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‘St. Nick’s of Niles’

Tradition! The Nutcracker

The Rotary Club of Niles turns 75

Page 39

Page 20 Page 15

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR The holiday season has arrived! Twinkly lights are appearing on rooftops and balconies, turkey has been devoured and holiday shopping is underway. Among the hustle and bustle of preparing for winter festivities, take some time to relax and enjoy

www.tricityvoice.com

November 27, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 74

this time of year. Ardenwood Historic Farm has the perfect solution to the sometimes overwhelming holiday preparations. Each year since the park’s opening in 1985, the farm has held a special Christmas celebration. Being home to the historic Patterson House, a traditional continued on page 6

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI PHOTOS BY JUREK ZARZYCKI BY GUSTAVO LOAMS Winter - a time that brings cold weather, shorter days and the desire to stay home sitting cozied by the fire sipping on deliciously soothing hot chocolate. Inspiring holiday classics of compassion and caring begin playing on television, and delectable treats and feasts abound. No matter the occasion - Thanksgiving, Hanukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa -this is the time of year for people to indulge in a little something special, release their inner child. And nothing appeals to a person’s inner child like creating an imaginary world and learning how to bring continued on page 6

Looking to check off that Christmas list without websites and shopping malls? The Olive Hyde Art Guild invites you to explore a wealth of artistic, handcrafted selections at their annual “Holiday for the Arts Gala, Show & Sale.” Celebrating its 30th anniversary, “Holiday for the Arts” offers beautiful and unique gifts created by local artists with proceeds benefitting Fremont’s Olive Hyde Art Gallery as well as supporting visual arts programs and projects in Fremont’s schools and the community at large. A ticketed gala kicks off the event on Friday, November 30, where attendees will enjoy hors d’ oeuvres and wine alongside the first viewing of art and opportunity to buy. Not only will ticket holders enjoy the first fruits of the event, but will also be entered in a drawing to win an original watercolor painting by award-winning artist Charlotte Britton entitled “Near Elk.” Britton is a signature member of American Watercolor Society and National Water Society, and founded the Santa Clara Valley

Watercolor Society in 1968. She has participated in juried art exhibitions throughout the United States, and taught painting in Fremont and Berkeley as well as abroad. Britton conducted watercolor classes and workshops at La Romita School of Art in Italy and led painting trips to locales such as England, Scotland, and Spain, along the coast of Maine, and New York City’s Hudson River. In addition to Britton, over 80 artists are participating with a diverse array of creative items from paintings, photography and fiber arts to ceramics and glass, jewelry, sculpture and holiday inspired gifts. Discover the wood works of John Neto and Larry Gipson; enjoy the scenery of Grace Rankin, Thomas Cory, Lynn Slade, and Yvonne Gee; pick up some jewelry from Linda Abernathy, Nithya Ruff, and Susan Helmer; and marvel at the glass and ceramics creations of Christopher Roscoe, Akio Aochi, Debbie Shull, and Mary and Gene Bobik. Publicity Chair and participating artist Emelie Rogers says, “What attracted me to this event is the Guild’s commitment to vicontinued on page 16

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 30

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 29

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

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ast week was the 14th Annual GERD Awareness Week—an opportunity to encourage everyone who may be suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) to learn more about the condition and seek medical attention, if needed. A recent study by the Gallup Organization estimates between 25 percent and 40 percent of Americans have GERD—a more serious form of heartburn, which is also called acid indigestion or acid reflux. The Gallup study estimated that up to 10 percent of Americans have symptoms of GERD on a daily basis. “Heartburn is an uncomfortable, burning sensation in the chest, and if you experience it occasionally, it’s not a cause for concern,” said Mary S. Maish, M.D., chief of thoracic and foregut surgery for Washington Township Medical Foundation and a member of the medical staff at Washington Hospital. “However, if you have more serious and frequent symptoms, such as heartburn that occurs more than twice a week, you should learn what to do because GERD can lead to more serious health problems.” GERD is a group of symptoms. Besides heartburn, it can include a range of other problems like regurgitation, bloating, or an acidic taste in the back of the mouth. If you have GERD, you may experience nausea, chronic ear infections, frequent cough, recurrent pneumonia or hoarseness. You can also have problems with your mouth and teeth, such as dental decay or bad breath.

Mary S. Maish, M.D., (above) chief of thoracic and foregut surgery for Washington Township Medical Foundation says that if you suffer from heartburn more than twice a week, you should learn what to do because gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can lead to more serious health problems. If you or someone you know has GERD symptoms, call the Washington Township Medical Foundation at (510) 248-1400 to schedule a free 15 minute consultation with our nurse practitioner.

The most frequent cause of GERD is obesity. Stress can also be a factor. Other possible contributors are: • Medication that causes your stomach to empty more slowly • Hiatal hernia, when the upper part of the stomach rises up inside the chest. This allows air to be trapped in a very tight space under the breastbone causing a pressure sensation. • Irritable bowel syndrome • Anxiety-related problems, like panic disorder There are four diagnostic tests to help confirm that your symptoms are truly GERD. “Unfortunately, none of these tests is very comfortable for patients,” observed Dr. Maish, “But, together, they give us the best picture of what’s happening and why. This helps us develop the best treatment plan.” One test called a barium swallow gives a good picture of the anatomy of your esophagus and how it is functioning. A second test, called an upper endoscopy, enables the physician to see the inside lining of your esophagus and look for abnormalities. A test called manometry checks the pressure in your esophagus while you are swallowing liquids or semisolids. This helps the physician determine how well the esophagus and the valve between the esophagus and the stomach are functioning. Finally, pH monitoring measures how much acid and non-acid reflux material comes into your esophagus. The test is done over a period of one or two days while you go about your normal activities. continued on page 5

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

11/27/12

11/28/12

11/29/12

11/30/12

12/01/12

12/02/12

12/03/12

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacemen

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Men's Health Expo 2011 Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Radiation Safety

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Neuropathy

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes Voices InHealth: Radiation Safety

Kidney Transplant

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Living with Heart Failure Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Partnering with Your Doctor to Improve Diabetes Control

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Peripheral Vascular Turning 65? Get To Know Positivity - A Positive Disease: Leg Weakness, Medicare Approach to Managing Symptoms and Treatment Diabetes

Brain Health for Seniors

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

Disaster Preparednesss

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Crohn's & Colitis (Late Start)

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

The Weight to Success Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Keys to Healthy Eyes

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The PreSchool Years

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Da

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

IVoices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 14, 2012

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

Shingles

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?l

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Learn Exercises to Help Fitting Physical Activity Into Lower Your Blood Pressure Your Day and Slow Your Heart Rate


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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recent study by the Centers for Disease Control has revealed that, between 1995 and 2010, the rate of diabetes cases in 42 U.S. states increased by at least 50 percent. In the remaining 18 states, the rate of diabetes doubled during the same period.

Getting the Most From Acute Rehabilitation of Stroke There’s no doubt that acute management of stroke saves lives and helps mitigate long-term disability. But stroke care is a constantly evolving field, which means that hospitals and the medical professionals who work in stroke care must stay at the forefront of research in order to best serve patients. This is part of the reason members of Washington Hospital’s

stroke. At this point, we can get good results with administering tPA intravenously,” he explains. “Then, if the patient comes in between four and six hours after the stroke, we would inject the drug directly into the brain and still get fairly good results.” Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), also known as clot-busting medication, is one of the key tools in acute stroke care. Unfor-

Besides insulin, there is a variety of other medications to help people control their diabetes. On Thursday, Dec. 6, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Washington Hospital is holding a free diabetes education seminar called “Straight Talk about Diabetes Medications.” The class is open to the public as part of the monthly Diabetes Matters series sponsored by the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center. For more information call (510) 745-6556. At an upcoming stroke education session, Washington Hospital clinicians will discuss stroke rehabilitation and chronic care after stroke. Chronic problems that stroke survivors must overcome and the toll stroke takes on caregivers will also be addressed. To learn more about acute management of stroke, as well as rehabilitation and chronic care following stroke, make sure to attend the upcoming free Stroke Education Series seminar Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A and B, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To register for the upcoming seminar, call (800) 963-7070 or visit www.whhs.comand click on Upcoming Health Seminars.

Stroke Program recently attended and presented research at the 8th World Stroke Congress in Brazil. The forefront of stroke care “We are staying on the leading edge of stroke research in a way that many community hospitals cannot,” says Dr. Ash Jain, cardiologist and medical director of the Stroke Program. “Techniques for acute management of stroke are always advancing, and to best serve our patients, we need to stay ahead of the curve, which is exactly what we are doing.” Next Tuesday, Dec. 4, Dr. Jain and Stroke Program Clinical Coordinator Doug Van Houten, R.N., will present a free seminar focusing on Acute Management of Stroke/Chronic Care and Stroke Rehabilitation. “Attending the World Stroke Congress reaffirmed our goal to treat stroke as quickly as possible once a patient reaches our Emergency Room,” according to Dr. Jain. “Acute management of stroke is all about timing, and even small delays can have heavy costs.” Dr. Jain says he is more determined than ever to maximize the use of intravenous (IV) tPA and associated interventional techniques for eligible patients, which requires that patients reach the ER as soon as possible. “It is in our power to improve our times, which will maximize the number of patients who benefit from advanced treatment options, including interventional techniques in our Cath Lab,” he explains. “However, it is very much up to community members to understand stroke so that they know how imperative it is to call 9-1-1.” Because timing, he says, is everything. “Let’s say the patient comes in within four hours of suffering a

tunately, after six hours, patients are no longer good candidates for clot-dissolving medications. Fortunately, Washington Hospital’s Stroke Team can still treat strokes for up to eight hours by inserting a catheter through the groin into the brain to remove the clot. The goal, in all cases, is to preserve as much brain function as possible. However, after eight hours, most of the damage to the brain has been done, and the window for acute treatment has usually closed. “With the latest research and best tools at our disposal, we save lives and help reduce the chances of long-term disability from stroke, but it’s people in the community who first need to recognize the signs and symptoms and call 9-1-1 immediately,” Dr. Jain says. The way back from stroke After acute management of stroke is done, when as much brain function as possible has been spared, patients begin the task of acute rehabilitation. And this is the stage, according to Doug Van Houten, when patients can make real strides by working with the professionals he calls the “unsung heroes” of stroke care. Speech therapists, occupational therapists and physical therapists work tirelessly with patients to help them regain lost function, including speech, activities of daily living and mobility. Van Houten is quick to note, though, that recovery starts with the stroke survivor, who many times is dealing with depression on top of stroke recovery. “During this seminar of the Stroke Education Series, my emphasis will be on depression, a serious factor that can displace somebody’s ability to participate continued on page 9

“Today, more people are living with diabetes and it’s important that they understand how to manage their disease,” said Adrian Palisoc, PharmD, a postgraduate pharmacy practice resident in the Clinical Pharmacy at Washington Hospital. “In addition to making lifestyle changes, people with diabetes need to understand their treatment options, and that includes the various medications and how they work.”

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On Thursday, Dec. 6, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Palisoc and Michele Siu, PharmD, also a pharmacy practice resident at the Hospital, will lead a free diabetes education seminar called “Straight Talk about Diabetes Medications.” The class is open to the public as part of the monthly Diabetes Matters series sponsored by the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center. Intended to provide science-based information to help all community members increase their knowledge about diabetes, Diabetes Matters is held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium of the Washington West building next to Washington Hospital at 2500 Mowry Ave. in Fremont. Advance registration is not required. Following the program, there will be a meeting of the Center’s Diabetes Support Group. People with diabetes, their families and caregivers are welcome to participate. “During the class, we’ll start by talking about the basic biology of diabetes—what it is and how it affects your body,” explained Palisoc. When people have diabetes, the levels of glucose, or sugar, in their blood are too high. That’s because the glucose stays in the blood rather than going into the cells of the body to produce energy. Ideally, insulin—a naturally occurring hormone secreted by the pancreas—helps the glucose enter the cells. When someone has diabetes, this doesn’t happen. There are two types of diabetes. With type 1, the body doesn’t make insulin, so having regular insulin injections is the only way people with type 1 diabetes can control their blood glucose levels. With type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin and the cells don’t take in glucose as well as they should. “It’s very important that people manage their diabetes because high levels of blood glucose can cause damage to vital organs, and this could lead to heart attacks, strokes or other serious, even life threatening, health problems,” added Palisoc. “One way to manage diabetes is with medication.” Palisoc went on to explain that, once people start taking medication to help manage their diabetes, it is most likely they will need to be on it for the rest of their life. “So, if someone is not on diabetes medication yet, and depending on blood test results, we encourage them to try managing their diabetes through healthy lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise,” Palisoc stated. “If this doesn’t help get their blood glucose levels under control, they will need to start taking medication.” continued on page 5


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, adapted and directed by Brian Allan Hobbs, is a song-filled holiday classic for the entire family. Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge, the curmudgeon everyone loves to hate; the ghost story of the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Future; the festive Fezziwigs; over 20 holiday songs in glorious choral harmony; dancing; the darling Cratchit family with the ever hopeful Tiny Tim; and an unrequited love story offer a memorable tale of human transformation that will steal your heart in this special time of the year.

Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 6, 7, 8 & 9 8pm (Dec. 6th is a Thursday $10 "Poor Actors"performance, tickets at the door only) Dec. 2 & 9 Sunday Mattinees 2:30pm Tickets are available at www.stage1theatre.org or by calling 510-791-0287 or BROWN PAPER TICKETS (800) 838-3006 or The Book End 5678 Thornton Ave in Newark

General Admission $22 Senior/Advanced Purchase $20 Students 17 & under $10 Groups 12+ $18 *group prices apply to same performance only

39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark 94560 - Held in the Newark Memorial High School Theatre across from Newpark Mall. We recommend you park in front of the school by the Library and Office.

November 27, 2012


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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“Depending on what we learn from these tests, there is a range of treatment options,” added Dr. Maish. If no abnormalities are found, you can take drugs called H2 blockers or proton pump inhibitors. H2 blockers, available by prescription or over-the-counter, decrease the acid production in the digestive tract. Proton pump inhibitors, available by prescription only, relieve acid reflux symptoms and also help to heal the lining of the esophagus. “If the tests show anatomic or functional problems or if there is a hiatal hernia, you may need surgery,” advised Dr. Maish. “With minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, we can prevent reflux from coming back into the esophagus and relieve the symptoms of GERD.” “If you have recurring symptoms of GERD and don’t get diagnosed and treated, the outcome can be very serious,” warned Dr. Maish. If reflux continues untreated, it can lead to inflammation of the esophagus, and this can cause

scarring and narrowing. Ongoing reflux can also result in Barrett’s syndrome, increasing your chances of getting cancer of the esophagus. “If we determine that surgery is the best option for a patient, we can restore the barriers that contribute to GERD and stop the disease from progressing,” explained Dr. Maish. “More than just relieving symptoms, we want to help you avoid serious problems down the road.”

Got GERD? Heartburn Relief is Here! If you or someone you know has GERD symptoms, call the Washington Township Medical Foundation at (510) 248-1400 to schedule a free 15 minute consultation with our nurse practitioner. To learn more about diagnostic testing and treatment options for GERD, visit Washington Township Medical Foundation online at www.mywtmf.com

continued from page 3

Besides insulin, there is a variety of other medications to help people control their diabetes. To determine whether to take insulin or other diabetes medications, people with diabetes should talk with their doctor or healthcare team. “The answer depends on which symptoms or complications you’re experiencing, your blood glucose levels, and other factors,” advises the American Diabetes Association. In the Diabetes Matters class, Palisoc and Siu will focus on the different types of diabetes medications, other than insulin, that are available. They’ll describe the six classes of drugs and explain how each works differently to lower blood glucose levels.

They’ll also talk about how to take each medication and the possible side effects. In addition to taking medication, it is important that people with diabetes exercise and eat a well-balanced diet. Before starting an exercise regimen, they should check with their doctor, since they may have heart or other physical problems related to diabetes. It is best to select exercise routines they enjoy and that help to burn calories and glucose, such as walking or bicycling. It is also good to do some type of resistance or weight-lifting exercise to build muscle. When beginning an exercise program, start slowly and gradually increase the regimen over time. To help manage their blood glucose levels, people with diabetes

should also keep track of and control the carbohydrates in their diet. Foods that contain carbohydrates increase blood glucose. At the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center, a team of certified diabetes educators teaches people with diabetes the skills they need to control diabetes for a lifetime.

Learn more For more information on the Dec. 6 seminar and other upcoming Diabetes Matters seminars, or if you would like to receive information about additional upcoming diabetes-related events, call (510) 745-6556. For more information about the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center, go online to www.whhs.com. For more information on diabetes, visit the Web site of the American Diabetes Association at www.diabetes.org.

Calif. man charged in Good Samaritans’ deaths AP WIRE SERVICE A California man was charged Friday with killing two women who were electrocuted after his SUV struck a fire hydrant and light pole. Aman Samsonian, 19, turned himself in Thursday and faces two counts of vehicular manslaughter in the deaths of Stacy Schreiber, 39, and Irma Zamora, 40. He faces up to seven years and four months in prison if convicted.

Samsonian had been driving at a high rate of speed, but drugs and alcohol didn’t appear to be factors in the crash, police said. The posted speed limit in the area was 35 mph. The women were killed in August when they tried to help Samsonian after his vehicle hit a hydrant and toppled a light pole. Since the crash occurred at night, the downed electric lines may have been hard to see. The two women stepped in electrified water created by the

collision. Their bodies remained in the pool, which continued to grow from the hydrant gush. Several people tried to help, including Samsonian and a police officer, but they also were injured by electric shocks. Samsonian surrendered after Los Angeles County sheriff’s investigators issued an arrest warrant. It wasn’t immediately known if he had retained an attorney. He is scheduled to be arraigned Nov. 19 and is free on $100,000 bail.


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that world to life with their own classic images. This year at the “Holiday Anime Faire and Art Show,” people have the opportunity to do just that. The “Holiday Anime Faire and Art Show” has been running since 2006 and grown to be quite an interesting animated place during the holiday season. This year there will be arts and crafts, the opportunity to visit local artists, a manga drawing room, art on the spot contest, and art lessons throughout the day. Those are just a few features available! The fun begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, December 1, and is open to all ages. If you pre-register, event tickets are $9, but will cost $15 at the door. However, admission is good for two people, so bring a friend or a parent or even an annoying sibling because each admission comes with a “goodie” bag and two activity tickets; each additional ticket costs $1. Rena Kiehn, Recreation Supervisor for the City of Fremont and the event’s supervisor, expressed the desire to encourage youth of all ages to participate. “We need to encourage children and teens to learn early on the power in having numerous skill sets,” Kiehn stated. “This is not just about one type of art; it is about art

as a whole. We will even have someone there speaking who paints holiday murals on glass windows of buildings. Talking about the direction a person could go if that is what they wanted to do to help satisfy their need for creativity,” Kiehn said. The special guest artist is Laura Ramie, a muralist, painter, and artist extraordinaire. There are even possible volunteer hours for teens looking to knock out a few and help out on Friday and Saturday. A special Japanese café truck will be on site, Spice It Up, serving perfectly priced exotic food, such as green tea donuts as well as Thai and Japanese style crepes. “The best part about it is, with this food truck, the money is meant to go far!” Kiehn exclaimed. Raffles will be held throughout the day. Parking for the venue is free and attendees can choose to register early online or in person by going down to the Teen Center at Lake Elizabeth. The event starts at 10 a.m. and will be over at 3 p.m. Time is running out for early registration, so sign up soon and remember to bring a buddy. Registration hours are 8:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information go www.holidayanimefaire.com or contact Rena Kiehn at rkiehn@fremont.gov or (510) 494-4344. To register online go to www.RegeRec.com; the office is located at 39770 Paseo Padre Parkway in Fremont, and for any registration questions call (510) 494-4300 extension 1. Holiday Anime Faire and Art Show Saturday, Dec 1 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Teen Center, Central Park 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4300 x1 www.holidayanimefair.com www.RegeRec.com Tickets: $9 in advance, $15 at the door (price good for two)

November 27, 2012

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Victorian farmhouse built in 1857, “Christmas at Ardenwood” has a nostalgic, Victorian charm. Volunteers and staff lovingly decorate the Patterson House in a different theme each year. Tours are held year-round, but the magic of Christmas really brings the house to life. “Christmas at Ardenwood” isn’t just an occasion to see beautiful lights and holiday décor. This event is a full weekend’s celebration! Dancing, caroling, wassailing, music, puppet shows, crafts, and a visit from Father Christmas, the Santa Claus of the Victorian age, provide wonderful memories for park-goers of all ages. Children will love the Yule log hunt! They gather after hearing the farm’s bell rung and an initial clue begins the search. Gradually, more clues are revealed to help the hunters find their prize. The winner receives a slice of the Yule log, bringing good luck for the New Year. For the grownups, a cookie-baking contest will be held on both days. Recipes and baked cookies are due at 11 a.m. and winners will be announced at noon. The Country Kitchen will have docents demonstrating baking old-fashioned treats on a wood-burning stove from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Volunteers will lead children making crafts at the Craft Corral; wooly lambs, made of wool from Ardenwood’s own sheep, are always a favorite. Handcrafted gifts are also available for purchase and make great holiday treats. Train rides and carriages rides are available all weekend at a nominal cost. In addition to “Christmas at Ardenwood,” there are several other events happening in the park throughout December. Holiday tours of the elegantly decorated Patterson House will be available Thursday through Sunday until December 16 with a special magical evening open house on Friday, December 7. The monarch butterflies have begun their yearly migration south and can be found overwintering on the eucalyptus trees at the park. Several naturalistled events are scheduled over the month, so be sure to check out the monarch program. On

Tuesday mornings, Ranger Ira teaches very young children about feeding and caring for the animals on the farm. On December 15 there will be a workshop for making homemade holiday cards. Ardenwood Historic Farm is a Bay Area treasure. Stop in this holiday season and step back into a slower pace of life. Bring a little nostalgia to your celebration by taking in all the delights of Ardenwood at Christmas time. Christmas at Ardenwood Saturday, Dec 1 and Sunday, Dec 2 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org Tickets: $8 adults, $6 seniors, $5 children ages 4 to 17, children three and under are free Christmas Tours of the Patterson House Thursday-Friday: Dec 6 and 7, 13 and 14 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: Dec 8 and 9, 15 and 16 11 a.m., noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org Tickets: $4 adults and seniors, $3 children (plus farm admission) A Christmas Evening at the Patterson House Friday, Dec 7 5 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org www.regerec.com Advance tickets: $5 adults and seniors, $3 children At Door: $6 adults and seniors, $4 children


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Auto Review

Hyundai Azera: the Korean “Avalon” BY STEVE SCHAEFER ith the new Azera, Hyundai has completed its 24/7 2.0 program. That means they delivered on their promise to bring out seven new or revised vehicles in just 24 months. That’s a pretty darned amazing accomplishment. The Azera takes off from the popular midsize Sonata and of-

petitor. And being a little lighter, it doesn’t feel like a tank going down the road. Despite its large-midsize proportions, the Azera gets decent mileage. The EPA says 20 City, 28 Highway, with an average of 23. I got 21.9 mph - still reasonable. Environmentally, the car rates 6 for Air Pollution and 5 for Greenhouse Gas - right in the middle. The Azera’s body is attractive

through your smart phone. Prices begin at $32,000 more or less. That’s in the right range for cars like this. My tester came with the Technology Package, for an additional $4,000. For that sizable investment you get 19-inch alloy wheels, a panoramic sunroof, HID Xenon headlights, power rear sunshade, manual side window sunshades and the potent

fers a little more room, power and style (and price, of course). It’s hard to remember sometimes where Hyundai was years ago. Hyundais were odd, derivative, cramped, funny-smelling little transportation modules. But for the last, say, decade, things have really turned around. This new, second-generation Azera sedan offers a long list of standard features, cavernous passenger accommodations, and, with another take on Hyundai’s “Fluidic Sculpture” design template, head-turning style. The car comes only as a sedan and with just one engine - a 3.3liter V6, with 293 horsepower and 255 lb.-ft. of torque. That may be because the model not only fits in size between the midsize Sonata

and energetic looking. The customer for this type of car isn’t really looking to make a powerfully unique statement, but he or she does want to look up-to-date, and the car has all the right touches. The grille is chrome and prominent. The folds along the body sides are just like you’d find on an Infiniti or even a BMW. The headlamps and tail lamps are chock full of jewelry. Hard to believe that not long ago the illuminated parts of cars were plain plastic bars. Inside, it’s a swirl of silvery trim - typical for today, but quite nicely laid out. The only place it wasn’t completely satisfying was at the windshield pillars, where the intersection of vents and seams seemed a little busy. At

Infinity 12-speaker Logic7 audio system with subwoofer and external amplifier. There are several other comfort and convenience features included, too. I was impressed by the feel of the Azera on the road. That could be thanks in part to the suspension, with its Sachs Amplitude Selective Dampers (ASD) front and rear. It allows for tuning flexibility at smaller damper displacements. It was smooth, quiet, and had an upscale feeling that Hyundai has figured out how to provide. The Genesis, you expect to be that way, but the Azera has it too, at a fairly affordable price. Good work, Hyundai!

and the luxury Genesis sedan, it reserves the four-cylinder engine for the Sonata and two V8s for the Genesis. The V6 is mated to Hyundai’s six-speed automatic transmission with SHIFTRONIC(r) manual control. This transmission offers smooth shifts and a wide ratio spread that ideally suits the engine’s characteristics. Azera’s powertrain also has an Active Eco mode, which modifies engine and transmission control for improved fuel economy. You don’t have to do anything except push the Eco button, but it can add up to as much as a five percent fuel economy improvement. At 3,605 pounds, the Azera is more than 200 pounds lighter than the Buick LaCrosse (3,835 pounds) and more than 400 pounds lighter than the Ford Taurus (4,015 pounds). That means that the 3.3-liter V6, slightly smaller than competitors’ 3.5 and 3.6-liter engines, delivers the goods, with the highest horsepower per liter of any com-

night, the gauges glow and a slim illuminated line snakes across the dash and doors. The firm but comfortably padded seats are nice to look at too. Both driver and passenger get numerous get adjustment options - and the controls are right where Mercedes puts them - on the door. You can select from three levels of heating - and of cooling. Speaking of seats, Hyundai engineers have developed an impact-reducing seat system for the Azera. It eliminates the need for active front head restraints and is expected to reduce head and neck injuries by 17 percent over the front seats in the previous generation car. All Azeras come with touchscreen navigation with backup camera standard. No other car in the segment offers this as standard equipment. There’s also the standard Hyundai Blue Link telematics. You can access the Web using buttons on the rearview mirror inside the car,

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Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Do you know this suspect?

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On Saturday, November 17, 2012, at approximately 12:55 p.m. a female suspect approached a home on the 4500 block of Meyer Park Circle. (Glenmoor neighborhood) about 20 minutes after a UPS delivery had occurred. She walked up to the door and took the package along with a bag of canned goods that had been left out for a charity organization.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD November 20 An alert reporting party called about three suspicious males hiding near a residence in the 3700 block of Eugene Street. Officers arrive on scene and contacted three subjects; a 17 year old juvenile found to be in violation of his probation out of the area of his residence - while on ankle monitoring. The other two subjects, a 24 year old adult male and a 20 year old adult male were arrested for attempted burglary after they admited to trying to break into a residence. Case investigated by Officer Hanhrahan. November 21 CSO Allen is investigating a residential burglary that occurred on Woodbridge Place. Reporting party called to report that someone was in her backyard at the 5000 block of Curtis Street trying to break in through a window. Officer Settle arrived and saw a male flee from the front yard over the side gate. Units established a perimeter and Newark PD K-9 responded to assist. A search of the yard and the Hetch Hetchy right-of-way revealed the path of the suspect but suspect was not found; a rear screen and window pane were pried out. Officers were dispatched to The Huddle on the 5000 block of Mowry Avenue. A caller reported that a male brandished a handgun at another male during a heated argument. She provided the suspect vehicle plate and suspect description then left the area. One male witness/victim was located in the bar. Due to his intoxication level, his story was inconsistent. The caller returned with some coaxing and declined to provide any further information to Officers.

The female suspect is described as 25-30 years old, 5”4”, 180 lbs, wearing a blue sweater, blue pants and black shoes (possibly boots). If you know this suspect, please contact the Fremont Police Department at fremontpolice@fremont.gov or call the Investigative Unit at 510-790-6900. To learn how to make an anonymous tip, go to www.fremontpolice.org/tip. Please reference the “Glenmoor Mail Theft.” Thank you in advance for helping to identify this suspect.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD November 16 At 3:15 p.m., Officers were dispatched to Macy’s at Newpark Mall in regard to a shoplifter in-custody. The shoplifter was determined to have stolen approximately $478.43 worth of merchandise by using a $400 gift card at multiple locations and electronic vending machines inside the store prior to the balance being updated with the card issuer. The suspect, Jeffrey Barnes, was arrested for burglary. In addition, Barnes may also be linked to numerous incidents throughout the Bay Area using a similar M.O. November 17 Officers contacted Daniel Hark of San Francisco at 3:51 p.m. who was panhandling on Mowry Avenue. Hark was arrested for 21 outstanding traffic warrants. Officers investigated a citizen’s arrest/shoplift case at the Newpark Mall JC Penney store at 6:21 p.m. Kisha Hill of Oakland was arrested for burglary. At 10:29 p.m., Officers investigated a residential ransack burglary on Crystal Springs Drive. November 18 Officers responded to a neighbor reporting a residential burglary in-progress at 3:06 p.m. in the 6800 block of Cedar Boulevard. Officers found the front door open and saw three subjects inside. Arrested for burglary were, David Galvan, Fremont; Oscar Iniguez, Fremont; and Lena Faitague. November 19 Officers investigated residential burglaries reported on Mandarin Street, Poplar Street, and Papaya Street. At 7:28 p.m., Officer Ramos investigated a vehicle burglary that occurred in the BJ’s Restaurant parking lot. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at (510) 5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 578-4965.

You Are Not Alone (Y.A.N.A.) SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD

The Fremont Police Department, in partnership with the City of Fremont’s Human Services Department, announces the Y.A.N.A. program - a free telephone reassurance service provided by Police Volunteers for City of Fremont residents. In the City of Fremont we want our elderly, disabled, and homebound to know that they are never alone. Using the Y.A.N.A. program, Fremont Police Volunteers will provide enrolled participants with peace of mind and a sense of security for those who enjoy the independence of living alone but realize that a medical crisis could render them helpless. How does it work? Police volunteers will provide each participant with a daily check-in phone call, Monday - Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. If an enrollee does not answer the phone after a few attempts, a series of follow up steps are taken to ensure the participants safety and well-being, which could include a home visit. Enrollees must want the service and participate in an assessment prior to acceptance into the program. Volunteers and staff are ready to begin accepting participants. If you know someone who could benefit from this service, please visit our website www.fremontpolice.org/Yana or call (510) 790-6691.


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fully in rehab,” he explains. “After stroke has occurred, rehab is really the only way back. Based on the research, depression is something that is expected, because it occurs in as many as 30 percent to 40 percent of stroke survivors. It’s also something that’s pretty treatable.” He says that the kind of depression common after a stroke usually can be successfully treated with medication. Unfortunately, there are challenges that prevent many stroke survivors from getting the help they need in the first place. “Many still feel a stigma about depression,” he says. “They’ll say, ‘Well, I’m not the kind of person who has mental problems or can’t control my emotions.’ On the other hand, some people really don’t even see depression in themselves; they just know they’re not doing well.” Most significantly, by not seeking help for depression, Van Houten says, stroke survivors can jeopardize their recovery.

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN The San Francisco Bay is a fabulous winter haven for thousands of shorebirds and waterfowl. Join a shore side walk to discover some of the winter migratory birds in the Bay Area on Sunday, December 2, from 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The migratory birds have arrived from up north in Alaska, and should be found in abundance in both the mud flats that have tidal flow and the flooded salt ponds. Dress warmly, wear good walking shoes, and bring binoculars if you have a pair. Registration for the walk is required. The group will meet at the Eden Landing Ecological Reserve parking lot at the intersection of Clawiter and Arden Road. To reserve your spot, call Hayward Area Historical Society at (510) 581-0223. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for seniors and students. No dogs allowed. Hayward Area Historical Society and the Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center are collaborating to offer this fun and enlightening program. The Hayward Area Historical

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“Emotional stress leads to behavioral changes like disinterest and apathy,” he says. “It’s this downward spiral. Despite the fact that rehab can help you, depression makes you less likely to do rehab, which makes it harder to get better, causing you to go down and dThe good news is that there are plenty of resources for stroke survivors. Van Houten facilitates the monthly Stroke Support Group at Washington Hospital, and says it’s the perfect opportunity for stroke survivors to get out of the house and talk to other people who understand the challenges they’re going through. “It’s very touching in stroke support when you have a new person come to the group,” he says. “When you see a person really experienced with stroke talking to someone new, it’s great to watch that relationship and the stroke mentorship that takes place. It’s encouragement; it’s understanding; it’s advice.” To learn more about acute management of stroke, as well as rehabilitation and chronic care following stroke, make sure to attend the upcoming free Stroke Education Series seminar Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A and B, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To register for the upcoming seminar, call (800) 963-7070 or visit www.whhs.com and click on Upcoming Health Seminars. For more information about the Stroke Program at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/stroke.

Society preserves and interprets the diverse history of the Hayward, Castro Valley, and San Lorenzo area through educational programs, history exhibitions, and the preservation of historic sites and artifacts. The Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center is your introduction to the ecology of the San Francisco Bay-Estuary. The Interpretive Center features exhibits, programs and activities designed to inspire a sense of appreciation, respect and stewardship for the Bay, its inhabitants and the services they provide. For additional information regarding “Let’s Go Birding!” contact Johanna Fassbender at (510)581-0223 or visit www.haywardareahistory.org. Let’s Go Birding! Shore Walk Sunday, Dec 2 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Clawiter and Arden Rd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Tickets: $8 adults, $5 seniors and students

Community workshops for General Plan Update SUBMITTED BY ERIK PEARSON The General Plan is a city’s basic planning document that provides a blueprint for development, guides growth and sets land use policy city-wide. The purpose of a General Plan is to: identify land use, transportation, environmental, economic and social goals and policies as they relate to new development; provide a basis for the City’s decision-making; provide citizens with an opportunity to participate in the planning and decision-making process; and inform citizens, developers, decision-makers and others of the ground rules that guide development within the city. Community input is needed to establish the vision for the City of Hayward which will hold six community workshops in November and December 2012 to prepare for a comprehensive update of the City’s General Plan. The meetings will be: Thursday, Nov 29 7 - 9 p.m., Conference Room 2A, City Hall, 777 B Street, Hayward. Saturday, Dec 1 10 a.m. - 12 p.m., to Noon Conference Room 2A, City Hall, 777 B Street, Hayward. Monday, Dec 3 6:30 - 7:45 p.m., MLK Middle School 26890 Holly Hill Avenue, Hayward. Thursday, Dec 6 6:30 - 8:00 p.m., Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel Street, Hayward. Monday, Dec 10 6:30 - 8:00 p.m., Conference Room A/B (near the Food Court), Southland Mall, Hayward. Wednesday, Dec 12 6:30 - 7:45 p.m., Hayward High School 1633 East Avenue, Hayward. Spanish translation is available at all meetings. At the community workshops, participants will be asked to share: their favorite place in Hayward; what they consider to be the community’s biggest assets, challenges and opportunities; and “Why you love Hayward.” For more information and to sign-up for regular updates, visit the City’s website at www.hayward-ca.gov/GENERALPLAN/

Cataract surgery can mean freedom from glasses! In the past, choosing the type of lens to implant was made by the cataract surgeon; few options were available. All lens implants were monofocal, providing excellent vision after cataract surgery, but usually only for seeing things at a distance such as distant signs when driving, going to a movie or a ballgame. Corrective glasses were necessary for near vision activity: reading, knitting, sewing, playing cards or keeping your golf score. Today, Dr. Shobha Tandon is able to offer a choice – a multifocal lens. This type of lens provides excellent vision after cataract surgery at a variety of distances. Multifocal lens implants correct both your distance and near vision. For the vast majority of patients, having a multifocal lens implant means that they will be able to see at distance and up close - drive, watch television, read or do crafts - without glasses.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY BONNIE FREY

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hen most people think of the Jewish holiday, Chanukah, they think of the dreidel. To gain perspective on its origin and how to play with this simple yet wonderful spinning top, consider its history. Long ago, during the rule of the Greek king Antiochus, Jews were forbidden to study their religion. Jewish children resorted to learning in outlying areas and forests. When the children were studying, they would keep a dreidel nearby to pull out and play in case they were discovered, so that they could pretend to be merely playing games. A dreidel has one Hebrew letter on each side. Outside of Israel, those letters are: _ (Nun), _ (Gimmel), _ (Hay) and _ (Shin), which stand for the Hebrew phrase “Nes Gadol Haya Sham.” This phrase means, “A great miracle happened there [in Israel].” After the State of Israel was founded in 1948, the Hebrew letters were changed for dreidels used in Israel. They became: _ (Nun), _ (Gimmel), _ (Hay) and _ (Pey), which stand for the Hebrew phrase “Nes Gadol Haya

November 27, 2012

Po.” This means, “A great miracle happened here.” The miracle referred to in both versions of the Hebrew phrase is the miracle of the Hanukkah oil, which lasted for eight days instead of one. Here is how to play dreidel: Any number of people can play. At the beginning of the game each player is given an equal number of “gelt”, usually about 10-15. “Gelt”, is the Yiddish word for money. Children most frequently use chocolate coins, nuts or pennies to play, but use whatever you like. At the beginning of each round, every player antes up and puts one piece into the center “pot.” They then take turns spinning the dreidel, with the following meanings assigned to each of the Hebrew letters: • Nun means “nothing” in Yiddish. If the dreidel lands with a nun facing up the spinner does nothing. • Gimmel is “gantz,” in Yiddish which means “everything.” If the dreidel lands with the gimmel facing up the spinner gets everything in the pot. _ Hey means “half” in Yiddish. If the dreidel lands with a hey facing up the spinner gets half of the pot. _ Shin means “shtel,” in Yiddish for “put

Tri-Cities Democratic Forum SUBMITTED BY JAN GIOVANNINI-HILL The Tri-Cities Democratic Forum’s regularly scheduled November General Meeting has been moved to the fourth Wednesday, November 28, 2012 due to the Thanksgiving holiday. This is also the Forum’s annual opportunity to support our Meeting Sponsor, Chandni Restaurant. Please arrive early at 6 p.m. for a no-host dinner this month. We especially would like to reach out to all our AD20 and AD25 Democratic activists and leaders as we review our election year results and move forward together. For more information, contact hillfam16@aol.com

in.” If you are using an Israeli dreidel, the _ Pey means “pay.” If the dreidel lands with either a shin or a pey facing up the player adds a game piece to the pot. If a player runs out of game pieces they are “out.” Now how to get your kids not to whine, when they loose their candy, well that is another type of miracle. Guess it’s all about sharing in the end. Join us for a Chanukah Faire and Boutique at Congregation Shir Ami in Castro Valley, Sunday, December 2nd, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be many talented local artists selling beautiful handcrafted items just in time for the holidays. We will have a silent auction and a raffle, and it will be a fun event for the whole family, with lots of activities for the children. The cost is $5 per child, which includes face painting and crafts, and the event is free for adults. There will be Chanukah food and lots of latkes of course. So come and spin the dreidel with us, everyone is welcome. Chanukah Faire & Boutique Sunday, Dec 2 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley (off Redwood Road) http://www.congshirami.org

Rotary Club memorabilia on display SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT Milpitas Rotary Club memorabilia, photos, gear, history, regalia, and more are now on display in the Milpitas City Hall lobby through the month of November. Milpitas Rotary’s 60th Anniversary, 50th Anniversary, Leo B. Murphy Teacher Of The Year Award, Gene Schwab Award for exemplary city employees, Family Carnival, Community Pumpkin Patch, 4-Way Test, The Object of Rotary, Milpitas High Interact Club, Camp RYLA ice cream extravaganza, and Mystery Trip, plus former activities like Casino Night and Agnews Christmas party. Club banners presented by visiting Rotarians from overseas and from other states are shown. Historical documents and certificates are also included. The Milpitas Rotary Club meets on Mondays at noon in Brandon’s Restaurant at the Beverly Heritage Hotel.


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Water District proposes rate increase SUBMITTED BY FRANK JAHN The Alameda County Water District has announced a proposed increase in its bimonthly service charge. The increase would help fund projects that would seismically retrofit critical water mains and replace aging pipelines that deliver potable water to TriCity homes and businesses. These projects are needed to help ensure long- term water supply reliability and fire protection after a major earthquake. The proposed rate increase would result in an overall water bill increase of about 24.5 cents per day (17.1%), or $7.47 per month for the average residential customer. Under the proposal, the service charge for all customers would double while the commodity charge would remain unchanged. The service charge is intended to recover costs that do not vary with water consumption, such as maintenance and replacement of pipelines and other infrastructure, and water quality monitoring and testing. Even with the proposed increase, the District’s service charge would still fall below the average of 30 other Bay Area water agencies. In addition, ACWD’s overall rates would still be among the lowest in the Bay Area. To help balance the financial impact on customers, no increase is proposed for the commodity charge, which is based on the amount of water used. The commodity charge would remain at $3.152 per unit (one unit is equivalent to 748 gallons). “Tri-City residents have invested substantially in securing reliable water supplies to meet the needs of our community,” said John Weed, ACWD Board president. “These investments paid off during the last drought, when mandatory water rationing was averted. With improvements to our local network of pipelines, ACWD will be able to better assure the delivery of water after a major earthquake.” In response to a 2008 seismic vulnerability assessment which identified the possibility of catastrophic water loss in the event of an earthquake, ACWD developed plans for the Main Replacement and Seismic Retrofit programs. These programs,

which would be funded in part through the proposed rate increase, will help to maintain adequate water flows for fire protection and reduce water service disruptions after a major earthquake by replacing aging pipelines and seismically retrofitting strategic pipelines along the Hayward Fault. “We recognize that we cannot ask our customers to pay more for their water without the District first taking steps to control existing costs,” said ACWD General Manager Walt Wadlow. “Toward that end, over the past several years, the District has: secured over $2.6 million in grants; saved over $7 million by leveraging our excellent AAA credit rating to issue revenue bonds to refinance existing debt; and taken advantage of our customers’ water conservation efforts by minimizing purchases of the District’s most expensive imported water supply.” The proposed increase in the bimonthly service charge will be on the agenda for the December 13 Board meeting to enable customers to provide input. The meeting will start at 6 p.m. at ACWD Headquarters at 43885 South Grimmer Boulevard in Fremont. In addition, a public hearing on the proposed increase will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, January 10, 2013 also in the Board Room at ACWD Headquarters. ACWD supplies drinking water to the more than 331,000 people living in the cities of Fremont, Newark, and Union City. For more information, please visit www.acwd.org. ACWD rate increas discussions: Board Meeting Thursday, Dec 13 6 p.m. Public Hearing Thursday, Jan 10 6 p.m. ACWD Headquarters 43885 So. Grimmer Blvd. Fremont (510) 668-4200 www.acwd.org

Letter to the Editor

His Way My dad, Steve Cho, has always loved Sinatra’s “My Way.” I used to laugh when I played it on our piano and he would sing along. But the song has come to mean much more to me, especially in the aftermath of the November 6, 2012 Fremont mayoral election. Though I do not currently reside in Fremont, I still affectionately call it “home.” So, I stood by, tracking the mayoral race from the sidelines in Fresno. I observed from the beginning, that my dad worked tirelessly campaigning. I could not understand why it meant so much to him. But I now realize it is because of the passion he had, and still has, for Fremont. Sinatra’s lyrics read: Regrets, I’ve had a few But then again, too few to mention I did what I had to do and saw it through without exemption I planned each charted course, each careful step along the byway And more, much more than this, I did it my way

But through it all, when there was doubt I ate it up and spit it out I faced it all and I stood tall and did it my way I’ve loved, I’ve laughed and cried I’ve had my fill, my share of losing And now, as tears subside, I find it all so amusing To think I did all that And may I say, not in a shy way, “Oh, no, oh, no, not me, I did it my way” For what is a man, what has he got? If not himself, then he has naught To say the things he truly feels and not the words of one who kneels The record shows I took the blows and did it my way! Indeed my dad should have no regrets in this election because he ran a strong, clean campaign. He spoke candidly about his views, and that is why so many had come to respect him regardless of political party, ethnicity, or age. I am proud of my dad, not just for always being there for me, but because he did it “his way.”

Yes, there were times, I’m sure you knew When I bit off more than I could chew

Dr. Beverly Cho-Chang, MD Fresno, formerly of Fremont

SUBMITTED BY RACHEL SCHOPLER Animal-lovers will have the opportunity to bring their furry friends to Pet Night with Santa at Great Mall. This is the purr-fect chance to create a memorable holiday keepsake with the big man in red. Pet Night is for domestic pets only, and all pets must be leashed or in a carrier. Pet owners are responsible for cleaning up after their pets as well as for their pets’ behavior while at Great Mall. Visits with Santa are free. Photo package prices vary. To learn more call Guest Services at (408) 956-2033, visit www.greatmallbayarrea.com or check us out on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GreatMall. Pet photos with Santa Sunday, Dec 2 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Great Mall - Entry #2 447 Great Mall Drive, Milpitas (408) 956-2033 www.greatmallbayarrea.com

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Why must we buy? Black Friday’s powerful pull BY JESSE WASHINGTON AP NATIONAL WRITER BEAVER FALLS, Pa. (AP), Gravy was still warm. Dallas Cowboys were still in uniform. Thanks were still being given across the country as the pilgrimages to the stores began, heralding a new era of American consumerism. Lured by earlier-than-ever Black Friday sales, people left Grandma and Grandpa in search of Samsung and Toshiba. They did not go blindly: In dozens of interviews, people acknowledged how spending has become inseparable from the holidays. Older folks pined for the days of Erector Sets and Thumbelinas while in line to pay iPad prices. Even some younger shoppers said it felt wrong to be spending money instead of quality time on Thanksgiving. “But we’re still out here,” said Kelly Jackson, a paralegal who was standing inside a Best Buy store in the Pittsburgh suburbs, a 32-inch television ($189) in her cart. It was a consolation prize: Despite four hours on line, she missed the cheaper 40-inchers ($179) that she had heard about while listening to Internet radio. Jackson’s resignation was common among those who flocked to capitalism’s temples for the consumer equivalent of genuflecting. Many said that this Black Friday bled into Thursday crossed a line, that merchants should not intrude like this. Christmas is about the message of Jesus, the feeling went - not about the gold, frankincense and myrrh. Yet amid these protests, people still talked about feeling powerless beneath the moment - as if they had no choice but to shop. “You have to have these things to enjoy your children and your family,” said Jackson’s friend Ebony Jones, who had secured two laptops ($187.99 each) for her 7 and 11 year olds. Why must we buy? To demonstrate our love for others? To add a few more inches to our televisions? To help America recover from a vicious recession that itself was born of the desire for more? Such questions make Jones wince. “It shouldn’t be that way, but in a sense there’s no way around it,” said Jones, a nurse. “Everything ends up with a dollar amount. Even your happiness.’’ Retailers have long capitalized on the holiday season’s perfect storm of emotion and tradition. ``We all want to be loved, we all like to give love,���’ says Roger Beahme, director of the Center for Retail Innovation at the Wake Forest Schools of Business. Through a flood of advertising on TV, radio and newspapers, he says, retailers can create emotions. “Will Rogers said it’s the art of convincing people to spend money they don’t have on something they don’t need,” Beahme says. Although advertising can serve useful purposes, he says, “there’s some truth to that.” Many embrace the feeling - and have, in accelerating ways, for a generation and more. Without legions of believers, Black Friday never would have gotten this bold. Despite a surge of resistance as the sales drew near, with scolding editorials and protests by retail employees and reminders of frantic tramplings past, Black Friday’s grip on America may have been proven stronger than ever this year. “It’s all part of the holiday - part of the tradition,” said Dennis River, a truck driver who was in line for a television at the Walmart in Beaver Falls, a small community outside of Pittsburgh. Last year, he went out alone at midnight Thursday. This year, he brought his wife and daughter. They were in place by 7 p.m. “You get up in the morning, cook, do your dinner and your football, then you go shopping,” River said. “It’s the new thing now. Everyone’s afraid of change.” “If they wanna have sales today,” he said, “I’m gonna go shopping today.” Walmart’s cavernous store is always open, but the deals began at 8 p.m. As with most big retail stores, a police car was parked near the Beaver Falls store entrance. A uniformed officer was at the door, near a stand holding maps to ``featured products’’ such as bikes, cookware, sheets, video game consoles, and eight different TVs. The witching hour approached. Yellow CAUTION tape cordoned off the bargains and funneled a few thousand supplicants through aisles of ignored items - yarn, shower curtains, party hats, clocks. Balloons printed with dollar signs followed by low numbers floated above the treasures. As the cell phones struck eight, a din arose. Excited voices mixed with the sound of boxes dropping into metal shopping carts. The balloons danced as people dug into stacks of leather ottomans ($29) and 5-by-5 foot bins of $5 DVDs. The temperature climbed. An old man inched through the throng using a folding chair ($11.88) as a crutch. Traffic jammed. Complaints and a few curses echoed. “I’m not an angry person, but I was angry for the 20 minutes I was in there,” Danyel Coyne, a college student, said as she loaded a child booster seat ($12.98) into her trunk. She and her boyfriend, Mike Yanke, had not come to shop. They needed a spare car seat to take Yanke’s daughter back to Pittsburgh. Yet Yanke still had bought a red, battery-powered convertible ($129) at his dad’s request. “I wouldn’t say Black Friday has taken over,” said Dave Davies, a music producer who was part of the national parade of TVs (his was 50 inches and $399). “Shopping IS the holiday. That’s all people care about - what are you gonna get?” continued on pag 38

Stocks soar on Black Friday; tech leads the w ay N ov 23 BY DANIEL WAGNER AP BUSINESS WRITER The stock market enjoyed some Black Friday cheer, rising sharply as shoppers braved the annual post-Thanksgiving rush. Major stock indexes closed one of their best weeks of the year. Traders were encouraged by positive economic news from Germany and China, two engines of global growth. Technology stocks soared after a few weeks of selling. And early reports from retailers suggested strong consumer spending. “Foot traffic appears heavier than we’ve seen in recent years, there are a lot of positive statements out of the companies themselves, and momentum appears to be strong,” said JJ Kinahan, chief derivatives strategist at the brokerage TD Ameritrade. Many stores opened earlier than ever this year, Kinahan said, allowing for earlier informal reports about their performance. Technology stocks soared, lifting the Nasdaq composite index by more than 1 percent. Dell, chipmaker AMD and Hewlett-Packard were the top three gainers in the Standard & Poor’s 500. Technology rose the most among the index’s 10 industry groups. The stocks were bouncing back after confidence in tech stocks declined broadly, Kinahan said. AMD dropped sharply in recent weeks as investors fretted about its solvency. HP plunged 12 percent on Tuesday after executives said that a company HP bought for $10 billion last year lied about its finances. The Nasdaq ended up 40.30 points, or 1.4 percent, at 2,966.85. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 172.79, or 1.4 percent, to 13,009.69 - the first time since election day that the Dow closed above 13,000. The S&P 500 added 18.12, or 1.3 percent, to 1409.15. The rally gave the S&P 500 its biggest weekly point gain since last December - 49 points, or 3.6 percent. The Dow gained 3.4 percent and the Nasdaq almost 4 percent for the week. The market closed early, at 1 p.m. EST. Stocks started strong after news that German business confidence rose unexpectedly in November after six straight declines. The gain in a closely watched index published by Munich’s Ifo institute raised hopes that Europe’s largest economy can continue to weather the continent’s financial crisis. China’s manufacturing expanded for the first time in 13 months in November, the latest sign that the world’s second-biggest economy is recovering from its deepest slump since the 2008 global crisis. HSBC Corp. said its monthly Purchasing Managers’ Index improved to 50.4 for November. Any number above 50 indicates expansion. The PMI measures overall manufacturing activity by surveying indicators including orders, employment and production. The result was released Thursday, when the U.S. market was closed for Thanksgiving. Around the U.S., shoppers flocked to malls and logged on to computers to take part in the annual cheer-fueled retail rush known as Black Friday. Target and Toys R Us welcomed buyers on Thanksgiving evening. Retailers are also trying to draw shoppers with free layaway and shipping, by matching prices of online rivals and by beefing up mobile shopping apps. Retail is a key driver of the nation’s economy. Consumer spending accounts for about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity. November and December, which can account for as much as 40 percent of a retailer’s annual revenue, are crucial for stores. The Friday after Thanksgiving is known as Black Friday because it begins the period in which many retailers turn profitable for the year. Traders will be looking for signs about how enthusiastically Americans are spending. That could reflect the momentum of the economic recovery. Wal-Mart rose $1.31, or 1.9 percent, to $70.20. Macy’s gained 72 cents, or 1.8 percent, to $41.73. Trading volume on Wall Street was light, with many investors away for an extended weekend after Thanksgiving. The rally’s strength will be tested on Monday, as many traders return to their desks and retailers begin to release hard data about their holiday sales results, Kinahan said. continued on pag 38


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

Drivers for Survivors holiday fundraiser

SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT Join the Hayward Chamber of Commerce in January 2013 to honor hometown heroes: Pam Russo, St. Rose Hospital (Business Person of the Year), Ariel Dolowich, Ochoa Middle School Principal (Educator of the Year), Battalion Chief George Silva (Firefighter of the Year) and Detective Ryan Cantrell (Police Officer of the Year). The event at California State University, East Bay includes a grand banquet with fine wine and silent and live auctions for fabulous items and travel. Tickets are $125 each and available from the Chamber November 26, 2012 and will sell out. For more information, contact the Hayward Chamber of Commerce at (510) 537-2424. Hayward Chamber Awards Gala Saturday, Jan 26, 2013 6 - 9 p.m. California State University East Bay University Union 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 537-2424

SUBMITTED BY SHERRY HIGGS Drivers for Survivors’ mission is to alleviate the stress associated with some of the more practical aspects of a cancer diagnosis. We provide free transportation services and supportive companionship during treatment of cancer patients, freeing them to focus on their health and essential treatment. We serve cancer patients and their families living in Fremont, Newark, and Union City. DFS is currently recruiting volunteer drivers with a five-year good driving record, and is seeking to raise funds to support operational expenses. Join the board of DFS on Friday, December 7 from 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. for a holiday fundraiser with wine and cheese, hors d’oeuvres, dessert, and holiday cheer! There will also be select auction items for the holiday season. A minimum donation of $25 per person is requested and appreciated. Please RSVP by Monday, December 3 to Nina Moore, nmoore@earthlink.net. Address will be provided upon RSVP. To learn more about DFS, visit driversforsurvivors.org.

Nominations for HARD awards SUBMITTED BY SAMIRA HAMID The Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD) Board of Directors is accepting nominations of candidates for the Annual Board of Directors’ Award for Distinguished Recreational Service in 2012. This award is given annually to an individual and also to an organization for outstanding volunteer service or accomplishment in the field of recreation and parks. HARD appreciates all the individuals and organizations that provide important volunteer service to the District and the community and have so honored these individuals and organizations with an award program since 1962. Please take the opportunity of nominating an individual and/or an organization for this honor. Nomination forms are available from the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District at 1099 E Street, Hayward, CA 94541 or by calling Samira Hamid at (510) 881-6731. The deadline for receipt of applications is Friday, December 14, 2012. Please direct your replies or inquiries to Mr. Paul Hodges, Jr., Chairperson, Board of Directors’ Awards Program, at (510) 881-6700 or by fax at (510) 888-5758.

Olive Garden hosts lunch for Fremont Adult and Continuing Education SUBMITTED BY ROSHNI EASLEY On October 31, 2012, the Special Needs program at Fremont Adult and Continuing Education (FACE) were treated to a delicious pasta lunch provided by the Olive Garden (Fremont). Sarah, Team Trainer, delivered spaghetti, salad, breadsticks, and tiramisu for approximately 50 students in attendance on Halloween. Christine, a manager at the Olive Garden, made the arrangements for the wonderful surprise. For over 30 years FACE has provided an excellent life skills training program for adults with special needs. Our daily activities include: exercise, computer lab, recycling program for the City of Fremont, volunteer work at the library, and maintenance of the garden and the green house. Students make their own lunch daily and enjoy their community outings as well as developing appropriate habits and skills. In 2010, the program was reduced drastically, including the cancellation of our summer program. This past year we began a fundraising effort partnered with the Fremont Education Foundation (FEF). Through the generosity of parents, staff, and community members such as Rene Lovely of Avalon Spa and Salon, funds were raised for a five week session during the 2012 summer. The fundraising efforts continue this year for the 2013 summer program. We are accepting donations through FEF. Checks payable: FEF/AWD. Mail to: FACE Attn: Adults with Disabilities 4700 Calaveras Avenue Fremont, CA 94538 If you have any questions, please contact Michele Sullivan at (510) 793-6465, Ext. 29505 or email her at michelesullivan@fremont.k12.ca.us

Free Home Visit Service for Seniors SUBMITTED BY COLLEEN COLLINS At the time of year that seniors are most vulnerable emotionally, a free service to assist them is growing. The Home Visit Program is an initiative by senior care professionals at Emeritus at Atherton Court that’s designed to check on the wellbeing of older people throughout the region. The program is being expanded at this time because the approaching holidays bring a greater risk of depression among seniors. To further encourage families to take advantage of the Home Visit Program, the public is now invited to call Emeritus at Atherton Court directly at (510) 797-4011 to request a visit to a local senior. This is a significant step for the initiative, which has primarily operated through referrals from agencies and emergency services providers since being launched in 2009. Through the Home Visit Program, family members can arrange for an Emeritus at Atherton Court expert to go to the home of an elderly loved one

to see if he or she is doing well physically and psychologically. If appropriate, a nurse conducts an evaluation to help identify care needs. Emeritus then connects the senior and family with the proper resources and services to provide assistance. “We may bring a hot meal, snack or dessert, and we also offer a listening ear and companionship,” said Tamra Schmutzler, executive director of Emeritus at Atherton Court. “Afterwards, if needed, we coordinate between families and community resources. We may also follow up with additional visits. All of what we do through the Home Visit Program is complimentary.” Emeritus at Atherton Court decided to expand the Home Visit Program during the holiday season because of the increased likelihood of depression among the elderly at this time of year. Offering the Home Visit Program as a free service to the public reflects a central philosophy at Emeritus at Atherton Court, Schmutzler said. Emeritus at Atherton Court is located at 38035 Martha Avenue in Fremont. It offers assisted living, and specializes in care for those with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other memory-impairing diseases through its Join Their Journey program (www.Emeritus.com).


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The Rotary Club of Niles turns 75 SUBMITTED BY SANDI PANTAGES

N

iles Rotary will celebrate its 75th anniversary with a grand party at the historic Central Chevrolet showroom in Fremont on Saturday, December 1. Niles Rotary, founded on December 9, 1937, was one of the first service clubs formed in what was to become the City of Fremont. In the past 75 years, Niles Rotary has been a significant presence in the community and world, participating in community projects as well as donations to organizations and services - at local and international levels. Sponsored by the Hayward Rotary Club, Niles Rotary Club was the first in southern Alameda County, then a district of Washington Township. The charter night dinner was served at the Veterans Memorial Building in Niles. Charter president Charles (Chuck) Kraft was president and owner of Kraftile, a manufacturer of terra cotta tiles in Niles. The club had 16

charter members and soon grew to 60 members. According to Gladys Williamson, author of “They Helped to Build Three Cities,” members of Niles Rotary initiated the Fremont incorporation process, and were represented in the three cities - Fremont, Newark and Union City they helped create in the 1950’s. Niles Rotarians served as mayors, council members, commissioners, other board members, and city staff. Williamson notes that in Fremont’s first six years as a city, members of Niles Rotary had filled nearly 100 positions on councils, commissions, boards or committees. Since its founding, Niles Rotary has founded several other Rotary clubs in the area, including Newark Rotary in 1961, Fremont Rotary in 1963, and Fremont Sunrise in the early 1990’s. Niles Rotary has made an impact in Rotary International with Niles Rotarian Rick King serving as president of Rotary International in 2001-2002. Club meetings were originally held at the historic Hotel Belvoir above Mission Boulevard in Niles, and in 1944 were moved to the Florence Restaurant in Niles. In 1947, the meeting place was moved to the International Kitchen on the NilesCenterville Highway (later named Fremont Avenue, then Peralta Blvd.). On November 7, 1960 a fire at the International Kitchen destroyed the club files and banners; to this day, the club’s bell is badly scorched on one side as a reminder of the fire. Niles Rotary continued to meet at the International Kitchen, after it was re-built in 1962, until 1972, when the meetings were moved to the Villa Del Greco on Mission Blvd. (now known as Papillon Restaurant). Niles Rotary now meets at Washington West (Anderson Room) on Mowry Avenue every Thursday at noon. Among the club’s first community service projects was construction of several Rotary model homes in the Niles area. Charter member John Kimber (of Kimber Farms) was credited with suggesting that the Oakland-San Jose freeway be named in honor of Admiral Chester Nimitz. Niles Rotarians were instrumental in the formation of the Washington Hospital District, proposing the district in 1947 and serving on the hospital staff and hospital boards over the years. Since 1937, Niles Rotary has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to many community organizations and services, including the Fremont/Newark YMCA, Fremont/Newark Philharmonic (Fremont Symphony Orchestra), Tri-City Salvation Army, Fremont Education Foundation, Young Life, Fremont Cultural Arts Council, the Tri-City Homeless Coalition (Abode Services), Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments (SAVE), StarStruck Theatre, TriCity Health Center, youth activities and sports, scholarships, and the Washington Hospital Healthcare Foundation.

“Planning the 75th Anniversary of the Niles-Fremont Rotary Club are Left to Right Rotarians Lisa Lorenz, past world President of Rotary International Richard King, and Kimberly Hartz-Foster, Niles Rotary immediate Past President and Chairwoman of the Anniversary Dinner.The event takes place on December 1 at Central Chevrolet in Fremont.”

Hands-on projects by Niles Rotary have resulted in community improvements in Fremont such as the Central Park par course, crabapple trees planted in Central Park, the boat dock and fishing pier at Lake Elizabeth, stock corrals at Ardenwood Farm, flagpoles at the City Government building and Tak Fudenna Stadium, landscaping at the City Government building and Niles School, a fence around the barbeque area at the Senior Center, benches at bus stops. For many years, Niles Rotarians cleaned Vallejo Mills Historical Park, and in the 1990’s, Niles Rotarians could been seen in Niles Canyon cleaning up the highway for CalTrans in their Adopt-a-Highway program. Niles Rotary sponsors Interact Clubs

Niles Rotary leads planning efforts and work for the annual Chili Cook-Off. Proceeds benefit Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation, Tri-City Rotary Clinic, Washington on Wheels, HOPE Project Mobile Clinic of Abode Services. Niles Rotary has been active in projects of Rotary International as well as its own international projects. When Rotary International developed the PolioPlus program (raising over $755 million internationally to eradicate polio), Niles Rotarians donated heavily to the program, and continue to donate to the End Polio Now campaign. In connection to the Wheelchair Foundation in Danville, Niles Rotary collected $21,000 to send 280 wheelchairs overseas, providing the gift of mobility to

Niles Rotary work party at Niles Community Park

(youth service clubs) at Washington High School and Fremont Christian High School, and has just started a new Interact Club at Robertson Continuation High School. Since 1988, a regular community service of Niles Rotary has been the “Feed the Hungry” program; Niles Rotarians prepare and serve dinner at the Centerville Free Dining Room whenever there is a fifth Thursday of the month. The club’s Paint a House Program resulted in newly painted houses of elderly or poor residents. Niles Rotarians worked with other Rotarians to refurbish transitional housing for the TriCity Homeless Coalition at Rotary BridgeWay Apartments in the Irvington district of Fremont and in Union City. In October 2011, Niles Rotary sponsored and assisted the City’s Trick or Treat on Safety Street. Each December, Niles Rotarians, along with other area Rotarians, act as bell ringers for the Salvation Army. A current ongoing community service project of Niles Rotary is the care of the Niles Community Park. Niles Rotarians have replaced and refurbished the fishing docks. In addition, the club cleans up the park on a regular basis, and is working on other projects to benefit the park. For Make a Difference Day, October 2012, Niles Rotarians replaced trees with native bushes and trees as part of the City’s Sabercat Creek restoration project. Annually in December, Niles Rotary sponsors a Pizza With Santa party for children and their families. Rotarians purchase gifts for each child and give them to the children at a special party for the families including horse rides, a jump house, crafts, and a visit from Santa Claus.

hundreds of people. Members of Niles Rotary have sponsored several specific international projects, such as refurbishing and donating buses to an orphanage in Colona Guerrero, Mexico; the buses were driven to Mexico by Niles Rotarians. Children in the orphanage had prayed for a blue bus, and were delighted when they arrived - the Rotarians

coincidentally had painted the bus blue, not knowing about the children’s prayers. Niles Rotary has worked with Fremont’s sister city of Puerto Penasco on several projects, including providing x-ray machines, another refurbished bus, building a computer lab, and sending physicians to perform corrective surgery. For several years, Niles Rotarians traveled to Mexico two times a year to help with the Thousand Smiles Dental Program. A computer lab for a girl’s school in Brazil was funded and donated by Niles Rotary. In the Azores, a breast screening program and mammography units were sponsored by Niles Rotary. Heart monitors were sent to two hospitals in Romania. A few years ago, the club donated two ambulances with the necessary equipment to Lebanon. Niles Rotary sponsored Project Quest for Peace in 2003-2004, which resulted in 1,100 shoeboxes for Iraq; the shoeboxes were filled with toys and sundries and were delivered to Baghdad. Rotarians, their families, friends, and the community at large really got behind the effort to help the children in Iraq who had lost so much in the war. In spring 2005, a boy’s orphanage in Bolivia was refurbished and repaired as a result of a cooperative Niles Rotary project with Rotary clubs in Morgan Hill and Bolivia. A Serbian relief project was the recipient of fund raising by Niles Rotary and Rotary International in 2006. Current international service projects include refurbishing orphanages in Chile and Guatemala, and installing a water-well at the Segera Mission in Kenya. Such international projects typically involve collaboration with Rotary International, a local club here, the local Rotary district, and a Rotary club in the country of the project. Of the current members of Niles Rotary, 25 members have served as club president; they reflect the civic and business leadership of our community: Don Amsbaugh; Harry Avila; Steve Barnett; Don Billings; Tony Boudames; Jim Brunelli; Rich Brunelli; Gene Cowell; Nancy Farber-Szekrenyi; Kimberly Hartz Foster; Otis Highbaugh; Rick Hood; John Kimber; Rick King (Rotary International President); Dick McKay; Sandi Pantages; Paul Parhiala; Gary Robinson; Jack Rogers; M.O. Sabraw; Rakesh Sharma; Dan Smith (Newark Rotary); Craig Steckler; Daren Young; Sandra Young. Rotary “lifts our lives,” and serves the local and global communities through acts of humanitarian service. The work of Niles Rotary fits the current slogan of Rotary International - “Peace through Service.” Rotary can be briefly described as “humanity in motion.” Niles Rotary 75th birthday celebration Saturday, Dec 1 5:30 p.m. Central Chevrolet showroom Thornton Avenue and San Pedro Drive, Fremont (510) 745-6483 (Kimberly Hartz) Tickets are $75 per person For more information about the Rotary Club of Niles (Fremont) visit www.nilesrotary.org.

A July 4 parade - with Niles Rotary banner


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November 27, 2012

Support the great work being done in the Fremont community while enjoying the spirit of the holiday season and finding that one-of-a-kind memorable gift. Event sponsors include Fremont Bank Foundation, The Anderson Family Foundation, and Tri-City Voice Newspaper with In-Kind contributions from Trader Joe’s, Spin A Yarn, Papillon, Massimo’s, Tango Fusion Bistro & Tapas Bar, Vintage Catering, Catering by Gael, The Cheese Taster Delicatessen, California Craft Beer, Mission Coffee Roasting Co., Raley’s and Safeway. Many OHAG members also make donations. Tickets to the gala are $15 and can be purchased at the door or in advance by contacting Angie Parker at (510) 793-5067 or galatickets@olivehydeartguild.org. The Show and Sale is free and open to the public on Saturday and Sunday, December 1 and 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit: www.olivehydeartguild.org.

continued from page 1

sual arts in the schools. As a retired teacher, mother, and new grandmother, I know what difficulties our schools are facing and the many programs that have been eliminated. Students need a broad-based education which must include exposure to the Arts. There are many reasons students become engaged in their school community. For some it is sports, or music, or the computer or science lab, and for others it is art. They may never become professional artists but having the opportunity to explore that mode of learning can open a door to a whole new way of viewing themselves and their world.” While there is no set monetary goal, a percentage of earnings from the show is given to the City of Fremont, so “the more we raise, the happier we all are,” says Event Coordinator Gail Blalock. “We can designate how the funds are to be used and a good share goes to support the elementary In-School Art History Program in Fremont Schools.” The Olive Hyde Art Guild also awards three scholarships to high school seniors annually, and in the past year has donated funds to the Fremont Library for children’s art books, Abode Services for children’s art supplies, Fremont Art Association’s Paint

Holiday for the Arts

Out and Fall Show, and for classes and an exhibit for the developmentally disabled clients of the Serra Center. Over $25,000 of handcrafted items and fine art are sold each year, and in its 30year history, the Guild has raised over $330,000 from “Holiday for the Arts.” Show decor and musical accompaniment enhance the cache of art; flautists Alicia Unis, Joyce Tanaka, Roberta Brokaw, and Sue Rudholm will perform

on Saturday at 1:30 p.m., with classical guitar ensemble Lucy Lanham, Mark Loy and Peter Denyer on Sunday at 1:30, followed by flute and piano duo Joyce Tanaka and Yea-Lian Huang at 3:30 p.m. “I always encourage people to come by on Saturday or Sunday even if they have no interest in buying anything because I believe it is truly a work of art - a show displaying the work of many talented artists,” says Blalock.

SUBMITTED BY CARENDA KISER

corporate takeovers, bullies on the playground, and on the battlefield, or just life’s tedious repetition? Perhaps you are even feeling a little “bah humbugish” this year. If life has been a little less than Christmas-magical, have we got a story for you! A story of now and yesterday, of mangers and wisemen, seekers and finders. This is their story, and this is your story-skillfully woven in song and narrative, through troubadour and orchestra. “A Christmas Tale” will be performed in four parts every Sunday in December at Harbor Light Sanctuary in Fremont. Start the journey with “The Beginning” on De-

“Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at your nose . . .” The magic season is here again, with scents of cinnamon candles and housebound evergreens, open fires and Yuletide carols. And in the midst of frantic gift buying, we dare to hope for a brief interlude of childlike wonder and enchantment-a reincarnation of childhood-waking on Christmas morning to creep downstairs to a lit tree and wonderfully wrapped gifts, anticipation in our eyes, wondering if we’ll be surprised. Instead, have you been surprised by

Friday Gala, Nov 30 5:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. Tickets: $15 Show and Sale Saturday, Dec 1 & Sunday, Dec 2 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-5067 galatickets@olivehydeartguild.org www.olivehydeartguild.org cember 2, and follow the story with “The Longing” December 9, “The Visit” December 16, and “The Finale” on December 23. Pre-show music and entertainment begins at 10 a.m., and the performance begins at 10:30 a.m. Admission is free. A Christmas Tale Sunday, December 2,9,16, and 23 10:30 a.m. Harbor Light 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont www.harborlight.com Free


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Tri-City Stargazer NOVEMBER 28 – DECEMBER 4, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Eclipses always occur in pairs. On Nov. 13 we experienced a Solar Eclipse in Scorpio. This week, on Nov. 29, we will have a lunar eclipse in the sign of Gemini at 1:31 a.m. It should be visible in the morning hours in this country for those with clear weather. A lunar eclipse is essentially a strongly punctuated full moon. All those activities normally related to the full moons, such as increased traffic and potential for accidents, general hyperactivity, etc. are double accented. Often full moons bring fulfillment or consummation of important affairs in life. If an activity has a flaw or a foundation problem, its crack becomes visible near the full moons. This eclipse is in the sign of Gemini. The emphasis is on illuminating the public with facts previously unknown or only guessed by a few observers. It will affect everyone, so read below for your Sun sign and Ascending sign. Both are workable. Aries (March 21-April 20): Legal, ethical or educational issues are emphasized. Travel is punctuated, whether of body, mind, or spirit. Exposure to those of different backgrounds or cultures opens your heart and leads you in new directions. Renewal may be necessary related to vehicles, relationships to roommates or siblings, or neighborhood. A household move may be on the way or may be just completed. Taurus (April 21-May 20): The eclipse pattern emphasizes issues of sexuality, intimacy, and material accumulation. Your attitudes in these areas need renewal. Reorganization of debt and investments may be in progress. You may be more conscious than usual about existential matters related to life, death and what is on "the other side" of normal, waking consciousness. It could feel important to arrange your will or estate. Gemini (May 21-June 20): What is your pattern in Significant Relationships? What needs to be repaired or improved? How might you contribute to a fuller, richer life for yourself as well as the important persons in your life? It is crucial to search out solutions that favor

everyone concerned. Recapitulation of old habits will simply regenerate trauma. Cancer (June 21-July 21): It is important to concentrate on work related relationships and health maintenance. Diet, exercise and improvement of physical regimen will serve you well. Honing your management systems in personal and work arenas is necessary to improve the efficiency of the daily work routine. You must balance concerns of recent years with better self-care. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): The eclipse season is bringing things to a conclusion concerning your community networking and development of friendships. Certainly you will continue to have the friends you have chosen to keep. But now it may be time to let go of the extras, some of the less meaningful relationships. Virgo the Virgin (August 23-September 22): Matters concerning your family are accented. Old problems in relationships, even with the deceased, are brought to consciousness for cleansing and healing. A new family member may enter the scene. Property and real estate matters require concentration. Bringing

career into alignment with your true self is an important focus. Libra (September 23-October 22): The accent of this eclipse period is on travel, education, care of vehicles and relationships to siblings, roommates, neighbors, or others who daily traverse your life. Lifelong habit patterns of thought must be reviewed and negative thinking corrected; habits of speech and communication improved. Now is the time to focus on learning new and practical life skills. Let go of outmoded belief systems. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): This eclipse series accents personal and financial resources. Greater understanding is developing related to expenditures of time, energy and money. Debts need to be repaid. You need to eliminate or recycle whatever is no longer useful in your life. Conditions of intimate life and sexuality are stale and call for renewal. Sagittarius the Archer (Nov. 22 Dec. 20): Your personal identity is the subject under consideration. Who are you becoming and who do you need to be? How do you wish to define yourself before the world? How can you develop an in-

dividual identity that is workable while simultaneously maintaining a personally rewarding relationship? Capricorn (December 22-January 19): This eclipse emphasizes your need for internal order and self-reflection. Consider hypnosis or meditation, psychotherapy, dream work or journaling as resources to help you contemplate. Solitude can be healing now. Streamlining daily routines and exercising your body will help you preserve energy for thought. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Involvement in your community, networking, and developing friendships has occupied a center role in your life at this time. You

have lessons to learn about discerning who is truly a friend. Those with children must concentrate on fostering those relationships. Some may decide not to have any more babies. Pisces (February 19-March 20): There has been emphasis on career, life goals, and community reputation. Honors may have occurred during this period if you have previously built a solid foundation. Family members plead for more attention in subtle and overt ways. Property may require repair, rejuvenation, or replacement. Family patterns are changing. You may experience a sense of loss, but renewal occurs in its wake.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH The auditorium of Fremont Adult School was packed with appreciative students and parents on November 17, watching tal-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

trict’s homeless students and families struggling with extreme financial difficulties especially during this holiday season. “There are 250 homeless students in the district and 7,000 who are eligible for free and reduced meals,” explained Wu.

November 27, 2012

The Irvington High School Dance Class/Club placed 1st in the high school category

school of the 1st place winner. However, as there are many more elementary schools in the district, 1st place ($1,000 and trophy),

(Front row, L to R): Students representing the three winning elementary schools of Warm Springs, Mattos and Parkmont. (Back row):Thomas Banuelos, Fremont Christian; Sharon Coco, FUSD; Jeanne Batacan-Harper StarStruck Theatre, Superintendent James Morris, and FUSS Coordinator/School Board member Ivy Wu.

ented district students of all ages perform throughout the day. Outgoing School Board member Ivy Wu initiated the formation of the non-profit organization FUSS (Fremont Unified Student Store), to come up with creative solutions in answer to the budget crisis and raise needed revenue for the school district. The talent show, just one of the group’s many fundraising ideas, was the culmination of not only her efforts but those of a multitude of dedicated volunteers working tirelessly to make this event a success. In particular, proceeds generated from “FUSD’s Got Talent” are being earmarked for the dis-

Superintendent James Morris, who served as the event’s Master of Ceremonies, commented, “Every student who performed and was willing to step forward and showcase their talent is a winner.” Serving as the judges for this talent competition were: Thomas Banuelos of Harbor Light/Fremont Christian School; Sharon Coco, FUSD district office; and Jeanne Batacan-Harper StarStruck Theatre. Their decisions were made even more difficult due to the range of talent exhibited by the students’ in their performances. At the junior high and high school level, a trophy and a $1,000 were awarded to the

2nd place ($600) and 3rd ($400) place awards were given at the elementary level. “Perpetual” trophies will be engraved with the names of the students/schools and housed at their schools until the following year’s event.

Winning students and schools include: High School Category: 1st place: Irvington High School Six students from Irvington High’s Dance Class and Advanced Dance Club led by teacher Ms. Michelle Lau, choreographed and performed a dance named “Build a Home.” ($1,000 and a trophy for Irvington High School.) Junior High School Category: 1st place: Thornton Junior High Student Natalie Dunn sang the beautiful song “Hallelujah,” accompanied on guitar by Mr. Scott Iwata, who was her elementary school teacher and had inspired her to sing. Iwata is now the principal of Warm Springs Elementary School. ($1,000 and a trophy for Thornton Junior High.)

Elementary School Category: 1st place: Parkmont Elementary School Parkmont’s 70-student chorus, led by Ms. Cathy Strommen, sang “50 Stars - You’re a Grand Old Flag.” ($1,000 and a trophy for Parkmont Elementary School.) 2nd place: Mattos Elementary School Student Eden Mercado sang “Greatest Love of All.” ($600 for Mattos Elementary School.) 3rd place: Warm Springs Elementary School Students, Ansal Majmudar and Tejas Venkateswaran, sang and performed a traditional Indian Tabla Duet. ($400 for Warm Springs Elementary School.) For more information or to order a DVD of FUSD’s Got Talent, please visit www.fuss4schools.org

The 1st place winner at the junior high level was Natalie Dunn from Thornton.


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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BY MAHIMA GOEL

A

s fall takes hold, residents look forward to a venerable tradition in Mission San Jose, the annual olive harvest. What makes this year even more special is the “Green Fair” of sustainable energy production and usage being held by the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose in conjunction with this year’s harvest. Founded back in 1876, three sisters by the names of Maria Pia Backes, Maria Amanda Bednartz, and Maria Salesia Fichtner traveled across the country in hopes of establishing a school for German immigrants. They found refuge in a parish in San Francisco, but after the 1906 earthquake, moved their establishment to the Mission San Jose. Overcoming everything from the Western frontier to the risk of loosing their lives for a chance at starting something new, the Dominican Sisters have kept their motto of “Have Courage” alive to this very day. This same motto is what they hope to bring the people of Fremont as they delve deep into the environmental hazards that are facing our country today and how to fix them. The Green Fair, similar to one held at the Fremont Hub in 2011, will host various “green” local businesses and non-profit organizations along with educational groups who will spread awareness about composting, recycling, and restoring our natural resources. From the City of Fremont’s Environmental Specialty Department to Moreau Catholic High School and Kennedy High School’s environmental clubs to Kaiser Permanente’s Hospital and PG&E’s California Energy Upgrade Service, the “Olive Harvest and Green Fair” will be held as a family event-with the use of no electricity! Food will be served from compostable materials only and there will be no plastic or Styrofoam equipment available. Signing up as a volunteer for the Dominican Sisters Motherhouse Garden, collecting the year’s homegrown olives straight from the garden with no electricity usage, and spending time with family while helping a good cause and the environment around you. All this and more can be done at the “Olive Harvest and Green Fair” on Saturday, December 1 from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Olive Harvest and Green Fair Saturday, Dec 1 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dominican Sisters Convent 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (behind the Old Mission) (510) 325-3107 www.msjdominicans.org


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

Tradition! The Nutcracker T

here is no holiday tradition more colorful or anticipated than the spectacular choreography and dazzling costumes of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Ballet. Presented as an introduction to the winter holiday season by Ballet Petit, this classic tale tells the heartwarming story of a young girl’s Christmas dreams. Ballet Petit opened in Newark in 1983 and now located in Hayward, has grown through the years to welcome enthusiastic audiences to warm and sophisticated performances suitable for the entire family. Although the focus of Ballet Petit remains on ballet as a classical art form rather than competition, both serious and recreational dancers have found a home at Ballet Petit. Many graduates have moved on to professional careers in renowned theater companies including The Royal Ballet of London, Boston Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Joffrey Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, The Pacific Northwest Ballet, Cleveland San Jose Ballet and others. The Nutcracker story begins as young Clara and her family prepare for a festive Christmas Party. A visit from Uncle Drosselmeyer includes magical toys for Clara and her brother Fritz; a life-sized dancing puppet doll, a ballerina doll, a soldier doll, and three mysterious boxes. Fritz becomes jealous of Clara’s beautiful Nutcracker doll and, while roughhousing, breaks it. Uncle Drosselmeyer repairs the doll and lulls Clara to sleep, where her Nutcracker doll guides her into the Land of Snow to meet dancing snowflakes. Angels then take her into the Land of Sweets to entertain her with dancers and introduce her to the Queen of the Kingdom, the Sugar Plum Fairy and numerous other characters. A rousing battle for dominance of the magical kingdom between the Nutcracker and the Rat King ensue. Even for those who have shared this adventure many times, the draw to see it again is undeniable. The Nutcracker marks the beginning of the festive season and dancers of the Ballet Petit Dance Company take their place in history, their mark in a continuum of performances stretching back over 30 years. Led by Peggy Peabody, Ballet Petit presents its thirty-fourth production of the holiday classic. In addition to evening performances, matinees are scheduled on both Saturday and Sunday. The full-length performance of The Nutcracker with over 300 dancers is a beautiful production to begin holiday activities. Don’t miss it!

The Nutcracker Saturday, Dec 1 and Sunday, Dec 2 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Chabot College Theatre of Performing Arts 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 324-4988 www.balletpetit.com Adults: $25 Children: $20 Seniors: $20


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

The Tech Museum 201 South Market St., San Jose (408) 294-8324 www.thetech.org

1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org

Continuing Events Saturdays, Sep 29- Dec 8

Math Olympiad $R

1:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m. Students master creative problem solving techniques. Ages 7 - 11

Irvington Community Center 41885 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 791-4334 Tuesday,Oct 16–Friday, Nov 30

Grant Peterson Collection

Mon – Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Works by Jay Lewis, Larry Bendoski & Frank Wight

John O’Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Thursday, Oct 20 - Saturday, Dec 1

Area Artists' Annual Juried Exhibit

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Various artworks from Bay Area artists

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.adobegallery.org Mondays, Tuesdays, & Thursdays, Oct 23 - Dec 13

A Single Step...Begins the Journey

Mon: 5 p.m. -10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Photo exhibit by participants of Advanced Portfolio Workshop

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Monday, Oct 23 -Sunday, Jan 6

Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition $

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Emmy-nominated comes to life

television

series


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

Continuing Events Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 7

Tuesday, Nov 27

Monday, Oct 24 - Saturday, Dec 1

1890’s Christmas at Shinn House

Medi-Cal Options for Long Term Care - R

Cal State East Bay Art Faculty and Staff Exhibition

Fri: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Sat & Sun: 12 noon - 4 p.m.

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (Thurs: 2 p.m. 7 p.m.)

Docent led tour of historic home

Re/Max 39644 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 894-4032

Paintings, ceramics & sculptures

Cal State East Bay Art and Education Building 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3299

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 795-0891

Tuesday, Nov 27-Friday, Nov 30 Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 9

A Christmas Carol $

Fri & Sat: 8:00 p.m. Sun. 2:30 p.m.

Fridays, Nov 2 - Nov 30

Charles Dickens’ holiday classic

Toddler Ramble: Wonders of Water

Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org

11 a.m. -11:30 a.m. Nature classes for 1 to 3 year olds

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

10 a.m. - 12 noon

California Conservatory Theater 999 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org

Joann Reed Exhibit

Grants Workshop $R

Friday, Nov 16 - Sunday, Dec 9

All My Sons $ 8 p.m. World War II story about family, love & deceit Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Monday, Nov 20-Friday, Jan 25

Book Drive

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Donate books to create a high school library in Ghana

Milpitas High School 1285 Escuela Pkwy., Milpitas (408) 318-8458 bookclubofmhs@gmail.com Thursday, Nov 22 - Saturday, Dec 14

Member Holiday Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Fine art & gift items by Hayward Arts Council members

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Friday, Nov 23 - Sunday, Dec 30

Train of Lights $ Ride restored railroad cars decorated for the holidays

4:30 p.m. Niles departure Niles Station 37001 Mission Blvd., Fremont 7:30 p.m. Sunol departure Sunol Depot 6 Kilkare Rd., Sunol www.ncry.org Saturday, Nov 24 - Sunday, Dec 23

Stories of the Season $

Sat., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. & Sun., 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Explore the Victorian home decorated for the holidays

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Thursday, Nov 29 - Saturday, Dec 8

The Diviners $

Thurs & Fri: 7 p.m. Sat: 2 p.m. Set in Zion, Indiana during the Great Depression

Irvington High School 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 590-7510 www.irvingtonconservatory.org

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Wednesday, Nov 28

Medicare Overview Discussion on eligibility, cost, benefits & recent changes

Tuesday, Nov 27 - Wednesday, Nov 28

Newpark Mall Cultural Corner Lower level near Sears 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 284-1600

Easy to moderate 4-mile hike - meet at Visitors Center

1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Tuesday, Nov 13 – Friday, Nov 30

Oil paintings from the award-winning artist

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com

Wednesday Walk

Chorus performs Broadway tunes to cheer your holiday

12:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Win four Ohlone for Kids summer classes (Deadline Nov. 30)

Cantare! Presents “A Broadway Holiday” $

A Tuna Christmas $

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org

5 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov 28

8 p.m. (Sunday matinees, 2 p.m.)

Colorful residents of Tuna, Texas, celebrate Christmas

Ohlone for Kids Drawing Contest

Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 9

Friday, Nov 9 - Sunday, Dec 15

8 p.m. & Sunday matinees 1 p.m.

Free legal seminar

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Grant writing & management

Hayward Adult School 22100 Princeton St., Hayward (510) 293-8595 ext. 5431

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Wednesday, Nov 28

Saturday, Dec 1

Sunday, Dec 2

McNevin & Friends $

Take Art for a Walk

Holiday Show $

5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

3 p.m.

Live music

Exhibit of carved walking sticks by Rick Boreliz

Featuring the New Dimension Chorus

The Vine 37533 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0112 Thursday, Nov 29 - Saturday, Nov 30

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Dec 1

7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Movie Night $

Live Blue Grass & Country music

7:30 p.m.

Mission Pizza & Pub 1572 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6858 www.missionpizza.com

“The Great K & A Train Robbery,” “Felix Busts a Bubble,” & “Mum’s the Word”

Winter Dance Showcase $

8 p.m. Students perform tap, jazz, contemporary, lyrical & hip hop

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 2

Holiday for the Arts $

Fri: 5:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Sat & Sun: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Original art work for sale

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.olivehydeartguild.org Friday, Nov 30

Ohlone College Chops Big Band $

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Dec 1

Holiday Anime Faire & Art Show $

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Ornament making, art lessons, Manga & Anime vendors

Fremont Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4344 www.holidayanimefaire.com Saturday, Dec 1

Children’s Breakfast with Ronald McDonald & Santa $

8 a.m. Entertainment, refreshments, raffle, photo with Santa

Washington Hospital West Anderson Auditorium 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 791-3428

8 p.m.

Saturday, Dec 1

18 piece band plays variety of hits

Alex Wong Live $

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Saturday, Dec 1

Olive Harvest Day & Green Fair

9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Help the Sisters harvest their olive trees. Wear work clothes & gloves. Family event

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335 www.msjdominicans.org

Prince of Peace School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 789-8651 www.ndchorus.com Sunday, Dec 2

Mill Creek Ramblers & Prairie

Thursday, Nov 29 - Saturday, Dec 1

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Multi-instrumentalist

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.fremontcoffee.com Saturday, Dec 1

Fishing -Trout Basics $

8 a.m. - 10 a.m. Learn about knot tying, rigging, bait & gear. Fishing license required

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895 Sunday, Dec 2

Madrigal Dinner $R

3 p.m. Five course meal, holiday songs, costumes & entertainment

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 358-1249 www.AaaahzYouthTheater.org Sunday, Dec 2

Pet Photos with Santa $

4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Animal-lovers bring your furry friends to meet Santa

Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 945-4022 Sunday, Dec 2

“Here We Come A’ Caroling”

2 p.m. Holiday Concert by The Misletoe Singers

Contributions to Abode Services welcome First United Methodist Church of Fremont 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-0175 Sunday, Dec 2

A Christmas Tale “The Beginning”

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon Live musical drama

Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont (510) 744-2216 Tuesday, Dec 4

Buon Tempo Club Crab Feed $R

6 p.m. Support student scholarships. Reservation deadline Nov. 28

Castro Valley Moose Lodge 20835 Rutledge Rd., Castro Valley (510) 483-6929 Friday, Dec 7

Saturday, Dec 1 -Sunday, Dec 2

Let’s Go Birding! $R

Drivers for Survivors Holiday Fundraiser $

Christmas at Ardenwood $

10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. View winter migratory birds. Dress warmly & wear walking shoes

6 p.m. - 10 p.m.

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Live music, puppet shows, “Christmas Cookie” baking contest

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org

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Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Eden Landings Corner of Clawiter and Arden, Hayward (510) 581-0223

Wine & cheese, dessert, and holiday auction items.

Address provided upon RSVP Drivers for Survivors 39270 Paseo Padre Pkwy., #335, Fremont (510) 579-0535 nmoore@earthlink.net

Christmas Boutique Saturday Dec. 8th from 10-3 Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38802 Blacow Rd, Fremont Lots of handmade Christmas gifts, some outside vendors as scrapbooking, shoes, jewlry, It Works Body Wraps, Mary Kay Tupperware, bake sale of Christmas goodies and gently us Christmas decorations....


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

It’s Christmas in the third smallest town in Texas. Radio station OKKK news personalities Thurston Wheelis and Arles Struvie report on various Yuletide activities, including hot competition in the annual lawn display contest and how the production of “A Christmas Carol” is jeopardized by unpaid electric bills. Many colorful tuna denizens join in th holiday fun. A delightful holiday show – with all characters portrayed by just two actors! Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont, presents the hilarious sequel to Greater Tuna, A Tuna Christmas by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, directed by Jim Woodbury, November 9 through December 15 (no shows Thanksgiving weekend). For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218 or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org.

SUBMITTED BY BELINDA MALONEY Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” adapted and directed by Brian Allan Hobbs, is a song-filled holiday classic for the entire family. Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge, the curmudgeon everyone loves to hate; the ghost story of the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Future; the festive Fezziwigs; over 20 holiday songs in glorious choral harmony; dancing; the darling Cratchit family with the ever hopeful Tiny Tim; and an unrequited love story offer a memorable tale of human transformation that will steal your heart in this special time of the year. Performances will be held at 8 p.m. on November 30, December 1, 6, 7, 8 and 9, with two Sunday matinees on December 2 and 9 at 2:30 p.m. General admission is $22, senior/advanced purchase $20, students 17 and under $10, and groups 12+ $18 (group prices apply to same performance only). December 6 is a Thursday $10

“Poor Actors” performance; tickets at the door only. Parking in front of the school by the Library and Office is recommended. Tickets are available at www.stage1theatre.org, by calling (510) 791-0287 or Brown Paper Tickets at (800) 838-3006, or visiting The Book End at 5678 Thornton Avenue in Newark. A Christmas Carol Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 9 8 p.m., Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org Tickets: $10 - $22


November 27, 2012

Boutique Calendar

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

Saturday, Dec 1

Christmas Boutique Wednesday, Nov 28 - Sunday, Dec 23

Artisan’s Holiday Boutique

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hand-crafted gifts by local artists

Fremont Art Association Center/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org Friday, Nov 30 - Saturday, Dec 1

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Homemade crafts, food, jewelry & more

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-6600

7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Handmade arts & crafts, baked goods & toys

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-2546 Sunday, Dec 2

Holiday Craft Fair

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Gifts, clothing, jewelry, home décor, pottery & more

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5600 www.unioncity.org Sunday, Dec 2

Chanukah Faire and Boutique Friday, Nov 30 - Sunday, Dec 23

Annual Holiday Boutique

Fri: 12 noon - 6 p.m. Sat. & Sun: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Handcrafted items by local artists

Sun Gallery 1015 “E” St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Saturday, Dec 1

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Jewelry, pottery, gift baskets & more. Over 50 vendors

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont ritu_saksena@hotmail.com

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Crafts, artwork, food & family activities

Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley www.congshirami.org Saturday, Dec 8

Christmas Craft Faire

10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Baked goods, handcrafted gifts, candles, jewelry & more

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-4062 Saturday, Dec 8

Christmas Boutique

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Handmade gifts, baked goods & vendors

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38802 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 793-6285

SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT Downtown Hayward will sparkle for the holiday season again this year at the “Light Up the Season” celebration on December 6. “Light Up the Season,” sponsored by the City of Hayward, the Hayward Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Business Improvement Area, will include holiday musical and dancing groups, children’s rides, an ice-skating rink in City Hall Plaza, lighting of a huge tree in the City Hall Rotunda, and the opportunity for kids to meet Santa Claus. The principal events will occur on B Street between Mission Boulevard and City Hall Plaza. Watkins Street, in front of City Hall Plaza, will be closed for the evening. Entertainment will include performances from the Dancing

Christmas Trees, Mariachi Juvenil, the Youth Orchestra, New Dimension, the Melody Chorus Society, the Peninsula Graces Dancing Group, and the Hayward High School Band. In addition to the traditional tree in the City Hall Rotunda, visitors to the downtown area will enjoy twinkling lights on downtown trees, light poles and railings on B Street from Foothill Boulevard to City Hall Plaza strung by volunteers from the Hayward Rotary Club, Pacheco Brothers Landscaping, and Soulciety. For more information, go to the Hayward Chamber of Commerce website, www.hayward.org or call (510) 537-2424. Light up the Season Thursday, Dec 6 5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. B St. (between Mission Blvd. and City Hall Plaza), Hayward (510) 537-2424 www.hayward.org

Tree Lightings

Thursday, Dec 6

Saturday, Dec 1

Light Up the Season

Mission San Jose Tree Lighting

5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

5 p.m. Live music, face painting, hot drinks, cookies & Santa

Tree lighting, children’s rides, ice rink, live music & Santa

Old School House 43571 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0600 www.msjchamber.org

Hayward City Hall B Street and City Hall Plaza, Hayward (510) 537-2424 www.hayward.org

Saturday, Dec 1

Saturday, Dec 8

Milpitas Tree Lighting

Centerville Tree Lighting

7 p.m. Civic Center Plaza 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. at Train Depot (kid’s activities)

Monday, Dec 3

Tree of Angels

6:30 p.m. Tree lighting, entertainment, refreshments, raffle, plus Mr. & Mrs. Santa Claus

MidPen Housing is sponsoring a community meeting to solicit input for the mural artwork in progress at that site. Renowned muralist, Mona Caron, received the commission to paint a mural that consists of two parts: a 65foot tall reproduction of a small wildflower that was found near the project site and a smaller, ribbon element that will contain images inspired by the history and people of Union City and be presented at eye-level. The larger mural is almost complete and the artist is about to begin

Centerville Depot/Dale Hardware Depot: 37260 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-3376 Dale: 3700 Thornton Ave., Fremont (510) 797-3700 Saturday, Dec 15

Wednesday, Dec 5

(510) 656-5375 www.irvingtonbusiness.com www.irvingtonlights.com

Tree Lighting Ceremony

5:30 p.m. Nakamura Clinic 33077 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 487-6000 www.whhs.com/treesofangels

work on the smaller, ribbon element. Staff from Mid-Pen Housing and Ms. Caron will talk about the mural and what it represents. The artist would like to hear from the community about their history and ideas for the future to inspire the final design of this portion of the mural. Mural Community Meeting Tuesday, Dec 4 7 p.m. Station Center Community Room 34888 11th Street, Union City (510) 684-1532 RheaS@ci.union-city.ca.us

5:30 p.m. tree lighting at Dale Hardware

Newark City Hall 37101 Newark Blvd., Newark (510) 578-4200 www.whhs.com/treesofangels

Community input sought for mural SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN

5:15 p.m. walk and carol to Dale Hardware

Irvington Lights

6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Monument Lighting and Christmas Carols followed by light display judging

PG&E awards community grants SUBMITTED BY TAMAR SARKISSIAN Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) will distribute Power Your Community grants to 18 organizations in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties this month, all thanks to nominations by supportive PG&E employees. This is the second year of PG&E’s Power Your Community program, which invites the utility’s employees to apply for grants of $2,500 or $1,000 on behalf of schools or community organizations they’re connected with. The employees’ relationship with the organization can be anything from founder to former neighbor. PG&E chose the recipient organizations based on their connection to the company’s three community investment priorities-education, environmental stewardship, and community vitality. For example, some serve

disadvantaged youth or homeless women; others spread messages of energy conservation or wildlife habitat preservation. Recipients include: Earth Island Institute Inc., Climbing for Kids/Bay Area Wilderness Training, Bay Area Leadership Foundation, IMPACT Bay Area, Luna Kids Dance Inc., Mercy Retirement Care Center, United Roots, Alameda County Meals on Wheels Inc., Oakland Technical High School, Wardrobe for Opportunity, Babe Ruth League of Metropolitan Oakland, Capture The Dream Inc., K to College, Golden Oak Montessori of Hayward Charter School, Amelia Earhart Elementary School, Stand! Against Domestic Violence, Festival Opera Association Inc., Diablo Ballet and Hanna Ranch Elementary School. For more information, visit www.pge.com/community


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November 27, 2012

Colts head to NCS Division I Championship SUBMITTED BY KENNY JACOBY The James Logan Colts football team, ranked #3 in the State, defeated the #2 ranked California Grizzlies on Saturday, November 24, earning their place in the North Coast Section (NCS) championship game scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday night, December 1, at Dublin High School. This will be the Colts’ first NCS finals appearance in 15 years. A convincing 40-7 victory over the Grizzlies set up what is expected to be a titanic battle with top-seed De La Salle in next

Saturday’s championship game. At the beginning of the semifinal contest, California was the first to get on the board, after an 80-yard balanced rushing and passing attack led to a 8-yard rushing touchdown to take a 7-0 lead. But the Colts were quick to rebut, scoring three unanswered touchdowns before the half came to an end with the Colts in the lead 19-7. Colt quarterback Jeffrey Prothro had a spectacular night, moving out of the pocket and away from the California pass rush. His biggest play of the game was under his own propulsion on a 56-yard run. The Colts’

quarterback scored on a keeper with 46 seconds left before halftime. Running Back Warren Miles Long opened the third quarter with his second touchdown run of the night, setting up a 26-7 lead for James Logan; Long would add another touchdown later in the quarter for his third of the night. James Logan continued to pile it on late in the game with another long touchdown making it 40-7 Colts, the final score. The Colts look forward to the contest with De La Salle who are undefeated this season. This one is for all the marbles!

James Logan downs Freedom in NCS football quarterfinals

BY NICK ZAMBRANO PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The James Logan Colts football team was met with a difficult challenge this past Friday night [Nov 16]. The mission at hand? To shut down a Freedom High Falcons team that came into this quarterfinal North Coast Section (NCS) game averaging almost 40 points per contest with an arsenal of weapons. Challenge accepted and challenge completed. The Colts kept the high-powered Falcons offense grounded and walked away with a 33-18 victory, earning a berth in the NCS semi-finals. The 18 points was the lowest total that Freedom scored in a game all season. “We really just wanted them to work for their touchdowns,” Logan head coach George Zuber said. On the first play of scrimmage, the Logan defense answered the call when linebacker Victor Fualaau picked off Freedom quarterback Dante Mays. A solid return on the interception by Fualaau gave the Colts an excellent starting position at the Freedom 29-yard line. Prior to Logan, Mays had thrown just four picks all season. After a 21-yard bootleg by quarterback Jeffrey Prothro put Logan at the Falcons’ goal line, running back Warren Miles Long notched the game’s first score with his first of three touchdown runs. It would be a night to remember for the Northwestern University-bound Long. The senior finished the contest with a careerhigh 290 yards rushing to go along with his three touchdowns. In his last two games alone, Long has seven scores and averaged 250.5 yards on the

Ohlone Sports SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR AND DONALD JEDLOVEC PHOTOS BY DONALD JEDLOVEC Women’s Volleyball 11/7- Ohlone Renegades- 3; Foothill Owls- 1 (2518; 25-18; 15-25; 27-25) Men’s Basketball- Jonathan Wallace Tournament 11/8- Ohlone Renegades- 63; Solano Falcons- 48 11/9- Ohlone Renegades- 65; San Joaquin Delta Mustangs- 47 Scoreboard Submitted by Christopher Fortenberry, James Williams, and Kenny Jacoby

November 20 Men’s Basketball - Foundation Game - James Logan Colts - 54, California Grizzlies - 32 November 21 Men’s Soccer - Winter Soccer Classic - James Logan Colts - 1; Granada Matadors - 0 Men’s Soccer - Winter Soccer Classic - Mission San Jose Warriors - 1; Miramonte Matadors - 0

ground. On defense, he was equally effective with one fumble recovery. Back on the other side of the ball, the Colts defense was handed the daunting task of shutting down Freedom star running back Joe Mixon. Mixon led the Bay Valley Athletic League this season in total rushing yards with 1,354 and in total points scored with 170. In addition, the junior has racked up 26 total touchdowns. On perhaps the most impressive play of the night though, Mixon took a pass from Mays, fumbled after the catch, recovered the fumble and then reversed field and navigated his way to the end zone for an 18-yard touchdown. Another touchdown run late in the fourth quarter gave Mixon two scores for the night but that would be all the offense that the Falcons could muster. “He’s a heck of a back, but we certainly contained him,” Zuber said of Mixon. Up next for the Colts will be a semi-final game against the California High Grizzlies, scheduled for Nov. 23 in San Ramon. The Grizzlies run an offense similar to the same style that the Colts use, relying heavily on a power running game. Featuring senior running back Karris Johnson, the California running game averages what most teams get on total offense with 254.7 yards per contest. “Cal’s a good running team and we’re a good run-stopping team, so we’ll see how that goes,” said Zuber. The winner of this contest will face the winner of Amador Valley High Dons and De La Salle High Spartans in the NCS championship game. Kick-off for the Colts and Grizzlies is set for 7 p.m.


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Mission San Jose Warriors (MSJ) defeat Irvington Vikings (I) Cross Country

SUBMITTED BY COACH JOHN HOTCHKISS October 31 Results include (lowest score wins): Boys Varsity - MSJ-25; I-31 Girls Varsity - MSJ-17; I-44 Boys JV - MSJ-18; I-45 Girls JV - MSJ-15; I-50 Boys F/S - MSJ-20; I-40 November 8 MSJ achieved much success at the MVAL Finals November 8 at Coyote Hills Park. The MSJ Boys Frosh/Soph team was undefeated in the League this year and won all of their dual meets and also the League Meet. MSJ took 5 of the top 13 spots in the League Finals led by Jonathan (2nd) and Keshav (3rd).

Men’s Soccer

Logan vs Alameda Submitted by James Williams November 16 Logan 0, Alameda 1 1st Half Scoring: Alameda: Karl Blivell (20:00) Logan Goalie: Andres Marquez, 80 min. 1 GA, 1 Save Alameda Goalie: Eric Vanwinkle, 80 min, 0 GA, 5 Saves

Volleyball

Moreau Catholic Volleyball Report Submitted by MaxPreps October 30 Moreau Catholic Mariners- 3; Irvington Vikings- 2 (25-22, 25-22, 24-26, 20-25, 15-7) November 1 Moreau Catholic Mariners- 3; James Logan Colts- 0 (25-23, 25-17, 25-21)

The MSJ Girl’s JV team easily won the League Meet by taking 5 of the top 9 spots led by Jordan (2nd), Victoria (4th), Raquel 5th), Minji (8th), and Anna (9th). The MSJ Girl’s Varsity finished 2nd in the League Meet behind Washington. Because MSJ beat James Logan at the League Meet, there is a 3-way tie for the overall League title between Mission San Jose, James Logan and Washington. MSJ beat Washington in their previous dual meet. Top League finishers for MSJ were Lindy (3rd), Lizzy (6th), and Taylor (8th). November 9 MSJ finished as follows: Frosh/Soph Boys: 1st JV Girls: 1st JV Boys: 4th Varsity Girls: 2nd Varsity Boys: 5th Congratulations to all MSJ runners.

Vikings defeat Warriors on Senior Night BY KENNY JACOBY PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Irvington Vikings took down the Mission San Jose Warriors at home on Thursday, November 1, by a final score of 3-1 (25-12, 25-19, 35-33, 25-20). Both teams honored their seniors during a pre-game Senior Night tribute. The Warriors honored seniors Tiffany Chen and Shannon Chua, while the Vikings said farewell to seniors Danielle Carothers, Nicole Ho, Cammie Kajioka, and Amy Laus. In Game 1, Irvington came out strong, claiming seven of the first eight points. The Vikings never looked back, dominating the game and winning by a final score of 25-12. The momentum shifted in Game 2, as Mission San Jose held the lead for nearly the entire game. Finally, the Vikings tied it up at 19-19, and went on a 6-0 run to steal the game from the Warriors, 25-19. Game 3 was a wild one, with both teams trading leads several times. The Vikings’ Laura Hubacek provided some key blocks to keep the Vikings in the game. Irvington broke a 2323 tie with a point to force match point against the Warriors. With the game and match on the line, the Warriors tied it up with a blocked spike after a long rally. Mission San Jose scored again to force game point, but Irvington battled back and scored the 25-25 equalizer. The rest of the game was incredibly suspenseful, as both teams found themselves with their backs against the wall several times. Mission San Jose held game point five more times, while the Vikings held match point four more times. The trailing team scored on game point ten times in a row, until finally Mission San Jose took

the win by a final score of 35-33 in an incredible game. In Game 4, Irvington fought to a 6-0 lead, with some key powerful kills from their star player Carothers. Mission San Jose sparked a comeback in the end, but finished with a loss, 25-20.

Union City Pallen Karate students building success

November 2 Moreau Catholic Mariners- 3; Newark Memorial Cougars- 0 (25-23, 27-25, 25-22)

Ohlone Sports Submitted by Coach Jeremy Peñaflor and Donald Jedlovec Women’s Volleyball 11/7- Ohlone Renegades- 3; Foothill Owls1 (25-18; 25-18; 15-25; 27-25)

SUBMITTED BY MEL J. ALBANO Men’s Basketball- Jonathan Wallace Tournament 11/8- Ohlone Renegades- 63; Solano Falcons- 48 11/9- Ohlone Renegades- 65; San Joaquin Delta Mustangs- 47

Pallen’s Union City Leisure Services program students competed in the inaugural AMAPA4KIDS Competition on Oct 27, 2012 in Antioch. The kids, ages 5 to 16, trained in the mixed martial art of Kajukenbo and wowed the competition, taking not just 2nd place (Jade Cabatbat and Kira Bjornson) and 1st place (Ashley Estabillo and Mason Oania) but also grand champion (Mason Oania) in Katas. Grand Master Max Pallen Sr.’s student (Mason Oania) also placed 2nd in Team Sparring. The founder of Pallen’s Martial Arts Association, Grand Master Max Pallen Sr., a 10th degree Black Belt, has been teaching Karate/Arnis in Union City (Holly Center) for more than 17 years.

Newark Fire earns third place SUBMITTED BY FRANZ BRUCKNER PHOTOS COURTESY OF SOFIA OCEGUEDA The Newark Fire, and under12 G girl’s class 1 team took third place at the Sonoma Halloween Classic. Fire defeated Sonoma Wildcats and San Carlos Blitz on Saturday, 10, before falling to Sonoma Fury 0-2 in the Sunday Semifinal. Fire bounced back in the consolation game, defeating the Rohnert Park Warriors by the score of 3-0. Against, Fury Angie Valenzuela scored the lone goal for the Fire victory. Also playing well for Fire were goal keeper Lissette Mason, defenders Elizabeth Salazar, Sara Buffey, and Sam Ocegueda, and midfielders Natalia Sanchez and Isabella Garcia. In the second game, Fire defeated San Carlos on an “own” goal, but were very unlucky not to have scored several goals. Rachel Bruckner narrowly missed a goal as did Napal and Hannah Gamez. Isabella Alvarellos also had a very good game for the Fire. In Sunday’s game against Sonoma, Fire had several chances but were unlucky not to convert. In the consolation game against Rohnert Park, Fire took a 1-0 half time lead thanks to a goal by Valenzuela. Fire added two more goals when defender Marissa Ferreira scored off of a Gamez corner, and midfielder Aracelli Hinojosa rounded out the scoring by converting a pass from Napal for the final goal. Midfielders Bri Motta, Christian Nava-Gona, and defender Trinity Castillo also had very good games for the Fire.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12656768 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Deborah Ann Ware for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Deborah Ann Ware filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Deborah Ann Ware to Deborah Ann Ramona Zuniga The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 2/22/2013, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happenings, Tri-City Voice Date: November 19, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2411853# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12654255 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Prabhakaran Ganesan for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Prabhakaran Ganesan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Mridhula Prabhakaran to Hridhaya Prabhakaran The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: December 11, 2012, Time: 2:30 pm, Dept.: 522 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street #108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri City Voice Date: October 31, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403205#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 472006-07 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Trux-Book 2. Lifestyle Fremont, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Parminder Singh, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555 Bhacwant Singh Sandhu, 33765 Whitehead Ln., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a General Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11-16-12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Parminder Singh, Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 16, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2410895# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471988 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DNF Auto Sales, 5051 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 Asmir Buliubasic, 5051 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Asmir Buliubasic This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 15, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/27, 12/4, 12/11, 12/18/12 CNS-2410475# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471449 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Chinese Medicine Center, 37200 Meadowbrook Common #105, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Chia-Chi Wang, 37200 Meadowbrook Common #105, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-31-2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wang, Chia-Chi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 31, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11/12 CNS-2410084# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471652

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sugar High Desert Dispensary, 2036 New Park Mall, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Kristen Leann Hiller, 38343 Hamlin St., Fremont, CA 94536. Jacquelyne Renee Parish, 6354A Buena Vista Dr., Newark, CA 94560. This business is conducted by a joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kristen Leann Hiller This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 6, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/20, 11/27, 12/4, 12/11/12 CNS-2409596# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471685 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Charlang Auto, 1940 Springwater Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Omid Haidari Kahkesh, 1940 Springwater Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/14/2009. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Omid Haidari Kahkesh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2406501# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Valero Nanua Auto Repair, 26978 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 44620 Highland Pl, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Nanua Auto Repair Inc., 44620 Highland Pl., Fremont, CA 94539; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 5/24/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hari Krishan Saini, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2406232# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470938 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Women of Lace, 42757 Gatewood St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Carol Helstrom, 42757 Gatewood St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Carol Helstrom, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2405003# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471324 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Diego Marcial Rios Art & Design Works (DMRAD), 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Diego Marcial Rios, 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555 Anna Rios, 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by Husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Diego Marcial Rios, Anna Rios This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 29, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2404296# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471282 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ynspyre, 35221 Noel Place, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Kshama Lodha, 35221 Noel Place, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/24/2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kshama Lodha This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 25, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403500# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471146 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: C/A Associates, 225 W. Winton Ave., #125, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda James F. Collins, 840 Sueirro St., Hayward, CA 94541 Vishal Anand, 32779 Sumac St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by Co-Partners. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Vishal Anand, James F. Collins This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 23, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403363# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471292 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shanghai Bistro, 1793 Decoto Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 1444 Washo Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Tian Yuan Yang, 1773 Decoto Rd., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tian Yuan Yang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 26, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403151# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470800 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dynasty Enterprise, 2211 Parkside Drive, Ste. G, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont, CA 94527 Steven C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Ct., San Leandro, CA 94577 Roger P. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 Samuel Sosum Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Declaration of Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Robert Glen South, Jr., 1884 Flynn Creek Rd., Gainesboro, TN 38562 Diane K. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 June L. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Jean M. Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Declaration of Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Janice C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on April 1, 2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402555# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470786 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Parkside Dynasty, 2211 Parkside Drive, Ste. G, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Steven C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 Roger P. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 Samuel Sosum Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Trust dtd April 1984, 1510 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 Robert Glen South, Jr., 1884 Flynn Creek Road, Gainesboro, TN 38562 Janice C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 Karen M. Ingram, Trustee of the Ingram 1982 Trust dtd June 16, 1982, as amended and restated, 271 Stratford Place, Los Altos, CA 94022 June L. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Diane K. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 Jean H. Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on May 17, 1988. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402550# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470771-74 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Winter Wish Media, 2. Winter Wish Design, 3. Winter Wish Studio, 4. Winter Wish Photography, 1126 Quintana Way, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Shaowen Yao, 1126 Quintana Way, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shaowen Yao This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402427# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 469890 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: La Huasteca Chiquita dba RJ2 Catering & Party Rentals, 7673 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 The fictitious business name statement for the partnership was filed on 9/20/2012 in the County of Alameda. Rafael Sanchez, 7675 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 Janice Justiniani Velez, 7675 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business was conducted by N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Rafael Sanchez S/ Janice Velez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 12, 2012. 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402012# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470727-728 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. La Huasteca Chiquita, 2. RJ2 Catering & Party Rental, 7673 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Rafael Sanchez, 7675 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 Janice Justiniani Velez, 7675 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by Husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rafael Sanchez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402003#

GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF FUNDING AVAILABILITY CITY OF FREMONT SOCIAL SERVICE GRANT FUNDS FOR FY 2013-2016 Para información en español, por favor llame a Leticia Leyva a (510) 574-2072. On Tuesday, December 3, 2012, the City will release a Request For Proposals (RFP) for Social Service Grant funds for FY 2013-2014, FY 2014-2015 and FY 2015-2016. Approximately $385,000 in funds will be available for projects and programs in each year, including $328,000 for Human Services and $57,000 for Senior Services. Not-for-profit 501(c)(3) and public agencies serving low and moderate income Fremont families are eligible to submit proposals. Grant funds will support programs and projects commencing on July 1, 2013, July 1, 2014, and July 1, 2015 respectively. Request for Proposal (RFP) materials will be available on ZoomGrants at https: //zoomgrants.com The following types of proposals may be funded with Social Service funds: I. Strengthening Services Services that are designed to foster independence and/or prevent people from needing services in the future. Services may include, but are not limited to health monitoring, child care, citizenship assistance, job training, legal assistance, and transportation. II. Crises Intervention Services Services that help people who are in crisis and in immediate risk of losing their independence. Services may include counseling, family mental health, domestic violence, sexual assault, and youth criminal justice. III. Basic Needs Services Services that help people with the fewest resources and who are most in need. Services may include food, housing and emergency health care. The City of Fremont will be holding a proposal orientation for all agencies interested in submitting funding proposals. City Staff will review the RFP, the proposal timeline, and criteria used to evaluate proposals. They will also answer any questions you may have about the process. The proposal orientation will be held as follows: Date: Thursday, December 13, 2012 Time: 6:00PM – 7:00PM Place: City Hall Training Room 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building B, Fremont, CA 94538 Please note the following important dates: •

Monday, December 10, 2012: Deadline for submitting RSVP’s for the Proposal Orientation by calling Shanti Jeyakumar at (510) 574-2061 or sjeyakumar@fremont.gov

Monday, December 3, 2012: Request for Proposal (RFP) materials will be available on ZoomGrants at https://zoomgrants.com

Thursday, December 13, 2012: Proposal Orientation (see details above)

Thursday, January 10, 2013 by 5:00 p.m.: Pre-application due via ZoomGrants at https: //zoomgrants.com

Thursday, January 24, 2013 by 5:00 p.m.: Proposals are due to the City of Fremont Human Services Department, via https: //zoomgrants.com. Hard copies, faxes or emails will not be accepted.

petitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Purchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #901056 Electronic Monitoring and Surveillance of Offenders South County – Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. at Public Works Agency, Room 230B, 951 Turner Court, Hayward, CA North County – Friday, December 7, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Conference Room 201, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on January 9, 2013 County Contact: Michael Lu (510) 208-9649 or via email: michael.lu@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 11/27/12 CNS-2411429# NOTIce is hereby given that sealed bids will be accepted in the office of the Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services, 1900 Embarcadero Cove, Suite 205, Oakland, CA INFORMATIONAL MEETING/BIDDERS’ CONFERENCES South County–RFP BHCS #13-03, Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) Expansion, Monday, December 10, 2012 at 3:00 PM, City of Fremont, 39155 Liberty Street, Pacific Room, Suite H800, Fremont, CA and North County–Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 3:00 PM, Behavioral Health Care Services, 1900 Embarcadero Cove, Suite 205, Wildcat Canyon Room, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on January 4, 2013 County Contact: Zandra Washington, (510) 383-2872 or via email: zwashington@acbhcs.org Attendance at the conference meetings is not required. The RFP is available via the GSA website— www.acgov.org under Current Contracting Opportunities 11/27/12 CNS-2410414#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILFORD OLAN REESE CASE NO. RP12644986 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the lost will or estate, or both, of: Wilford Olan Reese A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Donna Cramer in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Donna Cramer be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s lost WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The lost will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 10-242012 at 9:30 in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Berkeley, California 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan E. Foley Attorney at Law, State Bar #76421, Foley & Foley, 827 Broadway, Suite 220, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: 510-547-3788 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2409586# NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MILDRED DARLENE UNGER CASE NO. RP12-644110 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Mildred Darlene Unger A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Peter Shelton in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Shelley Mattice be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 12/31/12 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94709-1109. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Peter Shelton, 827 Broadway, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: 510-3945483 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2408571#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION

Either the Senior Citizens Commission or the Human Relations Commission will review Social Service funding applications, depending on your target population. The Commissions will make funding recommendations to the Fremont City Council. The City Council will review these recommendations and make their final funding decisions in April 2013. For more information, contact Leticia Leyva at (510) 574-2072 or lleyva@fremont.gov or Lucia Hughes at (510) 574-2043 or lhughes@fremont.gov 11/27/12 CNS-2412994# Notice is hereby given that sealed com-

Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 11th Day of December 2012 at or after 11:00 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Melissa Gaither AA1609S 8/6/12 Matthew Gracia AA4687B 9/5/12 Roderick Thomas AA7220B 9/29/12 Steve Lyons AA9353A 7/29/12 Vevencio Torres B137 8/17/12 Eseta Tuakihekolo B156 9/30/12 Edward Yoda B170 10/3/12 Lamar Johnson B233 9/15/12 Anita Brown B279 10/5/12 Sergio Hernandez B296 10/2/12 Alain Tshimanga B313 10/5/12 Vincent Wu C125 9/23/12 Michael Topper C127 9/30/12 Monique Nolen C157 9/07/12 Monique Nolen C158 9/07/12 Celia Molina C260 9/30/12 Wilma Owens C299 9/15/12 Cheryl Nelson C301 9/27/12 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2411377#


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Kimber Park Raumschach

WILLIAM MARSHAK

P

laying chess in a two-dimensional space is difficult enough to demand a high level of concentration from even the most brilliant players; mastery of it certainly exceeds my abilities. However, this challenging medium was not enough for some who recognized that simulated warfare of the chessboard could not be adequately represented without adding at least one additional dimension representing action above and below ground level. After all, combat variables from the air and below the sea were well recognized even when Raumschach “Space Chess” was invented early in the 20th Century in Germany. Today, many variations of this game are available, testing the intellectual and emotional limits of gamers and those just trying to understand the basics. Chess, a

simulation of combat scenarios, allows players to study and refine the outcome of their tactics and strategies.

forms to the pledge of the new General Plan preserving the character of neighborhoods continues.

Politicians and astute business people have long understood the value of evaluating risks and rewards of their own actions as well as possible countermeasures by opposition. In complex interactions, gain or loss may be simply a feint or diversion masking true intentions. Masters at such manipulations use plans that have calculated results well in advance of present moves.

Blocking residential development on this property is a two-dimensional victory for Save Kimber Park. It is definitely a step forward and brings the intent of the Private Open Space Initiative to bear. Scale and commercial recreational land use is now in the limelight and will continue to be negotiated as the next city council is seated - a bit of a transformation. As new players emerge and others return, the question arises of whether a new dimension will be added to the mix. Although it may appear the game has neared its conclusion, vigilance is always recommended in such contests since no matter how many dimensions are involved and what the perceived stage of play, the objective is “checkmate.”

Although I was unable to attend last week’s Fremont City Council meeting that began to resolve the Kimber Park open space controversy, I watched the webcast and was heartened to see the council pay attention to community concerns. Much work done behind the scenes by Kimber Park advocates and, from what I hear, a particular councilmember, are to be commended. However, there is a significant amount of work left to finally settle the matter. It is entirely possible to revive the swim and tennis club and create a viable open space amenity consistent with Private Open Space General Plan designations. However, the search for a plan that con-

I am so proud of the level of passion and engagement in our SKP (Save Kimber Park) community. We have remained unified, committed and respectful, although many obstacles were encountered along the way. Together we have put in thousands of hours and dedicated ourselves to our mission statement “to forever preserving a park-like natural and open area, including a recreational facility in the Kimber Park Neighborhood.” I believe that no group in Fremont’s history has ever fought as vigorously to protect their neighborhood.

In July, we made history in Fremont with the passing of the Protect Fremont Private Open Space Initiative and now, based on City Council’s direction, this parcel will be placed in the Private Open Space General Plan designation and will be subject to the Initiative. City staff will need to modify the definition of Private Open Space slightly to ensure the owner has a conforming recreational use; however, we have kept this parcel from being a target in the future. Change of its use will not be possible without a unanimous vote of council or a vote of the people of Fremont. The developer and owner have also agreed to place a deed restriction on the property which prohibits residential and will provide an additional

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

A Win-Win for Kimber Park I would like to thank everyone who participated, in any way, in our effort. Without the combined efforts of each and every one of you, we would not be where we are today. Although admittedly significant work lies ahead, in terms of follow through and execution and trust-building, I believe we are now in a different phase entirely.

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

Letter to the Editor

On November 20, 2012, collective efforts of the Kimber neighborhood’s 20month-long grassroots campaign were rewarded. We can now look forward to a future where we will have what we have always hoped for... a beautiful, appropriately scaled, multi-faceted recreational facility in the center of our neighborhood which preserves the open space, trees, foliage and wildlife...and truly builds community...something our neighborhood and all of Fremont can be proud of.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

layer of protection. We have achieved as close to “forever” protection as we can get. This is the win-win solution we had hoped for. I have met with the owner several times over the last ten days and sincerely believe that she is motivated to move forward in earnest on this new path. I would specifically like to thank her and the developer for the progress which has been made in changing the proposal over the last 30 days. If you missed the meeting and want to watch it online, the web link is: http://www.fremont.gov/Archive.aspx?AMI D=39&Type=Recent. We will continue to post updates of any plan revisions on our website at www.SaveKimberPark.com. Thank You Fremont for supporting the initiative and our Save Kimber Park efforts. Christina Broadwin Co-President, Save Kimber Park Steering Committee

Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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November 27, 2012

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Newark Unified School District is looking for a Child Care Coord. $34,835-$41,126/yr, 6hrs/day, 24 Hrs/wk. Admin Credential or a B.A. degree +12ECE units & 6-admin/Super units req. Deadline: Open until Filled; HR Dept., 5715 Musick Ave., Newark, 510-818-4242.

Project Manager, eCommerce (Fremont, CA). Dvlp, create, & implmt product reqmts in Agile s/ware dvlpmt environment. Use knowl of eCommerce, s/ware engg, Online Retail Mktg projects, & web mktg strategies such as promotions, email campaigns, & loyalty prgms to lead product dvlpmt & deploy mkt ready product releases. Reqd: Bach's deg in Comp Engg, Comp Sci or related/equiv. 5 yrs of progressive post baccalaureate exp in field. Exp w/ Online Retail Mktg projects, & eCommerce & web mktg strategies such as promotions, email campaigns, & loyalty prgms. Exp working in Agile environment. Send resume & cvr ltr to Monya Kemp (Job Code MP-PME) at The Men's Wearhouse, Inc. 40650 Encyclopedia Circle, Fremont, CA 94538.

Education Specialist wtd to assist with coordinating education unit. JobES1. Send resume: Joongang Daily News SF, Inc. 40523 Encyclopedia Cir. Fremont, CA 94538.

Become a hospice patient care volunteer!

Child Care Coordinator

Java Developer Programmer: design and development of software architecture. MS in Comp. Sci. + 1 yr exp. as Program Developer. Jobsite: Newark, CA 94560. E-mail resume to careers@maansystemsinc.com

HELP WANTED Tri-City Voice Newspaper Part time delivery people needed 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

SENIOR ANALYST ORACLE (FREMONT, CA) Collect & analyze business requirements for Oracle financial projects. Formulate & communicate the business vision for the project & work with clients to determine requirements of new application. Participate in design, development, testing & implementation of Oracle projects. Develop testing scenarios & write test scripts. Bachelors in IT/Comp. Science or Finance & 60 months of experience in job offered, or as Systems Analyst or Oracle Financial Systems Analyst + knowledge of Oracle. Mail Resume- Mr. Murugan, CEO, Dynasoft Synergy, Inc. 38930 Blacow Rd, Suite B1, Fremont, CA 94536

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

IMC Global Inc. is offering a position of Payment Clerk and Office Assistance where you can earn extra income at your flexible schedule plus benefits that takes only little of your time. Requirements • Must have access to the internet • Must be Efficient and Dedicated Send your resumes to :- hrimcglobalinckbates@gmail.com This great opportunity is limited.

HELP WANTED Auto Repair Machanic Full or Part Time Call 510-713-7771

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477 Tuesday, November 27 9:15–11:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts. 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, November 28 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts. 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct. 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, November 29 9:50 – 10:20 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 10:40–11:30 Preschool Storytimes NEWARK 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy 38325 Cedar Blvd., NEWARK 2:00 –3:00 Graham School 36270 Cherry St, NEWARK Monday, December 3 9:20-10:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 10:15-11:15 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 1:45 – 2:45 Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., UNION CITY 3:05 – 3:25 Alvarado Elementary

School, Fredi St. & Smith St., UNION CITY 4:15 – 4:45 Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., UNION CITY 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, December 4 9:45-11:05 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, December 5 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060

Wednesday, November 28 1:45-3:00 Foothill School 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928

Our Lady of the Rosary Church 703 C St., Union City 510-471-2609 www.olrchurch.org

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766 St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100 St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776 Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Life Church 1699 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-483-8940 www.clife-church.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net Grace Church Fremont Multi-Ethnic 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

Calvary Chapel Fremont 42986 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-656-8979 www.calvaryfremont.org

Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org

Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net

November 27, 2012

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491

Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont 510-226-2800 www.resonatemovement.org ROADMAP FELLOWSHIP International Best Western Plus Inn 360 W. 'A' St.,Hayward 510-574-5663 San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 nilesdiscoverychurch.org

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org

Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/

Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org

Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

St. Steven Lutheran Church Meets at Grace Lutheran Church 1836 B. St., Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Chinese Mission of Hope Evangelical-Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd, Fremont 510-938-0505 http://www.hopelutheranfremont.org/zh.html Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.southhaywardumc.org

Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org

St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM

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Al-Medinah Educational Center: Masjid & School 5445 Central Ave., Newark

Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

NON

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org

Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org

First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com

Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858

First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Heavenly Christ's Church (Meets in Calvary Lutheran Church) 17200 Via Magdalena San Lorenzo 510-303-5592 Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

New Seed of Faith Ministry 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nsofm.com 510 612-4832

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

Alert Citizen aids Newark Police SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD On November 18, 2012 at approximately 3:00 p.m., Officers of the Newark Police Department were dispatched to the 6800 block of Cedar Boulevard to investigate a report of three suspicious people not known to the neighborhood “lurking” around a residence. Based on the quick actions of the caller, officers arrived on scene and surrounded the residence in question. As officers approached the residence they found the front door was open and contacted David Galvan, Oscar Iniguez and Lena Faitague. The trio was in the process of removing items from the interior of the residence when contacted by officers. All three were arrested for residential burglary. This case is a prime example of a resident being vigilant and not justifying the actions of suspicious people who are not known to the neighborhood. The Newark Police Department would like to thank those members of our community that have called to report crimes. Additionally we would like to encourage others to notify police when suspicious activity is occurring. Anyone with information regarding this incident is requested to call the Newark Police Department at (510) 578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “Silent Witness” hotline: (510) 578-4000, extension 500.

Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA

New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937

Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org

New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org

True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org

SIKHISM

PRESBYTERIAN

DENOMINATIONAL

Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org

Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 http://www.missionpeakuu.org/

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (in the future home of Niles Discovery Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

Remove it, lock it or lose it SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD • Remove all valuables from your vehicle (phone, wallet, laptop, camera, packages) including GPS devices, cell phones, IPODS and chargers. • Lock your vehicle and roll up all windows. Park in a well-lit, populated area and refrain from parking between two large vehicles. • Use anti-theft devices such as alarms and steering wheel locks. Be aware and alert of suspicious activity or persons in the area. • Place valuables in your trunk before arriving at the parking lot. If you need to drop off extra packages in the middle of your shopping, put them in your trunk and then move your vehicle to another area of the shopping center. • Leave your expensive jewelry and gold chains at home in a secured area while you shop. Don’t allow a robber to snatch your jewelry. • If possible, shop with a friend or family member. If you must be out alone at night, stay in well-lighted areas. Walk close to street lights, staying well away from dark corners and alleys. • Remember, crime occurs during the day, evening, weekdays and weekends. Stay alert and be observant of any suspicious person or vehicle in your immediate area. Please report suspicious activity to the nearest on-site security service or to the Fremont Police Department. Emergency 9-1-1 & non-emergency 790-6800, option 3.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club

We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont

First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose

American Legion Auxiliary

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS

Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters

Having trouble controlling the way you eat?

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Fremont Cribbage Club

Friendship Force

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

We offer no-fee job search, resume and interview workshops. For workshop schedule please call (510) 794-2442.

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Holiday Gift Faire: food, goodies, & Hanukkah items Sunday, Nov 11, 10am-2p.m. Family Services: Fri., Nov 16, 7p.m. Hanukkah Dinner & Service: Fri, December 14, 7p.m. www.bethtorah-fremont.org (510) 656-7141

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 15 Highest $: 777,000 Median $: 468,000 Lowest $: 275,000 Average $: 485,067

ADDRESS

q 12 Months for $75

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing:

Home Delivery

q

SOLD FOR BDS

455,000 468,000 410,000 275,000 405,000 310,000 535,000 300,000 495,000 750,000 721,000 550,000 777,000 290,000 535,000

1 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 2 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1400 1428 1660 1126 1254 1288 1814 1213 1442 2605 2645 1840 2527 1334 2119

1957 1956 1964 1951 1952 1948 1962 1926 1957 1998 1984 1985 1996 1983 1975

10-11-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-10-12

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

572 A Street 22828 Amador Street 624 Artistic Place #31 994 Chenault Way 1119 D Street 24239 Fairview Avenue 22158 Main Street

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541

583,000 745,545

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

475,000 100,000 457,000 351,000 315,000 975,000 375,000 530,000 530,000 625,000 525,000 2,424,500 473,000 1,227,500 348,000 710,000 1,025,000 1,124,000 679,000 825,000 2,050,000 1,150,000 775,000 1,100,000 927,000 410,000 1,045,000 583,000 337,000 450,000 386,000 516,000 780,000

1312 928 1107 1306 1158 3140 1388 1324 1720 1409 1430 1360 1321 1387 1430 1931 2541 1785 1453 4045 2555 2643 1914 1214 2082 1499 840 1590 1060 1476 2102

2007 1979 1958 1973 1943 1993 1961 1962 1959 1988 1999 1936 1959 1966 1962 1964 1988 2010 1955 1996 1968 1980 1967 1987 1963 1978 1988 1984 1969 1973 1990

10-10-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12

3 2 3 2 3 5 3 4 4 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 3 4 3

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 31 Highest $: 690,000 Median $: Lowest $: 112,000 Average $: ADDRESS

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552

ZIP

546 Boulder Terrace 38626 Country Common 4579 Diaz Drive 38011 Edward Avenue 36930 Niles Boulevard 38624 Pickering Court 5462 Borgia Road 5048 Conde Court 40117 Davis Street 4415 Doane Street 3450 Ellery Common 41126 Fremont Boulevard 40249 Pacific Street 41223 Roberts Avenue 5476 Wallace Place 46877 Bradley Street 42261 Camino Santa Barbara 43529 Euclid Drive 49018 Feather Grass Terrace 43303 Gallegos Avenue 954 Hunter Lane 2231 Marion Avenue 321 Merrill Avenue 101 Pawnee Place 39972 San Simeon Court 205 Shaniko Common #48 41953 Via San Gabriel 34825 Armour Way 4995 Conway Terrace 34368 Gadwall Common 33156 Lake Champlain Street 32543 Lake Louise Street 5380 Shamrock Common

Business Name if applicable:

q

ZIP

20170 Butterfield Drive 18361 Carlwyn Drive 2738 Darlene Court 22100 Idena Avenue 18473 Ogilvie Drive 21480 Orange Avenue 3534 Remco Street 2588 Somerset Avenue 3430 Wyndale Drive 25577 Crestfield Drive 19280 Edwin Markham Drive 6668 Giannini Court 25350 Gold Hills Drive 5345 San Simeon Place 5845 Shadow Ridge Drive

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 33 Highest $: 2,424,500 Median $: Lowest $: 100,000 Average $:

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Subscription Form

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Jan 5, 2013 from 9:00-11:30 in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or Email Joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/F2F

ADDRESS

Out of work? ProNet can help you!

The “NO” List:

Serious Mental Illness

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Winter holidays with Temple Beth Torah of Fremont

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

SOLD FOR BDS

189,000 311,000 310,000 255,000 140,000 200,000 290,000

3 3 3 3 2 3 2

300,000 296,823

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1219 1918 1595 1070 1062 836 1551

1920 2008 2004 1951 1912 1926 1950

10-10-12 10-05-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT 3270 Naomi Drive 25088 Panitz Street 20038 Ricardo Avenue 342 Shirley Avenue 552 Staley Avenue #164 26969 Hayward Boulevard 3885 Oakes Drive 45 Brookstone Way 679 Denslowe Lane 31471 Meadowbrook Avenue 24271 Park Street 27647 Pensacola Way 292 Revere Avenue 1356 Sheridan Lane 27904 Thornton Court 30114 Treeview Street 30408 Treeview Street 2726 Beachwood Court 1969 Catalpa Way 24559 Long Court 942 Malcolm Lane 593 Ravenna Way 1256 Stanhope Lane #358 26634 Wauchula Way

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545

380,000 311,000 297,500 240,000 310,500 397,000 350,000 381,000 301,000 375,000 280,000 160,000 230,000 300,000 115,000 368,000 440,000 690,000 280,000 272,500 200,000 396,000 112,000 320,000

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 2 3 5 4 4 3 3 3 1 3

1917 1075 1156 1090 1662 2067 1558 1204 1231 1608 1192 1221 1200 980 1647 2337 3240 1387 1402 1276 1998 748 1128

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 699,000 Median $: Lowest $: 190,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1337 Acadia Avenue 424 Dempsey Road #225 460 Elm Court 1720 Grand Teton Drive 1029 North Abbott Avenue 1243 North Hillview Drive 1822 Petaluma Court 1583 Pinewood Way 1099 Sandalwood Lane 421 Sandhurst Drive 1101 South Main Street #133

SOLD FOR BDS

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

609,000 250,000 435,000 400,000 190,000 586,000 314,000 530,000 699,000 480,000 320,000

4 3 3 5 2 4 3 3 3 3 2

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

5984 Bellhaven Avenue 94560 36582 Bonnie Street 94560 6308 Buena Vista Drive #A 94560 35138 Dorchester Court 94560 6316 Jarvis Avenue 94560 6279 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #F94560 5726 Lafayette Avenue 94560 36644 Olive Street 94560 36396 Shorehaven Place 94560 5930 Smith Avenue 94560

673,000 307,000 232,000 535,000 350,000 230,000 405,000 405,000 480,000 421,500

5 3 2 4 3 2 3 6 3 4

10-11-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-09-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-09-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-09-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-12-12

435,000 437,545

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2030 1021 1253 1769 863 1964 1328 1270 1922 1768 1281

1965 2007 1960 1965 1979 1967 1971 1967 1989 1997 2007

10-24-12 10-25-12 10-25-12 10-25-12 10-29-12 10-25-12 10-23-12 10-25-12 10-26-12 10-23-12 10-23-12

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 10 Highest $: 673,000 Median $: Lowest $: 230,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1977 1954 1952 1951 2008 1976 1991 1958 1955 1945 1954 1951 1956 1986 1959 1959 2003 1963 1984 1958 2008 1989 1957

405,000 403,850

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2591 1187 1031 2073 1630 1132 1144 2107 1482 1468

2002 1953 1985 1969 1986 1981 1960 1951 1969 1986

10-11-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-09-12 10-11-12

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES:17 Highest $: 525,000 Median $: 330,000 Lowest $: 89,000 Average $: 305,559 ADDRESS

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

2238 Buena Vista Avenue 94577 1586 Graff Avenue 94577 1009 Greenbrier Court 94577 2071 Pacific Avenue 94577 1568 Pearson Avenue 94577 111 Sunnyside Drive 94577 13985 Tahiti Road 94577 1302 Timothy Drive 94577 2077 Washington Avenue #30494577 1467 136th Avenue #10 94578 16307 Bevil Way 94578 413 Bradrick Drive 94578 2178 Prosperity Way 94578 16411 Saratoga Street #106W 94578 1423 Church Avenue 94579 15025 Dewey Street 94579 14499 Locust Street 94579

240,000 525,000 452,000 299,000 330,000 335,000 330,000 265,000 89,000 110,000 240,000 350,000 390,000 150,000 346,000 333,500 410,000

2 3 3 3 4 2 4 3 1 2 2 3 3 2 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1032 1886 1785 1280 1877 1040 1466 1015 726 811 1059 1086 1289 962 1274 1020 1546

1936 1955 2007 1952 1943 1925 1961 1944 1984 1970 1947 1953 1964 1981 1952 1950 1952

10-12-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-11-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-12-12 10-09-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 02 Highest $: 520,000 Median $: 350,000 Lowest $: 350,000 Average $: 435,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

15992 Nielson Avenue 17246 Via Frances

Highest $: Lowest $: ADDRESS

520,000 350,000

5 3

SQFT

BUILT

2519 1451

2006 10-10-12 1953 10-10-12

SUNOL | TOTAL SALES: 01 650,000 Median $: 650,000 Average $: ZIP

162 Kilkare Road

SOLD FOR BDS

94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

94586

650,000

2

ZIP

33209 Alvarado Niles Road 4183 Asimuth Circle 2459 Cameron Drive 133 Cascades Circle 31256 Lamprey Drive 2129 Mann Avenue #2 4516 Niland Street 3240 San Andreas Drive 4320 Solano Way

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

801,000 265,000 449,000 590,000 656,000 123,000 772,000 400,000 228,000

4 4 4 4 5 2 5 3 3

650,000 650,000

SQFT

BUILT

1363

1926 10-10-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES:09 Highest $: 801,000 Median $: Lowest $: 123,000 Average $: ADDRESS

CLOSED

CLOSED

449,000 476,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2504 1584 1888 1881 2356 903 2968 1449 1338

1950 1974 1968 2000 1993 1972 2006 1971 1972

10-11-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-12-12 10-10-12 10-10-12 10-11-12 10-10-12 10-11-12

Prevent cooking fires SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD FIRE DEPARTMENT Hayward Fire Department responds to cooking fires yearround. They are the most common type of fire experienced by U.S. households and the main cause of injury in residences. They can be prevented simply by paying more attention to cooking materials and equipment. Do not become a cooking-fire casualty. Learn the facts about cooking safely. Safe Cooking Tips The kitchen can be one of the most hazardous rooms in the home unless there are safe practices. Stay in the kitchen; never

leave boiling, frying or broiling food unattended. If you must leave the kitchen, even for a short time, turn off the stove. Regularly check food that is cooking; use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. Keep anything flammable oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains - away from the stove. Keep the stovetop, burners and oven clean. Wear short, close-fitting or tightly-rolled sleeves when cooking. Suspended, loose clothing can catch fire. Have a “kid-free zone” of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drinks are prepared or carried.

Page 35

Family Giving Tree to serve ‘One Millionth Child’ SUBMITTED BY FAMILY GIVING TREE

F

amily Giving Tree’s (FGT) 23rd annual Holiday Wish Drive is under way. This year, FGT will reach its “One Millionth Child” milestone while delivering happy holiday memories and gifts to Bay Area children. The Family Giving Tree began in 1990 in a San Jose State University MBA class. Jennifer Cullenbine and Todd Yoshida created the Family Giving Tree with the hope of providing holiday gifts to 300 children in East Palo Alto, Calif. Encouraged by a successful first year, Cullenbine continued and expanded the organization, becoming a licensed 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. In 2001, the nonprofit formalized its Back to School Drive, which delivered 21,000 backpacks to low-income children prior to the start of school this fall. Each year during the holiday season, children who have been registered with recipient social services agencies are asked to name their specific gift wishes. The children’s wishes are printed on cards and distributed to Holiday Wish Drive leaders for employees and customers to fulfill and return. The gifts are then collected, sorted and wrapped by more than 7,000 volunteers at Family Giving Tree’s warehouse. The gifts are picked up by the participating agencies and presented to the individual children. Since 1990, Family Giving Tree has fulfilled the wishes of 991,516 children for holiday gifts and backto-school supplies. The organization needs 1,050 Holiday Wish Drive leaders to help reach this year’s goal. “Every gift counts toward meeting our goal and fulfilling our One Millionth Child wish,” says Founder and Executive Director Jennifer Cullenbine. “Any corporation, small business or community group is welcome to participate as a Holiday Wish Drive leader.” As Cullenbine explains, supporters come up with many different and creative ways to do so -decorating a Christmas tree with request cards, establishing a virtual giving tree with Family Giving Tree, hosting a party, or collecting toys as admission to an event. Last year, 17 ambitious Junior Girl Scouts

Always use cooking equipment that bears the label of a recognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Follow manufacturer’s instructions and code requirements when installing, cleaning and operating cooking equipment. Plug microwave ovens and other cooking appliances directly into an outlet. Never use an extension cord for cooking appliances; it can overload the circuit and cause a fire. Check electrical cords for cracks, breaks or damage. If You Have a Cooking Fire Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire and do not reenter for any reason. Call 9-1-1 after you leave from a cell phone or neighbor’s home. If calling from a cell phone, tell the dispatcher exactly where you live as they may not be familiar with your local area. If you attempt to fight the fire, be sure others are leaving the building and you have a clear path to the exit. Always keep a lid nearby when you are cooking. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. To keep the fire from re-igniting, leave the lid in place until the pan is completely cool. If an oven fire occurs, turn off the heat and keep the door closed. After a fire, the oven should be checked and/or serviced before being used again. Always call the fire department. They have special equipment to locate hidden fires that you may have overlooked. Nuisance Smoke Alarms If a smoke alarm sounds during normal cooking, you may need to move it further away from the kitchen (according to manufacturer’s instructions) and/or install a smoke alarm with a pause button. If your alarm already has a pause button, push the pause button, open the door

from Troop 61080 in Los Altos, Calif. set up a tree in the front office of their school and described the Holiday Wish Drive at the Monday morning assembly. They collected 165 gifts. On a larger scale, a number of local corporations have made the Holiday Wish Drive a tradition. Jessica Graham of Cisco Community Relations, one of the nonprofit’s long-standing corporate sponsors, says, “Cisco is thrilled to lead the 2012 Holiday Drive with Family Giving Tree. With this year marking the one millionth fulfilled wish, Cisco’s Silicon Valley employees are eager to participate in the legacy of bringing gifts and holiday cheer to children and families across the Bay Area.” Information about how organizations can register to lead a holiday wish drive is available at www.familygivingtree.org.

Top 20 requested gifts: 1. Scooters, skateboards, skates 2. MP3 players 3. Legos 4. Shoes 5. Barbie dolls 6. Baby dolls and dollhouses 7. Coats, jackets and sweaters 8. Remote control vehicles 9. Movie tickets 10. Arts and crafts 11. Digital cameras 12. Ride-on toys 13. Sweatpants and sweatshirts 14. Boom boxes and radios 15. Bath and body products 16. Team logo items 17. Children’s outfits 18. Balls 19. Action figures 20. Toy trucks and cars

or window, and fan the area around the alarm with a towel to get circulate the air. Do not disable the smoke alarm or remove the batteries. Treat every smoke alarm-activation as a possible fire and react quickly and safely to the alarm. Charcoal Grills Purchase the correct starter fluid and store it out of reach of children and away from heat sources. Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals or kindling have already been ignited and never use any flammable or combustible liquid other than charcoal starter fluid to get the fire going. Propane Grills Check the propane cylinder hose for leaks before using it for the first time each year. If you smell gas while cooking, immediately move away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not attempt to move the grill. All propane cylinders manufactured after April 2002 must have overfill protection devices (OPD) which are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel. Use only equipment bearing the mark of a recognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to set up the grill and maintain it. Never store propane cylinders in buildings or garages. If you store a gas grill inside during the winter, disconnect the cylinder and leave it outside. Barbecue Grills Stovetop and oven fires are not the only types of cooking fires. As the weather gets warmer, the use of barbecue grills increases. While many of the safety tips are similar to indoor cooking, there are special concerns with barbecue grills. Position the grill well away from siding and deck railings and from under eaves and overhanging branches. Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic. Keep children and pets away from the grill area by de-

claring a three-foot “kid-free zone” around the appliance. The chef should use long-handled grilling tools to ensure clearance from heat and flames when cooking. Periodically remove grease and fat build-up in trays below the grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill. Use only outdoors; if used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces, such as tents, barbecue grills are fire and carbon monoxide hazards. Burns and Scalds Hospital emergency rooms treat around 29,850 thermal burns and 8,460 burns caused by cooking equipment. Ranges accounted for 62 percent of thermal burns and grills, 28 percent. Microwaves accounted for 41 percent of the scald burns. (Source: NFPA) Microwaves are the leading cause of scalds; exercise care when opening a heated food container. Heat food in containers that are marked “microwave safe.” Since foods heat unevenly in the microwave, make sure you stir and test the food before eating. Protecting Children from Scalds and Burns As the statistics suggest, young children are very vulnerable to burns by hot food and liquid. Some precautionary measures can reduce the risks. Keep children at least three feet away from where food and drinks are prepared or carried. Keep hot foods and liquids away from the table or counter edges. Use the stove’s back burners if young children are in the home. Never hold a child while cooking, drinking or carrying hot foods or liquids. Teach children that hot things burn.

For more information on Disaster Preparedness and safety-related materials, visit www.hayward-ca.gov, click on the red “Disaster Preparedness” button or contact Hayward Fire Department Emergency Services Office at (510) 583-4948.


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 27, 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Amelia S. Wico RESIDENT OF UNION CITY January 6, 1927 – November 9, 2012

Stanley L. Davis, Sr. RESIDENT OF UNION CITY February 12, 1959 – November 10, 2012

Clifford D. Booth RESIDENT OF SUSANVILLE June 14, 1924 – November 12, 2012

Eduardo P. Mahusay, II RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 11, 1969 – November 14, 2012

Simeona Medrano Albano RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 13, 1919 – November 15, 2012

A Thi Nguyen RESIDENT OF HAYWARD February 18, 1960 – November 16, 2012

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD December 27, 1942 – November 9, 2012

Neha Chawla

Ruben G. Jimenez RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA July 30, 1951 – November 9, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 10, 1922 – November 16, 2012

510-657-1908

Lalitha D. Maganti

www.lanasestatesales.com

RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA August 25, 1978 – November 18, 2012

Genya Kuznetsov

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 5, 1987 – November 19, 2012

Phil Yang

Bipinchandre R. Patel

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 24, 1921 – November 20, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 15, 1936 – November 19, 2012

Myra J. Temlock

Arthur “Tudie” Rodriguez RESIDENT OF UNION CITY September 12, 1959 – November 22, 2012

LaWanda M. Verbitsky RESIDENT OF PATTERSON February 25, 1929 – November 23, 2012

Donna Jean Southard RESIDENT OF NEWARK December 28, 1941 – November 25, 2012

Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Marguerite B. Street

Royce F. Gutschall

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 24, 1929 – November 22, 2012

Lana August Puchta

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 27, 1925 – November 15, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 11, 1926 – November 17, 2012

Hon Ming Fung

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Gertrude A. Adams

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD September 24, 1924 – November 19, 2012

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD October 24, 1944 – November 18, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON July 8, 2004 – November 9, 2012

Elizabeth “Betty” Fought

Gary C. Newport

Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

George F. Walker

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 17, 1932 – November 22, 2012

Santhosh Krishna RESIDENT OF REDWOOD CITY August 12, 1977 – November 23, 2012

Judy E. Choate RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA July 14, 1946 – November 21, 2012

Esther C. Yowell RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 10, 1937 – November 24, 2012

Mary G. Naseef RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 12, 1917 – November 25, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Berge • Pappas • Smith Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

‘Cinderella’ nominated for BroadwayWorld.com SF Awards 2012 SUBMITTED BY DAVID OJAKIAN Curtain Call Performing Arts (CCPA), now in production on the annual holiday musical favorite, “A Christmas Carol,” continues to enjoy success from this past summer’s critically acclaimed “Steampunk Cinderella.” BroadwayWorld.com’s Linda Hodges said the “...decision to ratchet up the energy by going steampunk, lifted this production into the stratosphere...” The production has been nominated for nine categories in the BroadwayWorld.com San Francisco Awards 2012. BroadwayWorld.com, site for Broadway, theatre, live entertainment, Broadway shows and Broadway tickets, continues the third year of regional awards after a record number of nominations in 30 regions worldwide in 2011. The 2012 awards are open through December 31, 2012 in most regions. “Cinderella” was nominated in the following categories: -Best Direction of A Musical: Misty Megia -Best Costume Design: Andrea Gorham -Best Choreography: Misty Megia -Best Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical: Kevin Foley -Best Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical: Ali Lane, Alice Beittle, and Kate Offer

-Best Leading Actor in a Musical: Matt Ono -Best Leading Actress in a Musical: Catherine Williamson -Best Scenic Designer: Cat Jansen and Ric Tringoli -Person to Watch: Catherine Williamson and Matt Ono -Best Musical: “Cinderella” “We are honored and humbled to be nominated in the third annual BroadwayWorld.com regional awards. The hard work, talent, and magic of this cast and production team is paying off even months after the close of the show. I’m grateful for the team we have assembled, and excited for the talented cast and crew that are gaining recognition for their work,” said Andrea Gorham, Curtain Call’s Founding Artistic Director, and nominee herself for Costume Design. This past August, Curtain Call presented the Broadway Enchanted Version of the Rogers & Hammerstein classic “Cinderella,” in a version that had never been seen as the company incorporated the science fiction and fantasy of “steampunk.” Referring to a genre that incorporates elements of science fiction, fantasy, and alternate history, steampunk features technology, or futuristic innovations as Victorians might have envisioned them, based on a Victorian perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, and art.

Unique and daring set and lighting design, paired with edgy costumes, and the talent of the cast made the show a “...must see theatrical event” according to BroadwayWorld.com’s Linda Hodges. “It’s wonderful to be recognized for something you’re so passionate about. This entire cast and creative team from day one dove in head first to make this Steampunk Cinderella a reality and something that each person involved in was proud of,” expressed Best Director nominee and “Cinderella” director Misty Megia. “Andrea (Gorham) and her costume team definitely deserve recognition for doing something so out of the box and creative. Every detail was thought about and each character had hidden touches that had great meaning. It

was beautiful and thoughtful costuming,” continued Megia. The 2012/2013 CCPA season kicks off November 30-December 9 with Cantare! Concert Choir in “A Broadway Holiday,” and the holiday favorite, “A Christmas Carol, the Musical” takes the stage December 14-23. For tickets and info on Curtain Call Performing Arts and to purchase season tickets, visit www.curtaincallperformingarts.org, or call (510) 909-9516. Follow the official CCPA Facebook page at www.facebook.com/curtaincallperformingarts. To vote for Curtain Call and other leading local theatre company’s visit: http://sanfrancisco.broadwayworld.com/vo te2012region.cfm#sthash.d3ZLPvqV.k8PI ky1y.dpbs .


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council November 20, 2012 Consent: Appoint Bill Harrison as Vice Mayor until certification of election results and he becomes Mayor. At that time, Anu Natarajan will assume duties as Vice Mayor for the 2013 term. Authorize Memorandum of Understanding with County of Alameda and other public agencies to participate in the Regional Renewable Energy Procurement Project. Ceremonial Items: Badge pinning ceremony for new Fire Chief Geoff LaTendresse Oral Communications: A representative of nonprofit Computers for a Cause announced the company’s intention to locate in the area. The company recycles ewaste to refurbish, repurpose and put them back into the community. Reversal of Councilmember Chan previous recusals said to be unfair to both parties involved in Kimber Park decision.

Scheduled Items: Amend Smoking Ordinance to clarify “reasonable distance” as 25 ft. from building entrances, windows and intakes. It prohibits smoking in public places used for public events, recreational areas and sidewalks. Areas of conflict with State Law are amended, smoking prohibitions and signage in employer and multi-family residential units defined. Kimber Park Swim and Tennis Club: Certify the Final Environmental Impact Report. Consider appeal of Planning Commission consideration of a Preliminary Planned District to establish a private swim and tennis club as an accepted use. Designate the entire Kimber Park Open Space property to be designated Private Open Space subject to the provisions of the Open Space Initiative. Clarify restrictions and scale of any proposed non-residential development. Mayor Gus Morrison Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Bill Harrison Suzanne Lee Chan Dominic Dutra

Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

Give reusable tote bags for the holidays SUBMITTED BY ALEXIS VANNI On January 1, 2013, Alameda County will join San Francisco, San Mateo County, San Jose, and 49 other California cities and counties in no longer providing single-use plastic bags at checkout - making reusable bags a must-have for any Bay Area resident during the gift-giving season. Here are some tips to help you incorporate reusable bags into your holidays this year: Save money and avoid the bag charge by bringing reusable bags while doing your holiday shopping. Get a head start on your New Year’s resolution! Give friends and family reusable bags as gifts or stocking stuffers. Stylish, eco-friendly bags can be found at Etsy.com or for as little as $5 on Amazon. Get in the DIY holiday spirit and craft your own reusable bag using only an old t-shirt and scissors (no sew). You can even personalize it with a favorite design or message for a loved one. For more information on Alameda County’s new ordinance, visit www.ReusableBagsAC.org.

Youth help Dominican Sisters SUBMITTED BY MR. KRISHNASWAMY NARASIMHAN Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose (DSMSJ) established 133 years ago in San Francisco moved to Fremont after the 1906 earthquake. The architect of this institution, Mother Maria Pia Backes embraced all cultures and opened her heart most especially to the needs of the young, the poor and vulnerable. Thanks to her efforts, this institution grew like a Banyan tree offering services to the needy. Established in 2006, the Dominican Schools Music Project brings music instruction to 1,700 students in six Bay Area schools affiliated with the Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose. Of these six schools, three serve predominately low income families. Through partnerships with each school, they provide every child with twice weekly, year-long, sequential and comprehensive music instruction, opportunities to study vocal and instrumental music in on-site after school programs, professional concerts, school and community performances, and summer camp opportunities. The music program was started with funding from the May and Stanley Smith Foundation. But the initial funding is decreasing, and schools cannot support the program on their budgets alone.

Youth Service Through Cultural Arts (YSTCA), a group started by four 11th graders, Divya Mohan, Gopal Ravindran, Ashwin Srikant, and Vignesh Thyagarajan, to showcase and utilize the young music and other cultural talents of the Bay Area youths for the community, is organizing an all-day music and dance event to raise funds for the music programs offered by the Sisters. All, from different high schools in the Bay Area, all are advanced students of Indian Classical music. They have organized an all-day music and dance event to raise funds for the music programs offered by the Sisters. This day-long program will feature classical music and dance programs of students from 15 Bay area schools. Vice-Mayor of Fremont, Ms. Anu Natarajan will serve as Guest of Honor. Admission to the event is FREE for the audience; donations/contributions are highly appreciated. Please contact YSTCA@yahoo.com for more details. Youth Service event Saturday, Dec 8 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Chapel Auditorium, Dominican Sisters 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont www.ystca.org

Staff changes at Mission Valley ROP SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER Margie Trujillo, former MVROP Coordinator, assumed a new role as MVROP Director of Educational Services. A valued staff member of the MVROP family for nearly fifteen years, her wealth of knowledge, experience, and innovative ideas has helped MVROP start the 2012-2013 school year smoothly and on a positive note. James Briano was hired to fill Trujillo’s former position. MVROP Superintendent, Pete Murchison stated, “James will help MVROP highlight and expand the use of technology in career technical education. As an experienced teacher and instructional leader from Washington High School, James has gone above and beyond to prepare himself for this next step in education. He will undoubtedly be an asset to us as we design and facilitate the implementation of common core standards in career technical education.” For the latest news and information about MVROP, visit www.mvrop.org

Hayward City Council November 13, 2012 Business Recognition Award for November 2012 presented to Siemens Infrastructure & Cities, Hayward. Work Session Overview of the 2012 Resident Satisfaction Survey results. Consent Authorized City Manager to execute professional services agreement (PSA) in the maximum amount of $45,000 with Corrpro Companies, Inc. for consultant services for the Cathodic Protection System Evaluation Project. Authorized City Manager to execute a four-year Master Lease Purchase Agreement for 13 Police Department vehicles (seven Patrol, five for Investigations and one for Administration) and procurement of equipment lease financing for $535,305 from Zions First National Bank. Established the City’s contribution for active and retiree medical premiums determined by CalPERS for calendar year 2013 (employer’s contribution of $115 per person). The City has budgeted adequately for CalPERS; consequently, there is no additional fiscal impact. Authorized payment of $29,745.75 for legal consulting services supplied by Wulfsberg Reese Colvig & Firstman for contract negotiation with WM Lyles Group and Fuel Cell Energy for the new Cogeneration Power System at the Water Pollution Control Facility. An earlier payment of $4,981 was made on July 27, 2012. There are budgeted funds in the Cogeneration System Project in the Sewer Capital Improvement Fund to cover these legal fees. Accepted resignation of Muhammad Irfan from the keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force. Public Hearing Approved General Plan Amendment Application (Low Density residential to Medium Density Residential), Zone Change Application (Single-family Residential to Open Space and Planned Development), Parcel Map Application (for park expansion and future development lots) and Development Agreement Application and passed a resolution to adopt the Mitigated Negative Declaration for the proposed project/property at the northeast corner of Eden and Denton Avenues. Applicant: Westlake Development LLC. Owner: Chang Income Partnership L.P. Legislative Business Adopted ordinance to amend the Hayward Municipal Code relating to Nuisance Abatement on Public Property - Illegal Dumping. Adopted staff recommendations, including staff reports from the October 23 and the November 13, 2102 Council meetings, subject to an annual review, with Council and the keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force, of the ordinance’s performance and exploration of ways to improve the program. (6 YES, 1 NO (Jones)). Introduced ordinance amending the City’s Building Abatement Code to create a three-person building abatement panel, instead of a fivemember board, to hear appeals when the City’s Building Official deems a building or structure substandard. Introduced two ordinances amending the Municipal Code to enable collection of delinquent Water and Sewer Charges through the County tax rolls and clarify responsibility for payment of Water Charges. Public Comment Bill Betchart (representing a Bunker Hill resident) and Caltrans tenants Debbie Frederick, Tracy Diane Asturias and Anthony Fidel spoke about the transfer of title from Caltrans to responsible and qualified tenants who wish to buy their homes. They feel that signing a Deferred Maintenance Agreement, as requested by the City, is inappropriate at this time and asked the Council to review/reschedule the process. Some are concerned about the sums and the terms involved. Jim Drake complained about poor drainage on Foothill Boulevard between Pankey’s Radiator Shop and Grove Way and the consequent hazards to motorists. Kristoffer Cabanesas, Mt. Eden HS Instrumental Program, announced a Texas Roadhouse Chicken & Ribs Dinner on December 1, 2012 at 6 p.m. at Mt. Eden HS, 2300 Panama St., Hayward. All instrumental groups will perform. Tickets: $20 (adult); $10 (ages 10 and under). The program’s annual Winter Concert will be at All Saints Church on December 13, 2012 at 7p.m.; tickets start at $7. Visit www.MEHSBand.com. Peter Green, a resident of City Walk Place, would like an improved police presence in the Downtown area. Generally, police only respond to incidents. On October 20, 2012 Green heard celebratory firecrackers for the SF Giants in the area between City Hall and Hayward BART Station. Unexpectedly, his second-floor sliding door was shattered by a bullet that missed him and lodged in a door frame in his home. He presented the misshapen bullet. His immediate concern was for his son’s long-term safety but he concludes that this is a random incident and that he will not move. However, such events are beyond his control. A more visible police presence is likely to deter such behavior. Jon Super is concerned that the park being built at The Cannery Development will be detrimental to traffic. Si “Sam” Samiul encouraged the City to provide the City Manager and Council members with electric vehicles from Tesla to support the Council’s priority of being Green and enable them to set an example. Mayor Sweeney thanked him for his consideration but suggested bicycles might be cheaper and healthier for Council members. Mayor Michael Sweeney - Yes Barbara Halliday - Yes Greg Jones - Yes Al Mendall - Yes Marvin Peixoto - Yes Mark Salinas - Yes Francisco Zermeno - Yes


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Why must we buy? Black Friday’s powerful pull For some, the items themselves can even take a back seat to the simple act of shopping. Childhood friends Jesse Bredholt, Ryan Seech and a few other buddies have camped out at Best Buy for four years straight. This year, they arrived a full week early, with a tent, sleeping bags, deodorizing mist sprayer, propane heater and battery power for their gadgets. They had no idea what they would buy. That was not the point. For this group of single men in their early 20s, part of a generation who mark the passage of time by their first cell phones and video games, the point is spending time with each other at the source of the products that have always defined their lives. “Our family is here,” said Bredholt, who works for a health-care company. “With five guys on one mattress, you gotta be family.” Karen Jefferson, 49, also has found family on line at Best Buy, be-

yond her husband and three children. She was there Wednesday, seated on a folding chair, clutching a rolled-up circular. “I’m missing Thanksgiving, and my husband thinks I’m crazy,” said Jefferson, who works at a mortgage insurance company. “But I do this every year . because I enjoy meeting people and the people that come when I do. I mean, you see the same people year after year. And I do get some very good deals.” What about studies that have shown better deals are available at other times of the year? “Oh, really?” Jefferson said. “You just think, Black Friday! Oh, my gosh, that’s the deal of the year.” “Maybe that’s something I need to look into,” she continued. “Because, I mean, if these aren’t good deals, then what are we DOING then?” AP National Writer Allen Breed in Raleigh, N.C., contributed to this report.

Fremont Unified School District Board meeting report ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH The following are highlights from the Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) Board meeting held November 14, 2012. Superintendent’s Report: The School Board and the Fremont Fire Department honored two Horner Junior High School employees, Sheri Erickson and Jason Strong, for their

This was money earned back for paying off vendors on time, and by using American Express. Parungao said that the funds will be used to help purchase necessary school supplies where needed, at all school sites.

Agenda Item- Common Core Standards Implementation Plan: The Common Core State Standards Initiative were standards developed in 2009 with the collaboration of teachers, administrators and others, to

continued from page 12

Stocks soar on Black Friday; tech leads the w ay N ov 23 “It’s great when something like this happens, but on a half-day without the major players in there, it’s not so surprising,” he said. European indexes added to earlier gains after Wall Street opened and closed higher. The FTSE 100 index of leading British shares rose 0.5 percent. Germany’s DAX and France’s CAC-40 both added 0.9 percent. Investors were monitoring developments in Brussels, where European Union leaders are trying to agree on a $1.25 trillion long-term spending plan for the 27-nation bloc. Markets expect that another meeting will be needed for an agreement. Among the stocks making big moves: - MAP Pharmaceuticals spiked after the company announced that the Food and Drug Administration will review its experimental migraine drug Levadex. The stock rose $2.60, or 20.3 percent, to $15.42. - KIT Digital Inc., a video software and technology company, lost two-thirds of its value after the com-

pany’s former chief executive accused it of blaming prior management for its financial problems. Two days earlier, KIT said it would restate its financial results because of accounting errors. The stock lost $1.33, or 64.3 percent, to 74 cents. Among tech’s big gainers: - Research in Motion Ltd. jumped on growing optimism for an earlier-than-expected launch of its delayed BlackBerry 10 smartphone. A senior executive from the Canadian company said earlier this month that Research In Motion, or RIM, will release the latest version of its smartphone “not long after” a Jan. 30 event. One analyst saw that as an indication that the products are to be unveiled in February. U.S.traded shares of RIM rose $1.40, or 13.7 percent, to $11.66. - Dell rose 49 cents, or 5.4 percent, to $9.55. - HP added 50 cents, or 4.2 percent, to $12.44. - AMD rose 8 cents, or 4.3 percent, to $1.95.

Did you cash in on Black Friday or Cyber Monday deals?

Jason Strong (at podium) and Sheri Erickson (center) after being honored by the School Board and Fremont Fire Department. Schools Superintendent James Morris is in the background and Board President, Lily Mei (right side).

heroic actions on October 25 in reviving a Para-Educator, Harold Green, who suffered a heart attack while at the school. Erickson provided emergency care and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and Strong, experienced in first aid and CPR, administered chest compressions. Sadly, it was learned that four days later, Mr. Green passed away in the hospital. Travon Willis, a graduate of the Fremont Adult School, was only one of two students in California recognized as the Adult Continuing Education Student of the Year. He is currently working toward his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. His former principal Steve Giudici and teacher Peggy Torres were present to congratulate him. Additionally, FUSD Superintendent Dr. James Morris remarked: The district has been named an AP Honor Roll District, by the College Board. FUSD has also been ranked as the 2nd highest performing district in California, for English language learners. Robertson High School was selected as a model continuation high school. Budget Update: Assistant Superintendent of Business, Raul Parungao reported that although Prop 30 was passed by the voters, the district won’t see any of the funds until June, so that doesn’t help us much for now. “We have to manage our cash flow and expenditures,” he added. In a bit of good news, he said that the district received a check for $63,000 from American Express.

provide a framework, in order to better prepare students for college and the world of work with the overall goal to succeed in a global economy. California is among the 49 states that have adopted the plan, coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. Working together with the Assistant Superintendent of Instruction, Deborah Sims, a presentation was made by the group of Fremont’s teachers who have taken on the challenge of developing strategies, in preparation of implementing the Common Core Standards. Additionally, as a member of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, FUSD will develop a student assessment system to align with the Common Core Standards. The new assessments will be in place for the 20142015 school year. Agenda Item - Data Dashboard: Superintendent Morris and each Assistant Superintendent took turns presenting a brief overview or a “State of the District” to inform and update the community on how the School District system is doing as a whole. The following areas were mentioned: high expectations and academic achievement for all, professional development, community engagement, the budget crisis, positive budget certification, enrollment growth, facilities’ needs, professional development, accountability, the increasing growth each year of CAHSEE (high school exit exam) pass rate, and pride in FUSD’s excellent Certificated and Classified personnel.

Save your receipts, you might owe Use Tax

SUBMITTED BY THE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION Many California consumers have purchased Black Friday and Cyber Monday specials offered online or via smart phone applications. The State Board of Equalization (BOE) reminds them that they may owe use tax for pre- and post-holiday shopping sprees. California law imposes tax on in-state purchases and also imposes tax on items purchased out-of-state for use in California. When an out-of-state or online retailer does not collect the tax for an item delivered to California, the purchaser may owe “use tax,” which is simply a tax on the use, storage, or consumption of personal property in California. The purchaser is responsible for paying the use tax on their own, based on the tax rate for the area in which they live. There are two easy ways to pay any use tax that might be owed: 1) register and pay on eReg after each purchase; 2) as a line item on state income taxes, using BOE’s and the Franchise Tax Board’s use tax calculation based on the consumer’s adjusted gross income. California law has required the payment of use tax since 1935 to prevent out-of-state retailers from having a competitive advantage over California-based vendors who were required to report sales tax beginning in 1933. BOE estimates that consumers and businesses that do not report and pay the use tax they owe cost the state more than $1.1 billion a year. The average California family owes about $61 in use tax each year. Like sales tax, this money helps fund programs such as public education, public safety and transportation. For more information, visit www.boe.ca.gov (L to R): Adult Continuing Education Student of Year Travon Willis, with Teacher Peggy Torres and Adult School Principal Steve Giudici


November 27, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

‘St. Nick’s of Niles’ SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL MCNEVIN

O

n Sunday, December 2, the third annual “St. Nicks of Niles” benefit show takes place at The Nile Cafe in Fremont. “St. Nick’s of Niles” is a group of devoted folks who work with the City of Fremont’s Social Services Department to provide holiday happiness to families and seniors in the area who are in need during the holidays. The group provides gift baskets and grocery cards in the hopes that they can make the holidays a little less stressful for those in our community hit hard during difficult economic times. The Benefit consists of six hours of “drop in” time and fun for the entire family; Santa will be in residence from 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. and Michael McNevin and Friends will provide music from 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Multiple musical acts share the bill and mix it up. While there is no minimum cover charge, guests are encouraged to make a tax deductible contribution via cash, check, or gift cards to grocery or department stores. Additionally, the owner of The Nile Café, Han Trinh, will donate 20 percent of guests’ orders to the donation baskets. Her “Hanburgers” are legendary. In this season of giving, there are many ways to lend a helping hand to those less fortunate and this party is a good one! We hope you can drop in for music, food, friends, and Santa at the annual “St. Nicks of Niles” gathering at The Nile Cafe in the historic Niles district. For further information contact Tom Smyth at t.smyth@comcast.net or (408) 504-5597. “St. Nick’s of Niles” Benefit Sunday, Dec 2 3 p.m. - 9 p.m. The Nile Café 121 “I” St., Fremont (408) 504-5597

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Most Cars and Trucks

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

AL MINARD The Shinn House, completed in 1876, will be decorated as it may have been in 1890. The house, once the home of James and Lucy Shinn and three generations of the Shinn family, will be open for public tours with no reservations required beginning Friday, November 30. James, Lucy and their son Charles came to California from Texas in 1856. On a tour of this historic house, visitors will learn about the accomplishments of the Shinn family: Milicent Shinn, editor and publisher of the prestigious Overland Monthly Magazine and the first woman to get a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley; Charles Howard Shinn the first forest ranger in the Sierra National Forest and roommate of Woodrow Wilson the 28th President of the United States and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; and Joseph Shinn who helped to found the Alameda County Water District, the first publicly owned water district in California. Christmas decorations, typical of a middle class farming family in 1890, make this a unique opportunity for visitors to step back in time and enjoy an old fashioned holiday atmosphere. Victorian Christmas House Tour Friday, Nov 30, Dec 7 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec 1 & Sunday, Dec 2 12 Noon - 4 p.m. Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Adults: $5; Children 7-13: $2.50

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

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AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

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FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 1/30/13

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TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

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RADIATOR FLUSH

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Coolant

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Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 1/30/13

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TCV 2012-11-27