Issuu on Google+

Once Upon A Mattress

I Hate Hamlet

Making Fremont safer

Page 39 Page 15

Page 40

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 12 No. 12

March 19, 2013

BY SARA GIUSTI PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHASHI DESAI, DREAM SNAPS Spring is in the air, and it smells like gulal powder! Holi falls on Wednesday, March 27 this year. Also called The Festival of Colors, Holi is a Hindu holiday celebrated on the day after the full moon in the Hindu lunar calendar month of Phalgun, usually in late February or March. Holi is one of the most anticipated holidays, and not only for the good food. Gulal powder (perfumed colored powder) and colored water are tossed on anybody and everybody, regardless of continued on page 17

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW A large crowd started to form in front of the Hayward City Hall Rotunda about one hour before the Giants were scheduled to unveil their 2010 and 2012 World Series trophies. Excitement was palpable as people of all ages took advantage of a rare opportunity to have their picture taken with the awards. Hayward Police Lieutenant Sheryl Boykins and others on the Hayward Junior Giants staff were on hand to watch as the culmination of their efforts to bring the trophies to a local venue were rewarded by the attendance of approximately 1500 enthusiastic fans. The trophy tour has almost completed its tour of 85 cities. After final visits to the World Baseball Classic in San Francisco, Tracy, San Mateo and San Rafael, it will complete its journey March 26 in Medford, Oregon. The Junior Giants program has been a great benefit to the local program by providing equipment, uniforms, training and coaching for local youth.

SUBMITTED BY ALAN FRANK The Niles Canyon Railway (NCRY) kicks off its spring season with an “all steam weekend,” April 6 and 7. Dedicated volunteers at NCRY have kept the proud steam and rail history of the region alive throughout the year, preserving the magical sounds of steam whistles, the smell of coal smoke and the sight of steel wheels rolling along the rails. Adding to the splendor of riding the rails of history this spring, nature has prepared a visual feast of wildflowers along the way.

continued on page 16

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 26

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 19

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 25

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 24


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

New study shows earlier use of Gamma Knife radiosurgery can help prevent permanent hearing loss from non-cancerous brain tumor

T

his week is Brain Awareness Week, a global campaign to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research. Event sponsor the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives states, “disorders of the brain are a major cause of death and disability worldwide” so “finding ways to prevent, treat, and cure disorders of the nervous system is a primary goal of neuroscience research.” Here in the Tri-City area, the latest neuroscience research is having an impact on advanced medical care offered at Washington Hospital’s Taylor McAdam Bell Neuroscience Institute. One example is a French study of treatment for acoustic neuroma, a non-cancerous brain tumor located on the main nerve leading from the inner ear to the brain. Neurosurgeon Sandeep Kunwar, M.D., co-medical director of the Institute’s Gamma Knife program, reports the study shows Gamma Knife radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma, when done at an earlier stage than recommended previously, can lessen the chance of a patient experiencing permanent hearing damage. “Sometimes, people with acoustic neuroma have no symptoms, especially in the early stages. Until now, doctors believed simply monitoring the tumor was often the best strategy,” explained Dr. Kunwar. “But, if the tumor grows, patients are at risk of being unable to recover their hearing.”

Sandeep Kunwar, M.D., a neurosurgeon and co-medical director of the Gamma Knife Program at Washington Hospital’s Taylor McAdam Bell Neuroscience Institute, says Gamma Knife radiosurgery is an excellent alternative to surgery and other forms of conventional radiation therapy for some conditions. In addition to benign brain tumors, the Gamma Knife is used to treat malignant tumors, brain aneurysms, epilepsy, neurovascular diseases, spinal conditions and movement disorders.

“Data from this new study indicates radiosurgery with the Gamma Knife, when done at an earlier stage, increases the likelihood of preserving a patient’s hearing,” he continued. “For this reason and because the Gamma Knife has an excellent record of safety and ef-

fectiveness, we are becoming more aggressive in treating acoustic neuromas.” About 3,000 Americans are diagnosed with acoustic neuroma each year. This type of benign tumor represents from 5 percent to 10 percent of all brain tumors in adults.

People in their 40s and 50s tend to be at higher risk of having an acoustic neuroma. “Acoustic neuromas usually grow slowly, with symptoms appearing gradually,” said Dr. Kunwar. Symptoms may include ringing in the ear or increasing dizziness and problems with balance, sometimes accompanied by nausea or vomiting. There may also be hearing loss, usually in one ear, or a feeling of pressure in the ear. “If you have these symptoms, especially hearing loss, ringing in your ear or difficulty with balance, you should see your doctor,” recommended Dr. Kunwar. Diagnosing an acoustic neuroma can be difficult, especially in its early stages, he added. One reason is that the symptoms are similar to those experienced by people who have middle or inner ear problems. To check for an acoustic neuroma, doctors perform an ear exam and hearing test. An MRI, or magnetic resonance image, is taken to confirm the existence, size and location of the tumor. When a neurosurgeon determines that the acoustic neuroma should be treated, options include traditional open surgery or minimally invasive endoscopic microsurgery to remove the tumor. With surgery, there is a risk that the patient’s facial continued on page 11

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

3/19/13

3/20/13

3/21/13

3/22/13

3/23/13

3/24/13

3/25/13

Diabetes Matters:Vacation or Travel Plans?

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Washington Women's Center: Circulation 101 for Women - Part 1: Varicose Veins

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

12:00 PM 12:00 AM

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

12:30 PM 12:30 AM

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Shingles

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting February 13th, 2013

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Kidney Transplants

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Raising Awareness About Stroke

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting February 13, 2013

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Skin Cancer

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting February 13, 2013

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting February 13, 2013

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013 (New)

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 13th, 2013 (New)

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Heart Healthy Eating After Surgery and Beyond

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Inside Washington Hospital: Pediatric Care

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Diabetes Matters: Top Foods for Heart Health

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Heart Irregularities

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Alzheimer's Disease

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Food and Mood: How One Can Affect the Other (Late Start)

Disaster Preparedness Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting February 13th, 2013

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Disaster Preparedness

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Varicose Veins and Chronic Venous Disease

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Vitamins and Supplements How Useful Are They?


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

Washington Hospital’s Prestigious Magnet Status Highlights Quality Care Washington Hospital Dietitian Warns About Bacteria that Could Make You Sick Reusable grocery bags may be good for the environment, but they could wreak havoc on your health if you aren’t careful. Bacteria and other pathogens that come from raw produce, meat, poultry, and fish can grow in them and contaminate other items that could make you sick. “There are more than 30 known pathogens that could contaminate your food and cause food-borne illnesses,” said Kim Alvari, a registered dietitian and director of Food and Nutrition Services at Washington Hospital. “If you don’t wash your reusable bags, those pathogens are left to grow and multiply. Then the next time you go to the grocery store, you are putting your food into those contaminated bags.”

With the new law banning plastic grocery bags that went into effect in Alameda County on January 1, some of the responsibility for food safety has been shifted to the consumer. It’s important to take proper care of your bags and use safe food-handling practices to prevent food-borne illnesses.

Compounding the problem is the practice of leaving reusable bags in the car for convenience. That way you don’t have to remember to bring them, but cars can get hot inside. The danger zone for food is between 41 and 135 degrees, Alvari said. Food is kept cold (below 41) to avoid the growth of dangerous pathogens and heated up to kill pathogens. “The really dangerous zone is between 70 and 125,” she explained. “Think about it, even on a cool day most cars can get above 70. So if you put raw chicken in the bag and some of the juices get on the side of the bag, within 10 hours you will have billions of bacteria cells growing inside the bag.” Another issue with reusable bags is that often shoppers try to cram too much into them because they only have a limited number. “Now you have meat juices contaminating other foods you stuff in there,” Alvari said. “People also set their bags in the cart or on the conveyer belt, which are often loaded with bacteria because they have come in contact with raw food.” According to Alvari, food-borne illnesses are already a serious problem in this country, affecting one in six people each year at an annual cost of about $77 billion. Because so many cases go unreported, that is most likely an underestimate, she added. Alvari offered some tips for handling reusable bags that can help protect against food-borne illnesses: Wash your reusable grocery bags in the washing machine frequently. If food has leaked inside the bag, be sure to wash it before you use it again. If your bag has been used to carry nonfood items such as detergents, household cleaners, and other chemicals, wash it before using it to carry food. You may want to consider using different colored bags for food and nonfood items so you can keep them separated. After putting your groceries away, clean the areas where the reusable bags were sitting, especially surfaces where food will be prepared or eaten like counters and tabletops. Store your grocery bags away from contamination sources such as chemicals, pets, and children. Don’t store them in your car if you can avoid it. When you are grocery shopping, place the reusable bags on the bottom shelf of the grocery continued on page 9

N

urses are on the frontlines when it comes to quality patient care. From the bedside to the operating room, they are involved in nearly every aspect of patient care at Washington Hospital. Today is Certified Nurses Day, which honors nurses worldwide who contribute to better patient outcomes through national board certification in their specialty. Certification requires advanced knowledge and skills to better meet the challenges of modern nursing. “I enjoy being a certified nurse because I get to share my increased knowledge with other nurses and that leads to improved patient care,” said Yanli Chang, BSN, RN, ONC, a certified orthopedic nurse at Washington Hospital’s Institute for Joint Restoration and Research. “I am very passionate about the care I provide and it’s great being able to see the results when patients say they received the best care possible. Our orthopedic services are ranked very high for the advanced and specialized treatment options that patients receive and I think our success is also a reflection of how advanced the nursing care is as well.” Washington Hospital’s emphasis on continuing education and advanced nursing skills helped to earn it Magnet® status from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the highest level of recognition that a hospital can receive for nursing care. This prestigious designation is relatively rare, with only five other hospitals in the Bay Area having earned the distinction. “The Magnet® recognition program recognizes health care organizations for quality patient care, nursing excellence, and innovations in professional nursing practice,” said Trang Nguyen, BSN, RN-BC, a certified medical-surgical nurse at Washington Hospital. “Consumers rely on the Magnet® designation as the ultimate credential for high-quality nursing. It is the leading source of successful nursing practices and strategies worldwide.” Certification focuses on the same principles as the Magnet® status such as increased nurse retention and satisfaction, increased patient satisfaction, decreased mortality rates, and overall improved quality patient care, according to Nguyen. Certification sets a higher standard with evidence-based practices, professionalism, and advocating safe and responsible practices for patients and families. Lower Mortality Rates In fact, a study published in the October 2012 issue of Medical Care shows that surgical patients cared for in a Magnet®-recognized hospital have significantly lower mortality rates than those cared for in non-Magnet hospitals. Dr. Linda Aiken and her team analyzed data from 564 hospitals in California, Florida, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Of the hospitals involved, 56 had received Magnet® recognition from the ANCC. Controlling for differences in

Tammy Ballantyne, BS, RN, OCN, an oncology certified nurse who works at Washington Hospital’s Sandy Amos R.N. Infusion Center is also a cancer survivor. She says being a certified nurse in oncology means that in addition to sharing her personal experiences, she can delve deeper into the realm of cancer treatment options that are available and better explain to people what they can expect.

nursing, hospital, and patient characteristics, the team found that surgical patients in Magnet® hospitals had 14 percent lower odds of inpatient death within 30 days and 12 percent lower odds of failure-to-rescue compared with similar patients in non-Magnet hospitals. “The Magnet® designation places an emphasis on professional education for nurses and encourages them to obtain specialty certification,” explained Hillary Baldocchi BSN, RN, PHN, CNRN, a certified neuroscience nurse at Washington Hospital who works with stroke patients. “Specialty certification ensures that patients receive the highest level of care and simultaneously improves patient outcomes.” continued on page 9


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

nual High School Theatre Festival this month. The two-day festival takes place March 22 and 23 on the Ohlone College Fremont Campus, attracting high school students from over 22 schools across California. The annual event is the largest high school theatre festival in northern California. It allows students from all over the Bay Area to participate in what the students describe as a “life-changing” performing arts marathon. More than 200 professionals, professors, and theater practitioners come together to make this an unforgettable day for these young thespi-

Theatre festival SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE More than 650 high school students will travel from as far as Grass Valley to participate in Ohlone College’s 19th An-

SUBMITTED BY ALANNA POWELL Join us as we celebrate Boldly Me’s first anniversary on Friday, April 12 with an evening of delicious food and exciting entertainment at the Fremont Marriott. Hollywood actress Carolyn Hennesy (of General Hospital, True Blood, and Cougar Town fame) will be our Master of Ceremonies. Tickets include dinner, drinks, and dessert as well as a silent auction, live entertainment, and musical entertainment by the Dream Achievers Band, a world traveling band of autistic musicians led by Friends of Children with Special Needs (FCSN). A designated childcare area will be available with kid’s meals and entertainment included at $25 per child. Corporate sponsorship levels (which include complimentary tickets and other promotional benefits) are available for this event: For more details about the benefits of sponsorships, please contact us at: info@boldlyme.org or call (408) 768-9257. You can purchase sponsorship packages online, or save on processing fees by arranging your sponsorship with us directly. Please support Boldly Me’s ongoing mission to provide counseling programs, training and recreational classes to help individuals build self-esteem and learn to adapt to their physical differences caused from disease, injury, medical treatments, or physical condition. Boldly Me’s Got Talent Friday, Apr 12 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (408) 768-9257 www.boldlyme.org Tickets: $75 adult, $25 child (part of ticket price is tax deductible)

ans and theater technicians. Over 100 awards are given to aspiring high school actors and techs performing in multiple categories including: one-acts, musical theater, contemporary and classical plays, original monologues, scenes, improv, video, dance, design and the very popular Tech Olympics. Each student competes on the first day in hopes of qualifying for the finals held on the second day. Throughout the festival, judges provide students with both written and verbal critiques as they carefully select winners in the various categories. By participating in the festival, the high school students not only engage in theatre workshops and showcase their talents, they also earn a half-unit of college credit. Now in its 19th year, the Annual Ohlone College High School Theatre Fes-

Page 5

tival encourages young theater artists in their craft, allows them to interact with others who share the same passions, and introduces them to new and exciting material through energetic competition. For questions or more information, email theatrefestival@ohlone.edu or visit http://www.ohlone.edu/instr/theatredance/hstheatre.html. Ohlone College High School Theatre Festival Friday, Mar 22 - Saturday, Mar 23 Friday: begins at 1 p.m. Saturday: begins at 9 a.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont theatrefestival@ohlone.edu http://www.ohlone.edu/instr/theatredance/hstheatre.html

for increasing ridership and reducing congestion. Another service alternative is augmentation of Transbay service to San Francisco with an additional route along Oakland’s Fruitvale Avenue. The added Transbay service was in response to the capacity problems being experienced on Directors explore lower BART’s transbay fares/more Transbay and trains, which have been operating at other service standing-room-only capacity. SUBMITTED BY The AC Transit Board of DiCLARENCE JOHNSON rectors also reviewed new fare strategies recommended by the The Board of Directors of the staff which could increase riderAlameda-Contra Costa Transit ship and revenue through the inDistrict (AC Transit) is considertroduction of new fare products ing service design and fare stratewith accompanying roll backs in gies that would expand service the base cash fare and the price of options, reduce the cost of bus the agency’s monthly pass. Staff rides while expanding the numalso recommended the eliminaber and availability of fare paytion of paper transfers issued ment choices for passengers. from the fare-box and only allowThe service strategies were ing transfers on passes and the part of a package of proposals, in- Clipper Card. cluding a Comprehensive OperaAC Transit is in the third year tions Analysis (COA) that was of a 10-year fare policy that will presented to the Board at a wellautomatically increase fares by 15 attended public forum the week cents on July 1, 2013, taking beginning March 11, 2013. The basic fares from $2.10 to $2.25. COA recommended AC Transit Staff proposed four alternatives: focus its routes in key ‘trunk’ cor- 1) Lower the basic fare to $2, ridors with the greatest potential which would retain the loyalty of

existing riders and increase ridership; 2) Eliminate paper transfers, which are abused and the source of operator/rider conflicts; 3) Introduce a Day Pass and a 7-Day Pass, reasonably priced and available primarily on Clipper Cards; and 4) Expand the number of Clipper Card sales locations, making the card more accessible particularly in low-income areas. The new fare strategies have the additional benefit of reducing bus dwell times at bus stops by minimizing the use of cash and paper transfers to board buses. That, in turn, could make service more reliable, potentially luring more riders and subsequently increase fare-box revenue. “I am glad we are now taking a long-term view of this because sometimes a 15 percent increase in fares does not mean a 15 percent increase in revenue,” said Board President Greg Harper. While intrigued, Harper and other board members said more information about possible funding and fiscal impacts is needed before taking action on any of the staff recommendations. In April 2013, staff will provide the Board a more definitive plan for the revisions to the fare policy, and a public comment period will be established for riders and others to voice concerns about any potential changes. For more about AC Transit, visit www.ACTransit.org.


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

SUBMITTED BY JESSIE MANGALIMAN A bone marrow registration drive will be held March 21 at the Kaiser Permanente Fremont Medical Center (39400 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont) for Joey Tyquiengco, a Hayward resident battling cancer and in need of a bone marrow match. Tiquiengco, 41, originally from Guam, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in 2011. He is being treated at University of California-San Francisco. Before his cancer diagnosis, he worked at Costco in Hayward. Joey has been active in hosting bone marrow/stem cell registration drives in the Bay Area within the Chamorro and Filipino communities to encourage them to become potential bone marrow/stem cell donors. Guam is a big supporter of Joey since his diagnosis. Joey, his family and his supporters have been hosting bone marrow/stem cell registration drives in Guam with great success. Joey is still looking for his life-saving donor. The national pool of Asian donors is small, and in the U.S., there is a shortage of minority donors on the national registry. “Cancer affects everybody,” said James De Lara, Senior Outreach and Volunteer Manager for the Asian American Donor Program, a non-profit agency in Alameda that is partnered with Be The Match Foundation, the national organization that helps patients find a bone marrow or umbilical cord blood transplant donor, and receive treatment. “We’re encouraging people to be a donor because by registering as a potential bone marrow or stem cell donor, you have the potential to save someone’s life,” De Lara said. To donate, you must be between 18 to 44 years old; meet general health requirements; complete a consent form and do a cheek swab. For additional information on how to become a donor, visit www.aadp.org, or call 510-568-3700.

SUBMITTED BY CHRIS CAVETTE PHOTO BY PHILLIP CAVETTE If the Cloverleaf Family Bowl in the Irvington district of Fremont looks like something out of the 1950s or 60s, that’s because it is. In fact, the popular bowling center will officially celebrate its 50th Anniversary on Saturday, March 23, with a team tournament starting at 1 p.m. The original Cloverleaf Family Bowl was built in 1959 at 40645 Fremont Boulevard, near the corner of Grimmer Boulevard. The brightly painted and sharply angled roofline at the entrance is flanked by a cluster of palm trees. Both were typical features of the California Coffee Shop Moderne style of architecture that started in Southern California and spread throughout the West during that period. According to Jim Chambers, one of the current owners, the building had only twenty lanes when David and Marian Hillman bought it in 1963. That

was about the same time General Motors opened its assembly plant at the south end of Fremont Boulevard and the area was booming. The Hillmans quickly added twelve more lanes on the west side of the original bowling alley in 1963, then another twelve on the east side in 1974 to keep pace with the growing popularity of the place. The 50th anniversary celebration is in recognition of the original purchase by the Hillmans. Today, the Cloverleaf Family Bowl is jointly owned and operated by the Hillman and Chambers families. Just like fifty years ago, a steady stream of bowlers still comes through the front doors day and night for leagues, tournaments, and birthday parties. Cloverleaf Family Bowl 40645 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-4411 M-F: 8:30 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. Wknd: 7:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

EarthTalk® E - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE

Citizen scientists Dear EarthTalk: What exactly are “citizen scientists” and how can I become one? Eric Wilson, Barre, MA “Citizen scientists” are members of the public who help scientists and researchers by making observations and/or collecting and recording data. The term was first popularized by the National Audubon Society as part of its annual Christmas Bird Count (CBC), during which volunteers from across the country fan out to count local birds. The aggregated data has been helping Audubon assess the health of U.S. bird populations and plan its conservation initiatives accordingly since the tradition began in 1900. Thousands of Audubon members still participate in the CBC, though modern-day citizen scientists are more likely to be members of Project Noah, an app-based tool that allows everyday people to share wildlife sightings via their Internet-connected mobile devices. Through the power of so-called “crowdsourcing” (outsourcing a task to a distributed but undefined group of people), it has become one of the most popular online communities for nature exploration and documentation. User-created local missions allow members to observe specific wildlife species based on their own interests, accessing the efforts and enthusiasm of other Project Noah members in the process. And of course, individuals or small groups or classes can search for other missions to help via Project Noah’s website or mobile app. Some other examples of environmentally oriented citizen science include BugGuide.net, an online community of amateur and professional naturalists who share observations of insects and collaborate on related research, and Citclops, a European Union-funded project where everyday people help scientists gather data to assess the environmental status of water bodies across that continent. Budding citizen scientists looking for different types of projects can browse the offerings on Zooni-

verse, a citizen science web portal that grew out of the online crowdsourced Galaxy Zoo project, whereby amateur astronomers help classify the morphology of galaxies. Over 700,000 volunteers have so far contributed time to various Zooniverse projects. Many Zooniverse projects pertain to space and astronomy, but green-leaning citizen scientists will find plenty to pitch in on there. For example, analyzing wartime ship logs to better model Earth’s climate, categorizing underwater calls from endangered killer whales to help identify and track family groups, or identifying African animals “caught” on millions of camera trap pictures. According to Zooniverse, conducting research by using citizen science has several advantages. One is the ability to cope with extremely large data sets so that researchers can access many person-years’ worth of classifications within days, weeks or months. Another is the fact that so many multiple independent interactions with the data sets help highlight quantitative errors and also serve as great training regimens for how to incorporate machine learning approaches to classification problems. “While the primary goal of our projects is to produce academic research, by their very nature they are also outreach projects,” reports Zooniverse. “As it involves our volunteers directly in the process of research, citizen science is a powerful tool for both formal and informal education.” CONTACTS: Audubon CBC, http://birds.audubon.org/christmas-bird-count; Project Noah, www.projectnoah.org; BugGuide.net, wwwbugguide.net; Zooniverse, www.zooniverse.org. EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.

Abode Services receives grant from Fremont Bank agencies responsible for their wellbeing. The team consists of a fulltime social worker and a peer counselor who collaborate with local law enforcement to connect individuals with critical health, social service and housing programs. “This generous grant from Fremont Bank Foundation will support our ongoing partnership with local law enforcement to help homeless people access housing, health care, and other services,” said Louis Chicoine, Abode Services’ executive director. “The HOPE Crisis Outreach Team meets a critical need in our community, and we appreciate the foundation’s commitment to keep Marie-Pascale Peterson, Director of Community Outreach at Fremont Bank, presents it moving forward in service to Frea $25,000 check to Louis Chicoine, Executive Director of Abode Services. mont’s most vulnerable residents.” In the first seven months of operation, HCOT SUBMITTED BY KURT HEATH engaged nearly 100 individuals, successfully conFremont Bank Foundation awarded Abode Serv- necting many of them with mental and primary health care, shelter services, and permanent housing, ices $25,000 on February 25 for its HOPE Crisis Outreach Team (HCOT), an innovative partnership among other programs. “The HOPE Crisis Outreach Team is one of the with Fremont’s Police Department and Human most creative partnerships I’ve seen to care responsibly Services Division to care more effectively for the for the homeless in a community,” said Hattie Hyman city’s homeless. Hughes, president of Fremont Bank Foundation. HCOT was formed last year to engage Fremont’s Visit www.abodeservices.org to learn more. homeless population and improve coordination among

SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT How nonprofit organizations can get the most out of their volunteers will be the focus of a presentation to the Hayward Nonprofit Alliance (HNPA) when it meets on March 21, 2013 at 10 a.m. at Eden Medical Center, 20103 Lake Chabot Road, Castro Valley. The meeting will be held on the second floor of the new medical office building attached to the new hospital. The presentation will focus on how to build boards of directors, recruit fund-raisers and recognize volunteer leaders for the work they do. Presenter Terry Pink Alexander, Executive Director of the Eden Medical Center Foundation manages a development staff and works with a board of directors to coordinate all foundation fundraising activities. Her expertise includes recruiting, training, and supporting volunteers who contribute to fundraising. Her experience includes serving as Director of Development for Head-Royce School in

Oakland, Executive Director of The Judah L. Magnes Museum in Berkeley, Western Regional Executive Director for The Foundation Fighting Blindness, and in various fundraising positions at UC Berkeley. The HNPA is an affiliate of the Hayward Chamber of Commerce for more than 100 nonprofit member organizations in cooperation with the Hayward Area Historical Society and the Nonprofit Resource Center. For information, visit the Hayward Chamber of Commerce, 22561 Main Street, Hayward, call (510) 537-2424 or email www.Hayward.org. Engaging Your Volunteers Thursday, Mar 21 10 a.m. Eden Medical Center 20103 Lake Chabot Road, Castro Valley (510) 537-2424 www.Hayward.org

Page 7


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BART Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD March 8 A patron was in the bus zone at 6:19 a.m. when an adult male came up to him and threatened to kill him (unprovoked). The suspect then tried to strike the victim, but missed. The victim was able to get away and call for help. Officers located the suspect and detained him until the victim identified him as the responsible person. The suspect had an $85,000 warrant for DUI and a $5,000 warrant for disturbing the peace. The victim placed the suspect under citizen’s arrest for threatening and assaulting him. The suspect was booked into the Santa Rita Jail for the warrants, making threats and the assault.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD March 8 Three Asian males knocked on Reporting Party’s (RP) door in the 4300 block of Dorsey Avenue and when RP answered through the door, they claimed to be looking for someone who did not live there. They then sped off in a silver import vehicle, possibly a Honda. March 9 Kudos to several citizens who called FPD with driving observations of suspected DUI drivers! Arrests include: Ofc. Hunt stopped and arrested a 49 year old adult female for DUI; Sgt. McCormick stopped and arrested a 27 year old adult male for DUI. A residential burglary occurred on Ferdinand investigated by Barbero. March 10 Ofc. Luevano documented fresh gang graffiti in the area of Dusterberry/Hansen. Graffiti appears to be from a Newark norteno gang “YNL”. Documented. Two black male adults, both armed with handguns, entered Haller’s Pharmacy and robbed it of Oxycodone. They were last seen running w/b into the parking lot. Both were wearing masks so there is a very limited description. Investigated by Ofc. Luevano. March 11 At about 10:15 a.m., Ofc. Peters and Ofc. Dias were dispatched to Fry’s Electronics on a possible theft in progress. Fry’s security saw a suspicious vehicle park near an emergency exit and one occupant entered Fry’s. As expected, the suspected, an adult male, Redwood City resident, committed a theft and left the store; Ofc. Peters was waiting for him. The suspect immediately took off running through the parking lot but could not outrun Ofc. Peters in his patrol car. He quickly surrendered without incident. Ofc. Dias contacted the driver and accomplice, an adult male, Redwood City resident, as he tried to drive out of the parking lot. A significant amount of methamphetamine, several computers, credit cards, and other suspicious property was recovered. Both were booked for a variety of felony charges. Officers responded to GameStop at the Fremont Hub on a reported armed robbery. The suspect produced a black firearm and ordered continued on page 36

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On Thursday, March 14, for the second day in a row Thornton Jr. High School received a bomb threat that came in via multiple telephone calls. Quick thinking staff, with the help of patrol officers, was able to determine that a student on campus was responsible. It is unlikely that this student was acting alone and officers are continuing to investigate whether additional people are involved. Due to a number circumstances stemming from Wednesday’s incident, the school was not placed on lock-down. A 14-year old male student was arrested and released to his parents on a NTA (Notice to Appear) charging him with two counts each of a bomb threat at a school and domestic terrorist threats. The incident was supervised by Sgt. Crandall & SRO Sgt. Koepf.

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD March 8 At 10:25 a.m., officers were dispatched to an “inprogress” residential burglary on Elias Drive. A resident living in the area called 911 to report two male subjects attempting to break a window on his neighbor’s home. Responding officers observed two males matching the suspect descriptions attempting to leave the area. The two juvenile males attempted to run away as Officer Vasicek approached them. Both males were arrested after a short foot pursuit. Property from the residential burglary was located on the suspects. Both juveniles were transported to Juvenile Hall. One of the arrestees later stated that they randomly picked out a house that had no cars parked in the driveway. They then peeked into the garage window’s to determine if cars were in the garage. They walked around to the rear of the house and smashed open a rear French-style door to gain entry. Excellent job by neighbors alerting the police to the whereabouts of the second suspect who was hiding in a bush. Neither suspect is from the neighborhood. Officers responded to Wal-Mart to investigate a bomb threat at 4:53 p.m. Someone called into the store and threatened that a bomb was at the location. Precautionary steps were to taken to ensure the safety of persons in the area. No device was located at the store. Officers Lanier and Rodriguez conducted a security check at Arroyo Park at 8:38 p.m. The officers located three males smoking marijuana inside of a vehicle. The driver fled in the vehicle as the officers approached them. The officers pursued the suspect vehicle onto Royal Ann Drive, near Chinook Court. One of the occupants stayed inside the vehicle, while the other two occupants fled on foot. One of the suspects was arrested after a short foot chase. The driver and second suspect was identified as Mr. Samir Hudieb of Union City. Mr. Hudieb is still outstanding and anyone with information about his whereabouts is encouraged to contact the Investigations Unit. March 10 Officer Persinger investigated a suspicious device at the Citibank on Decoto Road. A customer noticed a new card skimmer near the ATM. The customer pulled on the new card skimmer and a false face plate pulled away from the actual ATM. Criminals are known to place accessory card readers over machines in an atcontinued on page 36

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Fremont community members are invited to attend the third “Coffee with Cops” event scheduled this year. Meet with Interim Chief of Police Richard Lucero and his command staff in an informal, friendly setting. Officers from Patrol, Street Crimes and specialists from the Community Engagement Unit will be available to talk with folks about community issues, neighborhood concerns or just get acquainted with you. We hope to see you for coffee next week. No formal presentation is planned. Future coffee events will be held during evening hours.

Coffee with Cops Wednesday, Mar 27 8 a.m. - 9 a.m. Ardenwood Forest Club House 5016 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-6740


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 3

The ANCC’s strong emphasis on advanced skills also requires Washington Hospital nursing staff to continually increase their knowledge and abilities year after year. “I am a cancer survivor, so I know what it’s like from the patient’s perspective,” added Tammy Ballantyne, BS, RN, OCN, an oncology certified nurse who works at Washington Hospital’s Sandy Amos R.N. Infusion Center. “I received my chemotherapy and breast cancer surgery at Washington Hospital and it was the support that I received from the nurses during my treatment that helped motivate me to become a nurse. Chemotherapy is scary and I wanted to give back. That’s why I became a specialized oncology nurse. Being a certified nurse in this specialty means that I have the ability to delve deeper into the realm of cancer treatment options that are available. I can better explain to people what they are going to go through and share my own experiences with them as well.” For more information about Washington Hospital’s Magnet® status, visit www.whhs.com/magnet. To learn more about the Magnet recognition program and nurse credentialing, visit www.nursecredentialing.org. continued from page 3

cart while you are shopping. That area is not as likely to be contaminated. Use the small plastic bags provided by the store for raw produce, chicken, meat, and

fish. Put each item in its own plastic bag to separate it from other food items. Do not place the reusable bags on the conveyer belt at check out. Hand them to the bagger or if you are bagging them yourself, carry them to the bagging area. “There are a lot of things to think about with reusable bags,” Alvari said. “Some of the responsibility for food safety has been shifted to the consumer, so it’s important to take proper care of your bags and use safe food-handling practices to prevent food-borne illnesses.” For information about programs and services at Washington Hospital that can help you stay healthy, visit www.whhs.com.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Have you ever wanted to get an inside look at the Fremont Police Department? Now is your opportunity. Beginning, Tuesday, April 23, 2013, the Fremont Police Department will start it’s next Citizen’s Academy Class. The class will be limited to approximately 25 attendee’s and will fill fast, so don’t delay and sign up today. The free twelve session program will run for nine-weeks. The 40-hour academy generally meets one night a week from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. and one or two Saturday classes will be scheduled to accommodate specialized training. The first class on April 23rd is mandatory. Participants learn about topics such as police selection and training, internal investigations, criminal law, patrol operations, communications, crime prevention, crime analysis, firearms training, critical incidents, narcotics, gangs, traffic enforcement and much more. To learn more about the academy and to sign up go to www.fremontpolice.org/citizensacademy. If you have any questions, please contact Lt. Fred Bobbitt at Fbobbitt@fremont.gov or call 510-790-6917.

Cataract surgery can mean freedom from glasses! In the past, choosing the type of lens to implant was made by the cataract surgeon; few options were available. All lens implants were monofocal, providing excellent vision after cataract surgery, but usually only for seeing things at a distance such as distant signs when driving, going to a movie or a ballgame. Corrective glasses were necessary for near vision activity: reading, knitting, sewing, playing cards or keeping your golf score. Today, Dr. Shobha Tandon is able to offer a choice – a multifocal lens. This type of lens provides excellent vision after cataract surgery at a variety of distances. Multifocal lens implants correct both your distance and near vision. For the vast majority of patients, having a multifocal lens implant means that they will be able to see at distance and up close - drive, watch television, read or do crafts - without glasses.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

History

March 19, 2013

Warm Springs

W

arm Springs could be called “the land of water” not only because, as its name suggests, water flows to the surface from underground. However, in the past, natural warm water springs were a notable feature of the area. We don’t know much about who first discovered these springs or the names that Native Americans may have used to describe them. Charles Shinn wrote that early Spanish settlers called the ravine above the springs “Agua Caliente”

Alameda County Water District

Agua Fria Creek

(Hot Water) and the creek that flows from it, Agua Caliente Creek. We do know that some Native Americans established their homes at the springs and others came to camp and use the waters for medicinal purposes.

ground, all traveling toward the bay. A branch of Coyote Slough formed much of the southern boundary of Washington Township. Pioneer settlers built their houses close to these creeks. Mud Creek, which travels inland to the edge of the old Agua Caliente Rancho, receives much of its fresh water from the slopes of Mission Peak; it was here that Warm Springs Landing and Dixon’s Landings were established. The water was deep enough so shallow draft schooners and scows could navigate, unloading merchandise

Fremont City Council adopted a plan to install a 12-inch main down Warren Avenue and an 18inch main in front of Warm Springs School. The plan was financed by the Alameda County Water District with a City guarantee to return the cost through hydrant rental until the Water District had recovered its $40,000 investment. The City of Fremont paid $1600 annually until development in Warm Springs called for additional hydrants and extended service. There came a time when farmers used so much water for

Warmsprings

A Mission San Jose writer described the springs as “nearby.” Skilled engineers at Mission San Jose transported the warm water through an aqueduct to use for bathing and laundering. Spanish families sent their servants here or came themselves with ox-carts loaded with soiled clothing and linens to be cleaned in the soft waters. Water, whether hot or cold, was always a great blessing for any mission. The springs - five of them in one group and a sixth about a quarter of a mile distant - were located in the foothills at an elevation of about 350 feet. About 50,000 gallons flowed daily at a temperature of approximately 98 degrees. Springs water contained a solution of sulphur, soda and borax that resists rusting and required little soap for cleaning purposes. The springs became the property of Fulgencio Higuera when he was awarded Rancho del Agua Caliente in 1836. His sons erected several adobes for their homes near the creek. Clemente Columbet bought the property and established a resort at the springs that became very popular, even famous, around the state and abroad. As a result of the 1868 earthquake, buildings on the property were damaged and the water cooled. Leland Stanford bought the property in 1869; his family planted vineyards managed by his brother Josiah, creating the Leland Stanford Winery and a private country estate. The last use of the land as a winery was by the Weibel family from 1946 until late 1990s. Springs on the slope and in the valleys leading up to Mission Peak flowed into small streams Agua Fria, Agua Caliente, Scott, Toroges - or disappeared into the

from San Francisco and taking grain back to markets in San Francisco. These landings provided vital transportation for an area that otherwise would have been isolated. Farmers not fortunate enough to have springs near their homes

irrigation that the water table fell and wells had to be dug deeper. Commercial construction and housing developments increased the demand for water. People campaigned and encouraged local officials to find additional sources of water. Alameda County Water District officials studied sites for water storage and routes for transporting water. A bond election was held in 1955 to provide money for a distribution system. The Warm Springs area was added to the Alameda County Water District; the sixties brought the South Bay Aqueduct and a continued search for water. The year 1977 is remembered by many as a year of water shortage and voluntary rationing. Water has been and continues to be a critical resource for Warm Springs and the entire TriCity area.

Windmill and Tankhouse

had to haul water or dig wells. There was at least one artesian well near Warm Springs Landing, but for most, water had to be pumped when needed. Hand pumps were sometimes used and even installed in covered areas, but the usual method for pumping water was a windmill. Water was then stored in an elevated water tank, usually above a tank house, and available by gravity flow. An unusual use of water was the G. K. Fish Hatchery on Warm Springs Boulevard which Gerry and Diane Klinke built on the site of a former chicken ranch operated by Agnes Keyes. They constructed a fish pond and filled it with colorful Koi fish which they sold along with filters and fish supplies. They also installed and repaired filter systems. Residents were still struggling to get water in 1958 when the

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 2

nerve or hearing may be damaged. Radiation therapy is another option to slow or stop tumor growth “Gamma Knife radiosurgery is an excellent alternative to surgery and other forms of conventional radiation therapy,” stated Dr. Kunwar. “Compared to surgery, the Gamma Knife controls tumor growth 97 percent of the time, and the chance of facial nerve injury is less than 1 percent. There is also a much lower risk of infection than with conventional surgery.” Gamma Knife radiosurgery is nearly painless, and patients usually return home the same day the procedures is done, resuming normal activities the day after that. Rather than making an incision to remove the tumor, the Gamma Knife uses precisely focused beams of radiation to stop the tumor’s growth without the risk of harming nearby tissue. This is especially critical when tumors are located near sensitive areas of the brain. Dr. Kunwar is part of a skilled team of experts at Washington Hospital that includes physicians and surgeons, a physicist, technologists, nurses and other health care professionals. At the Taylor McAdam Bell Neuroscience Institute, they treat adults and children with a wide range of neurological problems. The Leksell Gamma Knife PERFEXION, which is the Institute’s technological cornerstone, is the worldwide gold standard for non-invasive radiosurgical treatment of many conditions involving the head and neck. Besides benign brain tumors, the Gamma Knife is used to treat malignant tumors, brain aneurysms, epilepsy, neurovascular diseases, spinal conditions and movement disorders.

Lean more To find out more about the Gamma Knife Program at Washington Hospital, go to www.gammaknifeprogram.com. For more information about Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com. For more about Brain Awareness Week, visit the Web site of the Dana Foundation at www.dana.org.

School Board considers honoring Filipino civil rights workers SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE MOTOYOSHI Union City residents may soon be honoring two notable figures in U.S. History. At the March 19 meeting of the New Haven Unified School District Board, members will vote on a plan to rename Alvarado Middle School Middle School after two important, but often forgotten, leaders in the farm labor movement of the 1960s: Larry Itliong and Philip Vera Cruz. Several community groups, including the Pilipino-American Society for Education, Kaisahan, Filipino Advocates for Justice, Pilipino Youth Coalition and students of the Tagalog and Filipino Heritage Studies classes from James Logan High School have spearheaded the renaming campaign. Their efforts have included petition-signing activities and sponsoring history workshops on the contributions of Filipinos to American culture and history. A public hearing on the matter was held on March 5. Numerous organizations, such as the State Asian Assembly Caucus, the Filipino Advocates for Justice, the Korematsu Institute at the Asian Law Caucus, and The League of Filipino American Veterans came out in support of the name change, as did representatives for politicians Assemblyman Ron Bonta, Assemblyman Quirk, and Union City Council Members Jim Navarro and Pat Gacoscos. Anthony Chavez, grandson of Cesar Chavez, sent a letter of support. Although a vast number of Union City’s residents are in favor of the name change, there has been some opposition. The primary objection, raised at the March 5 hearing, was the financial cost of changing the name. Athletic uniforms and other school products, for example, would have to be reordered to reflect the change. Despite the opposition, most residents feel the social benefits of the change would outweigh the economic costs, believing it would acknowledge the area’s diversity and raise awareness about Filipino Americans (who make up one-third of Union City’s residents) and their contributions to the city and the country. Philip Vera Cruz and Larry Itliong, who would be honored by the renaming, have long been respected figures in the Filipino community locally and nationally. Both worked tirelessly in the farm labor movement. Itliong organized numerous protests and boycotts in California and Alaska, including a highly successful strike against grape growers in the Coachella Valley. He also founded the Filipino Farm Labor Union (FFLU) and served as the president of the Agricultural Workers’ Organizing Committee (AWOC). Similarly, Vera Cruz participated in many boycotts, such as the Stockton Asparagus Strike of 1948, was president of the short-lived National Farm Labor Union, and was active in AWOC. It was through Itliong’s and Vera Cruz’s leadership that AWOC launched the famous Delano Grape Strike in 1965. Together the two Filipino leaders convinced Cesar Chavez and his union, the National Farm Workers’ Association (NFWA), to join the grape strike. The Delano Grape Strike was the most successful farm labor strike in U.S. history and was a key step in ending unfair labor practices and improving working conditions for farm laborers. Yet, if not for the efforts of Itliong and Vera Cruz, the strike may have never happened. Not long after the strike, AWOC and the NFWA merged to form the United Farm Workers Union (UFW). Both Vera Cruz and Itliong served as vice president of the organization and continued to fight for the rights and betterment not only of Filipinos, but also of all agricultural workers. To sign a petition in support of the school name change, go to http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/support_the_renaming/signatures

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Calif. winemaker buys Oregon vineyard lands AP WIRE SERVICE PORTLAND, Ore. (AP), Jackson Family Wines, one of the nation’s largest wine producers, has purchased nearly 400 acres of land in the Willamette Valley. The purchase by the company best known for its Kendall-Jackson brand is the first large-scale acquisition of Oregon vineyard lands by a California winemaker, The Oregonian newspaper reported (http://is.gd/3fTUfH ). The company said it looks forward to producing high-quality Oregon pinot noir at the three parcels: two in the Eola-Amity Hills growing area and one farther south in the foothills near Dallas. The company purchased Willamette Valley pinot noir grapes during the 2012 harvest and was impressed by the quality of the fruit, said Barbara Banke, chairwoman of Jackson Family Wines. “I admire pinot noirs from the Willamette Valley and its sub-appellations like Eola-Amity Hills,’’ Banke said in a statement.

News Corp. to spin off publishing with $2.56B cash AP WIRE SERVICE NEW YORK (AP), News Corp. said Friday that it will spin off its publishing division with $2.56 billion in cash and no debt, giving it the means to invest in digital operations and acquire businesses. The amount of cash the publishing unit will receive was included in a securities filing on Friday. The amount includes a payment of $1.82 billion from the parent company, to be renamed Fox Group. Another $741 million is already held in cash by the businesses to be spun off. The separation of the publishing businesses from the TV and movie businesses is expected by June. The publishing company will include newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, the HarperCollins book publisher, Australian TV assets and its fledgling for-profit education business, Amplify. It will keep the News Corp. name. News Corp. also said Friday that the new publishing company would not have to pay for any further legal costs or civil claims related to the phone hacking scandal involving its British newspapers. News Corp. has spent $346 million on probes related to the case. The publishing company would be liable for criminal penalties if they arose. News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch will be executive chairman of the spunoff company and remain CEO of Fox Group. He’ll end up controlling both entities through the nearly 40 percent of Class B voting shares he controls through a family trust. Robert Thomson will be CEO of the spun-off News Corp. He had been managing editor of The Wall Street Journal.

The company’s has not disclosed how much it paid for the land. Wine industry reports said the parcels were previously owned by Commonfund, a Connecticut-based institutional investor. Wine Business Monthly ranks Jackson Family Wines as the ninth largest wine producer in the country. Interest in the Willamette Valley by the prominent winemaker could enhance the region’s reputation for pinot noir. “There’s plenty of market to go around,’’ Willamette Valley Vineyards founder Jim Bernau told the Statesman Journal (http://is.gd/WFejLm). “I welcome the further development of the Oregon wine industry.’’ Earlier this month, Wine Spectator reported that Jackson Family Wines was interested in the Oregon vineyards. The company wouldn’t confirm its plans at that time, but the article got plenty of attention in Oregon’s wine country. “It’s the talk of the neighborhood. In fact, the valley,’’ said Pat Dudley, president and marketing director of Bethel Heights Vineyard.

Carnival returns to profit; travelers fear mishaps AP WIRE SERVICE MIAMI (AP), The world’s largest cruise line has suffered through a series of high-profile mishaps. Yet passengers continue to book vacations thanks to discounts, albeit at a slower pace. The company offered more sales to help attract passengers after an engine fire last month crippled the Carnival Triumph, leaving 4,200 people stranded for five days without working toilets or power. This week, two more of its ships had mechanical problems, ruining the vacations of thousands of more travelers. Carnival Corp., earned $37 million, or 5 cents per share, in its first quarter. That compares with a loss of $139 million, or 18 cents per share, a year earlier. But its forecast for the year came in below analyst’s predictions. Its shares fell more than 3 percent in morning trading. On Thursday, the company ended the voyage of the Carnival Dream after the ship’s backup emergency diesel generator failed, causing problems with elevators and toilets. Instead of continuing back to Florida, Carnival was forced to charter airplanes to fly home the ship’s 4,300 passengers. The Dream’s next trip, which was supposed to start Sunday, was also canceled. All of the passengers on that voyage will receive a refund for the cruise and airfare. Late Thursday, the company announced another ship - the Legend was also having mechanical problems and would skip its stop at the Cayman Islands, heading straight to its final port in Tampa, Florida instead. Vacationers have been wary about booking cruises ever since the Costa Concordia - also owned by Carnival sank off the coast of Italy in January 2012. Passengers have returned to the seas, but only thanks to deep discounts. Following the Triumph mishap, the cruise line is doing an assessment of emergency power and redundancies across its entire fleet, Howard S. Frank, Carnival’s chief operating officer, told analysts during a conference call Friday. There is no estimate to the cost of improvements, which will take some time to carry out. “I don’t

Support grows for modifying California environment law BY LAURA OLSON ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), California’s four-decade-old environmental protection law has been credited with saving habitat, reducing air pollution and giving residents a voice against deeppocketed developers. Yet this year, the California Environmental Quality Act has become a target for sweeping changes in the Legislature. Democrats who typically align with

environmental groups are taking seriously the concerns that have long been raised by business leaders. The champions of change include Gov. Jerry Brown, who has called reforming the law ``the Lord’s work.’’ Critics say the act is being used well beyond its intended purpose and instead is employed by unions, activist groups and even rival developers to delay or stop projects they don’t like, often at great legal expense to developers.

see it as being enormous,’’ Frank said. The company refused to tell analysts how much it spent each year on safety and training. In its earnings release Friday, the Miami-based company said advance bookings for 2013 are behind the same point a year earlier. The company also blamed Europe’s economic problems for its inability to raise prices. North American prices are up slightly but those in Europe and Asia are lagging behind. Passengers in Europe are booking vacations much closer to the date of departure. Asked if they would like to share how deep the discounts have been for the various lines, Carnival executives replied, “Not particularly.’’ Carnival runs cruises under 10 brands including Holland America, Princess, Cunard and Seabourn. For the quarter that ended Feb. 28, adjusted earnings were 8 cents per share. Analysts had expected 3 cents per share. Revenue rose slightly to $3.59 billion. Analysts expected $3.64 billion. The best thing going for Carnival right now is declining fuel prices. The cruise line paid $677 per metric ton for fuel in the first quarter, down 4 percent from the same period last year. That savings alone accounted for 3 cents per share. However, it is the full-year outlook that worries Wall Street. Carnival had predicted in December that revenue would rise in 2013 by 1 to 2 percent. On Friday, it said that is now expects revenue to be flat. Other cruise lines have also been hurt, mainly because of the lagging European economy. Summer Mediterranean cruises favored by Italians and Spaniards are suffering due to those countries economic woes. Last month, Royal Caribbean, the world’s second-largest cruise line wrote down $413.9 million due to a substantial drop in bookings and prices in Spain following the government’s austerity measures there. Royal Caribbean also blamed residual fears from the Costa Concordia disaster for a drop in European bookings. Carnival’s stock was down $1.28, or 3.6 percent, to $34.45 in morning trading.

The law has been amended virtually every year since it was signed in 1970, often in the form of ``nipping around the edges and carving out exemptions,’’ said Richard Frank, a professor of environmental practice in the law school of the University of California, Davis. This time, he sees momentum building behind larger changes to the law. ``There is a shrinking minority of stakeholders that believe CEQA shouldn’t be touched or changed at all,’’ he said. Modeled after the National Environmental Policy Act, a federal law passed the year before, California’s statute requires an initial environmental review for certain projects and a more comprehensive examination if a project is likely to have significant impacts. Supporters say the review process leads to modificacontinued on page 29


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Fremont Is Our Business FUDENNA BROS., INC. Leader in Small To Medium Size Office Space

FEATURED OFFICES Available Now

PARKWAY TOWERS

BLACOW OFFICE CENTER

3909 Stevenson Blvd., Suite C, Fremont 94538 (Stevenson x Fremont Blvd.)

38950 Blacow Road, Suite F, Fremont 94536 (Mowry Ave. x Blacow)

• 886 square feet • 4 room office • Large store-front windows

• 1321 square feet • 5 room office • Includes mini kitchen

EXECUTIVE I

EXECUTIVE I

2450 Peralta Blvd., Suite 112, Fremont 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.)

2450 Peralta Blvd., Suite 209-A, Fremont 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.) • 515 square feet • 2 room office • Spacious backroom

• 377 square feet • 1 room office • Ground Floor

EXECUTIVE II

EXECUTIVE II

2140 Peralta Blvd, Suite 205 Fremont, CA 94536

2140 Peralta Blvd., Suite 102, Fremont, CA 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.) • 1016 square feet • 3 room, 1 closet • Ground floor

• 376 square feet • 1 room office • Large work area

Phone: 510-657-6200

www.fudenna.com Need someone that speaks fluent insurance?

I’m your agent for that.

Aida Pisano State Farm Agent

38970 Blacow Road, Suite A Fremont 510.796.5911

www.insuremeaida.com Nisha Agrawal, EA (510) 585-3TAX • Specialize in Individual and Small Business • Bookkeeping services available • Audit support for IRS & State • Reasonable Fees • Free e-file • Free review of prior years An Enrolled Agent providing reliable, dedicated service. Appointments available Mon-Sat

www.ana4tax.com Parkway Towers, 3909 Stevenson Blvd, Suite C1, Fremont, CA 94538


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Feds release confidential report on Cal nuke plant BY MICHAEL R. BLOOD ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES (AP), Federal regulators on Friday released parts of a once-confidential report at the center of a dispute between California Sen. Barbara Boxer and the company that runs the troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant. However, sections of the 64-page report released by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were redacted, and it wasn’t immediately clear if the issues highlighted by Boxer were included. The Democratic senator said last month that the study suggests operator Southern California Edison took shortcuts that compromised safety at the seaside plant, which was shut down

more than a year ago after a tube break released a trace of radiation. Edison has said the senator is off the mark. The report was authored by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries - the Japanbased company that built the plant’s troubled steam generators. The problems at the twin-domed plant between Los Angeles and San Diego center on the huge generators, which were installed in a $670 million overhaul in 2009 and 2010. After the plant was shut down, investigators found unusual damage on hundreds of tubes that carry radioactive water inside the equipment. NRC investigators later blamed the problem on a flawed computer analysis that resulted in design flaws. Edison has asked the NRC for

permission to restart one of the reactors, Unit 2, and run it as reduced power in hopes of slowing or stopping tube damage. The generators, which resemble massive steel fire hydrants, control heat in the reactors and operate something like a car radiator. At San Onofre, each one stands 65 feet high, weighs 1.3 million pounds, with 9,727 U-shaped tubes inside, each three-quarters of an inch in diameter. Overall, NRC records show investigators found wear from friction and vibration in 15,000 places, in varying degrees, in 3,401 tubes inside the plant’s four generators, two in each reactor. The plant is owned by SCE, San Diego Gas & Electric and the city of Riverside.

Comedian to Perform at Ohlone College SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Kristina Wong, one of the “Seven Funniest EcoComedians” per Mother Nature Network, performs her solo comedian act “WONG Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” at the Ohlone College Smith Center on Wednesday, April 3rd. Her performance takes a surprising, raucous approach to directly address the high rates of depression and even suicide among young Asian American women. Although she uses humor to present her subject, she has nevertheless taken on the serious mission of helping these women and others to recognize their shared experiences and hopefully to benefit from her “no topic is sacred” attitude. Sally Bratton, Director of Ohlone’s Student Health Center said, “We are thrilled to welcome Kristina Wong to Ohlone to present her live performance of ‘Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.’ Kristina is an international performer with roots in the Bay Area and addresses the subject of suicide very artfully.” Ms. Wong’s performance is part of Ohlone’s campus-wide efforts to promote student mental health, through “STEP Up Ohlone”, a grant funded program. Ohlone College’s Student Health Center is hosting this event as part of the “STEP Up Ohlone” program, a campus-wide effort to promote student mental health, reduce stigma and discrimination around help-seeking behaviors, and increase the capacity of faculty and staff to understand mental health issues among students. This

event is one of many events funded by a two-year grant from the Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services through Prop 63 state funds. One hour prior to the performance, many event sponsors will have tables in the Smith Center lobby, with information about mental health services they provide. Event sponsors include: STEP Up Ohlone, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Fremont Hospital, Washington Hospital, Asian Community Mental Health Services, the Afghan Coalition, Portia Belle Hume Center, and the Office of Assemblymember Bill Quirk (D-20). This event is also sponsored by ASOC, Associated Students of Ohlone College, and Ohlone College’s Asian Pacific American Student Association. Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Wednesday, Apr 3 Information Tables: 6:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. Live performance: 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Reception: 9:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Smith Center Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com. FREE for Ohlone students, staff, faculty (must be picked up at box office) $5 General Admission $2 Event Parking ASL Interpreted

Free CERT program SUBMITTED BY THOR POULSEN Hayward Fire Department is providing a free Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training Program which will consist of four evening indoor classes and one outdoor “hands-on” skills class. Participants learn skills that will enable them to provide emergency assistance to their families and immediate neighbors and organize a neighborhood team response. Training will begin April 2013 at Hayward City Hall, 777 B Street, Hayward. Participants must attend all classes to receive certification. CERT training is for all City of Hayward and Fairview residents, aged 18 years or older. Residential verification will be required during the final application process. Residents, who are interested in this free training, can sign-up by clicking on the green “CERT” button on the City of Hayward’s Disaster Preparedness page at http://bit.ly/Pzu6VI. Near the bottom of the next page, follow the yellow “Please Click Here” link. Residents will then need to provide only their name, phone number and address in the email. They will receive an email acknowledging their enrollment in the program and further directions. For residents without Internet access or more information, contact: Hayward Fire Department’s Public Education Officer at (510) 583-4948.

CERT Training Class 1, Monday, April 8, 6-9:30 p.m., Hayward City Hall Class 2, Monday, April 15, 6-9:30 p.m., Hayward City Hall Class 3, Monday, April 22, 6-9:30 p.m., Hayward City Hall Class 4, Monday, April 29, 6-9:30 p.m., Hayward City Hall Skills 5, Monday, May 6, 6-9:30 p.m., Fire Station #6, W. Winton Ave.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

Platinum award for T.G.I.F. Body Shop SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER T.G.I.F. (To Get It Fixed) Body Shop, Inc. was presented the Mission Valley ROP Platinum Educational Business Partner Award on March 14 in front of over 130 MVROP business and industry advisors, staff, and students at their Spring CTE Advisory Meeting. For over fifteen years, T.G.I.F. Body Shop, Inc., a successful family owned and operated local business, has demonstrated unwavering support of Mission Valley ROP and its programs by supporting instruction, providing industry-relevant feedback to maintain program curriculum and its reflection of technology, trends, and employer expectations regarding student training in the Auto Body Painting and Refinishing program. In addition, T.G.I.F. has created a student scholarship in memory of an instructor’s loved one, enthusiastically sponsored students to compete in the an-

nual Toys for Tots charity event, contributed numerous equipment donations, served as an active advisory member for nearly 20 years and made a commitment to the local community with the gainful employment of program graduates. The quality CTE provided in Mission Valley ROP programs, along with resources and support from T.G.I.F. Body Shop, Inc., have resulted in preparing students with the hands-on skills, industry training, and professionalism needed to secure employment in the Transportation Technology industry. The Platinum Educational Business Partner Award highlights the type of relationship that is critical for the ongoing success of career technical education programs and the positive benefits that result for the students, the community, and local economy when it is treated as a fundamental commitment. For the latest news and information about MVROP, visit us on the web at www.mvrop.org.

Making Fremont safer “Man of existential frustration is always unhappy, even enjoying social success. Man of existential fulfillment is always happy, even not enjoying social success.” Huberto Rohden

Discover and mature your spirituality through meditation and intuition and learn the purpose and plan of God under a totally new perspective: SUBMITTED BY SANJANA CHOPRA “We don’t have to give up our lives to serve,” said Rodney Clark, Executive Director, SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) in his address at the “Safe and Peaceful Fremont: A Leadership Conference” held at Fremont Family Resource Center on March 9. His words aptly described the sentiment behind the conference, which was organized by Art of Living Foundation as part of its Stress-Free, ViolenceFree Community Campaign. The conference, aimed to integrate solutions to make Fremont a safer and more peaceful community, brought together leaders from various city departments, non-profit organizations and common citizens. The City Government was represented by Councilmember Raj Salwan and Commissioner Yogi Chugh of the Planning Commission, who gave the city’s vision. Raj urged the citizens to engage with the city with their concerns and ideas. Yogi mentioned that the five-six members of the city council alone cannot create a safer and more peaceful community; it can be achieved only if everyone works together. A City panel was followed by representatives from the Fremont Police Department discussing neighborhood safety. Interim Chief Richard Lucero gave statistics about crime in Fremont and stressed that robberies and burglaries were getting his prime focus at the moment. He was accompanied by Geneva Bosques, PIO/ Community Engagement Manager for FPD. Geneva talked about the various ways that people can stay in touch with the Police Department and also engage in the neighborhood watch program that really helps in cutting down crime in our neighborhoods. They both mentioned that tips given by alert citizens of a neighborhood have always been most effective. The panel on domestic violence and teenage violence included Dr. Gayathri Sundar, Board member, Narika and Rodney Clark, Executive Director, SAVE. Both gave very moving as well as inspiring speeches that stirred the audience into probing what they were really doing for the community and how they can serve more. Gayathri shared surprising statistics of how prevalent domestic violence is in the South Asian community and

what we can do to support them. Talking about teenage dating violence, Rodney mentioned how many of these kids had never seen what a real relationship is like. They get their foremost education from what they see around them, in their homes. Adults have to lead by example. This was followed by a panel on School Safety which had representation from the Board of Fremont Unified School District - Desrie Campbell, Clerk, FUSD and the President of the Fremont Education Foundation, and Lily Mei, Board Member. They brought up the issues of school security in the post-Newtown era and the steps they were taking to address this. They discussed the subject of bullying in schools. One of the school principals present at the conference was invited by Desrie to share how the school dealt with this issue. As part of the solutions side, a presentation by Priya Mayureshwar from the YES for Schools program of International Association for Human Values demonstrated how a lack of awareness leads to problems among young children. YES is being conducted in a number of schools around the Bay Area with amazing results. More information can be found at: http://www.youthempowermentseminar.org/. The Art of Living Foundation, represented by senior instructors Sanjana Chopra and Manik Advani shared how breathing exercises can have a transforming effect on the mind. Art of Living workshops are conducted in over 150 countries worldwide; a center is located in Fremont. For more information, visit: www.artofliving.org. Moderator for the evening was Karishma Anand, who volunteers with AOLF and the Stress-Free, Violence-Free Community Campaign. The campaign joins thousands of citizens from schools, organizations, corporations, and the government in a collaborative effort to build a stress-free, violence-free society. “We want to create a community where every member feels connected to a greater whole, empowered to create positive change around them. We will do this by engaging everyday people into compassionate action, inspiring them to stand together as a collective force of change,” said Karishma. The campaign will host a launch event Saturday, March 24 at 4 p.m. at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center with global humanitarian, social reformer, and spiritual leader, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar. For more information, visit: www.stressfreeviolencefree.org

www.CuoreFoundation.org/courses.htm


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

continued from page 1

SUBMITTED BY TANYA ROUNDY

During “steam weekend,” two trains will run between Sunol and Niles (Fremont) through scenic and historic Niles Canyon. Featured is the public debut of the newly restored Clover Valley #4 as well as the Quincy #2. Built by Baldwin in 1924 for the Clover Valley Lumber Company the #4 has just completed a multi year restoration and federal inspection. It is the only operating mallet type locomotive based on the west coast. NCRY will run public excursions on the first and third Saturday’s and Sunday’s each month through August. A steam and diesel locomotive is scheduled to operate on each weekend. Trains from Sunol Station depart hourly between 10:30am and 2:30pm and Niles from 11:20am and 2:20pm. The round trip takes approximately an hour and a half. Diesel locomotives will operate on a reduced schedule in September and October on the first and third Sunday’s only. The Niles Canyon Railway is a preserved segment of the original 1869 transcontinental railroad on the National Register of Historic Places. It is an operating railroad museum run by volunteers of the Pacific Locomotive Association, a 501c3 non-profit. For more information, visit: www.ncry.org

Mission San Jose High School’s spring musical, “Once on this Island,” is an energetic, lively tale of a young girl who is sent on a journey by the gods to see if Love is stronger than Death. Loosely based on “The Little Mermaid,” Papa Ge (the God of Death) and Erzulie (Goddess of Love), along with the other gods, play with Timoune’s fate in typical mischievous godly fashion. Falling in love with a rich young man, Timoune saves him from Death by promising her own soul and follows him home to “heal” him from his injuries. She arrives to find he is already engaged and that while Daniel loves her, they cannot marry because of tradition and social constraints. The God of Death offers Timoune her life back if she can kill the young love, which she ultimately can’t. Timoune sacrifices her own happiness and life for love, allowing the gods to feel compassion in her death and turn her into a tree that breaks down the walls between rich and poor and setting future generations free to love and be together. Featuring an Indian/Asian theme in costume and a mix of classical Indian, Bollywood, Ballet

and Hip hop dance, this show will reach all audience members. The story is universal across time and cultures. Everyone will find themselves in one of the characters and their emotions. The ensemble cast includes about 40 performers, featuring James Gao as Pape Ge, Shivanni Ariathurai and Mars Sartori as Asaka, Soukhya Inamdar as Erzuli, Joshua Roundy as Agwe, Leena Yin and Lucy Shen as Mama, John Roundy as Tonton, Daniel Zopfi as Daniel, MC Mendonca and Gelsey Plaza as Timoune, and Lynnea Shuck and Ahsas Sood as Andrea. There is also a technical crew of 10. This show will truly astound and leave you singing and dancing, with tears in your eyes! Once on this Island Mar 21 - 23 7 p.m. Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 www.Showtix4u.com Tickets: $15 adults, $10 seniors and children under 12


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 17

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Lake Elizabeth Park (Lion 1 area) 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont gcbayarea@yahoo.com www.gcbayarea.com

continued from page 1

class, age, gender or race. This is not only loads of fun, but a reaffirmation of universal sister-andbrotherhood. While people are covered head to toe in pink, yellow, orange, red and green hues, they celebrate the arrival of spring and say goodbye to winter. A proper celebration is full of food, drinks, dancing and music. Holi also has mythical origins. One myth is that of Holika and Prahlad. King Hiranyakashipu demanded all worship him, but his son Prahlad worshiped Vishnu, the Hindu God, instead. Enraged, Hiranyakashipu ordered

Holika to kill Prahlad by burning him, as she had the ability to be unharmed by fire. Unknown to her, this was only if she entered fire alone - she died, while Prahlad survived by chanting the name of Vishnu. Bonfires are lit to remember Holika and Prahlad during Holi celebrations. Holi is a time of revelry, joy, fun, pranks, letting loose and having a blast. Many things once deemed offensive are now perfectly acceptable, like throwing bright pink powder on your grandmother, or playing pranks on your friends (saying, “Don’t

mind, it’s Holi!” will get you out of sticky situations). Let the colors do the talking at these local Holi celebrations! Rana Holi 2013 Saturday, Mar 23 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Softball Field at Cordoza Park Kennedy Drive and N. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas (408) 359-7262 http://rana.org/Holi.html Tickets: $10 adults, $3 children 5 years or older BAYVP Holikotsav (bonfire) Tuesday, March 26

SUBMITTED BY LUCINDA BENDER The highly anticipated “Artists in the Garden” is back for another year. This extremely successful event, presented by The Fremont Art Association, will be held Saturday, June 29 and Sunday, June 30 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The host, Regan’s Nursery, located at 4268 Decoto Road in Fremont, is the perfect venue to showcase and sell your art. The application deadline is April 12, but space is limited so please send in your application as soon as you can. There are two choices in booth size, a “mini” 5’ x 10’ booth in a shaded area or a standard 10’ x 10’ booth. Artists must supply their own tent if they are interested in the standard booth. Booth fees are a mere $45 for FAA Members and $60 for non-members. In addition, a 10 percent commission applies to all sales. This fee is paid to the Fremont Art Association to support their “Art in the Community” efforts. This is a juried show of fine art and crafts and space is limited. Once the available space has been assigned on a first-come, first-served basis, a wait list will be generated for requests above the spare limit. Art not accepted will be returned after the jury date. For more information please visit www.FremontArtAssociation.org or call (510) 792-0905.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m., in the parking lot Dhuleti (celebration with colors) Saturday, Mar 30 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Dolotsav Sunday, March 31 3 p.m. - 7 p.m. 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas (408) 586-0006 http://bayvp.org/program-activities/event-calendar/ Free Holi Celebration with Gujarati Cultural Association Saturday, Mar 30

Holi Celebration at Fremont Hindu Temple Sunday, Mar 31 11:30 a.m. onwards, in the parking lot 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont (510) 659-0655 http://www.fremonttemple.org/ upcoming-events.php Asha Stanford Holi Saturday, Apr 6 - Sunday, Apr 7 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sandhill Fields Oak Road, Stanford Tickets: Online purchase only Early Bird special (before March 23): $14 single day, $24 weekend pass $16 general single day, $28 general weekend pass www.ashanet.org/stanford/even ts/holi2013/ stanford.holi@ashanet.org


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS De Young Museum docent and lecturer Marsha Holm will present a program entitled, “Girl with the Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis” from 10 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, March 27 at the Fremont Main Library. Holm will discuss a selection of paintings by the leading artists of the Dutch Golden Age. On exhibit at the de Young Museum in San Francisco from January 26 - June 2, this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition, including Vermeer’s timeless masterpiece, is made possible only because of the current renovations and expansion of the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in The Hague, Netherlands. Holm will include a slide presentation with her lecture. As a popular speaker with Fremont audiences, Holm has been a docent with the San Francisco museum since 1979. In addition to giving tours in all areas of the museum’s collections, she has served in several administrative capacities, including chair of the latest training session for new docents, a three-year program. She has also assisted in training docents at Blackhawk Museum, Oakland Museum, and the San Jose Museum of Art. Admission is free. This program is sponsored by the Olive Hyde Art Guild. Girl with the Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis Wednesday, Mar 27 10 a.m. to 12noon Fremont Main Library, Fukaya Room 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401 Free

SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN

A young and successful television actor relocates to New York, where he rents a marvelous, gothic apartment. With his television career in limbo, the actor is offered the opportunity to play Hamlet onstage, but there’s one problem: He hates Hamlet. His dilemma deepens with the entrance of John Barrymore’s ghost, who arrives intoxicated and in fullcostume to the apartment that once was his.

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont

The Milpitas Recreation Services Senior Nutrition Program staff will celebrate their 35th anniversary on Thursday, March 21. The milestone of serving meals to seniors in the community is shared with program sponsors City of Milpitas and the Santa Clara County Department of Aging and Adult Services. In those 35 years it is estimated that the program has served an amazing 590,000 meals to seniors. The Senior Center will be commemorating the anniversary during their regular lunch program on Thursday, March 21 at 12 noon. For more information on the Senior Nutrition Program, call Milpitas Recreation Services at the Barbara Lee Senior Center at (408) 586-3400 or visit www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19


Page 20

SUBMITTED BY ANU ASOKAN

B

ay Area residents built two houses for Mexican families during winter break - December 2629 - as part of a non-profit organization DOXA, also known as “Homes without boundaries.” DOXA, established in 1998, provides services in Ti-

juana, Mexico, including house building. Fifteen families, in two groups of adults and children, supplied the funding for supplies and built the houses by hand. Each family was required to raise $1,000 for house supplies such as wood, concrete, electricity, and plumbing. Though electrical and plumbing services were provided by professionals, the families hammered, sawed, and finally raised the house. Mr. Ramachandran, leader of one of the groups, declared, “It was a great experience. I would love to go again and again.” DOXA volunteers stayed at Casa Hogar de los Ninos, an orphanage in Tijuana, with large halls for sleeping quarters and an industrial-sized kitchen. Sleeping bags and inflatable beds lined the walls upstairs; the mess hall and kitchen were located on the ground floor. A small basketball court and an adjoining five-story orphanage were located on the grounds. Everyday, supplies - wood and paint were loaded onto two large white trucks to be carried to the worksites, a few miles

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

from the orphanage. The two building sites were only a hundred yards apart so both groups could share the expertise of Seattle-based architect and DOXA leader Alex Maxim. The houses, constructed on a 12 ft by 24 ft concrete base, consisted of two rooms of identical size, three windows, and one metal door. DOXA selects families living in dilapidated homes, often made of

cardboard, who cannot afford a house. The only requirement is that the family must own the land for their new house.

In three days, volunteers measured the wood studs, sawed them properly, nailed the frames and siding, painted the house with white trimming and attached the roof. It was a great bonding experience for the volunteers and the new homeowners. Many of those in the group became close friends and learned building skills by the end of the trip. Riding in the back of the truck, meeting many new people and learning to cook for fifty hungry workers are just some of the lasting memories of

this trip. DOXA helps everyone—a family gets its well-deserved new house, and the volunteers get an unforgettable experience. For information on how to volunteer or donate to DOXA, please visit doxaserves.org.

Anu Asokan is a ninth grade student at Mission San Jose High School in Fremont who recently visited Mexico on a service project.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 574-2053

Thursday, Mar 22 - Sunday, Apr 20

I Hate Hamlet $

Continuing Events Saturdays, Feb 2 thru Mar 23

Children’s Theater Classes $R

10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Presented by Boldly Me. Ages 14 & under

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (408) 768-9257 www.boldlyme.org Saturdays, Feb 9 thru Apr 20

Teen/Senior Computer and Gadget Help

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Teen volunteers help seniors with electronic gadgets & computer basics

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Monday, Feb 1 - Friday, Mar 30

Art: Believe/Achieve

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Art from the National League of American Pen Women

Thursday, Mar 14 – Saturday, Mar 23

Thurs - Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 1 p.m.

Once on This Island $

Comedic play about a young actor’s struggle

7 p.m. Musical love story

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (866) 967-8167 www.showtix4u.com Thursday, Mar 14 - Saturday, May 3

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Offerings from member artists

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Friday, Mar 15 - Sunday, Mar 24

Wednesday, Feb 13 - Saturday, Apr 6

Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Eleven Illustrators & sixteen books are featured

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Monday, Feb 1-Friday, Mar 19

Tri-City Senior Peer Counseling Volunteer Training

9 a.m. Seniors 50+ learn counseling skills to support other seniors

City of Fremont 3300 Capital Ave., Fremont (510) 574-2064 lcox@fremont.gov Thursday, Mar 7 – Friday, May 3

Hayward Arts Council Members’ Spring Show

1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Offerings from member artists

Foothill Arts of the Bay Gallery 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Monday, Mar 12 - Friday, Jun 14

Apocalypse & Adaptation: How Catastrophes Shape Society

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Exhibit exploring the relationship between humans & catastrophes

Cal State East Bay University, C.E. Smith Museum of Anthropology Meiklejohn Hall, Rm. 4047 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-7414 Wednesdays, Mar 13 - Jun 12

Walk this Way: Ages 55+

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon Program integrates walking, flexibility & strength

Kennedy Community Center

Hands-on activities for school age children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Women’s Council of Realtors $

Teenager integrates a local TV dance show

Discuss 1031 Exchanges, taxes & luncheon

San Leandro Arts Education Center 2200 Bancroft Ave., San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.aaaahzyouththeatre.org

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 886-2662 www.WCRTriCities.com

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Mar 20

Queen’s quest to find a suitor for her son

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5328

7 p.m.

Wednesday, Mar 20

Monday, Feb 12 - Sunday, Apr 30

Winning entries from the annual photography contest

Fossils of Long Ago: Going Back Through Time

Fri & Sat: 7 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m.

Friday, Mar 15 - Sunday, Mar 29

Mon – Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. & Sat – Sun: 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Tuesday, Mar 19

Hairspray $

John O’Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Tom Cain Memorial Photography Exhibit

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

Once Upon a Mattress $

Fri & Sat: 8:00 p.m. Sun: 2:30 p.m. Newark Memorial High School 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org

Sutro’s: The Palace at Lands End

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Documentary film about San Francisco’s historic complex

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Wednesday, Mar 20 - Thursday, Mar 21

Monday, Mar 18 - Thursday, May 16

College Week Live

Photo Exhibition

Online virtual college fair

Mon: 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Tues & Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Over 200 pictures from patrons & students

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org Monday, Mar 19 - Sunday, Mar 31

Easter Bunny

11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Visits and photos

Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 945-4022 www.greatmallbayarea.com

10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (888) 697-0050 Support@CollegeWeekLive.com Thursday, Mar 21

Pops Italian Dinner Concert $

6:15 p.m. Buffet dinner & live music

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext. 57708 Thursday, Mar 21

East Bay Stompers Band

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Dixie, swing & standards music

Bronco Billy’s Pizza – Irvington 41200 Blacow Road, Fremont (510) 914-7304


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Thursday, Mar 21

Saturday, Mar 23

Saturday, Mar 23

Hayward Nonprofit Alliance Meeting

American High School Crab & Pasta Feed $

Comedy Short Subject Night $

10 a.m.

5:30 p.m.

Engaging your volunteers

Dinner, no host bar, music, raffle & dancing

“The Bank,” “Coney Island,” “High and Dizzy,” & “Leave ‘em Laughing”

Eden Medical Center 20103 Lake Chabot Road, Castro Valley (510) 537-2424 www.Hayward.org

Fremont Holy Spirit Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-2711

7:30 p.m.

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Mar 23

Saturday, Mar 23

Bird Hike

Women’s Hall of Fame Luncheon $R

12 noon - 2 p.m.

Unity Dinner $

7 p.m. - 11 p.m.

12:30 p.m.

Dinner, entertainment & keynote speaker B.V. Jagadeesh

Alameda County charity benefiting women & girls

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 589-3702 www.indocommunity.us

Greek Orthodox Cathedral 4700 Avenue, Oakland (510) 272-6510

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Friday, Mar 22

Saturday, Mar 23 Friday, Mar 22

Long Range Implications of Prop. 30 $R

Saturday, Mar 23

The Apple Pushers Film & Student Showcase

Family Scrapbook Making Workshop – R

1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

2 p.m.

San Leandro Public Library 300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro (510) 577-3971

11:30 a.m.

Instruction & supplies provided

State Controller John Chiang speaks & luncheon

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

San Lorenzo Village Homes Association Hall 377 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea@aol.com

Bird watching hike for all ages

Documentary about fresh food

Sunday, Mar 24

Saturday, Mar 23

Fremont Residents Free Compost Giveaway

Relaxation Session $

8 a.m. - 12 noon

10 a.m. - 12 noon Massage & meditation for all ages

Bring a recent trash bill as proof of eligibility

Comerica Bank 39008 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont www.boldlyme.org

Allied Waste Services 41149 Boyce Rd., Fremont (510) 657-3500 www.AlliedWasteAC.com

Live production about a Native-American girl

Saturday, Mar 23

Sunday, Mar 24

Warwick Elementary School 3375 Warwick Rd., Fremont (510) 793-8660 ext. 56025

Rana Holi 2013 $

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Music at the Mission: Salon Series Presents $R

Friday, Mar 22 - Saturday, Mar 23

Pocahontas

Fri: 7 p.m. Sat: 1 p.m.

Friday, Mar 22

Toddler Ramble: Land Animals of the Marsh

10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Exploration for kids ages 1 – 3

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Friday, Mar 22

Sun, Stars, Moon Hike Series: The Magnetic Sun

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Enjoy a short hike & fun science stories

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Mar 23

Spring Fever Dance $

8 p.m.

Celebrate the Hindu Festival of Colors

3 p.m.

Cordoza Park Kennedy Dr. & N. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas (408) 359-7262 http://rana.org/Holi.html

Katherine & Alison Lee, Pianists

Mission San Jose Museum 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-8186 www.musicatmsj.org

Saturday, Mar 23

Sunday, Mar 24

Easter Bunny

Special Musical Matinee & Reception $

12 noon - 3 p.m. Meet the Easter Bunny, face painting & prizes

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Saturday, Mar 23

Sunday, Mar 24

Pregnancy Petite Retreat $R

Leopard Shark Feeding Frenzy

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Childbirth preparation event

Kids feed aquarium animals

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 342-3263

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturday, Mar 23

E-Waste Recycling Event

Dressy attire recommended Crowne Plaza Hotel 777 Bellew Dr., Milpitas (415) 507-9962

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

What’s Up Big Band $

7:30 p.m. 18-piece dance band

California Conservatory Theater 999 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org Saturday, Mar 23

Chinese Parenting Class Conducted in Madarin

3:30 p.m. Discuss early childhood development ages 0-5 years

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

“The Cover Story: Album Art”

Fremont Hub 39261 Fremont Hub, Fremont (800) 762-1641

Single professionals of all ages

Saturday, Mar 23

2 p.m.

Monday, Mar 25

Open Mic Night

Support local Boy Scouts

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

James Logan High School 1800 H Street, Union City (408) 857-2094

Writers & poets read their work

Round Table Pizza 1744 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 857-6722


March 19, 2013

THEATRE REVIEW

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 23

Bye Bye Birdie

SUBMITTED BY P.R. LEVEY “Bye Bye Birdie” is practically a rite of passage in the world of high school musicals. It’s hard to believe, but there are people in their 70s now who were in their high school productions of “Birdie,” and today, teens all over the world are still putting on their poodle skirts or slicking back their hair to take the trip to Sweet Apple, Ohio. Now it’s Irvington Conservatory Theatre’s turn to bring this beloved, iconic musical to the stage, performing at Valhalla Theatre in Fremont, March 7-23. This smartly-designed production is both an homage to, and a comment on the mythical idyllic life of teens in small town America in the 1950s. Blending distinctly 21st-century technology, like robotic lighting and big-screen video, with the familiar ‘50s look gives the production a fresh, modern feel. The open sets are modular, multi-level, and a sleek silver, with delightful vintage furniture and props popping in and out to create a typical 50s kitchen, a small-town Tiki bar, or a perfect “Mad Men” New York office. Irvington’s production is sophisticated and cheeky. Video clips, which intermingle historic footage with additional material from the cast, occasionally throw jarring images at us to remind us that the nostalgic 1950s were, in retrospect, a pretty scary time. Nothing is scary in Sweet Apple, though, and the beloved story of fifteen year old Kim MacAfee (winsome and perfectly-cast senior Katie Kelly, most recently seen at Irvington in The Diviners), who just got “pinned” to the wonderfully dorky Hugo Peabody (freshman Tim Sanders, who audiences may remember as Huck Finn in StarStruck Theatre’s Tom Sawyer last year) learning that she’s just been chosen at random to be kissed on national television by teen heartthrob Conrad Birdie. Conrad’s been drafted into the army, and his songwriter, Albert Peterson, at the insistence of his longtime, long-suffering secretary/girlfriend Rosie Alvarez, has written a farewell song for Conrad. The song is intended to be the ticket out of show business and into normal married life for Rosie and Albert. However, nothing goes as planned: Hugo’s jealous, Rosie is frustrated with Albert’s undying devotion to his overbearing mother, and Conrad and Kim long for a fling before settling down. Robert Ritchie is engaging as Albert Peterson, a pleasant-voiced dreamer who’s painfully henpecked by two women—he’s a man with a good heart and no spine to hold it up. As Rosie, Jennica Christman

is an inspired choice. She represents everything that women were fighting for at the time – and to this day - in a single character. She’s a scorned woman, a career woman, an ethnic minority, and a single woman in a man’s world, and she deals with every one of these issues in the space of two hours. Without a hint of the abrasiveness or desperation seen in other Rosies, Jennica Christman shines, even through material which modern audiences may find politically incorrect. Director Scott Di Lorenzo found a dream of a Conrad Birdie in Gabriel Block. Block does not list a great deal of theatre experience in his bio, but you’d never know it from his performance. His presence is electrifying, and his smile works its magic all the way to the back row. His intensity will cause some sweaty palms in the audience. Other standouts include Savannah Riddle as Ursula, the over-the-top fangirl friend of Kim’s, Kaeo Tiwanek-Finkes, who plays Mr. MacAfee without trying to do a Paul Lynde impression and still makes him funny, 14-year-old Molly O’Donnell, who doesn’t look a day over 28, camping her way through the role of Gloria Rasputin, and Lauren D’Ambrosio as Mrs. Mae Peterson, Albert’s mother, who brings down the house in the second act with her number (which was added to the show for the Broadway revival a few years ago) “A Mother Doesn’t Matter Anymore.” Irvington’s production boasts a strong ensemble, and they have an unusual plethora of talented boys to round out the cast. The girls hold their own, too, with lovely harmonies one moment and wild screams the next. Director Di Lorenzo has wisely kept the screaming to the bare minimum. The young directing team of Di Lorenzo, and husband and wife team of Jennifer and Chris Olson as vocal director and choreographer, respectively, have a lot to be proud of. They’ve breathed some freshness into a chestnut of a show that could easily become a parody of itself. Along with musical director Charlie Rodda and his enormous, 30+ piece onstage orchestra (an innovative feat in itself ) it’s possible to get excited about “Bye Bye Birdie” again. Bye Bye Birdie performs at Irvington High School’s Valhalla Theatre March 14, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, and 23. Thursday-Saturday curtain is at 7:30 p.m., Sunday matinees at 2:00. Ticket prices range from $12-$20; all seats on Thursday evenings are $10. For more information, see www.irvingtondrama.com.

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM SUBMITTED BY DEBBIE CARAVALHO Join the Viola Blythe Center on a fun getaway to the Black Oak Casino in Tuolumne. Board the bus on Saturday, March 30 and enjoy food and refreshments, bingo, raffle, and auction excitement on the ride, followed by the chance to win big at the casino. The Viola Blythe Center is a non-profit agency providing the needy of Newark, Fremont, and Union City with emergency food and clothing. Supported by local businesses, churches, schools, organizations, and individuals, the agency feeds peo-

ple year round, distributing thousands of pounds of fresh produce each week to those in need. Help them help others by purchasing your ticket today! Black Oak Casino Trip Saturday, Mar 30 7:30 am. Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 673-3016 Tickets: $30

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change Tuesday, March 19 10:00 – 11:00 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, March 20 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, March 21 9:30 – 10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:30 – 10:50 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 1:55 – 2:20 Daycare Center Visit - SAN LORENZO 2:45 – 3:40 Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., SAN LORENZO Monday, March 25 10:00 – 10:25 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 10:25 – 10:50 Peace Academy, Peace Terrace, FREMONT 1:30 – 2:00 Acacia Creek Retirement

Community, 34400 Mission Blvd., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:45 Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Lane, FREMONT 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, March 26 9:45–10:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT Wednesday, March 27 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, March 20 1:45 - 3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15 - 3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Mitty ends Cougar season (again) in NorCal opener SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW March 9, 2013 could have been a day of triumph for the Newark Memorial Cougars as they faced last year’s post-season nemesis Archbishop Mitty in the first round of NorCal competition. At the start of

the game, things were looking good for the Cougars as Joey Frenchwood opened up with barrage of 3pointers, three in the first quarter, and added 13 points in the second. Great Cougar team defense forced 15 turnovers early allowing a double-digit Cougar lead in the first quarter.

With just three minutes left the second quarter, the host Archbishop Mitty Monarchs regrouped and made a run of their own, slowly breaking through the Newark defense with their biggest offensive weapon, Forward Aaron Gordon. Gordon drew double and sometimes triple coverage, allowing outside shooting. The Monarchs slowly fought their way back into the game as they closed the Newark lead to 29-26 at halftime. As the third quarter progressed, it became clear that the end of the Newark Cougar season was in jeopardy as momentum started to swing in favor of Mitty. When 6-foot-8 Aaron Gordon, ranked 5th in the nation, finally broke through the Newark defense, the Monarchs began to run the court at will. The Cougars were unable to stop the Mitty Express. The Monarch offense, stifled in the first half of the game began to stir and they scored 15 points in the third quarter to open an insurmountable lead. Gordon led Mitty with 14 points, 17 rebounds and four assists, most in the second half. Final score: Mitty 63, Newark Memorial 51 Although eliminated from further competition in 2013, the Cougar team was a dominant force on the hardwood this year and look forward to another winning season of hoops next year.

Softball

Ohlone beats arch rivals PHOTO BY DON JEDLOVEC The Lady Renegades got a boost to their 2013 season on Friday, March 8 with a shutout of arch rivals and last year’s Conference Champs, College of San Mateo, 2-0. With the win, the Lady Renegades are now 4-2 in Conference play.

Letter to the Editor

Remembering Coach “I” Earlier this month one of the people I personally respected passed away. His memory will be revered by everyone that came in contact with him no matter whether you were a student, parent of a student or an educator. I am sure anyone that came in contact with Coach “I”, as he was fondly called, could come up with a story about Coach. I met him several times as my son played under Jim for Washington High School and Coach would frequent Dino’s Restaurant in Fremont. He did everything necessary for his players to learn the sport of football. I remember my son coming home telling me Coach

had busted a clipboard over his helmet. He could remember nearly all the players he ever coached. I called Coach “I” once and talked to him about my son’s school work when he was doing poorly and he told me he would help. Heck, I thought to myself that if I had played ball in high school I would have wanted a coach like him as my teacher and meeting him after one of the last games I really felt as if I HAD played for him. Rest in peace, Coach I. You are gone but will never be forgotten. Conrad Bloom Fremont


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

BY STEVE TAYLOR

O

ne local sports shop is enjoying a golden age of sorts. Archery Only in Newark just expanded their indoor shooting range and pro shop to accommodate the new interest in their sport. The expansion, nearly doubling the size of the shop and completed late last year, was necessary to accommodate the flood of new archers coming in after seeing bow-slinging heroes in blockbuster movies like “The Hunger Games”, “Brave” and the TV series “Arrow” on the CW. “Last couple of years it (archery) just exploded,” Wayne Piersol, owner of Archery Only for the past 23 years explained. “Young girls and boys come in after seeing the movies, then buy a starter bow and setup. And plenty of them come back to practice.” For $25, you can rent all the necessary archery equipment (Bow, Arrows, Finger Tab, Arm Guard) and get an hour on the range to play “Merida”, “Katniss”, or any noble archer you’d like. Bring your own equipment and the lane rental is just $10/hour. With 12, twenty-yard indoor lanes, the store hosts Olympic style target shooting and Bowhunting events weekly, as well as supervised instructions for the young and old. On scheduled days, you might see the Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, a birthday party, the disabled/handicapped and even a handful of “visually impaired” or special events for the blind. Archery Only typically runs two leagues: a “Vegas” target shooting grouping that runs October to February, and a Bow Hunting League that simulates hunting conditions shooting from elevated stands at cushioned,

life-like animal figures February through May. The Beginner’s League is just that and starts whenever a dozen sign up. Few businesses can claim steadily growing revenues over these past three economically tough years, but this recreational venture is one of them. Piersol said the shop’s annual income, including bow, equipment sales and service as well as range fees “usually make in the six figures.” That’s a lot of arrows downrange! Piersol credits his personal touch and “hands on” approach to explain Archery Only’s success where ranges offering the same product have failed in the area. He said, “a few years ago, there were about10 archery shops in the South Bay. Now, there are three.” This approach was on display over and over as Piersol abruptly ditched an interviewer to tend to customers, calling each by name. Although startup costs can be high, Archery Only’s beginner’s kits start at under $200, and learning the craft can be relatively cheap. Arrows can be reused for years and for the price of a few hay bales to stop them and 60 feet of backyard space, you’ve got your own range. Plus, there are five outdoor ranges within an hour drive of the Tri-Cities offering FREE access to archers. “It’s like buying golf clubs, which aren’t cheap, then being able to skip the green’s fees”, Piersol adds. Links for directions to the public outdoor ranges can be found at their website: archeryonly.com Archery Only 37300 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 795-0460 Mon – Fri: 12 p.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES

Happenings Tri City Voice Date: Feb. 01, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2455295#

ESCROW NO: 11273-PD DATE: March 14, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (SECS. 6104, 6105 U.C.C. & B & P 24073 et seq.) Notice is hereby given to creditors of the within named seller that a sale that may constitute a bulk sale has been or will be made. The individuals, partnership, or corporate names and the business addresses of the seller are: Ashok Adrian Singh 31887 Alvarado Blvd, Union City, CA 94587 The individuals, partnership, or corporate names and the business addresses of the buyer are: Ephrem Solomon and Awot Gebre 1934 9th Ave #A, Oakland, CA 94606 As listed by the seller, all other business names and addresses used by the seller within three years before the date such list was sent or delivered to the buyer are: NONE KNOWN The assets sold or to be sold are described in general as: ALL FURNITURE, FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, TRADENAME, GOODWILL, LEASE, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS, COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE, ABC LICENSE & ALL OTHER ASSETS OF THE BUSINESS KNOWN AS: Bob's Quick Shop Beer & Wine AND ARE LOCATED AT: 31887 Alvarado Blvd, Union City, CA 94587. (a) The place, and date on or after which, the Bulk Sale is to be consummated: Business & Escrow Service Center, Inc. 3031 Tisch Way, Suite 310 San Jose, CA 95128 on or before 4/5/2013. (b) The last date to file claims is 4/4/2013, unless there is a liquor license transferring in which case claims may be filed until the date the license transfers. BUYER'S SIGNATURE: Ephrem Solomon Awot Gebre 3/19/13 CNS-2459774#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13670378 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Logeshkumaar Paramaswaran to Logesh Nathanael Kumaar The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 5-31-2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Mar. 8, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2457330# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13669870 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Shiva Swaminathan & Suganthini Shiva-Swaminathan parents, on behalf of Shaini and Abishayan minors for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Suganthini R. Shiva-Swaminathan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Suganthini Rajeswaran Shiva-Swaminathan to Suganthini Sugi-Rajeswaran Shiva Shaini Saras Shiva Swaminathan to Shaini SarasValli Shiva Abishayan Rajes Shiva Swaminathan to Abishayan Abi-Thamba Shiva The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 05/24/13, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amado Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri-City Voice Date: Mar. 05, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2455300# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13665777 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Chi Fong Yip for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Chi Fong Yip filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Chi Fong Yip to Francisco Yip The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Fri 4/26/2013, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG13669256 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Jacob A Paine for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Jacob Anthony Paine to Jacob Anthony Moller The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Fri 5/24/2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happening Tri City Voice Date: Feb 28, 2013 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2454359#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475766 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bombay Pizza House, 4922 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda; 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 G & G Food Inc., 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587; California This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gursewak Singh Gill, CEO/Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 7, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2459091#

The One Construction, 2755 Country Dr. #135, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Brandon Hyok Lee, 2755 Country Dr. #135, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 02/26/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Brandon Hyok Lee This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 28, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/12, 3/19, 3/26, 4/2/13 CNS-2454358#

Aone Beauty Saloon, 4927 Mansbury St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ranjita Khadka, 4927 Mansbury St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Feb. 15th, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ranjita Khadka This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 15, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/26, 3/5, 3/12, 3/19/13 CNS-2449125#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475414 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MZ Limousine, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555,County of Alameda Muhammad Z Rafique, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Sumreen Zafar, 4171 Greenland Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by married couple The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 02/27/13 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Muhammad Rafique This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 27, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2452882#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 474697 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: K-Pop Cafe, 3504 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Edward Y. Choi, 3610 Andrews Dr. #312, Pleasanton, CA 94588 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 2/7/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Edward Y. Choi, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 7, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/26, 3/5, 3/12, 3/19/13 CNS-2448455#

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 437115 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Green Cleaning Solutions, 3963 Southampton Ter., Fremont, CA 94555 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on April 12, 2010 in the County of Alameda. Sonia Vazquez, 33030 Lake Mead Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business was conducted by: S/ Sonia Vazquez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 25, 2013. 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2451664#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475932 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Virtual Associate, 2411 Jackson St., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 1033, Fremont, CA 94538 Navneet Pannu, 244 Jackson St., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on January 1, 2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Navneet Pannu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 11, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2458304#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475160 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kyrin International Trading Company, 46228 Warm Springs Blvd., #420, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Shaolong Qu, 46228 Warm Springs Blvd., #420, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shaolong Qu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2450425#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475274 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Amaran Consulting, 38524 Athy Ct., Fremont, CA 94836, County of Alameda Ami Jagdish Biligiri, 38524 Athy Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ami J. Biligiri This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 25, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/19, 3/26, 4/2, 4/9/13 CNS-2457465#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475143 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Realty One Group American, 42820 Albrae St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda American Realty & Business Corp., 42820 Albrae St., Fremont, CA 94538; CA This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mohinder Pal Singh, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 21, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26/13 CNS-2450423#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 475437 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 474973 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Letter to the Editor

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 473980 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Five Star Massage, 21915 Foothill Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Xiuli Wu, 1639 9th Avenue, Oakland, CA 94606 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Xiuli Wu This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 17, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/26, 3/5, 3/12, 3/19/13 CNS-2447866#

from the list of conditional uses allowed in the ML Zoning District; 3) Remove “Union halls” from the list of principal permitted uses and add to the list of conditional uses allowed in the MS Zoning District; and 4) Add “Transit and passenger railroad stations” to the list of conditional uses in the MS Zoning District The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on March 12, 2013. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was read and adopted on March 12, 2013, is available on the City's website at: http: //lf2.unioncity.org/weblink8/0/fol/112/Row1.aspx. A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on March 12, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Ellis, Gacoscos, and Navarro, Vice Mayor Duncan, Mayor DutraVernaci NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Carol Dutra-Vernaci CAROL DUTRA-VERNACI, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 3/19/13 CNS-2458744# Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be accepted in the office of the Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #9002013ETX Environmental Treatment/ Safety Device Installation Thursday, March 28, 2013, 2:00 PM and Friday, March 29, 2013, 10:00 AM, Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite #300, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 PM on April 19, 2013 County Contact: Dennis Jordan at (510) 567-6852 or via email: dennis.jordan@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 3/19/13 CNS-2457502# PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE FY 2013-2022 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Union City will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 14, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 34009 AlvaradoNiles Road, Union City, California, regarding the following matter: UNION CITY TRANSIT SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN, which includes a study of existing service conditions, ridership, service and fare recommendations, and capital, operating and financial plans for both the fixed-route bus and paratransit services. Members of the public are invited to view a copy of the Plan and to submit comments. Copies of the Plan are available for review at the Information Counter at City Hall (34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California), at the Union City Public Library, at the Holly Center, at the Sports Center, and on the City's website www.uctransit.org/. Send all questions and comments to: Steve Adams, Transit Planner City of Union City 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road Union City, California 94587 Phone: (510) 675-5446 Facsimile: (510) 675-9885 E-mail: transit@unioncity.org At the conclusion of the Public Hearing, the City Council will act to adopt the Union City Transit Short Range Plan, either as initially presented, or as amended pursuant to the comments and discussion which take place during the Public Hearing. Date: 3/11/13 3/19/13 CNS-2457249#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that public hearings will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications: Use Permit (UP-13-005) The applicant, Sealed Air, is seeking Use Permit (UP-13-005) approval for on-site storage of hazardous materials in quantities that categorize the use as a large storage plant as defined in Chapter 18.40 of the Municipal Code. The project site is located at 2877 Volpey Way (APN: 463-0045-08502), which is located in the ML, Light Industrial, Zoning District. Notice is also given that this project is exempt under Section 15301, Class 1, Existing Facilities, of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING Thursday, April 4, 2013 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. For further information on the above application, contact Avalon Schultz, Senior Planner, at (510) 675-5321. Written comments regarding this project should be received by the Planning Division prior to Thursday, April 4, 2013. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. Joan Malloy Economic and Director 3/19/13

Community

Development

CNS-2459603# ORDINANCE NO. 774-13 ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY APPROVING MUNICIPAL CODE TEXT AMENDMENT, AT-13-001, TO: 1) Remove “Professional trade schools and colleges”, “Transit and passenger railroad stations”, and “Union halls” from the list of principal permitted uses allowed in the ML Zoning District; 2) Remove “Health services”

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES /NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 27th Day of March 2013 at or after 12: 00 p m pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Melissa Gaither AA1609A 8/6/12 Timothy Ferman AA1930C 10/29/12 Matthew Gracia AA4687B 1/5/13 Venencio Torres B137 1/17/13 Eseta Tuakihekolo B156 9/30/12 Rosa Arreola B242 1/10/13 Sergio Hernandez B296 1/2/13 Brianna Hill B316 10/10/12 Tiffany Brooks-Dumont C119 12/22/12 Vincent Wu C125 11/23/12 Michael Topper C127 12/31/12 Anita Acosta C179 11/7/12 Elizabeth Teo C291 11/5/12 Danielle McGraw C303 1/9/13 3/12, 3/19/13 CNS-2455444# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 27th of March, 2013 at or after11:15 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Fremont, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Matthew Brady 191 9/29/12 Rufus Davis Jr. 279U 11/27/12 Cathryn Kittrell 301 12/29/12 Eswarudu Merugumala 302 1/4/13 Lorenzo Smiley 305 1/17/23 Jennifer Byrne 335 12/29/12 Sue Pokart 336 11/21/12 Emmanuel Coa 341 12/15/12 Rigoberto Valle 346 10/5/12 Serge Kalombo MM413 11/23/12 3/12, 3/19/13 CNS-2455436#

Posting rules at Fremont Parks

I believe rules for neighborhood parks should be posted at neighborhood parks. I have previously suggested such posting in a letter to the City Attorney: FMC Sec. 4-9100 . . . “The Fremont City Council finds that nuisances can be avoided with effective property management . . . .” Sec 4-9110, and others.

years and years, Fremont City Council has allowed our neighborhood streets to be used as changing rooms for sports recreational use! What kind of discouragement to perverts is this? I suggest to you, our elected fiduciaries acting on behalf of the voting citizens in your electorate, posting conditions granting permission to use a NEIGHBORHOOD park.

The City owns parks, streets, and sidewalks in nearly all instances. Our elected fiduciaries for voting citizens manage such facilities or delegate authority to others to do so, on their behalf. While such authority can be delegated, the responsibility for that function cannot be delegated. We have had incidents of school children in Warm Springs recently being approached inappropriately. Yet, for

• Park closed 30 minutes past sunset to dawn. • Noise abatement rules strictly enforced sunrise to 9 a.m. every morning. • Consumption of alcoholic beverages prohibited. • A “No-Smoking” ordinance is in effect. No smoking allowed on park grounds or on public sidewalks. (Surely people won’t stand in the middle of the street to smoke??)

• Trespassing on private property prohibited. • Park users prohibited from parking on residents’ side of the street. • Changing into sports attire (removal of shirt, trousers, or pants of any kind including shorts) while on public park grounds, streets and sidewalks near a public park, or in any vehicle parked on such streets where persons can see inside, prohibited except in a restroom if provided for such purposes and under other specific conditions (as in sweatsuits when already clothed in playing attire underneath or in a medical emergency). Faye McKay Fremont


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

Take a deep breath consultant argued against residential or mixed use development, stating that the residential component of mixed use does not necessarily attract customers to support the retail component. Maybe the downtown project will be different and city employees who live in other municipalities of Bay Area will flock to Fremont’s downtown within walking distance of City Hall. The concept could include a requirement that those who plan the area, should live in it. Inclusionary housing would truly be inclusive!

WILLIAM MARSHAK

T

he long anticipated construction of a downtown civic center for Fremont may be about to take shape. Along with peripheral high-rise development under construction on Walnut Avenue, the City is now about to dive, headfirst, into building a main thoroughfare along Capitol Avenue. Following notable false starts such as plans for a collapsible entertainment stage in the middle of the street and the infamous back-in parking experiment, Fremont will work with Development manager TMG Partners who proposes to begin with two “first-class residential buildings with street retail and other nonresidential uses along Capitol Avenue.” Mixed use is alive and well in Fremont; residential development is the Fremont downtown linchpin these days. Ironically, in a recent discussion of development plans for the vacant Central Chevrolet site, City planners and their

The City of Fremont has been preparing, hiring consultants, setting money aside and buying property along the Capitol Avenue corridor for years with little to show for it except annual dog and pony shows at council meetings that, at times, approached hilarity. Except for the dark depression days of recent years, millions have been deposited in a downtown fund even as other services were reduced or eliminated. Hopefully, adherence to the downtown dream may culminate with success. However, entrepreneurs – many of whom no longer have businesses – that invested in close by retail enterprises and others who succumbed to big promises (i.e. Centerville Unified Site, Irvington Monument Center, Gaslight Square, etc.) will take a deep breath and watch. An outline of the amended Memorandum of Understanding notes that this initial project will “establish the community’s expectations.” In glowing planspeak, it goes on to say that “architectural design, generous amenities” will

“embody the urban experience the new Downtown is intended to offer, infusing the neighborhood with a new vitality.” Although shaky at best, an economic upturn may be in sight. The City is now poised to plunge in and, as the TMG proposal states, make “a significant investment of institutional capital in Downtown, which should catalyze additional investment in the Plan area going forward.” With stars in their eyes and City machinery firmly focused on glorious and glamorous Downtown and Warm Springs BART developments, will the City of Fremont break an established pattern of words, studies and consultant fees followed by neglect? Will the City give the same consideration to Fremont’s historic districts? A schedule of negotiations and agreements outlined by TMG culminates with the beginning of construction in Spring 2014. As the TMG report notes, “Milestones are still in the process of being refined.” Let’s hope this isn’t a misprint and doesn’t represent a millstone around our necks as we struggle to breathe.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2013® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

March 19, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

Become a hospice patient care volunteer!

Mission San Jose For Rent: Professional Office in Bldg with other Professionals Ideal For Tax Service/Accounting/ Law/Real Estate/Insurance 1 large office, secretarial area, common use of conference room

Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

510-490-1100

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info

We want to buy empty Lot 25,000 sft to 100,000 sft empty or commercial, retail or school building. Built area may be 4000 sft to 15000 sft. Please contact Gary Grewal at 510-409-2049 Email at gary grewal@hotmail.com.

Great Rates! Great Results Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

Estate Sale

Systems Analysts level I and II in Fremont,C A, develop IT solutions. Fax resume 510-790-3301 HIR SamePage Information Solutions Inc.

March 22,23 & 24th 9:00 to 5:00 Linens, clothes, kitchenware, home deco, lamps, furniture & more. Please park in visitors parking .No on street parking allowed. No earlies, cash only. No bills over $20.00. Basaro M.H. Park 4141 Deep Creek Rd. SPACE 168 Fremont

HELP WANTED Tri-City Voice Newspaper Part time delivery people needed 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

BOOTH RENTALS

Upon Naturalization dated 23rd May 2008, my name appears in my former Indian passport as Bala Murali Krishna Kanugula son of Rama Murty Kanugula, now appears as Bala Kanugula in my current US passport

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Salon Both Rental Available First Month FREE Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

49ers partner with SunPower SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski, whose 25th Assembly District includes the City of Santa Clara and SunPower Corp., praised the San Francisco 49ers’ decision to partner with SunPower on the new Santa Clara Stadium. The 49ers announced they named SunPower the official and exclusive solar technology partner for the stadium. SunPower will supply 400 kilowatts of its high effi-

ciency solar panels that will generate electricity to offset the power consumed by the stadium during the 49ers home games. “By partnering with SunPower, Jed York and the 49ers are again demonstrating their commitment to building a stateof-the art, energy-efficient stadium for Santa Clara and Silicon Valley,” said Wieckowski, the former co-chair of the state Assembly’s Select Committee on California’s Clean Energy Economy. “Not only will this result in helping to power a Na-

tional Football League stadium with solar energy but it is also another boost to our local economy. SunPower symbolizes the valley’s innovative spirit and support for a sustainable future.” The stadium will seat about 68,500 fans and contain 165 luxury suites. In addition to being the future home of the 49ers, the stadium will host concerts, soccer, college football and other activities. Since his election to the Assembly in 2010, Wieckowski has strongly supported an

array of alternative energy programs throughout the state. He successfully pushed legislation to streamline the state’s Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology program. The reform gets funding to companies more efficiently and quickly to put more clean vehicles on the road. “California is the national leader in solar power jobs and this partnership will only enhance our state’s primary role by teaming up on such a high-profile project,” Wieckowski said.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 12

Support grows for modifying California environment law tions that prevent harmful consequences while giving the public information about potential changes to their neighborhoods and business districts. Yet the law also can tie up building proposals for years. Reform advocates cite numerous examples of project opponents using the law to halt, rather than fix, development proposals. Business leaders who have raised those concerns in the past are bolstered this time by groups supporting affordable housing, mass transit and public works. Their coalition, the CEQA Working Group, highlights an analysis by the San Francisco law firm Holland & Knight, which examined published cases between 1997 and 2012. The review concluded that few challenges targeted industrial projects, while many targeted socalled urban infill projects and other environmentally minded proposals. “We’re not for taking away anyone’s right to make sure CEQA is available,’’ said Carl Guardino, the coalition’s cochairman and president of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. “We want to make sure it’s not being abused.’’ Supporters of the current law cite a study by the state attorney general’s office that examined challenges filed in San Francisco during the final six months of 2011. Of the 5,203 city and county projects reviewed under the environmental law, just 18 resulted in lawsuits, the study found. Among recent challenges filed under the law is one regarding Cordova Hills, a proposed development east of Sacramento. Developers have defended their plan for 8,000 housing units and commercial development as abiding by strict criteria, but two environmental groups have objected to the project as promoting sprawl in a way that is incompatible with regional planning efforts. Advocates say the right to express concerns about a development project must be preserved if changes to the law are considered. “CEQA gives every Californian a right to weigh in,’’ Sarah

Rose, chief executive of the California League of Conservation Voters, said during a recent news conference to announce a coalition of the law’s supporters. “Those who would like to see California’s environmental laws deregulated seem to want to silence that voice.’’ The debate also is important to city and county officials, who generally favor development but try to balance it against protecting open spaces and the integrity of their communities. The California State Association of Counties is compiling a set of policy proposals to be released later this spring. It is expected to detail some of the ambiguities faced by the agencies that review development projects to ensure they comply with the law. Brown has said he wants reasonable changes to a law he has called “a land mine that often blocks things,’’ but he has offered no details on the fixes he would like. Democratic lawmakers in the state Senate are leading the overhaul efforts but also have offered few specifics. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, introduced a bill outlining general areas he intends to address, including easing the process for projects within urban areas and preventing opponents from delaying a project by filing thousands of pages of documents as court deadlines approach. Detailed bill language could be taken up by the Senate Environmental Quality Committee by late April. The committee’s incoming chairman, Sen. Jerry Hill of San Mateo, is working with Steinberg on the proposal. Recounting how he gasped for air during high school football practices in the Bay Area, he said environmental improvements in the years since then illustrate the law’s influence. Still, Hill said he supports finding a way to eliminate the “background noise’’ of lawsuits that blur the distinction between legitimate environmental concerns and peripheral issues. “It’s created delays and distractions from the environmental regulations that we cherish,’’ he said of the act’s evolution.

New search engine tailors its result for tablets BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER SAN FRANCISCO (AP), The makers of Blekko believe they’ve built a great alternative to Google, but they’re also realistic. They know their two-year-old Internet search engine won’t ever supplant Google as the most popular place to search on laptop and desktop computers. But Web surfing on tablet computers is a different matter, creating an opportunity that Blekko hopes to exploit with a new product called Izik – a search engine designed especially for Apple Inc.’s iPads and tablets running on Google’s Android software. Izik, whose name is a riff on 17th-century scientist Isaac Newton, debuted Friday with the release of free apps for the iPad and Android tablets. To cater to the more visual format of tablets, Izik displays search results in rows of information capsules that can be easily scrolled with a swipe of a finger. Users scroll vertically to look at different categories related to a search request. Scrolling horizontally displays more capsules within each category, which vary depending on the request. Blekko CEO and founder Rich Skrenta likens the experience to a hybrid service that is part search engine, part magazine and part discovery tool. Izik also shares some similarities to a tablet search app called Axis that longtime Google rival Yahoo Inc. released last May in an attempt to shake up the market. Like Izik, Axis also relies on visual thumbnails to list search results. Izik’s system is much different from Google’s. Entering ``Apple’’ into Izik on Friday produced a set of results sorted into these easily navigable categories: ``Top Results,’’ ``Images,’’ `’Recipes,’’ `’News,’’ `’Reviews,’’ and ``Tech.’’ Most of the information and pictures either pertained to Apple the company or the fruit. Searching for the term at Google generated a map pinpointing the location of several nearby Apple stores. The rest of the results page was mostly devoted to a stack of blue links to other websites – a familiar format that has become the industry standard.

Page 29

Governor Brown releases judicial appointment data SUBMITTED BY GOVERNOR’S OFFICE Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. has released applicant and appointee data for the administration’s 2012 judicial appointments. Since Governor Brown took office, there have been a total of 1,168 applicants for judicial appointments and 90 appointments. Women accounted for about one-third of the applicant pool and more than 34% of Governor Brown’s judicial appointees. Approximately 34% of the applicant pool identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Black or African-American; Hispanic; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; or Other/Unknown and 37% of Governor Brown’s appointees were from these groups in his first two years in office. Like 2011, Governor Brown’s 2012 judicial appointees included a number of notable firsts: • Halim Dhanidina, the first American-Muslim judge ever appointed in California • Jim Humes, the first openly gay justice to serve on the California Court of Appeal • Miguel Marquez, the first Latino justice to serve on the Sixth District Court of Appeal • Rosendo Peña, the first Latino justice to serve on the Fifth District Court of Appeal • Chris Doehle, the first female judge to serve on the Del Norte County Superior Court • Kimberly Colwell, the first openly lesbian judge to be appointed to the Alameda County Superior Court • Mark Andrew Talamantes, the first Latino judge to serve on the Marin County Superior Court • This is also the first time in the state’s history that a Latino/a is serving on all six Courts of Appeal in California. Under SB 56 and SB 182, the Governor is required to disclose aggregate statewide demographic data provided by all judicial applicants by March 1.

Kickoff meeting for Relay for Life SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL RITCHIE The American Cancer Society Relay For Life is a 24-hour community celebration where individuals and teams camp out, barbecue, dance, laugh, love, share, and take turns walking around a track relay style to raise funds to fight cancer and to help those battling cancer. At nightfall, participants will light hundreds of luminaria around the track in a moving ceremony to honor cancer survivors as well as friends and family. Union City Relay For Life is announcing the Kickoff for the 2013 Event, to be held on Tuesday, March 26. Last year, Union City’s Relay event raised $93,000! Past team captains and participants are invited to the meeting and new folks are welcome as well. There will

be food, prizes, and fun and an opportunity to learn more about the 2013 Relay for Life. Every team captain attending the kick off rally will receive a prize. Onsite team signups will be available. For more information, contact Union City Relay Chair Charmaine Banther at newha?venta@?aol.?com or (510) 363-9009. Relay for Life Kickoff Meeting Tuesday, Mar 26 7 p.m. Mountain Mike’s Pizza Union Landing 32170 Dyer St., Union City (510) 363-9009. www.relayforlife.org/unioncityca

Fremont student earns national recognition

Rohan Chandra shakes hands with his school principal for receiving the Distinguished Finalist Award from Prudential Spirit of Community Awards

SUBMITTED BY ANNIE TASKER PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHA CHANDRA Rohan Chandra of Fremont, a senior at The Harker School, was presented with an engraved bronze medallion to recognize his selection as a Distinguished Finalist in the 2013 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program. The award accompanied a letter from the office of President Barack Obama, congratulating Chandra for his accomplishment. Chandra was honored for creating the “Earthquake Preparedness for Seniors” project, for which he wrote and distributed 1,000 multilingual earth-

quake safety guides in Spanish, Farsi, Mandarin and Hindi and English, to an older immigrant population in our earthquake-prone region. Rohan recruited a group of 50 volunteers and raised more than $12,000 to support his project, and also assembled and distributed 250 earthquake kits to the most needy of seniors in his community. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, conducted by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), represents the United States’ largest youth recognition program based exclusively on volunteer community service. For more information, visit http://spirit.prudential.com

But Skrenta believes search will have to change as more people become tablet owners and start to use them more frequently than their laptop computers. With more than 100 million of the devices already sold since the iPad’s April 2010 debut, tablets already have contributed to declining sales of traditional PCs and printers. Skrenta is betting it’s only a matter of time before the technological upheaval triggered by tablets hits the search market and people start to break their Googling habits. Google so far has been able to extend its dominance to tablets, largely because its search engine is the builtin option on the iPad and most Android devices. But the algorithms and format that Google uses on tablets and laptops are basically the same. Skrenta doubts Google will switch to a format as dramatically different as Izik’s approach because it still makes most of its money from online advertising displayed on traditional PCs. The tendency to stick with a long-established product that is still bringing most of a company’s money while challengers are introducing

breakthroughs that threaten the status quo is sometimes referred to the ``innovator’s dilemma.’’ Blekko’s namesake search engine also sought to address a problem that Skrenta didn’t think was being adequately addressed by Google. By relying on humans to highlight the most useful information under frequently searched topics, Blekko, which is based in Redwood Shores, California, tries to remove the rogue websites that have learned to how to manipulate search formulas to gain a prominent ranking in search results. Although Blekko began working on its technology five years ago, its search engine didn’t debut until late 2010. About four months after that, Google unveiled sweeping changes to its search algorithm in an effort to reduce the rubbish showing up in its results. Although its search engine has yet to undercut Google’s dominance, Blekko has attracted a loyal following. It draws about 12 million monthly visitors and has raised about $50 million in venture capital from a group of investors that includes actor Ashton Kutcher and Yandex, a Russian search engine that is more popular in its home country than Google.


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Places of Worship” is published on the first Tuesday of every month. Faith-based organizations that have agreed to distribute Tri-City Voice to their congregations are included. A complete list of all greater Tri-City faith-based organizations can be found at: www.tricityvoice.com under “Community Resources.”

BY BY STEVE TAYLOR

D

aniel was bent over at the waist, eyes squeezed in pain, sweat beading on his forehead under a protective visor. But the technician in his late 20’s, who works on cell towers for a living, is smiling happily mid-day on a Wednesday. Twice each week, Daniel and men from all walks of life, and an occasional lady, gather to play pickup ice hockey at the Sharks Ice At Fremont, the only ice rink in the Tri-Cities. Most in the Greater Tri-Cities know ice hockey at the professional level, watching the San Jose Sharks on TV, sprinting up and down the ice, passing the puck crisply, pausing only to crash into one another or fight. The half-dozen guys who showed up at a recent drop-in session were just happy to slap a puck around and stay upright.

March 19, 2013

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Any skater with a helmet, stick and shin pads can play on Wednesdays and Fridays from 11:45 to 1:15 for $13 and $15, respectively. Players have to create a free account and sign-up and pay online at the rink’s website at www.sharksiceatfremont.com. Online reviews of the rink and its various programs are mixed with hockey moms scattering complaints about the bleachers and cold temperature. One “Yelper” seemed to sum it up best a few months ago saying, “It’s okay, though for being in Fremont it is a lot less busy than the one in San Jose, which could be a good thing for many (and) the camaraderie of all the people at the arena make for a better experience.” For the working professional who needs to get in, get a sweat and get back to work, the shower facilities at the rink are clean and work well. For the rink rat with a few extra hours in the day or be-

SUBMITTED BY WENDY WINSTED After the successful hatching of Barn Owl eggs on camera last year, nature lovers can once again watch nature in action, peering into the secret world of Barn Owls. The Hayward Area Recreation & Park District has placed a small, unobtrusive camera inside the nesting box of a wild pair of Barn Owls at the Sulphur Creek Nature Center. Live streaming video footage of Barn Owls caring for their owlets is constantly in view. The first egg has now been laid! Visit www.haywardrec.org to watch this amazing family to be. Check back often for updates on the Barn Owls’ progress and stop by Sulphur Creek Nature Center to see where these owls like to live. This special cam has been made possible through grants and the support of HARD, Castro Valley Rotary Club, Ojo Technology and Building Knowledge. Keep checking back to see how fast these babies can grow! You can view this cam 24 hours a day. Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D Street, Hayward Owl Cam http://www.haywardrec.org/sc_owl_cam.html

Over 400 Guests Join Abode Services for Eighth Annual Journey Home Breakfast SUBMITTED BY KATIE DERRIG

“I’ve only skated a couple times in the last two years,” wheezed Robb, a 40-something electrical engineer working for a local semiconductor company. Grinning and speaking in gasps between shifts on the bench, he added, “We got real busy again but I just had to sneak in a skate on my lunch break,” then shakily swung a leg over the boards for another charge down the ice. The pick-up action is admittedly slow and sloppy, but players like Darryl don’t mind. He’s in his 50’s and works graveyard at the wastewater treatment plant. “I started playing hockey in my 30’s,” he said, “and I should be sleeping now, but I just couldn’t miss this.”

tween jobs, Stanley’s Sports bar inside has a mountain chalet look and feel, with plenty of flat screen TVs tuned to the NHL Center Ice package and serves beer, wine, juices and fountain drinks. For the advanced or more committed player, the rink has leagues for different ages and levels. Back on the ice, Anton was the youngest skater that session and acted like it. A college student, he carried the puck through the older, less skilled players until a stumbling reporter bumped him with a shoulder; hard. “Checking” or running into other players is prohibited during drop-in times but this is still hockey… even though it may not always look like it

Abode Services welcomed more than 400 people to its eighth annual Journey Home Breakfast at the Fremont Marriott on March 7. This event is intended to increase awareness of the continuing need for housing services in our community and raise funds to support Abode Services’ work to end homelessness. Several people who escaped homelessness through Abode Services programs shared their stories. Two, a young father and a recently widowed veteran, spoke of their experiences via a video presentation. A third, Trinity, appeared at the breakfast and shared her struggles to overcome addiction, complete her education, and find a home for herself and her four sons. “I’ve been on a really long journey to get to where I am today,” Trinity said of her experience with Abode Services. “There is no way I could have come this far on my own. I love my home;

Letter to the Editor

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Suite B, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Red light cameras cancelled in Hayward The Hayward City Council voted 6-1 at its March 5 meeting in favor of a resolution to cancel its photo enforcement contract with Redflex effective at the “earliest practicable time.” The current contract calls for early termination upon 10-days notice with cancellation fees ranging from $108,000 to $138,000 depending on the actual date of cancellation during the next three months. It was actually the Hayward Police who initiated the proposal to phase out photo enforcement. The motivating force seems to be that the program expenses may have been exceeding income. Numerous complaints from motorists, along with sketchy evidence as to the safety benefit, and damage to the local economy were cited as additional reasons for the decision. In the Police Report to Council, it was acknowledged that right turn tickets made up about 60% of citations but rarely were a factor in collisions. The report went on to add that right-on-red violations were never considered when entering into the contract. Rear-end accidents have clearly increased the report went on to say. Broadside collisions sometimes even went up after the cameras went on-line. Police Chief Urban said, “data was consistently inconsistent.” Roger Jones Fremont

it is a gift to me and my boys.” “Our work relies so much on support from the community, from donors and volunteers to landlords and local government officials,” said Abode Services Executive Director Louis Chicoine. “To have so many people join us for this event truly shows how committed this community is to ending homelessness and helping low-income families and individuals live a better life.” The Journey Home Breakfast was sponsored by Fremont Bank; Kaiser Permanente; Digital Nirvana, Inc.; Washington Hospital Healthcare System; Bernard, Balgley & Bonaccorsi, LLP; BKF Engineers; Devcon Construction, Inc.; Focus Business Bank; Gonsalves & Kozachenko; Hayward Tri-City Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.; and Symantec. Abode Services Board member and Fremont Planning Commissioner David Bonaccorsi emceed the event. For more information or make a donation, visit: www.abodeservices.org.

q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 31

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org You’ll find valuable information about your community & voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are nonpartisan & free to the public

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Fremont Cribbage Club

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

American Legion Auxiliary We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters

Mustang & Ford Enthusiasts Meets 1st Fri of the Month 7pm at Suju’s (Winter) 3602 Thornton, Fremont missiontrailsmustang.org or call510-493-1559 We do Car Shows & other social activities monthly

First United Methodist Church Music Series

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

T.O.P.S. Weight Support Group Take Off Pounds Sensibly Real People! Real Weight Loss!

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Serious Mental Illness Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Mar 7, 2013 from 6:30-8:30pm in Union City. Registration required. Contact: Barb St. Clair 415-879-0399 or Email Stclair.barb@gmail.com NAMIacs.org/F2F/mar2013

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area

Drivers for Survivors Need Volunteer Drivers!

Monthly meetings; interesting cultural programs. Stay in members’ homes abroad. We need home and day hosts for members from New Zealand visiting us May 17-24. www.ffsfba.org 510-794-6844

Volunteers to be companion drivers for ambulatory cancer patients to transport & accompany our clients to their life saving medical appointments. We work with your schedule. Please email volunteer@driversforsurvivors.org or call 510.579.0535

Ford F-100 Elite of Northern CA East Bay Chapter

Tri-Valley Arthritis Walk

All owners of 53-56 FORD 1/2 ton pick-up and panels are invited to join our club. Pick-ups up to 65 are welcome also. Newsletters, shows, fellowship Call Ken, 510-782-7312

Wednesday Nights 6:30 - 8:00 27303 Sleepy Hollow Ave S Kaiser Building 1st Floor Hayward RLTOPS0336@yahoo.com 207-651-0565

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

Mission Trails Mustangs

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Shout out to your community

Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Free concerts the first Sunday each month, 4pm. 30 minute organ & piano recitals & occasional guest artists. Free-will offering opportunity to benefit local charities. First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Saturday, May 4th at LifeStyleRx 1119 E. Stanley Blvd., Livermore Registration 8:00 a.m. Walk 10:00 a.m. 1 or 3 mile options, Tailgate Extravaganza, Raffle Prizes, Refreshments, Kids Activities, www.TVArthritisWalk.Kintera.org or Call (800) 464-6240

Community Seder Welcomes All! March 26th join us to celebrate Passover! RSVP req for the seder by 3/15.Night of Illusion (for all ages) 3/16 Family Shabbat services 5:30pm & 7pm on 3/22 Inclusive Reform community. 510-656-7141 or visit www.bethtorah-fremont.org

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Eagle Scout project completed

SUBMITTED BY CITY OF UNION CITY On March 2, Kyle Ritchie of Boy Scouts of America of Troop 603/876 completed his Eagle Scout project on Railroad Ave. Less than five percent of Boy Scouts become Eagle Scouts. Kyle and his volunteers planted and staked

drought tolerant and low maintenance Brachychiton rupestris trees along the right away. This tree planting connects to several other volunteer projects along the railroad tracks done by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), The Hillview Baptist Church, Union City Work Furlough pro-

gram, Irvington High School QUEST program and the Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center Promotoras. Public Works employees Robert Vera and Frank Morales help set up and assist with Kyle’s project.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Opposition to TSA knife proposal

HOME SALES REPORT

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 825,000 Median $: 500,000 Lowest $: 325,000 Average $: 542,438 ADDRESS

ZIP

5287 Crane Avenue 94546 19548 Eagle Street 94546 17301 Madison Avenue 94546 22147 Orange Avenue 94546 20095 Stanton Avenue 94546 5817 Badger Court 94552 23169 Canyon Terrace Drive #394552 20607 Glenwood Drive 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

500,000 460,000 825,000 325,000 519,000 640,500 420,000 650,000

3 3 3 3 4 4 2 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1321 1484 2352 1631 1794 1834 1258 2160

1955 1956 1949 1948 1960 1960 1996 1992

01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 26 Highest $: 1,400,000 Median $: Lowest $: 195,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

36065 Asquith Place 94536 595,000 4838 Balboa Way 94536 195,000 4664 Devonshire Common 94536 285,000 4371 Gibraltar Drive 94536 680,000 1185 Gilbert Court 94536 620,000 35658 Linda Drive 94536 595,000 3674 Oakwood Terrace #303 94536 225,000 4390 Rustica Circle 94536 455,000 4111 Wakefield Loop 94536 590,000 42342 Blacow Road 94538 325,000 5622 Greeley Place 94538 508,000 4854 Oscar Court 94538 500,000 4606 Serra Avenue 94538 540,000 3695 Stevenson Boulevard #E21194538 250,000 44 Burnham Place 94539 680,000 288 Hackamore Common 94539 332,000 124 Hackamore Lane 94539 260,000 41341 Joyce Avenue 94539 1,400,000 2330 Olive Avenue 94539 880,000 1087 Sundance Drive 94539 1,280,000 4677 Celia Court 94555 830,000 34159 Via Lucca 94555 455,000 34171 Via Lucca 94555 562,000 34177 Via Lucca 94555 607,000 34183 Via Lucca 94555 551,000 34189 Via Lucca 94555 622,000

4 2 2 4 4 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 2 2 4 4 4 5 -

ADDRESS

ZIP

1453 170th Avenue 22857 Alice Street 623 Atherton Place 1981 East Avenue 575 Hampton Road 44 Leighty Court #7 21897 Rio Vista Street 2055 Twin Creeks Place 160 Arundel Drive 27360 Parkside Drive 28376 Pacific Street 23 Raintree Court #15 26117 Regal Avenue 28634 Bay Port Court 27527 Capri Avenue 1993 Catalpa Way 27766 Del Norte Court

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545

BUILT

CLOSED

2160 1330 945 2578 1674 1624 990 1631 1645 1392 1387 1148 1661 1040 2070 878 835 3207 2395 3034 1717 -

1965 1982 1987 1965 1977 1952 1984 1997 1964 1957 1965 1960 1961 1991 1980 1984 1983 1957 1954 1980 1986 -

01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-30-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13

ZIP

310 Hazen Street 95035 102 Marylinn Drive 95035 1101 South Main Street #330 95035

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

291,000 250,000 480,500 250,000 300,000 145,500 355,000 605,000 1,010,000 455,000 300,000 223,000 285,000 615,000 250,000 350,000 250,000

1795 1371 1224 847 947 864 1531 2786 4315 2431 1050 1000 1059 1835 1320 1387 1474

1948 1949 1997 1953 1940 1992 1953 2008 2011 1976 1952 1986 1952 2007 1957 1963 1970

01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13

4 3 3 2 2 2 5 4 4 4 3 2 3 4 3 4 4

SOLD FOR BDS

550,000 399,000 400,000

4 2 2

ZIP

6121 Castillon Drive 35726 Haley Street 6984 Jarvis Avenue 5122 Tenaya Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

357,000 412,500 275,000 300,000

4 3 3 3

400,000 449,667

SQFT

BUILT

1386 1378 977

1958 02-15-13 1983 02-14-13 2007 02-13-13

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 412,500 Median $: Lowest $: 275,000 Average $: ADDRESS

300,000 377,353

SOLD FOR BDS

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 550,000 Median $: Lowest $: 399,000 Average $: ADDRESS

551,000 570,077

SQFT

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 1,010,000 Median $: Lowest $: 145,500 Average $:

CLOSED

300,000 336,125

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1537 1100 1182 1145

1959 1961 1982 1955

02-01-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 15 Highest $: 645,000 Median $: 345,000 Lowest $: 150,000 Average $: 369,200 ADDRESS

ZIP

1237 Amber Court 363 Dutton Avenue 1479 Gardner Boulevard 741 Lee Avenue 2272 Marina Boulevard 2500 Outrigger Drive #216 13804 Sausalito Road 1306 Scenicview Drive 348 Anza Way 16820 Ehle Street 16586 Kildare Road 711 Moraga Drive 14968 Peninsula Street 16878 Selby Drive 1460 Thrush Avenue #42

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578

SOLD FOR BDS

500,000 448,000 338,000 635,000 345,000 270,000 350,000 645,000 285,000 233,000 300,000 269,000 370,000 400,000 150,000

4 2 3 4 3 2 3 4 3 2 4 3 3 2 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2091 1533 1368 2080 1447 1033 1126 2698 1078 1293 1792 1114 1813 1464 749

1925 1942 1931 1990 1986 1962 1977 1954 1940 1970 1954 1979 1960 1994

01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 02-01-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 01 Highest $: 200,000 Median $: 200,000 Lowest $: 200,000 Average $: 200,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

15605 Tracy Street

94580

SOLD FOR BDS

200,000

2

SQFT

BUILT

1276

1920 01-30-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 720,000 Median $: Lowest $: 187,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2533 Copa Del Oro Drive 4600 Delores Drive 2820 Dowe Avenue 32643 Endeavour Way 249 Entrada Plaza 4205 Lunar Way 2978 Mallorca Way 4205 Saturn Way 2512 Village Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

230,000 389,000 450,000 254,000 187,000 275,000 720,000 295,500 362,000

2 4 3 4 3 4 5 3 3

Page 33

CLOSED

295,500 351,389

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

908 1973 1392 1342 1135 1342 2905 1137 1437

1984 1972 1977 1972 1986 1970 1994 1971 1984

01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 01-31-13 02-01-13 01-31-13 01-31-13

SUBMITTED BY ALLISON BORMEL U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell (CA-15) questioned Transportation Security Agency (TSA) Administrator John Pistole in a hearing of the Homeland Security Transportation Security Subcommittee on March 14, 2013. Swalwell objected to TSA’s new policy to allow certain knives and sports equipment on-board planes, arguing it could put passengers and crew at serious risk. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 when hijackers overtook planes using mace, box cutters and knives, all knives and dangerous sporting equipment were placed on a list of prohibited items and banned from planes. TSA’s most recent decision will change the prohibited items list by allowing passengers to bring small knives with nonlocking blades smaller than 2.36 inches and less than .5 inches in width, and sporting equipment like hockey sticks onto plane cabins. “Since September 12, 2001, there have been zero planes hijacked by terrorists using sharp objects. That number cannot get better but it can get worse with this new policy,” said Swalwell. “After questioning TSA Administrator Pistole at the Homeland Security Committee hearing, I am still concerned that this policy endangers passengers and crew, was made without formal consultation with stakeholder groups like flight attendants, pilots and transportation security officers and will only make the security process lengthier and more cumbersome.” Swalwell is leading a letter of Members of Congress to TSA opposing this decision and asking it be withdrawn until TSA engages in meaningful consul-

tation with interested stakeholders. The policy has been criticized by the Coalition of Flight Attendant Unions, the Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations, Federal Flight Deck Officer Association and the National Association of Police Organizations. “I appreciated the opportunity to engage with Administrator Pistole and I hope he takes into account serious concerns brought by stakeholder groups. Old threats do not just disappear when new threats arise and we should not proceed with policies that will put Americans at risk,” added Swalwell. The following day, U.S. Representatives Eric Swalwell (D-CA), Michael Grimm (R-NY) and Benny G. Thompson (D-MS), Ranking Member of the Homeland Security Committee, announced that a bipartisan coalition of 50 Members of Congress had signed on to their letter to the TSA expressing serious concerns about the agency’s new policy which is set to take effect on April 25, 2013. “The support for our letter objecting to TSA’s decision by Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle validates the general consensus that this is a foolish policy that could, in a worst-case scenario, seriously harm Americans,” said Swalwell. “Based on my conversation with Administrator Pistole, yesterday, at the Homeland Security Committee hearing, I am more convinced that TSA should not implement this policy.” The letter is supported by the American Federation of Government Employees, the Coalition of Flight Attendant Unions, the Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations, the Federal Flight Deck Officer Association and the National Association of Police Organizations.

Probation officers honor Wieckowski as Legislator of the Year SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA The State Coalition of Probation Organizations honored Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) on March 13, 2013, as the Legislator of the Year 2012 at a meeting in Sacramento. “This recognition is not just about me,” Wieckowski told the officers. “It’s about our common goal to increase the personal safety of officers across the state.” Wieckowski was recognized for his “dedication in advancing the standards for the betterment of probation, probation officers and the improvement of public safety.” In 2012, Wieckowski authored AB 1968, a bill to allow for the arming of probation officers responsible for “high risk” offenders. To help the state meet the prison inmate reduction set in place by the U.S. Supreme Court, the Legislature passed AB 109 in 2011, the public safety re-alignment bill. This put rank and file probation officers on the receiving end of a significant public safety policy shift. This enhanced public safety role has resulted in increased caseloads for probation officers and many offenders previously under the supervision of state parole agents are now re-aligned under their responsibility. Even though AB 1968 was eventually vetoed by the Governor, despite strong bipartisan support, Wieckowski and probation officers made important progress in raising awareness of the issue among members. Wieckowski is hoping to get a new bill, AB 1040, approved in this session of the Legislature.

Gun Buy Back distributes over $50,000 SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On Saturday, March 16, the Fremont Police Department hosted a Gun Buy Back event at the Fremont Fire Department Training Facility on Stevenson Boulevard for residents of the Tri-City area (Fremont, Newark, Union City). In less than three hours, $50,300 of donated funds was distributed and approximately 343 weapons collected.

AC Transit to end year with balanced budget SUBMITTED BY ROCHELLE ORAL Literacy is a family affair. Are you able to read to your children in English and help them with their homework? If not, perhaps you need to improve your own English and reading skills. Fremont Adult and Continuing Education’s CBET (Community Based English Tutoring) Program has ESL classes where parents and other adult family members can learn English while learning how to become more involved in their children’s education. Your children will do better in school if you read to them and get involved with their schoolwork. We have nine locations throughout Fremont to serve parents of ESL students in Fremont. Free babysitting is provided by Fremont Adult and Continuing Education at certain sites. Children must be 18 months to 11 years old. Proof of immunizations is required. Our CBET/ESL classes are held at American High School, Ardenwood Elementary School, Blacow Elementary School, Brier Elementary School, Durham Elementary School, Grimmer Elementary School, Irvington High School, and Vallejo Mill Elementary School. We also have a class at the United SIKHS Center in Fremont. Please visit our website at http://www.fremont.k12.ca.us/Page/15800 for more information, or call (510) 793-2240 and ask for Susan Anderson, ESL Department Secretary. We look forward to seeing you in one of our CBET/ESL classes!

SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE JOHNSON For the second consecutive year, AC Transit is on track to end FY 2012-13 with a balanced budget, resulting from a series of new initiatives and performance strategies. The local economy’s on-going recovery has led to a more stable, reliable stream of subsidies primarily from sales and parcel taxes but new performance and management strategies have taken effect over the past year, cutting expenses, boosting workforce efficiency and winning approval from the AC Transit Board of Directors. “It is great to know we have a stable budget platform to make our service better as we proceed into the future,” said Board President Greg Harper. “Our focus now is on a variety of new initiatives to improve efficiency as a way to both upgrade our customer service and reduce our expenses,” said General Manager David Armijo. “For example, we are buying new, better-performing buses, phasing out older, less reliable vehicles that routinely require expensive repairs.” “All things considered, we are heading in the right direction,” Armijo said. For more information, visit www.ACTransit.org


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Donna M. Swift RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON May 7, 1937 – March 5, 2013

Lew J. Dias RESIDENT OF LOS GATOS May 19, 1953 – March 13, 2013

Eleanore M. Strawn RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 2, 1916 – March 14, 2013

Lillian A. Hickethier RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 4, 1942 – March 16, 2013

Michael Reynoso RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 11, 1951 – March 16, 2013

Petronila Leyva RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 28, 1932 – March 5, 2013

Brandon W. Eckel RESIDENT OF STOCKTON March 24, 1986 – March 6, 2013

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease. Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Rocky W. Bannister RESIDENT OF UNION CITY August 30, 1949 – March 13, 2013

Edward S. Tananka RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 9, 1947 – March 13, 2013

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Tuyet Ha Tran RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 3, 1936 – March 13, 2013

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com

Evelyn J. Miller

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 5, 1928 – March 14, 2013

Donald W. Gillis RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 6, 1930 – March 14, 2013

Benjamin Y. Adante RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 10, 1963 – March 14, 2013

Flossie B. Pennington RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 26, 1921 – March 14, 2013

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Union City City Council March 12, 2013 Proclamations and Presentations: Proclaimed March as Knights of Columbus Month. Mayor Dutra-Vernaci praised the Catholic charitable group for their philanthropy and historical value. Representatives from St Anne’s Church, Our Lady of the Rosary Church, St James the Apostle Church, Fremont, and St Edward’s Catholic Church, Newark, accepted the recognition on behalf of the Knights of Columbus. Kanat Tibet and Michael Richie of Kaiser Permanente-sponsored Healthy Eating, Active Living (HEAL) program urged Union City to join Fremont, Hayward and San Leandro to adopt their program with the goal of reducing obesity in children. Staff will bring back a resolution for adoption at a subsequent meeting. PG&E presented their pipeline safety enhancement plan. PG&E will test the strength of pipes in the City’s sewer system from early April 2013 to late May 2013. This will require road work mostly in the vicinity of Decoto Road and Alvarado-Niles Road. Residents in affected areas will be notified by letter and telephone Northbound traffic on Decoto Road will be reduced to one lane during the project. A Union City resident expressed concern about traffic congestion. Consent Calendar: Amended the Municipal Code to 1) remove professional trade schools and colleges, transit and passenger railroad stations and union halls from the list of principle permitted uses allowed in the Light Industrial (ML) zoning district; 2) remove health services (medical, dental, physical therapy and pharmacies) from the list of conditional uses allowed in the ML zoning district; 3) move union halls from the list of principal permitted uses and add to the list of conditional uses allowed in the Special Industrial (MS) zoning district; 4) add transit and passenger railroad stations and union halls to the list of conditional uses in the MS zoning district.

Florindo S. Marques RESIDENT OF NEWARK February 11, 1939 – March 16, 2013

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Appropriated $29,106.83 from the First Five of Alameda County Grant Program for the Leisure Services Department Literacy Jamboree Program for Early Childhood Literacy and Kindergarten Readiness. Accepted work for the Promenade & Playground Project, which according to an article on the city’s website, “will include walkways, lighting, landscaping and children’s play equipment.” The project is budgeted for $1.81M. City Manager Reports: Union City adopted a resolution in support of Assembly Bill (AB) 981, which amends the Health & Safety Code relating to community redevelopment. Under current law, funds shall be used and committed in a manner consistent with the purposes of the Low & Moderate Income Housing Asset Fund. Under the revised bill, bonds can only be used for their original purpose, effective January 2014. Items Referred by Council: The Mayor attended the Alameda County Transportation Commission’s Programs & Projects SubCommittee which discussed further construction at the Union City BART Station. This will cost $32.5M; the City seeks $23.6M from One Bay Area Grant (OBAG) Program. Also, Union City will receive $695,000 in federal Local Streets and Roads grants for repairs to Whipple Road. Oral Communications: A representative of the League of Women Voters of Fremont, Newark & Union City, promoted Sunshine Week to encourage transparency in government. The film “The United States of Alec” will be shown on March 18 at Fremont Congregational Church. Public comment that economic development of the greater Bay Area did not seem to benefit Union City. Mayor Carol Dutra-Vernaci - Yes Vice Mayor Emily Duncan - Yes Lorrin Ellis - Yes Pat Gacoscos - Yes Jim Navarro - Yes

Newark City Council March 14, 2013 Presentations and Proclamations: Commendation for Newark Team 5185 Topsy Turvy - Ignatious Hoh, Mira Partha and Victoria Yuan - in Northern California First Tech Challenge Championship held at Newark Memorial High School on February 24. They and two other teams in their “Alliance,” won the Winning Alliance trophy. Consent: Second reading of amendment to Title 17 of Zoning text in the Newark Municipal Code Authorize one-year extension of auditing services by Badawi & Associates Approve extension of Alameda County Abandoned Vehicle Abatement Program until May 2023. On average, Newark receives approximately $34,000 per year for 600 abandoned vehicles Amend 2012-14 Biennial Budget to allocate $5,000 for 20122013 recycling promotion materials and $20,000 for 2013-2014 Removed from Consent: Approve bid and award to Marina Landscape, Inc. for Lakeshore Park irrigation renovation. Public speaker asked if low bid was suspect because of significant difference from other bids and if the monetary

difference would be used for Lakeshore Park projects. Staff response was that “responsible” bids are acceptable and the economic conditions and expansion efforts had a bearing on the low bid. Monies saved by the difference between the engineering estimates and bid will be part of the General Fund, not specifically allocated to Lakeshore Park. Councilmember Marshall requested a cost/benefit review of future agreements for Music at the Grove. Non Consent: Adopt Complete Streets Policy that makes streets “safe and convenient” for all users. This is required by Alameda County Transportation Commission and Metropolitan Transportation Commission in order to be eligible for local transporation sales tax, vehicle registration fee funding and One Bay Area grant funds. City Council Matters: The Mayor noted Stage 1 performances beginning March 15 of Once Upon A Mattress. Public Comment: League of Women Voters Sunshine Week promoting transparent government March 10-16 Invite Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski for work session to discuss water quality concerns Mayor Alan Nagy Aye Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Aye Luis Freitas Aye Maria “Sucy” Collazo Absent Robert Marshall Aye


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Hayward City Council March 5, 2013 Presented March 2013 Business Recognition Award to Manada Roofing, Inc. Accepted by Jesus Perez, VP, Manada Roofing, Inc. Proclaimed March 12, 2013 as Women Veterans’ Day. Accepted by Lani Wilson, Chabot College. Work Session Strategies to improve delivery of food and support services to people in need. Typically, food-sharing programs occur on City property without permits which, currently, are not required. Community members point to the adverse effect of such activities and the anti-social behavior of some of the beneficiaries and also assert that more constructive approaches to homelessness and affordable housing are needed. Other jurisdictions have enacted ordinances to ban or regulate food distribution at public locations. Some have been challenged successfully but the courts have tended to uphold legislation that regulates rather than prohibits such programs. Staff recommends amendment of the Hayward Zoning Ordinance to introduce reasonable permitting for and better delivery of these programs. Consent Amended JPA Agreement for the South Hayward BART Transit Oriented Development and appointed Councilwoman Barbara Halliday as Alternate Director to the JPA Board. Legislative Business Approved phase-out of the City’s Red Light Camera Program. The number of side-on collisions (right and left turns) has declined but the number of rear-end collisions has increased. In the interests of public safety, Councilman Greg Jones proposed a motion to decommission the system as soon as possible. (6 YES votes; 1 NO vote (Halliday)). Fiscal Year 2013 Mid-Year Budget Review & General Fund Ten-Year Plan Update. Amended Water Supply Agreement with City and County of San Francisco to protect water supplies from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and assure continued operation of the O’Shaugnessy Dam unless the Agreement is further amended at a future date, subject to certain conditions. Public Comment “Citizen Sam” encouraged everyone to participate in the City’s General Plan Update (Hayward2040.org), hopes the Oakland A’s will come to Hayward and wishes to see a ferry service to San Francisco leave from Winton Avenue by 2040. He thanked Denise Chan, Suzanne Phillis (City Clerk’s Office, Planning Commission Sara Lamnin, Gale Bleth and Mary Fabian (Hayward Police Department) and former Councilwoman Anna May for their help. Betty DeForest, Executive Director, South Hayward Parish, thanked the Mayor and Council for the opportunity to create dialogue and bring together parties that are concerned about homelessness in Hayward. She would like to see the establishment of a task force of citizens, businesses, elected officials and other stakeholders to discuss and identify solutions quickly and effectively. South Hayward Parish shares the City’s concern about food-distribution on the street; it is demeaning. DeForest

appreciates staff ’s regulatory proposals, which refer to “free food,” for such programs and wondered if they include food pantries some of which might have to close because they cannot afford a permit. Would programs that prepare food have to be certified by the County as “kitchens?” Jeanette Johnigan relies on the food programs because of her income level. She cannot afford to shop at the supermarkets after her expenses have been deducted. She is able to access programs every day except on Wednesday and Saturday; so, twice a week she goes hungry. In addition to the homeless, many others go hungry, too. A member of the First United Methodist Church congregation feels that the proposed zoning changes will not solve any of the current issues and might lead to unintended consequences. He supports the Hayward Community Action Network’s desire for a central facility where a full range of services for the homeless are available – counseling, mental and physical support, kitchen, washing and laundering facilities, training and job preparation and jobs running such a center. Marcy Timberman echoed the sentiments adding that staff ’s proposals would not make anyone “less hungry or less homeless.” Bob Goodwill, Hayward CAN Advocate, stated that disruptive activity occurs before or after the food distribution programs at Portuguese Park and that the programs, per se, are not a problem. Culpable individuals are responsible for their own actions. Legislating the programs without dealing with the troublemakers would be an exercise in futility. Sherri Blair does not feel an ordinance will solve the problems underlying hunger and homelessness but feels it might help identify which public sites can be used for food-sharing programs. Hunger is a world-wide problem. In Brazil, there are five government-owned restaurants, with low-priced menus, where everyone can dine – students, seniors, homeless, business people, construction workers, nurses. Sara Lamnin, CAN Program Director, does not support the proposed amendment to the Zoning Ordinance preferring to spend the City’s limited resources on solutions to the underlying issues. Establish a deadline to move the meal programs out of civic spaces to a centralized, indoor service program which would enable stakeholders to leverage existing resources, improve efficiency, address sanitation issues, maintain consistent enforcement and help residents reach a greater level of self-sustainability. Jim Drake asked if Hayward is a dumping ground for felons and how the City compmares with other cities in the East Bay. He questioned the process by which bond measures are placed on election ballots, subsequent voter-approval, elected officials’ decisions to proceed with a bond issue and the cost of that funding; he referred specifically to Hayward Unified School District’s Measure I.

Milpitas City Council March 5, 2013 Staff Changes to Calendar The March 13 Planning Commission is cancelled. There will be a special meeting on March 20, 2013 at 7 p.m. The San José/Santa Clara County Treatment Plant Advisory Committee (TPAC) meeting has been moved from March 14 to March 25, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. Public Hearing: Considered a request to fly flags in honor of Black History Month; continued to an indefinite date. Consent Calendar: Received the February 2013 Odor Control Report. There have been mostly unconfirmed garbage and sewer-related odor complaints. Approved Mayor’s recommendation to appoint Jacqueline Holland to the Community Advisory Commission. Holland is a 2010 graduate of the University of California, Irvine, and was Sigma Cum Laude in Psychology. Amended the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Commission By-Laws to reflect changes to the meeting dates. The commission advises Council on matters related to non-motor vehicles. Accepted the annual Citizen Options for Public Safety (COPS) grant of $107,684. The monies will be used for collision-investigation equipment, crime analysis software, firearms and accessories, critical incident response equipment, surveillance equipment and police canine & training. Approved Amendment No 1 to the Water Supply Agreement with the City and County of San Francisco. The amendment prohibits the City of San Francisco from changing the existing condition of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, by abandoning or decommissioning the O’Shaughnessy Dam or by draining the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir except for maintenance purposes or, if necessary, during a drought or meeting certain legal requirements. Authorized Police Chief to execute the service agreement with Santa Clara County Public Health Department for the 2013 San José Bike Party Grant Program. The department will assign officers to at least two Bike Party events. Authorized the City Manager to execute an agreement with DR Horton for free credit reimbursement for public facilities and improvements within the Transit Area Specific Plan. Reports of Mayor and Commission: Considered proposed resolution requiring the Chief of Police to be informed if any delegates from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam visit the City. This action was greeted with enthusiastic response from citizens. Considered the criteria for establishing a donation-and-fee-waiver policy. This will require an application process for donation requests and will be reworded to add specificity to terms such as “non-profit” and “public benefit.” According to the Mayor, this is needed because the City receives an excessive number of requests for such benefits. Mayor Esteves appointed Vice Mayor Polanski his alternate for the Business Association of Santa Clara County and Selection Committee and volunteered to serve as delegate to the Santa Clara County Library District Joint Powers Authority and to the Association of Bay Area Governments’ General Assembly on April 18, 2013 in Oakland. Public Forum: Maureen Jones of San José wants to prevent the use of fluoride in drinking water. According to Jones, there are no studies that show that water fluoridation helps prevent tooth decay. Robert Marini feels that sewer rates are too high. Rob Means addressed the problem of global warming and urged the City to adopt smarter policies dealing with this issue, such as energy independence. Shri Ram promoted his website www.StressFreeViolenceFree.org. Mayor José Esteves – Yes Vice Mayor Althea Polanski – Yes Debbie Giordano – Yes Armando Gomez –Absent/Yes (arrived after first Mayoral report item) Carmen Montano - Yes

Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barabara halliday – Yes Greg Jones – Yes Al Mendall – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Mark Salinas - Yes Francisco Zermeno – Yes

Measure A oversight report BY ASHLEY, GUY Almost 10 years ago, Alameda County voters approved a tax to ensure a basic level of health care services across all segments of the population. The latest report about “Measure A” health care spending in Alameda County, covering fiscal year 10/11, describes how over 100 County health care service providers used Measure A sales tax funds to enhance services, expand outreach, and upgrade facilities. Measure A, the Essential Health Care Services Initiative approved by voters in March 2004, raised the County sales tax by one-half cent to support emergency medical, hospital inpatient, outpatient, public health, mental health, and substance abuse services for indigent, low-income, and uninsured County residents. This “half-cent on the dollar” has made a big difference: Measure A generated $105,513,482 in FY 10/11, distributing funds to well over 100 health care service providers and ultimately serving over half a million Alameda County residents. Measure A also created a Citizen Oversight Committee that monitors Measure A spending for each fiscal year. In December 2012, the committee published its fifth report, covering Measure A

spending for FY 10/11. Highlights from the report include the following: • Despite the down economy, Measure A enabled a large number of providers to continue existing programs and maintain the service levels offered by these programs. • Measure A funds increased access to health care services for organizations ranging from the Alameda County Medical Center to school health centers, while decreasing wait times for these services. • Several recipients, including Children’s Hospital and St. Rose Hospital Silva Clinic, school health centers, the Juvenile Justice Center Victims of Crime Unit, and the Alameda Health Consortium, used Measure A funds as leverage to draw down matching funds, including both federal and foundation grants. • Many organizations and departments, including the Public Health Department, Multicultural Institute, Preventive Care Pathways, and Horizons Family Counseling, used Measure A funds to increase health outreach and education efforts, focus-

ing on prevention. Measure A also allowed many providers to continue and expand mental health services. • Measure A gives the County flexibility to address unmet needs and unanticipated costs. Specifically, the County Board of Supervisors receives a discretionary $784,088 allocation that gives the Supervisors the flexibility to respond to unanticipated needs in their districts. • From Axis Community Health sites in Livermore and Pleasanton, to the Fremont-based Tri-City Health Center and the Newark Health Center, to multiple agencies in Berkeley, Measure A funding touched all areas of the County, thus delivering on its promise to help ensure basic health care for all County residents. Louis Chicoine, chair of the Oversight Committee, says,“While the federal health care reform effort has the potential to expand health care coverage nationwide, we in Alameda County can take pride in the fact that for many years we have contributed toward making sure health care is available to all members of our community. Measure A continues to enable a large number of health care providers serving low-income and uninsured patients to maintain and even expand the service levels they offer.” The full report contains comprehensive information, such as a complete list of all providers receiving Measure A funds in FY 10/11; the amounts received by each provider; descriptions of the services offered by Measure A recipients; maps showing the geographic distribution of Measure A fund recipients, indicating the spread of services throughout all parts of Alameda County; and more. To request a free copy of the report, or for information on becoming a member of the Measure A Oversight Committee, please call (510) 618-2016 or email James.Nguyen@acgov.org. You can also download a free copy of the report at www.acgov.org/health/indigent/measureA.htm.


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

Fremont Police Log an employee to give him an iPad and cash from the register. After receiving the loot, the suspect fled on foot. The suspect was described as a white male adult, 30’s, 6’00, 150 lbs., dressed in a blue hat, grey sweatshirt, and blue jeans. Incident was captured on video. This incident was investigated by Ofc. Candler and supervised by Sgt. Snelson. Ofc. Wilson checked the area of Central/Dusterberry and located six new gang graffiti tags. The tags were red and read “VNF X4,” “VNF,” “XIV,” “SK,” “NSF” and “NORTE” each was documented under a separate report number. The tags were seen as early as 10:30 p.m. and more was documented between 1:00 a.m. - 2:45 a.m. RP reported four people fighting in the bar at the Cloverleaf Bowl at 1:30 a.m.. Units arrived and detained all four acquaintances, two were fighting over a female. One male was arrested for Obstructing/Resisting. Two other males, and the female (that was being fought over) were arrested for drunk in public. Inv. by Ofc. Sanchez. March 13 Ofc. Luevano took a vehicle theft report at around 11:00 a.m. The victim vehicle was equipped with LoJack and at around 1:00 p.m., Newark PD advised they were receiving a LoJack hit on Central Ave. in their city for the vehicle. Numerous officers checked the area without success. Outstanding is a 2000 Ford

March 19, 2013

Econoline van, CA/8E06702. Victim was walking in the area of Capitol/Liberty when a suspect battered him and stole $20 from his hand. The suspect was described as a black male adult or Indian adult male in his 50’s, grey hat, grey jacket, last seen running towards the old Schoeber’s. At approximately 5:50 p.m. officers responded to Blaisdell Way to investigate a residential burglary. The burglary occurred during the day between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Loss was jewelry and cash. At approximately 2:00 p.m., FUSD Main Offices received a phone call from what sounded like a juvenile male. The male told FUSD personnel that there was a bomb on the grounds of Thornton Jr. High. Sgt. Cochran responded to the FUSD offices while Sgt. Russell and SRO Sgt. Koepf went to Thornton Jr High. The school was placed on lockdown for approximately 25 minutes while school was cleared. Patrol went to level one during this incident. Investigated by FTO Hanrahan and Ofc. Barbero handled the investigation. A clerk was closing the Subway at Charter Square when a masked suspect ran into the store, shoved her toward the counter, and demanded the cash from the register. The suspect fled prior to police arrival and no witnesses or video surveillance were located. Investigated by Ofc. Wright and FTO Huiskins.

Bank Robbery at Chase Bank SUBMITTED BY OFFICER W. QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On March 9, 2013, at about 1:59 p.m., a bank robbery occurred at the Chase Bank located at 37 N. Milpitas Blvd. The suspect entered the bank, approached the counter and gave the bank teller a demand note. The suspect indicated he wanted money and had a gun. The teller handed over cash and the suspect fled the area. The suspect is described as a White male adult in his mid 40’s, approximately 6’0”. He was seen wearing a black SF Giants baseball hat, grey jacket, blue shirt, blue jeans and white shoes. We are asking anyone who can identify the suspect or possesses any information regarding this investigation to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Stolen vehicle suspects arrested

Union City Police Log tempt to obtain customer information. The accessory card readers are designed to store customer card information. March 12 At 9:45 a.m., a 77 year old female was walking around Mariner Park, near Dorado Drive. The victim saw an adult male who proceeded to pull down his pants and expose his penis. The female fled the area after the incident. The suspect was described as a black male adult, between 30 and 35 years old, approximately 6 feet tall, with a heavyset build.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD March 8 Officer Taylor handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s store at 6:05 p.m. Lesleigh Pelzl was arrested for petty theft and issued a citation at the scene. March 9 The family of Edgar Real of Newark called Police at 7:04 p.m. to report he was possibly overdosing on Methamphetamine and had just physically assaulted several family members. Before officers could arrive at the scene, Real fled the residence and forced entry into the nearby AllCare Veterinary Hospital (6600 block of Thornton Avenue) by punching out a plate glass window. Officers located Real in the parking lot of the Veterinary Hospital. He had severe lacerations on his right arm and had severed one of his arteries. Real began swinging his arm towards officers covering them with his blood. Real continued to assault the initial officers. Additional officers arrived at the scene, Real was taken into custody after the deployment of Officer Jackman’s K-9 partner. Thanks to Fremont PD officers and sergeants who assisted us while the officers conducted the investigation and decontaminated from this incident. Real was charged with battery on an officer, burglary, child abuse, resisting arrest and assault. He is currently being treated at a local hospital and is in police custody. March 10 Officers responded to an audible alarm sounding at Bella Eye Care on Jarvis Ave. at 12:26 a.m. and located Darryl Bernard of Newark rummaging in the garbage dumpster. The alarm appeared to be false but Bernard was cited for possession of a Methamphetamine smoking pipe. March 11, 2013 Officers responded to a commercial burglary to a business in the 8400 block of Central Ave. at 6:44 p.m. A window had been broken, allowing access into the building where copper wire had been removed along with items that were being stored for sale. The burglary occurred sometime between

03/08/13 at 0900 hours to time of call. March 12, 2013 At 3:03 p.m., Officer Homayoun investigated a residential burglary in the 37000 block of Spruce Street. Entry was made through a doggie door which led into the garage and evidence showed the suspect(s) kicked open a garage door leading into the house. The burglary occurred between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., the loss was cash. Officer Lopez was traveling on Highway 84/880 at 3:30 p.m. when he received a LoJack (an electronic tracking system) alert on a stolen van out of the City of Fremont. Officers followed the signal into Fremont and located the stolen van on Enea Common. Officer Homayoun responded to JC Penney at 3:31 p.m. after they had detained two juveniles for shoplifting. Both juveniles were arrested for petty theft and released to their respective parents. Officer Geser accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from JC Penney at 6:15 p.m. Kathy Gonzales of Union City was arrested for shoplifting. She was released on a citation. March 13, 2013 At 4:30 p.m., officers responded to assist Fremont PD Street Crimes unit who had a suspect running from them in the Dairy and Bonnie area. The suspect was captured and subsequently arrested by Fremont PD. Officer Geser accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from JC Penney at 5:04 p.m. A 17 year old male (Newark) was arrested for shoplifting and released to his parents. At 1:20 a.m., Officer Geser investigated an auto burglary near the Burlington Coat Factory at the mall. The vehicle’s window was smashed and 5 pairs of Nike shoes were taken. The theft occurred between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510578-4000, extension 500.

Fremont Fire Department Log SUBMITTED BY BATTALION CHIEF STEVE SILVA AND OPERATIONS STAFF CAPTAIN DON LINNEMAN, FFD March 11 At 4:52 p.m., the Fremont Fire Department was dispatched to a report of a structure fire at 40379 Fremont Blvd. The first arriving engine found heavy smoke showing from a single family home. An aggressive interior attack and search were made and the fire was contained to the room of origin. Reports indicate fire damage to one room and smoke damage throughout the home. Control of the incident took 10 minutes; resolved within one hour. Damage estimate was $15,000 structural and $5,000 contents. Seventeen Fremont Fire personnel and five equipment units were involved with no reported injuries. Cause of the fire is under investigation. March 13 At 7:15 p.m., the Fremont Fire Department responded to multiple calls of a structure fire in the area of Carpenter Court and Lockwood Avenue. The first arriving engine company found heavy smoke and fire showing from a single family residence at 2353 Carpenter Court. Initial companies made an aggressive interior attack and search, rescuing the family dog. The fire was brought under control in 20 minutes. The occupants were not home at the time of the fire and there were no injuries. Fire Investigators are on scene and a cause has not yet been determined. Damage estimates are $300,000 to the structure and $75,000 contents. Twenty FFD personnel and six equipment units were employed with no injuries reported. Total time on scene is estimated at three hours.

Be aware of PIN theft

SUBMITTED BY SGT. JOHN TORREZ, MILPITAS PD On February 22, 2013, at 10:21 a.m., a Milpitas Police Officer saw two people driving in a 1999 Honda Civic and park in the parking lot of Kentucky Fried Chicken at 73 S. Main Street. The two occupants left the vehicle and walked into the nearby business. The officer did a random check on the vehicle’s license plate and found the license plate had been reported stolen earlier the same morning. Both occupants were detained and further investigation led to the discovery that the vehicle was stolen from San Jose. Officers arrested one of the suspects, a male 17-year old juvenile and San Jose resident, was in possession of ecstasy pills and drug paraphernalia. Roy Alexander Spotwood, also of San Jose, was arrested for auto theft, possession of stolen property, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession of burglary tools. Spotwood was booked at the Santa Clara County Main Jail. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents occurring in our city is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD One of the more interesting crimes that occurred the week of March 10-15 was the discovery of a PIN card reader illegally attached to the lobby entry doors at the CitiBank in Union City (Decoto Rd). This was a very sophisticated operation. Identity theft is the fastest rising type of crime and we must all remain vigilant. This scam was uncovered by a regular bank customer that noticed a small imperfection in the device and promptly reported it. While using a credit card at a gas pump, look into the area where you swipe the card in the event that a small device/card reader has been placed there. If you do that each time it becomes a habit. Make sure to pay attention to the details when using your ATM or credit cards. Criminals are known to place accessory devices over ATM machines, and even gas pumps. The criminals will commonly add an additional face plate to any machine that accepts a credit card or access card. The face plate might resemble an authentic part of an existing machine. However, the face plate is used to conceal a device that will store information associated with your card. Additional spy cameras are often used in conjunction with the face plate to obtain access codes as you enter numbers on the ATM keypad. It is a good idea to use one of your hands to hide any “PIN” or access numbers you may enter when using ATM style machines.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 37

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

2

3

4

5 2 9

B 205

5

6

6

7 8

8

9

8 7 3 4 2 9

10 11

12

13

14

18

15

19

20

8 5 2 4 1 5 8 6 4 6 3

17

21

22 24

16

23 1

25 26

27

28

29

D

A

D

A

N

9

I

U M

S

P

E

D C

E 15

T

35

R

37

E

E

S

A P I

I

O

F

R

A

N

I 38

26

D

27

E

W H

P

28

33

Down 2 Contended resolutely with task (9) 3 Discouraged by failure (12) 4 Land of the Alps (11) 5 By way of (5) 6 To be emphatic and firm (6) 7 Unknown territory (10) 9 Candidate's concern (5) 10 Grasping the subject matter (13) 13 Moving towards a direction (7) 15 Features (15) 16 Expressionless (5)

T

I

E

A

E

T

E

T

E

C

14

H

U

R O

O

N

I

B

F

C

I

T

L

G

Y

O

M

P

E

N

O

A

E

6 9 2 4 8 1 3 7 5

U

I

E

17

R

A

N

C

T

O

E

S

S

I

E

E

L

4 6 5 3 2 9 7 1 8

H

G

P

N

30

T

C T

R R

E W R

C

E

O

P

T

3 1 9 8 7 4 5 6 2

E

P

B

R

U

E

S Y

A 11

S

T

N

5 3 7 6 9 2 1 8 4

S

R

E T

I

E H

S

7

D

U

T

R

24

S

1 8 4 5 3 7 2 9 6

P M

A 29

D

B 204

I

N 23

E

E

S

I 19

F

I

A

L

A

E

I A

U I

R

N

S U

E

U

S

A A

Q

P R

M

C

C

P

E

6

C

22

32

O

5

I

C O M E

E H

R

D

S

S

12

O R

4

C

E

C

O

Discussions (13) Opportunities, so to speak (5) High marks (6) Take up space (5) Appropriate (6) At a prior time (7) Watching and scrutinizing (9) Wooded areas (7) Ill-fated (7)

V

I N

A

U

O

O

B

M

31

17 20 23 25 26 28 29 31 33

R M

S

C

35 Special stress (8) 36 Express displeasure (5) 37 Favorable prospect or time (13) 38 Done without the knowledge of others (8) 39 E-mail (7)

O

16

T

E

39

Across 1 Stationed (5) 4 Get juice from lemon by ___ (9) 8 Burdens of obligation (16) 11 People from Land of the Sphynx (8) 12 Series of turns in a line (7) 13 "You there?" (5) 14 Dissimilarities (11) 18 Totaling (6) 19 Kind of wrestling (6) 21 Quantities or measure (7) 22 Unusually great (13) 24 Eminent (5) 27 Things that have been picked out (10) 30 Street musician, one from a band of carolers (5) 32 Bushy tailed rodent (8) 34 Trembling with cold or fear (9)

U

C

M

R 21

H

H

R

E 18

36

13

T 34

3

Y

A

E 33

D

I M

32

2

8

10

30 31

3 9

E D

R

I 34

2 7 8 1 6 5 4 3 9

9 4 6 2 1 3 8 5 7

Y

S

E

N E

T

E T

P P

O

R

R

E

I

S C

S

E

D

G A W N

8 2 3 7 5 6 9 4 1

S

F

E S

20

U

D 25

T

S

U

E

7 5 1 9 4 8 6 2 3

Tri-City Stargazer MARCH 20 – MARCH 26, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The spring equinox occurs on March 20 at 2:55 p.m. EST. This is the point in the annual cycle at which we (theoretically) experience equal days and nights. It is the moment the sun appears to move into the zodiac sign of Aries. For many agricultural and herding peoples of ancient times (pagans), the equinox was one of the eight holiday festivals of the year. It was customary in those days, to prepare for the coming season by welcoming its arrival through appropriate celebration. It is widely thought that Stonehenge and other such structures were built for the express purpose of marking the seasonal changes. Now in our air conditioned, urbanized society, we hardly give the equinox a moment's thought. However, since 2010 the equinoxes and solstices have heralded extraordinary events. Aries the Ram (March 21April 20): The sun returns "home" to your sign this week. You likely will find it to be energizing. Now is the time to focus on new plans for this next year of your life. Take a fresh look at where you want to direct your energy. Use this month to let go of past hurts and take a deep breath of fresh air. Taurus the Bull (April 21-May 20): An unpleasant interaction with another early in the week may cause you to withdraw for some introspection. You have a need to be alone and quiet during this period. That is why social life is not going so well. Give attention to your inner life and reduce or eliminate negative thoughts.

a child. Underneath it all, the issue is tied to your internalized sense of what a caretaker “should” do or be. Our culture has always struggled with images of the feminine. Is she a caretaker or a seductress? Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): At this time of year, the Sun shines upon your ninth house of travel and expansion. You are probably already making plans for your next vacation. Aspects favor opening yourself to greater territory in your life. You may be thinking of beginning a new study, a spiritual pursuit, or creating a website.

your path. Perhaps this includes clientele, if you have a business. It seems everyone is self-interested and wants a piece of you as well. Do as much as you feel is necessary. Don't give away the farm. Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): You may feel pinned down on all sides by circumstances and responsibilities you believe you cannot manage. Your instinct tells you to bolt and run. The adrenalin may be running high in your veins. Be really cautious with anything you do with your body. These circumstances can produce an accident.

Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): Your ruling planet has just turned direct in Pisces, sign of the ocean. You may not yet have your sea legs. Don’t demand that you move rapidly forward. Just get your balance in the new situation concerning your career or life direction for now.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): Your planetary ruler is Mercury, which just shifted into direct motion last week. This retrograde has been all about the “others” in your life. You have slowed to a virtual stop until those “others” could make up their minds. Now things can move forward but it will require a couple of weeks to be up to speed.

Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): You want to move forward on a significant matter, which may have to do with partnership. But there is a nagging fear in the background. It feels as though something important has been hidden from your awareness and this keeps you from pressing ahead. Conservative choices are best for now. You will know soon whether to take action.

Cancer the Crab (June 21-July 21): At the beginning of the week you may be feeling stress related to your lover or a partner, maybe

Libra the Scales (September 23October 22): Circumstances concerning partners, lovers, or children are throwing pebbles in

Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): This is not the best week for mechanical objects. Breakage or failures are highly

possible. Your reflexes are strung too tightly so make an effort to relax muscles and concentrate on steady, but consistent forward motion. This is the advice whether driving the car or running a mile.

care for a loved one. It is probable that the issue has been pending since mid-February. You have known a problem exists, but until now your direction has not been made clear. It is a sacrifice, but if you do not do something here, you may feel guilt later.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): At this time your life may feel as though you are sitting in a car revved to the max while simultaneously pressing the brake. If you have a choice to make, keep your decision conservative for the present. However, it is possible you won’t be allowed a choice. If so, take your best shot. Pisces the Fish (February 19March 20): Circumstances that are entirely beyond your control may press you to leave home to

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY VANDANA DEEP

D

elaine Eastin Elementary School in New Haven Unified District was represented by a team of two second graders and four third grade students at a March 2 Odyssey of the Mind competition. Odyssey of the Mind is an international educational program that provides creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college, who then bring their solutions to competition on the local, state, and world level. The Eastin Elementary team members, named “The Prize Burglars,” worked for six months to prepare themselves to present an eight minute skit on a pre-defined long term solution, specified by the Odyssey of Mind challenge. The presentation had to be completed by the team, without any assistance from parents, making props and outfits, directing the play, writing dialogue and songs. In addition, the team prepared for a 10 minute spontaneous challenge that tested their creativity, verbal and mechanical skills. The team was the youngest in their

participating division that included mostly 4th–5th grade teams. They were also the only team from the New Haven Unified School District. The “Prize Burglars” chose to solve Problem 3: ARTchitecture: The Musical. For this problem, teams were asked to create and present an original performance that included a replica of a documented architectural structure built between 1,000 AD and 1,600 AD. The performance in-

cluded a requirement that three works of art must “disappear” and two characters would go on a quest to find them. When the works of art were found, they had to be incorporated into the replica. The performance also needed to include two songs, accompanied by some type of choreographed movement. The “Prize Burglars” chose to present their performance around the Leaning tower of Pisa and received a lot of cheers

from the judges for an entertaining eight minute show. Although, they did not finish among the top three, it was a remarkable achievement for the “Prize Burglars” team. Team members included second graders: Ankita Deep and Navika Singhal and third graders: Rayna Arora, Sania Choudhary, Inaya Siddiqui and Esha Bhasin. Coaches were Vandana Deep and Geeta Arora.

BOOK REVIEW

BY SIMON WONG PHOTO COURTESY OF PUBLISHAMERICA

ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY BRUCE ROBERTS

A

huge concrete H resides on the steep hillside behind the Safeway on Foothill Blvd. Now obscured by trees and brush, this was once the proud symbol of Hayward High School (HHS), whose magnificent old campus covered the entire area now occupied by Safeway, other businesses, and apartments. The campus even went across the creek. Before any other high schools, before Chabot, before Cal State, this was the educational, social, and cultural center of the town for over fifty years. The Hayward High ‘Save the H’ committee would like to offer all those interested in Hayward, and Hayward High School history, the opportunity to preserve this valuable local monument and ensure a place in Hayward history as well, by urging you to buy a brick - professionally engraved and dedicated to someone special - teacher, friend, yourself? These bricks will be installed in a patio, at the base of the H hill, along with benches and informational signs about the significance of the H and this site in Hayward history. Trees and brush will be cleared so that the H is visible from below. A piece of Hayward history will live on in the memories of all those who visit this site. Of course all this costs money; thus, we are requesting a donation of $100 for each brick. To become part of this important historical project, please include the information/dedication you wish to be placed on the brick. You may have from one to three lines on your brick, with no more than 15 characters per line and a space counts as a character. Attach your check for $100 per brick ordered, along with the accompanying brick message, your name, address and phone number. Checks should be made out to the Hayward Historical Society (Tax deductible, of course). Be sure to write “Save the H” on your check. Mail to: Hayward Historical Society, Attention: Alison Wentz, 22380 Foothill Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541. For all of your valuable high school memories, for all the current residents who have no idea of the awesome high school we had, for all the wonderful history of our home town, the Save the H committee thanks you for your donation. Save the H Committee: Guy Sandoval (son of Hayward historian Jonathan Sandoval, former HHS teacher), Francisco Zermeno (Hayward City Councilman and nonstop promoter of Hayward) and Bruce Roberts (grandson of Frederic Johnson, HHS principal from 1911 to 1935).

Author John Chyan’s latest book is I Spy Hidden Angels from Shambhala (ISBN 9781627093378). The Fremont resident is a Buddhist and volunteers with the Purple Lotus Buddhist School, Union City. His first foray into publishing was a collection of his thoughts and beliefs on the subjects of meditation, the spiritual world, prayer, love, dreams, life, death, reincarnation, science, auras, orbs and steps towards enlightenment through the experience of end-of-life support and care for others. Over the years, the tenets by which he leads his life and his perspectives on the matters about which he has written have come to be regarded as “teachings” and, with the encouragement of his friends, he recorded them in Expand Our Spiritual Hearts (ISBN 9781456029326), two years ago. He points out others have shared their stories with him and their experiences have helped shape his spirit. Chyan’s new book deals with re-birth, purpose and progress towards nirvana. The Sanskrit term “Shambhala” is understood to be a Buddhist Pure Land, a place of peace, tranquility and happiness whose inhabitants are enlightened. Kalapa is the capital city. The Buddhist myth of Shambhala is an adaptation of the earlier Hindu myth of Kalki of Sambhala. The Buddhist version may be based on a long-lost culture either in Central or Far Eastern Asia (China). Although there are other ideas about this society’s location, it is often placed in central Asia, north or west of Tibet. Depending on the culture, Shambhala is identified in Punjab, or in certain valleys of southern Siberia. Some believe Mount Belukha is the gateway to Shambhala. Modern Buddhist scholars opine that Shambhala is in the upper reaches of the Himalayas in the Dhauladhar mountains around Mcleodganj from where the current Dalai Lama manages the Tibetan government in exile. The idea of Shamhala has fascinated westerners to whom Tibet was essentially closed until the early 20th Century. Available information had consisted of fragmentary accounts. The concept of Shangri-La, first described in James Hilton’s 1933 novel Lost Horizon, is said to have been inspired by the Shambhala myth. Conceptually, Shambhala has “outer,” “inner,” and “alternative” meanings. The outer meaning

regards Shambhala as a physical place, although only individuals with the appropriate karma can reach it and experience it. In 1985, the 14th Dalai Lama noted that Shambhala is not an ordinary country: “Although those with special affiliation may actually be able to go there through their karmic connection, nevertheless it is not a physical place that we can actually find. We can only say that it is a pure

land, a pure land in the human realm. And unless one has the merit and the actual karmic association, one cannot actually arrive there.” The inner and alternative meanings refer to what Shambhala represents to one’s own body and mind (inner) and the practice of meditation (alternative). Oral history passes on symbolic explanations from teacher to student. “Based on my beliefs and spiritual experiences, I truly believe we all have missions we need to accomplish in our lives. I also believe if you have a true heart, then you must be a re-born angel from Shambhala or other paradises, no matter what your background,” states Chyan. Chyan was born in Taiwan and came to the United States to complete his MBA degree. He is involved with many community service programs and has founded some of his own. For more information about John Chyan’s perspectives, visit www.PeopleCarePeople.com. To order a copy of I Spy Hidden Angels from Shambhala, visit http://bit.ly/TQE2Ll. For an introductory 20 percent-discount, enter coupon code: Discount20.


March 19, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

THEATRE REVIEW

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Stage 1 Theatre brings a spark of fairy tale fun to Newark with “Once Upon A Mattress,” a musical retelling of Hans Christian Anderson’s classic tale of “The Princess and the Pea.” Young Prince Dauntless is in need of a wife, but his mother Queen Aggravain insists on putting each girl to the Royalty Test to find out if she’s a true princess and worthy of the position. Though the overbearing Queen claims she wants her son to wed as badly as he wishes, somehow a suitable girl is never found. Twelve princesses have tried and failed the test; the whole household despairs, for until the prince is married, no one else may marry. Eager to secure a wedding date when he learns that his love, Lady Larken, is expecting a child, Sir Harry leaves the kingdom in search of a princess and returns with a boisterous, vigorous girl from the swamps. While certainly

not the princess anyone expects, Winnifred (Fred to her friends) captures the heart of Prince Dauntless. And while Queen Aggravain and the Wizard devise a test that Winnifred will be sure to fail, with a little help, she just might prove that number 13 isn’t so unlucky after all. Lively, fun, silly, and light, “Once Upon A Mattress” is sheer escapism and entertainment. Director Barbara Williams and the rest of the production team do a fine job of creating a fairy tale

world with great costumes and set designs, and get the most out of the unique and likable characters. Despite the fun, the first act is a little on the long side, and though this version is proudly presented as the original script without editing the story underwent for various TV versions, it would benefit from a little trimming. The second act moves much better, but even it could be relieved of the Jester’s “Very Soft Shoes” number, as it is a superfluous piece that ultimately doesn’t

Page 39

serve the story. (This in no way reflects on the entertaining Dane K. Lentz as the Jester who is fun and delightful throughout.) Supported by a live, 25-piece orchestra, conducted by Ken Nadler, the vocals are remarkably strong, with Barry Bailey (Minstrel), Christi Marie Wallace (Princess Winnifred), and Sven Shutz (Sir Harry) leading the way. Wallace’s enthusiasm knows no bounds and she takes ownership of her character with a lot of energy and zest, and can really belt it out as displayed in the fun number “Shy.” Stage 1 first timer Shutz makes a strong and memorable mark as Sir Harry, perfectly embodying a knight of the fairy-tale realm with spot on accent and bearing. The only thing lacking is more opportunities to showcase his wonderful voice. Hopefully we will be seeing the talented Shutz in many future productions. While an able Jami Wallace as Queen Aggravain rules the roost, mute, woman-chasing King Sextimus trumps her. Ray D’Ambrosio is a standout in this role, perhaps the best character in the show. Not held back in the least by the curse upon him (“King Sextimus will never talk until the mouse devours the hawk”), D’Ambrosio’s King speaks volumes with hilarious body lan-

guage and facial expressions. Never has an old man in tights been more appealing! Their son Prince Dauntless is very much like a whiny little boy begging for a toy as he pleads for a wife and is extremely childlike throughout, but Brandon Fouch is funny, sweet, and endearing, and handles the task with tender grace and skill. “Once Upon A Mattress” is an enjoyable romp with plenty of laughs and entertaining characters, sure to lighten your mood and leave you with a smile. Shows begin at 8 p.m. with two Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. The Sunday, March 24 performance will be ASL interpreted. Tickets are $22 general admission, $20 advanced admission, $18 seniors (62 and over), $10 students (17 and under), and $18 for groups of 12 or more. For more information or to purchase tickets, call (510) 791-0287 or visit www.stage1theatre.org. Once Upon A Mattress March 15 - 30 8 p.m. (Sundays: 2:30 p.m.) Stage 1 Theatre Newark Memorial High School 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org Tickets: $10 - $22


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

March 19, 2013

Page 40

THEATRE

Adam Magill and James Lucas star in Broadway West’s “I Hate Hamlet.”

SUBMITTED BY MARY GALDE PHOTOS BY DAN SPARKS Broadway West Theatre Company in Fremont presents the wonderfully funny comedy, “I Hate Hamlet” by Paul Rudnick, directed by Angie Higgins, March 22 – April 20. A young and successful television actor, Andrew Rally, relocates to New York, where he rents a marvelous, gothic apartment. With his television career in limbo, the actor is offered the opportunity to play Hamlet onstage, but there’s one problem: He hates Hamlet. His dilemma deepens with the entrance of John Barrymore’s ghost, who arrives intoxicated and in full costume to the apartment that once was his. The contrast between the two actors, the towering, dissipated Barrymore whose Hamlet was the greatest of his time, and Andrew Rally, hot young television star, leads to a wildly funny duel over women, art, success, duty, television, and yes, the apartment. Performance times are 8 p.m. on Thursdays through Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees:

March 31 and April 7 matinee performances begin with a continental brunch at 12:15 p.m., and the show begins at 1 p.m. The April 14 performance starts at 1 p.m. with refreshments during intermission. Regular ticket prices are $25 general and $20 for students, seniors and TBA members. Thursday, March 28, April 11 and 18 performances are $17 for everyone, with a bargain Thursday (no reservations – first come, first seat!) held on April 4 - all tickets $10. Brunch Sunday performances and Opening night are $25 for everyone. All ticket prices include refreshments. For reservations and information, call (510) 6839218, or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org. I Hate Hamlet Mar 22 – Apr 20 8 p.m. (Sundays at 1 p.m.) Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Tickets: $10 - $25

Call for art entries SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER We are pleased to announce the Sun Gallery will host an exhibition entitled “World View: Landscape in Contemporary Art.” Thanks to Jacqueline Cooper for this great theme which she describes as:

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

“Landscape painting is a very broad term. Traditionally, it describes the depiction of natural scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests. It can also cover the representation of the urban environment and, more broadly speaking, landscape may act as a background for figurative work where the narrative of the completed artwork relies upon the interaction of the two. The Sun Gallery is interested in exploring as broad an interpretation of landscape as possible and is soliciting submissions from artists that work in all media and across genres.” The show dates will be April 24 to June 1 at the Sun Gallery in Hayward. Artwork will be juried for entry digitally or by photo at no cost to the artist. We are calling for submissions of art for this exhibit, and as always look forward to the creative ways our members choose to address the theme of the show. Artwork can be any media including, but not limited to, painting, sculpture, glass-work, ceramics, drawing, and assemblage. The submission of multimedia pieces is also encouraged, including photography, digital collage, short films (5-10 min.) and soundscapes. Deadline for consideration of your work for our postcards and press release is Friday, April 5, and the final deadline for consideration of your work in the show is Monday, April 15. For complete information, visit: www.sungallery.org. Thank you, and we look forward to receiving your submissions!

Most Cars and Trucks

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

Exp. 4/30/13

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

$24.95+ FREON Easy Service we will check for leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only.

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 4/30/13

Exp. 4/30/13

TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

$79.

$89.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 4/30/13

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 4/30/13

RADIATOR FLUSH

$29.

95

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 4/30/13

$19.

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 4/30/13

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.95 6-CYL. $49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp. 4/30/13


TCV 2013-03-19