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Free Holiday Concert and Community Sing-along

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December 11, 2012

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Vol. 11 No. 76

BY PRAVEENA RAMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO

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n December 1982, Fremont Cultural Arts Council (FCAC) and the Committee for the Restoration of the Mission San Jose cosponsored the first Las Posadas, as it is celebrated today, in the Mission San Jose district of Fremont. Andrew Galvan, President, Board of Directors, Committee for the Restoration of Old Mission San Jose mentions that the celebration was started in honor of Father William N. Abeloe, pastor of St. Joseph Church/Old Mission San Jose from 1977-1981, who died in October 1982. This year as in the past, Mission San Jose district will celebrate a traditional Las Posadas from Friday, December 14 through Friday December 21 at 6 p.m. each day. Las Posadas, which in Spanish means “the inn” or “shelter,” is a traditional Christmas celebration that started in Mexico in the 16th century when the Spanish led an expedition to conquer the Aztec empire and Mexico became a Spanish colony. Catholic missionaries who came with the conquistadores found that the Aztecs celebrated the birth of their sun god Huitzilopochtli during the last days of December, around the winter solstice, at about the same time as Christmas. According to the Aztec story, Huitzilopochtli was conceived supernaturally by his mother Coatlicue. His brothers did not believe her and schemed to kill her. Huitzilopochtli came to her rescue and destroyed his brothers with a fire serpent. The Aztecs celebrated his birth from continued on page 9

BY GUSTAVO LOMAS The wonders of the world are magnificent and inspiring to say the least; a world full of splendid sights, delicate tastes and textures, and smells that can change a person’s mood in an instant. It is the sounds, however, that help to consolidate a moment into a memory. The way something sounds is a difficult thing to describe, and harder still when a person is lost within it. What if sounds did not echo but instead, were felt like vibrations of an earthquake? There are members of the community who not only have come to live such an experience but have also learned to thrive and share how it is they see beauty. The Virtuoso International Flute Ensemble will be helping these members of the community do just that.

This year on Saturday, December 15, Virtuoso International Flute Ensemble (VIFE) will host their 15th fundraising Christmas Benefit Concert to help raise money for Deaf Plus Adult Community (DPAC). DPAC is an “adult day program for people who are deaf or deaf/blind and have developmental delays.” In 2007, Nancy Eddy, co-founder of Deaf Plus Adult Community (DPAC) and mother of three adult children – two with special needs, was involved in a small group who wanted to simply take their children out and show them what it meant to explore. They would take them to shows, on bowling trips, and even rock climbing outings. Eddy was inspired to start her own non-profit organization by her youngest daughter, Christy, who has developmental disabilities and is also deaf. Finally, this year the dream came true. continued on page 9

Yoko’s Dance Academy

An enduring holiday tradition throughout the world is the entertaining ballet performance of the Nutcracker. Theatre companies look forward to this Christmas production, captivating audiences – young and old – everywhere. For those who have missed several excellent performances in the greater Tri-City area, there is still time to capture the magic and sights and sounds of The Nutcracker; to introduce youngsters to an enchanting evening filled with adventure, thrills and outstanding music and dance. Join young Clara on a magical adventure as her beloved Nutcracker comes to continued on page 11

Berkeley City Ballet

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 30

Sports . . . . . . . . 26

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 29

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 11, 2012

Washington Hospital Dietitian Offers Tips for Eating Healthy During the Holidays

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t’s no surprise that Santa is overweight considering all the tempting treats that seem to be everywhere this time of year. Eggnog, pecan pie, stuffing, and other high-calorie foods are part of the holiday tradition. But there are ways to indulge during the holidays without the traditional weight gain. “The average American will gain somewhere between five and 10 pounds from now through New Year’s Day,” said Kim Alvari, a registered dietitian and director of Food and Nutrition Services at Washington Hospital. “The problem is many won’t get the weight back off, so it’s best not to put it on in the first place. You can still enjoy the holidays. It really comes down to planning.” She encourages people to sit down and think about what the month of December looks like in terms of activities and plan ahead. With shopping, holiday parties, family gatherings, and other commitments, she said most people are overbooked. “It can get very chaotic without a basic plan,” Alvari added. “That can be stressful, and stress causes most people to eat more. It’s important to plan out your activities so you can anticipate what you need to get done and determine what is reasonable. Planning ahead can also help you avoid the tendency to overeat this time of year.” Alvari suggests “banking” calories so you can indulge in some of the treats you enjoy. For example, if you are going to a holiday party, try to eat a few hundred

calories less than normal for two or three days before the event. Choose Wisely “Think about what matters most,” she said. “You might enjoy many of the foods that are available this time of year, but you have had most of them before. So focus on the ones you really enjoy the most. Also, make smart choices when possible. For example, maybe you get just as much enjoyment out of pumpkin pie as you do pecan. A piece of pumpkin pie has 200 fewer calories than the pecan and a lot of good nutrients. So stick to pumpkin unless having a piece of pecan pie is really important to you.” People often drink more alcohol during the holidays, but alcohol is high in calories. She said consider how important a drink is to you. Would you rather have an alcoholic beverage or dessert? Alvari said it’s easier to make good choices if you don’t go to a party famished. She recommends eating a light snack before you leave home. “When you arrive at the party or event, look at the food table before you start eating,” she added. “Walk up and down and see what there is so you can make your choices. If you don’t, you will take everything because you don’t know what else there is. Then if it’s on your plate, you may feel obligated to eat it.” She also recommends offering to bring a dish to gatherings. That way you can bring a healthier option that you know you will enjoy.

Maggie Villagomez, registered dietitian at Washington Hospital, shows off the homemade holiday cookie mixes created by the Hospital's Food and Nutrition department. Oatmeal Cherry Chocolate Chip is the dietitians' version of a healthy cookie.The mixes make a great gift and are available for sale in the Washington Hospital cafeteria at 2000 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

Slim Down There are ways to slim down many of your favorite recipes by substituting some of the ingredients, according to Alvari. For example, use nonfat or low-fat cream cheese, mayonnaise, and sour cream instead of the full-fatted versions. Low-fat or nonfat Greek-style yogurt also serves as a good substitute for sour cream. Applesauce can be used in place of butter in some baked goods and adding nuts, whole oats, and dried fruits can make them healthier. She said you can also slim down portion sizes by using smaller plates. She suggests a nine-inch plate instead of the standard 12-inch size. “A smaller plate holds less food, so you can save 200 to 300 calories by reducing the size,” Alvari added. “If you are host-

ing a gathering, do your guests a favor by providing a smaller plate.” Staying physically active can also help to reduce stress and keep the added pounds off during the holidays. Make time to go to the gym or take a walk. “It really gets back to planning,” Alvari said. “With a little planning, you can find time to exercise and avoid impulsive eating. Take healthy snacks with you when you go shopping so you aren’t tempted to grab a cookie at the mall. Don’t just eat because it’s the holidays. Instead savor the foods you enjoy most and plan your eating so you can splurge on those special occasions when you want to go all out.” For more information about programs and services at Washington Hospital that can help you stay healthy, visit www.whhs.com.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

12/11/12

12/12/12

12/13/12

12/14/12

12/15/12

12/16/12

12/1712

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Diabetes Matters:Vacation Healthy Nutrition for Your or Travel Plans? Heart Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

Voices InHealth: Bras for Body & Soul

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Dietary Treatment to Treat Celiac Disease (New)

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Shingles

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Diabetes Matters: Ins and Positivity - A Positive Outs of Glucose Approach to Managing Monitoring Diabetes

Citizen Bond Oversight Committee Meeting November 8th, 2012

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Kidney Transplants

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Raising Awareness About Stroke

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Dietary Treatment to Treat Celiac Disease (New)

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Diabetes Matters: Back to the Basic Keys for Success (New)

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint Important Immunizations Learn If You Are at Risk for for Healthy Adults Liver Disease

The Weight to Success Do You Have Sinus Problems? Keys to Healthy Eyes

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Diabetes Matters: Back to the Basic Keys for Success (New)

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Citizen Bond Oversight Committee Meeting November 8th, 2012

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Wound Care Update

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Keys to Healthy Eyes

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Vitamins and Supplements How Useful Are They?

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart


December 11, 2012

“Johnny wants a pair of skates. Susie wants a dolly. Nelly wants a storybook; she thinks dolls are folly.” (Lyrics from “Jolly Old St. Nicholas”)

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any different cultures in the United States celebrate a variety of holidays during the month of December, often exchanging gifts with the ones they love. Unfortunately, some of those gifts may represent a safety hazard if they’re not suitable for the intended recipient. That’s why December is also recognized as “Safe Toys and Gifts Month,” to alert people to potentially dangerous gift choices, especially for the little ones on their lists. “We often counsel our patients and their families about gift and toy safety,” says Dr. Courtney LaCaze-Adams, a board-certified pediatrician with the Washington Township Medical Foundation. “The most important factor is whether or not the gift is age-appropriate.” These days, many toys are age-graded for safety reasons, as well as for the child’s developmental stage. The age declaration is usually right on the package in big, bold print. “Of course, some children may seem more advanced than other kids their age, but you shouldn’t overestimate a child’s capabilities,” Dr. LaCaze-Adams cautions. “A lot of these age recommendations are based on reasons such as choking hazards. For example, the government regulations on toys for children under the age of 3 specify that the parts of the toys have to be larger than 1-1/4 inches in diameter and 2-1/4 inches in length so that they are too big for the child to swallow.” When you’re buying a toy for your own child or someone else’s child, or if your child has received a toy from someone else, be sure to read the instructions and safety precautions that come with the package. Watch Out for Susie’s Dolly The warnings about toys with small parts also apply to stuffed animals and other types of dolls. “With stuffed toys and dolls, the eyes and noses should not be made of items that can fall off or be pulled off – or even be chewed off, since little kids put absolutely everything in their mouths,” she

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

7-year-old. Plus, you need to make sure there is always adult supervision when kids are playing with their toys. Let the kids play in the kitchen with you while you’re cooking, rather than letting them play alone upstairs.” Give Johnny a Helmet with those Skates Sports equipment also is often labeled for age suitability, but parents should make sure to instruct the child in the proper use of all sporting equipment – including wheeled vehicles such as bicycles, tricycles, scooters, roller skates, in-line skates and skateboards. “I always recommend that parents insist on having their children wear helmets at all times when they are playing on a moving object,” Dr. LaCaze-Adams emphasizes. “Set a rule in your home that the bike December is National Safe Toys and Gifts Month, a project led by Prevent doesn’t get ridden if the Blindness America. Dr. Courtney LaCaze-Adams, a board-certified pedia- helmet isn’t on. And that trician with the Washington Township Medical Foundation, encourages her includes helmets for kids patients and their families to make sure gifts and toys are age-appropriate who ride on the front or and to not overestimate a child's capabilities. back of an adult’s bike. says. “It’s also important to watch out for “Parents need to set a good example the clothing on a stuffed animal or doll. for their kids and be consistent when it Sometimes they come with bows or ribcomes to wearing helmets while biking, bons or strings that can present a hazard. skating or skateboarding,” she continues. “Stuffed animals and dolls should al“Keep the helmet right near the bike or ways be sturdy and well-made so that the other equipment. And be sure that each stuffing won’t come out of the seams,” she person’s helmet fits properly. Many sportadds. “And you should never, ever have any ing goods stores in the area will gladly stuffed toys located in areas where infants help parents make sure their kids have a or small children sleep to avoid the danger properly fitting helmet.” of suffocation.” Other Hazards Dr. LaCaze-Adams notes that if you Toys and sports equipment are not the have multiple children of different ages in only items that may present a hazard for your home, it’s a good idea to keep their youngsters. toys in separate locations. “One of the most common items that “Toy chests or large plastic containers little kids choke on or accidentally swallow with lids that close snugly can be a convenare the little round ‘button’ batteries that ient way to keep toys separated according to come with a variety of toys and even with age suitability,” she suggests. “You don’t the greeting cards that play music,” Dr. Lawant to make it easy for a 6-month-old to Caze-Adams says. “These button batteries get at toys that belong to a 3-year-old or a can cause problems with the stomach and

More than anything else this holiday season, Vera Packard, M.D., is especially grateful for an increase in community support and donations to the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation (HBCF) located in the Washington Women’s Center at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. “It was a high point of the year for us to be recognized by our community for making a difference in the lives of breast cancer survivors,” says Dr. Packard, who spent 20 years as a breast cancer surgeon in Brazil and has served as Executive Director of HBCF for the past four years. “We heard from many groups and individuals in the community who said they were interested in supporting a local service for breast cancer patients, rather than large national organizations,” she notes. “Their contributions would be merely a drop in the bucket for some larger organizations, but for us, the money we raise goes a long way in serving the women of our community.” Some of the highlights of the year’s fundraising efforts included: KEEP ABREAST Walk/Run HBCF held its 13th annual KEEP ABREAST Walk/Run event at Quarry Lakes East Bay Regional Park in Fremont on September 29. continued on page 5

The staff and volunteers of the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation (HBCF) provide emotional and financial assistance to women fighting breast cancer. Dr.Vera Packard, Executive Director, is especially grateful for an increase in community support and donations to the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation in 2012. For more information about HBCF, visit www.hersbreastcancerfoundation.org.

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intestines, as well as with the windpipe and esophagus if swallowed or inhaled.” Balloons are another item on Dr. LaCaze-Adams’s list of things to avoid for children under age 8. “When balloons pop, the pieces go everywhere,” she explains. “It only takes one piece of a balloon to get stuck in a child’s throat to cause a tragedy. One of the saddest stories I recall from my time as a pediatric resident was an 18-month-old girl who was playing with an older sibling who had a balloon. The toddler swallowed the balloon and died.” For gifts of clothing, make sure the items fit properly and won’t cause the child to trip or fall. Dr. LaCaze-Adams also recommends checking sleepwear labels to ensure that they are flame-resistant and to avoid clothes for small children that have strings or ribbons, which can be a choking hazard. When it comes to food gifts, she suggests checking food labels for ingredients that might cause allergic reactions or chemical sensitivities. “Some kids have severe allergic reactions to peanuts, for example,” she explains. “If you received food gifts that don’t have ingredient labels – such as a batch of homemade cookies or candy from grandma – be sure to ask whether the items have ingredients that might not be suitable for your child. Also, for kids under 1-year-old, don’t give them any small foods such as hard candies, raisins or nuts that have to be chewed, since they can be a choking hazard.” Nelly Had a Good Idea Among the best holiday gifts for children, according to Dr. LaCaze-Adams, are storybooks that you can read with them. “Even with books, you should make sure that they are age-appropriate,” she says. “Books with paper pages, for example, might not be suitable for little kids who may try to eat the pages. Instead, look for cloth books or books that are made of coated cardboard that are easy to clean since little kids love to get their smudgy, germy handprints on their books.” And what does Dr. LaCaze-Adams consider the ideal gift for the holidays? “Well,” she responds with a chuckle, “as the mother of a 4-month-old baby, I’d love to get a good night’s sleep!”


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December 11, 2012


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 3

This community fundraising event included a celebration of life, music, barbeque and an exposition featuring various HBCF sponsors. “This was truly an inspirational event,” Dr. Packard says. “With our increased visibility in the community, the event attracted Golden State Warriors guard Charles Jenkins, who walked with his mother, a breast cancer survivor. We raised over $100,000 thanks to the efforts of more than 1,000 event participants and 200 volunteers, including many local high school students. Our Community Expo featured 30 local vendors and organizations.” Fundraising from Alaska to South America (A2SA) Just days before the KEEP ABREAST event, Dr. Packard, Development Director Karen Jackson, and other staff members and volunteers at the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation met with two courageous young men who had decided to take the journey of a lifetime. “Neil Walsky and Jesse Frechione were biking from their home state of Alaska all the way to South America to raise funds for us,” Dr. Packard explains. “Walsky is leading this endeavor after experiencing his mother’s challenges and triumph of surviving breast cancer. He was by his mother’s side as she struggled to get essential products that insurance didn’t cover, such as lymphedema and post-mastectomy garments. This is what immediately attracted Walsky to us and our mission to help women with or without insurance, regardless of financial situation, to obtain the necessary postsurgical products and services.” Walsky is a recent college graduate in civil engineering and an ex-pro Switzerland hockey player. During their lifetimes, he and Frechione had racked up fewer than 1,000 miles on a bike between the two of them. Both believe, however, that this challenging adventure only adds more inspiration to their mission and increases their determination and passion to raise money for HBCF. Walsky and Frechione embarked on their journey on August 23rd and have biked through Alaska, Canada, Washington, Oregon and California. They currently are cycling through Mexico. From Mexico, they will ride through Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama before wrapping their journey up in Columbia. The entire journey will total roughly 7,000 miles. The A2SA riders have been featured in various news reports, including: Huffington Post, Huffington Post Canada, Huffington Post San Francisco, Good Morning San Diego, Fremont Patch, Bike World News, Bike198 and KTVU. To sponsor the cyclists, visit http://alaskatosouthamerica.com/sponsor-cyclists/. All funds raised will go directly to the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation. Breast Cancer Awareness Month Support “This year, during Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, several different local groups and organizations generously focused their efforts on raising funds for us,” Dr. Packard says.

Local organizations, schools and companies who contributed to HBCF during Breast Cancer Awareness Month included: • Panera Bread • Castlewood Ladies 18-Hole Golf Club • The Skyettes/Skywest Golf Course • James Logan High School • Washington High School • Newark Memorial High School • Irvington High School • Our Lady of Guadalupe School • District 10 Car Show • Fremont Fire Department • Yelp! • Moffett Towers Club • Acacia Creek Retirement Home • Longaberger • Barberia Hair Salon • M Salon • Pyramid Alehouse Brewing Company • O’Glory Organic Spa Products Your Support Helps Support Women in Our Community “We offer a comprehensive array of services to help breast cancer patients and survivors feel good about themselves again after they’ve experienced the pitfalls of breast cancer,” says Program Director Polly Sherman, RN. Services offered by the foundation include: Bras for Body and Soul – Private fittings for attractive post-surgery bras, camisoles and prostheses in a comfortable setting and compassionate environment. All fittings are provided by one of the program’s four professional breast-care specialists. Hair with Care – A wide selection of wigs to help breast cancer patients and other women going through chemotherapy cope with disconcerting hair loss. The wigs can be custom-styled by the program’s two wig consultants to suit each woman’s style preferences. Lymphedema Project – This project provides upper-body compression garments to treat the swelling caused by lymphedema, which can result from removing lymph glands during breast cancer surgeries. Some insurance companies including Medicare do not cover these garments therefore our project offers them at a substantial discount to breast cancer survivors. We Support, You Survive – A program to provide post-mastectomy undergarments to underserved women who are not covered by health insurance or cannot afford these products because of other circumstances. “In addition to an overwhelming sense of gratitude for the support of our community, I also feel a huge sense of responsibility to continue our work to serve more and more women in our community who face the struggle of battling breast cancer,” Dr. Packard emphasizes. “This is important work that we are all doing together.” Appointments for HERS Breast Center Foundation services are strongly encouraged, 510-790-1911. For more information about the foundation, visit www.hersbreastcancerfoundation.org.

Demonstration of teaching competency SUBMITTED BY JANET BASS, AFT In a report recently released on boosting the standards for teacher preparation, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) said that all future teachers should be required to meet a universal and rigorous bar that gauges mastery of subject-matter knowledge, much like the bar exam lawyers must take before they can enter the legal profession, and demonstrates competency in how to teach. The report, “Raising the Bar— Aligning and Elevating Teacher Preparation and the Teaching Profession,” issued by the AFT Teacher Preparation Task Force, urged a move toward a systemic approach to preparing teachers and a more rigorous threshold to ensure that every teacher is ready to teach. “School systems are raising the bar for students through the widespread adoption of the internationally benchmarked Common Core State Standards; we must do the same for teachers,” said AFT President Randi Weingarten. “It’s time to do away with a common rite of passage into the teaching profession—whereby newly minted teachers are tossed the keys to their classrooms, expected to figure things out, and left to see if they and their students sink or swim. This is unfair to both students and their teachers, who care so much but who want and need to feel competent and confident to teach from their first day on the job,” she said. In an April 2012 Peter D. Hart Research Associates survey of 500

novice K-12 public school teachers, one in three reported feeling unprepared on their first day. Teachers said the top problem in their training program was a failure to prepare them for the challenges of teaching in the “real world.” And new teachers were more likely to feel unprepared if they taught large numbers of special needs students or taught in a low-income or low-performing district. The report recommends three changes to truly improve teacher preparation and, by extension, teaching and learning: All stakeholders—teacher education institutions, K-12 schools, teacher accrediting agencies, state education boards, the federal government, education associations and unions—must collaborate to ensure that teacher preparation standards, programs and assessments are aligned around a well-grounded vision of effective teaching. Teaching, like the medical, legal and other professions, must have a universal, rigorous entry assessment that is multidimensional. Its components include subject and pedagogical knowledge and demonstration of teaching performance—in other words, the ingredients to be a caring, competent and confident new teacher. This assessment would be required of all future teachers, whether they enter the profession through the traditional or an alternative route. Primary responsibility for setting and enforcing the standards of the profession and for ensuring quality and coherence of teacher preparation programs must reside with K-12

teachers and teacher educators. The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), which established the standards for what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do, has agreed to convene the group of stakeholders to begin designing the standards and entry assessment. “The time is right for moving teaching into the ranks of the premier professions, such as law and medicine. The AFT has laid out a wise and bold vision for transforming the profession, and we are pleased to help ensure a coherent career trajectory that builds on professional knowledge and skills from pre-service through board certification and teacher leadership roles,” said NBPTS President and CEO Ronald Thorpe. AFT Executive Vice President Francine Lawrence, who chaired the AFT Teacher Preparation Task Force, said that top-ranked countries put substantial resources and time into preparing teachers, while the United States has taken a haphazard, inconsistent approach, including a patchwork of state-driven entry exams. “The time is long overdue for the United States to commit to a consistent approach that will lift the teaching profession by making the training and preparation of our educators more effective, efficient and rigorous,” Lawrence said. The report now goes to the AFT executive council for approval at its February meeting. View the report at: http://www.aft.org/pdfs/highered/raisingthebar2012.pdf

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December 11, 2012

Pat Kite’s Garden

BY PAT KITE

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love making Pomander Balls. This is a fun project for children’s groups, or youngsters with parents and grandparents. The aromatic pomanders get displayed around the house, infusing my castle with the scents of whatever ancient spices I have in my cupboard that need a life’s purpose. You really don’t need much effort for this project. I use medium-size oranges, but have tried apples and once, a large lemon. Aside from fruit, you need whole cloves… oodles of them. For the least expensive cloves, buy them by the bagful in markets catering to the multi-ethnic community. To insert the cloves into the orange, use a large needle or the tines of a fork. Pierce the orange all the way around, with the holes no more than one-fourth the way around. Now fill a small bowl with whatever spices you have too much of. Ideas include cloves, powdered cinnamon, allspice,

nutmeg, marjoram, grated orange peel, and/or pumpkin pie spice. Roll the pierced fruit in the spices, and place on a saucer. The orange is now covered with dark dots. Now insert the cloves. I just do this with my fingers, since I have gardener’s calluses. But if that seems much, find a thimble and use that.

The tops of all the cloves should touch, with the fruit surface entirely hidden. Recently I saw a photo where decorative pins and beads were interspersed with the cloves. This is a chance to investigate what’s at the bottom of your sewing box. To complete the pomander ball, you need to

stick a bobby pin or preferably a hairpin, in its top. Through this, thread a pretty holiday ribbon. This will eventually serve as a hanger. The final step is to let the newly constructed pomander ball totally dry out. This will take about two to three weeks. The pomander is ready when it is rock-hard to

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

the touch. As the fruit shrinks, the hairpin and cloves become firmly embedded. Pomanders were an early type of aromatherapy. In use since the 13th century, they continued to be popular during the times when folk threw leftovers and sewage into the streets. With the lack of sanitation came all sorts of diseases. People thought the stink was the direct cause of the epidemics. The general belief was the pleasing pomander scent could get rid of the disease in the air. We still have aromatherapy today, just because pleasing scents tend to make us feel happy or soothed. One pomander, apple or orange, will perfume a mediumsize closet. Smaller pomanders, from a lemon or lime, will perfume a large bureau drawer. My pomanders have remained scented for several years. They do look pretty too! Try it, just for season fun. Happy Newest Year

Wells Fargo’s Bay Area team members donate millions locally SUBMITTED BY MARIANA PHIPPS, WELLS FARGO BANK Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) recently announced that its team members donated $60.5 million during the company’s annual Community Support and United Way Campaign from September 4 – 30. In the greater Bay Area, local team members donated $11 million to schools and nonprofits. In 2011, United Way Worldwide named Wells Fargo the nation’s No. 1 Giving Campaign for the third year in a row.

“The results of this year’s campaign are testament to our team members’ deep, personal and ongoing commitment to building strong, stable, and thriving communities,” said Chairman and CEO John Stumpf. “Each year our team members give their time, money, and talent to make a difference in their communities. I am proud of the example they set.” Wells Fargo encourages team members to donate to any nonprofit, school or religious institution of their choice. One hundred percent of team member donations go to the organizations they choose. Wells Fargo pays all processing costs and it matches gifts to qualify-

ing schools through the campaign – and year-round – up to $5,000 per team member. In addition to monetary donations, Wells Fargo encourages its team members to volunteer their time for community service, part of the company’s commitment to finding local solutions for local needs. Volunteer work gives team members the opportunity to work directly with the people in their communities, where they can learn first-hand about their specific needs, as well as gain insight into how they can target their donations. For more information, visit www.wellsfargo.com.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Auto Review

Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Deserving More Attention BY STEVE SCHAEFER

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itsubishi has gone through some changes over the last few years. Some of the old favorite models, such as the rugged Montero Sport Ute and American built Eclipse, are gone, along with the stalwart Galant midsized sedan. Now, the compact Outlander Sport crossover has become the brand’s biggest seller. I first drove this pleasant little model almost exactly two years ago, when it was introduced. Since then, it’s picked up a Top

Safety Pick award from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and has helped move the metal at Mitsubishi dealers. With its RISE (Reinforced Impact Safety Evolution) body design technology, it protects occupants and shields against damage to the fuel system in a rear collision. Its looks have worn well, so the 2013 version isn’t heavily changed. Yeah, there’s a pretty significant revision to the bold, Lancer-inspired big-mouthed face, with new grille and fog lamps. New side sills integrate nicely with the revised rear bumper. Every Outlander Sport now comes with 18-inch alloy wheels - no cheap steels. There are two new colors. This is what you do when a car enters its third year to keep it fresh. Inside, it’s now quieter because of better insulation, and the seat fabrics are upgraded. From a health standpoint, the interior materials are lower in volatile organic compounds. You can pick from the ES or higher level SE model. Do you think the assembly plant has one barrel of chrome S’s and one of E’s and just switches them depending on which model is coming down the line? At least the name “Outlander” sounds like something you’d take on an adventure. Carrying over is the durable, proven 148-horsepower 2.0-liter four-cylinder. The EPA thinks fairly highly of this one, with an average of 27 miles per gallon (24 City, 31 Highway). That’s not going to impress any Prius owners, but it is better than the big

old SUVs of yore. I earned 24.2 mpg, but a lot of my driving is in commute traffic, so your mileage could be significantly better. There’s a manual five-speed transmission available in the ES model, but you can order up an upgraded continuously variable automatic. The SE comes only with the automatic, with a contrived six-speed manumatic sport setting. With its crossover SUV configuration, the Outlander Sport hauls stuff easily but still feels contained and taut in town. It sits up nice and high for seeing

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

over folks driving sedans in the daily commute. You can take the thing off road if you want, but you’ll probably want to order up four-wheel drive. My Rally Red tester had only two-wheel drive, which is fine for most folks. Every Outlander Sport is pretty well stocked with stuff

keyless entry, rain-sensing wipers (normally a luxury car feature), and more. My SE tester featured two nice options. For one, it seemed like the entire roof was one huge panoramic moonroof. It doesn’t open, but it does expose everyone to lots of sunlight, and it has cool lights around the edges that are a date-impressing novelty at night. The 710-watt Rockford Fosgate audio system, with subwoofer, added significantly better sound, although the speakers themselves didn’t seem that special. The Outlander Sport saves Mitsubishi a lot of taxes by being built in the good old U.S.A., but local content is only 20 percent. The engine and transmission are Japanese. Assembly quality felt fine to me, and I certainly had no issues during the car’s brief stay. There’s nothing that remarkable about the way it drives - it’s

when it arrives. Inside, there’s a 140-watt stereo system and a leather-wrapped shift knob and steering wheel. Every car these days has things like power windows, locks and mirrors, but the Outlander Sport also provides a full USB connection for your music and Bluetooth for your phone - and the FUSE handsfree link system. Interesting that this is the first car in which I’ve connected my phone with Bluetooth using only voice commands. The SE has more stuff than the ES, including standard SiriusXM Satellite Radio, two more speakers to hear it with, high-intensity-discharge (HID) headlamps, automatic climate control,

smooth and quiet where it needs to be, even though continuously variable transmissions don’t make a sporty gear change sound. The 148 horsepower is not exhilarating with 3,120 pounds to move, but it’s no slug either. The Outlander Sport starts out pretty inexpensive, to compete against a variety of models, from Hyundai Tucsons to Honda CR-Vs to Toyota RAV4s. The ES begins at $19,995, including shipping. My SE, with two-wheel drive but the fancy roof and powerful audio system, came to $27,170. Without the packages it would total just $23,000. Who’s buying the new Outlander Sport? Folks who know a good value, I’d say.

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 11, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Alert Neighbors lead to arrest SUBMITTED BY JAMES LEAL, NEWARK CHIEF OF POLICE On December 3, 2012, at approximately 11:48 a.m., residents in the area of the 6200 block of Madeline Drive noticed several males trying to force entry into a residence on Madeline Drive. A second witness noticed a suspicious vehicle parked in the area and provided a detailed description of the vehicle. As officers arrived in the area, the alert neighbor provided updated information that the suspicious vehicle was leaving the area. Based upon the information provided by both witnesses, Newark Police Officers located the vehicle as it left the area. The officers attempted to make a traffic stop of the vehicle, but the driver refused to yield to the officers. The driver of the vehicle lost control of the vehicle and struck another motorist on Mayhews Landing Road and Spruce Street. The other motorist was not injured. The suspects fled from their vehicle. The males ran west along the edge of the flood control channel, which separates residences between Mayhews Landing Road and Peachtree Drive. Officers from the Newark PD, Fremont PD, and CHP

searched the area for approximately 3 hours, until the driver, Carlos Morales-Villela of East Palo Alto was located hiding in the rear yard at 8230 Mayhews Landing Road. A.L. Schilling Elementary School, located on Spruce Street approximately 1 block from the search area, was secured as a precaution while the search was taking place. Unfortunately despite the efforts of the vigilant citizens, the residence on Madeline Drive was burglarized. The loss at this time is unknown. Inside the suspect vehicle were numerous, apparently stolen items. This is the second incident in the last few days where observant residents called police about suspicious people in their neighborhoods that resulted in the arrest of thieves and the return of property to victims. Investigating officers, Officer Ethan Katz, Officer Jeff Neithercutt and Officer Sean Eriksen are continuing the investigation. Carlos Morales-Villela was booked for residential burglary, evading police, resisting arrest, prowling and hit and run.

Fremont Police Log

Newark Police Log

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

December 5 Homeowner called to report a burglary that occurred on the 41200 block of Chiltern sometime on December 4, 2012 between 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. The front door was pried and kicked, but the unknown suspects did not enter the home. At approximately 10:20 a.m. Officers responded to the 3900 block of Mowry Avenue to take a commercial burglary report. Pry job on the register in the floral department. Officers are following up on possible suspect leads. Theft reported at Dale Hardware. License plate provided by witness. Subject tracked down at her home by Officer Torrico/Burkhammer and arrested is an adult female. At approximately 12:50 p.m. officers responded to Safeway at the Hub. An adult male was taken into custody by store security for shoplifting. He was arrested by Officer Chinn. Officer Sanchez made a traffic stop at Parkmont/Holland and arrested a 30 year old adult male for possession of narcotics for Sale, dangerous weapon - dagger, and possession of burglary tools. At 3:40 p.m. officers responded to the 45400 block of Coyote Rd to take a residential burglary report. Unknown suspect(s) entered through an unlocked bathroom window. Jewelry and electronic devices were taken. Investigated by CSO Ernst. December 7 A woman walking home from BART was robbed at gunpoint of her smart phone. Units flooded the area and searched the BART station and one train but no suspect was located. Several 911 wireless calls near Brown/ Research throughout the night with the subject acting bizarre. After second call, Ofc Settle locates a male who was detained for 72 hours for an evaluation.

December 2 Officer Neithercutt accepted a Citizen’s Arrest from Sears at 3:52 p.m. Deann Wharton of San Lorenzo was arrested for shoplifting. Officer Katz investigated a stolen auto at 36705 Cherry St. The vehicle was taken this morning, it is described as a white 1993 BMW 325i, 4- door, CA License #4SBW069. Officers responded yet again at 7:52 p.m. to the “Psychic House” on Thornton Avenue to a report of a disturbance call involving a male subject with an unknown object in his hand chasing a female subject. Due to the large number of people at the residence, the entire shift was needed to sort out today’s incident. In the end, Officer Ramos ended up arresting: -Dana Rodriguez of Newark) for possession of methamphetamine pipe and under the influence of drugs. -Sidronio Gomez of Newark for possession of methamphetamine pipe. -Marty Silliman for possession of a concealed knife. December 3 A family returned home to their residence on Mayhews Landing Road at 8:27 p.m. and found it had been burglarized during the day. Subsequent investigation revealed the items missing from this residence were currently at the City Yard in the trunk of the suspect vehicle from Dayshift’s burglary investigation. Units responded to a fight occurring inside of the Whiskeytown Bar at 10:10 p.m. Although Dispatch received multiple calls from patrons inside the bar while the fight was occurring, all the callers appeared to be suffering from varying degrees of memory loss upon the arrival of Police at the scene. Officer Smith resolved the problem for the night by arresting Isileli Fakalata of Menlo Park for being drunk in public. Fakalata was booked at FPD Jail. December 4 Officers responded to a request for assistance from the Melbourne (Florida) Police Department, two small children listed as missing and endangered were located at 1:13 p.m. The children were taken into protective custody in accordance with a Florida court order and placed with Child Protective Services. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Missing Juvenile Kristina Krage - 15 years old- walked away from her Glenmoor neighborhood home Friday, December 7, 2012 at 2:00 a.m. She is a special needs student. She is described as a white female, 5’4”, 170, brown hair and green eyes. She was last seen wearing blue jeans, a white t-shirt and black tennis shoes. She may be headed to Modesto or Richmond via BART. Anyone with information to Kristina’s wherabouts is asked to immediately contact the Fremont Police Department (510) 790-6800


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midnight through the following day with singing, dancing, and speechmaking. The Indians paraded under elaborate arches of roses, wearing their finest attire adorned with brightly tinted plumes. Special dishes were prepared, including small idols made of corn paste and cactus honey, huge bonfires burned in courtyards and on the flat roofs of their houses. The missionaries saw the similarities between the Aztec celebration and Christmas and used it to introduce the Aztecs to a new religion, Christianity. During this time, St. Ignatius Loyola suggested a Christmas novena, or special prayers, to be said on nine successive days before Christmas. A spirit of fun and joyful celebrations soon intermingled with the religious novena and the nine day celebration moved from the church to the community. In Mexico and in other Latin American countries Las Posadas starts on Dec. 16 with a processional led by children as soon as it gets dark. A child dressed as an angel heads the procession, followed by two more children carrying figures of Mary and Joseph on a small litter adorned with twigs of pine. Groups of boys and girls follow the lead figures, then come the adults, and last of all, the musicians. They sing and chant special Posada songs and walk slowly carrying a lighted candle. The processional stops at a previously selected destination, on each of the eight nights before Christmas, and asks for lodging for the night. The people are first denied shelter. They again request lodging and are then invited in to read the scriptures and sing Christmas carols called alguinaldos. After the carols are sung, everyone is given a basket of Christmas sweets called colaciones along with sandwiches, cookies and fruit punch. Then a very fancy piñata, filled with candies and nuts, is broken and the party begins. The nativity is left at the chosen destination and picked up on the next night when the processional begins again. On the ninth night, Christmas Eve, an impressive posada takes place. On this evening, an image of the Christ Child is carried in by two people who are called the godparents, and laid in His tiny crib in the nacimiento. In some Mexican cities the procession on the ninth day will start in the church courtyard, go through the community and end back at the church. In other cities there is a live enactment of the birth of Jesus with people dressed as Mary and Joseph, shepherds with animals and children giving gifts of flowers and fruits to the infant Jesus. The enactment ends with dancing, tamales and hot chocolate. Due to the Spanish influence in the Philippines, Simbang Gabi, the Filipino version of Las Posadas is celebrated. If you have never attended the Las Posadas celebration in Fremont, this is an experience not to be missed. This year, Las Posadas at the Mission starts on Friday, December 14 and will be celebrated through Friday December 21, 2012. The procession will

begin on the steps of the Mission Museum at 6:00 p.m. on Fridays December 14 and on December 21st. On the other nights, the celebration will start at the site of the designated host for the evening. Everyone is invited to experience this unique celebration where participants are from diverse cultural and religious backgrounds. Las Posadas begins every evening promptly at 6:00 p.m. The schedule is given below: Friday, Dec 14 (meet on the steps of the Old Mission Museum (at Washington and Mission Blvd., next to St. Joseph’s Church at 6:00 p.m.) Old Rectory 152 Anza St., Fremont. Anza St. Troubadours Traditional Christmas Music Saturday, Dec 15 Mission San Jose Museum Audio/Visual Room (Washington and Mission Blvd., next to St. Joseph’s Church), Entertainment ‘TBA’ Sunday, Dec 16 Dominican Sisters Motherhouse 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont. Madrigal Singers James Burris, Director Classical and Traditional Christmas songs Monday, Dec 17 Mission Coffee 151 Washington Blvd., Kristin Del Rio Christmas Mix and More Tuesday, Dec 18 Holy Family Convent 159 Washington Blvd., Fremont First United Methodist Church Choir Religious Christmas music Wednesday, Dec 19 Cheese Tasters 43367 Mission Blvd., Fremont Sharon De Sousa Christmas past, present and future – Classical and Contemporary Thursday, Dec 20 Better Homes & Gardens (Dutra Building), 43430 Mission Blvd # 100, Fremont Band of Gold Billy Smith and Knuti Van Hoven Pop and Country music celebrating the holidays Friday, Dec 21 (meet on the steps of the Old Mission Museum, next to St. Josephs Church at Washington and Mission Blvd. at 6:00 p.m.) Local History Museum 90 Anza St., Fremont Center Stage Singers Knuti Van Hoven, Director Christmas favorites

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Cataract surgery can mean freedom from glasses! “The goal here is to encourage, encourage interactions within the community as well as inform and hopefully inspire the community to become more involved with its deaf or deaf/blind and developmental disabled neighbors; a group that is often neglected,” Eddy stated. She has been able to renovate an area to accommodate a small computer lab, a sensory room for the deaf/blind, as well as a large space in the back of the building where there are possibilities for group exercise, acting lessons, arts and crafts, a rest area, with the possibilities for cooking and filmmaking experience in the works. “Our goal is not to just take in people, but to prepare them for living on their own. Not just deaf/blind adults but equally the developmental adults. We will be continuing basics and from there moving forward along side with them to help them utilize new found or modified living skills.” Eddy hopes to help many who have been in developmental centers move on and give them the opportunity to see how the world has changed. She wants to show them there is a place for them and that they can live on their own. “There was a man who I talked to who had been in the center since he was five years old, five, and he is now fiftythree. Back then a lot of people didn’t know what to do or know how to help the developmental disabled, so a lot of them were put into centers,” Eddy explained. “We are hoping this is the first of many events we will be able to have and hope to also gain more support form the community. Any and every kind of donation is appreciated: computers, toys, back-

packs, decorations, art and craft equipment, any and every little bit can help show the adults of the program they have not been forgotten by the cities in which they live in.” For now, they will have two to three adults to every one staff member. Staff members will be either deaf or interpreters and the facility will be open on January 7 of 2013 “or shortly after” Eddy exclaimed. “In the future we also hope to expand to at least twenty plus deaf/blind as well as any others who have disabilities. Communication is key and we want to help teach and strengthen the adults’ communication skills either through A.S.L or gestural programs. No restrictions, we want to institute a diverse way to dictate desires or needs.” The benefit concert takes place at Centerville Presbyterian Church in Fremont on Saturday, December 15 at 3 p.m. The concert will include some interpretive dance, an American Sign Language Choir, and of course, outstanding flute performances by the Virtuoso International Flute Ensemble directed by Judy Lam. Admission is free; raffle prizes will be given away and donations of any kind are welcomed. For more information, contact VIFE at (510) 979-9236 or DPAC at (510) 610-0170. To learn more about Deaf Plus Adult Community, go to www.deafplus.us. VIFE Christmas Benefit Concert Saturday, Dec 15 3 p.m. Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 979-9236 www.deafplus.us Free

In the past, choosing the type of lens to implant was made by the cataract surgeon; few options were available. All lens implants were monofocal, providing excellent vision after cataract surgery, but usually only for seeing things at a distance such as distant signs when driving, going to a movie or a ballgame. Corrective glasses were necessary for near vision activity: reading, knitting, sewing, playing cards or keeping your golf score. Today, Dr. Shobha Tandon is able to offer a choice – a multifocal lens. This type of lens provides excellent vision after cataract surgery at a variety of distances. Multifocal lens implants correct both your distance and near vision. For the vast majority of patients, having a multifocal lens implant means that they will be able to see at distance and up close - drive, watch television, read or do crafts - without glasses.

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Counseling Corner

To speak up Or not to speak up? BY ANNE CHAN, PHD, MFT Does this scenario sound familiar to you? You are really upset with a friend, a partner, a room-mate, or a co-worker. This person didn’t do something horribly evil, but what they did bothers you as much as a lingering cold in winter. You stew over this endlessly at work and at home — the annoyance bugging you like a bad rash that won’t go away. You talk about it with everyone except the person who wronged you – but talking about it with friends and colleagues only relieves your feelings temporarily. You imagine all kinds of scenarios in which you confront the person and you wish you had the courage to carry them out. However, for one reason or another, you decide not to speak up. It’s not a satisfying decision, but it’s the best one in your mind. The unresolved irritation continues to fester inside you. Friends, family, and colleagues can hurt us in a multitude of ways and in any day of the year – they might say the wrong thing, do something thoughtless, or act in a way that insults us. Whenever something hurtful happens, we are left with a choice point – to speak up or not to speak up? We’ve all probably been in situations when we swallow our feelings and don’t speak up. There are lots of reasons why we might choose to remain silent. Perhaps it’s too risky or even dangerous to do so, perhaps we fear saying something, perhaps we are afraid of damaging the relationship irreparably, perhaps we don’t know how to articulate our feelings, perhaps we feel foolish for our reactions, or perhaps we don’t feel confident that the other party would be receptive to what we have to say. Depending on your situation, it might be wise to remain silent. For instance, if you are in an abusive relationship or involved with someone with a violent temper, please seek consultation before you voice your feelings – it might not be physically safe for you to speak your mind. (A wonderful local domestic violence resource is SAVE: (510) 794-605) In other situations, it might be healthy for you and for your relationship to make the choice to speak up. In my personal life as well as from my professional experience as a psychotherapist, I have observed the following “side effects” from not speaking up: • Withdrawal • Increased tension, stress, and internalized anger • Passive-aggressive behavior (e.g. acting out in some other way to punish the other person) • Taking your feelings out on someone else • General unhappiness with your overall life (this can affect your loved ones as well)

• Physical symptoms such as insomnia, stomach aches, and headaches • Frustration • Increase in unhealthy behaviors to deal with the stress (e.g. eating unhealthy foods or drinking excessively) This is certainly not a happy list and it isn’t even a complete rendering of all the consequences of not speaking your mind! Sadly, there is a price to pay when you don’t get to speak your mind. Often, you are the one who pays that price. Of course, you can’t always voice your feelings. There are certain situations at work or in your personal life where it’s best to preserve the silence. However, if it’s not dangerous or risky for you to speak your mind and if it’s worthwhile for you to speak up, you might want to think about experimenting with saying what’s in your heart. There is no perfect formula for speaking up since each situation varies with the personalities of the people involved, their emotional capacities, and the history of the relationship. But here are some ideas to get you started: • Figure out the goal for having this conversation: do you want a better relationship? Better communication? Keep this goal in mind as you plan your talk with the other party. • Be clear about your personal goal for having this conversation – what do you want to see in yourself when you have this conversation? • Discuss a strategy for speaking up, preferably with an impartial person who can give you some objective feedback • Be honest about your feelings without being unkind and disrespectful to the other party • Propose a solution(s) for how the conflict can be resolved • Be interested in the other party’s perspective (even though this is extremely hard to do!) I’ll be the first one to tell you that it is not easy to voice your feelings when you’ve been wronged. There are, however, some clear benefits to be gained if your feelings can be aired and you can reach a better understanding with the other party. Not only will you experience relief from the “side effects” outlined above, you might also enjoy a strengthened relationship, a sense of personal empowerment and confidence in your growth as an individual. I wish you all a happy, healthy, and peaceful holiday season and may your feelings be honored and validated! Anne Chan is a career counselor and licensed psychotherapist in Union City. She specializes in helping people find happiness in their careers, lives, and relationships. Her website is www.annechanconsulting.com © Anne Chan, 2012

SUBMITTED BY PATRICIA OSAGE

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hat a wonky word; sequestration. I didn’t even know what it was until recently and now I want you to know because unless you are in the top – and I mean really top – percentage of earners, it will probably impact you or someone you care for. Sequestration basically means mandatory cuts to federal programs – sealing off money that was authorized by Congress but is now prohibited from being spent. Literally, the money is being “sequestered” or taken from the targeted federal agencies. Looming today on the D.C. horizon is one of the biggest sequestrations of all time: $1.2 trillion in mandatory cuts – half from the military, half from domestic programs. This is the very last thing our country needs right now in the midst of our ever-so-tenuous, stop-and-go road to economic recovery. If Congress allows this to go into effect, $1,800,427 will be taken away from home delivered meals to homebound seniors in California alone. In the Tri-City, we at LIFE ElderCare deliver 350 meals every day to some of your most vulnerable neighbors- maybe to you, or your mom or dad. Right now 16.48% of our state’s seniors are experiencing or are at risk of malnutrition. But here’s the problem, any “savings” from this sequester would quickly be seen as trivial when compared to the added costs that would assuredly result in premature nursing home placement for thousands of seniors. What’s cheaper? What’s easier? Keep a senior in their home and bring them a nutritious meal every day or place them in a nursing home because they can no longer cook for themselves? These cuts would also place greater financial strains on family caregivers and drive higher medical costs due to elders’ poorer nutrition and health, increased falls, and other avoidable crises. Did you know that a full year of Meals on Wheels for a senior cots approximately same amount spent in one day in a standard California nursing home? Did you know that the leading cause of fatal injuries in Alameda County for those aged 55-100. Falls are also the leading cause of nonfatal injuries coming in at a staggering 2,966 each year in your county. Spending a relatively tiny amount on basic, user-friendly Fall Prevention Programs and home-delivered nutritious meals can save incalculable amounts of public tax dollars at both the State and Federal levels. Senior population rates are skyrocketing and instead of cutting back now, we need to be ramping up with a well thought out spending plan that gives everyone their biggest, most effective ROI for every tax dollar they spend. The automatic wiping away of funding scheduled for Jan 3rd if parties cannot agree on how to do so. This indecision will cause some of the worst debt and job loss we’ve seen in our lifetime (yes, including 2008). Now that you know what sequestration is or maybe you knew already (heck, maybe everyone else know but me), please print out or cut out this article and send it to your representative right away. To find out who your rep is, go to www.house.gov and you can just enter your zip code. Thank you for caring enough to make your voice heard on behalf of many!


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life, battles the rat king, waltzes Clara through the swirling flowers of snow, and joins the Sugar Plum Fairy to reign again in his kingdom. Two dance companies will bring the delightful story to life at the Fremont Campus of Ohlone College over the next two weekends. Berkeley City Ballet presents its 39th Annual production of Nutcracker Saturday, December 15 and Sunday, December 16 followed by Yoko’s Dance Academy, an icon of the Tri-City Christmas season, on Friday, December 21 and Saturday, December 22.

(510) 659-6031 www.smithcenterpresents.com Tickets: $25 adults; $15 age 12 & under; $20 seniors/staff/students Smith Center Presents! Yoko’s Dance Academy The Nutcracker Friday, Dec 21: 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec 22: 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $15-$20

Berkeley City Ballet Nutcracker Saturday, Dec 15 & Sunday, Dec 16 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

Event Parking: $2

Bring your own bags Alameda County’s Reusable Bag Ordinance takes effect January 1, 2013 SUBMITTED BY JEFF BECERRA When the Alameda County Waste Management Authority’s Reusable Bag Ordinance goes into effect January 1, 2013, grocery stores and many other retailers selling packaged foods and/or alcohol will stop distribution of single-use bags at checkout. Recycled-content paper or reusable bags may be provided, if the retailer charges a minimum price of 10 cents per bag. To avoid the bag charge, customers should take their own shopping bags. The Alameda County Waste Management Authority adopted the Reusable Bag Ordinance in January of 2012 to further the agency’s long-term waste-reduction goals by helping to decrease the number of bags entering landfill. Plastic bags take hundreds of years to break down, causing a cumulative litter problem. The ordinance will also save cities money on litter and storm drain clean-up, which costs Alameda County jurisdictions approximately $24M every year. On January 1, 2013, jurisdictions in Alameda County join the 51 other cities and counties in California, including San Mateo, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles, working to reduce the number of single-use bags. All 14 cities and unincorporated Alameda County agreed to participate in the ordinance, increasing the number of jurisdictions with bag ordinances statewide by almost 30 percent. “Plastic bags harm marine life, are difficult to re-

cycle and are one of the most common litter items found in our creeks, storm drains and streets,” said Gary Wolff, P.E., Ph.D., Executive Director of StopWaste.Org. “By limiting the distribution of single-use bags and urging people to bring reusable bags, we expect to see far fewer plastic bags littering our cities in future years. One reusable bag can replace as many as 600 single-use bags over its lifetime.” The Reusable Bag Ordinance affects most grocery stores, minimarts, convenience stores, pharmacies and other retailers that sell packaged foods and stores that sell alcohol in Alameda County. Stores are still permitted to provide free plastic bags to protect and transport produce, bulk food or meat from display area within a store to the checkout or cash register. Restaurants and take-out food establishments are exempt from the ordinance. WIC and food stamp customers are not subject to the bag charge. To prepare, the Alameda County Waste Management Authority has been providing stores with resources and educational materials on the ordinance and conducting countywide outreach to help consumers and retailers prepare for the changes. For more information, visit www.ReusableBagsAC.org.

Crowdfunding fulfills hospital wish list SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER KERN Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland is taking part in the launch of the first-ever crowdfunded hospital gift catalog – www.GiveMiracles.org – as part of a national campaign led by the world’s largest crowdfunding-for-good platform, Fundly, and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. Through www.GiveMiracles.org, individuals wanting to give back with their holiday gifts can purchase critically-needed medical equipment and medical care for children at Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. Once donors choose their gift from the online catalog – ranging from comfort toys ($30), to a pediatric wheelchair ($970), to an entire hospital wing devoted to neonatal intensive care ($12 million) – they will receive updates on exactly how their gift is being utilized to benefit local children with critical medical needs. www.GiveMiracles.org is the first-ever online catalog of in-demand pediatric medical equipment, supplies and services that donors can purchase for one of 170 member nonprofit hospitals across North America. More about Fundly is at http://fundly.com/.

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Bank of America delays higher account fees AP WIRE SERVICE NEW YORK (AP), Bank of America is postponing an increase in monthly fees for checking accounts, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. The paper cited unnamed people familiar with the bank’s

plans saying that the new fees would be delayed until at least late next year. T. J. Crawford, a spokesman for the Charlotte, N.C. bank, had no comment on the story Saturday. Bank of America Corp. has been testing new fees in a pilot program in Georgia, Massachusetts

Why is Wall Street losing its appetite for Apple? BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER

and Arizona. The bank has been charging between $6 and $25 per month depending on the type of account and level of service. Banks are moving to collect more in fees as low interest rates make it harder to make money from lending.

Israeli beverage maker takes on soda super-giants

SAN FRANCISCO (AP), This holiday season is shaping up to be a record-breaking period for Apple as shoppers snap up iPhones and iPads. So, why is the world’s most valuable company losing its luster with investors? Apple began selling the iPhone 5 on Sept. 21, the same day the company’s stock hit an all-time peak of $705.07 per share. Since then, the stock has plunged nearly 25 percent, trimming the company’s market value by more than $150 billion. On Friday, the stock fell almost 3 percent and closed at $533.25. The sell-off has had broad impact. It has reached beyond Apple’s own stockholders because the company is the largest component in the Standard & Poor’s 500 and Nasdaq composite index – two benchmarks that are tracked by widely held mutual funds and exchange traded funds, or ETFs. Apple comprises 4 percent of the S&P 500 and nearly 12 percent of the Nasdaq, according to FactSet. The Nasdaq has shed 6 percent since Apple’s stock price peaked while the S&P 500 has declined 3 percent, the same as the Dow Jones industrial average, which doesn’t include Apple in its basket of 30 stocks. Apple’s abrupt descent is fueling a debate among marketwatchers. Is the stock now a bargain, as some would argue? Or, is the recent markdown in Apple’s value justified because the company has entered a phase of less innovation and slower revenue growth? Disagreements over the issue are contributing to unusual volatility in the stock. On Wednesday, Apple’s stock fell 6.4 percent, the biggest one-day drop in more than four years. Just two-and-half weeks ago, the stock surged 7.2 percent for its biggest one-day gain in three years. There’s no consensus regarding the cause, but one thing is clear: There have been more investors eager to sell Apple’s stock than buy it in recent months, despite all the evidence indicating Apple’s products have never been more popular. Here are three theories that seek to explain the recent downturn in Apple’s stock: Theory: The Competition Conundrum Hypothesis: Apple’s grip on the growing mobile computing market is loosening amid a wave of cheaper alternatives to the iPhone and iPad. The iPhone’s early lead in the smartphone market already has been surrendered to the more than 500 million devices running on the free Android software made by Google Inc. By comparison, as of the end of September, Apple had shipped 271 million iPhones since its 2007 debut. Nokia phones running on the recently released Windows 8 system from Microsoft Corp. pose a new threat, especially in China, where Nokia has struck a deal with that country’s largest wireless carrier. Meanwhile, struggling Research In Motion Ltd. is pinning its comeback hopes on a revamped operating system for the once-iconic BlackBerry to rekindle demand for that device. Now, there are signs the competition is putting pressure on Apple in the booming tablet computer industry that it launched in 2010 with the release of the iPad. In a report that likely contributed to Wednesday’s steep drop in Apple’s stock, research firm IDC predicted the iPad’s share of the worldwide tablet market this year will decline to 54 percent from 56 percent in 2011. IDC said the iPad will dip below 50 percent by 2016. Meanwhile, the market share of tablets powered by Android, including Google’s Nexus line and Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire, has climbed from 40 percent last year to 43 percent his year, according to IDC. Windows 8, which is designed to run on tablets, also is expected to chip at Apple’s lead and latch on to 10 percent of the market by 2016, IDC said. The popularity of smaller tablets with seven-inch diagonal screens and retail prices below $200 has already forced Apple to make changes. The company responded by introducing the iPad Mini, which features a nearly eight-inch screen. The iPad Mini sells for $329, which helps Apple protect its profit margins and preserve its reputation for selling top-of-the-line products that merit prices a notch above the competition. Nevertheless, the iPad mini is undoubtedly diverting some sales from full-sized iPads, which sell at prices ranging from $399 to $829. That is one of the reasons BGC Financial analyst Colin Gillis expects the iPad’s average selling price to fall by about $50 in the current quarter, which ends this month. That would be a 9 percent decline from the iPad’s average price of $535 during the July through September period. Even if it’s no longer the market leader, the iPhone remains hotter than ever. Based on figures released by wireless carrier AT&T earlier this week, Jefferies analyst Peter Misek predicts Apple will sell 53 million iPhones this quarter, primarily the newest model. That would be a more than 40 percent increase from Apple’s previous one-quarter record of 37 million iPhones set in the period covering last year’s holiday shopping season.

JERUSALEM (AP), An Israeli maker of home soda machines hopes to make a splash in the U.S. soft drink market through a global advertising campaign it will launch during Super Bowl XLVII. For SodaStream, the advertising push marks a bold – and risky – bet on tapping into the tastes of the world’s largest soft drink market. But opposition from major beverage makers and criticism of the company’s operations in a Jewish settlement in the Israeli-occupied West Bank could hinder SodaStream’s goal of making it big in the U.S. The company has long been a target of pro-Palestinian activists who promote boycotts of settlement products. The company says it is the world’s biggest manufacturer and distributor of home beverage carbonation systems, which it is trying to position as a cheaper and environmentally friendly alternative to bottled soft drinks. SodaStream says its machines offer a simple and compact, doit-yourself solution for those who want to carbonate their own drinks. “This is the new way to do soda. We’re revolutionizing it,” said SodaStream CEO Daniel Birnbaum. “There exists a smarter way to enjoy soft drinks, getting the bubbles without the bottles.” He said the world’s soft-drink giants are relying on an outdated business model, and have hurt the environment by generating some 1 billion bottles each day. SodaStream’s drinks can be made one glass at a time, or can fill reusable bottles, then flavored with juices or other mixers. SodaStream has enjoyed widespread success in Europe. It says 25 percent of Swedish households use its products, and reports similarly high rates in countries like Finland and the Czech Republic. But in the U.S., the household penetration rate is just 1 percent. Birnbaum is confident that with his publicity blitz, beginning with the Super Bowl, he can gradually bring that number closer toward the European levels. “We’re talking about revolutionizing consumer habits and behavior, but it’ll happen,” he said. The company has been in the U.S. for only about four years. To make its machine more desirable, it has formed partnerships to offer a variety of concentrated, liquid flavors that users can squeeze into their water. For example, users can make drinks with Kraft’s Kool-Aid. The Super Bowl, advertising’s largest showcase, provides a golden opportunity for SodaStream to put itself on the map. Last year, the National Football League’s championship game garnered an estimated 111.3 million viewers, according to Nielsen. But it comes at a great cost. A 30-second spot costs about $3.5 million, no small sum for SodaStream, which reported net earnings of $27.5 million in all of 2011. Industry experts remain unconvinced about the product’s true potential and reach. John Sicher, editor and publisher of the trade publication Beverage Digest, said he was skeptical about SodaStream’s prospects and predicted it could fizzle. While the product is interesting, he said it would probably remain a niche item. Soft drink volume has steadily dipped in the U.S. by 1 to 2 percent a year since 2005. “Certainly the cool gadget factor of it and the novelty will attract some users, but people like consuming brands,” he said. “SodaStream is not to be considered a phenomenon.” Wall Street liked SodaStream’s growth prospects, driving it up to a peak near $80 in mid-2011. The love affair has cooled, and the stock is now trading around $40.

continued on page 36

continued on page 38

BY LAUREN E. BOHN ASSOCIATED PRESS


December 11, 2012

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Local REALTOR® receives award SUBMITTED BY WCR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Gregory T. Jones, Hayward-based owner and Realty World Neighbors REALTOR®, has been awarded the Performance Management Network Designation by the Women’s Council of REALTORS? (WCR). The Performance Management Network is a next-generation REALTOR® designation designed from the ground up to deliver the real-world skills, know-how and tools to keep an agent’s business out front and on top of an evolving real estate market. Jones is also the incoming President 2013 of the Tri-Cities Chapter of WCR. PMN curriculum is driven by the following topics: negotiating strategies and tactics, networking and referrals, business planning and systems, personal performance management and cultural differences in buying and selling. For more information, visit WCR.org.

Students offer service at out-patient clinic SUBMITTED BY IRIS MURILLO Life Chiropractic College West recognized 28 students starting public practice in the college out-patient clinic. This group of students, under the tutelage of professional staff doctors, will proved services to citizens of Hayward and surrounding communities at significantly reduced costs, providing valuable health services to the community, while supporting the growth and development of students. Eighteen graduating students were also recognized for completion of clinical requirements. Life West graduates, James Beadle and Heather Isensee, received special recognition for presentations they made earlier this quarter to the entire student body. In addition, Roberto Rosas received Intern of the Quarter award for Fall 2012. Dr. Kathleen Kinney, Dean of the Health Center, states, “This ceremony marks a major milestone for our senior interns who have demonstrated exceptional knowledge and skill having attained this level in their education. They are now ready to deliver outstanding chiropractic care to patients at Life West and beyond.” For more information, visit: www.lifewest.edu.

CSU on pace for record applications SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE THARA Despite early concerns about state trigger cuts and enrollment reductions, the fall 2013 application cycle appears to be on pace to set another CSU record. As of November 18, CSU has received 368,157 applications – an increase of about seven percent from this time last year – and expects that number to nearly double by the time the priority application period closes on November 30. Transfer applications are leading the growth with 113,520 so far this year, a 20 percent increase from the

previous year. At least part of the rise in transfer applications is due to CSU’s closing of spring 2013 enrollment to all but a very limited number of students. Typically, potential CSU students submit applications to more than one campus and application numbers are not necessarily a reflection of the total number of potential students. However, the high number of applications underscores the continued demand for higher education, which the CSU has not been able to meet due to decreased state funding support. The system held applications from new students pending the outcome of Proposition 30, which had a direct impact on funded enrollment targets due to the potential for $250 million in trigger cuts. Having avoided those cuts, CSU campuses are able to admit 10,000 to 15,000 more students than otherwise possible and will now begin processing applications. Potential CSU students are encouraged to apply before the priority application period ends on November 30 by going to CSU Mentor. The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 427,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. For additional information, visit www.calstate.edu.

SUBMITTED BY AISHA KNOWLES Take a picture with Santa on the antique fire engine, get the latest holiday safety information, have some milk and Otis Spunkmeyer cookies, sing holiday carols, and listen to firefighters read their favorite holiday story, “A Firefighter’s Night Before Christmas”! All proceeds will go towards supporting the Alameda County Firefighters Holiday Toy Drive, which partners with local non-profit organizations in the Tri-City area to help grant holiday wishes to children and families in need in Newark. This event is sponsored by the City of Newark, the Alameda County Fire Department, and Alameda County Fire Fighters Association - Local 55 Charity Fund. For more information or to make a donation please call, Aisha Knowles at (510) 618-3479 or email aisha.knowles@acgov.org, or visit: www.acgov.org/fire. An Evening with Santa at the Fire House Sunday, Dec 16 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. 7550 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 618-3479 www.acgov.org/fire Cost: $10 donation per photo (optional)


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Moreau Leo Club BY SIMON WONG PHOTO BY SIMON WONG Union City Lions Club is the proud sponsor of a Leo Club at Moreau Catholic High School, Hayward. Moreau Leo Club has approximately 25 members, thanks to the efforts of Charter President Freshman Krisel “Sam” Ong who was sworn-in with another officer and member before signing the club charter on Sunday, November 4, 2012 at Heritage Way, Union City. The purpose of Leo Clubs is “to promote service activities among the youth of the community which will develop the individual qualities of Leadership, Experience and Opportunity. To unite its members in friendship, fellowship and mutual understanding.” Jim Graver an active member of the Glenside Lions Club, with the help of William Ernst, another local Lion, chartered the first Leo club with 35 high school boys on December 5, 1957 at Abington High School, Pennsylvania, where Graver coached baseball. The Club adopted the high school’s colors of maroon and gold and also created the acronym Leadership, Equality, Opportunity for the word “Leo.” Subsequently, Experience was substituted for the word Equality. Leo members acquire Leadership skills as project organizers and motivators of their peers. Through Experience, they learn how teamwork and cooperation can bring about change in their community and the world. Leos have the Opportunity to develop positive character traits and receive recognition for their contributions. In 1964, the Leo Club program became a sponsored program of the Lions district. Three years later, it had become an official youth program of Lions International with more than 200 clubs in 18 countries. By the end of 1968, the program had 918 clubs in 48 countries. Today, the Leo movement has 150,000 members in 2,550 Alpha Clubs and 3,550 Omega Clubs in 138 countries. Alpha clubs, often school-based, focus on the individual and social development of teens aged 12-18 years. Omega clubs, usually communitybased, focus on the personal and professional development of young adults aged 18-30 years.

“Union City Lions Club welcomes Moreau Leos,” stated the installing officer, Lions Club President [retired Union City Police Chief ] Greg Stewart. “The Lions Club is a great organization and I’m happy that I became involved. Our motto is “We Serve.” Community service is our cornerstone; we try to do the best we can by the people we serve. As Leos, you will serve, too. Many of the Lions’ activities are possible only with your help. It speaks volumes to your character that you should be interested in serving the community. I commend you. One of the greatest things you can do in this life is serve your fellow man; we all need help at one time or another. We all have a duty to try and make this world and our community better. This is what the Leos and Lions try to do. Those who are freshmen can look forward to an enjoyable four years.” Stewart installed Anthony Wu as a member, Gabi Blanch, as Vice President (VP) and Sam Ong as Charter President. Other officers and members were unable to attend and will be installed in a separate ceremony. “On behalf of the officers and members, I welcome you to the Moreau Leos Club. You’ve been invited to become a member and we’re all happy and proud of your decision to accept. Membership is a privilege. You’re about to enter a world-wide program that began in 1967 as an official activity of the Lions Club International. Leos’ goals include high moral standards, personal responsibility, an attitude of cheerfulness and understanding and extending a helping hand to those in need. Now, in your community and with your acquaintances, a series of challenges awaits. You are not alone in your efforts; you can always count on the encouragement and cooperation of your fellow Leo Club members, officers and Leo Club Advisor Lion Helen Kennedy. They’ll gladly help you achieve the high goals which you’ve adopted. Once again, congratulations on joining this Club. Please raise your right hand and repeat the Obligation of Membership.” “I, Anthony Wu, in the presence of the members of the Leo Club, take on this solemn obligation to abide by the constitution and by-laws of the Club, to attend all meetings and contribute my fair share towards the financial support of the Club. I

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR

T

he beloved Union City icon, Paddy’s Coffee House, is closing its doors—but not forever! After nearly a ten year run, the lease on the current Smith Street location is expiring. The downturn of the economy over the past several years has taken quite a toll and small, local businesses are suffering. With hope to continue the vision begun in 2003, owner Paddy Iyer has been scouting out a new location and intends to reopen in 2013. Paddy’s has been a fixture in the neighborhood. As Union City Landing was constructed nearby, Paddy’s retained its familiar, cozy atmosphere. It has been called a “cultural hub” and is a second home to college students, couples communing over a steaming cup of coffee, and startup musicians on open mic nights. The presence of this little coffee house will be sorely missed and faithful patrons eagerly await its return. Iyer left the software industry and decided to open an independent coffee shop in 2002. He and his wife quietly opened the doors to the coffee house in February 2003, with no grand opening or fanfare. They intend, however, to go out with a bang and have a Grand Closing planned for December 15; a potluck event as guests are encouraged to contribute to the community spirit by bringing food for the celebration and donations for needy families. The coffee house is firmly invested in the community in every way. Beans for the coffee are purchased from local roaster McLaughlin Coffee

(l-r) Union City Lions Club President Greg Stewart, Anthony Wu (charter member, Moreau Leo Club), Gabi Blanch (charter Vice President, Moreau Leo Club), Sam Ong (charter President, Moreau Leo Club), Cindy Nguyen (President, Logan Leo Club), Leo Club Advisor Union City Lion Helen Kennedy, Heritage Way, Union City, November 4, 2012.

further declare that I will assist in maintaining, building and strengthening the Club’s membership, that I shall help the Club by actively serving on committees and in other capacities where my efforts are needed and, finally, that I shall develop in myself those qualities of cheerfulness, service and loyalty which should characterize a Leo Club member at all times.” Vice President Gabi Blanch will occupy the position of President if the incumbent cannot perform his/her duties. In this event, the VP has the same authority as the President and will fulfill that role accordingly. The VP will also help the President by fostering unity among Leo Club members with the sponsoring Lions Club and Leo Club Advisor. The VP also assists and supports the President’s initiatives for service projects. President Sam Ong is the chief executive officer of the Moreau Leo Club. The President must foster unity among Club members, work with the sponsoring Lions Club, Leo Club Advisor, preside at all meetings, be the chairperson of the board of directors, ensure all committees function properly, call regularly for committee reports and oversee regular elections. The President also determines service needs in the community and motivates Club members to respond generously. “You’ve made an excellent decision. Our guest Cindy Nguyen, Logan Leo Club President, can vouch for that,” said Helen Kennedy, Leo Club Advisor for the Union City Lions Club and who is also an alumna of the first class of girls at Moreau and member of the Class of ’73 with Stewart. “Charter members must build the Club in addition to

Company. Treats are made from ingredients found at the farmer’s market, located just across the street. Paddy’s is also a green business, recycling and reusing enough to produce less than 1 percent in garbage. It was one of Union City’s first green businesses, and the first restaurant in the Tri-City area to be certified as a green business. Paddy’s Coffee House has been a hub of activity with comedy nights, art shows, voter registration drives, fundraisers, live music, and book exchanges. It’s a place where friends and neighbors come together. It is difficult to be a small business owner in this economy. With so much competition from larger chains, small businesses rely on faithful customers who believe in supporting a local economy. Regulars at Paddy’s will miss the old place tremendously, as it has been such a fixture in their lives and their neighborhood. Iyer promises to continue the Paddy’s brand and is working to reopen in a new location. Join Union City citizens in celebrating the success of a great small business. The coffee house will be open from 8 a.m. until closing. For more information, check out Paddy’s Coffee House online at www.facebook.com/paddyscoffee or www.twitter.com/paddyscoffee. Paddy’s Grand Closing Saturday, Dec 15 8 a.m. to Closing Paddy’s Coffee House 3900 Smith Street, Union City (510) 324-8572

Continued funding to address gang violence SUBMITTED BY LT. ROGER KEENER Hayward Police Department (PD) is pleased to announce the receipt of a grant to continue its gang reduction efforts. In 2007, Governor Schwarzenegger announced the creation of the California Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention (Cal-GRIP) initiative to provide a comprehensive approach to addressing gang violence. Through this initiative, Hayward PD developed the Hayward Positive Alternatives for Youth (HPAY) program. Hayward PD has previously been awarded the grant which is due to expire at the end of 2012. HPAY’s goals include increasing youth’s ability to resist violence and other negative behaviors, improved academic performance and reduced gang membership. The program provides age-appropriate services to Hayward’s ele-

mentary and high school students and their families. Partners in HPAY include the Hayward Unified School District, La Familia, the Choose College Education Foundation, Horizon Services and Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center. HPAY targets truancy, suspensions, expulsions and alcohol and drug abuse. The two-year grant of $500,000 will help fund the continuation of a Gang Prevention Specialist and two Youth & Family Services Bureau (YFSB) case managers and the resources required by the HPAY partners to continue the program which has served more than 4,600 participants including youth, parents and teachers resulting in a much better understanding of the negative impacts of gang involvement and lower truancy and suspension rates. For more information, contact Lt. Keener at Roger.Keener@hayward-ca.gov

undertaking community service. Your names’ inclusion on the Charter is very special. Our clubs enjoy longevity and founding members are recorded in their histories in perpetuity. The Union City Lions Club charter is 50years old; though we might not know them personally, we respect and remember the founding members who established the tradition of community service in Union City. Legend has it that the water damage on it arose when the Charter President, who was the Fire Chief at the time, rescued it from a burning building; that’s how important this document it is. The Logan Leo Club, founded with fewer than 25 James Logan High School students, is 30-years old and now has more than 200 members; their charter is displayed on special occasions, too.” The Moreau Leo Club charter also bears Katrina Sison’s signature. Sison completed the administrative work late last year as Organizing President with the help of then Leo Advisor Lion Gloria Watson. Unfortunately, there was little time left to recruit members. In the summer, Kennedy mentioned the new Leo Club to friends whose daughter, Sam Ong, was keen to be involved. Nguyen has been a Leo for four years and is sharing her experience with Ong. Moreau and Logan Leo Clubs plan to make more than 600 cards to bring festive cheer to Washington Hospital patients who will not be discharged before Christmas. Moreau students interested in joining the Moreau Leo Club should contact Krisel “Sam” Ong. For more information about Lions and Leo Clubs, visit www.LionsClubs.org


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Cheeni For Tots makes “Diwali fun for kids” SUBMITTED BY RAKHI SHARMA PHOTO BY DR. VISHAL SHARMA “You did a really good job! It was a boost of confidence for the kids, the type of boost that cannot be bought,” gushed Rina Mal, a mother who attended the Cheeni For Tots “Diwali Fun for Kids” event with her two children on November 17. The event, co-sponsored by the Alameda County Library, was an unequivocal success based on the reactions of “wonderful, definitely awesome and a big thumbs-up,” heard from parents after the event. In fact, anticipation had been building for over two weeks, ever since the first posters showed up at the Fremont Library. Cheeni For Tots, with its online and interactive language and culture immersion programs, builds a strong foundation for kids while enabling parents and kids to spend quality fun time together. The library event kicked-off with Rakhi Sharma, Co-Founder of Cheeni For Tots, welcoming the over 110+ attendees - parents, kids, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts – everyone filled with anticipation and excitement. Sharma announced the launch of Cheeni For Tots’ brand new website, and the fact that its engaging content had been accessed from more than 170 nations in just 2012 alone! The kids learned of the significance of Diwali – the Festival of Lights, through the story of the Ramayana (an ancient Indian epic), narrated by Sharma while over 50 eager kids hung onto her every word. As the story proceeded, the kids were involved and chiming in every step of the way. They quickly learned and recited the poem “Aayi Diwali!” (Diwali is Here!). The highlight of the evening was the Talent Show, which kicked-off with a melodious incantation to Lord Ganesha by none other than Cards-by-Tots’ designerin-chief, 10-year old Urvi Sharma. With a

Kids learn the significance of Diwali, the Festival of Lights, with Rakhi Sharma, Co-Founder, Cheeni For Tots.

focus on creativity, entrepreneurship, and awareness in kids, it was only apt that they sponsor the Art Contest. As Urvi explained, Cards-by-Tots is her attempt to share her creativity with the world, while raising awareness (both her own and her audience’s) about issues affecting us all, such as health, conservation, wildlife, and the environment. The Talent Show included over 33 performances from kids ages 4 to 10. There was singing, dancing, and playing of musical instruments, and reciting of shlokas (verses), poems (some even self-composed by the budding poet laureates), ditties, and short speeches. With devoted parents eagerly snapping photographs and shooting video clips with smartphones, it was a sight to behold. Everyone was thrilled to see two sets of sisters make the house swing to contemporary Bollywood tunes. From the international sensation KolaveriD to the foot-tapping hit “Aunty-ji,” these

talented little performers had the house clapping in unison to the beats. The performances came in multiple languages, English, Hindi, Tamil, and Telugu, to name but a few. The other highlight of the evening was the prizes for coming bedecked in festive attire. One could see the little ones –boys and girls – dressed in their very best and proud parents pleased with their handiwork. Boys in shiny silk kurtas (long shirts) and stylish “churidars,” (tight-fitting trousers), and little girls dressed in colorful saris (traditional Indian women’s attire), bangles, and beautiful ornaments. It was colorful, bright, and cheerful! The award for the “Best Festive Dressed” went to a five-year old, who stole hearts by holding her own in a sari for the better part of the evening. The event concluded with certificates awarded by two very special guests – Shambhu Rao, Chief Evangelist of Indian-

American.org, and the Silicon-Valley-based US Editor/Bureau Chief of the Indian Express, and Karen Pacheco, Fremont Library’s Children’s Services Supervisor who is a big supporter of Cheeni-for-Tots’ community efforts and helped make the event happen. A bunch of excited kids crowded around Rao and Pacheco, eager to grab their certificates. Of course, there were the obligatory photographs at the end, with dads, cameras in hand, clicking away as an enthusiastic crowd of kids, moms, organizers and the special guests lined up to say “cheese”! The sentiments of Nilam Singh, a mother of two, summed it all up, “We liked it a lot; my daughter especially enjoyed the Diwali story. Actually, I was regretting not enrolling her for the contest!” Well, for that there’s always “New Year Fun for Kids!” For more information about “Cheeni for Tots” visit www.cheenifortots.com.


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

2

3

4

5

6

9

B 191 7

8 7

10 11

12

2

14 15 16

20

17

18

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Tri-City Stargazer DECEMBER 12 – DECEMBER 18, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Since November we have experienced a parallel between Saturn and Neptune. This will continue through early January. Saturn rules hard core reality, the rules, and limits of our lives. Neptune rules the spiritual, the ethereal, that which is illusive or having no boundaries. Saturn's practicality displays the "lie behind the curtain" as seen in the Wizard of Oz. Neptune represents that which is perfect or ideal. It often suggests illusions. We must cultivate hope and optimism, lest we fall into despair. Yet our dreams need to be based upon something realistically possible, or we might never accomplish anything. This is a theoretically perfect arrangement for Congress to find compromises between what is real and what is possible in order to sidestep the fiscal cliff. . Aries (March 21-April 20): You have more energy than you know how to burn! This is a good week for workouts. Good news or helpful information comes to you from one or more of the following sectors: publishing, education, places of worship, travel and the law. Travel is possible. Taurus (April 21-May 20): This is not the best of weeks to embark on a new sexual encounter, or a new broker/financial manager relationship. Your judgment is cloudy in these areas. Those who look like new friends may become a source of disappointment. So be really cautious. There may be concerns about your partner’s resources. Gemini (May 21-June 20): This week is all about communications of every sort. Even you will be talking, speaking, and writing way more than is normal. Some of your discussions will be intense, so be prepared. Read or at least scan all new information coming your way. A fresh piece of data might just be what you need to fill in the gaps. Cancer (June 21-July 21): Your energy level is good. Positive outcomes related to your partner

and/or children are reflecting well upon you. Almost anything you set out to accomplish is handled in unusually quick time. You have what it takes to be a warrior on behalf of yourself or others. People will listen to you.

communications could go awry. Don't allow a misperception to ruin a day. Discuss it immediately, if possible. You may encounter a short period of brain fuzz. Let it be and it will go by the end of the week.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): A project begun in late October is just beginning to yield results. The outcome is probably not what you imagined, but give it time to grow on its own before you press it to become your original image. Sometimes creative work takes on its own purposes and changes shape before our eyes.

Scorpio (October 23-November 21): You occasionally confuse what you think with who you are. There are those who will disagree with you this week. Just don't let it become a battle to the death. Remain aware that your identity is not at stake in this situation. Coworkers may be challenging. You are bigger than that. Rise above it.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23-September 22): Your focus shifts to matters of home, hearth, and family. Things of the past may float up in your mind for reflection. Think carefully about what is truly important to you now, at this time in your life. Don't allow old habits or rules from the past to make your decision for you. Obsessing is not good for your health.

Sagittarius the Archer (Nov. 22 Dec. 20): Mercury travels rapidly through your sign between Dec. 10 and the end of the year. During this period there likely will be greater emphasis on communications, errands, and other short distance travels. Your mind will be quick and your attitude persuasive. You are loaded with ideas, so remember not to monopolize conversations.

Libra (September 23-October 22): Speak and act with conscious intention around children or with romantic partners. It is possible that

Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Take really good care of yourself throughout this week. You are moving toward a slump in your

physical cycle that will reach bottom next week. Your responsibilities in managing groups may be getting the best of you. Make it a point to avoid a “life and death” attitude. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Things involving the Powers That Be continue to move forward on your behalf. Your social life is definitely on the upswing. This is a great week for a getaway. Do something novel, even if you don’t leave home. Your mind is open to whatever seems fresh and unique.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): It is possible you will feel a sense of fatigue this week. Maybe something has caused you to be disappointed with yourself. Don't take the blues seriously or worry about yourself. In a few days you will feel much better. It is a temporary mood swing. Get some extra rest. Stay in touch with good friends.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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December 11, 2012


December 11, 2012

Kids stepping up to the challenge SUBMITTED BY CLAUDIA D’AVANZO

F

rom preparing senior citizens for earthquakes to combating prescription drug abuse, four winners of the 2012 Kids Who Give contest, sponsored by Farm Rich (www.farmrich.com), have created innovative solutions to address challenges within their communities and beyond. Kids Who Give (www.kidswhogive.com) is a national program focused on young people, ages 7-17, who dedicate their time and energy to improving the lives of others. The contest awards quarterly winners with contributions to their favorite causes. All quarterly winners from 2012 will be entered into an online voting competition in early 2013 to be eligible to receive a $10,000 grand prize. Rohan Chandra, 17, of Fremont, California was the first place winner for the period ending September 30, 2012. When Rohan Chandra realized the senior citizen community would be especially vulnerable if an earthquake struck in his area, he created the Earthquake Preparedness for Rohan Chandra (Fremont) was awarded first place in Seniors (EPS) project. With the help of bi-linKids Who Give gual seniors, he developed a multi-lingual safety instruction guide available in English, Spanish, Mandarin, Hindi, Farsi and Tagalog – the most common languages used in the San Francisco Bay area. Rohan has raised more than $10,000 for the cause, distributed more than 1,000 copies of the guide and assembled and distributed 250 earthquake kits to local seniors. Each quarterly first place winner receives $3,500, with the second and third place winners receiving $1,500 and $1,000, respectively. Honorable mention is awarded a $250 gift card. Visit www.kidswhogive.com to find out more about the contest. The deadline for the fall/winter quarter is Dec. 31, 2012, and applications are now being accepted.

Calling all sponsors SUBMITTED BY GREG STEWART January 26, 2013, marks the date for the Third Annual Union City Lions Crab Feed, and we need your help! We are seeking sponsors to host a table for 10 of their guests for this wonderful event raising funds to benefit local Lions Club community projects including, but not limited to; scholarships for college bound high school seniors and assistance to youth groups and needy and elderly community members. Please contact Kevin Finnerty at atkfinnert@aol.comor or (510) 431-3005 by January 11, 2013.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY JIM CARTER Enjoy an evening of symphonic music provided free of charge by the Tri-City areas’ 40-musician symphony, the Newark Symphonic Winds, directed by Richard Wong. The night will be filled with surprise, including a reading of “‘twas the Night Before Christmas,” a performance by the Newark Saxophone Quartet, and a community sing-along. Chances are Santa and Mrs. Claus will make an appearance as well, so be certain to bring the children!

Formed in 2005, the Newark Symphonic Winds (NSW) is a fully nonprofit, 40-piece wind ensemble composed of professional, semi-professional, and amateur musicians from our communities. The NSW and their smaller ensembles entertain audiences in the area with numerous performances throughout the year. The NSW’s repertoire includes some of the most beloved music written, including classical works, Broadway and film selections, jazz compositions, and marches. The NSW works closely with the community to encourage and support arts and music programs

December 11, 2012

in area schools and within the community at large. Call (510) 552-7186 or visit newarksymphonic.org to learn about upcoming performances. Free Holiday Concert and Community Sing-along Saturday, Dec 15 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 552-7186 newarksymphonic.org Free


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Mondays, Tuesdays, & Thursdays, Oct 23 - Dec 13

A Single Step...Begins the Journey

Mon: 5 p.m. -10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Photo exhibit by participants of Advanced Portfolio Workshop

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District 1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org Monday, Oct 23 -Sunday, Jan 6

Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition $

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Emmy-nominated television series comes to life

The Tech Museum 201 South Market St., San Jose (408) 294-8324 www.thetech.org Friday, Nov 9 - Sunday, Dec 15

A Tuna Christmas $

8 p.m. & Sunday matinees 1 p.m. Colorful residents of Tuna, Texas, celebrate Christmas

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Monday, Nov 20-Friday, Jan 25

Book Drive

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Donate books to create a high school library in Ghana

Milpitas High School 1285 Escuela Pkwy., Milpitas (408) 318-8458 bookclubofmhs@gmail.com Thursday, Nov 22 - Saturday, Dec 14

Member Holiday Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Fine art & gift items by Hayward Arts Council members

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Friday, Nov 23 - Sunday, Dec 30

Saturday, Nov 24 - Sunday, Dec 23

Train of Lights $

Stories of the Season $

Ride restored railroad cars decorated for the holidays

Sat., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. & Sun., 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

4:30 p.m. Niles departure Niles Station 37001 Mission Blvd., Fremont 7:30 p.m. Sunol departure Sunol Depot 6 Kilkare Rd., Sunol www.ncry.org

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Explore the Victorian home decorated for the holidays


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Continuing Events Thursday, Nov 29 - Saturday, Dec 8

The Diviners $

Thurs & Fri: 7 p.m. Sat: 2 p.m. Set in Zion, Indiana during the Great Depression

Irvington High School 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 590-7510 www.irvingtonconservatory.org Friday, Dec 7 - Sunday, Dec 30

Crossroads Church Light Show

Fri & Sun: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Sat: 8:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Free light show choreographed to music

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0103 www.crossroadsfremont.org Saturday, Dec 8 – Tuesday, Dec 25

Crippsmas Place

6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Decorated neighborhood benefitting six charities

Crippsmas Place Wellington Court, Fremont www.crippsmasplace.org Monday, Dec 11 - Sunday, Dec 31

Works of Jan Small

11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Award-winning artist, writer & teacher exhibits paintings

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 742-2326 www.newparkmall.com Monday, Dec 11-Friday, Jan 11

Student Impressions

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Work by students of teacher & local artist Diana Mihalakis

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 Monday, Dec 11- Friday, Feb 1

Ten Women’s Perspectives

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Work from the women artists of Watercolor Connections

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Friday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Dec 23

A Christmas Carol, the Musical $

8 p.m. (Sunday matinees: 2 p.m.) The classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge

San Leandro Performing Arts Center 2250 Bancroft Ave., San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org Saturday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Mar 3

Strolling Art by Rick Boreliz

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Carved walking sticks reflect endemic wildlife & indigenous art motifs

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

December 11, 2012

Tuesday, Dec 11

Thursday, Dec 13

Drop-In Housing Clinic by ECHO

Festival of Trees Gala & Silent Auction $R

12 noon - 2 p.m.

5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Information on landlord/tenant issues & emergency housing

Hors d’oeuvers, champagne, live music & auction

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Milpitas City Hall 455 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-2528 www.milpitasfoundation.org

Tuesday, Dec 11

Thursday, Dec 13 - Saturday, Dec 15

It’s All About Legs & Feet; Look Good & Feel Better

Mill Creek Ramblers

6:30 p.m.

7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Treatment of varicose veins & foot care

Live music

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 264-4095

Mission Pizza & Pub 1572 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6858 www.missionpizza.com

Tuesday, Dec 11 - Wednesday, Dec 12

Thursday, Dec 13

Signing Santa Claus $

Winter Concert

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

7 p.m.

Photos with Santa, drinks and refreshments

Students perform holiday favorites

California School for the Deaf 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont (510) 794-3666 aash@csdf-cde.ca.gov

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702 Thursday, Dec 13

Holiday Mixer and Toy Drive

Castro Valley, San Leandro, & Hayward Chambers Holiday Mixer

5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Bring a new, unwrapped toy for the Toys for Tots drive

Bring a new unwrapped toy for donation

Fremont Chamber of Commerce 39488 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 789-1950

Eden Medical Center 20103 Lake Chabot Road, Castro Valley (510) 537-1234

Wednesday, Dec 12


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Friday, Dec 14

Saturday, Dec 15

Saturday, Dec 15

End of the Year with a Geminid Shower

Holiday Concert and Community Sing-Along

Night of Comedy $

8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Meteor shower hike along the bay

Newark Symphonic Winds Concert

Smooth Jazz & Comedian J Red; a benefit for Toys for Tots

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.newarksymphonic.org

DeVry University 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont (510) 574-1200 $5 or new unwrapped toy

Saturday, Dec 15 - Sunday, Dec 16

Sunday, Dec 16

Friday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Dec 16

The Nutcracker $

7:30 p.m. Holiday family favorite by the Berkeley City Ballet

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Friday, Dec 14

Holiday Singles Dance $

8 p.m. - 12 midnight Dance to your favorite hits. Single adults of all ages

W Silicon Valley 8200 Gateway Blvd., Newark (415) 507-9962 Friday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Dec 16

The Holiday Concert $

Fri & Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m.

Christmas at the Mission: Hark How the Bells $

Ohlone Chamber Singers, Celebration Chimes Bell Choir & harpist Dan Levitan

Newark Fire Station 7550 Thornton Ave, Newark (510) 618-3479

Mission San Jose Museum 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-8186 www.smithcenter.com

Sunday, Dec 16

Saturday, Dec 15

A Christmas Carol $R

4:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Charles Dicken’s timeless tale brought to life

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardarehistory.org Saturday, Dec 15

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org

“His New Job,” “The Goat,” “High and Dizzy,” & “Big Business”

1 p.m. Benefit for Mission Peak Heritage Foundation. Refreshments included

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352 Saturday, Dec 15

Science Lecture for Children

2 p.m. For Elementary school ages

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Saturday, Dec 15

Virtuoso International Flute Ensemble Christmas Concert

3 p.m. Benefit for Deaf Plus Adult Community

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 979-9263

7:30 p.m.

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Dec 15

The “Meshugenah” (Crazy) Comedy Tour $

7:30 p.m. Professional comedians (ages 17 & up)

Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7141 Saturday, Dec 15

Grand Closing Party

8 a.m. - closing All-day, pot luck party; donate a gift to the Tree of Hope

Paddy’s Coffee House 3900 Smith St., Union City (510) 324-8572 Saturday, Dec 15

Free College Financial Planning Workshop

2:30 p.m. Learn about financial aid & other ways to pay for college

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Boutique Calendar Wednesday, Dec 12 – Sunday, Dec 23

Friday, Dec 14 – Sunday, Dec 23

Annual Holiday Boutique

Artisan’s Holiday Boutique

Fri: 12 noon – 6 p.m. Sat & Sun: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Handcrafted items by local artists

Hand-crafted gifts by local artists Fremont Art Association Center/Gallery

37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org

5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Milk & cookies, holiday carols, & safety information

Comedy Short Subject Night

Winter Fantasy $

An Evening with Santa at the Fire House

Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 4 p.m.

Special songs for a special time of the year

Saturday, Dec 15

6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Sun Gallery 1015 “E” St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Tri-City Winter Charity

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Free food, toys, clothes, fun, games & Santa

Purple Lotus School 33619 9th St., Union City (510) 408-7294 (English) (510) 489-4100 (Spanish) Sunday, Dec 16

Winter Concert

2 p.m. Hillside Woodwind Quintet & Montecito Brass Ensemble

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley 510) 667-7900

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December 11, 2012

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont, presents the hilarious sequel to Greater Tuna, A Tuna Christmas by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, directed by Jim Woodbury, Through December 15 For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218 or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Saturday, Dec 15 Irvington Lights

6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Monument Lighting and Christmas Carols followed by light display judging

(510) 656-5375 www.irvingtonbusiness.com www.irvingtonlights.com

SUBMITTED BY DAVID OJAKIAN This weekend, Curtain Call Performing Arts (CCPA) presents the annual holiday production of “A Christmas Carol, the Musical” at the Arts Education Center in San Leandro. Running December 14-23, this installment presents a re-imagining of the famous Dickens story. Set in 1940s Londontown, Scrooge travels back in time to a roaring ‘20s party, meets some crazy zombies, and catches a Rockette Style Show, all while being visited by the three ghosts we all know so well – Past, Present, and Future. The musical version receives the full Broadway treatment from the creative team of Alan Menken (“Beauty and the Beast”), Lynn Ahrens (“Ragtime”), and Mike Okrent (“Crazy For You”) as the classic tale based on Charles Dickens’ novel is brought to life by a diverse and vibrant cast of community performers. Rich vocals, elaborate sets, staging, and costume design will take the audience on a fantastic journey through time, as they witness Scrooge’s transformation from miser to benefactor. Curtain Call, whose steampunked summer 2012 production of Rogers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” was nominated for 10 BroadwayWorld.com San Francisco regional awards including Best Musical and called “…a must see theatrical event…” by the site’s own Linda Hodges, opened their fifth season November 30 with their hit concert choir CANTARE! Now the company is ready for the first musical of the season. “Much like our steampunk ‘Cinderella’ did last summer, our re-imagining of ‘A Christmas Carol’ sets our production apart from the other ‘Christmas Carol’s in the area. We’ve taken the show out of Dickensian London and placed it in 1940s WWII era Londontown,” said Andrea Gorham, CCPA Founding Artistic Director. As part of an exclusive program, Curtain Call provides multiple shows free of charge to San Leandro Unified School District (SLUSD) school children as part of its exclusive “Gift of Broadway” free assembly program. The program is designed for

children that have never before experienced the wonder and magic of theatre, and for whom a visit to the theater is a rare or impossible experience. Also CCPA’s “Family Day at the Theatre,” Sunday, December 16, will offer $1 admission for K-5th grade children with a paid adult. These two programs have been a part of “A Christmas Carol” since the company’s launch in 2008, with a “Gift of Broadway” having served over 9,000 students in the San Leandro Unified School District. “Our vision of making the arts accessible to everyone is at the heart of our offerings each December, with our ‘Gift of Broadway’ program and ‘Family Day at the Theatre.’ Ticket prices have made the arts inaccessible in many ways, and I’m proud that we can continue to offer these opportunities for our community,” said David Ojakian, CCPA’s Marketing Director. “A Christmas Carol, the Musical” directed by Misty Megia (Pleasanton), choreography by Christina Lazo (San Francicso), with music and vocal direction by Jedidiah da Roza, features John Cotrufo (Oakland) as Ebenezer Scrooge, Catherine Williamson (San Leandro) as the Ghost of Christmas Past, Nik Dmoski (San Leandro) as the Ghost of Christmas Present, Victorian King-Bowman (Livermore) as the Ghost of Christmas Future, and Emily Joy Kessel (San Ramon) as Tiny Tim. The show runs December 14 – 23 at the San Leandro Arts Education Center on the San Leandro High School Campus. “Family Day at the Theatre” is the 2 p.m. matinee showing Sunday, December 16. For tickets and information, visit www.curtaincallperformingarts.org or call (510) 909-9516.

The Ohlone College Department of Music presents the Ohlone Chamber Singers in the 27th annual Christmas at the Mission concert. Under the direction of Michael Morris, “Hark How the Bells” will feature special guest Celebration Chimes from the First Presbyterian Church of Livermore directed by Cathryn Griggs, renowned harpist Dan Levitan, and the featured work “A Ceremony of Carols” by Benjamin Britten. The Ohlone Chamber Singers have been performing since 1987, and are currently comprised of 32 singers from 17 Bay Area communities. They perform an eclectic array of songs from the Renaissance through the late Romantic and Contemporary eras, and have completed seven European tours, performing to critical acclaim in countries such as Austria, England, Scotland, Hungary, Italy, and Poland. They have also released five CDs. Tickets for Christmas at the Mission are $12 general and $10 for seniors, staff and students when purchased in advance, and $15 general, and $10 for seniors, staff and students when purchased at the door. Buy tickets online at www.smithcenter.com, or call the Box Office at (510) 659-6031. Christmas at the Mission Ohlone Chamber Singers: Hark How the Bells Saturday, Dec 15: 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec 16: 4 p.m. Old Mission San Jose 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com www.chambersingers.org Tickets: $10 - $12

Ask us about our March Move-In Specials!!!

A Christmas Carol, the Musical Dec 14 – 23 8 p.m. (Sunday matinee: 2 p.m.) San Leandro Arts Education Center 2200 Bancroft Ave., San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org Tickets: $10 - $25

SUBMITTED BY JULIE REMS-SMARIO California School for the Deaf invites Deaf youngsters and their families from all walks of life to have a chance to meet signing Santa and his helpful elves to get all their Christmas wishes. Signing Santa signs fluent American Sign Language to communicate with the children, Deaf and hearing, about their Christmas list. Last year, the event, first of its kind organized by the school, was the realization of a dream of one of school’s staff, Connie Davenport. Based on the smiles on many Deaf children’s faces, there’s no way that their wish didn’t come true. Inspired by the joyful children, California School for the Deaf staff is determined to make this an annual event for Deaf children and their families everywhere in the Bay Area. Thus, the school’s second Annual Signing Santa event has become a reality. This festive event takes place at California School for the Deaf in Fremont at the Middle School Activity Center (by the football field). It is open to the public on December 10, 11, and 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Admission is $2 and photo with Santa Claus is $3. Drinks and refreshments will be sold. Parking is free. For more information, contact Alex Ash at aash@csdf-cde.ca.gov.

Signing Santa Claus Dec 10 – 12 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. California School for the Deaf 39350 Gallaudet Drive, Fremont aash@csdf-cde.ca.gov Admission: $2, photo with Santa $3


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December 11, 2012

Work out for Cole

2:30 p.m. Special Zumba class for those who would like to participate

SUBMITTED BY KENNY JACOBY Cole Lewis, a Mission San Jose High School Student was badly hurt in a car accident recently and is currently in ICU at a Bay Area Hospital. Our desire is for everyone to come together and support his family that needs our help during this difficult time. We are asking for a $20 donation to benefit the Lewis family. 1 p.m. Check-in begins at ClubSport

We will make a slideshow as an inspirational message to show our support. Please join us to lighten the load for a family in need and an opportunity to come together as a community. A workout for Cole Sunday, Dec 16 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. ClubSport 46650 Landing Parkway, Fremont

1 p.m. – 4 p.m. enjoy designated activities such as basketball, swimming and fitness center (Those who would like to play racquetball, squash or badminton need to bring their own rackets).

Newark Fire takes third at Sonoma tournament SUBMITTED BY FRANZ BRUCKNER The Newark Fire, a U12 Girls’ Class 1 team took third place at the Sonoma Halloween Classic. Fire defeated Sonoma Wildcats and San Carlos Blitz on Saturday by the score of 1-0, before falling to Sonoma Fury 0-2 in the Sunday semi-final. Fire bounced back in the consolation game, defeating the Rohnert Park Warriors by the score of 3-0. Against Fury, Angie Valenzuela scored the lone goal for the Fire victory. Also playing well for Fire were goalkeeper Lissette Mason, defenders Elizabeth Salazar, Sara Buffey, and Sam Ocegueda, and midfielders Natalia Sanchez and Isabella Garcia. In the second game, Fire defeated San Carlos on an own

goal, but were very unlucky not to have scored several goals. Rachel Bruckner narrowly missed a goal, as did Napal and Hannah Gamez. Isabella Alvarellos also had a very good game for the Fire. In Sunday’s game against Sonoma, Fire had several chances but were unable to convert. In the consolation game against Rohnert Park, Fire took a 1-0 halftime lead thanks to a goal by Valenzuela. Fire added two more goals when defender Marissa Ferreira scored off of a Gamez corner, and midfielder Aracelli Hinojosa rounded out the scoring by converting a pass from Napal for the final goal. Midfielders Bri Motta and Christian Nava-Gona and defender Trinity Castillo also had very good games for the Fire.

Newark Memorial Girls Basketball SUBMITTED BY COACH DARRYL REINA The Newark Memorial High School Lady Cougars are off to a 2-1 start in the 2012-13 girls varsity basketball season. After dropping their season opener to Woodside, 56-46, the Lady Cougars bounced back to defeat Los Altos, 51-33 and Independence, 61-28. In the win over Los Altos, senior guard Taylor Norman led the way with 21 points, including seven field goals and going 7-8 from the foul line. Junior Ni’yesha Brown added 17 points. Brown led all scorers with 19 points in the solid win over Independence. Norman added 15 points, and Sydney Hills chipped in with 10 points. The Lady Cougars travel to Overfelt High on Tuesday night, December 11 for a 7 p.m. game, before returning home to host Fairfield in the first round of the 2012 “HOOP-FEST” on Thursday, December 13 with a 7:45 pm game time. The Newark Memorial Girls Junior Varsity team is off to a fast 3-0 start and will be participating in the Milpitas JV Tourney on December 13-16. The Newark Memorial High School Girls Basketball Program is hosting two December tournaments and invites the community to attend. The first annual Newark Memorial Girls Varsity Basketball “HOOP-FEST” will be held December

13-15 at the Newark Memorial Event Center, 39375 Cedar Boulevard, Newark. The opening night schedule of games on Thursday, December 13 will include the following match-ups: 3:15 pm Wilcox vs. Pittsburgh 4:45 pm Arroyo vs. Lowell 6:15 pm Leland vs. College Park 7:45 pm Fairfield vs. Newark Memorial The annual Newark Optimist Club Holiday Classic will be held December 27-29 at the Event Center with 16-teams participating from all-around the greater Bay Area. Eight exciting girls Varsity and Junior Varsity games will be played each day. The opening round on Thursday, December 27 will feature the following teams: Junior Varsity Division: 9:00 a.m. Carondelet vs. Los Gatos 10:30 a.m. Logan vs. Notre Dame-Belmont 12 Noon Monte Vista vs. Castro Valley 1:30 p.m. Arroyo vs. Newark Memorial Varsity Division: 3:15 p.m. Castro Valley vs. Irvington 4:45 p.m. St. Joseph-Notre Dame-Alameda vs. Evergreen Valley 6:15 p.m. Fremont-Oakland vs. Menlo-Atherton 7:45 p.m. Notre Dame-San Jose vs. Newark Memorial

Logan Report Submitted by Christopher Fortenberry and James Williams Men’s Soccer 12/3- James Logan Colts- 0; Berkeley Yellow Jackets- 0 Men’s Basketball 12/6- James Logan Colts- 47; Fairfield Falcons- 50 12/7- James Logan Colts- 62; Richmond Oilers- 42


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Iron Men

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SUBMITTED BY COACH TIM HESS

Beginning this year’s season, the Newark Memorial Cougar Wrestling Team placed 5th at the Newark Rotary Ironman dual-match competition held at Newark November 30 – December 1, 2012. The team was led by freshman 106-pound Ironman Champ Ian Hutchinson, runners-up at 126-pound Eric Tolbertson, and 285-pound Jacob Clausen and 3rd place finishers Dominic Fitzgerald (120), Marlin Hess (132), and Kyhree Mackey (138).

Warriors begin season with a bang The Fremont Christian Warriors kicked of the 2012 junior high basketball season on Tuesday, November 27, 2012 facing Milpitas Christian. As customary, the schools preceded the game with prayer led by Tyler Pon on their home court. The much anticipated season by Warrior players began in sweet victory with a final score of 46 to 33. Warriors’ momentum ignited in the first quarter with Kyle Alcosiba scoring eight points in the first two minutes. Tyler Pon made one of his poetic three-point shots, giving the Warriors a confident lead. Josh Ramirez jumped in on the scoring action with six points, and the Warriors finished the quarter with a 17-7 lead. The second and third quarters, the Warriors continued to shine with amazing shots and assists by new comer Hikili Jordan. Alcosiba, Jordan, and Ramirez led the team in rebounds while other spectacular shots and plays were made by Ryan Grim, and Tyler Pon. By the third quarter, Warriors chemistry was shining as the Warrior defense was relentless. Giving up just 4 points, the third quarter ended with a 46-22 lead. Going into the fourth quarter, the team was confident of a victory and solidified that with a 46-33 win in their opening game. “The win was needed after our preseason loss to the Valley Christian Vikings,” Kyle Alcosiba said. “Although we only lost by a point, a loss is a loss, but it kept us humble as we entered the season.” Coach Pon felt the preseason game against The Valley Christian Vikings was a good start to the season. “They are a very solid and competitive school team who we played in the last year’s tournament final,” Pon said. The Warriors allowed the adrenalin rush to lead them in their next game against Chinese Christian. Giving up just 15 points in through the entire game, the Warriors dominated with a victoryof 63-15. Lead point scorers of the game were Josh Ramirez with 16 points and Brandon Bains with eight points. However, throughout the game, the points scored were well distributed among the Warrior players including new comer, Nick Loaiza who is excited and thankful to be a part of the warrior team. “I was welcomed to the team and feel very fortunate to be a part of such a great group of players,” Loaiza said. With a 2-0 record, the Warriors were ready to face off against Kimber Hills, and on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, the Warriors delivered what the fans wanted. Shutting down the Coyotes in the first quarter, with a 14-0 lead the Warriors defense could not be challenged, and with amazing shots by Josh Ramirez, Hekili Jordan and Bharat Nair, the team finished the first half with a 30-5 lead. The Warrior defense is stacked, and throughout the game, they were able to shut down their opponent and maintain the lead. Ryan Grim attributes the Warriors success to their hard work. “We have had significant growth as a team and have been working hard on our defense,” Grim said. With the high level of skill and chemistry, the win was sweet for the Warriors as the Coyotes have always been a challenging team. “We have a great team, and we work hard, and success has been the outcome,” Bharat Nair said. Although the Warriors have a 3-0 record in their conference, they know they need to keep their momentum strong. “As long as we continue to give 110% effort and play with Godly integrity, we can always hold our head high on the court,” Kyle Alcosiba said. The next stop for the Warriors is their rival Redwood Christian, but Coach Glen Pon is confident. “I am excited about this year’s team we have several returning players, who have made significant contributions and we have a good mix of talent and experience with new and eager additions,” Coach Pon said. One thing is for sure the Warrior momentum is strong, and as the school rallies behind the team, they are working tirelessly for that first place victory.

I

n their final performance of the year, the Douglas Morrisson Theatre Chorus presents “The Holiday Concert,” a collection of special songs for a special time of the year. From December 14-16, attendees will enjoy a diverse collection of seasonal sounds under the direction of Special Guest Conductor April McNeely with musicians Jesse Micek and Aaron Iosefa on piano and Bob Blankenship on drums/percussion. McNeely comes to the Chorus with more than 25 years’ experience in choral singing and conducting, and has been a featured soprano soloist with many symphony orchestras and choirs. An active member of the National Association of Teachers of Singing and the American Choral Directors Association, McNeely currently conducts The Menlo Park Chorus and Kol Truah Jewish Choir of the East Bay and serves as Director of Music at the First United Methodist Church of San Leandro. McNeely teaches applied voice at Santa Clara University and maintains a private voice studio in Hayward. She holds a Master’s Degree in Musicology from California State University, East Bay. The evening will be full of rich sounds and stories, with McNeely providing some insight into those less familiar. “‘The Banquet Fugue’ is part of a larger work called, “The Reluctant Dragon.” A boy who loves myths discovers that a real dragon has moved into his neighborhood so he goes to visit him. While he is there St. George shows up to slay the Dragon but the Dragon – who is a poet – refuses to fight. Reluctantly, St. George admits that he really doesn’t want to slay the Dragon anyway so they decide to stage a tournament instead. Everyone celebrates the Dragon’s alleged demise with a banquet (The Banquet Fugue.) Not one to miss a good meal, the Dragon shows up and after some discussion everyone decides that since it’s almost Christmas the Dragon should be allowed to stay. They finish the banquet off by joining in a Christmas carol. And, of course, they all live happily ever after. “‘The Snickelways of York,’ set in a light madrigal style, tells of a man in York, England, hurrying home for his Christmas Eve Supper, who unwisely takes a shortcut

Sneak preview at California Nursery SUBMITTED BY JOYCE BLUEFORD See a part of Fremont History not open to the public since 1970’s. On Wednesday, December 19, the California Nursery Historical Park (36501 Niles Blvd, Fremont) will open (weather permitting) for a “sneak preview” between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. See the Math Science Nucleus’ newest project with City of Fremont, Bruce Roeding, and California Nursery Legacy Council to preserve the history of this nationally recognized area of Fremont. This open house will provide a rare look into the archiving operation in progress. Please no children under 10 at this event. For more information, visit: http://msnucleus.org/calnursery/events1.html

down ‘Mad Alice Lane,’ one of the hundreds of medieval alleys called ‘snickelways’ that wind through the heart of York. He becomes hopelessly turned around before finally being rescued and directed home by ‘a red-suited man with a nod and a wink.’ St. Nick gets him back to York just in time to hear the bells of York Minster greeting the dawn of Christmas Day – but as he turns to thank him, he finds that Nick has ‘snick’d away.’” “Various Themes on Fa-la-la” (arranged by Chuck Bridwell) features musical references such as Rossini’s William Tell “Overture,” Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, Strauss’ “On the Blue Danube,” and Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture.” “A Musicological Journey through the Twelve Days of Christmas” (arranged by Craig Courtney) will take listeners on the 12 obvious stops, hitting such time periods as 6th century Rome (Gregorian Chant), 16th century Italy (Monteverdi – Madrigal), 18th century Austria (Mozart – Serenade), 19th century Germany (Wagner – “Ride of the Valkyries” from “Die Walkure”), 19th century Russia (Tchaikovsky – “Dance of the Reed Flutes” from “The Nutcracker”), and ending in the19th century United States of America (J.P. Sousa – “Stars and Stripes Forever”). The audience will be invited to sing-a-long on such holiday standards as ���Joy to the World,” “The First Noel,” “Feliz Navidad,” “The Christmas Song,” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” The Douglas Morrisson Theatre Chorus is sure to put you in the holiday mood with a wonderful celebration of the season. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 60 and over, and $10 for students, juniors, and TBA members with ID. The Holiday Concert Friday, Dec 14 and Saturday, Dec 15: 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec 16: 2 p.m. Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Tickets: $10 - $15

SUBMITTED BY ROBERT COOK Scouts from Boy Scout Troop 154, chartered with Holy Spirit Catholic Church (Fremont), participated in the Scouting for Food program on November 10 and 17. The Scouting for Food program is a program to collect food for local food banks to give to needy families. Boy Scouts of America has been a major contributor to the effort to reach out to families in need by organizing two weekends to distribute flyers about the program and later to collect food donated by local homeowners. On the first weekend, the troop helped Cub Scout Pack 154 hang door flyers in their pack area. Later, the troop put up the door flyers in their own collection area. During the second weekend, about 20 troop scouts split up into two groups to help Cub Scout Packs 163 and 154 collect food from their two pack areas. Later, the troop collected food from their own area. Almost 2000 items of food from all three areas was collected. The food was collected, sorted and transported to a central point where it will be later distributed to a number of local food banks.


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December 11, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG 12655910 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sujithkumar Kanjirakkattu Viswanathan Nair for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sujithkumar Kanjirakkattu Viswanathan Nair filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sujithkumar Kanjirakkattu Viswanathan Nair to Sujith Kumar Viswanath The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 15, 2013, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening - Tri-City Voice Newspaper Date: November 13, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2413950# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12656768 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Deborah Ann Ware for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Deborah Ann Ware filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Deborah Ann Ware to Deborah Ann Ramona Zuniga The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 2/22/2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happenings, Tri-City Voice Date: November 19, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2411853#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 472318 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: S & S World, 21572 Mission Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda. Sam Kharie, 21572 Mission Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/29/2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sam Kharie, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 29, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2415653# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471656 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BRIGHT BEGINNING DAYCARE/PRESCHOOL FREMONT, 34270 WHITEHEAD LANE, FREMONT, CA 94555 MAILING ADDRESS: SAME, County of ALAMEDA BIBHA RANI SARMA, 34276 WHITEHEAD LANE, FREMONT, CA, 94555 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BIBHA RANI SARMA This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on NOVEMBER 6, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2415425# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 472163 The following person(s) is (are) doing business

as: J J Cleaning Services, 4291 Stevenson Blvd., Apt. 15, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Jose Raul Padilla, 4291 Stevenson Blvd., Apt. 15, Fremont, California 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jose Padrilla This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 26, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2415288# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471730 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Angel Bookkeeping, 38727 Greenwich Cir., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Hoori Samsami, 38727 Greenwich Cir., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/7/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hoori Samsami This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2414683# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471952 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Universal Transportation, 3500 Pennsylvania Ave. 104, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Minu Bhandari Thapa, 3500 Pennsylvania Ave. 104, Fremont, CA 94536 Janaki Bhandari, 3500 Pennsylvania Ave. 104, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a general partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as

true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Minu B. Thapa This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 14, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/12 CNS-2413563# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 472006-07 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Trux-Book 2. Lifestyle Fremont, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Parminder Singh, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555 Bhacwant Singh Sandhu, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a General Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11-16-12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Parminder Singh, Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 16, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2410895# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471988 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DNF Auto Sales, 5051 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 Asmir Buliubasic, 5051 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Asmir Buliubasic This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 15, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2410475# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471449 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Chinese Medicine Center, 37200 Meadowbrook Common #105, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Chia-Chi Wang, 37200 Meadowbrook Common #105, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-31-2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wang, Chia-Chi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 31, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11/12 CNS-2410084# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471652 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sugar High Desert Dispensary, 2036 New Park Mall, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Kristen Leann Hiller, 38343 Hamlin St., Fremont, CA 94536. Jacquelyne Renee Parish, 6354A Buena Vista Dr., Newark, CA 94560. This business is conducted by a joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kristen Leann Hiller This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 6, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11/12 CNS-2409596#

Students create video for day laborer center SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL Cal State East Bay criminal justice administration students have provided the Hayward Day Labor Center with a video to inform day laborers about protecting themselves against wage theft and other forms of exploitation. Alejandro Galindo, job developer and legal advocate for the center, says the film is so successful that similar organizations across the country are already asking for a similar video to address their needs. Silvina Ituarte, professor and chair of CSUEB’s Criminal Justice Administration Department, learned of this need from consulting with Galindo, and offered a Day Laborer Center project to her student this fall in the “Prejudice, Violence and Hate Crimes” class. Criminal justice majors Joshua Chavez, Ramneet Dhillon,

Robert Huerta, Andreina Leon, Kristen Martin, Vinh Nguyen, Jagdeep Singh, Jaclyn Skinner, and Bryant Weatheroy created the film in about six weeks, with the leadership of Huerta, who owns a film company. The center knew it needed a campaign to train workers how to prevent wage theft, inform them of their rights, and of the vindication process. It was the students, according to Galindo, who came up with the idea of the Spanish language video. He was impressed with the students’ initiative. “They explained to me that a video could illustrate some of the common scenarios under which the theft of wages takes place, and that these scenarios would serve to compare and contrast the cases in which we can help the workers, because we have enough information to prosecute the employer and cases in which we cannot,” said Galindo.

Whereas the labor code can be intimidating and seem contradictory, the students devised a simple way to cover the key points as a list of do’s and don’ts. “Being an immigrant worker from a poor community in Mexico or Guatemala is one thing, but having a group of university students advocate and focus on their needs, is a clear statement of care and compassion,” said Galindo. Ituarte and the students were invited to present the film to the workers, so that the university community could meet the population they served, and the workers could be face-to-face with those who worked on their behalf. “The Criminal Justice Administration Department at Cal State East Bay prides itself in producing compassionate, ethical, and proficient justice professionals who begin their contributions to community

Forest Park PTA holds forum with Fremont Police SUBMITTED BY JAY RAMANATHAN Forest Park Elementary School PTA invited Fremont Police Chief Craig Steckler on Monday, November 19 to speak at the inaugural session of their Luminary Speakers Series 2012-13. Chief Steckler was accompanied by staff from the Department’s Investigative and Community Engagement Units. The event was attended by a sizable number of Ardenwood residents. Chief Steckler spoke about crime in Fremont in relation to other similar cities and the cyclical nature of crime rates. He stressed the importance of being alert and helping the Police by reporting suspicious activity as soon as possible. He also answered questions from the audience on a wide range of safety-related topics. Sergeant Bobbitt gave an update on recent burglaries and gold chain snatching robberies in the Ardenwood area. He urged people to be cautious of wearing gold chains in public and recommended carrying an emergency device (like a whistle) to alert bystanders. He advised against walking or jogging on lightly travelled roads and trails in the dark and gave tips about solicitors. Community Engagement Specialist Martha Matthiesen stressed the advantages and benefits of the Neighborhood Watch program.

needs through meaningful class projects,” Ituarte said. Galindo says the video is also helping the workers understand the importance of a pocket-size booklet they’re being given to document identification data on an employer, the job site, times worked, names, etc. “When we have to go to court to vindicate the rights of one of our workers, we will use that booklet as evidence,” Galindo said. “If the booklet is habitually used as a recording mechanism, it will be deemed admissible evidence in court. The video explains all of this.” The Hayward Day Labor Center, located at 680 West Tennyson Road, enables low-income, predominantly migrant workers in the East Bay Area, to reach self-sufficiency through employment and community integration programs. They also may view the film at the Center.

Early entries being accepted for Green Kids Conference SUBMITTED BY SHANTI BALARAMAN Green Kids Now, Inc., in Partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, is calling for interested students to submit abstracts (summaries) for science poster presentations, to be entered in the Jr. Scientists and Innovators section of the Green Kids Conference. Students may download the entry form at www.greenkidsconference.org and email the completed form to info@greenkidsconference.org by March 1, 2013. The topic should be related to experiments and research work in any environmental related area pertaining to saving the earth and green living. Applicants must be under 18 years of age as of June 1, 2013. The Green Kids Now conference will take place on Saturday, June 1, 2013, on the Microsoft campus in Mountain View.

A $200 participation award will be awarded to up to ten groups/entries. Additionally, competitive entries will be judged and offered the following winning prizes: $800 for 1st place prize, $600 for 2nd place prize, and $400 for 3rd place prize. Event sponsors and partners are: Microsoft, Acterra, Lawrence Berkeley Lab and Food Empowerment Project. Green Kids Now Conference Saturday, June 1, 2013 11a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus 1065 La Avenida St., Bldg 1, Mountain View www.greenkidsconference.org info@greenkidsconference.org Entries for competition being accepted now through March 1, 2013 There is no fee for participants or general attendees.


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

The hidden war for freedom

WILLIAM MARSHAK

W

e have just passed a significant anniversary of U.S. history and it was barely noticed. On December 7, 1941 the United States of America was attacked, a provocation termed “a date which will live in infamy” by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Although discussions within the U.S. were mixed about participation in the conflict, the direct attack could not be denied or ignored, leading to immediate entry into World War II. Military battles were wellknown to U.S. citizens, fought before and following the conclusion of this titanic struggle. In all circumstances, the specter of denial of free thought and speech has been raised as a rallying cry. This precious commodity, often taken for granted, is the foundation of our country, a unique promise to its citizens. Our constitution begins in its “preamble” with the force of common consent: “We the people of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. This document and its amendments are the foundation of our country and explain the radical idea that people are free to think and choose among a plethora of ideas, allowing others to do the same. In direct opposition to this, some believe that strict control of thought leads to a more organized and efficient society. Business and financial tycoons of all stripes have constantly tried to control and manipulate the political process in favor of monopolies, restricting a competitive marketplace. The argument is always one of efficiency and management by those who should lead supposedly ignorant masses. These are the tunes of dictators and fascists. This country, however, is founded on the

premise of civil procedures with allowance for dissent and diversity. Through hot wars, cold wars, “police actions,” overt and clandestine operations, one of the most important concepts that troubles powerful business magnates has been an open approach to disseminating information (i.e. news). With the advent and proliferation of the internet, traditional modes of distribution have been challenged. Moguls who have been quietly gathering and monopolizing news sources realized that their political and financial control was in danger. Forced to address and adapt to procedures and methods that were changing rapidly was a new and frightening challenge. The answer for many has been to increase monopolization – control it all! Success in the political and legal arena has spurred a bold move within the Federal Communication Commission. Working within The Federal Communications Commission, rules of media ownership has been repeatedly under attack. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski has advanced a proposal to alter restrictions that prevent ownership of television, radio and newspapers in the same town or city. Similar attempts in 2008 were defeated by the U.S. Senate and a court decision. But, as media moguls and the Terminator would say, “I’ll be back!” In the Bay Area, many have noticed the homogenization of news and liberal interpretations of the word “local.” Common ownership has not energized the media, rather replaced competition and independent content with pabulum or sensational debris. Leading the movement against these changes reminiscent of regulation relaxation on Wall Street, Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) have been vocal in their opposition. Sanders has been quoted, “We cannot live in a vibrant democracy unless people get divergent sources of information.” Countering the argument of a free and diverse media is the tired drumbeat of mega-corporations pleading for financial relief to provide more local news at lower cost. From what I have seen in the Bay Area, the result will instead be higher profits, less news and monopolistic control of news. This effort to manage news is nothing short of an attack on a basic freedom… information. Although the internet has become a powerful influence on our lives, much of what is reported in that medium is born in major media incubators. The ef-

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

fect of sanctioned multi-media control of the news can be devastating. Due to increased visibility, the FCC has postponed its decision, but stay tuned, your next local webcast, radio, television and printed news may soon look eerily similar.

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

For additional information, browse “FCC media ownership rules” on the internet.

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

Contact Information: Federal Communications Commission 445 12th Street, SW Washington, DC 20554 1-888-225-5322 (1-888-CALL FCC) Voice: toll-free 1-888-835-5322 (1-888-TELL FCC) TTY: toll-free 1-866-418-0232 FAX: toll-free To contact the Commissioners via E-mail Chairman Julius Genachowski: Julius.Genachowski@fcc.gov Commissioner Robert McDowell: Robert.McDowell@fcc.gov Commissioner Mignon Clyburn: Mignon.Clyburn@fcc.gov Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel: Jessica.Rosenworcel@fcc.gov Commissioner Ajit Pai: Ajit.Pai@fcc.gov To contact California Senators: Dianne Feinstein One Post Street, Suite 2450 San Francisco, CA 94104 Main: (415) 393-0707 Fax: (415) 393-0710 https://www.feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/e-mail-me Barbara Boxer Office of U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer 70 Washington Street, Suite 203 Oakland, CA 94607 (510) 286-8537 (202) 224-0454 fax http://www.boxer.senate.gov/en/contact/policycomments.cfm

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION:

William Marshak PUBLISHER

What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

December 11, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

Looking for career change? Here is a HOT one for you!

Become a Full Charge Bookkeeper in 9 weeks. REGISTER TODAY

Tel: 408-531-0203

Email: Info@bookkeepingtrainersinc.com www:bookkeepingtrainersinc.com

BOOKKEEPING TRAINERS, INC. Classes starting on Jan 08, 2013

HELP WANTED

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

IMC Global Inc. is offering a position of Payment Clerk and Office Assistance where you can earn extra income at your flexible schedule plus benefits that takes only little of your time.

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Salon Both Rental Available First Month FREE

Requirements • Must have access to the internet • Must be Efficient and Dedicated Send your resumes to :- hrimcglobalinckbates@gmail.com This great opportunity is limited.

Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

HELP WANTED Auto Repair Machanic Full or Part Time Call 510-713-7771

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE

Great Rates! Great Results Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

Product Manager, eCommerce (Fremont, CA). Dvlp, create, & implmt product reqmts in Agile s/ware dvlpmt envrmt. Use knowl of eCommerce, s/ware engg, Online Retail Mktg projects, & web mktg strategies such as promotions, email campaigns, & loyalty programs to lead product dvlpmt & deploy mkt ready product releases. Reqd: Bachelor's deg in Comp Engg, Comp Sci or rltd/equiv. 5 yrs progressive post baccalaureate exp in the field. Exp w/ Online Retail Marketing projects, & eCommerce & web mktg strategies such as promotions, email campaigns, & loyalty programs. Exp working in an Agile envrmt. Send res. & cvr ltr to Monya Kemp (Job Code MP-PME) at The Men's Wearhouse, Inc., 40650 Encyclopedia Circle, Fremont, CA 94538. LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Newark Unified School District is looking for a Child Care Coord. $34,835-$41,126/yr, 6hrs/day, 24 Hrs/wk. Admin Credential or a B.A. degree +12ECE units & 6-admin/Super units req. Deadline: Open until Filled; HR Dept., 5715 Musick Ave., Newark, 510-818-4242.

BOOTH RENTALS

Accountant, Intl Finance to assist CPA to org/audit multinatl corp clients’ tax/financial statements & provide consultation. Work site/apply: CGUCPA, LLP, 4032 Clipper Ct, Fremont, CA 94538.

Become a hospice patient care volunteer!

Child Care Coordinator

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477 Tuesday, December 11 9:45–10:15 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00Preschool Storytimes NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT Wednesday, December 12 12:45 – 2:15Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, December 13 10:00–10:30 Preschool Storytimes SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:30 Preschool Storytimes CASTRO VALLEY 1:00 – 2:00 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 2:25 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD Monday, December 17 9:30–10:05 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:25–10:55 Preschool Storytimes City UNION CITY 1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School, 34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY 4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY

5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, December 18 9:15–11:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, December 19 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060

Wednesday, December 12 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


December 11, 2012

Are you a writer?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 31

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928

Our Lady of the Rosary Church 703 C St., Union City 510-471-2609 www.olrchurch.org

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766 St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100 St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776 Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Life Church 1699 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-483-8940 www.clife-church.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org First Church of Christ, Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161 http://fccsf.hypermart.net/churc h/index.html Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org

Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Fremont 42986 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-656-8979 www.calvaryfremont.org Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net

December 11, 2012

Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net Grace Church Fremont Multi-Ethnic 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont 510-226-2800 www.resonatemovement.org ROADMAP FELLOWSHIP International Best Western Plus Inn 360 W. 'A' St.,Hayward 510-574-5663 San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Bautista Mission Peak 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 nilesdiscoverychurch.org

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org


December 11, 2012 Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Chabad of Fremont Jewish Center www.chabadfremont.com 510-300-4090 Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060 Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/

Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org

Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 http://www.missionpeakuu.org/

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org

First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org

Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org

Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net

Heavenly Christ's Church (Meets in Calvary Lutheran Church) 17200 Via Magdalena San Lorenzo 510-303-5592

Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133

Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org

New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church Meets at Grace Lutheran Church 1836 B. St., Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org

Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com

First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward

Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org

Al-Medinah Educational Center: Masjid & School 5445 Central Ave., Newark

PENTECOSTAL

Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860

Chinese Mission of Hope Evangelical-Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd, Fremont 510-938-0505 http://www.hopelutheranfremont.org/zh.html

Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org

MUSLIM

Page 33

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.southhaywardumc.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 New Seed of Faith Ministry 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nsofm.com 510 612-4832

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org

Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444

True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org

The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319

Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

SALVATION ARMY

Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/

Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (in the future home of Niles Discovery Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597

St. John’s School honors grandparents ARTICLE AND PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY

CICI SUSBILLA Fr. Ritche Bueza, together with the congregation, said a special blessing for the grandparents as they gathered in front of the altar during the parish school’s Thanksgiving Mass celebrated on November 21. Every year, the school celebrates Grandparents/Special Persons Day, to honor the grandparents (other special persons) of the students,’ to thank them for the love they give and for the sacrifices they make for their family. Guests had the opportunity to visit the classrooms where students presented the spe-

cial gifts they had made for their guests as a token of appreciation for their love and support. The

celebration concluded with a light reception in the hall where guests also enjoyed special treats

from the bake sale and free child fingerprinting services offered by volunteers from Milpitas Police

Department. St. John the Baptist School is located at 360 S. Abel Street in Milpitas.


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 11, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club

We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont

First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose

American Legion Auxiliary

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS

Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters

Having trouble controlling the way you eat?

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Fremont Cribbage Club

Friendship Force

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

We offer no-fee job search, resume and interview workshops. For workshop schedule please call (510) 794-2442.

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Holiday Gift Faire: food, goodies, & Hanukkah items Sunday, Nov 11, 10am-2p.m. Family Services: Fri., Nov 16, 7p.m. Hanukkah Dinner & Service: Fri, December 14, 7p.m. www.bethtorah-fremont.org (510) 656-7141

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 12 Highest $: 685,000 Median $: 410,000 Lowest $: 88,500 Average $: 438,708

ADDRESS

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com q 12 Months for $75

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

372,000 405,000 600,000 410,000 277,000 475,000 685,000 88,500 300,000 490,000 623,000 539,000

3 2 4 3 3 4 2 2 5 5

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1793 1056 2112 1614 1294 1685 2400 1460 1467 1550 2100 2600

1960 1955 1965 1965 1978 1961 1932 1980 1977 2002 1968 1967

10-25-12 10-29-12 10-23-12 10-23-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-25-12 10-24-12 10-22-12 10-24-12 10-25-12 10-24-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 53 Highest $: 1,755,000 Median $: Lowest $: 100,000 Average $:

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Subscription Form

ZIP

2111 174th Avenue 18112 Apricot Way 19331 Barclay Road 18580 Capricorn Court 2855 Ceekay Court 18210 Lake Chabot Road 18757 Lamson Road 20021 Santa Maria Avenue 20111 West Ridge Court 19575 Buren Place 5787 Cold Water Drive 4985 Heyer Avenue

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Jan 5, 2013 from 9:00-11:30 in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or Email Joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/F2F

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Winter holidays with Temple Beth Torah of Fremont

Celebrate Recovery

The “NO” List:

Serious Mental Illness

ADDRESS

Out of work? ProNet can help you!

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)

35968 Ashton Place 38727 Aurora Terrace 37660 Blacow Road 36919 Bolina Terrace 36156 Cabrillo Drive 910 Cherry Glen Circle 697 Cuenca Way 35624 Dante Place 3461 Davenant Court 4529 La Salle Avenue 38562 McDole Terrace 38420 Redwood Terrace #15 35558 Roca Drive 35559 Roca Drive 38762 Rosegate Terrace 3558 Sequoia Common 38363 Timpanogas Circle 4353 Torres Avenue 39203 Walnut Terrace #23 40232 Grimmer Boulevard 39224 Guardino Drive #105 39152 Guardino Drive #208 40423 Laiolo Road 40439 Laiolo Road 40393 Landon Avenue 4875 Omar Street 41394 Thurston Street 41418 Thurston Street 4782 Valpey Park Avenue 191 Bear Court 603 Becado Place 46527 Bradley Court 1400 Camero Way 372 Camphor Avenue 421 De Leon Avenue 295 Fusteria Court 1497 Gomes Road 44693 Japala Place 40665 Ladero Street 40689 Marino Way 41927 McKay Street 42959 Nido Court 2780 Olive Avenue 42255 Palm Avenue 890 Pebblewood Court 77 Shaniko Common #20 325 Via Rosario

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539

555,000 588,434

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

640,000 200,000 645,000 220,000 285,000 288,000 752,500 630,000 636,000 300,000 207,000 294,000 455,000 420,000 475,000 340,000 395,000 556,000 255,000 305,000 100,000 175,000 332,000 324,000 440,000 389,500 555,000 815,000 540,000 795,000 1,530,000 630,000 860,000 715,000 685,000 730,000 878,000 850,000 891,000 846,000 782,000 880,000 780,000 1,430,000 1,755,000 325,000 515,000

1811 1120 2376 1166 1148 840 2284 1523 1688 1136 1080 1400 1107 1427 1423 1519 1120 1740 1104 1055 857 844 1207 1325 1148 1822 1671 2751 1455 1960 3258 1516 1514 1298 951 1429 1514 2049 1972 1441 1242 2009 1366 4794 4568 1170 1242

1968 1980 2001 1971 1958 1987 1967 1970 1971 1954 1972 1982 1958 1958 1989 2005 1955 1962 1984 1982 1990 1990 1955 1955 1960 1963 1959 1959 1963 1989 1985 1965 1965 2010 1953 1963 1965 1979 1968 1967 1960 1980 1954 1922 1996 1987 1971

10-23-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-22-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-29-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-24-12 10-23-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-29-12 10-25-12 10-24-12 10-29-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-24-12

4 2 4 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 3 6 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 8 4 3 3


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35

HOME SALES REPORT 47363 Yucatan Drive 4852 Creekwood Drive 34334 Eucalyptus Terrace 4771 Mendocino Terrace 34915 Oyster Bay Terrace 33257 Palomino Common

94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

787,000 550,000 620,000 555,000 359,000 470,000

4 3 3 3 3 3

1692 1607 1615 1607 1555 1822

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 45 Highest $: 663,000 Median $: Lowest $: 95,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

25242 2nd Street 22593 5th Street 22717 6th Street 514 B Street 21259 Birch Street 3356 Creek View Court 1575 D Street 1502 East Street #3 279 Laurel Avenue 23214 Maud Avenue 232 Medford Avenue 22830 Myrtle Street 444 Shirley Avenue 1642 Ward Street 786 West A Street 22790 Woodroe Avenue 22613 Zaballos Court 28853 Bay Heights Road 27056 Belfast Lane 27980 El Portal Drive 1032 Major Avenue 26224 Parkside Drive 584 Brian Street 808 Broadway Street 393 Dutchess Lane 26869 Gaither Way 24490 Groom Street 31284 Meadowbrook Avenue 712 O'Neil Commons 125 Orchard Park Place 31969 Potsdam Street 32748 Pulaski Drive 26141 Regal Avenue 25764 Underwood Avenue 26304 Underwood Avenue 671 Woodland Avenue 2393 Bermuda Lane 2526 Bradford Avenue 26779 Contessa Street 27793 Coronado Way 2449 Depot Road 29177 Eden Shores Drive 2439 Oliver Drive 21071 Gary Drive #111 21228 Gary Drive #314

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546 94546

SOLD FOR BDS

205,000 226,500 332,500 300,000 400,000 420,000 275,000 95,000 245,000 370,000 300,000 375,000 304,000 220,500 280,000 183,000 392,000 651,000 475,000 512,000 400,000 663,000 245,000 113,000 375,000 251,000 170,000 262,000 250,000 389,000 210,000 325,000 240,000 300,000 230,000 385,000 225,000 396,000 224,000 305,000 360,000 515,000 179,000 172,000 225,000

3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 4 7 3 2 3 2 3 5 4 4 4 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 3

ZIP

1471 Big Basin Drive 1674 Blue Spruce Way 468 Dempsey Road #171 2431 Edsel Drive 1304 Elkwood Drive 128 Greentree Way 685 Heath Street 1058 Jungfrau Court 164 Junipero Drive #3 430 Matthews Court 251 Meadowhaven Way 2087 Mesa Verde Drive 301 Moretti Lane 121 Parc Place Drive 2164 Petersburg Drive 993 Phoenix Court 2248 Skyline Drive 1854 Snell Place 1030 Summerfield Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

320,000 545,000 171,000 725,000 645,000 520,000 450,000 501,000 280,000 420,000 560,000 724,000 450,000 400,000 655,000 653,000 960,000 495,000 789,000

2 5 2 5 3 4 3 2 2 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 4

ZIP

7104 Arbeau Drive 94560 6436 Buena Vista Drive #B 94560 39865 Cedar Boulevard #336 94560 5609 Civic Terrace Avenue 94560 36854 Hafner Street 94560 6075 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #A94560 7192 Marne Place 94560 8120 Mayhews Landing Road 94560 6398 Montcalm Avenue 94560 35908 Vinewood Street 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

426,000 270,000 235,000 330,000 330,000 252,000 400,000 310,500 461,000 405,000

3 2 2 2 3 3 4 3 3

300,000 310,456 BUILT

CLOSED

992 1112 1822 1131 1997 1705 1239 1075 1845 1226 1678 2466 1405 1293 1957 720 2149 3489 2088 1878 2104 3172 1167 528 1244 1034 1112 1252 1333 1807 1031 1031 1042 1041 1141 1501 1215 1638 1128 1375 1223 1965 1026 1118 1263

1952 1938 1949 1922 1942 1990 1931 1974 1932 1955 1940 1950 1951 1993 2005 1925 1949 2000 1980 1972 1951 1986 1952 1957 1955 1953 1950 1955 2010 2001 1951 1951 1952 1952 1952 1960 1957 1958 1957 1955 1928 2004 1970 1980 1982

10-26-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-25-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-24-12 10-29-12 10-24-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-29-12 10-24-12 10-25-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-24-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-29-12 10-22-12 10-29-12 10-24-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-23-12

520,000 540,158

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1008 1692 842 1980 1422 1824 1160 1271 882 1350 1653 1696 1550 1280 1796 2008 2460 1450 2316

1971 1965 2007 1970 1990 1968 1960 1977 1971 1961 1994 1977 1986 2005 1970 1998 1994 2010 1998

11-08-12 11-09-12 11-09-12 11-07-12 11-08-12 11-06-12 11-09-12 11-08-12 11-07-12 11-09-12 11-06-12 11-09-12 11-07-12 11-06-12 11-07-12 11-06-12 11-06-12 11-09-12 11-09-12

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 10 Highest $: 461,000 Median $: Lowest $: 235,000 Average $: ADDRESS

10-25-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-26-12

SQFT

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 19 Highest $: 960,000 Median $: Lowest $: 171,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1977 1989 1992 1987 1983 1992

ZIP

455 Castro Street 91 Euclid Avenue 837 Linwood Way 395 Oakes Boulevard 14215 Seagate Drive 1646 164th Avenue 1650 165th Avenue 16210 Calypso Court 15921 Gramercy Drive 14628 Julietta Street 731 Majestic Way 14787 Oleander Street 16223 San Remo Drive 16361 Saratoga Street #201E 14623 Saturn Drive 1276 Burkhart Avenue 1296 Cumberland Avenue 1363 Drake Avenue 730 Fargo Avenue #7 655 Garside Court 1984 Quebec Avenue 1580 Redwood Avenue 2030 Yankee Court

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

175,000 327,000 360,000 429,000 275,000 147,000 230,000 340,000 365,000 420,000 190,000 448,000 335,000 160,000 450,000 385,000 371,000 302,000 150,000 437,000 317,000 370,000 550,000

2 4 3 3 3 2 4 4 4 2 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 5 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1290 1004 1071 1515 980 1394 1438 1593 1392 1504

1975 1985 1986 1986 1954 1981 1961 1975 1977 1962

10-26-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-29-12 10-25-12 10-25-12

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

839 1850 1780 1822 1596 1165 1626 1828 1855 896 2007 1868 962 2245 1092 1306 1315 1136 2338 1100 1686 2820

1942 1911 1948 1936 1987 1980 1994 1953 1951 1987 1978 1966 1981 2007 1950 1953 1951 1965 1995 1958 1953 1997

10-25-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-26-12 10-26-12 10-24-12 10-22-12 10-29-12 10-22-12 10-26-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-29-12 10-24-12 10-23-12 10-29-12 10-23-12 10-23-12 10-29-12 10-23-12 10-25-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 420,000 Median $: 310,000 Lowest $: 183,000 Average $: 303,455 ADDRESS

16792 Bar Avenue

ZIP

94580

SOLD FOR BDS

263,000

2

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

365,000 183,000 310,000 260,000 336,000 420,000 320,000 366,000 235,000 280,000

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

1398 1188 1418 1031 1050 1664 1082 1485 1000 1228

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 850,000 Median $: Lowest $: 160,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

35005 11th Street 5504 Alvelais Drive 4155 Aquarius Circle 4911 Bridgepointe Place 2133 Eric Court #1 4255 Miramonte Way 35425 Monterra Circle 35520 Monterra Terrace #102 35024 Perry Road 4146 Polaris Avenue 31353 Santa Elena Way 3245 Santa Sophia Way 34876 Travertine Way

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

438,000 850,000 265,000 180,000 160,000 230,000 285,000 240,000 390,000 280,000 400,000 515,000 610,000

4 5 3 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 4 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

1378

1947 10-23-12

CLOSED

1954 1972 1946 1951 1951 1948 1955 1951 1944 1947

10-24-12 10-24-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-24-12 10-26-12 10-22-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-23-12

285,000 372,538

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1431 3642 1137 1154 810 1298 1015 1023 1362 1280 1833 1762 1988

2007 2000 1970 1985 1974 1972 2001 2001 1965 1974 1969 1971 1997

10-26-12 10-23-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-29-12 10-23-12 10-24-12 10-23-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-22-12 10-22-12 10-25-12

Homeowner assistance grant program SUBMITTED BY OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL Attorney General Kamala D. Harris has announced a $10.4M grant program for organizations that provide housing counseling and legal services to homeowners. The grant funds were secured

through the National Mortgage Settlement with the goal of providing assistance to homeowners impacted by California’s foreclosure crisis. The California Department of Justice will award Consumer Assistance Grants for housing counseling and legal service providers ranging from $150,000 to

$750,000 per organization. A Homeowner Bill of Rights Implementation Grant of approximately $1M will also be awarded to assist in the implementation of California’s new homeowner protection legislation sponsored by the Attorney General this year. Grant applications must be received electronically no later than January 14, 2013. Details regarding the application process can be found at http://oag.ca.gov/grants. The California State Bar, under the leadership of Executive Director Joe Dunn, will work with the Attorney General’s office to administer the grants. The California Homeowner Bill of Rights, signed into law earlier in 2012, restricts dualtrack foreclosures, where a lender forecloses on a borrower despite being in discussions over a loan modification to save the home. It also guarantees struggling homeowners a single point of contact at their lender with knowledge of their loan and direct access to decision makers, and imposes civil penalties on fraudulently signed mortgage documents. The California Homeowner Bill of Rights expanded Harris’ response to the state’s foreclosure and mortgage crisis. Harris created a Mortgage Fraud Strike Force in March 2011 to investigate and prosecute misconduct related to mortgages and foreclosures. In February 2012, Harris negotiated a commitment from the nation’s five largest banks to dedicate an estimated $18 billion to mitigate harm to California homeowners caused by bank conduct in the foreclosure process.

Community workshop for General Plan Update SUBMITTED BY ERIK PEARSON The General Plan is a city’s basic planning document that provides a blueprint for development, guides growth and sets land use policy city-wide. The purpose of a General Plan is to: identify land use, transportation, environmental, economic and social goals and policies as they relate to new development; provide a basis for the City’s decision-making; provide citizens with an opportunity to participate in the planning and decision-making process; and inform citizens, developers, decisionmakers and others of the ground rules that guide development within the city. Community input is needed to establish the vision for the City of Hayward which will hold the sixth and final community workshop, tomorrow, to prepare for a comprehensive update of the City’s General Plan. The meeting will be:

330,000 341,950

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES:23 Highest $: 550,000 Median $: 340,000 Lowest $: 147,000 Average $: 327,522 ADDRESS

1780 Bockman Road 1403 Jacqueline Place 15933 Via Arroyo 17347 Via Chiquita 1376 Via El Monte 1012 Via Honda 1430 Via La Paloma 15944 Via Marlin 16151 Via Media 17097 Via Piedras

SUBMITTED BY WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS Join the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter for their monthly luncheon at the Hilton Hotel, Newark, on December 19, 2012. Networking at 11:30 a.m.; program and lunch from noon until 1:30 p.m. WCR will thank outgoing board members and line officers Anna May (president), Greg Jones (president-elect), Viola Scott (VP membership), George Duarte (secretary) and Preiyaa Anand (treasurer) and welcome incoming line officers Greg Jones, Preiyaa Anand, Eliane Selwan and Melody Macabugao. There will also be a special holiday presentation of donations to Magnolia House Women’s Recovery Center and Life Elder Care, the beneficiaries of the WCR Tri-Cities Chapter’s annual fundraiser, Casino Royale, which was held in August. This month’s event is sponsored by Diversified Mortgage Group

Women Now and GOPIO SIlicon Valley present a Charity Show to benefit Hurricane Sandy victims and others from natural disasters. Musical performances presented by Manesh Judge. All money raised will be donated to Red Cross.

Wednesday, Dec 12 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. Hayward High School 1633 East Avenue, Hayward. The agenda for the workshop is available on the General Plan Update website at www.hayward-ca.gov/generalplan Spanish translation is available. At the community workshop, participants will be asked to share: their favorite place in Hayward; what they consider to be the community’s biggest assets, challenges and opportunities; and “Why you love Hayward.” There is also a survey that can be completed online by those who cannot attend. Please visit http://bit.ly/haygpu2. The General Plan must reflect the community’s values and priorities. Please take a few minutes and let us know what we should address in the new General Plan. For more information and to sign-up for regular updates, visit the City’s website at www.haywardca.gov/generalplan

All, including members of the public, are welcome to attend the luncheon. $20 online in advance, $25 at the door (Chapter members); $30 online in advance, $35 at the door (nonmembers). For more information about the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter and to register for this event, visit www.WCRTriCities.com or call (510) 886-2662. For 2013 sponsorship opportunities, contact Greg Jones at (510) 881-1234 ext. 105 or email GregJones@GregJonesRealEstate.com Women’s Council of REALTORS Tri-Cities Chapter Luncheon Wednesday, Dec 19 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 886-2662 www.WCRTriCities.com

Sunday, Dec 16 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. San Jose Airport Garden Hotel sonam@womennow.tv or (510) 364-4271 Minimum contribution: $20


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For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Georgia Ann Victoria RESIDENT OF HAYWARD December 30, 1946 – December 1, 2012

Joyce Silva

John Hsu RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 26, 1939 – December 3, 2012

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 24, 1933 – December 1, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

Maria I. Silva DeLeon

Allen Satterlee RESIDENT OF MILPITAS February 2, 1980 – December 3, 2012

John T. Randall, M.D.

Catherine S. Sisneros RESIDENT OF NILES November 25, 1920 – December 4, 2012

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 8, 1954 – December 2, 2012 RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 7, 1928 – December 4, 2012

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Rosie John

Antonio A. Rativo RESIDENT OF UNION CITY June 13, 1917 – December 5, 2012

RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO December 15, 1928 – December 5, 2012

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com

Muhammad Siddiqui, M.D. Jean E. Havens RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 13, 1932 – December 6, 2012

Secondo Merletti RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 26, 1914 – December 5, 2012

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY June 6, 1932 – December 9, 2012

Ilyas Fatima RESIDENT OF SOUTH SAN FRANCSICO September 20, 1931 – December 10, 2012

Russell C. Giese RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 26, 1925 – December 9, 2012

John R. Pickens RESIDENT OF NEWARK November 1, 1946 – December 9, 2012

Maria G. Quezada RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 5, 1920 – December 9, 2012

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

continued from page 12

Why is Wall Street losing its appetite for Apple?

Theory: The Creativity Contraction Hypothesis: Apple is running out of fresh ideas. Since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died 14 months ago after a long battle with cancer, the company has mostly been fine-tuning products that were created under his visionary leadership. The former CEO’s hand-picked successor, Tim Cook, is well-respected, but some investors are starting to wonder if Apple can conjure up another revolutionary product to catapult the company on another multiyear stretch of breakneck sales growth. Can Apple innovate like a hard-charging startup

while maintaining its giant company stature? Smartphones and tablets ``are starting to become more like commodities,’’ Gillis said. ``And how much upside is left if you are stuck in a commodities business? The question is: What is going to get Apple going again?’’Most analysts believe Apple’s next breakthrough will be a television that shares the same operating system as the iPhone and iPad. An Apple TV would give the company a prized perch on the biggest screen in most households and open up an array of

new business opportunities. Jobs hinted that Apple had figured out how to produce a mesmerizing new TV during interviews he gave with his biographer, Walter Isaacson, before he died. That led many analysts to predict an “iT”would come this year, only to be disappointed. Cook indicated Apple is still trying to develop the device during an interview that aired on NBC’s “Rock Center” Thursday night. “When I go into my living room and turn on the TV, I feel like I have gone backwards in time by 20 to 30 years,’’ Cook said. “It’s an area

Both sides cheer high court’s gay marriage review BY PAUL ELIAS ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Dec 07 – The bitter rivals in California’s gay marriage debate were in complete agreement Friday: The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to take up the state’s gay marriage ban was a good thing. Of course, each side is now hoping for a diametrically opposite ruling. Still, both sides expressed relief that the long, legal battle may be nearing an end now that the high court has agreed to consider California’s Proposition 8, which 52 percent of the electorate passed in 2008. Since then, two lower courts have struck down the ban as unconstitutional. The courts have put same-sex marriages on hold until the legal is-

sues are resolved, which could occur next year depending on how the U.S. Supreme Court rules. ``Every one of the numerous legal steps we have taken for the past four years has been in anticipation of this moment,’’ said Andy Pugno, general counsel for ProtectMarriage.com, which supported the ban in court. “Arguing this case before the Supreme Court finally gives us a chance at a fair hearing, something that hasn’t been afforded to the people since we began this fight.’’ On the other side of the divide, same-sex couples and their supporters similarly applauded the U.S. Supreme Court’s action, even though a denial to take the case would have lifted the ban. San Francisco City Attorney Den-

nis Herrera said this route is better because it could lead to a sweeping ruling for the entire country. “The federal challenge to Prop. 8 represents one of the most significant civil rights cases to be taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court in decades,’’ Herrera said. California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom said this was the ``beginning of the end’’ of the eight-year legal fight over gay marriage. Newsom defied state law on Valentine’s Day 2004 when, as mayor of San Francisco, he ordered City Hall to wed same-sex partners. “By agreeing to hear the Proposition 8 case, the U.S. Supreme Court could end, once and for all, marriage inequity in California,’’ Newsom said.

of intense interest. I can’t say more than that.’’ Theory: The Fiscal Cliff Factor Hypothesis: Many long-time Apple shareholders are selling stock to lock in gains at a lower tax rate. Under laws set to expire Dec. 31, profits on stocks owned for at least a year are taxed at a 15 percent rate – much less than the rate earned income is taxed at. The recent drop notwithstanding, Apple’s stock has still enjoyed an incredible run. It has more than quadrupled from about $120 per share since the iPhone’s release in

June 2007. Even investors who bought Apple’s stock a year ago are still sitting on a gain of nearly 40 percent. Gillis, though, points out that savvy investors probably wouldn’t be selling their Apple stock just to save some money on taxes if they truly believed the stock is destined to soar higher and make them even richer a year from now. “Sometimes, stocks just take a breather,’’ he said. ``And when you get to be as big as Apple, any shift in sentiment can have a material impact on the share price.”

Social Security Q&A BY MARIAELENA LEMUS SOCIAL SECURITY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST IN SAN JOSE Question: What are some of the documents Social Security will accept as proof of identity for a child? Answer: While you can use a birth certificate to prove age or citizenship, you cannot use it as proof of identity. For identity, we prefer to see the child’s U.S. passport. If you don’t have a passport, we may accept the child’s: * Adoption decree; * Doctor, clinic, or hospital record; * Religious record (e.g., baptismal record); * Daycare center or school record; or * School identification card. We generally can accept a non-photo identity document if it has enough information to identify the child (such as the child’s name and age, date of birth and parents’ names). All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. We cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents. To find out more, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber.


December 11, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council seeks to fill vacancy SUBMITTED BY NADINE NADER The Fremont City Council announced its plan to appoint one person to fill the City Council seat made vacant when Bill Harrison was elected to serve as Mayor for the City of Fremont. The person appointed will serve for approximately two years, until the results of the Nov. 4, 2014, General Municipal Election are certified. Those interested in being considered for the appointment to serve on the Fremont City Council are invited to complete

a City Council Vacancy Application and Supplemental Questionnaire. The application and supplemental questionnaire can be obtained online at www.Fremont.gov/CouncilVacancy or at Fremont City Hall, located at 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A. Completed applications and questionnaires must be returned to the Office of the City Clerk or submitted electronically to the cclerk@fremont.gov no later than Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, at 12 p.m. Once the application period has closed,

applications and questionnaire responses will be distributed to the City Council for review and discussion. A tentative schedule for the process is as follows: Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013 Special Council Meeting at 4 p.m. City Council discusses applications and reviews possible interview questions, and also decides which process to use for appointment (alternatives below): • Make a selection based on discussion of the candidates and motion of the Council

for one Candidate; or • Decide to rank the top 3-5 candidates and interview them; or • Decide to interview all candidates Monday, Jan. 14, 2013 Special Council Meeting at 6 p.m. Conduct interviews of top ranked candidates; rank and select preferred candidate. Interest in serving on the City Council of the City of Fremont is greatly appreciated. All applicants must be a Fremont resident. For more information contact the Office of the City Clerk at (510) 284-4060.

Fremont City Council December 4, 2012 Consent Calendar Second reading of ordinance regarding transit oriented development Second reading of ordinance regarding smoking regulations Second reading of ordinance regarding Kimber Park private open space Certification of election results Approve assumption of Community Development Block Grant with SAVE Authorize amendment to youth and family opportunity programs with Alameda County Extend amendment for 18months to tow contracts with multiple operators Amend special events ordinance Ceremonial Items: Recognition of outgoing Mayor Gus Morrison and Councilmember Dominic Dutra Oath of office for incoming Mayor Bill Harrison Oath of office for incoming Councilmember Vinnie Bacon Oath of office for re-elected Councilmember Suzanne Chan Other Business: Fiscal Year 2012/13 budget update showing a fragile, but positive trend in revenue and stabilization of reserves.

Councilmember Vinnie Bacon with son

Mayor Bill Harrison and family

Council Referrals: Selection of Councilmember Anu Natarajan as Vice Mayor Consider the timeline of election or appointment process to fill vacancy on City Council – 60 day window – for remainder of seat vacated by incoming Mayor Bill Harrison. Appointment process to be completed in January. 3 Ayes, 1 Nay (Harrison) Mayor Gus Morrison (Consent only) Mayor Bill Harrison (Non-consent & Referrals) Bill Harrison (Consent) Anu Natarajan Suzanne Lee Chan Dominic Dutra (Consent only) Vinnie Bacon (Non-consent & Referrals)

Hayward City Council December 4, 2012 Business Recognition Award for December 2012: Mimi’s Café Work Session General Plan Update: overall project schedule and proposed schedule for the General Plan Update Task Force. Completion of project is expected by June 2014. Recommended revisions to City’s Alcohol Beverage Outlet regulations. Staff will incorporate input from Council, from a community meeting on December 11 and from the Planning Commission’s December 13, 2012 work session and present them to the Planning Commission and Council in Spring 2013. Consent Authorized City Manager to grant easement on City-owned property to the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) to enable continued trail access. Final Tract Map 7748 – KB Home/First American Title Company (applicant/owner) – approved Final Map, authorized the City Manager to execute a Subdivision Agreement, a Grant of Easement Agreement and accepting, upon completion of improvements, certain streets into the City street system. Park In-Lieu Fee allocation to the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District for the Hayward Senior Center Kitchen Americans with Disabilities Act Improvement Project ($426,968.72 reimbursement), new Dog Park in the Eden Greenway

($72,287.52 reimbursement) and new Ruus Park Americans with Disabilities Act-Compliant Restroom Installation Project ($250,000 advance). Authorized City Manager to accept and appropriate $500,000 CalGRIP funding for continued gang suppression activities by Hayward Police Department. Extended temporary revisions to the Alcohol Beverage Outlet Regulations by six months to June 26, 2013 to allow Happy Hours from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and music until midnight at full-service restaurants. (5 YES, 1 NO (Sweeney)). Legislative Business Bay Area Water Supply and Conservation Agency bond for San Francisco Public Utilities Commission debt repayment. Authorized the Bay Area Water Supply and Conservation Agency (BAWSCA) to prepay the City’s portion of a $367M debt owed by BAWSCA members to the City and County of San Francisco (“San Francisco”); and agreed to make wholesale water purchase surcharge payments to BAWSCA to repay the City’s share of bonds to be sold by BAWSCA. These bonds will provide BAWSCA with the source of funds to prepay the debt owed to San Francisco. FY 2012 General Fund Year-End Review. Public Comment Caltrans tenant Debbie Frederick spoke about the Deferred Maintenance Agreement which tenants, who wish to buy their homes, are happy to accept if the process is reasonable; she asserts that it is not, at this stage. Property appraisals are also being questioned.

Aye Aye, 1 Nay Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

Councilmember Suzanne Chan with husband

Kim Huggett, President, Hayward Chamber of Commerce, stated that the prohibition of Happy Hour puts Hayward restaurants at a competitive disadvantage to those in neighboring communities. A Horizon Services representative spoke of the concerns expressed in writing by Linda Pratt, CommPre Program Director, regarding revisions to the City’s Alcohol Beverage Outlet regulations. Southland Mall’s Elephant Bar has seen sales increase by more than three percent and created a dozen jobs since temporary revisions to the Alcohol Beverage Outlet Regulations were introduced in June 2012 and would like Happy Hour to continue. Mimi’s Café has increased sales by five percent and also added staff; live, background music has doubled sales on Wednesday nights. Kupe Studio, Restaurant & Lounge supports Happy Hour. However, customers leave when it ends and it is difficult to retain or attract customers after 9 p.m. without the opportunity of live music which lures business away from this establishment. He has also lost potential business because his license is proving too restrictive but is working with the City to find a solution. Sally Porfido, City of Hayward Economic Development Coordinator, invited everyone to the fourth annual Shop Hayward event on December 15 and 16, 2012. Visit www.HaywardOpenForBusiness.org Kevin Thompson questioned the degree of government intervention in the free market, asserting, for example, that Council should not make decisions on behalf of

business by banning polystyrene containers. Businesses and consumers should determine what they want. Pianist Dennis Charles supports more live music and entertainment in Downtown Hayward establishments. Doug Ligibel presented DUI arrests/statistics and requested a greater police presence in the Downtown. He also mentioned license types and asked Council members of they want a restaurant-and-bar environment with a City-imposed condition that food accounts for at least 60 percent of sales or a predominantly nightclub environment with state licenses that do not include such a requirement. He asked if Hayward PD enforces the conditional use permits of bars and restaurants and if there is proof of compliance. There is a danger that nightclubs masquerade as bars and restaurants when applying for permits. Jim Drake spoke of an improperly constructed median by Pankey’s Radiator Repair on Foothill Boulevard and poor drainage. The safety of road users is paramount. Mayor Sweeney welcomed Eagle Scout Isaiah Henry and directed the City Manger to contact candidates, who ran in the November 6, 2012 election, to arrange removal of campaign signs. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Greg Jones – Yes Al Mendall - Absent Marvin Peixoto – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeno - Yes

Citizen’s Advisory Committee vacancy SUBMITTED BY KERRILYN ELY The Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD) invites applications from interested residents of Hayward, Castro Valley, San Lorenzo and unincorporated Alameda County for one committee position on the District’s Citizen’s Advisory Committee (CAC). This committee meets four times per year and provides recommenda-

tions to the District Board of Directors, reviews District programs and park design projects and works on specific Board-directed projects. To obtain a CAC application call (510) 881-6704 or visit www.HaywardRec.org to download an application. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. For more information about HARD and the CAC, visit www.HaywardRec.org.


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Israeli beverage maker takes on soda super-giants Birnbaum said the naysayers are simply living in the past. “The bottle and can thing will be illegitimate and uncool one day,’’ he said. “It’s harmful to people and the environment. It won’t be long until soda companies realize this and start offering do-it-yourself solutions of their own. Or they’ll be behind.’’ Skepticism and direct competition aren’t the only challenges. Pro-Palestinian activists who advocate consumer boycotts of goods produced in Jewish settlements – which are deemed illegal by much of the international community – have encouraged the public to shun SodaStream. The company’s main plant is in Mishor Adumim, an Israeli industrial zone next to the Jewish settlement of Maaleh Adumim in the West Bank. Pro-Palestinian activists say the company has profited from Israel’s occupation of the West Bank. They say Palestinian workers have suffered from low wages and poor working conditions and criticized the company for receiving economic incentives, including tax deductions, from the Israeli government. “The new SodaStream publicity blitz has given the U.S. boycott, divestment, sanctions movement a marvelous opportunity to bring our campaigns targeting settlement products to a new, unprecedented level of visibility and success,’’ said Anna Baltzer, an organizer of the U.S. Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation. “It’s time to burst SodaStream’s bubble. There’s nothing environmentally friendly about military occupation.’’ The boycott movement has had a generally limited impact on Israeli businesses, although in 2010, a European Union court said that goods produced in West Bank settlements did not qualify for the same duty free status granted to products made inside Israel. The case involved SodaStream products being shipped to Germany. The Palestinians want to establish a state in the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem, territories Israel occupied in 1967. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005, but continues to control access. Last week, the U.N. General Assembly recognized a state of Palestine in these boundaries as a non-member observer. Aside from political backlash, last month the United Kingdom banned a SodaStream TV advertisement saying it disparaged other soda manufacturers. In the 30-second advertisement, soft drink bottles simultaneously combust as people use the machine at home to happily carbonate their drinks. Birnbaum, meanwhile, defended the company’s West Bank presence. He called the anti-Israel activists a ``confused bunch’’ and said he is providing jobs for Palestinians. “We don’t strengthen or support the occupation,’’ he said. “What we’re doing is taking a facility in the occupied territory and giving Palestinians a career and economic benefits. I’ve got to laugh when they think we’re on the wrong side of this. We’re part of the solution. We build bridges, not walls.’’

(R to L): Adviser Katherine Geers, Kristina Wong, Sabeeka Naqvi, Adviser Bill Jeffers

‘Half the Sky’ ARTICLE AND PHOTO BY ANGIE WANG Mission San Jose High School’s (MSJHS) “Half the Sky” movement is a new group dedicated to raising money to end human trafficking. MSJHS Juniors Kristina Wong and Sabeeka Naqvi work with Human Geography Teacher Bill Jeffers to run the organization. “Half the Sky” is the title of a book by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, who tell stories of the oppression of women around the world. The book was later turned into a film documenting Kristoff, WuDunn, and six celebrity activists as they travelled throughout ten countries to confront this global oppression. Wong said the film inspired her to start a movement at MSJHS because she saw a raw first look at what actually happens around the world. She explained that in other countries, governments are so corrupt that men are arrested for sexual abuse but then just set free, as if they never committed the crime. Some police forces and law systems aren’t developed enough to convict criminals. “[The makers of the film] shared their own experiences with their audience, and when I saw the film I felt same feelings of shock and terror that they

felt,” she said. “It was so powerful and seemed so urgent that I had to do something about it.” Human trafficking is a hard issue to understand and confront as high school students. In Jeffers’ Human Geography class, he recognizes that these problems are difficult to discuss. This motivated Wong and Naqvi to raise funds for the cause because they wanted to help prevent the problem, even if they didn’t know how to talk about it. Wong felt that students her age also needed to be more aware of how big of an impact sex trafficking has on men and women everywhere. “When I talk about [the problem] with my friends, sometimes it just gets waved off as something funny and not serious because it has to do with sex,” she said. Wong and Naqvi plan to raise money and awareness by hosting a movie night and showing clips of the documentary at meetings. As “Half the Sky” grows as a group, they plan to involve the entire community and district rather than just the students at MSJHS. “We want to talk to other Fremont schools and get them involved because the point is to spread the word,” Wong said. For more information on the “Half the Sky” movement, visit www.halftheskymovement.org.

Tri-City Winter Charity SUBMITTED BY JOHN CHYAN

Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson, County Administrator Susan S. Muranishi, and a representative of Revolution Foods at Wednesday’s launch of the Let’s Move campaign to fight childhood obesity.

Let’s Move! to fight childhood obesity SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY PHOTO BY HANNAH GREENE Alameda County, on October 31, became one of the first counties in California to sign on with First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! campaign to fight childhood obesity. Top county officials joined representatives of Oakland-based Revolution Foods at a nearby school to push the new initiative focusing on healthier food choices and exercise as the

keys to wiping out the epidemic of childhood obesity. “We are thrilled to be one of the first counties in the state to adopt the First Lady’s Let’s Move! Challenge,” Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson said in a conversation with students and faculty at Oakland’s Lighthouse Community Charter School. “I look forward to enlisting leaders from California’s 57 other counties to develop a state-wide approach to providing children with greater access to healthy food choices.”

Let’s Move! is a comprehensive initiative that was launched by the First Lady in 2010 and is dedicated to solving the problem of obesity within a generation, so that children born today will grow up healthier and better equipped to pursue their dreams. Alameda County’s Let’s Move! campaign goals include: To provide children with a healthier start by incorporating best practices for nutrition, physical activity and screen time into early care and education programs; To provide healthy food in schools by increasing participation in the School Breakfast Program and the School Lunch Program; To improve access to healthy, affordable foods by implementing healthy and sustainable food service guidelines in all county venues that serve food. More information about the Let’s Move! campaign can be found at http://www.letsmove.gov/.

The Purple Lotus Temple & School and Centro De Servicios of Union City will host the annual Tri-City Winter Charity event on December 16, 2012 from 3 p.m. until 4 p.m. Families from Union City, Fremont, Newark and Hayward are welcome. Dry foods, toys, clothing, books and small household items will be available plus fun games, booths and the opportunity of photo with Santa. Please bring extra bags to take home groceries and other items. The organizers welcome contributions of any kind, including monetary donations (please make checks payable to PLT (memo: 2012 Winter Charity)), canned foods, gently used toys, clothing, books, shoes and small household items. All donations are tax-deductible. To arrange drop-off locations for your donations, call the Tri-City Winter Charity Hotline (English) at (510) 408-7294 and Centro de Servicios (Spanish) at (510) 489-4100. Share the love and warmth of the spirit of giving by spreading the word to those who might wish to visit us. We look forward to welcoming everyone. Tri-City Winter Charity Sunday, Dec 16 2 - 4 p.m. Purple Lotus School 33615 9th Street, Union City (510) 408-7294 (English) (510) 489-4100 (Spanish)

Kaiser Permanente Hospital honored as ‘Top Performer SUBMITTED BY JESSIE MANGALIMAN Twenty Kaiser Permanente hospitals, including Fremont Medical Center and Hayward Medical Center, have been nationally recognized as “Top Performers on Key Quality Measures™” for 2011 performance in “Improving America’s Hospitals The Joint Commission’s Annual Report on Quality and Safety 2012.” “This is a reflection of how our physicians and medical staff collaborate to provide care that is integrated, coordinated and technologically advanced,” said Dr. Calvin Wheeler, Physician-in-Chief, Kaiser Permanente Fremont Medical Center. This is the second year of The Joint Commission’s Top Performers report and the second time that the campuses of Fremont/Hayward made the list. Eight other Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California were also honored. For a complete list of the Top Performers hospitals, as well as the specific measure sets for which each of the 20 hospitals are being recognized, please see The Joint Commission’s “Improving America’s Hospitals” annual report.


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SUBMITTED BY LOLITA MORELLI The Castro Valley Community Band will perform festive favorites for its Holiday Concert on December 19, 2012 at the Castro Valley Center for the Arts. The audience can enjoy popular holiday songs, including March of the Toys, Waltz of the Flowers, Feliz Navidad, Klezmer Dances, highlights from Jersey Boys and a sing-along. Refreshments will be served after the concert, courtesy of Castro Valley Adult & Career Education. “It will be a joy for the band to perform in the beautiful Castro Valley Center for the Arts. We look forward to welcoming everyone at this free event,” says soloist Lolita Morelli.

SUBMITTED BY FUSS4SCHOOLS Do you want to help raise money to support Fremont Unified School District’s (FUSD) art and drama programs by participating in a fashion show? The first 25 applicants from each of the FUSD high schools will be given auditions. The top candidates from each high school will be selected to perform in the Education in Fashion Show. A total of 36 female and 12 male models will be needed. Participants will dress in gowns/tux supplied by Weddings & Dreams, and work with professional model agents, fashion designers and make-up artists. Auditions will be held on December 20, 21, and

DeVry University student organizations, Phi Beta Lambda and The International Student Club, have organized world-class entertainment for everyone to enjoy while supporting Toys for Tots. Join Comedy Jam celebrity J-Red in a world of fun and laughter and smooth jazz saxophonist, Rock Hendricks for a memorable evening.

22, (50 auditions per day), at Weddings and Dreams, 40528 Albrae Street, Fremont. To sign up, register online at http://www.fuss4schools.org/activities/registration/ and FUSS will be in contact to let you know the date and time of your audition. Proceeds from the fashion show will be given to support FUSD art and drama programs. For additional info visit: fuss4schools.org or email info@fuss4schools.org Fremont Unified Student Store (FUSS4Schools), a non-profit organization, was formed to come up with creative solutions to raise needed funds in support of the school district.

Night of Comedy Saturday, Dec 15 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. DeVry University 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont (510) 574-1200 $5 donation or new unwrapped toy

Holiday Concert Wednesday, Dec 19 7:30 p.m. Castro Valley Center for the Arts 19501 Redwood Road, Castro Valley

SUBMITTED BY ANDY LYN The Holidays are when many of us look forward to gatherings, holiday meals, decorations and exchanges of gifts. It is easy to forget there are people in our community going through tough times and struggling to put food on their tables. A holiday celebration and an exchange of gifts are not even an option. Holiday of Wishes is an organization consisting of local businesses and community members helping needy families enjoy this holiday season. This year, we are inviting children and families that are documented at poverty level or below from six of the elementary schools in our community. We will provide gifts for each child registered in each family for them to open on their holiday morning and a reusable grocery bag containing enough food for a holiday meal for a family of six. We are collecting new, unwrapped toys for children aged 1-16 years, boxed potatoes and stuffing, canned corn, green beans, cranberry and gravy. Everyone can help holiday wishes come true this year by giving the greatest gift... a community pulling together to ensure every child and family in our community enjoys the magic and beauty of the holiday season. Individuals or organizations wishing to participate should contact Renee@avalonspasalon.com For more information, www.HolidayOfWishes.org Drop-off Locations Avalon Spa & Salon, 5141 Mowry Ave., Fremont Bruce’s Tires, 2420 Prune Ave., Fremont Bruce’s Tires, 240 Hegenberger Rd., Oakland Bruce’s Tires, 1315 N. 10th St., San Jose Castro Valley Lumber, 2495 Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley Durbo Chiropractic Office, 43255 Mission Blvd., Fremont Fremont Bank Brookvale Branch, 3909A Decoto Rd., Fremont Fremont Bank Main Branch, 39150 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Fremont Bank Warm Springs Branch, 46635 Mission Blvd., Fremont Gift Gallery, 2720 Mowry Ave., Fremont La Piñata, 39136 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont Osborne Lumber Company, 8100 Enterprise Dr., Newark Pan Pacific Bank, 47065 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont Snap Fitness, 43480 Mission Blvd. Suite 160, Fremont Spin A Yarn Steakhouse, 45915 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont Starbucks, 39981 Mission Blvd., Fremont Tangles Salon, 4002 Bay St., Fremont Top Flight Gymnastics, 5127 Mowry Ave., Fremont


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Award-winning artist/author at Cultural Corner SUBMITTED BY DONALD WILSON The exquisite paintings of award-winning artist, writer, and teacher Jan Small will be on display at NewPark Mall’s Cultural Corner during the month of December. She has taught art for over 45 years. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and has been seen on television and published in newspapers and magazines. Her work has also been secured for public and private collections. Small has lectured and demonstrated to art associations, churche,s and Christian organizations as well as taught art classes at College of Holy Names in Oakland, the Fremont School District, and Fremont Recreation Department. In addition, she has taught special classes to the mentally and physically handicapped, senior citizens, and abandoned and abused children at Alameda County Juvenile Hall. Her love of art motivates her to hold classes in her studio where she facilitates workshops in painting prophetic art. The exhibit is free and open to the public. Hours are Monday – Saturday, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.; and Sunday, 12:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. On December 12 and 13 the exhibit will be open 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. and on December 24, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. It will be closed on Christmas Day. The Cultural Corner, which opened in May 2011, provides exhibit space for the work of local artisans, including painters, sculptors, photographers and digital artists. For more information, visit www.NewParkMall.com. Works of Jan Small December 1 – 31 Monday – Saturday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sunday: 12:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. Cultural Corner (lower level near Sears) NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.NewParkMall.com

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TCV 2012-12-11