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the opinions of our audience, musicians and stakeholders as a way to revitalize this great Symphony Orchestra,” said Executive Director Lee Foster. The Fremont Symphony will honor Monica Kraft for her years as Director of Instrumental Music at MSJHS, and will include a performance by some of her students. Kraft has conducted the MSJHS Marching Band, Symphonic Band and Orchestra in festivals around the world. She has taught instrumental music for the last 24 years at MSJHS. During her tenure, the music program has grown to include three concert bands, marching band, orchestra and jazz band, and she has conducted more than 22 musical productions. The bands and orchestra consistently earn Superior ratings at California Music Educators Association and Northern California Band Association concert festivals. The fundraiser is Step 2 of the Symphony’s five-step revitalization plan, 5 Steps to 50 Years, a year-long movement which also includes a series of meetings and parties o ask for public opinion, a performance by the virtuoso piano duo Anderson and Roe in February, the Annual Young Composer’s Concert (Children’s Concert) in March, and a Cabaret fundraiser on April 20, 2013 to meet the goal of re-engaging the community and raising $100,000 to kick off the 50th Anniversary Season in October 2013.

SUBMITTED BY SHANNON STOWE

F

remont Symphony Orchestra heads to the film age of Fremont, a time when Niles boomed with the early film industry, as a backdrop for their fall fundraising gala, “Music, Movies & Magic” on Sunday, November 18 at the Best House, Palmdale Estates, in Fremont. The November celebration will be filled with live music and merriment; all proceeds benefitting Fremont Symphony Orchestra. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. with no host Chaplin cocktails, Bronco Billy bites, and a Silver Screen auction, followed at 6 p.m. by the conductor's dinner and entertainment program. In addition to introducing new music Director Gregory Van Sudmeier and new Executive Director Lee Foster to the local community, Monica Kraft, Director of Instrumental Music at Mission San José High School (MSJHS) in Fremont, will be honored and the MSJHS jazz band will perform. Guests are invited to dress as their favorite movie star from the 1920s in tribute to celebrities of the silent film era. “This is the second step in our 5 Steps to 50 Years; the aim of the year-long program is to revitalize the Symphony by recreating community and artistic relevance. We look forward to listening to

SUBMITTED BY AL MINARD Twenty Bay Area artists recently photographed and painted eight models in Victorian costumes among the historic buildings and trees at Fremont’s Shinn Park. Come see the artistic results of the day and witness the fashions of yesteryear at the free “Victorian Models and Artist’s Fashion Show” at the Fremont Main Library on Saturday, November 17. Models will be present in their period clothes and explain the many layers that

Vol. 11 No. 72

November 13, 2012

continued onpage 39

comprise their costumes. Learn about hoop skirts, crinoline, bustles, corsets, cage crinoline, pantaloons, and more. There will also be talk about the historical events that inspired some of the fashion changes: King William IV died in 1837 with no heir, so his 18-year-old niece Victoria became the Queen of England and Ireland until her death in 1901. During the Regency Period, 1800 1820, female dress was designed on continued on page 39

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK Part of everyday lexicon is contained in city names, street signs, plazas and other identified places. Many of these are a remembrance of those who have made significant contributions and have been recognized by the community at large. This doesn’t happen often; when it does, those honored are elevated to a status that transcends a lifetime. One of the pivotal citizens of the City of Newark was honored on October 19, 2012 as Bridgepointe Park officially became Susan Johnson Bridgepointe Park. Mayor Alan Nagy spoke about her “highly devoted” service to the community since serving as a Newark Councilmember from 1985 until 2007. A long list of achievements includes service on the Alameda County Library Commission, Alameda County Congestion Management Agency and Newark Senior Citizens Advisory Committee along with host of community organizations. Her contributions have not gone unnoticed as Sue has recontinued on page 5 Models in hoop skirts in front of the 1850’s Sim Cottage at Shinn Park.

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 25

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 31

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 30


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Learn From the Experts on How to Manage the Disease

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n estimated 100,000 individuals in Alameda County have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes but many more may be unaware they have the disease. Untreated, diabetes can lead to kidney failure, vision problems, heart and circulatory issues and a host of complications that exacerbate other health problems. On Saturday, Nov. 17, Washington Hospital will host a free Diabetes Health Fair that will include a free breakfast and snack, diabetes screenings for blood glucose and cholesterol, and presentations by physicians specializing in diabetes and management of the disease. Additionally, cooking demonstrations will illustrate how to manage your diet with diabetes and still have delicious meals. Participants will

Anna Mazzei, a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital will conduct a healthy cooking demonstration at the upcoming Diabetes Health Fair on Saturday, November 17. The free event will feature free screenings and physicians will be available to answer your questions. The fair starts at 8 a.m. and will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

have an opportunity to speak to diabetes specialists with individual questions. The Health Fair will be held from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D., Auditorium, located in the Washington West building, 2500 Mowry Avenue, Fremont. Participants are welcome to come for the entire morning’s events or to drop in as time allows. The Health Fair is open to everyone who may have the disease as well as friends and family members — and to anyone in the com-

November 13, 2012

munity who may want to know more about diabetes and how to live a healthy life style. Speakers include Dr. Sarbjit Hundal, ophthalmologist, and Dr. Prasad Kilaru, plastic surgeon and medical director at the Washington Center for Wound Healing and Hyperbaric Medicine. Heading up the cooking demonstration will be Anna Mazzei, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, and Alfredo Macias, Washington Hospital Healthcare System chef. With diabetes, the body cannot properly convert sugar from food into energy, causing sugar levels in the blood and urine to rise. The complications of diabetes can be serious, and those complications can start very early. Most complications stem from changes in the blood vessels and nerves that affect various parts of the body, including the eyes, kidneys, heart and limbs. Dr. Hundal and Dr. Kilaru emphasize that active management of the disease is essential to prevent dangerous complications common to the diabetes. Diet, exercise and managing blood sugar levels are essential — as are preventative measures relating to circulatory problems in the eyes and extremities. Dr. Hundal will discuss how diabetes affects eyesight and how, unchecked, the disease can lead to blindness. “Prevention is the number one key to maintaining good eyesight for diabetes patients. Seeing your physician regularly and having your eyes checked annually is essential,” Dr. Hundal said. “Diabetes is basically an illness of the small blood vessels,” Dr. Hundal explained. “This is why it primarily affects a patient’s kidneys, extremities and vision. Diabetes damages the inner lining of small blood vessels (capillaries) which then are unable to properly circulate blood to the

eye. Eventually, this leads to the eyes drying out, the capillaries leaking and damaging the eyes.” The best way to control eye damage is to control the diabetes itself through diet, exercise and other strategies overseen by a physician. “We can treat eyes that are damaged but we can’t reverse the damage so controlling the diabetes is the very best action any person with diabetes can take,” Dr. Hundal said. Diabetics often have poor circulation in their feet, caused by the same damage to small blood vessels that impact the eyes and kidneys, according to Dr. Kilaru. Dr. Kilaru urges diabetics to examine their feet daily for any breaks in the skin, no matter how small and to have regular checks by a physician or podiatrist. Keeping to a proscribed diet is essential, he added, noting that rising blood sugar often indicates an infection in the body. One in four diabetics run the risk of a foot ulcer which, if untreated, can lead to amputation. “Prevention is essential,” Dr. Kilaru said. “Monitor your circulation; if you have a wound, make sure you have it treated. Catch it in the early stages. Never give up. Treatment at any stage is important; it may save your life.”

Get the Scoop on Diabetes To learn more about diabetes management, plan to attend the Washington Hospital Diabetes Health Fair on Saturday, November 17 beginning at 8 a.m. The fair will take place in the Conrad E. Anderson M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.Visit www.whhs.com/diabetes for more information.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

11/13/12

11/14/12

11/15/12

11/16/12

11/17/12

11/18/12

11/19/12

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Disaster Preparedness

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Shingles

Diabetes Matters:Vacation Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult or Travel Plans?

Men's Health Expo 2011 Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Radiation Safety

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Approach to Managing Diabetes

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Radiation Safety

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Crohn's & Colitis (Late Start)

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

Brain Health for Seniors

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Wound Care Update Do You Have Sinus Problems?

The Weight to Success Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10th, 2012

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10th, 2012

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Diabetes Matters: What's New? Diabetes Update Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Kidney Transplants Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Osteoporosis & Arthritis: What You Need to Know

GERD & Your Risk of Esophageal Cancer

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Kidney Transplants

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery

Shingles Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Vitamins and Supplements How Useful Are They?

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Minimally Invasive Surgery Heart Healthy Eating After for Lower Back Disorders Surgery and Beyond

Voices InHealth: Update Voices InHealth: New on the Journey to Magnet Surgical Options for Breast Status Cancer Treatment


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

Get Smart About When to Use Antibiotics Before They Become Ineffective

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In the midst of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, this Thursday, Nov. 15 will be the 37th annual Great American Smokeout—a good reason to quit smoking for a day or, better yet, forever. That’s the way Jason Chu, MD, a Fremont-based pulmonologist with Washington Township Medical Foundation and a member of the medical staff at Washington Hospital, sees it. “An even better reason to quit is that lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., and smoking is the culprit about 90 percent of the time,” he said. “Today, it seems that many more young people are taking up the habit. Besides encouraging people of all ages to quit, we need to give a better message about prevention that will motivate teens and young adults not to start smoking in the first place.” The American Cancer Society (ACS), sponsor of the Great American Smokeout, reports: “Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of diseases and premature death in the U.S., yet more than 45 million Americans still smoke cigarettes.” For people who are already smoking, it’s better to quit early, before respiratory symptoms appear, like a chronic cough, shortness of breath or bronchitis, Dr. Chu advised. Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of diseases and premature death in the U.S., yet more than 45 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. Thursday, Nov. 15 is the 37th annual Great American Smokeout—a good reason to quit smoking for a day or, better yet, forever.

“Damaged lungs are more likely to repair themselves after you quit smoking when you are a teenager or in your 20s or 30s,” he explained. “If you wait another decade or more until you are into your 40s, 50s or older, the damage may become irreparable. You may be able to halt the effects of smoking, but there is little chance of regaining the healthy lungs you had before you started. That’s why it’s important to get young people to quit smoking or never start in the first place.” But, even people in their middle years and older, will benefit from stopping the habit, Dr. Chu emphasized. Besides having to counter the “glam” appeal of smoking and the peer pressure, messages that convince young people to quit smoking or never start are challenging because the “stay healthy” motivation doesn’t work on most of them. “The younger population is often left alone when it comes to messages about the importance of taking care of your health because we think of them—and they think of themselves—as being impervious and having the luxury of time,” stated Dr. Chu. “It’s too bad because getting them to stop will have the greatest positive effect on their health, and yet they are the ones who are missing when it comes to targeting people with quit-smoking messages.” He suggested developing anti-smoking campaigns that effectively convince young people to quit smoking or never start would be good projects for high school service learning programs. “Kids are far more likely to listen to each other,” Dr. Chu reasoned. Difficult to diagnose One difficulty in identifying people who have lung cancer is that there is no proven screening test for lung cancer. And, because diagnosing it is difficult and there are few symptoms in the early stages, lung cancer is often more advanced by the time it is found. And, this means treatment options tend to be fewer and not as effective. If they are smokers or have a family history of lung cancer, teenagers and young adults—as well as all other smokers—should see their primary care physician if they are suffering from any of the following symptoms:persistent cough that doesn’t improve with antibiotic therapy, changes in their voice or the consistency of their sputum, or other chronic symptoms of asthma, upper respiratory infection or bronchitis.With smokers, these problems should be looked at with more urgency. “Smokers, including young people, may not want to tell others about their symptoms because they don’t want to be lectured, or their family has been after them to quit,” Dr. Chu commented. “They may be afraid of what they will hear if they tell their doctor. But, at that stage, the cancer may be more manageable.” Quitting is hard Quitting smoking is very difficult. The ACS reports that, of the 45 million smokers in this country, more than half have attempted to quit for at least one day in the past year. That’s why never starting at all is a much better option. The good news is that there are many methods for quitting, Dr. Chu pointed out. And, experience has shown that the earlier in their smoking years a person quits, the better chance they have of being successful.If you smoke and live with a smoker, it is important that you both quit at the same time. “If two smokers live together, it’s important that they support each other,” recommended Dr. Chu. “It is very unlikely that one person will be successful when the other has not stopped. You both need to quit together.”

Learn more To learn more about the Great American Smokeout, go to the web site for the American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org. To learn more about Washington Township Medical Foundation, visit www.mywtmf.com. For information about Washington Hospital’s Community Cancer Program, visit www.whhs.com.

s we enter the cold and flu season, it’s important to remember that antibiotics don’t work on those illnesses. Antibiotics kill bacteria, and the cold and flu are caused by viruses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC urges everyone to Get Smart About Antibiotics, the theme for its annual awareness week, this year scheduled for November 12-18. “I try to remind patients that most infections are viral not bacterial,” said infectious disease specialist Dr. Dianne Martin, who co-chairs the Infection Control team at Washington Hospital. “Even when kids come down with ear infections, sore throats, runny noses, and chest congestion, they are caused by a virus. Antibiotics won’t help.” The CDC launched the Get Smart campaign because too many people don’t understand that antibiotics don’t work on viral infections. That’s a problem because taking antibiotics when they are not needed does more harm than good, according to Martin. Widespread inappropriate use of antibiotics is causing an increase in drug-resistant bacteria, she explained. But people go to their doctors when they are sick and ask for antibiotics. They want relief and mistakenly believe antibiotics will cure what ails them. “Physicians have to explain to their patients why an antibiotic is not being prescribed,” Martin said. “But some patients are very insistent and for some doctors it’s just easier to write a prescription than engage in a lengthy conversation trying to convince a patient that antibiotics won’t work.” Just Say No It is estimated that more than 50 percent of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed in doctors’ office settings for upper respiratory infections like cough and cold, according to the CDC. In addition, three out of 10 children who visit an outpatient provider with the common cold receive an antibiotic. “Taking antibiotics unnecessarily increases your chances of becoming sick with an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection,” Martin said. “Antibiotic resistance is not just an issue for the sick person. It is a global health issue. Overuse of antibiotics promotes the development of drug-resistant germs that can spread from person to person.” She said there are steps individuals can take to reduce these risks, including • Take the antibiotic exactly as prescribed. Don’t skip doses and complete the entire course, even if you feel better. • Only take antibiotics prescribed to you. Do not share or use leftover antibiotics.

Infectious disease specialist Dr. Dianne Martin, co-chair of the Infection Control team at Washington Hospital, advises that taking antibiotics when they are not needed does more harm than good. Many people don’t understand that antibiotics don’t work on viral infections such as a cold or the flu. In fact, misuse of antibiotics can lead to drug-resistant germs.

• Discard any leftover antibiotics once the prescribed course is taken. • Do not ask for antibiotics when your doctor says you don’t need them. “We all need to work together to ensure that antibiotics are used properly,” Martin said. “Antibiotics are powerful drugs that can save lives. But they won’t be effective against existing and new bacterial strains if we continue to misuse them.” Get a Flu Shot The best protection against the flu is an influenza vaccination, also called a flu shot, she added. The flu shot contains three seasonal flu viruses that cause your body to build up antibodies capable of fighting off those strains. The viruses are inactivated or killed, so you can’t get the flu from a flu shot, according to the CDC. continued on page 5


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, adapted and directed by Brian Allan Hobbs, is a song-filled holiday classic for the entire family. Miserly Ebenezer Scrooge, the curmudgeon everyone loves to hate; the ghost story of the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Future; the festive Fezziwigs; over 20 holiday songs in glorious choral harmony; dancing; the darling Cratchit family with the ever hopeful Tiny Tim; and an unrequited love story offer a memorable tale of human transformation that will steal your heart in this special time of the year.

Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 6, 7, 8 & 9 8pm (Dec. 6th is a Thursday $10 "Poor Actors"performance, tickets at the door only) Dec. 2 & 9 Sunday Mattinees 2:30pm Tickets are available at www.stage1theatre.org or by calling 510-791-0287 or BROWN PAPER TICKETS (800) 838-3006 or The Book End 5678 Thornton Ave in Newark

General Admission $22 Senior/Advanced Purchase $20 Students 17 & under $10 Groups 12+ $18 *group prices apply to same performance only

39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark 94560 - Held in the Newark Memorial High School Theatre across from Newpark Mall. We recommend you park in front of the school by the Library and Office.

November 13, 2012


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 3

Antibiotics Don’t Work for Cold and Flu The best time to get your flu shot is now until December. The flu season generally runs from November through April, so that allows the protective antibodies to build up before flu activity is typically at its highest. “We are having an early flu season this year, so I really encourage everyone to get a flu shot as soon as possible,” Martin said. “Anyone over the age of 6 months should get a flu shot.” She said it’s important to wash your hands frequently to avoid spreading germs and keep hand sanitizers in your home, car, and at work. “Get kids in the habit of coughing and sneezing into a tissue instead of their hands,” she added. “You should also consider putting together a cold and flu kit so you are ready when someone in the house gets sick.”

Martin recommended including over-thecounter symptom relievers, cough syrup, throat lozenges, hand sanitizer, tissues, and soup. “That way you have everything you need and you don’t have to go to the store and spread your germs,” she said. “Parents sometimes feel pressure to send their kids to school when they are sick or go to work themselves. But it’s really best to stay home when you are sick. You need to rest so you can be at your best and you don’t want to get other people sick.” For more information about the flu, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To find out how to get a flu vaccination, call Washington Hospital’s Health Connection hotline at (800) 963-7070. To learn about upcoming Washington Hospital classes and seminars that can help you stay healthy, visit www.whhs.com.

continued from page 1

ceived many awards for her service: Outstanding Young Women of America, Business Achievement Community Service Award, Dumbarton Chapter ABWA Woman of the Year and Bay Area Women of Distinction Award. Johnson was instrumental in forming a joint task force of the Newark City Council and Newark Unified School District on youth issues including drug abuse, latchkey kids and domestic violence. The social element of the City’s planning process was also addressed by Councilmember Johnson as well as the addition of a Teen Center at Silliman Activity Center. The mayor concluded his remarks saying, “This is only a handful of changes and actions Sue has been involved in. The council and I feel humbled that Sue Johnson and her family have agreed to have their prestigious name associated with the City of Newark. Sue really understands the value and importance of creating a community.” Following unveiling the new signage at the park, Sue said that she felt the honor was not only for her, but her family as well. The park has had a prominent place in their life and future visits would be a constant reminder of her love for the City of Newark. Although her career path has led to the Alameda County Superior Court, Newark is still her home and its place in her heart has not wavered. Speaking of family gatherings of children and grandchildren, she said, “Now, when we finish our family dinners, we can say, ‘Come on everybody, let’s go to Grandma Sue’s park!’”

Sorensdale Recreation Center celebrates the holidays with their annual Thanksgiving Luncheon and Holiday Boutique on November 16. A fixture in Hayward since the ‘70s, the center serves adults with disabilities from ages 22 and up, offering a wide variety of educational and social classes. Six classes are held in the morning with another six in the afternoon, and currently 110 students participate in courses including physical education, performing arts, gardening, money management, life skills, English, reading and writing, art, computer lab, relaxation and stress management, and job training. There is also a thrift store on site that is open every Tuesday and first Saturday of the month. The Thanksgiving Luncheon and Holiday Boutique is an annual event, co-sponsored by the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District, and the South Hayward Lions Club. Students are treated to a full Thanksgiving-style meal, and the annual Sorensdale Recreation Center volunteer awards are also presented. “We recognize students that have really stood out throughout the year,” says Program Coordina-

tor Shelly Luchini. She says everyone’s skill level is noticed, and three individuals are selected annually, as well as an outstanding employee who has gone above and beyond throughout the year. While the holiday luncheon is not open to the public, the community is welcome to visit the boutique and purchase some of the great crafts the students have created in class. Items featured will include birdhouses, candlesticks, coasters, wine bags, and aprons. Support the great offerings of the Sorensdale Recreation Center by purchasing unique holiday items at the boutique, or make a donation Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. All funds collected go toward supporting their various programs. For more information, call (510) 881-6778. Sorensdale Holiday Boutique Friday, Nov 16 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Sorensdale Recreation Center 275 Goodwin St., Hayward (510) 881-6778 www.haywardrec.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

Pat Kite’s Garden TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602

BY PAT KITE

T

he man wonders whether spiders are attacking his indoor plants. He has seen tiny webs. He has seen ultrateensy black spider-looking things wandering about the plants. Plus his plants are beginning to look somewhat yucky. What should he do? Spider mites are not spiders, merely spider relatives. Since spiders aren’t insects, having eight legs instead of six, neither are spider mites. However, where spiders are usually quite beneficial, spider mites are pests. Basically you want spider mites to go away. Why? Spider mites have two needle-like feeding tubes called stylets. These act like miniscule

Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

straws. When the mites puncture a plant leaf they promptly proceed to suck out green chlorophyll that serves as plant food. The mites also suck out the plant’s water. This leaves the plant both hungry and thirsty. As the infestation proceeds, leaves begin losing color. They appear speckled yellow and green, at first. Then the leaves become mostly yellow. Tired, and sad, they begin falling off.

If you like science stuff, try observing spider mites under a magnifying glass. There are hundreds of mite types, or species. They may be red, yellowish, orange, greenish or blackish. You might have several types on your plants. This may not enthuse you, but it does add interest. Put a piece of white paper under a suspect leaf. Tap the leaf. If you see dots the size of salt grains frantically crawling around on the paper, that is an Aha! Moment.

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com. If you have oodles of spider mites, there may be lots of webs. Take your magnifying glass and check under the leaves. Perhaps you will see teensy-tiny red-orange or transparent eggs. Each female spider mite produces from 100 to 300 eggs during its sixmonth lifespan. And yes, the young mature rapidly. How did these pests get into your castle? From a new plant, on your clothes after gardening or

Fremont Elks make a difference SUBMITTED BY JOAN WHITE Fremont Elks Lodge #2121 had a busy October with community service events and projects. The Lodge invited area first responders as guests for the first Lodge brunch of the season. Almost 30 responders were able to participate. The group was comprised of EMTs and local police and fire departments. On Halloween, several members prepared dinner for residents of Abode’s Sunrise Village Emergency Shelter. The meal of ham with all the sides, and dessert of ice cream and homemade cookies was enjoyed by adults and families alike.

However, the biggest project Lodge members undertook was on Saturday, October 27, when the members participated in national Make-A-Difference Day. The team of 13 members and Elk friends cleaned up the large yard of a Fremont resident in her 90’s living in a 100-year-old family-built home. The team cleared a large backyard of brush, cut down and trimmed trees, removed ivy and cleaned flower beds. When the project was complete, a large dumpster had been filled with yard debris. Community service is major component of the Elks’ commitment to the community.

on the breeze from an open window. Spider mites infest outdoor plants too, but that’s another story. Getting rid of them on indoor plants is an iffy procedure. First, move the infested plant away from other indoor plants. Or you can just treat all at the same time. While the Internet gives multiple organic concoctions, some seem as lethal as the spider mites. You can also purchase miticides, insecticides specific for indoor use. They may, or may not work, depending on the mite type. Otherwise, in brief: remove infested leaves. Hose off the plants in the sink or shower. On really big plants, try wiping off all leaves with a soft, damp, cloth. Do this once a week until spider mites disappear. A targeted plant may recover, slowly, or may not. Keep watch. Prevention is more of a key. Spider mites go after stressed plants. Make certain your indoor plants have their preferred water amount. Fertilize as appropriate. I always talk to my plants, because if you pay attention to them, they often communicate little problems well before they become big problems.


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

www.aclibrary.org

BY GERTRUDE ROOSHAN, FREMONT MAIN LIBRARY Fremont Main Library and the branches of the Alameda County Library System now have access to a great business tool: Demographics Now. “Demographics Now” introduces novice and expert users of demographic data to a new way to view and act upon consumer and market insights, using instant interactive maps, detailed summary and comparison reports, and fast access to U.S. Census data sorted by geographies and demographic characteristics. This online database has a wealth of business and residential information covering detailed demographic data on more than 23 million businesses and 206 million consumers. You have the ability to search by company name, business type, number of employees and other limiters. Consumer data consists of 135 million households, containing information on more than 206 million U.S. residents, enabling users to search by name, address or a variety of U.S. Census data counts. Create custom reports and fully interactive maps; perform quick and accurate market analysis; create radius based maps and reports; generate summary and comparison reports for any geography; get full access to AGS current year estimates and five year projections. The data can be downloaded into MS Word, Acrobat PDF, or MS Excel spreadsheet files. Reports can be saved in Acrobat format or emailed... DemographicsNow is brought to you by Gale, a leading publisher of research and reference resources and SRC, the industry's leading developer of business and market intelligence solutions. The source of the business data is from Applied Geographic Solutions (AGS), and people data from AMACAI Solutions, a TARGUSinfo company. Designed with an intuitive interface, interactive mapping tools and comprehensive data, this new resource makes it easy to collect, analyze and act upon quality consumer market data, consumer spending data, demographic and housing data, population estimates and forecasts, and census data. The Business Module This new marketing tool will help small business owners, start-ups, sales personnel, community leaders and non-profit organizations. Business owners can create a business plan or do a location analysis, identify competitors in an area, relocate a business or change a product mix; marketing and sales people can develop targeted, accurate customer leads, and anyone can create and mailing lists for promotions, coupons, or to target new customers. You can retrieve detailed geographic business intelligence, such as: Create Business Marketing Plans Assess business viability Identify where your competitors are located Analyze minority ownership Analyze new markets for expanding product lines or adding a new location

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Understanding your customers better (How much do they earn? How much do they spend? ) Use direct mail advertising to customers most likely to buy your product/service. Create sales leads and marketing mailing list Estimate sales territories Find potential sponsors and donors to grow a non-profit Determine business failures by industry type Identify household buying patterns Create and analyze trade areas Evaluate market penetration Identify business locations Find new customers and reach them more effectively Reveal untapped markets Select the right merchandise mix Expand into appropriate markets Search for an individual company or create a mailing list of multiple companies from more than 23 million businesses. Searches can be refined by company name, executive title, business type, number of employees, credit rating, and more. QUICK SEARCH is the ideal way to find a business or company when you know all or part of the company name, an executive’s first and/or last name, or a geographic location. Through CUSTOM SEARCH, users can create lists of businesses. Search by company name, business type, executive title, credit rating, number of employees, minority ownership, and more. The Consumer and Lifestyles Module The database can analyze variables, such as sociodemographics, lifestyles, behaviors and culture to evaluate buying behaviors of customers, establish customer profiles, target prospects, reveal potential market opportunities and conduct analytics. Compare cities. Users can search the Households module by name, address, phone number, email and a variety of Census neighborhood data. Search by geography to find information on income, housing, race, age, education, retail spending with lifestyle market segmentation classifications. Sift data to a specific county, zip code or street address. A unique mapping tool allows users to map their results, create custom geographies and view demographic variables in thematic coloring scales. Geographic and Map Data The database covers any national geography, such as, county, ZIP code, congressional district, census tract, and metropolitan area, and allows users to create their own customized geographic areas. Thematic maps come with coloring scales. Define an area such as a street address or intersection or by selecting a preset area such as a ZIP code or census tract. Once you have made their selections, you can turn to the thematic map window that has tools and features for further analysis. View trade areas by drive times, target businesses in the area, create market profile maps, highlighting your customers or competitors. Create maps with many variables. Mapping is provided in conjunction with SRC, LLC of Orange, Calif., a developer and provider of geographic business-intelligence technology and solutions. Tutorials If you need help, go to the tutorials, use the many help pages and watch six different videos on how to build a sales lead list, find a business, find a person, use mapping, access Census 2010 data, and generate a demographic report. Whether you have a library card or an e-card, you can access this database from home or your business, at no cost. Just go to www.aclibrary.org and click on Research. A drop down menu will show A-Z Resources, and then click on D for Demographics Now. It will be the first link on the page. We will also be happy to assist you in person at the library.

Fremont’s Got Talent results SUBMITTED BY RENA KIEHN The official City of Fremont Youth Advisory Commission's Fremont’s Got Talent Show concluded at the Teen Center on Friday, November 9. Participants included: Music Makerz Band, violinist Katherine Lin, vocalist Leigh-Anna Nielson, Sparkles Bollywood Dance Group, Aman Chopra on guitar and vocals, vocalist Soukhya Inamdar, vocalist Cathryn Flores, vocalist Eliza Chau, Andrew Wilson & Bernard Smith music group, Starz Band, vocalist Ashlesha Sathe, Tomas Choi on the flute, vocalist Christine Pagador, Act 4 Acapella quartet, vocalist Sandhya Chari, Washington High School Taal Dance Group, and vocalist Marissa Madan. Audience Awards Solo Award: 1st Place: Tomas Choi, Flute 2nd Place: Aman Chopra, Guitar/Vocals, “She Will Be Loved” Group Award: 1st Place: Starz Band, “One on One” and “Price Tag” 2nd Place: Act 4 Acapella quartet, “But I Do” Senior Award (13 - 18 years): 1st Place: Starz Band, “One on One” and “Price Tag” 2nd Place: Soukhya Inamdar, Vocalist, “Hurt” Junior Award (12 years and under): 1st Place: Aman Chopra, Guitar/Vocals, “She Will Be Loved” 2nd Place: Music Makerz Band, “Sweet Child o’ Mine/Just the Way You Are” Judges Awards Solo Award: 1st Place: Soukhya Inamdar, Vocalist, “Hurt” 2nd Place: Marissa Madan, Vocalist, “If I Ain’t Got You” Group Award:

1st Place: Starz Band, “One on One” and “Price Tag” 2nd Place: Andrew Wilson & Bernard Smith music group Senior Award (13 - 18 years): 1st Place: Starz Band, “One on One” and “Price Tag” 2nd Place: Act 4 Acapella quartet, “But I Do” Junior Award (12 years and under): 1st Place: Cathryn Flores, Vocalist, “One Thing” 2nd Place: Aman Chopra, Guitar/Vocals, “She Will Be Loved” Youth Advisory Commission Chair Griffin Sloves was emcee for the evening, accompanied by judges Sonia Sachar, Sanjana Gundala, Wanda Zhan, and Yash Pal. Serving as Adult Judge was Will Matlack. A former "band nerd" from the fourth grade, Will quit the school band and joined rock and roll bands when he turned 16. He's been playing drums in bands ever since. He currently plays with two groups including a jazz trio. When he is not playing music, he works as a publisher and writer for a line of comic books. Will and his artist partner are currently in the process of branching out into publishing children's books. A first title is being designed now. Pavithra Nagarajan served as Youth Judge. Pavithra was invited to be a youth judge because she won two first place awards in the FGT competition in the past. She has also won several other awards and achievements - 1st place awards in the VARNAM Papanasam Sivan Dance competition, Classical Dance Solo - Bay Area Telugu Assn., B.A.Talent show, and B.A Tamil Manram's Classical Dance competition. She has also won several other awards and achievements at such events as: Finalist in Livermore's Talent Competition, OSAAT (Group) multiple years, Cleveland Bharathanatyam Competition at the Thyagaraja Aradhana Festival,TANA Dance Competition “Dheem Tana,” Papanasam Sivan Dance competition and more. For more information on what the Youth Advisory Commission is all about, visit: www.fremont.gov/teens.

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Milpitas SWAT Officer tops at Best in the West SUBMITTED BY SGT. HUY TRAN, MILPITAS PD On September 20-21, 2012, the Milpitas Police Department S.W.A.T team competed in the Best in the West competition held in San Jose, CA. The Best in the West, is the largest invitational S.W.A.T. competition in the Western United States. A total of 29 S.W.A.T teams, including teams as far away as

Pasadena and Las Vegas, participated in this year’s event. The Milpitas Police Department S.W.A.T team placed 16th overall as a team, and Officer Corey Lee took first place for the Top Sniper Award.

Urban Search & Rescue Team finishes first in Urban Shield Exercise

SUBMITTED BY AISHA KNOWLES On Monday, October 29, the Alameda County Fire Department (ACFD) Urban Search and Rescue Team was announced as the First Place recipient of the 2012 Urban Shield Urban Search and Rescue Competition during the Urban Shield Awards Banquet at the Oakland Marriott. Urban Shield is the largest annual Department of Homeland Security exercise in the United States. This year twelve Urban Search and Rescue teams from throughout the San Francisco Bay Area were presented with a variety of challenging scenarios that reflect the reality of operating in an “all-risk” environment. Urban Shield is a test of response readiness capabilities and is a performance-based training and exercise program involving local, state, and federal first responders in addition to personnel from public works and emergency medical services along with Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members. The event provides an objective assessment of a response team’s capabilities so that strengths and areas for improvement can be identified. “While promoted as a competition, the real benefit to participants is the opportunity to bolster preparedness

and validate the benefits of such capabilities to the communities they serve,” said Rob Schnepp, ACFD Division Chief of Special Operations. Led by Urban Search and Rescue Task Force Leader, Captain Jim Call, the ACFD Urban Search and Rescue Team won the competition, outscoring 11 other teams from around the Bay Area. Given the level of training and experience in and around the region, this is a significant accomplishment for the 10-member team. Additionally, the ACFD Urban Search and Rescue Team won the competition in 2011, becoming the only team in event history to be repeat First Place recipients. The members of the First Place 2012 ACFD Urban Search and Rescue Team are: Task Force Leader Captain Jim Call Captain Tom Pappas Captain Clare Takhar Engineer Dean Lundstrom Engineer Brandon Franco Firefighter Paige Bowie Firefighter Anthony McAdams Firefighter Carl Denyer Firefighter Garrett Brown Firefighter Brian Ferreira

Officer involved shooting SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD On Sunday, November 4 at approximately 11:00 p.m., officers responded to a domestic violence call on the 4500 block of Central Avenue in Fremont. The reporting party stated that her roommate was being attacked by her (the roommate’s) husband. As officers arrived, they witnessed a female (later identified as the victim) fleeing the apartment and a naked man holding a knife pursuing her. Officers demanded that the suspect stop and drop the knife, and when he refused, officers fired their weapons hitting the suspect. The suspect was transported to a local trauma center where he was pronounced dead. No officers were injured during the incident. The suspect is a 37 year old San Jose resident. Two officers, with 3 and 20 plus years of service were involved in the incident. The officers have been placed on paid administrative leave per department policy. The incident is being investigated jointly by the Fremont Police Department’s Investigative Unit and the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office.

Officer involved shooting incident update SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES, FREMONT PD The Fremont Police Department is releasing the suspect’s name in the officer involved shooting that occurred on Sunday, November 4, 2012 at approximately 11:00 p.m. on Central Avenue. The suspect, Dejuan Eaton, is a 37 year old San Jose resident. This incident continues to be an ongoing joint investigation between the Fremont Police Department Investigative Unit and the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office.


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Halloween costume give-away

Happy recipient (center) of a pirate Halloween costume with Lt. Dave Lundgren (left) and Officer Jewel Smith (right), courtesy of Hayward Police Department, Hayward Police Officers’ Association and the Bay Area Chapter of the California Narcotic Officers’ Association.

SUBMITTED BY SGT. ERIC KRIMM Hayward Police Department (PD) provided more than 300 kids with Halloween costumes on October 29, 2012. This was the second annual Halloween Costume Giveaway for which Hayward police officers collected and distributed Halloween costumes to children, aged five to 12, who attend one of five Hayward elementary schools and who might not otherwise have had something special to wear on Halloween night. The costumes were presented to the children at City Hall on Monday afternoon. This year, Hayward PD joined forces with more than 20 Downtown businesses that distributed candy. Parents were given a list of businesses where they could collect candy until 6 p.m. According to Hayward PD’s Lt. Dave Lundgren, Officer Jewel Smith has led this endeavor for the last two years after learning that a number of children in Hayward did not participate in Halloween activities at their school or on Halloween night because their family could not afford a costume. With the assistance of Hayward community leader Edward Montgomery and Hayward Police Community Service Officer James Alejo, Hayward PD received numerous donations from Party City and Wal-Mart in Union City and from Target, Costco, American Licorice Company and Annabelle candy, all from Hayward. The Hayward Police Officers’ Association and the Bay Area Chapter of the California Narcotic Officers’ Association also donated the funds to purchase the costumes for the children. Lt. Lundgren thanks the community for their generous donations.

Newark SWAT Participates in Urban Shield SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Battling sleep deprivation, physical and mental fatigue the Newark Police Department’s SWAT team persevered and earned a top ten finish in the 2012 Urban Shield. Join Chief James Leal in congratulating our SWAT Team for their outstanding performance during this year’s Urban Shield competition which was held this past weekend throughout the county. A total of 32 tactical teams from all over the country, including teams from Texas and Chicago IL., as well as the Brazilian Special Operations Battalion and the United States Marine Corps 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, competed in a

grueling 48 hour continuous exercise that included 38 different scenarios. Newark PD's team placed 8th overall, which is an amazing accomplishment when considering the size of many of the competing departments and the fact that many have full time teams. The NPD Swat team was also one of only four teams to complete the Colt Firearms specialty combat challenge successfully. Our community can sleep well knowing this dedicated group of officers trained hard over the past several months in anticipation of this event and their dedication, teamwork, effort, and work ethics propelled them into the top of the field and are ready to respond to any and all crisis! Thanks again to all involved for a job well done!

Body discovered in trash can SUBMITTED BY DET. CZAR VALDEHUEZA, UNION CITY PD On November 22, 2012, at approximately 6:30 a.m., the owner of a residence on 10th Street in Union City went to dispose of her trash in an exterior trash bin. She located an unresponsive subject inside the bin and called 911. Both Union City Police and medical units were dispatched to the scene. The subject, identified as Joseph Perez of Union City, was transported to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries. The Union City Police Department is pursuing active leads in this investigation. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call Det. Czar Valdehueza at (510) 675-5354 or the Union City Police Department’s Tip Line (510) 6755207 or email: tips@unioncity.org

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November 13, 2012

Auto Review

Infiniti M56, so much to like BY STEVE SCHAEFER nfiniti, the upscale division of Nissan, has offered various interpretations of upscale transportation over the last two decades. The M sedan is today's halo car, with a pleasing blend of performance, luxury and technology, held together with style and craftsmanship.

removes odors and then distributes the breeze in an irregular, outdoorsy way. Technology may be the most important ingredient in this super car. A rear-view monitor is nothing special today, but how about a rear sonar system that detects objects? You have access to the Zagat restaurant guide through the Hard Drive Naviga-

thing that could be missing. Side panels are made of aluminum to save weight, but are hand-inspected to be perfect. You won't get that on a Nissan Sentra. You'll pay for the privilege of driving an M56. It starts at $61,100, and when you add the $895 shipping charge, you're touching $62K. With the Technology and Sport packages, the

Just listing the amazing array of features would take more room than I have, so let’s look at some representative examples. Performance is a great place to start. There are two available engines the 3.7-liter, 330-horsepower V6 found in the M37 and the mighty 5.6-liter V8, with 420 horsepower and 417 lb.-ft. of torque, that powers the M56. Both engines come mated to a seven-speed automatic. The car has standard rear wheel drive but you can order Intelligent AllWheel-Drive. My 2013 M56 was rated at 16 City, 24 Highway, with an average of 19 mpg by the EPA. I accumulated 17.1 mpg - not bad, but premium fuel was running nearly $5.00 a gallon during my test. The 2012 model earned a 6 for Air Pollution and 3 for Greenhouse Gas from the EPA. Big engines have trouble getting a good Greenhouse Gas score, but you can carefully control an engine of any size for low emissions. Luxury is both a look and a feel. What other motorists see is a bold, curvilinear design that has borrowed something from classic British Jaguars and Bentleys but is comfortably informal too. It's almost prettier than you expect, and it's comforting to look out the windshield at the sensuously proportioned hood. My tester was a Platinum Graphite M56 - a formal gray that fits for a car of this caliber. Luxury is best represented inside, with sublime leather seating, Japanese Ash trim and a long list of amenities. Yes, there's dualzone climate control, but this car has something even better - Forest Air. As part of the Sport Package (more on this later), it

tion System, along with traffic and weather information. Rain sensing windshield wipers are no longer a new idea but they fit right in here, along with automatic on-off High Intensity Discharge headlamps. If you really want technology though, you have to order the $3,050 Technology package. Here you get a blind spot warning system that tells you, with lights, when someone's next to you where you can't see them in your mirrors. The next step is Blind Spot Intervention, where the rear brakes automatically kick in to guide you away if you try to turn into an occupied lane. If no-one's there but you need to stay in your lane, the Lane Departure Warning and Lane Departure Prevention systems are there to protect you. Forward Collision Warning is part of the braking package that lets you know with flashing lights if you're coming up too quickly on someone in moving traffic. My least favorite part of the Technology Package was the Eco Pedal, which pushes back at you if you drive too vigorously. I'm glad to save gas and the environment, but that's too much nannying. Further enhancing my tester was the Sport Package ($5,650) that introduced stunning 20-inch wheels to go with lots of "sport" features, such as the Sport front fascia (dark instead of chrome), Sport brakes with four pistons in the front disc and two in the rear. How about Sport seats in front? A Sport-tuned suspension? Craftsmanship? The pieces fit together perfectly, the materials are top-level and there is such a wealth of things to look at and touch. It's hard to think of any-

bottom line for my car was $70,195. However, driving a car like this puts you in a different frame of mind. Everything is so lovely, so comfortable and so silent. You feel more relaxed in stop-and-go commuting. It feels good to move your eyes and hands over the swirling, exuberant trim and pieces inside. I often found myself feeling the armrest, the steering wheel, the dash, the console. It's been a long haul for Infiniti - they haven't been the sales star that Lexus has been - but they definitely have found their way today and offer a beautiful

I

alternative other upscale fourSteve to Schaefer’s first car wheeled choices. memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

Location change for ‘FUSD’s Got Talent’ SUBMITTED BY FUSS4SCHOOLS Due to the large number of participants, the location venue for “FUSD’s Got Talent,” on November 17, has been changed to the Fremont Adult School at 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont. Various district students and schools will be participating in the unique fundraising event, hosted by FUSS (Fremont United Student Store), a nonprofit organization, raising money in support of the Fremont Unified School District. The goal is to raise $20,000 to assist FUSD students whose families are struggling with extreme financial difficulties especially during this holiday season. Additionally, the best act in each of the three school division categories: high school, junior high, and elementary school, will win a trophy and $1,000 for their school.

Advance online tickets are $2/each at: http://www.fuss4schools.org/activities/registration/ Deadline to buy tickets online by credit card is November 14. Tickets will be $5/person at the door. Student work/products will also be available for purchase. ‘FUSD’s Got Talent’ Saturday, Nov 17 12 noon – 5 p.m. Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont. (Note: location and time change) Tickets: $2 online/$5 at the door Order at: http://www.fuss4schools.org/activities/registration/ Email: info@fuss4schools.org


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY RACHEL SCHOPLER Santa Claus will be at Great Mall through Monday, December 24. Visits with Santa are free; photo packages are available for purchase. Mon – Thurs: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. (Elf break at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m.) Fri – Sat: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. (Elf break at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m.) Sun., Nov. 11, 18, 25: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. (Elf break at 2 p.m.) Sun., Dec. 2, 9, 16, 23 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. (Elf break at 2 p.m.) For more information on Great Mall, please call (408) 956-2033 or visit www.greatmallbayarea.com

SUBMITTED BY AMY PHILLIPS BURSCH Population Connection, a national grassroots group, is once again seeking submissions from high school students, for their “World of 7 Billion” student video PSA (Public Service Announcement) contest. Students have the chance to win $1,000 and other cash prizes. Students in grades 9-12 are asked to create a 30-45 second public service announcement that illustrates the connection between world population at seven billion and one of the following topics: food security, wildlife habitat, or the global status of women and girls. Cash prizes will be awarded to four winners in each topic area. Three grand prize winners will each receive $1,000. Participating teachers will receive free curriculum. The deadline for video submissions is February 21, 2013. For full contest rules or to see previous winning videos, please visit www.worldof7billion.org.

THEATRE

‘The Good Person of Setzuan’ SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL

C

orey Fischer, an actor and writer, will guest direct the Cal State East Bay Theatre and Dance Department’s first production of the academic year, “The Good Person of Setzuan.” Fischer, who is co-founder of the Jewish Theatre San Francisco -- first known as 'A Traveling Jewish Theatre' -- refers to the show as “one of the world’s most popular plays for almost 70 years.” Written by Tony Kurshner and adapted from the play by Bertolt Brecht, the piece tells a story of three rag-tag gods who come to Earth to learn if a thoroughly good person can survive – or even exist – on the troubled planet. “Full of comedy, music and vivid characters, ‘The Good Person of Setzuan,’ is that rare theatrical experience that erases the boundaries between high and low art," said Fischer. "Brecht was, of course, a poet, a philosopher. But, above all, he was a brilliant entertainer.” The director has told his cast that for him; the “spine” of “Good Person” is the telling of a fable, using all the elements of theater: character, action, direct address, song, dance, physical humor; by an ensemble of actors. Unlike conventional fables, however, this one has a moral lesson. This is Fisher’s second time at CSUEB. He performed his one-man show, “Sometimes We Need a Story More Than Food,” at the university in 2007 as part of the Jewish Culture and History Series of the College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences. Thomas Hird, professor and chair of the Theatre and Dance Department, said: “Our department and the campus are lucky to have Corey Fischer directing this quarter. Fischer has been cre-

ating and performing theatre for over 40 years, largely in the Bay Area. His work has been recognized for its excellence by audiences, critics, and publishers, as well as the Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays.” Robert Hurwitt, senior drama critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, wrote that Fischer is “one of the Bay Area’s acting treasurers.” He also is a published writer of fiction and non-fiction, a teacher of improvisation and theatre-making, and a creative consultant/coach for individuals and organizations. Rhoda Kaufman, professor of theatre and dance at Cal State East Bay, observed that an ensemble show, such as Good Person "is best when created through collaboration – hallmarks of Fischer’s work." Tickets are priced from $5 to $15 and may be purchased online at csueastbaytickets.com. The Theatre and Dance Department may be contacted for further information at (510) 885-3118. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodation upon request. Please notify event sponsor in advance at (510) 885-3118 if accommodation is needed. The Good Person of Setzuan Nov 16 – 18 8 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. Cal State East Bay University Theatre 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 csueastbaytickets.com Tickets: $5 - $15

Healthcare reform forum SUBMITTED BY ISABELLE MCANDREWS President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act 2010 to provide comprehensive health reform for Americans and the US Supreme Court upheld it. Learn about how this historic law affects you and your families. On November 19, 2012, Alex Briscoe, Director of Alameda County Health Care Services, will discuss how the Act affects the wellness of Alameda County residents and describe what additional changes will be implemented in the coming months. He will also provide an update on the development of Teen Health Centers for Fremont. This free forum, at Fremont Main Library, is sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Fremont, Newark & Union City. Healthcare Forum Monday, November 19 6:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Boulevard, Fremont

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November 13, 2012

Beyond the ‘fiscal cliff,’ reasons for optimism BY CHRISTINA REXRODE AND MATTHEW CRAFT AP BUSINESS WRITERS NEW YORK (AP),Forget about the “fiscal cliff.” That might be hard, considering the drama of this week. The stock market had its worst two-day plunge in a year after voters returned President Barack Obama, a Republican House and a Democratic Senate to power. Investors fear the approaching cliff – tax increases and government spending cuts that begin to take effect Jan. 1 unless Obama and Congress can work out a compromise. Economists say the hit to the economy next year could be $800 billion, enough to push the United States back into another recession. And financial analysts are predicting more market turmoil as the deadline approaches. Lawmakers almost certainly will work out a deal – perhaps messily, unsatisfyingly and with lots of theatrics, but a deal nonetheless. But what happens after that, and to the market in Obama's second term? Home prices are rising again in many parts of the country. Job growth is much faster than it was last spring. Consumer confidence and retail spending are up. And so is the stock market, this week's jitters notwithstanding. Even some of those who think the economy and markets will run into trouble soon see better times on the other side of the cliff. David Kostin, Goldman Sachs's U.S. equity strategist, expects a budget battle in Washington to send the Standard & Poor's 500 index down to 1,250 by the end of the year, about 10 percent lower than where it closed Friday. Once the fight is finished, however, things should turn around quickly, he says. By the end of next year, the S&P 500 will reach 1,575, Goldman says, clearing its previous all-time high by 10 points. There are factors that could still hobble the economy, of course. Median household income has dropped every year since 2007, after adjusting for inflation. The unemployment rate is still high. The Federal Reserve warned last month that job growth, like U.S. economic

growth, remains slow. Here are three things you should watch as you plot an investing strategy for the next four years. THE BOTTOM LINE The traditional thinking is that a Democratic president equals higher taxes for businesses. But financial analysts at UBS aren't so sure. In a report before the election, they predicted that the corporate tax rate would drop under Obama or Romney. And anyway, says Carol Pepper, CEO of the wealth management firm Pepper International in New York, companies aren't going to stop growing just because they're faced with higher taxes. “That,” she says, ‘is cutting off your nose to spite your face.” For more than three years, companies in the S&P 500 have improved earnings every quarter compared with the year before, according to market research company S&P Capital IQ. Often, their growth has defied expectations. At the beginning of October, analysts were predicting that third-quarter corporate profits would fall nearly 2 percent compared with a year ago. With about 90 percent of the companies in the S&P 500 turning in results, they're expected to be up more than 2 percent. And higher earnings generally send a company's stock higher. That's no guarantee, of course. Revenue for the third quarter so far is up only about 0.6 percent, which means that companies' profit growth is driven not by selling more goods and services but by cutting costs, which can mean laying off workers or trimming salaries. And compared with a year ago, the earnings and revenue growth is downright anemic. In the third quarter of 2011, earnings grew more than 17 percent over the previous year, according to S&P Capital IQ. Revenue was up more than 11 percent. Still, if companies managed to increase profits during a slow economic recovery, they should have no trouble doing it if the economy really picks up. THE CHINA MACHINE You can't consider the future of the world economy, and therefore the future of the U.S. stock market, without considering China, the

world's second-largest economy behind the United States. You've probably heard that the Chinese economy has slowed. But it's still expanding at an annual rate of 7.4 percent, more than triple the U.S. rate, and far better than the contraction in most of Europe. China's middle class is big and getting bigger. That makes it more expensive for U.S. companies to produce goods there because of higher living standards, but it also means more customers for American companies to sell things to. Adrian Day, president of Adrian Day Asset Management in Annapolis, Maryland, says he's optimistic on China, though it's not without risks. Young people moving en masse from the country to the city can fuel social tensions, and the country's rules still prove baffling or impenetrable for many foreign investors. “However pessimistic people are about China,” Day says, “China's economy is still growing.” DRY POWDER One popular theory for why the economy is set to improve: Companies hoarded money during the financial crisis and now sit on record piles of cash. The Fed says nonfinancial companies hold about $1.7 trillion in cash and other liquid assets. Companies have cut back spending on machinery, tools, software and other so-called capital goods, resulting in the slowest growth in “capital stock” in nearly 50 years, notes Michelle Meyer, the U.S. economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “The positive story is that once the fiscal cliff is resolved, even if it's a messy process, some of the uncertainty hanging over businesses will be removed,” she says. Pent-up demand from corporations could turn into spending in the spring and pick up through next year. Jeremy Zirin, chief equity strategist at UBS Wealth Management, says the cash heap is the “dry powder” that will fuel growth. A major caveat: Market watchers have been talking about companies sitting on cash for a long time. The amount has been roughly the same nearly three years, and nothing so far has convinced companies to spend it liberally.

Obama insists on higher taxes for US richest

Private colleges boom as Calif universities falter

AP WIRE SERVICE WASHINGTON (AP), President Barack Obama said Friday his re-election means Americans are behind his approach for avoiding a looming “fiscal cliff” that threatens a new recession – and that his approach means the country's wealthiest people will have to pay more in taxes. A White House spokesman later said Obama will veto any bill extending tax cuts for those making more than $250,000 a year. Obama's brief public comments were his first since his reelection, and they set the tone for upcoming tense talks with congressional Republicans on avoiding a combination of deep spending cuts and the expiration of Bush-era tax cuts that automatically take effect Jan. 1 and total $800 billion next year alone. Republicans want the approach to avoiding the fiscal cliff to rely on spending cuts, but Obama insists that higher taxes for the wealthy must be part of the solution. “We can't just cut our way to prosperity,” the president said. Obama reminded his audience that if no deal is struck with a still-divided Congress, “everybody's taxes will automatically go up on Jan 1. Everybody's. ... That makes no

LOS ANGELES (AP), California's public higher education crisis has a flip side: swelling enrollment, expanding faculty, and state-of-the-art construction at the state's private colleges and universities. With five years of funding cuts causing stumbles in the state's public higher education systems, California students are increasingly turning to private institutions, as well as out-of-state schools, to get their degrees. California independent colleges report big upticks in enrollment of both freshmen and transferring students disillusioned with spiraling tuition for fewer classes at California State University, University of California, and community colleges. Universities in neighboring states also say they're seeing more interest from California students than ever before. “When it takes more than six years to graduate from a public university, that makes all of California's private schools a much better value for the money,” said Homa Shabahang, vice provost at the University of La Verne, where enrollment has soared almost 70 percent over the past five years to 8,600 students.

continued on page 29

continued on page 29

BY CHRISTINA HOAG, ASSOCIATED PRESS


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

Thousands attend Day on the Bay BY DAVE CORTESE

I

would like to thank everyone who joined me at the Third Annual Day on the Bay: A Multicultural Festival on Sunday, October 14th making it a huge success. Over 8,000 Santa Clara County residents joined us with their friends and neighbors at the beautiful Alviso Marina County Park. Held in coordination with the Santa Clara County Parks Department, the Day on the Bay featured free food, local entertainment, and over 140 exhibitors passing out information on their services. These included everything from county and city services to nonprofits and local businesses. There were many activities for families to enjoy. New this year was the rock climbing wall provided by Mobile Climb USA and my favorite, the zucchini car races. There were also arts and crafts, games, jump houses, and interactive displays such as the Santa Clara County Animal Shelter, Weights and Measures as well as Rural/Metro’s ambulance, the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Dive Team and Search and Rescue Team, the CHP and a San Jose fire engine. Additionally, many families took free kayak rides from the marina and were able to view the variety of wildlife habitat in the San Francisco Bay. This year, the kayaks were presented by the Los Gatos-Saratoga Community Education and Recreation. If you would like to do more kayaking, you can visit them during the summer at Vasona County Park. Thank you to the Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith for ensuring the safety of the kayakers on the water. This event would not be possible without the generous support of many local organizations and volunteers. The Santa Clara County Firefighters donated their time and barbecue grills to provide free hamburgers for attendees. I would like to give a special

thank you to the McDonalds Restaurants on White and Tully Road in San Jose for donating the condiments for the BBQ. Over 800 local children were able to pick out their own pumpkin to take home. We had many booths focused on healthy living and over 100 attendees received free flu shots. The Stanford Blood Center’s mobile blood drive unit received twelve donations of blood which will help thirty-six local patients. Attendees were treated to a day of diverse entertainment including Mexican Folk Dancing, African American folk songs, Vietnamese singers, Indian dancers from the Balaji Temple, and a great show put on by South Bay Kids. The entertainment was made possible through the help and support of Joe Santoro and the South Bay School of Music Arts in Milpitas. Thank you to all the volunteers that made this event successful including the Fire Science Students from the Central County Occupational Center, Peg Cathcart, Penny Aguilar, Jason Bennert, and many more. I would like to give a special thank you to our Gold Sponsors for this year: EV-Princess Cosmetic and The Health Trust for providing generous donations, Hi-Tech Dental for providing dental screenings and passing out toothbrushes, and MV Transit for providing the free shuttles for attendees. I would also like to thank our Silver Sponsors, Santa Clara Valley Water District, Target, Orchard Supply Hardware, Pacific Gas and Electric, Cubic Transportation Systems, Republic Services, Kaiser Permanente, South Bay School of Music Arts, and Los Gatos-Saratoga Community Education and Recreation. Additional thanks goes to the following Bronze Sponsors, South Bay Islamic Association, KLIV 1590, Barry Swenson Builder, Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Santa

Clara Family Health Plan, Rural/Metro Ambulance, McDonald’s, Sims Metal Management, Raging Waters, The Tech Museum, Phat Tri Sandwiches, Double Tenth Day Celebration Committee, JC Investments, Pin High Golf Center, San Jose Sabercats, San Jose Earthquakes, and San Jose Giants. The following supporters provided free services for attendees or donations for the door prize drawing: Michigan Avenue Market, Lunch with Tony’s, Maria Elena’s, Milpitas Golf Land, Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, Black Angus Steakhouse, PetSmart, Sports Basement Sunnyvale, Nurse Builders Academy, Dave and Busters, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Le Boulanger, Romano’s Macaroni Grill, Patxi’s Pizza, Applebee’s, AMC Theatres, Red Robin, BJ’s Restaurant , C&J Accounting, Zanker Road Resource Management, Miceli Financial Partners, American Pacific Mortgage, Amway, Milpitas Community Educational Endowment, TIMptations, Santa Clara Valley Daylight Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons, California Sports Center, The Legal Type, State Farm Insurance, Oak Hill Funeral Home and Memorial Park, New York Life insurance, Wettenstein Insurance and Financial Solutions, Mobile Climb USA, Panera Bread, Noah’s Bagels, and Laser Quest. This event was a great success, but we are always looking for ways to improve it. If you have any comments or suggestions, or would like to be put on our email list to hear about next year’s Day on the Bay, please contact me at dave.cortese@bos.sccgov.org or 408-299-5030.

Community Health Fair successful SUBMITTED BY AKHIL WADHERA, MD Over 75 people were able to ask for medical advice from health professionals and approximately 50 of them received free flu immunizations at a community health fair held November 3 at the Fremont Senior Center at Lake Elizabeth. The fair was staffed by 20 physicians and allied health professionals including - Primary care physicians, Pediatricians, Surgeons, Cardiologists, Gastroenterologists, Pulmonologists, Dermatologists, Oncologists, Nephrologists and Physical Medicine and rehabilitation physicians. There were also several nurses giving flu shots and measuring blood pressure. Physicians were from Kaiser Permanente, Washington Hospital and the community at large including allied health professionals such as Dieticians, Pharmacists, Physical therapists, Psychologists and even a dentist. Tri City Health and MySahana - two local community non profit groups – attended to provide support to the community. Kaiser Permanente provided the mobile health van along with the flu shots and the nurses who gave the flu shots, Washington Hospital provided a bone density measuring device along with the technologist and California Cardiovascular Consultants (local Cardiology group) provided the heart echo (ultrasound) machine that more than 15 people took advantage off. Each of these heart echo's usually cost around a $1000. The registration desk was staffed by high school students. This is an annual event that American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin holds in the fall as a service to the community


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ohlone Humane Society BY VIRGINIA HANDLEY As the election dust settles, campaign ads have mercifully disappeared and the 2012 state legislative session adjourns until January. Because of the election there will be many new legislators. Due to term limits, we are losing very good legislators such as San Mateo’s Senator Joe Simitian. It’s time to look back on the bills that passed or failed. As the Legislative Advisor to OHS and a member of Paw PAC, California’s Political Action for Animals, we monitored 50 pieces of legislation affecting animals. Among those that were supported and passed: Assembly Bill (AB) 2402 authored by Assemblyman Jared Huffman (who is going to Congress) changes the name of the California Department of Fish and Game to Department of Fish and Wildlife. It establishes an independent scientific advisory panel, authorized partnerships with non-profit organizations, and creates an “environmental crime task force.” This new law will reflect the broad responsibilities the Department has to all wildlife and their habitats, not just “game.” Next year Governor Jerry Brown has an opportunity to appoint at least two Fish and Game Commissioners who oversee the Department. The Commission has always been dominated by hunters. It’s time for more environmentalists. Senate Bill (SB) 1145 authored by Senator Bill Emmerson raises the maximum fines for ani-

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POLITICAL ANIMALS 510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont Ca. 94538-1304

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the TriCity Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organizations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today.

mal fighting from $5,000 to $10,000 and from $1,000 to $5,000 for spectators. Dog fighting and cock fighting are among the cruelest abuse of animals for entertainment and gambling. The penalties have to be high to be meaningful and encourage enforcement. SB 1221 authored by Senator Ted Lieu bans the hunting of bears and bobcats with dogs with the exception of pursuing them under a depredation permit or for research purposes. SB 1221 was the most controversial and contested bill in the Capitol Building, filling the halls and hearing rooms with hundreds of hunters and animal advocates. Hound hunting, as it’s called, entails dogs pursuing bears or bobcats sometimes for hours until the bear or bobcat is too exhausted to continue and climbs a tree to escape. The hunter then comes and shoots him/her at close range until the animal falls out of the tree. The majority of the legisla-

tors and animal advocates do not consider this “fair chase.” SB 1229 authored by Senator Fran Pavley prohibits landlords from requiring the de-clawing of cats or de-barking of dogs as a condition of rentals. De-clawing is a form of amputation and completely unnecessary as is debarking. While rentals may be temporary, these procedures are permanent. SB 1500 authored by Senator Ted Lieu amends and improves law enforcement procedures in dealing with “owners” of seized or abandoned animals to be sure the animals can be cared for properly. It does the animals no good to be returned to abusive or neglectful people. The California Fish and Game Commission passed amended regulations to improve the inspections of facilities where captive exotic animals are kept, including circuses. This is the result of a successful law suit by animal advocates, I am among

them, that maintained the Department was violating existing law by allowing permittees to have their own paid veterinarians conduct inspections, a conflict of interest. The Commission also accepted a petition by wolf defenders asking them to protect a lone wolf, OR7, who wandered into California from Oregon. Fortunately, the Commission will once again consider banning the importation of frogs and turtles for live animal markets and the pet trade. Many are diseased and released in California where they are killing our native wildlife. While good bills were passed, others failed. Among them: AB 298 authored by Assemblywoman Julia Brownley (who is going to Congress) would have phased out plastic bags that have a onetime use and require stores to make reusable bags available for sale. Plastic bags are a major source of litter often killing wildlife who mistake them for food. SB 969 authored by Senator Juan Vargas would have set up a California Pet Grooming Council to certify trained groomers and set standards in housing and handling. It would have been a voluntary certification program. This was the second unsuccessful attempt to protect animals from injuries by untrained groomers and unsafe handling. SB 1480 authored by Alameda County’s Senator Ellen Corbett was vetoed by the Governor and is probably the most disappointing loss to animals this year. It would have established a special

license for people who trap wildlife, often called “nuisance wildlife trappers.” Under current law the animals must have damaged property, but often they are trapped and killed just because they are considered a nuisance. SB 1480 would have banned cruel killing methods such as drowning, crushing chests, or injecting chemicals and would have required trappers to give information to their customers about current laws. Many people assume or are told that the animals will be released to the wild. But that is against the Fish and Game Code. If you have a wildlife problem, call a wildlife rehabilitation center for suggestions. SB 1523 authored by Senator Tony Strickland would have provided money from fines and fees to go into the “Retired California Race Horses Fund” for the retirement, rehabilitation, and re-training of race horses. Many race horses end up going to slaughterhouses. These animals have won money for their “owners” and deserve a humane retirement instead of being treated with neglect, abuse, and greed. Virginia Handley has advocated for animals at the State and local levels for more than 30 years. She is President of Paw PAC founded in 1980, and currently heads up the Animal Switchboard. Copies of the bills, the votes, and legislative analyses are available at www.leginfo.ca.gov. For more information on PawPAC contact Virginia at (510) 222-2236 or info@pawpac.org.

Letter to the Editor

Kimber Park asks for support SUBMITTED BY RENA KIEHN How much will ordinary citizens endure to protect something they value? The Kimber Park neighborhood is defining this right now. At the heart of the matter, is our belief that it is unjust and immoral for a developer to purchase land in a 36 year old Planned Development with the sole purpose of getting the zoning changed for their personal profit at the detriment of our community. The question about development on the Kimber Park property will come to a head next Tuesday, November 20th at 7pm when the latest development proposal will be voted on by City Council. Our community has shown extreme courage, conviction and perseverance. We have shown up in the hundreds at multiple city meetings, signed petitions and helped pass the Protect Private Open Space Initiative with over 13,000 signatures. Our battle has morphed over the past year from one against a 26 unit residential development to now being a fight against rezoning to allow a 42,000 square foot sport/lodging/business/event center complex larger than City Beach. There are some things in life that are worth fighting for and we believe this is one of them. This battle is not just about our neighborhood but is about the character of Fremont and our elected leaders. Will our leaders bow to the politics of money, influence, and threatened law suits? Or will they stand up for the community and tell the owner to stop trying to get the zoning changed? Will they tell the owner to run a facility with existing permitted uses in a scale that honors the original intent and is consistent with being on private open space in the middle of a residential neighborhood? We should all be watching the outcome of this battle. If zoning in a long-standing Planned Development can be changed with only a conceptual, vague plan amidst extreme neighborhood opposition, imagine what could be possible in your neighborhood? In an interesting twist, we learned that the owner has enlisted the help of Fremont’s Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber is claiming that the issue relates to economic development, but we know this is about one owner, leveraging her relationship with other business owners, to try to pressure our local officials through every means possible. The Chamber should not

be involved in a matter that relates to a park-like parcel in a residential Planned District with limitations on its usage (that the owner was aware of when she purchased it). The Chamber should not be getting involved in helping this owner receive a rezoning and additional land use entitlements. The project is not in a commercial or industrial area… it is in the center of a residential neighborhood on open space. This is politics at its worst where big money and friends in high places can buy influence. Do Chamber members really know what they voted on? Did they invite Kimber Park leaders to attend their meeting to hear the facts and answer questions? Were Chamber members who voted aware of the owner’s prior business practices? Did they know that the owner did not market or advertise the facility, that she closed the club with no notice to 20 year members, that she fenced off the club for five months? I am saddened by our Chamber’s decision to get involved, although not surprised, because of the circles of relationships and politics involved. Somehow the saying “it’s just politics” seems to magically erase the accountability that should come with such actions. There should be consequences for decisions that are not right. Kimber Park residents and Fremont residents have a right to know which Chamber members voted to support the developer. We have choices and we want to support businesses that really look out for the entire community… not just the business interests of wealthy developers. We hope to publish a list of the businesses, within the Chamber, who voted to support the developer’s plans on our website at www.savekimberpark.com . The residents of Fremont deserve to know before they shop. The Save Kimber Park group has been reasonable and respectful throughout this whole 20-month ordeal. We simply want zoning that was approved in a public process over 36 years ago, upheld. We believe the owner can run a profitable business with 13 tennis courts, an updated pool and a renovated clubhouse. Please attend the City Council meeting on Tuesday, November 20th and wear GREEN to show support for Save Kimber Park. Christina Broadwin, Save Kimber Park

The Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum makes happy the hearts of all Nancy Drew fans with a special stage

presentation and film screening double feature in honor of the famous, fictional girl detective. Features include First Person Singular’s “None Too Keene: Nancy Drew Noir” with special guests “The Czar of Noir” Eddie Muller (creator and host of the Noir City Film Festival each January at the Castro Theater in San Francisco) as Carson Drew, Mary Gibboney as Hannah Gruen, and Lydia Odette Warren as Nancy; and “Nancy Drew… Reporter” (1939, Warner Bros.) Bonita Granville stars in the 68 minute B-movie directed by William Clemens, who made features starring Perry Mason as well as four Nancy Drew films. Granville was the daughter of stage actors, making her film debut at the age of nine in “Westward Passage” (1933). Her big break was as Mary in the film adaptation of Lillian Hellman's “The Children's Hour” (renamed “These Three”). Granville was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In 1938, she starred as the saucy mischievous daughter in the multi-Academy Awards nominated hit comedy film “Merrily We Live” and as girl detective Nancy Drew in the hit film “Nancy Drew… Detective.” The Nancy Drew film success led to Granville reprising the role in three sequels from 1938 to 1939. In addition to the screenings there will be a Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys Book Swap & Sale in conjunction

with Berkeley’s Pegasus Books. Bring your books to trade or bring some cash for newto-you titles! Author Penny Warner will also be on hand signing copies of her Agatha Awardnominated “The Official Nancy Drew Handbook.” Pick up tips on beauty, relationships, survival, sleuthing, and success and start living the Nancy life. Questions? E-mail Rena at pr@nilesfilmmuseum.org or leave a message at (510) 494-1411. Tickets are available in advance at our box office during our regular tour hours: noon – 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. For the Love of Nancy Drew Stage Presentation & Film Screening Double Feature Saturday, Nov 17 2 p.m. Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, Edison Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 Suggested donation: $ 8 museum members, $10 general


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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3 7 8 2 1 4 9 6 5

Down

Tri-City Stargazer NOVEMBER 14 – NOV 20, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Chiron was the name given to a particularly special centaur in the Pantheon of Greek gods. Early in his history he was a misplaced soul, abandoned by both parents, and a renegade from the norm, even within his species. He was brilliant and learned to use the grasses and herbs in his world as healing poultices and teas. He made a place for himself in the Pantheon by developing surgical techniques and medicine. He adopted an avocation of gathering whatever other mismatched and peculiar creatures he found and helped them to define and develop their own skills so they would have a niche in that world. He is known as the “wounded healer” of physical and emotional pain. This week he turns direct after a five month retrograde period in the underworld. The shift of motion suggests that we will become conscious of whatever dis-eases we have, whether emotional or physical, over the next several months. Ailments will surface for treatment, rather than festering in the dark. Aries (March 21-April 20): Between now and the end of the year, your attention will be drawn to career and life direction. Activity in the outer world picks up speed. Authorities and others may be challenging. Be prepared to defend your initiatives. Use this time to improve your "product" or your presentation. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Warning to those on diet and exercise programs: this week it is just too easy to break training. If you mean what you've promised to yourself, don't go anywhere in which you would be in harm's way. It is a time in which you feel more outgoing and extroverted. Social life is a pleasure. Gemini (May 21-June 20): This is a week in which much of your time and attention will be absorbed by children or lovers. You choose which is the more likely. It is possible that you will feel compelled to return to relationship(s) or project(s) left undone from the past. Changes of direction may be prominent. Cancer (June 21-July 21): You have been considering how to fairly

share your resources with your progeny. This week brings an epiphany that blows away all your previous ideas. You will want to generate a discussion among the group, if possible. However, do not set anything in concrete for another month. There may be more changes to come. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Give special attention to new messages or to new people who enter your life during this time. A “teacher” crosses your path in the form of a person, a book, or a message that will steer you in the next favorable direction. This is worth some research. Virgo the Virgin (August 23-September 22): You have been considering alterations you want to make in the environment around you. Suddenly you feel the need to back out of a decision recently made. There is nothing wrong with this. It is important and worth giving a full reevaluation before you materialize changes. Libra (September 23-October 22): You may be learning about when is a good thing “too much” to handle. Travel is favored, along

with connections per the internet or long distance contacts. Sometimes even the best of things can grow like a balloon until they take up all the space in your life. Dieters be warned; avoid tempting situations. Scorpio the Phoenix (Oct. 23 Nov 20): Mars, your ruling planet, shifts your attention on the 16th to fresh territory. During the next six weeks, your activities and feelings will be intensified in the life sector related to vehicles, short distance travels, errands, communications, education, your neighborhood, and siblings. Use caution while driving because your accelerator foot may be itchy. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): You may discover that you are reluctant to follow through with decisions you have recently made. It is OK. It is important you think these plans over carefully. Perhaps they need to be reorganized. Meanwhile relationship and social life are in an upswing. It’s time to play. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Mars, the warrior, is entering your sign this week. You

want to take initiatives, fix problems, and generally take leadership. However, just for this week, these desires are countered by other planets (circumstances or people) who throw gravel in your path. Don’t give up on your goals. This is only temporary. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): You have two clear signals, “wait” and “go”. The “wait” signal is related to vehicles, siblings, neighbors, and roommates. No matter how you push forward, you cannot make anything happen. The “go” signal suggests you need to take charge of a program or plan that will help many people move forward.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): Please note the lead paragraph, because Chiron is turning direct in your sign. For the next seven months you will be given the consciousness to find better ways to care for yourself, both physically and emotionally. If you have been doing unconscious harm to yourself, the truth will come to light and give you the opportunity to be set free.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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SUBMITTED BY TRI-CITY ANIMAL SHELTER In celebration of the season of thanks, we are giving our little dogs a reason to be thankful. Adoption Fees will be waived for small dogs under15 pounds. The shelter is full of small dogs and we hope that by not charging an adoption fee for our littlest four legged friends, they will find a forever home during the holidays. Between November 10-30, 2012, adoptions on all small dogs (under 15 lbs.) will be free. The adoptions will also include spay or neuter surgery, microchip and rabies vaccine. To view available pets at the Tri-City Animal Shelter waiting for a new home, visit www.petharbor.com. November 10-30, 2012 Adoption Fees Waived for Small Dogs Under 15 pounds Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd. (located behind the Police Department), Fremont Tues-Fri: noon - 5 p.m. Saturdays: 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Closed Sundays, Mondays and holidays Note: Licensing fees for Fremont residents are not included in the promotion. Fees for a 1-3 year license range from $12-21 for altered pets. Visit

http://www.fremont.gov/index.aspx?NID=893 for more information on pet licensing fees.

November 13, 2012


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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THEATRE REVIEW

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR

T

he holiday season has descended upon the tiny fictional town of Tuna, Texas where small town stereotypes abound. This satirical comedy created by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears, and Ed Howard is the perfect remedy for post-election, pre-holiday stress. The 22 colorful characters are represented entirely by a cast of two talented men. Several subplots woven together with zingy one-liners create an evening full of laughs. A Tuna Christmas is the second in a series of three plays centered around an imaginary Texas town. Several characters

won 14 years in a row. Overshadowing the festivities is a mysterious Christmas vandal, nicknamed The Phantom. Townsfolk suspect the neighborhood juvenile delinquent, Stanley Bumiller, is behind the recent rash of holiday display destruction, even though he’s been paying off his societal debt through community service at the town’s Little Theatre production of A Christmas Carol. Alongside the Christmas contest, the theatre production, and the shenanigans of the Phantom, Tuna matron, Bertha Bumiller, is trying roles of 22 different men and women. The drag characters enhance the hilarity of the show. Stage décor is sparse, with little use of props. Sound effects, lighting, and numerous quick costume changes take center stage in this production, and it works very well. During one scene, cast members join the audience in listening to the radio broadcasting the winners of the holiday contest. This off-stage involvement further grabs the audience’s amusement. There is an abundance of fantastic comedic lines in this off-Broadway comedy. Since the play is about small-town Christmas in the heart of the Bible belt, many lines gently poke fun of religious sensibilities. In the final scene, faithful Baptist, Bertha Bumiller, learns to kick up her heels a bit saying, “I always wondered what it was like to be Methodist!” This great little satire is sure to delight any theatregoer’s comedic senses. The story line is very light and the many zany lines provide the audience with plenty of opportunities for laughter. This is the final show of Broadway West’s 2012 season. Come down and close out the year with some good-hearted fun!

reoccur throughout the series. Tuna, Texas is heralded as “the third smallest town in the state,” and its inhabitants fully play out all the troubles of small town living. The play opens upon a scene at the local radio station, OKKK broadcasting at 275 watts. Arles Struvie and Thurston Wheelis, station disc jockeys, are updating listeners on the town’s main holiday event—the annual Christmas yard display contest. Rich snob Vera Carp has

to hold her family together. Bertha has one Christmas wish, that her philandering husband would come home for Christmas. Will Bertha have a blue Christmas? Or will she find a little bit of holiday spirit elsewhere? The play was originally written for two men. After the play’s debut in 1989, creators Jaston Williams and Joe Sears often starred as the cast of characters themselves. Broadway West Theatre Company has carried on this tradition with Todd Wright and Tom Shamrell taking on the

A Tuna Christmas Nov 9 to Dec 15 (no shows Thanksgiving weekend) 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday 1 p.m. Sunday Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Tickets: $15 - $23


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November 13, 2012

Award-winning artist exhibits paintings at Cultural Corner SUBMITTED BY DONALD WILSON Known for her nature-inspired oil paintings, award-winning artist, Joann Reed will showcase her collection at NewPark Mall’s Cultural Corner in November. The San Jose resident who practices both oil paintings and pencil drawings has had her works shown extensively throughout galleries in California and have repeatedly hung in the Society of

BY ISABELLA OHLMEYER Brian Tracy once said, “Love only grows by sharing. You can only have more for yourself by giving it away to others.” Share

Western Artists and San Francisco’s Annual DeYoung Museum exhibit. Reed has won a large number of awards including “Best of” in shows for her renderings of tree-studded hills among other subjects. She devotes a large portion of her time roving through quiet places such as the ranchlands near the southern end of the San Francisco Bay, on her horse, who serves as the model for many of her multitude of horse pictures.

love by donating socks through Socks for Seniors in their 10th annual Sock Drive, now through December 23. Community leaders, volunteers, and dedicated families have been involved with

The exhibit is free and open to the public; it will be closed on Thanksgiving Day. For more information, visit www.NewParkMall.com.The Cultural Corner, which opened in May 2011, provides exhibit space for the work of local artisans, including painters, sculptors, photographers and digital artists. Local artists interested in displaying their work at the new Cultural Corner are invited to call Kenia Ortiz at (510) 284-1600.

Socks for Seniors for ten years, watching it become a nationwide network. Since 2002, over 250 communities worldwide have teamed up with Socks for Seniors, opening their hearts to volunteering, sock distributions, and sponsoring sock hops. Organization founder Kitty Coyne said, “We have one priority this season and that is to bring holiday cheer along with a new pair of socks to warm the hearts and cover the cold feet of our elderly seniors.” The Socks for Seniors Program encourages individuals to not only personally donate socks, but to become involved in a sock drive. It all starts with one person, a box, and a location. The socks will stay in the local Fremont area. If volunteers have a nursing home, assisted living center or other senior community in mind for distribution, that is great news. If not, Socks for Seniors will help

Joann Reed Exhibit Nov 1 - 30 Monday – Sunday: 12:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving, Nov 22 Cultural Corner (lower level near Sears) NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 284-1600 www.NewParkMall.com

connect those eager volunteers with a local senior community for distributing the socks at the end of the sock drive. Program area coordinators are encouraged to create a theme for their sock drive as well as take pictures of their decorated sock boxes and event sites. “It is fun to collect the funkier, holiday style socks you can find, along with traditional tube socks as well,” Coyne said. The holidays can be a bittersweet time for seniors who feel lonesome, so bring joy to their hearts and uplift their spirits with a kind donation of socks.

For more information or to register local churches, senior centers or civic groups in a sock drive, visit http://www.socksforseniors.com/.

It’s Christmas in the third smallest town in Texas. Radio station OKKK news personalities Thurston Wheelis and Arles Struvie report on various Yuletide activities, including hot competition in the annual lawn display contest and how the production of “A Christmas Carol” is jeopardized by unpaid electric bills. Many colorful tuna denizens join in th holiday fun. A delightful holiday show – with all characters portrayed by just two actors! Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont, presents the hilarious sequel to Greater Tuna, A Tuna Christmas by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard, directed by Jim Woodbury, November 9 through December 15 (no shows Thanksgiving weekend). For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218 or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org.


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Monday, Sep 18 - Thursday, Nov 16

Color and Light

8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Monday, Oct 24 - Saturday, Dec 1

Monday, Nov 6 - Sunday, Nov 29

Cal State East Bay Art Faculty and Staff Exhibition

"Phollages" and Photographs about "Nothing"...

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (Thurs: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m.) Paintings, ceramics & sculptures

Cal State East Bay Art and Education Building 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3299

Work of artist Hema Sukumar

Phantom Art Gallery at Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Saturdays, Sep 29 -Nov 17

Teen/Senior Computer and Gadget Help

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Trained teen volunteers help older adults

Thursday, Oct 26 - Sunday, Nov 17

Mixed Media Craft Exhibition

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Watercolor paintings by Barbara Cronin & Jaci Dadkarolis

Thursday, Nov 2 - Saturday, Nov 17

Thursday, Nov 8 - Saturday, Nov 17

Fridays, Nov 2 - Nov 30

Friday, Nov 9 - Saturday, Nov 17

"Peanuts" based characters deal with today's teen issues

Toddler Ramble: Wonders of Water

Tuesday,Oct 16–Friday, Nov 30

Nature classes for 1 to 3 year olds

Grant Peterson Collection

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Mon – Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Works by Jay Lewis, Larry Bendoski & Frank Wight

John O’Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Thursday, Oct 20 - Saturday, Dec 1

Area Artists' Annual Juried Exhibit

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Various artworks from Bay Area artists

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.adobegallery.org Mondays, Tuesdays, & Thursdays, Oct 23 - Dec 13

A Single Step...Begins the Journey

Mon: 5 p.m. -10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Photo exhibit by participants of Advanced Portfolio Workshop

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District 1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org Monday, Oct 23 -Sunday, Jan 6

Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition $

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Emmy-nominated television series comes to life

The Tech Museum 201 South Market St., San Jose (408) 294-8324 www.thetech.org

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org

Drama about the power of lies & gossip

8 p.m.

11 a.m. -11:30 a.m.

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

Showcase IV

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Irvington Community Center 41885 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 791-4334

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

Wednesday, Nov 7 - Sunday, Nov 25

Saturdays, Sep 29- Dec 8

Students master creative problem solving techniques. Ages 7 - 11

Sunday 10:00 AM

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.fremontcoffee.com

Dog Sees God $

1:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m.

Unity of Fremont

Digital collages & photographs by Cooksey-Talbott & Jacline Deridder

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Math Olympiad $R

A positive path for spiritual living

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

"The Children's Hour" $

7 p.m. American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702

The Little Mermaid Jr. $

7:00 p.m. (matinees at 2:30 p.m.) Live stage performance about an adventure-seeking mermaid

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 707-7158


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Continuing Events Friday, Nov 9 - Saturday, Nov 17

Bull in a China Shop $

7 p.m. Six old maids aim to capture the heart of the homicide detective

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 www.msjpups.org

November 13, 2012

Tuesday, Nov 13

Wednesday, Nov 14

California Native Succulents and Cacti Gardens

Women's Council of Realtors Luncheon $

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Naturalist Paul Heiple tell you how to care for plants

Real estate & aging

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Tuesday, Nov 13

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390 www.WCRTriCities.com

ASL Storytime

Thursday, Nov 15 - Saturday, Nov 17

7 p.m.

Mill Creek Ramblers

Friday, Nov 9 - Sunday, Dec 15

California School for the Deaf presents stories in sign language

7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

A Tuna Christmas $

8 p.m. & Sunday matinees 1 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Colorful residents of Tuna, Texas, celebrate Christmas

Mission Pizza & Pub 1572 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6858 www.missionpizza.com

Tuesday, Nov 13

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Tuesday, Nov 13 – Friday, Nov 30

Joann Reed Exhibit

12:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Live Blue Grass & Country music

Knee Pain Presentation

Thursday, Nov 15

6:30 p.m.

Tip-a-Cop $

Treatment options for knee pain

6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 264-4095

Law Enforcement Officers volunteer as food servers. Tips are donated to Special Olympics

Tuesday, Nov 13

Strizzi's Restaurant 2740 Mowry, Fremont (510) 797-9000

ACWD Water Supply & Fish Passage Projects

Thursday, Nov 15

Oil paintings from the award-winning artist

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Discuss improvement projects

Free Legal Clinic

Newpark Mall Cultural Corner Lower level near Sears 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 284-1600

Niles Elementary School 37141 2nd St., Fremont (510) 845-7549

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Friday, Nov 16 - Sunday, Dec 9

All My Sons $ 8 p.m. World War II story about family, love & deceit Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Friday, Nov 16 - Sun, Nov 18

The Good Person of Setzuan $

8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. Three rag-tag gods come to Earth

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 www.csueastbaytickets.com

Wednesday, Nov 14

Protecting Your Rental Housing Investment in Today's Environment

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Free workshop for Fremont landlords & property managers

City of Fremont Council Chambers 3300 Capital Ave., Fremont (510) 494-4508 Wednesday, Nov 14 Find it Fast! 4 p.m. Children grades 4-6 learn to use the library's website Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Wednesday, Nov 14

Tuesday, Nov 13

Coffee Cupping 101 $

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Learn to evaluate aroma & flavor

Suju's Coffee & Tea 3206 Thornton Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-5546 Tuesday, Nov 13

Holiday Business Promotions Workshop $

Fremont Bicycle/Pedestrian Technical Advisory Committee

7 p.m. Discussion to improve safety and accessibility

City of Fremont Development Services Center, Niles Room 39550 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 494-4535 rdalton@fremont.gov

For low income residents with civil legal problems. Call for appointment

Fremont Family Resource Center, Pacific Room #H800 39155 Liberty St. (at Capitol), Fremont (510) 574-2000 Saturday, Nov 17

Newark Rotary Crab Feed $

5 p.m. Cocktail, dinner & raffle

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-5683 Saturday, Nov 17

The Sangha

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. The First Followers

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-2581 Saturday, Nov 17 - Sunday, Nov 18

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Handcrafted gifts, holiday ornaments & baked goods

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335

11:30 - 1:30 p.m. Develop a promotions plan for the Holiday Season

La Quinta Inn & Suites 20777 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 247-2042 Tuesday, Nov 13

Overdrive eBooks Workshop for Mobile Devices R

12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Learn to use Overdrive service for your mobile device

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 Tuesday, Nov 13

Girls Night Out Networking $

5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Evening of networking. Appetizers & no host bar

Summitpointe Golf Club 1500 Country Club Dr., Milpitas (408) 262-8813 www.gnontrivalley.com Tuesday, Nov 13

Tri-City Women's Club Meeting $R

9 a.m. Bridge, card games & luncheon

Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont (510) 793-6830 Tuesday, Nov 13

Hurray for Veterans Luncheon $

11:45 a.m. Entertainment & lunch

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766

BJ Travel presents Educational Travel Seminars Discover the wonders of River Cruising through Europe and Asia

Wednesday, Nov. 14th 5:30pm -6:30pm for an informative presentation Featuring Chris Sisemore from Uniworld Boutique River Cruises. Presented at BJ Travel Center 39102 State Street, Fremont RSVP at 510 796-8300


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Saturday, Nov 17

Victorian Models and Artist's Fashion Show

www.fremontsymphony.org Saturday, Nov 17

Celebrate Diwali, Indian Festival of Lights

Sunday, Nov 18

See Victorian inspired fashions & artwork

3 p.m. - 4 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Family stories, poems, art & talent show

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401

Bring non-perishable foods for donation

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

St. Joseph Hall 43148 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-1055

Saturday, Nov 17

Saturday, Nov 17

For the Love of Nancy Drew $

Sunday, Nov 18

Five Wishes

Weekend Weed Warriors

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Discuss end-of-life health care choices

Volunteers remove non-native plants from the shoreline

12 noon - 1 p.m.

2 p.m. Double feature, book swap & author signing

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org Saturday, Nov 17

FUSD's Got Talent $

12 noon - 5 p.m. Singing, dancing & variety acts benefiting Fremont Schools

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538 www.fuss4school.ort/activities/reg istration/

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thorton Ave., Fremont (510) 797-7910 www.pathwayscommunity.info

Interfaith Thanksgiving Service

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturday, Nov 17

Fremont Atheist Forum

Monday, Nov 19

12:30 p.m.

Healthcare Forum

Politics and houses of worship

6:30 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Learn about the Affordable Care Act 2010

Sunday, Nov 18

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Music, Movies & Magic Gala Fundraiser $R

5 p.m. - 9 p.m. Cocktails, dinner & entertainment benefiting Fremont Symphony Orchestra

Best House, Palmdale Estates 159 Washington Blvd, Fremont (510) 624-4580

Thursday, Nov 8

FRC Discovery Cove Jewelry Boutique

Saturday, Nov 10 – Sunday, Nov 11

11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Newark Artists Open Studios & Holiday Boutique

Handmade items for women & girls

11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Fremont Family Resource Center Original art & holiday gift items 36493 Bridgepoint Dr., Fremont 39155 Liberty St., Fremont 36541 Cherry St., Fremont (510) 574-2000 35911 Ruschin Dr., Fremont Friday, Nov 9 – Sunday, Nov 11 6023 Tourraine Dr., Fremont www.myartiststudio.com/openHoliday Craft Boutique studios-map.jpg 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Handmade crafts & foods

4911 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont Side Entrance – Garage Rain or Shine Saturday, Nov 10

Saturday, Nov 17 – Sunday, Nov 18

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Handcrafted gifts, holiday ornaments & baked goods

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont Crafts, gifts, food, plus “Make & Take” (510) 933-6335 Veteran’s Memorial Hall 37054 Second St., Fremont

Sunday, Nov 25

Open House & Gift Extravaganza

11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Make gift cards, stocking stuffers & enjoy delicious treats

Coyote Hills Visitor Center 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Dec 1

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Jewelry, pottery, gift baskets & more. Over 50 vendors

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont ritu_saksena@hotmail.com

Holiday Boutique

Tree Lightings Friday, Nov 23

Festival of Lights Parade and Tree Lighting

6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-8023 www.niles.org

Saturday, Dec 1

Saturday, Dec 1

Mission San Jose Tree Lighting

Milpitas Tree Lighting

5 p.m. Live music, face painting, hot drinks, cookies & Santa Old School House 43571 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0600 www.msjchamber.org

7 p.m. Civic Center Plaza 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

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November 13, 2012

Sahil Markanday (front row, kneeling with baseball cap) and his volunteer crew on completion of his Eagle Scout Project at San Andreas Park, Union City.

Assisting with the climate action plan BY SIMON WONG PHOTO COURTESY OF NELSON KIRK

S

ahil Markanday, aged 14, is one of the youngest boy scouts to have recently completed his Eagle Scout project. Union City residents and the City’s Climate Action Plan are the immediate beneficiaries of his efforts. “Markanday and his crew of volunteers planted approximately 50 flowering trees and conifers around San Andreas Park to help expand the urban forest to sequester carbon as part of our Climate Action Plan,” explained Union City Grounds Supervisor, Nelson Kirk. “The flowering trees and conifers will also form a canopy to shade the pathways for residents who regularly walk in the park. They also planted another 120 shrubs along the back-up area of the park.” Eagle Scout is the highest attainable rank in boy scouting and requires years of dedication and hard work. Fewer than five percent achieve it. Remarkably, Markanday joined the Boy Scouts of America only in 2010. He has earned the 21 merit badges towards qualifying as an Eagle Scout; a dozen are compulsory and the remaining nine are elective. He has completed Camping, Citizenship in the

Community, Citizenship in the Nation, Citizenship in the World, Communications, Emergency Preparedness, Environmental Science, First Aid, Hiking, Personal Management, Personal Fitness, Family Life, Pioneering, Weather, Fingerprinting, Leatherwork, Mammal Study, Music, Astronomy, Stamp Collecting and Wood Carving. “The idea for my project arose from helping another scout with his Eagle Project,” Markanday explained. “To prepare, I first contacted City of Union City Public Works Department to see if they had any available projects, met Nelson Kirk to discuss the project and the work it would entail, planned the project, put it in writing and took pictures of the project site. I sought volunteers to help and must thank my scout master, Bruce Chan, committee chairperson, John Gillen, and Eagle Coordinator Merl Nygren for approval of the project and their guidance. The Eagle Scout project, which took two months from inception to completion, was an opportunity to apply leadership skills that had been taught at the National Youth Leadership Camp which I attended in the summer.” According to Markanday, completion of this project not only serves as a mile-

stone for becoming an Eagle Scout but, above all, feeling that he has done something useful for the community and City in which he lives has given him immense satisfaction. As for the future, the James Logan High School student plans to attend medical school and continue his community involvement, mindful of the need to be a good human being, to help others and to live by the Scout Oath at all times. “Union City owes the Boy Scouts of America a debt of gratitude,” said Kirk. “Most of our Eagle Scout projects are dedicated to planting trees in neighborhood parks and along boulevards and roadsides. These young men have become stewards in our urban forest and we appreciate them and their parents’ support.” For more information about Scouting within the San Francisco Bay Area Council, visit www.sfbac.org. Alternatively contact Joe Barton at (510) 577-9227 and joeb@sfbac.org or Steve Armstrong at starmstr@comcast.net about the different scouting units in the Mission Peak District (serves Fremont, Union City and Newark) and Tres Ranchos District (serves Hayward, Castro Valley, San Lorenzo and San Leandro).

For more information about Scouting within the Santa Clara County Council, visit www.scccbsa.org. Alternatively, contact Ken Schott at (408) 280-5088 or ken@scccbsa.org about the different scouting units in the Coyote Creek District (serves Edenvale, Evergreen, Milpitas, Berryessa, Alum Rock, Mt. Pleasant, parts of downtown and East San Jose).

Scout Master Bruce Chan (l) with Boy Scout Sahil Markanday (r), San Andreas Park, Union City.


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Matthews, Dino, and Ritchie retain Board seats SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE New Haven Unified School District voters have re-elected Michelle Matthews and Jonas Dino to the Board of Education and given Michael Ritchie a full term on the Board. Ms. Matthews, president of the Board for the past two years, was the leading vote-getter in the election, winning a second term as she received 7,758 votes (28.1 percent). Mr. Dino, the senior member of the Board, finished second with 7,659 votes (27.8 percent), earning a fourth term. Mr. Ritchie, who joined the Board last January after being appointed to fill the vacancy created when Trustee Kevin Harper moved out of the District, received 7,549 votes (27.3 percent). Challenger Nick Fresquez was fourth with 4,517 votes (16.4 percent). Statewide, the passage of Proposition 30 was a relief to New Haven families and employees, Superintendent Kari McVeigh said. “While it doesn’t mean we will be able to restore any of the myriad cuts that we’ve been forced to make during the past several years – remember, Gov. Brown asked us to build our budgets on the supposition Prop 30 would succeed – it does mean our District will be spared an additional reduction that we estimated at $5.5 million,” Ms. McVeigh wrote in a message to employees after the election. “We continue to face unprecedented financial challenges caused by five years of state budget cuts. All of us are familiar with the consequences: reduced services, larger class sizes; a school year that is five days shorter for students; and a work year that is nine days shorter for employees, on top of an additional 1 percent pay cut. The passage of Prop 30 won’t change any of that, but at least we are not being forced to make the school year and work year even shorter.”

Misson Valley ROP adds new talent to administrative team SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER There has been quite a bit of change at Mission Valley ROP from the very beginning of the new school year. Just before teachers returned from their summer break to begin staff development training, Margie Trujillo, former MVROP Coordinator, stepped into her new role as MVROP Director of Educational Services. Margie has been a valued staff member of the MVROP family for nearly fifteen years and has excelled in various capacities to help MVROP effectively provide the highest career technical education (CTE) to the Tri-Cities. Her wealth of knowledge, experience, and innovative ideas helped MVROP to start the 2012-2013 school year smoothly and on a positive note. She is excited to collaborate with everyone in her new capacity and to continue taking CTE to new standards. James Briano has been hired as the new MVROP Coordinator, the position which

was left vacant after Margie Trujillo assumed the role of Director of Educational Services. MVROP Superintendent, Pete Murchison stated, “James will help MVROP highlight and expand the use of technology in career technical education. As an experienced teacher and instructional leader from Washington High School, James has gone above and beyond to prepare himself for this next step in education. He will undoubtedly be an asset to us as we design and facilitate the implementation of common core standards in career technical education.” Now that all administrative positions have been filled with the best talent in education, Mission Valley ROP will continue taking its programs, staff, and students to new and exciting places with career technical education. Stay tuned. For the latest news and information about MVROP, visit us on the web at www.mvrop.org.

I-80 goes high-tech SUBMITTED BY TESS LENGYEL

The I-80 corridor, one of the most congested in the San Francisco Bay Area, has traffic volumes reaching 290,000 vehicles per day and an average of 7,500 hours of daily traffic delays. However, innovative high-tech solutions to improve highway and transit efficiency throughout the corridor are on the way. On October 19, 2012, Caltrans, the Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC), the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) and West Contra Costa Transportation Advisory Committee (WCCTAC), in conjunction with local jurisdictions and transit agency partners throughout the two-county corridor, began construction on the final phases of the Interstate 80 Integrated Corridor Mobility (I-80 ICM) project. The I-80 ICM project will improve traffic flow through the corridor to reduce congestion and travel time and improve safety by installing a suite of active traffic management (ATM) tools, along with adaptive ramp metering (ARM) at 40 on-ramps. The addition of these leading-edge intelligent transportation technology tools will position this section of I-80, between the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge Toll Plaza and the Carquinez Bridge, for 21st century vehicle and transit travel. The San Pablo Avenue corridor and other I-80 connecting arterials are also included in the project, which is the first of its kind in the Bay Area to integrate freeway and arterial operations into a single system. It is also the first project to use variable advisory speed signs for end-of-queue warnings (helping to reduce secondary accidents) and the first installation of lane use signs in California.

Transit will receive priority at ramps when they enter the freeway. “Safer and more efficient and reliable traffic flows along I-80 are essential to the current and future vitality of the Bay Area," said Alameda CTC Chair Mark Green. "Alameda CTC is working to ensure that county and regional transportation systems will run as smoothly as possible and keep pace with demand, as the Bay Area's population grows, using high-tech solutions to increase capacity on our existing roadways. This project means time-savings and greater convenience for Bay Area residents and businesses that rely on the I-80 corridor." "This project will provide our cities the necessary tools to better manage traffic on our streets when things break down on the freeway," added WCCTAC Chair Janet Abelson. "With an investment of $5M from the Contra Costa Measure J half-cent sales tax, the Contra Costa Transportation Authority has leveraged over $76M in State funds to improve traffic flow and safety along one of the most congested corridors in the Bay Area," said CCTA Chair Don Tatzin. The I-80 ICM Project, which will cost approximately $80M, is funded largely by the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the Traffic Light Synchronization Program, both created by State Proposition 1B. The Alameda CTC’s commitment of approximately $2.8M of Alameda County Measure B half-cent sales tax has also leveraged State funds towards the project’s overall cost. The project entails the collaboration and co-operation of 18 agencies on operating and maintenance principles for the corridor. For more information, visit www.AlamedaCTC.org

Tomato Palooza SUBMITTED BY ELEANOR LANUZA When most of the residents of the Masonic Home of California and Acacia Creek Senior Retirement Community first heard “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off,” they were just teenagers. Now, more than 80 years after the song was released, those same teenagers are saying Tomato, Tomato, Tomato… In celebration of the bountiful harvest, the Masonic Home of California and Acacia Creek Retirement Community held a Tomato Palooza and Parade Thursday, September 27 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Kicking off the festive event was the Tomato Parade led by its 90 plus years old group of residents in their tomato costumes and creative floats, and the Tomato King and Queen riding in their “tomato car.” Also, as an added treat to this spectacular occasion was a special belly dancing number by staff and residents, and the MHCUC All Male Choir rendition of “Yes We Have Some Tomatoes.” In addition, the event had everything from varieties of tomato displays, live blues and swing music performance by Terry Hank Band, dancing, salsa tasting, a delicious smorgasbord of “all things tomato” foods to Bloody Mary in purple, yellow and red. “This is what the heart of a great community is all about. Taking time to celebrate life together with joy, laughter, music….and tomatoes!” says Nadine Yother, resident of Acacia Creek and leader of the Tomato Sewing Group who made some of the costumes. The tomatoes are organically grown by residents in a one-acre garden, and significantly remarkable in this backyard farming endeavor is that the residents who tend the garden average 85 years of age and make their own decisions regarding the planting and growing of the variety. John Marshall, Director of Culinary Services who oversees the garden operation from a management perspective at the Masonic Homes, says, “We have 25 varieties of heirloom tomatoes, six varieties of hybrids, over 300 tomatoes planted all grown from seeds germinated in our greenhouse, thousands of pounds grown and eaten.” “It is our hope that next year’s festival and parade will be open to the public at large so they can see firsthand the garden and tomato harvest,” says festival organizer Penny Victoria.


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Blind tennis players keep their ears on the ball BY TERENCE CHEA ASSOCIATED PRESS FREMONT, California (AP), Learning how to play tennis is hard enough. Now try it when you can't see. That's what students are doing at the California School for the Blind. They're learning a form of tennis adapted for the visually impaired – and expanding the boundaries of what the blind can do. The state-supported campus in Fremont is one of three American schools for the blind that recently began teaching adapted tennis, which was invented in Japan in the 1980s. A nonprofit group called Tennis Serves is working to promote the sport throughout the U.S. “I didn't know someone with no vision could play tennis until I came to this school,” said a 16year-old student from Modesto named Jonathan. The school declined to provide his last name, citing a state law that protects the privacy of students with disabilities. Blind tennis features a smaller court, lower net and junior tennis rackets with bigger heads and shorter handles. String is taped to the floor so players can feel the boundaries with their feet. Players use a foam ball filled with metal beads that rattle on impact, allowing them to locate the ball when it hits the ground or racket. Once served, they have to return the ball before it bounces three times. “The most difficult thing to teach is timing their stroke,” said Sejal Vallabh, the 17-year-old

founder of Tennis Serves. “Being able to listen to the ball, locate it using their sense of hearing and swing at the precise moment the ball goes by is really difficult to teach.” While experienced players can keep the ball in bounds and stage extended rallies, just hitting the ball over the net can be a challenge for beginners. During a recent visit to the California School for the Blind, students mostly swatted balls into the ground, the net and toward the ceiling and walls. Few balls were returned, but teachers say some are developing that capability. Blind tennis was created in 1984 by Miyoshi Takei, a blind Japanese high school student who designed the adapted ball and helped the sport gain popularity in Japan and other Asian countries. He dominated blind tennis competitions until he was killed in a train accident last year at age 42. Vallahb, an avid tennis player who is now a high school senior in Newton, Massachusetts, first encountered blind tennis two years while doing a summer internship in Japan, where her grandmother lives. “After I saw it there, I knew that I wanted to recreate the sport that I had seen back in the U.S.,” she said, so she started Tennis Serves. Vallabh first began teaching at Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts with help from her high school tennis teammates. She then helped start similar programs at Lighthouse International in New York City and the

California School for the Blind. Vallabh is working with engineering students at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California to design a ball that continuously beeps to make it easier for blind players to track it. At the California School for the Blind, staff members said they were skeptical when Vallabh first approached them about teaching the adapted sport. “We were thinking, ‘How are we going to teach tennis?’” said Mary Alice Ross, who teaches adapted physical education. “My colleague said, ‘Tennis is like teaching football. It's not something we really do.’” The California School for the Blind, which has about 90 students ages 5 to 22, offers many adapted sports activities and sports, including bowling, boating, swimming, hiking, ice-skating and goal-ball. Tennis is one of the most difficult sports for the visually impaired, but it brings unique rewards, teachers say. “When it comes to being able to play a sport which is commonly only played by people with good vision, it's a big selfesteem boost.” said John Healy, a dorm counselor who teaches adapted tennis. A 12-year-old student named Sebastian said he was surprised when he first heard about the adapted sport. “Tennis? How could blind people play tennis?” he said. “But then I was like, blind people can do anything they want. If you set your mind to it, then you can do it.”

CSD defeats Tomales in Round 1 of NCS

SUBMITTED BY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The California School for the Deaf showed that they are in great season form and ready to make a run at the NSC Division 5 title on Saturday, Nov. 10. They took control of the game against Tomales High School from the start; the defense asserted itself by putting pressure on Tomales with great blocking and complete control at the line of scrimmage.

On defense and offense, Carlos Lopez had an all-star day. Lopez threw for 165 yards and found his receivers four times for touchdowns. He came up big on defense, as he hauled in an interception of Braves quarterback Jacob Brady and recovered a fumble that set up the Eagles’ first score late in the first quarter. Johnny Morales also had a good day, as he got the ball rolling for the Eagles with a 29-yard touchdown reception from Lopez with 24 seconds left in the first quarter. That put the Eagles in front 6-0. Lopez then found Dakota Daniels in the clear for a 13-yard touchdown, and later stayed in the pocket to find Brian Freeman for a 48-yard touchdown. Freeman helped ice the game for the Eagles with 116 yards on the ground on 21 carries. Daniels caught three passes for 71 yards and two scores. This 26-6 win sets up a great showdown next Saturday between the No. 3 St. Vincent de Paul Mustangs and the No. 2 California School for the Deaf Eagles.

Fremont Football League update SUBMITTED AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW In the Continental division of the Fremont football League [9-12 years], the Saints offense is performing well with 242 points, followed closely by the Chiefs with 172 points. Both team’s defensive efforts are beginning to jell. The Colts are beginning to form a formidable squad and Panther defense is making a difference. Coach of the Chargers says the team is learning a lot and there could be a future star in the group.


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Mission San Jose golfers take NCS championship SUBMITTED BY MARK HIRSCH

Elite Impact takes second at Halloween Cup

Mission San Jose Girls’ golf team won the NCS championship at Windsor, California. They defeated 16 other teams and were led by Monica Chen, 69, Meridith Hirsch, 77, and Emily Rotter, 78 a personal best. The next event will be the NorCal Championship in Stockton with the right to defend Northern California and battle with Southern California for the State Championship.

ARTICLE AND PHOTO COURTESY OF COACH TOMAS CLARK Newark Elite Impact U9 Competitive Girls attended the Breaker's Halloween Cup October 27-28 in Santa Cruz. The team recorded 1 win, 2 ties and 1 loss. Even with the loss, Impact was able to finish as the second place team in the U9 Girls division of the tournament. It was the team's first tournament of the year; finishing second was a really big accomplishment. Several of the players scored goals but Kiara Gutierrez scored four goals in the tournament and was the leading scorer for Impact. Impact's goalie, Jalina Vargas, also recorded a shutout in their win. The coach was extremely proud of his team as they never gave up.

James Logan tramples Irvington in first round of NCS

BY NICK ZAMBRANO PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Last Friday night [November 9], it took all of just one play for the James Logan Colts football team to set the mood of their North Coast Section Division I match-up with the Irvington Vikings. On the first play from scrimmage, Logan star running back Warren Miles Long busted through for a 67-yard touchdown scamper. From there on out, the floodgates would continue to open on the Vikings and the end result was a one-sided 56-8 win in favor of the Colts. “We’re always glad when we score on our first drive, it’s definitely a big bonus and breaks the ice, so to speak,” said Logan head coach George Zuber. “To be able to do it on the first play was exciting.” And the excitement would continue as Logan scored on each of their possessions in the remainder of the first quarter. On the Colts’ second goaround with the ball, quarterback Jeffrey Prothro connected on 31yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Amalani Fukofuka. It would be the first of four touch-

down hook-ups between the senior tandem. Prothro finished the contest going 6-8 with 178 yards passing, while Fukofuka racked up 176 yards of Prothro’s 178 through the air. After a second Prothro-Fukofuka touchdown, the rest of the first half became the Warren Miles Long show. Opening the second quarter the same way he opened up the first, Long busted another long touchdown. This one was for 60 yards and gave the Colts a commanding 28-0 lead. Long and the rest of the Logan offense continued to have its way with the Irvington defense for the duration of the half. After Prothro and Fukofuka’s third touchdown connection, Long made it 49-0 in favor of the Colts with two more touchdowns on runs of two and three yards. And that score carried its way to the end of the first half. “We said ‘run like your life depending on it’ and he did, he really took it to heart,” Zuber said of Long’s performance. On a mere 10 carries, Long finished the night with 211 yards and four touchdowns. Desperate to prevent a shutout, Irvington vigorously marched

down the field on their final possession. With the ball on the Logan two-yard line, lineman Mahmoud Eldesouky became the unsung hero when he trucked his way in for the score. A two-point conversion would bring the score to its final standing. The touchdown provided a moral victory for the Vikings. With Eldesouky’s score, Irvington snapped a three-season long drought in which they could not muster a single point against the Colts. The last time the Vikings scored against Logan was in 2009, a 36-6 loss. Moving forward, the Colts will play host to the Freedom High Falcons of the Bay Valley Athletic League in the second round of the NCS championship tournament. The Falcons come in to this match-up having toppled Berkeley High, 63-7. The Logan defense, which has allowed just eight points per game, will have their hands full as they try to stop a Freedom offense that has averaged 36.8 points this season. Kick off is set for Friday, Nov. 16 under the lights of James Logan’s Judson E. Taylor Stadium at 7 p.m.

Sportivo SC takes Championship SUBMITTED BY FRANZ BRUCKNER PHOTOS COURTESY OF ROBERT FERNANDEZ Newark Sportivo, an under-9 boy’s competitive team defeated the Los Gatos United in the final of the annual Diablo FC Halloween Tournament followed by a 4-1 win over the Danville Mustangs. In the semi-final, Sportivo faced a tough home squad (Diablo FC). Tied at half time 2-2, Sportivo came out like true champions and scored five more goals to defeat Diablo 7-3. Despite playing in a higher level tournament, Newark Sportivo SC endured, and were crowned champions. Coach Rob Fernandez commented “It was a total team effort, and these boys deserve a lot of credit.” Way to go Newark Sportivo!

TOPS are tops at Halloween Kick or Treat SUBMITTED BY CINDY BECK UC Premier TOPS U11Girlstook first place in the 14th Annual Halloween Kick or Treat

Championship, Diablo FC would prove to be a fierce team ready to face the TOPS! The match was intense and had fans on the edge of their seats. TOPS came out ahead, winning 3-1.

Classic, October 27-28.They remain the Champions for 2011 and 2012. All teams came in unique costumes; the TOPS came dressed as the "TOPS NERDS” with custom-made tshirts, suspenders and pocket protectors topped off with a stunning red bow tie! Each had on nerdy socks with coke bottle nerd glasses. This was a fun tournament, but the TOPS came to play some soccer! With their game faces on, TOPS faced the Manteca Rangers United. The TOPS didn't give up any goals and defeated the Rangers 7-0. Competition was just getting started as rivals Mustang Blast would present a big challenge. In a nail biting match, the TOPS came out ahead, 2-1. Now one game away from playing in the

The Championship game pit TOPS against FCA Lightening. The TOPS were determined to defend their title. Superb defense never gave FCA Lightening a chance at making a goal; TOPS offense scored seven goals. Excellent teamwork and ball skills brought TOPS the first place trophy with a final score of 7-0. A well deserved win aided by the efforts of Coach Rob Hernandez, Trainers Jorge Cisneros and Paola Cisneros. The win took the determination and great teamwork of Natalia Bartolome, Alex Carpio, Allison Chang, Samantha Conlon, Kyanna Cruz, Andrea Dan, Anmol Gill, Jordan Hong, Chloe Lujan, Jessica McNair, and Minah Yang. Congratulations UC Premier TOPS!

Football Mission Valley Athletic League Submitted by Kenny Jacoby and Mike Heightchew November 1 James Logan Colts- 58; Mission San Jose Warriors 0 November 2 Washington Huskies- 48; Irvington Vikings 7


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Calif. House candidates wait for vote count update BY GARANCE BURKE ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Republican Rep. Mary Bono Mack and her Democratic challenger, Raul Ruiz, were awaiting elections officials' latest update of outstanding votes Friday in their heated congressional race in the desert communities surrounding Palm Springs. Of the three U.S. House contests in California that remained too close to call, Bono Mack had the largest margin to make up of any Republican incumbent. As of Friday afternoon, she trailed Ruiz by 4,679 votes, out of 166,000 counted. County officials were still counting mil-

lions of ballot statewide three days after the election, and both campaigns were poised for elections officials' announcement Friday of the latest tally of mail-in and provisional votes. In the suburbs south of Sacramento, GOP Rep. Dan Lungren was struggling to fend off Democratic physician Ami Bera, who held a slight advantage with only absentee ballots left to count. Lungren trailed his opponent by 184 votes out of 176,000 counted. In San Diego, GOP Rep. Brian Bilbray's race against Democratic challenger Scott Peters was still a tossup Friday. Bilbray was behind by 814 votes out of 210,000 counted.

In Riverside County, elections officials had about 164,000 ballots left to count. San Diego County estimated about 375,000 left to count, while Sacramento County reported working through the 193,000 ballots it had left. California's congressional races have grown much more competitive since an independent panel redrew the district boundaries in 2010, the same year the U.S. Supreme Court struck down limits on outside political spending. State congressional races drew intense interest nationally, after gerrymandered strongholds were transformed into freefor-alls rich with campaign cash from groups as varied as Planned Parenthood

City office closures SUBMITTED BY CITY OF HAYWARD Most City of Hayward operations will observe holiday closures in November and December 2012 during which the majority of City offices will close. Police, Fire and emergency services will continue operating normally. The first closure period is from Monday, November 19 through Friday, November 23, 2012. Normal operating hours resume on Monday, November 26. The second is from Monday, December 24, 2012 through Tuesday, January 1, 2013. City services return to normal operating hours on Wednesday, January 2, 2013. Maintenance Services will be providing services and can be contacted at (510) 881-7745 during normal hours (6:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) except on City holidays (November 22-23, December 24-25 and December 31, 2012 - January 1, 2013). The Street Sweeping schedule will remain unchanged for November 19-21 and December 26-28, 2012. Both branches of Hayward Public Library (Main and Weekes) will remain open except on Saturday, November 24, 2012. Check the Library website for operating hours and holiday closures at http://library.hayward-ca.gov/

For emergency utility services (water/sewer), call (510) 293-7000. The Bill Payment/Revenue Center at City Hall will be closed; bills can be paid by using the night box outside City Hall; online payments can also be made on the City’s website at www.haywardca.gov). For emergency utility services, call (510) 293-7000. Building Permits/Inspections/Fire Marshal’s Office (Permit Center) services will be unavailable during the holiday periods. Job applications/Human Resources will close. For employment information and applications, visit www.hayward-ca.gov. Neighborhood Services and the City Clerk’s Office will also close and no services will be available. The Mayor/City Council/City Manager/City Attorney’s Offices will close for both holiday periods; the public can contact the Mayor, Council, City Manager or City Attorney by email. The Animal Control Center will close November 22-23 and December 23-25, 2012. Animals may be left in the “overnight box.” There will be staff caring for the animals during the holiday period. For more information about City of Hayward office closures and service impacts during the holiday periods, visit www.hayward-ca.gov.

City of Newark November 8, 2012

and Americans for Tax Reform, headed by low-tax crusader Grover Norquist. Super PACs and other outside groups flooded California's House races with more money than any other state under new rules allowing unrestricted outside political spending. By Tuesday, spending had reached nearly $54 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. County registrars have 28 days after the election to finalize results under California law, but any candidate or voter can ask for a recount within the following five days. Should that occur, local elections officials can appoint four voters to oversee a special recount board, a process that could take weeks to finalize.

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District NOVEMBER 5, 2012 Rejected a claim received regarding alleged personal injury, under the provisions of Government Code Section 912.6, and directed Staff to notify Claimant, District Legal Counsel and Insurance Broker. Authorized Staff to expend funds not to exceed $168,675 for the purchase of a new prefabricated restroom building from Public Restroom Company for San Lorenzo Community Park using Buy Board. Authorized Staff to purchase two skylights for the San Lorenzo Community Park Restroom Building in the amount of $1,068. Authorized Staff to expend funds not to exceed $182,575 for the purchase of a new prefabricated restroom building from Public Restroom Company for Ruus Park using Buy Board. Authorized Staff to purchase two skylights for the Ruus Park Restroom Building in the amount of $1,068. Appointed Director Paul Hodges, Jr., Chairperson on the Annual Board of Directors Award(s) Committee, as well as Director Minane Jameson, and Staff representatives Mr. Dan Giammona, Golf Manager, and Ms. Kerrilyn Ely, Recreation Superintendent, and directed Staff to begin soliciting nominations and select recipients for the 2012 Board of Directors' Awards. Adjourned the meeting in honor and in memory of Mr. Henry Francis, Greater Hayward Area Recreation and Park Foundation Board member since 1988, and former H.A.R.D. Board member. Chair Dennis Waspei - Yes Lou Andrade - Yes Paul Hodges - Yes Minane Jameson - Yes Carol Pereira - Yes

Letter to the Editor Presentations and Proclamations Presentations of 2012 Corporate Games awards Introduction of newly hired Assistant Planner Yesenia Jimenez Introduction of recently promoted Human Resources Technician Veronica Wortham Public Hearings Approve addendum to Dumbarton TransitOriented Development Specific Plan to add form based codes. Considered the “next step” in fulfillment of the Specific Plan, form based zoning results in predictable build results, using physical form as the organizing principle. A more extensive proposal will be presented at the November 29, 2012 council meeting. Consent Cancel meeting on December 27, 2012 Accept work of Graham Contractors for 2012 Street Cape Seal Program Accept work of Rosas Brothers Construction for 2011/2012 wheelchair accessible ramps Non-Consent Approve a text amendment to ensure consistency of Municipal Code with Subdivision Map Act Mayor Alan Nagy Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Luis Freitas Maria “Sucy” Collazo Robert Marshall

Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

Thank you

Introduction of newly hired Assistant Planner Yesenia Jimenez

My deepest appreciation to my supporters; I have been humbled and inspired by the incredible diversity of our East Bay communities, and I will continue to stand up for our underrepresented. I congratulate Bill Quirk on his victory [Assembly District 20] and encourage him to work toward our mutual goals of improving the lives of others. This campaign has been an amazing journey, and I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to meet so many wonderful people along the way. I will carry on my mission of serving others. Dr. Jennifer Hidalgo Ong, O.D

Support bill banning use of dangerous therapies SUBMITTED BY CHARLES JOUGHIN, HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN

Introduction of recently promoted Human Resources Technician Veronica Wortham

Presentations of 2012 Corporate Games awards

California Governor Jerry Brown has the chance to protect California’s most vulnerable children by signing into law SB 1172, a bill prohibiting therapists from harming lesbian, gay bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth by subjecting them to dangerous efforts that purport to change one’s sexual orientation. Recently, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, sent a letter to Gov. Brown urging him to support SB 1172. HRC has launched a petition, asking 350,000 members and supporters in California to call on Gov. Brown to do the right thing and sign the bill into law. In his letter to Gov. Brown, HRC President Chad Griffin detailed the consequences of continued demonization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, citing HRC’s landmark study of LGBT youth released in June. The top concerns for LGBT youth revolved around a lack of acceptance by family, classmates, and society more generally. In contrast, straight youth worried about classes, grades, college acceptance, and financial pressures. This stress is unsurprising considering that 89 percent of California youth reported hearing negative messages about being LGBT – 63 percent of those youth say those messages come from elected leaders. “LGBT youth have too many things to worry about in today’s society. It’s time to ban reparative therapy,” added Griffin. To sign the petition calling on Gov. Brown to sign SB 1172, visit http://action.hrc.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=65907.0


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Obama insists on higher taxes for US richest sense. That would be bad for the economy.'' He also invited Congressional leaders of both parties to the White House next week for talks on how to avoid the fiscal cliff. Obama had been silent since his victory speech early Wednesday, and leading Republicans have filled the vacuum with promises to stand resolutely against any effort to raise tax rates on the country's richest people. Obama's long-held position is that tax rates on family income over $250,000 should jump back up to Clinton-era levels. All sides say that they want a deal, and that now that the election is over, everyone can show more flexibility than in the heat of the campaign. Congress returns to work on Tuesday and faces about a month and a half of work before the holidays. But Republicans warn that a fight could hurt efforts for future compromise in a bitterly divided Capitol and threaten Obama's second-term agenda. “Raising tax rates will slow down our ability to create the jobs that everyone says they want,” John Boehner, the speaker of the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, told a press conference Friday shortly before Obama spoke. Boehner has warned that such a plan might not even pass the Senate, where Democrats hold control. A lot is at stake. A new Congressional Budget Office report on Thursday predicted that the economy would fall into recession if there is a protracted impasse in Washington and the government falls off the fiscal cliff for the entire year. Though most Capitol-watchers think that a long deadlock is unlikely, the analysts say such a scenario would cause a spike in the jobless rate to 9.1 percent by next fall. The rate is now at 7.9 percent. Some analysts believe that the fiscal cliff is more like a fiscal slope and that the economy could weather a short-term expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts and the government could manage a wave of automatic spending cuts for a few weeks. But at a minimum, going over the fiscal cliff would rattle financial markets as the economy struggles to recover. Markets have already slumped worldwide as investors have refocused on challenges to the world economy following Obama's re-election. World stocks mostly fell Friday as fears persisted over the “fiscal cliff” that's seen as a big threat to the economic recovery. By midafternoon in Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 index of leading companies was down 0.5 percent at 5,749.88 while Germany's DAX was 1.2 percent lower at 7,120.13. The CAC-40 in France slipped 0.3 percent to 3,397.53. On Wall Street, an early rally faded after President Barack Obama said he would stick to his pledge to seek higher taxes from the wealthy as part of his plan to reduce the U.S. government's budget deficit. At 3:00 p.m. (2000 GMT) the Dow was up nine points at 12,821. The CBO analysis says the looming combination of automatic tax increases and spending cuts would cut the massive U.S. deficit by $503 billion through next September, but that the fiscal austerity would cause the economy to shrink by 0.5 percent next year and cost millions of jobs. The new study estimates that the nation's gross domestic product would grow by 2.2 percent next year if all Bush-era tax rates were extended and would expand by almost 3 percent if Obama's 2-percentage-point payroll tax cut and current jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed were extended as well. Republicans say they're willing to consider new tax revenue but only through drafting a new tax code that lowers rates and eliminates some deductions and wasteful tax breaks. And they're insisting on cuts to federal aid programs like Medicare, Medicaid and food stamps. Democrats are sure to press for a guarantee that tax reform doesn't end up hurting middle-income taxpayers at the expense of upper-bracket earners. Republicans want to press for corporate tax reform and a guarantee that the top rate paid by individuals and small businesses goes down along the way. Associated Press writers Ben Feller, Andrew Taylor, Nedra Pickler, Julie Pace, Martin Crutsinger, Ken Thomas and Pete Yost contributed to this report.

Commercial burglars arrested SUBMITTED BY SGT. ABBIE SERRANO, MILPITAS PD On November 04, 2012, at approximately 12:56 p.m., a Milpitas police officer was patrolling in the 1600(B) of McCandless Dr. and noticed someone walking in the area of a vacant business. The officer confronted Gregory Mackin of San Jose as he traversed the parking lot adjacent to the vacant commercial buildings. Officers quickly arrived on scene and began setting up a perimeter around the building. A second person, Lawrence Rabello (San Jose), was apprehended as he exited the south side of the vacant building. Both men were arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Jail. Gregory Mackin was arrested for prowling. Lawrence Rabello was arrested for commercial burglary and an outstanding warrant. The Milpitas Police Department continues to work together with the community and encourage residents and business owners to call the police department if you see suspicious persons or suspicious activity. Anyone with any information on crimes or suspicious activity occurring in Milpitas is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. In the case of in-progress crimes, or emergencies, please call 9-1-1. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/cri me_tip.asp

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Private colleges boom as Calif universities falter California has long been recognized for its state-funded higher education and is one of a handful of states that boast two sprawling university systems. CSU enrolls 420,000 students at 23 campuses, while UC enrolls 222,000 at 10 campuses. Tuition is a bargain compared to private schools and many state universities – annual tuition runs $5,970 at Cal State and $13,200 at UC. The state's community college system, meanwhile, is the largest in the nation, with 112 colleges enrolling 2.6 million students. Fulltime students pay $1,104 a year. But California's promise of offering residents an affordable college education has slipped as the state's budget crisis has translated into $2.5 billion in funding cuts to higher education since 2008. State colleges and universities have boosted tuition, slashed faculty and pared back enrollment, making it harder for students to get admitted, come up with the cash, graduate on time and even find chairs in crammed classrooms. Independent schools have responded by touting their small classes, course availability and on-time graduation, as well as beefing up financial aid. It's proving a strong lure for many students. “It's either a high-price tuition or a low price and gamble with your education,” said Mario Melgar, who transferred to Azusa Pacific University this fall from Pasadena City College. The 21-year-old physical therapy student said he didn't even bother to complete his associate's degree because he couldn't get into the classes. He wanted to transfer to a Cal State but students there told him it was a similar situation so he

cobbled together Azusa Pacific's $30,000a-year tuition with financial aid and loans. “It's not going to get any better soon and I want to start working,” he said. Although the independent schools are picking up some of the slack from the state systems, many students are still falling through the cracks, said Patrick Callan, president of the Higher Education Policy Institute in San Jose. “The privates are going to help a lot of students, but they account for a small amount of capacity,” Callan said. “The scale of this problem is too big. In California, most students are in the big public systems.” Public universities say they're simply caught between rising demand and shrinking funds, but note they continue to serve hundreds of thousands of students inexpensively. Applications at UC have risen for eight consecutive years and tuition remains a relative bargain despite recent hikes, noted spokeswoman Dianne Klein. Larger out-of-state schools have also seen more interest from California students. The University of Oregon this summer hired two regional admissions counselors, one each for Northern and Southern California, to recruit more high school seniors. The number of freshmen just from Southern California jumped from 177 five years ago to 449 this year. California students have driven Northern Arizona University's 40 percent enrollment surge over the past three years. The school draws California students with a break on out-of-state rates and a pledge to keep the rate the same for four years. The growing wave of interest means the independents have become more selective in who they choose to admit, raising the col-

leges' academic profiles. At the same time, they're offering more financial aid. Saint Mary's College of California in Moraga has seen a 51 percent increase in applications since 2009 – nearly 6,000 students applied for 600 freshman slots this fall. “That leads to some difficult conversations,” said Michael Beseda, vice provost for enrollment. “We've had calls from family members of alumni saying they can't get in.” The $38,450-a-year college has also boosted its financial aid, now received by 86 percent of students, up from 74 percent in 2009. Mills College in Oakland is working more closely with high school counselors to ensure that students know about financial aid options that can make a private school affordable, said Brian O'Rourke, vice president for enrollment. To cope with more students, some privates are expanding facilities and programs. The University of La Verne, which undertook a major marketing campaign five years ago, has built a 400-bed residence hall and athletic fields and renovated academic buildings. Azusa Pacific, which enrolled 300 more students this fall from 2009's fall enrollment, has hired 63 new fulltime faculty and is looking at adding new majors and class sites. Despite the boom, private colleges see the overall situation as unfortunate. “We're happy to have these students but I hope nobody thinks we're the longterm solution,” said Beseda of Saint Mary's. “The long-term solution is to invest more in higher education.”

Body discovered SUBMITTED BY SGT. MARK ORMSBY Hayward Police Department responded to the discovery of a dead body located at an abandoned building at 28953 Mission Boulevard, Hayward, on November 6, 2012. The Alameda County Coroner’s Office was notified immediately and took custody of the deceased. Based on a dental X-rays and examination, the individual was identified as 19-year old Luis Calleros who had been reported missing on October 21, 2012 and was a Hayward resident. Mr. Calleros’ death has been classified as a homicide. The cause of death is under investigation. Anyone with information relating to the death of Mr. Calleros is urged to contact the Hayward Police Department at (510) 293-7000 or Det. F. Ritchie at (510) 293-7219.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD November 7 Officers responded to Brier Elementary School (Sundale Drive) on a report of suspicious man. A female Kennedy High School student reported that during the past month a man has offered her a ride in his vehicle on five different occasions as she walked to school. The suspect is described as an Asian male, early-mid 20's, heavy build with short dark hair. The suspect vehicle was described as a white mid-1990's Suburban like SUV with a roof rack. Officer Allsup investigating. A large dog attacked and killed another smaller dog in the area of Cornish Dr. Both dogs were off leash when the incident occurred. Officers responded and assisted Animal Control Officers with the investigation. The dog was taken into custody by Animal Services who will further investigate this incident. An 11 month old girl fell three stories from an open window into some bushes on the 800 block of Walnut Ave. Initially the child was unconscious but regained consciousness. The child was airlifted to a Stanford Hospital. Condition unknown and determined to be an accidental fall.

At 10:06 p.m. officers were dispatched to the 39300 block of Sutter Drive to investigate a residential burglary. A couple returns home to discover that their house was burglarized during the day. Several items were taken including: jewelry, personal documents and small electronics. Officer B. Johnson handling the case. Holiday Inn (Albrae) security interrupt three subjects near their property. They catch one, an 18 year old adult male, but the others flee. The 18 year old claims they went for a walk on Automall, but parked near Holiday Inn. Unfortunately, he still had the red paint on his fingers from tagging his artwork all over the Public Storage wall and cargo trailer parked on the street. The 18 year old is arrested for vandalism. Officer Valdes investigating. The reporting party calls us at about 3:40 a.m. stating that a suspicious person was looking into the homeowners vehicle parked in the driveway on Montalban Drive. We arrived and determined that the suspect had taken items out of the center consul of the vehicle. The suspect description is an adult male, 6 feet tall, wearing all black clothing and a hooded sweatshirt. The suspect got into a in a silver Mercedes 4-door with no plates when he realized the victim saw him. Officer Austin investigating.

November 9 Reporting Party in 34000 block of Winslow Terrace calls FPD stating two males at his front door knocking. He talked through the door and they said they were there to answer a craigslist ad to buy a TV. R/P denied ad and they left on Tupelo. Quick thinking R/P got the plate (6WQT211) of the silver Toyota RAV4 and it came back stolen. A short time later, Ofc. Sanders spots the car and they flee at a high rate of speed. He tries to catch up with lights and siren and eventually determines they were driving too erratically so he cancels his attempt. Vehicle still outstanding and last seen possibly into UC from Fremont/PPP north. Victim was loading groceries into his car at Safeway five corners when the suspect approached and robbed him of his Iphone at gunpoint. Suspect fled on foot. Officer Stillitano Investigated. FPD Officers were dispatched to BART for an outside assist. A rider in a wheelchair reportedly dropped a gun, as he transitioned from his wheelchair to a seat on the train. BART officers were extended. Officers Austin & B. Johnson led the team to evacuate the train car and detain the subject. The male had a toy semi-auto handgun under his hoodie and in his waistband. Ofcr Leopardi documented our actions.

Governor Signs AB 391: Statewide Digital Database SACRAMENTO (MMD Newswire)Governor Jerry Brown has signed into law AB 391, a bill authored by Dr. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) that will create a statewide partnership to build an online reporting system allowing law enforcement, pawnbrokers and secondhand dealers to work together to follow items sold or used as collateral. The California Pawnbrokers Association (CAPA), in cooperation with various state and local law enforcement agencies, acknowledges the legislative accomplishment of Assemblyman Pan for working to make AB 391 law. AB 391 mandates that the single Online Statewide Digital Database be funded through pawnbroker and secondhand dealer licensing fees. The California Department of Justice will be responsible for creating and administering the online database. Rather than providing paper transaction reports as is now the practice, the new system will report transactions electronically the same day that they occur. "This has been a very difficult 12-year legislative effort that has finally been enacted," said CAPA Board Member, Stan

Lukowicz, owner of Capitol City Loan pawn shops in Sacramento. "Pawnbrokers and secondhand dealers will now be able to report our transactions in an electronic format that saves our industry the unnecessary costs associated with the paper reporting, while at the same time providing law enforcement with an efficient means to combat property crime." Lukowicz added, "Even in these difficult economic times, CAPA is pleased to do our part in this effort." Currently, all secondhand dealers, pawnbrokers and coin and antique dealers are required to report transactions to law enforcement in an effort to dissuade any type of illegal activity. However, reduced funding to law enforcement has created transaction backlogs making it difficult for agencies to enforce laws already on the books. The single Statewide Digital Database will provide multi-jurisdictional law enforcement agencies with a vital tool to combat transaction paperwork backlogs as well as pinpoint any illegal transactions that may have occurred. For more information about CAPA, visit www.CaliforniaPawnbrokers.org.


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PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12654255 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Prabhakaran Ganesan for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Prabhakaran Ganesan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Mridhula Prabhakaran to Hridhaya Prabhakaran The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: December 11, 2012, Time: 2:30 pm, Dept.: 522 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street #108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri City Voice Date: October 31, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403205# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12652922 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: JOSE JWENAL TORRES AND OLGA GUADALUPE BARAJAS for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOSE JWENAL TORRES AND OLGA GUADALUPE BARAJAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: FRANCO TORRES BARAJAS TO FRANCO TORRES-BARAJAS; JUREND TORRES TO JOSE JWENAL TORRES; OLGA BARAJAS to OLGA GAUDALUPE BARAJAS The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 02/08/13, Time: 8:45 A.M., Dept.: 504, Room: N/A The address of the court is 24405 AMADOR STREET, HAYWARD, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county:WHAT’S HAPPENING TRI-CITY VOICE Date: OCTOBER 22, 2012 WINIFRED Y SMITH JUDGE of the Superior Court 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398165#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471685 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Charlang Auto, 1940 Springwater Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Omid Haidari Kahkesh, 1940 Springwater Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/14/2009. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Omid Haidari Kahkesh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2406501# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471691 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Valero Nanua Auto Repair, 26978 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 44620 Highland Pl, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Nanua Auto Repair Inc., 44620 Highland Pl., Fremont, CA 94539; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 5/24/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hari Krishan Saini, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2406232# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470938 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Women of Lace, 42757 Gatewood St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Carol Helstrom, 42757 Gatewood St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Carol Helstrom, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2405003# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471324 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Diego Marcial Rios Art & Design Works (DMRAD), 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Diego Marcial Rios, 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555 Anna Rios, 4552 Leonato Way, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by Husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Diego Marcial Rios, Anna Rios This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 29, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/13, 11/20, 11/27, 12/4/12 CNS-2404296# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471282 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ynspyre, 35221 Noel Place, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Kshama Lodha, 35221 Noel Place, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/24/2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kshama Lodha This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 25, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403500# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471146 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: C/A Associates, 225 W. Winton Ave., #125, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda James F. Collins, 840 Sueirro St., Hayward, CA 94541 Vishal Anand, 32779 Sumac St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by Co-Partners. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Vishal Anand, James F. Collins This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 23, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403363# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471292 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shanghai Bistro, 1793 Decoto Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 1444 Washo Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Tian Yuan Yang, 1773 Decoto Rd., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tian Yuan Yang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 26, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2403151# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470800 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dynasty Enterprise, 2211 Parkside Drive, Ste. G, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont, CA 94527 Steven C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Ct., San Leandro, CA 94577 Roger P. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 Samuel Sosum Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Declaration of Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Robert Glen South, Jr., 1884 Flynn Creek Rd., Gainesboro, TN 38562 Diane K. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 June L. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Jean M. Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Declaration of Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Janice C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on April 1, 2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402555# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470786

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Parkside Dynasty, 2211 Parkside Drive, Ste. G, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Steven C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 Roger P. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 Samuel Sosum Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Trust dtd April 1984, 1510 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 Robert Glen South, Jr., 1884 Flynn Creek Road, Gainesboro, TN 38562 Janice C. Fong, Co-Trustee of the Fong Family Trust as amended and restated, 1623 Edgehill Court, San Leandro, CA 94577 Karen M. Ingram, Trustee of the Ingram 1982 Trust dtd June 16, 1982, as amended and restated, 271 Stratford Place, Los Altos, CA 94022 June L. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, 46000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94539 Diane K. Lusch, Co-Trustee of the Lusch Family Trust, 893 Barcelona Drive, Fremont, CA 94536 Jean H. Law, Co-Trustee of the Samuel S. Law and Jean M. Law Trust dtd April 2, 1984, 1510 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on May 17, 1988. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard I. Hashimoto, Co-Trustee of the Richard I. Hashimoto and June L. Hashimoto 1993 Trust, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402550# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470771-74 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Winter Wish Media, 2. Winter Wish Design, 3. Winter Wish Studio, 4. Winter Wish Photography, 1126 Quintana Way, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Shaowen Yao, 1126 Quintana Way, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shaowen Yao This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402427# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 469890 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: La Huasteca Chiquita dba RJ2 Catering & Party Rentals, 7673 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 The fictitious business name statement for the partnership was filed on 9/20/2012 in the County of Alameda. Rafael Sanchez, 7675 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 Janice Justiniani Velez, 7675 Thornton Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business was conducted by N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Rafael Sanchez S/ Janice Velez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 12, 2012. 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402012# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470727-728 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. La Huasteca Chiquita, 2. RJ2 Catering & Party Rental, 7673 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Rafael Sanchez, 7675 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 Janice Justiniani Velez, 7675 Thornton Avenue, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by Husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rafael Sanchez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27/12 CNS-2402003# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470671 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Five Ten Auto Sales, 36616 Newark Blvd. Suite B, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Amandeep Lal, 36616 Newark Blvd. Suite B, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amandeep Lal, Principal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2399865# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470798 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mexifornia, 31679 Hayman St., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda. Jose Luis Morales, 33634 7th Street, Union City, CA 94587. Marina Morales, 33634 7th Street, Union City,

CA 94587. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-15-12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jose Luis Morales Marina Morales This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398918# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471057 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mighty Hauling, 3911 Cosmic Place, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Gregory Lofties, 3911 Cosmic Place, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/19/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gregory Lofties This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 19, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398902# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471042 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PLATINUM POOL SOLUTIONS, 7198 THORNTON AVE, NEWARK, CA, 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: 35545 PROVANCE ST., NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA JUAN LOPEZ, 35545 PROVANCE ST., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-18-12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ JUAN LOPEZ This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on OCTOBER 18, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398161# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470438-9 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SIMPLY CLEAN, SIMPLY CLEAN CARPET CLEANING, 1552 E GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, County of ALAMEDA M. OSMAN QUDDUS, 1552 E. GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566 MARYAM ADALAT, 1552 E. GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566 This business is conducted by A HUSBAND AND WIFE The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ M. OSMAN QUDDUS This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on OCTOBER 3, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398159# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470640 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Raquels R.E. Processing & Coordination, 17113 Via Alamitos, San Lorenzo, CA 94580, County of Alameda Raquel Salmeron, 17113 Via Alamitos, San Lorenzo, CA 94580 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raquel Salmeron This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 10, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2396977# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470384 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Meshicas, 398 Lexington Ave., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Patricia Valencia, 398 Lexington Ave., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Patricia Valencia This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

continued on page 38

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395824# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470493 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Premier Champagne, 22336 Meekland Ave., Unit E, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda. Johal Corp., CA, 238 Fuji Way, Hayward, CA 94544. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Johal Corp. /s/ Ravinder S. Johal, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395521# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470427 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Lavender Studio, 47854 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Chantal Vuong, 2086 Danderhall Way, San Jose, CA 95121. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chantal Vuong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 3, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395501# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470843 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shree Ganesha LLC dba Comfort Inn & Suites, 5977 Mowry Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Shree Ganesha LLC, California, 5977 Mowry Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/20/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ishuar J. Patel, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 16, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395496# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470053 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Connecting Through Art, 4099 Tawny Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Yvonne Ming Gee, 4099 Tawny Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07/01/2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yvonne Ming Gee This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 25, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2393914#

GOVERNMENT NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFQ #901068, 901069, 901070, 901071: 2013 Ford, Toyota, Dodge and Chevrolet Vehicle Purchase North County – Monday, December 3, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 222, 2nd Floor, Oakland, CA and South County – Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 2:00 p.m. at Castro Valley Library, Canyon Room, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, CA Response Due Dates by 2:00 pm as follows: RFQ 901068 - January 11, 2013, RFQ 901069 - January 8, 2013, RFQ 901070 - January 10, 2013, RFQ 901071 - January 9, 2013 County Contact: Evelyn Benzon (510) 2089622 or via email: evelyn.benzon@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 11/13/12 CNS-2407664# CITY OF FREMONT NOTICE OF FUND AVAILABILITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) FUNDS FOR CAPITAL PROJECTS FY 2013-2014 Para información en español, por favor llame a Leticia Leyva a (510) 574-2072. The City of Fremont hereby announces a Request for Proposals (RFP) for FY 2013-2014 projects. Approximately $1,000,000 in funds will be available for successful proposals, which will start July 1, 2013. Agencies that receive funding must be public entities such as a county department, or organizations that qualify for tax exemption under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code or secular service programs or ministries that are covered by the insurance of a tax exempt nonprofit religious organization. The following types of proposals may be consid-


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 31

Peace and quiet?

WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

fter months of political campaign signs littering lawns, fences and anything else capable of supporting them, we have finally come to the end of the 2012 election season. No longer will mailboxes be inundated with pretty mailers and phones tied up with robocalls for candidates; we will revert to simply fending off solicitors. The interesting thing about the “end” to an election is that it is not really the end. I visited with Alameda County Registrar of Voters, Dave Macdonald, and was surprised by the activity at the Oakland County Courthouse. Although votes are counted on the day of the election, many have not yet been tallied –

and they all will be – until days and weeks following Election Day.

tions and will closely scrutinize decisions through the lens of planning credentials.

Many hold misconceptions of the ballot process and how it is strictly regulated to make sure all ballots are counted. So, as some candidates celebrate victory and others lick their political war wounds, the result is not final until the City Clerk and/or County Registrar certifies the vote. In many races, the outcome is obvious and results are near certain, while in others, during the 28 days following Election Day, the Registrar processes all ballots to determine the final count. Every effort is made to include even a ballot spoiled by conflicting votes [In an article appearing next week in TCV, I will explain the process in greater detail].

As Harrison moves to the mayoral position, an empty seat means the old soft shoe manipulation of political gamesmanship will once again materialize. Selection of a new councilmember has, in the past, been the choice of behind-thescenes politicos… but with the possibility of a new paradigm, some of that may change. It will be interesting to watch how votes are manipulated this time. Councilmember Chan is back but was unable to bring enough support to her running mate, John Dutra.

In the Greater Tri-City area, there were few surprises, but Fremont voters split, retaining some of the status quo, but peppering it with the promise of a new council dynamic. With several crucial decisions in the wind – Warm Springs, Kimber Park, Downtown, Centerville, District priorities, etc. - Vinnie Bacon and Anu Natarajan hold key posi-

NCS Report BY KENNY JACOBY Football 11/9- Div. 1 Round 1: (3) James Logan Colts- 56; (14) Irvington Vikings- 8 11/9- Div. 2 Round 1: (10) Washington Huskies- 14; (7) Las Lomas Knights- 31 11/9- Div. 2 Round 1: (6) Newark Memorial Cougars- 40; (11) American Eagles- 8 11/10- Div. 3 Round 1: (16) John F. Kennedy Titans- 8; (1) El Cerrito Gauchos- 66 11/10- Div. 4 Round 1: (13) Moreau Catholic Mariners- 27; (4) Arcata Tigers- 65 11/10- Div. 5 Round 1: (2) California School for the Deaf Eagles- 26; (7) Tomales Braves- 6

Women’s Volleyball 11/7- Div. 1 Round 1: (12) James Logan Colts- 0; (5) Foothill Falcons3 (16-25; 17-25; 17-25) 11/7 Div. 1 Round 1: (11) Irvington Vikings- 0; Heritage Patriots- 3 (1225; 24-26; 12-25) 11/7- Div. 2 Round 1: (8) Newark Memorial Cougars- 3; (9) Montgomery- 0 (25-22; 25-22; 25-15) 11/7- Div. 4 Round 1: (4) Moreau Catholic Mariners- 3; (13) McKin-

leyville Panthers- 1 (25-19; 25-12; 19-25; 25-17) 11/10- Div. 2 Round 2: (8) Newark Memorial Cougars- 1; (1) Redwood Giants- 3 (25-27; 25-22; 11-25; 2325) 11/10- Div. 4 Round 2: (4) Moreau Catholic Mariners- 0; (5) Healdsburg Hounds- 3 (26-28; 23-25; 20-25)

Women’s Water Polo 11/1- Div. 1 Round 1: (14) Mission San Jose Warriors- 8; (3) Clayton Valley Eagles- 14 11/1- Div. 1 Round 1: (13) Washington Huskies- 8; (4) Las Lomas Knights- 18 11/1- Div. 1 Round 1: (6) James Logan Colts- 11; (11) Deer Valley Wolverines- 4 11/3- Div. 1 Round 2: (6) James Logan Colts- 8; (3) Clayton Valley Eagles- 7 11/7- Div. 1 Round 3: (6) James Logan Colts- 3; (2) Monte Vista Mustangs- 8

Men’s Water Polo 11/1- Div. 1 Round 1: (14) James Logan Colts- 2; (3) San Ramon Valley Wolves- 22 11/1- Div. 1 Round 1: (15) Mission San Jose Warriors- 9; (2) De La Salle Spartans- 22

Will those salivating for the empty seat on Council make their deals to assuage any fears of change that could diminish the control of powers that be or will a new model emerge?

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

William Marshak PUBLISHER

New Haven District sees more evidence of progress SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Test results released October 11 show more evidence that efforts to close the “achievement gap” are succeeding in the New Haven Unified School District. The APR (Accountability Progress Reports) released by the California Department of Education show that New Haven is making progress in tackling one of the most difficult problems in public education, the “gap” between high-performing students (typically Asian and white sub-groups) and lower-performing students (typically Hispanic/Latino and African-American sub-groups). Today’s results, which include both AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress) and API (Academic Performance Index) numbers, mirror CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam) and STAR (Standardized Testing and Results) results released in August. District-wide, 58.4 percent of New Haven students tested proficient or advanced in English/Language Arts in 2011-12, up from 57.7 percent in 2010-11, according to AYP results. Even more encouraging was the improvement in the percentage of African-American students who tested proficient or advanced, up almost 5 points, to 47.3 percent, from 42.6 percent in 2010-11. African-American students also gained 4 points on the API scale, more than any other subgroup in the District. James Logan High School raised its API by 4 points to 738, and Alvarado Elementary improved by 2 points, to 855, but most other schools declined. The District’s overall API dropped slightly, from 775 to 773, but still is up 42 points over the past seven years. There also was a slight drop in AYP in the percentage of students testing proficient or advanced in mathematics, from 53.5 percent to 53 percent. API scores (on a scale of 200 to 1,000) by school: Alvarado Elementary 855, Eastin Elementary 896, Emanuele Elementary 798, Hillview Crest Elementary 757, Kitayama Elementary 832, Pioneer Elementary 833, Searles Elementary 749, Alvarado Middle 817, Cesar Chavez Middle 715, James Logan High 738, Conley-Caraballo High 482 (the CDE notes that APIs based on small numbers of students, such as CCHS, are less reliable). More information is available on the California Department of Education website (www.cde.ca.gov).

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

November 13, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

BOOKKEEPING TRAINERS, INC. HANDS ON TRAINING CENTER Looking for career change? Here is a HOT one for you!

Become a Full Charge Bookkeeper in 9 weeks

REGISTER TODAY

Tel: 408-531-0203

Email: Info@bookkeepingtrainersinc.com www:bookkeepingtrainersinc.com HELP WANTED

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info

Child Care Coordinator Newark Unified School District is looking for a Child Care Coord. $34,835-$41,126/yr, 6hrs/day, 24 Hrs/wk. Admin Credential or a B.A. degree +12ECE units & 6-admin/Super units req. Deadline: Open until Filled; HR Dept., 5715 Musick Ave., Newark, 510-818-4242.

Seasonal Warehouse Positions Available!

Become a hospice patient care volunteer!

Adecco, the World Leader in staffing is hiring immediately for Warehouse positions in the Newark area. If you have experience in line production work, inventory or other warehouse skill sets then we have opportunities though out the end of the year and possibly longer.This is a fast paced environment working in the high end retail clothing industry. Shifts start early morning and run Monday through Friday, perfect positions for students or those looking to supplement their income. All candidates considered for these positions must submit to and clear Criminal Background checks. Please call our office for further information at 510.429.8995 over 100 positions available.

Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

BOOTH RENTALS

Great Rates! Great Results Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Salon Both Rental Available First Month FREE Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

Local DCDL Drivers Needed near Fremont, CA Minimum 12 months Class A experience required Need to fill these positions now! New dedicated account starts December 2012 Home Nightly or every other night Excellent Benefits/start by the 1st of the next month We fly to orientation, not bus! Limited positions available! Call Interstate Distributor Co. Today 1-800-374-8348 or text 24/7 at 909-353-5916 Apply at www.driveforinterstate.com

New portal provides crowdfunding for community projects SUBMITTED BY NANCY SAIN FundaGeek is pleased to announce the launch of our new Community Support Portal site: www.fundageek.com/community . The portal is designed to address a broad array of fund raising projects with a focus on helping whole communities, specific groups within communities, as well as individuals living in communities. The FundaGeek crowdfunding platform can be used as a resource to help push forward important projects involving community organizing, activism, mobilizing, advocacy, legal action, development and much more. FundaGeek has designed unique funding portals for technology, scientific research, inventions, education – and now community support. In the past several years, crowdfunding has seen tremendous interest from creative people in the arts, music and film, but now with FundaGeek, community support projects can be funded using crowdfunding techniques. FundaGeek’s CEO and Co-Founder Daniel D. Gutierrez says, “Community support is an expansive area that often involves projects on very tight budgets. With crowdfunding, vital community projects can keep moving forward. It is often quite challenging for community projects to get well-deserved funding. With FundaGeek, we hope to make a difference.”

Crowdfunding is a funding mechanism utilizing the power of crowds through social media. In the last few years over a billion dollars have been raised through crowdfunding campaigns around the world. Our Community Support portal provides the vehicle through which individuals and communities can build a project at no cost and promote it through social media over the Internet. With crowdfunding, needed funds are raised by offering “Rewards” in exchange for “Pledges.” As an example, think of NPR or PBS pledge drives where a large number of donors pledge small amounts in return for simple rewards. Donors can opt for no reward so that all the funds go to the project. One of the significant benefits of crowdfunding is that it costs nothing to try. As a byproduct of a crowdfunding campaign, there is a huge benefit of expanded, positive, public awareness for your organization or specific project being promoting. Unlike most crowdfunding sites that use the “all or nothing” funding model where funding is provided only if the goal amount is met, FundaGeek is different. Projects receive whatever funding they have attracted by the end of the campaign. We encourage the project owner to resubmit the project for a continued and on-going source of funding. There are no up-front fees to use FundaGeek.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Community, 34400 Mission Blvd., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:45 Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Lane, FREMONT 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT

Tuesday, November 13 9:45-11:05Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY

Tuesday, November 20 9:45–10:15 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Preschool Storytimes NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT

Wednesday, November 14 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Wednesday, November 21 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Thursday, November 15 10:00–10:35 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 1:55 – 2:20 Preschool Storytimes SAN LORENZO 2:45 – 3:40 Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., SAN LORENZO Monday, November 19 10:00–10:25 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 10:25–10:50 Peace Academy, Peace Terrace, FREMONT 1:30 – 2:00 Acacia Creek Retirement

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060

Wednesday, November 14 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928

Our Lady of the Rosary Church 703 C St., Union City 510-471-2609 www.olrchurch.org

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766 St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100 St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776 Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Life Church 1699 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-483-8940 www.clife-church.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net Grace Church Fremont Multi-Ethnic 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

Calvary Chapel Fremont 42986 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-656-8979 www.calvaryfremont.org

Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org

Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net

November 13, 2012

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491

Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont 510-226-2800 www.resonatemovement.org ROADMAP FELLOWSHIP International Best Western Plus Inn 360 W. 'A' St.,Hayward 510-574-5663 San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 nilesdiscoverychurch.org

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org


November 13, 2012 Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060 Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Chinese Mission of Hope Evangelical-Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd, Fremont 510-938-0505 http://www.hopelutheranfremont.org/zh.html Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church Meets at Grace Lutheran Church 1836 B. St., Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.southhaywardumc.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM

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Al-Medinah Educational Center: Masjid & School 5445 Central Ave., Newark

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Heavenly Christ's Church (Meets in Calvary Lutheran Church) 17200 Via Magdalena San Lorenzo 510-303-5592 Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 New Seed of Faith Ministry 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nsofm.com 510 612-4832 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

SUBMITTED BY LEAGUE OF VOLUNTEERS The freezers are empty and ready; TriCities League of Volunteers (LOV) is waiting for 320 turkeys & 80 hams… so far there are none. Last year, 5,485 were served either at the Newark Pavilion or to the homebound in Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, San Leandro, San Lorenzo and Castro Valley. Besides turkeys, there is need for: 500 pies (all kinds – not just pumpkin), 600 oval aluminum roasting pans, 250 loaves of sandwich bread and all the other ingredients to make it a memorable

Thanksgiving holiday for those who would spend the day alone and those who do not have the resources, either money or shelter, to enjoy the traditional Thanksgiving meal and fellowship. This is a joint effort by “Partner’s In Giving”, 31Tri-City & Hayward service agencies who will offer an afternoon of good food, entertainment, and children’s crafts. In addition we will try to give a free bag of food to every guest, depending on donations received. In order to make it easier for guests without transportation, volunteers will be personally picked up in Fremont, Newark and Union City. All

Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

SIKHISM

PRESBYTERIAN

Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org

UNITARIAN

First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA

Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 http://www.missionpeakuu.org/

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org

New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (in the future home of Niles Discovery Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

guests have to do is call LOV’s Program Director, Joanne Paletta, at 491-3799 (cell ) to dispatch a “Turkey Taxi” for a ride. For those who are homebound, meals will be delivered. For homebound meals call LOV at 793-5683. DONATIONS NEEDED Hams (boneless/pre-cooked), turkeys, canned chicken broth, yams, string beans & corn, cooked pies, sliced pickles, black olives, cookies, take home meal containers, instant mashed potato mix, oval aluminum roasting pans, butter (both patties & cubes), Chinette divided dinner plates, dessert plates, baked pies, brown sugar, grocery bags, large lunch bags, mayonnaise packets, sandwich bread, sandwich bags, dinner rolls, coffee (regular & decaf), tablecloths, dinner napkins, sliced pie containers, mini marshmallows, baby food, bottled water, styrofoam coffee cups, paper towels, turkey roasting bags, charcoal, charcoal lighter, aluminum foil and Saran Wrap.

Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

Monetary donations are very welcome to purchase what is not donated. Checks should be payable to LOV, marked “for Thanksgiving” and mailed to 36120 Ruschin Drive, Newark, CA 94560. Your donation is tax deductable – our 501c 3 Federal ID # is 94-2638329. We expect the need to be as great this year. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED There are many opportunities to give of yourself this holiday. From November 20 through November 22 – you can: cook a turkey or ham – carve – prepare dressing, or mashed potatoes– bake pies - deliver homebound meals – pick up donations pack food bags set tables - decorate – serve dinner – clean up – and more. Thanksgiving Dinner will be held on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 22, 12:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. For more information, visit: www.lov. or call LOV at (510) 793-5683


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club

We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont

First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose

American Legion Auxiliary

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS

Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters

Having trouble controlling the way you eat?

First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Fremont Cribbage Club

Friendship Force

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

We offer no-fee job search, resume and interview workshops. For workshop schedule please call (510) 794-2442.

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Holiday Gift Faire: food, goodies, & Hanukkah items Sunday, Nov 11, 10am-2p.m. Family Services: Fri., Nov 16, 7p.m. Hanukkah Dinner & Service: Fri, December 14, 7p.m. www.bethtorah-fremont.org (510) 656-7141

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Jan 5, 2013 from 9:00-11:30 in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or Email Joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/F2F

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 23 Highest $: 1,300,000 Median $: 490,000 Lowest $: 285,000 Average $: 516,522 ADDRESS

Out of work? ProNet can help you!

The “NO” List:

Serious Mental Illness

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Winter holidays with Temple Beth Torah of Fremont

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

ZIP

2201 170th Avenue 17611 Almond Road 19627 Barclay Road 3781 Brookdale Boulevard 4442 Cristy Way 18532 Doris Court 2771 Ganic Street 19082 Gliddon Street 3254 Lenard Drive 2227 Lessley Avenue 2317 Reading Avenue 18007 Reamer Road 3504 Remco Street 4344 Shamrock Way 4058 Somerset Avenue 4059 Somerset Avenue 2369 Star Avenue 3066 Todd Court 19655 Buren Place 5913 Charter Oaks Drive 16687 Columbia Drive 25385 Palomares Road 18906 West Cavendish Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

300,000 555,000 465,000 421,000 505,000 490,000 652,000 507,000 440,000 285,000 330,000 590,000 635,000 425,000 355,000 345,000 310,000 540,000 480,000 805,000 560,000 1,300,000 585,000

1768 1480 1854 1900 1927 1472 3636 1675 1339 1464 1387 2261 2308 1444 859 899 1236 2303 1550 3051 1890 3698 2292

1965 1933 1963 1953 1959 1966 1963 1953 1956 1948 1948 1948 1962 1960 1949 1949 1947 1977 2002 1988 1988 1998 1978

09-27-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 10-02-12 09-27-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 10-01-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12

3 3 4 3 4 3 9 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 2 2 3 4 3 3 -

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 55 Highest $: 1,198,000 Median $: Lowest $: 100,000 Average $: ADDRESS

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

37102 Alexander Street 94536 435,000 3514 Birchwood Terrace #302 94536 255,000 35864 Caxton Place 94536 630,000 3672 Colet Terrace 94536 260,000 37001 Contra Costa Avenue 94536 280,500 4712 Eggers Drive 94536 650,000 38896 Florence Way 94536 560,000 4084 Gibraltar Drive 94536 198,000 5139 Keystone Drive 94536 479,000 38265 Logan Drive 94536 845,000 38163 Miller Place 94536 420,000 624 Orangewood Drive 94536 450,000 3402 Pinewood Terrace #112 94536 185,000 5350 Sayre Avenue 94536 552,000 38043 Stenhammer Drive 94536 600,000 38700 Tyson Lane #108A 94536 365,000 39147 Walnut Terrace 94536 200,500 39495 Albany Common #M 94538 175,000 5549 Butano Park Drive 94538 458,000 4453 Cahill Street 94538 368,500 4419 Caren Street 94538 675,000 42222 Edgewood Street 94538 578,000 43379 Gatewood Street 94538 406,000 4415 Gina Street 94538 352,000 43105 Grimmer Terrace 94538 350,000 4108 Murray Common 94538 100,000 39890 Ogden Drive 94538 510,000 3695 Stevenson Boulevard #E31494538 186,000 39598 Trinity Way 94538 315,000 235 Bunch Grass Terrace #22094539 575,000 44398 Camellia Drive 94539 899,000 64 Comanche Court 94539 622,000 44997 Cougar Circle 94539 1,198,000 180 Las Palmas Court 94539 990,000 43330 Luzon Court 94539 1,135,000 40878 Marty Terrace 94539 735,000

3 2 4 2 3 3 5 2 3 4 2 3 1 3 5 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 2 4 1 3 2 4 3 4 4 5 3

510,000 543,991

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1080 988 1811 900 1408 1562 1624 988 1092 2340 1397 1140 714 1375 2884 1124 732 640 1204 1297 1640 1371 1209 950 1308 1067 1722 721 1371 1450 2277 1644 2743 2087 2056 1814

1960 1984 1968 1974 1972 1954 1963 1970 1954 1999 1973 1955 1986 1960 1980 2000 1984 1981 1961 1955 1959 1960 1956 1955 1986 1980 1963 1991 1978 2008 1969 1969 1989 1978 1978 1991

10-03-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 10-02-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 09-28-12


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 37

HOME SALES REPORT 2368 Night Shade Lane 94539 41314 Norman Court 94539 43908 Paso Cedro Common 94539 43928 Paso Cedro Common 94539 268 Paso Roble Common 94539 40466 Seville Court 94539 46947 Shale Common #9 94539 43666 Southerland Way 94539 2163 Sparrow Drive 94539 1273 Vuelta Olivos 94539 34302 Bodkin Terrace 94555 5974 Capriana Common #142 94555 33853 Capulet Circle 94555 34624 Creekwood Terrace 94555 4488 Darwin Drive 94555 3745 Dryden Road 94555 32611 Lake Mead Drive 94555 32920 Lake Mead Drive 94555 3902 Lake Woodland Common94555

790,000 690,000 683,500 745,500 622,500 922,000 301,000 955,000 1,150,000 1,050,000 570,000 505,000 620,000 594,000 320,000 404,500 470,000 310,000 224,000

3 3 4 2 3 4 6 2 3 3 2 4 3 2

1801 1148 1914 936 2189 3022 2623 1891 1514 1380 1477 1298 1450 1871 1148 991

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 39 Highest $: 725,000 Median $: Lowest $: 110,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

222730 Atherton Street 94541 806 Blossom Way 94541 693 Dean Street 94541 2188 Dexter Court 94541 24807 Joe Mary Court 94541 2241 Kelly Street 94541 2500 Kelly Street 94541 24025 Marchand Court 94541 23614 Maud Avenue 94541 421 Palmer Avenue 94541 441 Palmer Avenue 94541 24257 Ridgecreek Lane 94541 226 Rondale Court 94541 578 Staley Avenue 94541 26967 Parkside Drive 94542 25780 Spring Drive 94542 6 Tullach Place 94542 27767 Andrea Street 94544 688 Elizabeth Way 94544 26382 Flamingo Avenue 94544 945 Fletcher Lane #D335 94544 27723 Leidig Court 94544 29612 Mountain Oak Court #6194544 30265 Oakbrook Road 94544 168 Oswosso Place 94544 1080 Shelley Lane 94544 25042 Silverthorne Place 94544 385 Sycamore Avenue 94544 555 Telford Court 94544 24 Trestle Drive 94544 310 West Jackson Street 94544 24443 Willimet Way 94544 26694 Amapala Street 94545 27747 Calaroga Avenue 94545 27686 Del Norte Court 94545 24003 Malibu Road 94545 2770 Ocala Street 94545 2245 Occidental Road 94545 27408 Ponderosa Court 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

242,500 260,000 266,500 319,500 355,000 330,000 360,000 265,000 450,000 402,000 354,500 495,000 435,000 340,500 480,000 352,000 725,000 258,000 338,000 150,000 155,000 125,000 110,000 586,000 235,000 216,000 360,000 280,000 520,000 122,500 270,000 255,000 300,000 310,000 220,000 410,000 275,000 385,000 198,000

2 2 3 4 3 4 2 4 3 9 3 4 5 3 4 3 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 5 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3

ZIP

585 Clyde Court 1836 Conway Street 440 Dempsey Road #240 1260 Gingerwood Drive 247 Heath Street 331 Krismer Street 353 San Miguel Court #2 1814 Snell Place 125 South Gadsden Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

ZIP

6422 Buena Vista Drive #B 38974 Larkspur Street 35893 Newark Boulevard 4984 Oxford Place 39941 Parada Street #B 35984 Rosewood Drive 35611 Sheridan Court 36044 Toulouse Street

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

310,000 320,795 BUILT

CLOSED

1159 2232 936 1888 2097 1255 1556 1790 3036 3006 3755 2872 2121 3300 1455 1609 1047 740 818 723 2419 1191 1146 1624 816 2321 870 1191 1769 1260 1119 1474 1610 1128 2000 1254

2005 1947 1978 1977 1941 1948 1986 2004 2008 1963 1982 1951 2010 1952 1955 1952 1986 1948 1985 1999 1951 1955 2001 1920 2000 1991 1949 1955 1959 1955 1970 1978 1957 1994 1970

09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 09-27-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 10-03-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 10-03-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 09-28-12 09-28-12

361,000 473,611

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1,133,000 360,000 142,000 695,000 361,000 475,500 251,000 485,000 360,000

3274 1130 676 1705 980 1515 882 1359 1000

1996 1961 2007 1991 1962 1958 1971 2010 1958

10-16-12 10-11-12 10-11-12 10-12-12 10-16-12 10-16-12 10-15-12 10-09-12 10-10-12

4 3 1 3 3 3 2 3 3

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 707,000 Median $: Lowest $: 160,000 Average $: ADDRESS

10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 09-27-12 10-01-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12

SQFT

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 1,133,000 Median $: Lowest $: 142,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1967 1956 1967 1986 1988 1979 1964 1987 1992 1985 1987 1976 1977 1976 1970 1971

SOLD FOR BDS

160,000 525,000 460,000 550,000 240,000 390,000 707,000 305,000

1 3 4 3 3 3 4 3

390,000 417,125

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

924 1940 1495 1344 1480 1335 2182 1100

1985 1963 1959 1968 1983 1960 1971 1961

09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 09-27-12

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 30 Highest $: 573,500 Median $: 320,000 Lowest $: 140,000 Average $: 335,550 ADDRESS

ZIP

305 Accolade Drive 94577 1400 Carpentier Street #214 94577 771 Castro Street 94577 2437 Dundee Court 94577 625 Durant Avenue 94577 1781 Eveleth Avenue 94577 1631 Graff Avenue 94577 1539 Hays Street 94577 351 Leo Avenue 94577 2876 Marineview Drive 94577 1605 Marybelle Avenue 94577 365 Peralta Avenue 94577 833 Rodney Drive 94577 352 Rosewood Court 94577 2483 Sitka Street 94577 526 Superior Avenue 94577 789 Wrin Avenue 94577 1478 156th Avenue 94578 1656 Fairmont Drive 94578 1160 Grace Street 94578 16546 Hannah Drive 94578 1248 Lillian Avenue 94578 16238 Maubert Avenue 94578 1587 Oriole Avenue 94578 16401 Saratoga Street #101W 94578 13839 School Street 94578 15022 Andover Street 94579 14929 Crosby Street 94579 14315 Cypress Street 94579 15504 Farnsworth Street 94579 795 Lewelling Boulevard 94579 15313 Mendocino Street 94579 1320 Purdue Street 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

360,000 155,000 300,000 335,000 376,000 250,000 430,000 425,000 318,000 573,500 265,000 279,000 540,000 305,000 260,000 555,000 499,500 179,000 340,000 361,000 400,000 223,500 285,000 258,000 140,000 403,000 320,000 245,000 366,000 320,000 425,000 341,000 455,000

4 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 2 3 3 4 2 2 2 2 3 4 3 3 3 7 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1627 1193 1011 1723 1645 1028 1785 1655 1186 1859 1015 1424 2012 1049 1042 1477 3161 925 1312 1772 2133 1058 992 970 962 1376 1462 1119 1615 1190 2829 1166 2168

2002 1983 1943 1979 1925 1951 1957 2007 1941 1965 1944 1941 1935 1940 1950 1927 1951 1942 1990 1948 1977 1948 1947 1938 1981 1956 1950 1952 1952 1956 1924 1955 1951

09-28-12 09-27-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 10-03-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 10-03-12 10-03-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 10-03-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-01-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-20-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 310,000 Median $: 280,000 Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: 272,143 ADDRESS

ZIP

15709 Dermody Avenue 15885 Hesperian Boulevard 1358 Jacqueline Place 2152 Via Barrett 16049 Via Del Sol 17007 Via Pasatiempo 17673 Via Rincon

SOLD FOR BDS

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

255,000 280,000 180,000 300,000 305,000 310,000 275,000

3 3 4 3 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1326 1000 1392 1256 1178 1134 986

1950 1944 1972 1956 1944 1947 1944

09-28-12 09-27-12 10-02-12 10-02-12 10-02-12 09-28-12 09-28-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 740,000 Median $: Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: ADDRESS

33312 13th Street 33332 5th Street 30717 Canterbury Court 34608 Cascades Circle 2872 Cortina Way 2644 Great Arbor Way #53 34925 Osprey Drive 34834 Perry Road 4108 Polaris Avenue 3068 San Andreas Drive 523 Tamarack Drive #10

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

320,000 362,500 740,000 568,000 524,000 180,000 400,000 458,000 255,000 440,000 195,000

3 3 4 3 4 2 4 5 4 3 2

400,000 403,864

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1064 1364 2450 1605 2258 950 1378 2188 1584 1396 1072

1961 1925 1999 1999 1995 1985 1978 1967 1974 1970 1976

10-01-12 10-01-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 10-02-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 09-27-12 10-02-12 10-02-12

Policies for posting minors’ information online SUBMITTED BY THE OFFICE OF THE STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL

Attorney General Kamala D. Harris urges parents, coaches and officials for youth sports to develop protective policies related to minors’ personal information, particularly for information posted online. Harris also announced that after an inquiry from her office, GameChanger, a popular sports statistics website, has updated its privacy policy and practices to better protect minors. The action comes as an increasing amount of information about minors appears online, often without adult consent. “Most parents probably do not realize that the simple act of enrolling a child for soccer or Little League could put enough information online to put the minor in harm’s way,” said Harris. “While the Internet makes tracking games and statistics easier, it’s important that parents, coaches, school officials and volunteers are informed and consider any information to post

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD November 4 Officer Neithercutt investigated five separate auto burglaries (window smashes) that occurred in the Joaquin Murieta/Buena Vista Drive/Parada Street area. All appear to have occurred overnight with various electronic items missing. NPD Officers were dispatched at 2:29 p.m. to the Fiat Dealership in Newark regarding theft of two cellular phones. NPD Officer arrived on scene and learned that a subject had entered the business and stole two cellular phones from two different employees. The suspect then fled the scene in an older gold or tan Lexus or Honda sedan vehicle. Witnesses described the suspect as the following: 6’2”, thin build, light colored very short hair and a scruffy facial hair, wearing black hoody and navy blue long athletic shorts. At 6:55 p.m., Officer Geser investigated an attempted strong-arm robbery that occurred on Lafayette Ave. The 13-year-old victim was taking the trash out to the curb when he was grabbed by the suspect and then hit in the head with an unknown object. The suspect then checked the victim’s pockets before fleeing on foot. The suspect was described as a black male adult wearing a black sweater with red stripes on the sleeves and the victim did not sustain any loss. The victim was not injured. November 5 Officer Neithercutt investigated a theft of copper wire and tools from a construction site at 7999 Gateway. Officer Nobbe investigated a theft of a bicycle trailer from the garage of 37171 Sycamore. The stolen trailer is described as a yellow “Burleigh” brand. Officer Eriksen investigated a window smash auto burglary in front of a residence on Truckee Ct. The loss was a GPS device and tools. During a traffic stop at 9:28 a.m., Officer Neithercutt contacted Manolo

online, especially when it pertains to children.” GameChanger updated its privacy policy and put new protections for minors in place after an inquiry from Harris’s Privacy Enforcement & Protection Unit. The changes include: not allowing anyone under the age of 13 to sign up or post on the site; removing last names of team members under the age of 13; and providing privacy information pertaining to minors to users when teams are added to the website. The inquiry into GameChanger’s policies came after the Attorney General’s office was contacted by a parent who was concerned about the amount of information being posted on the site. For some teams, information included travel schedule, child’s statistics, full name and nicknames. “I was disturbed when I realized so much information about my son’s team was being posted without my permission,” said Amanda Biers-Melcher of Burbank. “I appreciate Attorney Mendioro of Newark who was on searchable probation for possession of stolen property. The search of the vehicle yielded stolen watches, one from a Fremont residential burglary. Mendioro was arrested. A probation search was later conducted at Mendioro’s residence on Dalewood Ct. and additional stolen property was located. Great work by Officer Neithercutt. At 11:06 a.m., Officer Nobbe investigated a stolen rear license plate (CA 4TNN582) from a residence on Breton Drive. Officer Geser handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting from the NewPark Mall Macy’s store at 5:38 p.m. Two male juveniles were both arrested for petty theft and then later released to the custody of their parents at NPD. Officer Ramos investigated a residential burglary on Christine Street at 9:15 p.m. This is the second time in less than a month that the same house has been burglarized. The loss is undermined at this time. November 6 Officer Clark located a black stolen 2007 Toyota Camry stolen out of East Palo Alto in the parking lot of Lincoln Elementary. Officer Slater investigated a theft of mail from a residence on the 6900 block of Jarvis Ave. At 9:51 a.m., Officers responded to an interrupted residential burglary at 8157 Juniper Ave. Suspects were described as black male adults, 18-20 years of age, 5’8” to 5’10” tall, thin build, one wearing a green jacket and one wearing a beige jacket. The loss was jewelry. At 12:30 p.m. Officer Clark investigated a vehicle window smash burglary at 5699 Mowry Ave. (BJ’s Brewery). Loss was undetermined at the time. Officer Clark investigated a residential ransack burglary in the 36200 block of Haley St. Entry point is unknown and the loss was watches. Officer Sandoval arrested Cassandra Pazdez of Fremont at 6:23 p.m. for Theft and Embezzlement. Cassandra was caught by Sears Loss Pre-

General Harris’ assistance with the company and dedication to helping protect the privacy of our children.” The Attorney General’s Privacy Unit will work with parents and sports leagues to develop best practices for handling children’s personal information in youth sports programs. Youth sports teams provide great opportunities for children to engage in exercise and learn valuable lessons about team work, healthy competition and fair play. When enrolling your children for such activities, be careful to protect their personal information. Ask if the team or league will post any of the child’s personal identifying information, such as name, address, school or photo on a website. Tell them if you do not want your child’s information posted online. Ask questions about any request for your child’s Social Security number, health insurance number or birth certificate. Propose alternatives. For instance, instead of handing over a copy of a birth certificate, offer to show a copy and ask that the child’s date of birth be entered in the records and noted as verified. Resist providing the Social Security number. In most cases, the child’s Social Security number should not be necessary. Insist that a health insurance number, if required, be protected with strong security measures, such as locking it in an office file cabinet or encrypting it, if in a digital format. Ask if the team or league has a written privacy policy and ask for a copy. If they do not, encourage them to develop an official policy statement that describes the kinds of personal information they collect, how they use it and how it is shared. (Note: If they collect personal information through a website, they may be required to post a privacy policy on the site.) For more information, visit http://oag.ca.gov vention skimming money from her register. At 2:07 a.m., Officers responded to several 911 calls of a house on fire at 8172 Merion Dr. Officers arrived to find the house fully engulfed in flames. All occupants of the residence were able to get out of the residence uninjured. Officer’s Kovach and Sandoval did an excellent job evacuating the neighbors around the burning residence. No one was injured and the cause of the fire is under investigation. The residence suffered severe damage to both floors. November 8 At 7:44 p.m., Officers investigated a residential burglary in the 36000 block of Spruce Street. The home owner was in the back yard when she heard someone inside her home. Thinking it was her sister’s boyfriend she didn’t go into the house. After 10 to 15 minutes the RP looked inside and spotted two unknown males inside her home. The RP grabbed her son who was in the back yard with her and fled to a neighbor’s house to call 9-1-1. Suspects fled the residence prior to the arrival of police. November 9 Officers investigated a residential burglary in the 36000 block of Fir Court. Officer Norvell investigated a residential burglary at 36978 Darvon Street. Entry was made via a bathroom window. Officers investigated a residential burglary in the 36000 block of Sycamore Street. Officers Hogan investigated two auto burglaries in the parking lot of BJ’s restaurant. November 10 Officers investigated a residential burglary at 6000 block of Smith Avenue. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Anthony T. Goularte

Lisa Swift McKnight RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 31, 1958 – October 20, 2012

RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 12, 1927 – October 29, 2012

Albertine M. Lent

Alfred A. Rodrigues RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 8, 1919 – October 31, 2012

RESIDENT OF SAN RAFAEL December 19, 1914 – November 5, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

Tatyana Passinsky

Rigoberto Venegas

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1945 – November 3, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 22, 1963 – November 5, 2012

Faisal Sheikh

Arthur N. DiFeo

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 28, 1984 – November 4, 2012

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY March 13, 1922 – November 7, 2012

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Jose De Jesus, Jr.

Lorraine B. Rodrigues

510-657-1908

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 27,1947 – November 4, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 30, 1916 – November 7, 2012

www.lanasestatesales.com

Luis Manuel Zavala Roman, M.D. Rolando De Leon Timoteo

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 26, 1951 – November 3, 2012

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 12, 1960 – November 7, 2012

John R. Hassman RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON September 23, 1930 – November 7, 2012

Raymond S. Bernauer RESIDENT OF TRACY May 18, 1922 – November 8, 2012

George F. Walker RESIDENT OF HAYWARD December 27, 1942 – November 9, 2012

Edward J. Fiala RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 15, 1920 – November 4, 2012

Neha Chawla RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON July 8, 2004 – November 9, 2012

Walter Michael Zbyzenski RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 31, 1920 – November 9, 2012

Ruben G. Jimenez RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA July 30, 1951 – November 9, 2012

Fiorabante J. Buti RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 2, 1926 – November 8, 2012

Mohammed Abdulmalik RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE February 2, 1929 - November 6, 2012

Krishna Bakshi

Chapel of the Roses

RESIDENT OF LIVERMORE January 1, 1930 - November 4, 2012

(510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

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ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

California State University rolls back tuition increase SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE THARA The California State University (CSU) will avoid a $250 million mid-year budget cut after voters’ approval of Proposition 30, and will start the process of rescinding the $249 per semester tuition fee increase already in place. With the passage of Proposition 30, CSU’s budget will essentially remain flat for the remainder of this fiscal year, but state funding is still approximately $1 billion less than several years ago. “We are hopeful that the passage of Proposition 30 will be the beginning of the state’s reinvestment in higher

education,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed. “The long term benefits of additional revenue can only be realized if higher education is once again a priority. The state needs to start making up for the devastating budget cuts of the past several years, and focus on higher education as a driver of California’s economic future.” The CSU Board of Trustees had previously approved a contingency plan to rescind a $249 per semester tuition fee increase that took effect for the fall 2012 term. Annual tuition fees for full-time undergraduate students will now revert back to $5,472 – the same rate as in the 20112012 academic year. Students will either be credited, refunded or receive a reconfigured financial aid package to

account for the revised tuition fee rates. Campus enrollments will also remain constant for fall 2013. The system had held applications from new students pending the outcome of Proposition 30, which has a direct impact on funded enrollment targets. Campuses will immediately begin to review applications for new student admissions for the fall. The California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 427,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. For more information, visit www.calstate.edu.

PUBLIC NOTICES ered for funding as part of this RFP: •

Acquisition, construction or rehabilitation of facilities and improvements, including energy efficiency improvements, for community use such as childcare centers, homeless shelters, and health centers, etc. The facility must predominantly benefit low and moderate-income households. Certain activities to stimulate the production of affordable housing for low and moderate-income families, seniors, and disabled. CDBG PROPOSAL ORIENTATION AND PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Fremont Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) and Staff will hold a Public Hearing and Proposal Orientation for all agencies interested in requesting FY 2013-14 funding. City Staff will review the CDBG RFP, the proposal timeline and criteria used to evaluate proposals. They will also answer any questions you may have about the process. The public will have an opportunity to give input and express funding priorities. Please RSVP for the proposal orientation by Monday, December 10, 2012. The Proposal Orientation & Public Hearing will be held as follows: Date: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 Time: 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Place: City of Fremont Training Room 3300 Capitol Avenue, Bldg. B Fremont, CA 94538 •

Monday, December 3, 2012: Requests for Proposals (RFP) materials will be available on ZoomGrants at https: //zoomgrants.com

Monday, December 10, 2012: Deadline for submitting RSVPs for the Orientation and Public Hearing

Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.: Proposal orientation and public hearing (see details above).

Thursday, January 24, 2013 by 5:00 p.m.: Proposals are due to the City of Fremont Human Services Department, via https: //zoomgrants.com. Hard copies, faxes or emails will not be accepted.

CDBG FUNDING PROCESS The Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) will review CDBG funding proposals in February and make its funding recommendations in March 2013. The City Council will review these recommendations and make their final funding decisions on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 (tentative date). If you would like to RSVP for the Proposal Orientation & Public Hearing or have any questions about the CDBG funding process, please contact Lucia Hughes by phone at (510) 574-2043 or email at Lhughes@fremont.gov. 11/13/12 CNS-2406126#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOROTHY LEE REESE CASE NO. RP12644992 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or

both, of: Dorothy Lee Reese A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Donna Cramer in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Donna Cramer be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 12/11/2012 at 9:30 in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the

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court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan E. Foley Attorney at Law State Bar #76421, 827 Broadway, Suite 220, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: 510-547-3788 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2402019#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF WAREHOUSE LIEN SALE I am an attorney at law retained to collect these debts. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the mobilehome described below will be sold as is at public sale on November 29, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at Space 199 Hawaii Cirlce, Tropics Mobile Home Park located at 33000 Almaden Blvd., Union City, California in order to satisfy the lien claimed by the owner of the above mentioned mobilehome park for storage and other related charges incurred by Ross G. Laverty. The mobilehome park owner may participate in the public sale. Rent & Storage $3,717.48 Sewer - $ 134.34 Trash - $ 168.72 Total Claim - $4,020.54 The sale will be free and clear of all claims, liens and encumbrances of record except for possible liens of unpaid mobilehome registration fees and unpaid taxes, if any. The Mobilehome Park owner has enforced a judgment for possession of the premises. Presently there is no right to keep this unit on Space 199 Hawaii Circle. However, after the sale is concluded, the management may entertain offers of financial consideration from the

buyer in exchange for granting the buyer permission to leave the unit on-site in the future. In the event that a post-sale agreement re: future occupancy is not reached, then the Mobilehome Park owner reserves the right to require the removal of the mobilehome within 48 hours after the sale. Prospective purchasers must tender a cashier’s check for the full amount of the purchase immediately at the conclusion of the sale. Except for the warranty that this sale is authorized by law, absolutely no warranties of sale are made. The park reserves the right to postpone and reschedule the sale without further notice. The general public will have access to the Mobilehome Park premises for purposes related to this sale. This sale does not include any contents of the unit and the successful bidder is responsible for the lawful disposition of all remaining contents of the unit. The Mobilehome is described as: One (1) 1971 Holiday Single Family Mobile Home; California HCD Decal No.: AAS9956; Serial Nos.: 1278X/U; HUD Label/Insignia Nos.: 470049 & 470050; Length: 57’; Width: 24’. Tropics Mobile Home Park’s claim for sums unpaid for June 1, 2012 through November 30, 2012, is set forth above and must be paid by the registered owner or other party in interest within 10 days of this notice in order to redeem the mobilehome, remove it from Space 199 Hawaii Circle and stop the sale. The Registered Owner’s payment of the sums demanded by this Notice will not reinstate the tenancy (and sub-tenancy, if any) under a rental agreement in default. NOTICE TO CONSUMER: The law gives you the thirty (30) days after you receive this Notice to dispute the validity of the debt or any part of it. If you do not dispute it within that period, I will assume the debt is valid. If you do dispute it - by notifying me in writing to that effect - I will, as required by law, obtain and mail to you proof of the debt. The law does not require me to wait until the end of the 30 day period before proceeding to collect this debt. If, however, you request proof of the debt within the thirty (30) day period that begins with your receipt of this Notice, the law requires me to suspend my efforts (through litigation or otherwise) to collect the debt until I mail the requested information to you. DATED: 10/29/12 /s/ Michael W. Mihelich, Attorney for Tropics Mobile Home Park (951) 786-3605 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2401986#


November 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Individual tickets for “Music, Movies & Magic” are $125. Please inquire about discounts for educators and musicians. There will be live and silent auctions as well as a drawing for a 16GB iPad and iPad mini. Drawing tickets are $20 or three for $50; you need not be present to win. For reservations or more information on how to become a supporter, sponsor, or advertiser for the event, visit www.fremontsymphony.org or call (510) 371-4860.

continued from page 1

Music, Movies & Magic Gala Fundraiser Sunday, Nov 18 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. Best House, Palmdale Estates 159 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 371-4860 www.fremontsymphony.org Tickets: Beginning at $125

Fremont Bank hires Ken Jones as VP, promotes three others Fremont Bank, a leading fullservice community bank in Northern California, announced on November 7, 2012, the hire of Ken Jones as vice president of retail banking. In this new role, Jones will lead the strategic expansion of Fremont Bank’s branch network, as well as deepen relationships with existing clients. Jones has nearly two decades of banking experience. He most recently served as senior vice president and regional president with Wells Fargo, where he managed $6.5 billion in assets and oversaw 45 branches. “Ken’s tremendous experience, skills and relationships will certainly benefit Fremont Bank’s

clients and the local communities we serve,” said Fremont Bank President Andy Mastorakis.

In addition to hiring Jones, Fremont Bank recently promoted three current associates to vice president: Helen Liu is a 27-year veteran of Fremont Bank and will now serve as the vice president of private banking. Dipak Roy, who joined Fremont Bank in 1997, has been named vice president of commercial banking. Brad Seibel, with Fremont Bank since 2009, has been promoted to vice president of residential lending group sales. For more information about Fremont Bank, visit: www.fremontbank.com

Induz celebrates successful Dandiya event SUBMITTED BY INDUZ Classical Principles. The Victorian period from 1820 - 1900 was based on Gothic principles. These two styles are diametrically opposed in their function. The Classical exploited the shape of the body; the Gothic exploited the shape of the dress. When cage crinoline became available they were somewhat inexpensive so that all classes of women could afford them. The invention of the sewing machine in the 1850s provided the opportunity for all women to make their own dresses. This did not make the upper classes happy, so design differences were instituted to make a fashion difference between upper class women and everyone else. This included the restrictive corset and addition of the bustle. This event will include the opening of the artists’ exhibit upstairs in the History Room with over 20 paintings of the session at Shinn Park, many of which will be available for purchase by contacting the artist directly. Artwork will be on display until the end of December. Talk to the models and the artists who painted them and learn what it was like for women over 100 years ago. The Christmas Open House schedule for the 1876 Shinn House will also be introduced. Victorian Models and Artist’s Fashion Show Saturday, Nov 17 Noon - 1 p.m. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401

Induz’s “Laser Dandiya 2012” fundraiser, held October 6 to raise funds for arts programs, was sold-out with attendance in excess of 1,200 people. Assistance has been expanded to include 30 Bay Area schools in the 2012 school year and continue the Tulika program which provides free art, music, and dance education for underprivileged children at orphanages in India. Volunteer Niharika Srivastava said, "It was so much fun. Volunteers did their best to provide a memorable experience." Anu Natarajan, Vice Mayor for the City of Fremont, congratulated the Induz team for the success of the event and the work that they are doing for underprivileged chil-

dren in India and the Bay Area. She presented a Proclamation on behalf of the City of Fremont to Induz Founder and President, Ray Mitra. Jose Esteves, Mayor of the City of Milpitas, also presented a Proclamation recognizing the contribution of Induz. A representative from the Office of Senator Ellen Corbett presented Induz a certificate of appreciation for the positive impact Induz is making in the local community. Induz founder Ray Mitra said, “I would like to thank all our sponsors, supporters and media partners, without whom such a large community event cannot be successful.” A special thanks was sent to young volunteers Neha Krishna, Shailja Sarin, Rhea Mitra and Anish under the lead of Dhaval Shah.

(center) Jose Esteves, Mayor of Milpitas, enjoys Induz’ Laser Dandiya.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 13, 2012

SUBMITTED BY CODY GEORGE The start of November means fall is in the air, and Thanksgiving is just around the corner. It is also time for the 11th annual Karen M. Gordin Turkey Swim. Every Thanksgiving Day, the Hayward Plunge staff sets aside this day to raise money for the Karen M. Gordin Scholarship Fund. Karen was a lifeguard for the District who was tragically killed in a car crash in 2001. She was very much loved at the Hayward Plunge, and we want to carry on her name and the values she held on to. The scholarship is given to two individuals who are currently certified lifeguards and in school working towards his/her goals. Between 9 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. the scholarship committee will be awarding two $1,000 checks to the award recipients. One of the checks is donated by the Greater Hayward Area Recreation and Park District Foundation, and the other by the

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Scholarship Fund itself, which is completely funded by donations. Throughout the remainder of the morning, patrons can swim laps as well as receive assorted prizes and giveaways. Come burn calories in the morning to make room for all that turkey, while supporting a good cause. We ask for a minimum $4 donation. All donations are tax deductible. Checks can be made out to The Karen M. Gordin Scholarship Fund, and mailed or hand delivered to: Hayward Plunge, 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward, CA. 94541. Karen Gordin Turkey Swim Thursday, Nov 22 Lap Swim: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Hayward Plunge 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-6703 www.haywardrec.org $4 donation

Prepare your teen for 21st Century challenges SUBMITTED BY GINNY GRIMSLEY Parents today contend not only with yesterday’s worries - drug abuse, bullying, teenage sex and delinquency - but new challenges. The digital age has introduced adult predators and other online hazards, and body-altering decorating such as tattoos and piercings are popular temptations, says James G. Wellborn, a clinical psychologist with 18 years of experience working with parents and teens. “The teenage years are unlike any other in a person’s life – it’s a unique in-between period from childhood to adulthood, and it’s helpful to remember that problems during this time are actually normal,” states Wellborn, author of the new book “Raising Teens in the 21st Century: A Practical Guide to Effective Parenting.” “But teens still require guidance, encouragement and good ideas to see them through to adulthood.” A universally admired trait, spanning all cultures, religion and philosophy, is compassion. A truly compassionate teen will inevitably have a host of other positive qualities, Wellborn says, including patience, understanding, sensitivity, tolerance, intuition and more. He says parents can encourage compassion in the following ways: Model it: Compassion is largely learned, so be aware of how you act around your children. How did you respond to the request for money from that panhandler on the street? What comment did you make behind his back, in the presence of your kid? What did you say about that idiot driver who just cut you off in traffic? Your teens are watching and listening. Notice it: Point out examples of compassion that occur around you. It comes in many forms. Relevant to our daily lives are the people who quietly, and without recognition, help others in need, including volunteers of all types. Make a game of identifying instances of compassionate deeds you’ve witnessed. Teach it: Compassion has to be taught, so be prepared to provide direct instruction on how your teen needs to think and act in order to develop that quality. One important component is empathy. If your teens can’t see things from another’s perspective, it is difficult for them to appreciate what that person is going through. Help them learn to walk a mile in their shoes. Anticipate it: Character can be fostered by projecting moral strength into their future. In this way, you will be subtly shaping the adult they are working to become. Say things like: “By the time you’re an adult, you will be such a person of strong character. That’ll be really cool.” Guilt it: A personal value system serves as a means of accountability to oneself (and your family and community). This begins with the value system parents promote in their kids. If they fulfill the promise of personal values it is a source of justifiable pride. Violating personal values should result in guilt for not doing what’s right and shame for letting other people down. Parents need to help their kids along with this. Repeat it: Once is not enough when it comes to character. Find every opportunity to work it into the conversation. Using all of the strategies mentioned above, you will be able to work character issues into every possible situation in a remarkably diverse number of ways. You need to have mentioned character so often – at least once every couple of days – and in so many different forms that they are sick of hearing about it by the time they graduate from high school. For more information, visit www.drjameswellborn.com.

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TCV 2012-11-13