” on March 9, a luncheon and vintage fashion show to benefit SAVE (Safe Alternatives

to Violent Environments) of Fremont. This event was made possible through the creativity and hard work of Elks First Lady Cindy Spickler, San Francisco Elks Members Jula Isola and Kimberly Manning-Aker, as well as donors, supporters, and volunteers.

The highlight of this special day was a fashion show featuring ensembles from the late 1800s through the 1960s. Fashions were provided by Isola, owner of CityVintage in South San Francisco, a studio that is a treasure trove of vintage clothing and accessories. Isola collaborated with Kimberly Manning-Aker, a Bay Area fashion historian, to style each look. As the show’s emcee, Manning-Aker shared her encyclopedic knowledge of fashion.

Historical references to the suffragette movement, World Wars, music and more were woven into her presentation of clothing, ranging from a look at restrictive corsets to flapper styles to mod, swinging A-line dresses from the ‘60s. Elks members and local residents volunteered as models and had a great time showcasing each look. Raffles of cash and donated items included jewelry, handmade crystal and china serving

trays, and gift cards to local restaurants, Strizzi’s and The Vine in Niles. Over $1,000 was presented to SAVE on March 18 at the Elks Lodge. SAVE and The Elks Lodge would like to thank all those who helped make this event a success. For more information about SAVE, visit: www.save-dv.org For more information about The Fremont Elks, visit: http://www.elks.org/lodges/home .cfm?lodgenumber=2121


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Durba Sen Exhibit Patrons of Mission Coffee will be treated to the artwork of Fremont-based painter Durba Sen for the month of April. Born and raised in India, Sen’s work finds inspiration in the vibrant colors, people, music, and architecture of her homeland.

“I was always interested in art and started off by taking art classes in Kolkata, India, for a few years. The medium I learned then was watercolor and a very basic introduction to pastels and charcoal,” says Sen. But she was unable to pursue art for a long time after, due to the busyness of life raising kids here and taking care of family. When she went back to India for a few years, Sen restarted painting and took some introductory lessons in oil painting. “On returning to the U.S. in 2009, I slowly made time for myself and took up painting. I enjoy working with vibrant colors and just let my imagination roll.” Sen works primarily with oils and acrylics, and her portfolio includes abstracts, landscapes, and still life. A reception will be held Sunday, April 14 from 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. where attendees can view the artwork, socialize, and talk with the artist about her paintings. To learn more about Sen and her art, visit www.durbasen.com. Durba Sen Exhibit April 2 - 30 Monday – Friday: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Reception: Sunday, April 14 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Mission Coffee 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 623-6920 www.durbasen.com

Majinga the Magician (Michael Stroud), Magic Genii and the Alluring Alela performed to a full house at Temple Beth Torah during “A Night of Illusion,” on March 16. With impressive sleight of hand, astounding illusions, and a wicked sense of humor, the show amazed and entertained the spellbound audience.

(PHOTO BY STEVEN MAZLIACH)


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