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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 11 No. 70

October 30, 2012

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Teacher Shelby Aldinger’s class of kindergarten students’ eyes open wide as they see the vast array of scien-

tific paraphernalia arranged throughout the multi-use room at Mattos Elementary. Fremont’s only Science magnet school, Mattos, is hosting a visit from Bob continued on page 43

Are you a robot?

Fun with electrical current!

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN Are you celebrating Dia de los Muertos? Or have you always wanted to

(L-R) Norman Munoz, Sarah Moser, and Sarah Gold perform in Oskar and the Big Bully Battle, a show created by TheatreWorks for Schools to teach K-5 students skills for handling bullying situations.

SUBMITTED BY MAX RICHTER PHOTOS BY SCOTT DEVINE The recent tragic suicide of 15 year-old British Columbia high school student Amanda Todd, reminds us that even with national movements, such as October’s “National Bullying Prevention Month,” this type of abuse is all too prevalent, and that bullying seems to be gaining traction among girls. TheatreWorks, the nationally acclaimed theatre of Silicon Valley, was called in by local school and mental health organizations to find solutions in educating students - and among their conclusions was the need to introduce the topic at an early age. With the help of experts, the company created a lively show which teaches youngsters to identify bullying behaviors, in both others and themselves, and school officials have been thrilled with the results. Now in its fourth year, “Oskar and the Big Bully Battle” has introduced a female protag-

onist (Olive) and is addressing cyber-bullying, involving kids in a give-and-take presentation that teachers find effective and informative (Tri-City Voice featured the earlier production in its March 15, 2011 issue). The assembly started touring Fremont elementary schools October 9, and will continue until December 6. Students at the following Fremont schools will have the opportunity to see the updated production during their school day. Ardenwood students recently saw the performance; the remaining Fremont school schedule is as follows: October 30, Oliveira Elementary; November 1, Vallejo Mill; November 6, Millard Elementary; November 26, Warwick Elementary; November 29, Blacow Elementary; and December 6, Mission Valley Elementary. Bay Area kids are now overheard on the playground asking “What would Oskar do?” repeating the mantra of the show. For more information, visit www.theatreworks.org

Oscar Cisneros from Tu Tienda Azteca and Hayward Area Historical Society staff will lead the workshop. All materials ($15 fee) will be provided, but attendees are encouraged to bring small photos to personalize shadowboxes. We will also make Dia de los Muertos inspired magnets. All ages are welcome; children need to be accompanied by an adult. At the end of the day you will take home your own work of art. This program is a collaboration between the Hayward Area Historical Society, Tu Tienda Azteca, and the Pancho Villa Event Center. For additional information regarding the Dia de los Muertos workshop, contact Johanna Fassbender at (510) 581-0223 or visit www.haywardareahistory.org.

find out more about this celebration of the dead? Then join us for a fun, handson workshop to create your own Dia de los Muertos shadowbox. Everyone is welcome; adults, children, and families. The program will take place on the actual Day of the Dead, Friday, November 2, at the Pancho Villa Event Center in Hayward.

Dia de los Muertos Craft (Day of the Dead) Workshop Friday, Nov 2 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. A fun, hands-on workshop to create a Dia de los Muertos shadowbox Pancho Villa Event Center 1026 B St., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Material fee: $15

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 25

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 23

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 333

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

INDEX

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 32


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

Stroke Seminar Gives Valuable Primer on No. 1 Cause of Long-Term Disability When you go to your primary care doctor, there’s a limited amount of time. He or she might tell you to lower your sodium intake, or to sign up for a smoking cessation class if you smoke. But chances are the doctor isn’t going to have an hour to discuss why controlling these risk factors is important. Dr. Ash Jain, cardiologist and medical director of Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program, does exactly that each month during the free Stroke Education Series. He is an expert in stroke care who recently presented research at the eighth international Stroke Congress held in Brazil. Stroke Experts Share Their Knowledge “We are always seeking to improve patients’ outcomes, because stroke is the most devastating disease there is,” Dr. Jain says. “Something people may not realize is that they play a critical role in stroke care. Timing is everything when it comes to treatment of stroke, and when community members recognize stroke, they are much more likely to take the appropriate action.” Next week, Dr. Jain and Stroke Program Clinical Coordinator Doug Van Houten, R.N., will begin the stroke series from the beginning with Introduction—

Stroke/Risk Factors for Stroke. “The beginning of the Stroke Education Series is very important, particularly for members of the community who don’t fully understand what stroke is or may not be able to recognize its symptoms,” Dr. Jain explains. He points out that the Stroke Program relies on community members to get emergency medical attention immediately if they suspect stroke. “We have a very efficient process for managing acute stroke, starting from the moment 9-1-1 is called, but in order for us to take full advantage of the tools at our disposal, community members must first recognize stroke,” he says. “Getting to the ER if they suspect stroke can make the difference between minimal damage and long-term disability or death. This introduction to stroke seminar is an excellent means to learn the basics of stroke, including how to recognize it.” Methods for treating and diagnosing stroke are constantly evolving, and the Stroke Education Series is a good way to stay up-to-date on the latest advancements from experts in the field. “I spend a great deal of time researching and implementing actions that will improve our pa-

tients’ outcomes following stroke, but I also encourage community members to learn more about stroke before it happens, as it is a highly preventable disease,” Dr. Jain says. What You Don’t Know Puts You at Risk As the Stroke Program’s clinical coordinator, Doug Van Houten talks to a lot of people in the community about stroke. He attends community events and health fairs and presents at organizations throughout the Tri-City area. “What I’ve found is that not enough people know enough about stroke,” he says. “At these events, we ask people, ‘Can you tell me a sign and symptom of stroke?’ and they say, ‘Pain in the left arm? Shortness of breath?’ They don’t know the symptoms. And if a family member or friend doesn’t seem to be in very much distress—just a little weakness in the arm or leg— then they might tell that person to take a nap. The reality is that brain cells are dying every minute they wait to call 9-1-1.” To emphasize his point, Van Houten cites a statistic from Stroke, a journal of the American Heart Association, which says that the average stroke patient with an acute large vessel stroke loses 1.9 million neurons each minute stroke goes untreated un-

It’s important to know that stroke warning symptoms are the signs of an emergency. For every minute that brain cells are deprived of oxygen during a stroke, brain damage increases. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you suspect that you or a family member is having a stroke.To learn more about the risk factors for stroke, attend the upcoming Stroke Education Series lecture at Washington Hospital on Tuesday, November 6.The free seminar will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E.Anderson M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.Visit www.whhs.com/stroke for more details.

treated. Compared with the normal rate of neuron loss in brain aging, the Stroke article says the ischemic brain ages 3.6 years each hour without treatment. Losing 3.6 years of brainpower every hour? Nobody wants that. “For most of us, we could give up half the muscle fibers in, say our arm, and we would still have a reasonable life—but if you give up half your brain cells, you are going to terribly disabled,” he says. Van Houten says his main focus during the upcoming seminar is to introduce people to a few simple tests that can predict with startling accuracy whether someone is having a stroke. He points out that learning the symptoms of stroke is like keeping bandages and first-aid ointment in the house. “Knowing the symptoms of stroke is a tool to keep in your mental first aid kit,” he says.

“Know when to call 9-1-1, and don’t have a family member take a nap if you suspect they are having a stroke. During the Stroke Education Series, we talk about how to identify stroke, what to do, as well as how to avoid it altogether. After attending the entire series, community members know a lot about stroke.” Stroke: Start at the Beginning When a stroke happens, everyone in the family needs to be able to recognize the signs. Next week is your chance to start at the beginning and learn from the stroke experts at Washington Hospital. Introduction—Stroke/Risk Factors for Stroke will be held next Tuesday, Nov. 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, (Washington West building) located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

10/30/12

10/31/12

11/01/12

11/02/12

11/03/12

11/04/12

11/05/12

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Disaster Preparedness

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Men's Health Expo 2011 Women's Health Conference: Can Lifestyle Reduce the Risk of Cancer?

Women's Health Conference: Food and Mood: How One Can Affect the Other

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Brain Health for Seniors

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Diabetes Matters: Manage Your Diabetes SMART Goal Setting

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Quality of Life Matters (Late Start)

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes Diabetes Matters: Manage Your Diabetes SMART Goal Setting

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Heart Healthy Eating After Surgery and Beyond

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Approach to Managing Diabetes

Quality of Life Matters (Late Start)

Living with Heart Failure

Colorectal Cancer: Healthy Diet To Prevent Cancer (Late Start)

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

Getting the Most Out of Your Insurance When You Have Diabetes

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10, 2012

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10th, 2012

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start) Vitamins and Supplements How Useful Are They?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 10th, 2012

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Diabetes Matters: Vacation or Travel Plans?

The Weight to Success Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Diabetes Matters: Key To A Healthy Heart with Diabetes

Kidney Transplants

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Raising Awareness About Conditions Stroke

The Weight to Success How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Brain Health for Seniors

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Learn More About Kidney Disease

Heart Irregularities

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery

Heart Healthy Eating After Surgery and Beyond

Learn Exercises to Help Voices InHealth: New Lower Your Blood Pressure Surgical Options for Breast and Slow Your Heart Rate Cancer Treatment


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

A rendering of the future Washington Hospital campus. To keep pace with the growing health care needs of the community, Washington Hospital is investing in new facilities that will provide quality patient care well into the future.

F

aced with aging emergency, intensive and critical care facilities, and an increasing number of patients entering the emergency room, Washington Hospital Healthcare System is asking local voters for help. On Wednesday, August 8th, the Washington Township Health Care District Board of Directors, in a unanimous vote passed a resolution calling for the placement of a General Obligation Bond in the amount of $186 million on the November 2012 ballot. For the average homeowner in Washington Township, the estimated average tax rate would be just under $10 per $100,000 assessed valuation of a home, or about $35 a year based on the average home values in the District. Several years ago, the Washington Township Health Care District Board of Directors developed a long-term master plan to upgrade all hospital facilities in order to meet California’s stringent seismic safety requirements and accommodate the growing population.

Washington Hospital has now completed Phase One of this plan, which included the Central Utility Plant and the Center for Joint Replacement, on time and on budget. Bond Measure Z proceeds will be used to finance the next phase of the master plan: an expanded and upgraded emergency room, intensive care unit, expanded cardiac care facilities, additional patient beds and operating rooms. In the last decade, the number of visits to Washington Hospital’s Emergency Room has increased by 25-percent. “Our emergency room always operates at or above capacity,” says Ed Fayen, Washington Hospital’s associate administrator of System Operations and Management Support Services. “Last year, we had more than 52,000 emergency room visits. An expanded emergency department is clearly a critical need, and that’s why it is an essential component of our master plan, which is designed to meet the current and future needs of our community.” The upgraded emergency

Washington Women’s Center Class Offers Recipes and Tips The holiday season is almost here and with it plenty of opportunities to eat foods that are high in fat and calories. This year trade some of those fattening appetizers with tempting treats that

everyone will enjoy without putting on extra pounds. “A good way to make sure you don’t overindulge at holiday parties continued on page 5

On Thursday, November 8, Maggie Villagomez, a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital, will be teaching a “Healthy Holiday Appetizers” class that will show you how to prepare low-calorie appetizers for your holiday gatherings.The class is scheduled from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Washington Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com or call (510) 608-1301 for more information.

room will be approximately four times its current size. The new intensive/critical care unit will have 48 beds, more than twice the size of the current unit. Fayen notes that the new expanded and upgraded emergency room will position Washington Hospital to apply to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors for designation as a Trauma Center. Currently the closest Trauma Center to the Tri-City area is Eden Medical Center. Washington will be able to provide a large portion of the projected expenditures for this next phase through internal resources and current bond holdings, and is now requesting consideration by the voters for the remaining funding through issuance of General Obligation bonds. The measure requires a two-thirds majority from voters in the Washington Township District. If passed, construction would begin in the spring of 2013 and would be completed in 3-5 years. The bond measure also requires annual performance and financial audits and an in-

dependent citizens oversight committee. Measure Z proceeds will be used exclusively for construction and not for day-to-day Hospital operations or administrative salaries. For questions or comments about Measure Z, email info@citizens4whhs.com or call 510-790-9806. Measure Z funds will be spent on essential repairs and upgrades, which will: • Reduce overcrowding and wait times by expanding Emergency Room facilities. • Upgrade and expand the aging Intensive and Critical Care Units • Provide local access to the latest advanced medical technologies and treatments. • Enable Washington Hospital to apply to become a designated Trauma Center to provide the highest level of emergency care to patients. • Provide state required upgrades for earthquake safety.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Board of Directors and the staff of the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation wish to thank all the following people for all their support and dedication to the 13th Annual KEEP ABREAST Walk/Run. We are so grateful!! Presenting Sponsor Fremont Bank Foundation Beverly G. Hagan, CPA Washington Hospital Healthcare System Micrel Genentech Heritage Bank of Commerce Palo Alto Medical Foundation Cents & Sensibility, Inc. Carol Dutra-Vernaci, EA Holy Spirit School Snap Fitness Amoena W.L. Hickey Sons Sensiba San Filippo Washington Out Patient Surgery Center Jack’s Brewing Company AMP Printing Dr. Jim Chen & Dr. Cecilia Ortega Dorso’s Automotive Repair Service American Breast Care Juzo Allcom Electric Presidio Bank Twin Oaks Flooring C V Administrative Services, Inc.

In kind Sponsors KTVU 96.5 KOIT Tri City Voice Dutra Enterprises Comcast Spotlight Collective Discovery Oakland Audio Visual Services Gutenberg Communications Sign a Rama, Union City BizVidTV Panera Catering Raley’s

Luna Trader Joe’s The Bold Brush New Balance The Shanks Margo LeDuc Michelle Callaghan Walt’s Mission Towing Cresco Rentals

And we can’t forget Heather Holmes Sue Glader Kalei Aipoalani Lily Ruiz Maria Munoz Harriet Whitney Marta Rivera Emily Onoshi Dianne Evans Byron Evans Dave Monette Jeremy Chavarria Ramil Sumalpong Angelique Chaparro Figueroa The Gift Gallery Sheraton San Jose Chardonnay II, Santa Cruz Tangles Salon/Lindsay Alexander Harriet’s Hands Starbucks, Mission Blvd. Erik’s Deli San Jose Museum of Art Aquarius Restaurant Michael Avalos and Staff- Quarry Lakes Regional Park East Bay Regional Parks Student volunteers from- American,Alsion-Ohlone, Fremont Christian,Hayward,James Logan, Kennedy, Newark Memorial,Washington KEEP ABREAST Volunteer Committee & their families

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation 510-790-1911 2500 Mowry Ave. Suite 130 in Washington West’s Women’s Center Fremont

October 30, 2012


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 3

is to make sure there are plenty of healthy appetizers available,” said Maggie Villagomez, a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital. “There are simple ways to make some of the traditional appetizers we all love less fattening”. She will offer tips and recipes for preparing healthier appetizers at an upcoming class titled “Healthy Holiday Appetizers.” The class is scheduled for Thursday, November 8, from 12 to 1 p.m. It will be held in the Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. You can register online at www.whhs.com or call (510) 608-1301 for more information. In addition to food preparation information, Villagomez will offer some ways to avoid overindulging during the holidays. For example, don’t go to a party hungry. “When you go hungry, you are tempted to eat everything in sight rather than being more selective,” she said. “Have a light, healthy snack before you head out to that family gathering or holiday celebration.” Another tip is to stay away from the food table as much as you can. Don’t hang out around the food. Instead, focus on engaging with others at the gathering. “Compensate for eating a bit more at your party by eating a little less that day,” Villagomez added. “Do some extra physical activity the day of your party. Make sure you take a walk or do something active.” She also said it’s important to pay attention to your beverage. Avoid rich, creamy drinks and don’t consume too much alcohol. Beverages can have hidden calories. Bringing something healthy to eat is another great way to avoid a lot of fat and calories. Make it Lighter Villagomez will provide suggestions for making healthier versions of some traditional holiday appetizers as well as new recipes for some tasty healthy options. For example, substituting light and low-fat cream cheese and sour cream for the full-fatted versions in recipes is a good way to slim them down. “You can also use low-fat or non-fat Greek-style yogurt, which provides a lot of good protein,” she added. “Using olive oil instead of butter is a good substitution for many recipes to get in some healthy fats and limit your saturated fat intake.”

Instead of chips, try cutting up pita bread and baking it in the oven. Hummus makes a great lowfat, nutritious dip, she said. Villagomez suggested adding fruit to cheese plates and using stronger cheeses like gorgonzola because they are more satisfying. Vegetable and fruits trays are always great. “A pear and gorgonzola plate is simple and tasty,” she suggested. “Roasted vegetables also make a great appetizer. Cut them into bite-sized chunks.” Villagomez will provide a number of recipes, including the following one, which participants will get the opportunity to taste: Sun- Dried Tomato Palmiers 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 4 oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained 1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives 1 garlic clove, minced 1 sheet frozen puff pastry dough, thawed Place first the first five ingredients in a mini chopper and process until finely chopped. Unfold the dough and roll to a 10 x 9-inch rectangle. Spread the tomato mixture over the dough, leaving a 1/2-inch border. Roll up the long sides of dough until they meet in the middle. Chill 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut dough roll crosswise into 20 slices. Arrange slices in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes or until lightly browned. “These are delicious and offer some good nutrition in addition to being fun to eat,” Villagomez said. “There really are ways to enjoy good food during the holidays while reducing the fat and calories.” For more information about other classes offered at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com. To learn more about the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Download Healthy Recipes Online Washington Hospital offers nutrition counseling by appointment for individuals with specific medical needs as well as those who wish to maintain optimal health. Visit www.whhs.com/nutrition for more information and to download healthy food recipes.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

Marty Fraga Human Relations Commission Award winner WRITTEN BY HANS BALSAM, FREMONT SENIOR CENTER CREATIVE WRITING CLASS Marty Fraga was recently recognized by the Human Relations Commission for her significant contributions to the well-being of local seniors. She was one of five recipients of such an award. In her role as a nurse and health care educator, Fraga has provided services to vulnerable seniors for many years. Ms. Fraga worked as a Registered Nurse for Kaiser as an Emergency Room, Helicopter, and Hospice professional for twenty-three years. Following her retirement, Ms Fraga volunteered for Life Elder Care to assist elderly people in the community. She was especially drawn to homebound seniors who often have unidentified and unrecognized health needs. Marty's love and of her new clients was a primary reason she studied to obtain a Master’s Degree in Nursing, specializing in Gerontology. She has also served as a Senior Commissioner to help seniors have a voice in city government. Ms. Fraga currently teaches Public Health Nursing at California State University East Bay and has become a mentor to students, encouraging interest in geriatric nursing. She promotes an understanding of the elderly and their needs, directing her students’ ethnic and language knowledge to assist seniors when English is not their primary language. Marty brings her students to the Fremont Senior Center four times each year to dine and become familiar with the services offered. She is reaching both students and seniors, successfully blending generations to make our world a better one. With Ms. Fraga’s guidance, her students perform outreach in the community by visiting Meals on Wheels clients as well as determining seniors’ safety needs, assessing medical requirements, educating them on how and when to take medications, clarifying long term care and working closely with their doctors so they get the best care. Her students are encouraged to participate in clinics at elder care facilities. Ms. Fraga’s sensitivity to ethnic differences and requirements create successful matches between caregivers and seniors. Marty Fraga is a well-deserved recipient of the Fremont Human Relations Commission award; our community has benefited by her passion and hard work as she improves the lives of our seniors.

SUBMITTED BY NATIONAL COALITION AGAINST CENSORSHIP PHOTO COURTESY OF REV. JEREMY NICKEL Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist (UU) Congregation and the Kids’ Right to Read Project (KRRP) are hosting a reading of two books banned by the Fremont School Board. The eight part series will be led by Washington High School English teacher Teri Hu whose attempts to include the modern literary classics in the Senior A.P. curriculum have been censored. The class will meet monthly, Wednesdays at 7 p.m. The first meeting was held October 24; the next scheduled meeting is Wednesday, November 14. Meetings will continue on the second Wednesday of every month, concluding in May. Despite statements in support of the books by Mission Peak UU, KRRP and others, the Fremont School Board moved once again in 2012 to censor the Advanced Placement English curriculum at Washington High School. The works in question, Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina and Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, are highly acclaimed works by lauded and respected authors. Both works are taught frequently in college preparatory courses—Angels in America has appeared on the national AP exam in the past. “When I read about this issue last summer, I was shocked that this could be happening in Fremont. I have since learned that Fremont’s School Board is the only school in the entire United States to have banned Angels in America. Bastard Out of Carolina has only been banned one other time. As a community that cherishes the free and responsible search for truth and meaning, and the inherent worth and dignity of all people, I knew our congregation had to find a way to support teacher Teri Hu, and work against this terrible and antiquated decision,” said Rev. Jeremy D. Nickel of Mission Peak UU Congregation. The class seeks to educate the community about the true value of these two transformative twentieth century works whose value goes beyond

Teacher Teri Hu reads aloud during the October meeting.

their use in an exam; these are literary texts that inform readers about the human experience and broaden their horizons. Books will be available for purchase at the class and available to students of the Fremont school system for free. “Often with book challenges, a book is quietly removed and the discussion ends there. In this case, Mission Peak UU has taken the initiative to open an educational, productive dialogue about what these texts have to offer,” said Acacia O’Connor, Coordinator of Kids’ Right to Read. “Banning these books from being used in the classroom denies students the right to explore these important texts in a safe and supportive educational environment.” “I truly believe that once Fremont residents have a chance to read these books and engage with them in a thought-provoking, structured setting, they will immediately understand the power and educational value of these books,” said Teri Hu. “And my hope is that by introducing these books to the larger community we can make sure the Board understands that Fremont parents want their kids to read these books, and that the classroom is exactly the kind of place where they should be encountering the complicated ideas and emotions they generate.” See for yourself on Wednesday, November 14! Banned Books series Wednesday, Nov 14 7 p.m. Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 936-1632 minister@mpuuc.org Second Wednesday: November through May


October 30, 2012

Earth Talk®

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 7

E - The Environmental Magazine

Are perfumes and colognes healthy Dear EarthTalk: I’ve always suspected that perfumes and colognes must not be too healthy simply because of the way the smell of most of them bothers me. Am I correct? Is there information available on this issue? -- Lucinda Barry, Minneapolis, MN

the label, so makers disclose some chemicals but “lump others together in the generic category of ‘fragrance’.” EWG blames the U.S. government in part, pointing out that the Food and Drug Administration “has not assessed the safety of the vast majority” of secret chemicals used in spray-on products such as fragrances. “Fragrance secrecy is legal due to a giant loophole in the Federal Fair Packaging and Labeling Act of 1973, which requires companies to list cosmetics ingredients on the product labels but explicitly exempts fragrance,” reports EWG. As such, the cosmetics industry has kept the public in the dark about fragrance ingredients, “even those

Ahhh...the sweet smell of petrochemicals! The Environmental Working Group (EWG) reports that, while many popular perfumes, colognes and body sprays contain trace amounts of natural essences, they also typically contain a dozen or more potentially hazardous synthetic chemicals, some of which are derived from petroleum. To protect trade secrets, makers are allowed to withhold fragrance ingredients, so consumers can’t rely on labels to know what hazards may lurk inside that new bottle of perfume. “A rose may be a rose,” reports EWG. “But that rose-like fragrance in your perfume may be something else entirely, concocted from any number of the fragrance industry’s 3,100 stock chemical ingredients, the blend of which is almost always kept hidden from the consumer.” The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a coalition of over 100 groups seeking transparency PhotoDisk/Thinkstock about chemicals in cosmetics, The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics commissioned independent laboratory tests that recommissioned independent lab- vealed 38 secret chemicals in 17 leading fragrances.To protect trade secrets, makers are oratory tests that revealed 38 se- allowed to withhold fragrance ingredients, so consumers can’t rely on labels to know what hazards may lurk inside that new bottle of perfume. cret chemicals in 17 leading fragrances. The top offenders?: American Eagle Sev- that present potential health risks or build up in enty Seven topped the list with 24, followed by people’s bodies.” Chanel Coco with 18 and Britney Spears Curious For more information, check out EWG’s May and Giorgio Armani Acqua Di Gio each with 17. 2010 “Not So Sexy” report, available on the group’s “The average fragrance product tested contained website. Also, EWG’s SkinDeep database serves as an 14 secret chemicals not listed on the label,” reports evolving source of information on the ingredients (and EWG, which analyzed the Campaign’s data. their health risks) in thousands of cosmetics and re“Among them are chemicals associated with horlated products widely available on store shelves. mone disruption and allergic reactions, and many substances that have not been assessed for safety in CONTACTS: Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, personal care products.” EWG adds that some of www.safecosmetics.org; EWG’s “Not So Sexy,” the undisclosed ingredients are chemicals “with www.ewg.org/notsosexy; Skin Deep, troubling hazardous properties or with a propensity www.ewg.org/skindeep. to accumulate in human tissues.” Examples include EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer diethyl phthalate, a chemical found in 97 percent of and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E Americans and linked to sperm damage in human The Environmental Magazine ( epidemiological studies, and musk ketone, which www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: concentrates in human fat tissue and breast milk. earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: EWG explains that ingredients not in a prodwww.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: uct’s “hidden fragrance mixture” must be listed on www.emagazine.com/trial.

BY DORIS NIKOLAIDIS

H

alloween I always dress up like a witch. Witchcraft runs in my family and I have to uphold the tradition. My husband insists that I am a witch naturally and would not even have to dress up for the role but he considers all women witches, so his opinion does not count. My grandmother, who lived with us, was a witch. I never did see her ride around on a broomstick but I heard my father several times referring to her in conversations with my mother as “that mother of yours, that witch!” In the farming community where she lived, stories abound of some of her mystical powers, especially faith healing. Neighbors in the community would often call on her to heal the pain of a sprain or ease the cough of a child. She would grasp at her cane, sit for a moment closing her eyes, get up and slowly walk to the neighbor’s house. When we asked my mother what grandma was doing, my mother answered, “She is doing a miracle.” My father would usually add, “She is doing her witchy stuff.” I was a little uneasy living with a witch under the same roof but my mother assured me that my grandmother was one of the good witches. When I was about ten years old, I experienced her healing powers first hand. I had to walk to school a distance of about forty-five minutes, plodding through heavy snow in wintertime. Every year, during the winter, I would get severe frostbite in my toes. One particular winter the frost bites were especially painful and some of my toes were turning blue. The doctor prescribed foot-

baths with some stimulating additives, but nothing helped. Then my grandmother took over. She told me she would make the frostbite problem go away once and for all, and I would never get frostbite in my toes again. I loved my grandmother dearly but the prospect of her turning into a witch in front of my eyes made me very apprehensive. She told me to follow her outside to the back of the house. I eyed her witchy weapons anxiously. To combat frostbites, she had taken a chair, a chamber pot, and the brushwood broom that my father used to sweep snow or leaves off the garden paths. I was determined to keep my eye on the broom. In every fairy tale story I had read, this was the usual mode of transportation for witches. My grandmother told me to sit on the rim of the compost bin. I hoped she was not going to use the content of the bin as a medical unguent! She took the broom and brushed the snow off a small area under my feet. If she asked me to ride the broom with her, I was going to yell for my father. She sat in front of me on the old, rickety garden chair, told me to take off my shoes and socks and walk around barefoot in the snow for about one minute. Then she told me to urinate into the chamber pot and poured the urine slowly over my feet. This was a very unpleasant ritual but if that was the alternative to having the content of the compost bin poured over my feet, I was willing to accept it. She dried my feet off with an old rag, told me to sit down again on the rim of the compost bin, and sat down opposite me in her garden chair. She took my feet into her hands, closed her eyes, and quietly sat with me for

about five minutes. Then she rose and told me that I would never get frostbite again. I never did. Years later, after my grandmother had died, my parents visited me in USA. My father told me that my grandmother, before she died, had told him the secret of faith healing and had instructed him to pass it on to me as she thought I might also have the gift. I had always rejected mystical claims people made unless their claims could be substantiated by concrete scientific evidence. Passing the secret on to my father, who was the very person who imparted a healthy dose of skepticism to all his children, seemed like an odd choice. My father explained that my grandmother had told him the secret could only be passed on to the opposite sex. By that simple statement I was convinced that the whole thing was a lot of hocus pocus but I was willing to listen. According to my grandmother, a person really heals himself. The healer, by the power of her personality, would only convince the person that she could heal him. That explanation seemed too simplistic. I had experienced my grandmother’s healing power on my very own feet, but I suspected that the cure was the result of my aversion to again having urine poured over my feet. Once, when my four year old daughter suffered from a severe ear infection, crying with the pain, I was desperate and decided to give that faith healing business a try. I put my hands over her ears and told her to close her eyes. Mommy would make the pain go away. I closed my eyes also and concentrated on the pain. After a couple of minutes she sobbed, “Mom, it is getting worse!” That was my last attempt at faith healing. If witchcraft runs in my family and I have, according to my grandmother, the gift, I must be a different kind of witch.

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Crime mapping SUBMITTED BY SGT. MARK ORMSBY Hayward Police Department unveiled its new crime mapping program on September 12, 2012. This initiative will help reduce crime and enhance community policing. CrimeMapping.com enables residents and business owners to analyze interactive maps and reports of recent criminal activity. The website allows users to search specified areas within the City by date, location and type of crime. They can also generate, print and electronically share the maps and reports. The program raises the community’s awareness of criminal activity in their neighborhoods and in the vicinity of businesses where they work or shop.

“In late January 2012, Hayward Police Department implemented a new records management system which has enabled our organization to take the next step in community policing and put the power to view crime, almost in real-time, in the hands of our community. This has been planned, developed and tested for some time; we needed to ensure the accurate capture of statistics. We are pleased and excited to leverage technology to ultimately increase public safety by empowering our residents,” said Hayward Police Chief Diane Urban. Community members can register online to receive free, daily updates via e-mail informing them that a new crime has been committed in a specified location. A user can register multiple times to receive up-to-date

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD October 19 A female patron at the Saddle Rack, stole the purse of another female and used the stolen credit cards to buy drinks for her friends. Saddle Rack security caught on and caught the action on video. The female dropped credit cards as Officer Chahouati and Officer Settle arrived. She went to jail for theft. Her drunk friend went to jail for drunk in public. A group of 6 to 8 men were heard yelling and fighting at the end of Bell St. Units arrived and found an abandoned cab with the a cell phone inside and a wallet nearby. Believing that a robbery or kidnaping had occurred, officers began searching the area and running records checks on the taxi driver. The driver was located in his apartment with some minor face injuries. It appears that the driver and some friends got into an alcohol fueled altercation then fled in different directions. Officer Blass documented the incident as a suspicious circumstance. One other male went to jail for drunk in public. October 20 Officer N. Johnson responds to the Garden Village Apts in regards to a family disturbance. An argument erupted over the male half having marijuana inside the apartment. Further investigation reveals that a 2 year-old child is present. Officer Johnson and Huiskens discover several H&S violations and they also locate a loaded AR15 along with several large knives accessible to the 2 yearold. A 32 year old adult female and a 31 year old adult male go to jail for child endangerment and weapons violations. Officer Kwok responds to Gawain Ct. in regard to a family disturbance. 80 year-old mom is having problems with her 47 year-old son who doesn’t work and will not help her out around the house. He goes to jail for two outstanding warrants. Officer Lambert and crew respond to the area of Fremont and Walnut in search of a 42 year old adult male who has warrants. The male slips away in the darkness. As usual, Officer Lambert fails to gives up and spots the adult male when he “pops” his head up over a fence. The foot pursuit is on and Lambert successfully takes Salazar into custody for the outstanding warrants. October 21 Officer Soper arrested an adult male for resisting arrest after the subject led Officer Soper on a short foot chase from the Main Library.

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD October 21 Officers responded to the Extended Stay Hotel located at the Union Landing Shopping Center to investigate a report of a subject passing counterfeit money. Arriving officers spoke to the hotel clerk and examined the currency. They determined the currency to be counterfeit and continued their investigation by contacting the hotel guest who presented the currency. The hotel guest was

crime information for their neighborhood, place of business or their child’s school. Officers can use the program during community meetings to provide an accurate picture of criminal activity in the neighborhood. An iPhone application is available to receive updates directly to mobile phones. An application for the Android is in development. Information on robberies, burglaries, assaults and 11 other crime-types can be found through the program. By helping to enable the community to be better-informed about criminal activity in their area, the community and police have an effective partnership to reduce crime. For more information, visit www.CrimeMapping.com

At 3:00 a.m., the last (2) units available in the city are detailed to a train vs. vehicle crash at Automall Pkwy near the dump. The driver had exited his vehicle before it was struck. The driver, a 57 year old adult male, was on his way home (in San Jose) from a Shoreline concert. He perceives the railroad tracks as a roadway, until the train arrives. He gets arrested for DUI. Union Pacific PD ended up handling the crash, while we handled the DUI and CSI Rodriguez took photos. Since no officers were left (available) in the city, all of day shift patrol officers were called in early at 3:30 a.m. Newark & Union City PD were advised & put on stand-by until day shifters arrived. October 22 Shortly after 5:00 p.m., and moments before the first pitch of the pivotal Game 7, a witness calls FPD to advise that a masked gunman with an assault rifle is presently holding up the Wells Fargo Bank. He is calling from outside and officers arrive on scene within two minutes. The bank is surrounded immediately but the suspect had left on foot moments earlier. After clearing the call Officer Haugh locates a male subject on Almond Ave hitting a child and as he contacts the male, learns that the subject is a witness. He points out the suspect’s discarded latex gloves and empty “loot bag.” Officers search the area and Officer Sasser locates the discarded “M4” Crossman Rifle in the drainage ditch behind Coaches Bar. Ofc. Peters investigating. R/P calls in a Suspicious Person at the Chase Bank at Paseo Padre Pkwy/Walnut. Officer Sasser contacts a 24 year old adult male and located 46 ATM/Debit Cards and $11,500 in Cash on the suspect. He is booked for numerous fraud charges. October 24 At 9:15 a.m., a reporting party called to report that his locked vehicle, a 2004 green Jeep Wrangler, had been stolen during the night on the 35700 block of Cabrillo Drive. The license plate of the vehicle is 5GET426. At 9:45 p.m., a reporting party called to state that his locked vehicle had been stolen from the Ohlone College parking lot sometime in this evening. He arrived on campus at 5:15 p.m. and when he went out to leave, the vehicle was gone. The vehicle is described at a dark green 1997 Honda Civic, black rims, trunk taped down, with a license plate of 6VQE921. If you see either of these vehicles please call 510-7906800 and select option 3. If you have information about any of the above listed incidents, or another crime that has occurred, please contact us at fremontpolice@fremont.gov or learn how to send us a tip at www.fremontpolice.org/tip. found to be in possession of additional counterfeit currency, methamphetamine, and had an active warrant for her arrest. She was arrested and transported to jail. October 22 An officer was sent to an apartment at the Avalon Apartment complex to investigate a burglary. The victim advised that he and his wife went to bed at 11:59 p.m. Sometime about 2:00 a.m. he was awakened by his dog barking but fell back to sleep. About 9:30 a.m. he discovered that someone had entered his residence via the sliding glass door and burglarized his residence while he and his wife were sleeping. October 24 Between 6:10 p.m. and 9:25 p.m., unknown suspect(s) burglarized two vehicles parked in the Tony Roma’s parking lot at the Union Landing Shopping Center. The suspect(s) broke a side window to the vehicles to make entry. Electronics in plain view were stolen.

BART Police Log SUBMITTED BY SENIOR POLICE OFFICER E. JENKINS, BART PD On October 14, 2012 at approximately 1:25 a.m., a BART Officer on patrol noticed the windows were open to the Fremont Terminal Zone. The officer checked further and it appeared that someone had entered the building and possibly removed a computer monitor. The officer contacted the on-duty station agent who left a message for the line fore worker. At 6:25 a.m., the fore worker confirmed the theft of the computer monitor and contacted BART Police. A community Service Officer took the report and the case is under investigation. Loss is a 22? computer monitor valued at $250.00. (510) 464-7046 ejenkin@bart.gov


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Social Security Tips BY MARIAELENA LEMUS, SOCIAL SECURITY PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST How do I change my citizenship status on Social Security’s records? To change your citizenship status shown in Social Security records: • Complete an application for a Social Security card (Form SS-5), which you can find online at www.socialsecurity.gov/online/ss-5.html; and • Locate documents proving your: • New or revised citizenship status (Only certain documents can be accepted as proof of citizenship. These include your U.S. passport, a Certificate of Naturalization, or a Certificate of Citizenship. If you are not a U.S. citizen, Social Security will ask to see your current immigration documents); • Age; and • Identity. Then, take (or mail) your completed application and documents to your local Social Security office or card center. All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. We cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents. For more information, visit www.socialsecurity.gov.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD October 19

Officer Hogan responded to Raley’s at 8:04 p.m. for a shoplifter in-custody. Officer Hogan accepted the arrest of Roel Olpindo of Newark. October 21 At 5:34 a.m., a citizen called to report seeing suspects underneath his neighbor’s vehicle attempting to steal the catalytic convertor. Unbeknownst to the citizen, his catalytic convertor had just been stolen minutes earlier. The suspects then left the area in a minivan. Officer Hogan located the suspect vehicle blocks away and initiated a stop. The vehicle contained 24 freshly cut catalytic convertors, assorted pipe cutting tools and an assortment of Methamphetamine smoking pipes. Rhota Vin, Jim Aing and Bobby Onesavanh (all from Stockton) were all arrested. Officer Taylor coordinated this investigation. If you may have been a victim of the theft of a catalytic converter, please contact Officer Hogan at 510-578-4941 or Officer Taylor at 510-578-4982. JC Penney’s NewPark Mall called NPD Dispatch at 4:47 p.m. regarding an adult male subject in custody for petty theft. Officer Nobbe responded and arrested Tran, Liem. October 22 1734 Hours: Officer Ramos handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s Store at 5:34 p.m. Maria Campista of Fremont was issued a citation for petty theft and released at the scene. October 23 Officer Kovach investigated an Auto Burglary at 3:21 a.m. The Victim called from a residence in the 5000 block of Abbotford Ct. to report their vehicle had been broken into. The Victim advised they heard the sound of glass breaking and went outside to check and see

what it was. The Victim spotted a white male in a black hooded sweatshirt fleeing the area. The Victim checked their vehicle and found nothing missing. The suspect was not located. October 24 Officer Homayoun responded to Macy's at NewPark Mall at 1:44 p.m. and took custody of Deanna Klimkosky, Pleasanton after she was detained by loss prevention officers for shoplifting. At 3:02 a.m., Officer Norvell investigated a window smash burglary at Bung Tau restaurant, 6092 Mowry Ave. The loss was being determined. October 25 At 11:08 a.m., Officer Allum investigated a residential burglary in the 38300 block of Birch St. The lone suspect was contacted by the landscapers while in the back yard and described as a White Male Adult or Hispanic Male Adult 16-17 years old, brown hair about 5’7” and 140 lbs., wearing a gray sweatshirt, jeans and a backpack. Officer Knutson accepted the citizens’ arrest of Ashley Marbley of Fremont at 12:53 p.m. from Spencer’s Gifts for petty theft with a prior arrest for theft. At 2:15 p.m., Officer Johnson investigated the theft a MacBook Pro laptop stolen from a classroom at Newark Memorial High School. Special Events: Commander Milner was recognized by the City Council for his service to the City. The Citizen Police Academy graduation ceremony was well attended. Thanks to the participants, instructors, and Beverly Ryan for her tireless work organizing and facilitating this wonderful program. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Robbery Suspect Arrested SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD At 3:42 p.m. on October 24, Officers responded to Greenback Pawnshop (7102 Thornton Ave) on a report of an armed robbery. Responding officers received information in regards to a possible suspect and vehicle description. The involved vehicle was spotted on N/B Highway 880 approaching Decoto Rd. Officers attempted to stop the listed vehicle, but it failed to yield to the emergency lights and sirens. The vehicle slowed down just north of the Decoto Rd exit and a male subject jumped from the moving vehicle and fled over the fence that boarders the freeway into a Fremont neighborhood. Responding units from Newark, Fremont and Union City setup a wide perimeter. An Eastbay Regional Park Police Helicopter responded to assist. During a search of a backyard on Santee Rd, a 26 year old male was arrested.

Catalytic Converter Theft SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Alert: recently there has been a catalytic converter theft in a Newark neighborhood. Here is a list of ways motorists can deter converter thieves, including: • Parking your vehicle in well-populated, well-lit areas • Installing conspicuous video surveillance cameras outside homes • Parking your vehicle in a closed, locked garage • Watching local news to monitor epidemics of local converter thefts so as to take extra precautions • Etching the car's VIN on the converter to make it easier to identify a ring of thieves in the future • Installing an aftermarket security unit meant to deter catalytic converter theft Also with the sky rocketing price of gas now would be the time to purchase that locking gas cap!!!

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Local professor selected as Fulbright Scholar SUBMITTED BY SUSIE WHITE DeVry University professor Abhay Ghiara has been selected as a Fulbright-Nehru Senior Research Scholar. He has been awarded a grant to travel to India in 2012-2013 for his research project, “26 Brief Glimpses of Gandhi: Towards a Sequel to the London Performance-Lecture (Performance Studies International Conference).” Ghiara joins the ranks of a distinguished group of grantees that includes heads of state, CEOs and university presidents, as well as 43 Nobel Prize recipients. Ghiara is a senior professor with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at DeVry University’s Fremont campus. In November 2012, he will travel to India, where he spent his childhood, to begin his research under a grant through The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. “I am honored to be a part of such a prestigious program,” said Ghiara. “I look forward to my research in India because of its diversity, religious tolerance and thriving performing arts community. I hope the research will make both my students and colleagues at DeVry University proud.” Ghiara’s research will focus on Mahatma Gandhi’s life and legacy in nonviolence and its effect on interdisciplinary performance art. The collected research and materials will be used for a 26 part performance-lecture series on Mahatma

Gandhi, which will feature writing, visuals and performance. Dr. Donna Loraine, provost/vice president of academic affairs for DeVry University said, “Professors such as Abhay further reaffirm DeVry University’s breadth and depth of academic instruction excellence.” For more information about the Fremont campus of DeVry University, visit: www.fre.devry.edu/

THEATRE PREVIEW Take advantage of a great opportunity to meet and network with East Bay Chamber members when Golden Gate Fields hosts “A Chamber Day at the Races.” Tickets are $35 and include valet parking, Turf Club admission, reserved seating, daily racing program, Turf Club buffet, and a Hayward Chamber named race. Golden Gate Fields will donate 10 percent of Hayward Chamber’s net ticket sales to Leadership Hayward. Gates open at 11 a.m. with buffet hours from 11:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. The first race begins at 12:45 p.m. and the last race at 4:15 p.m. Advanced registration is required; there is no payment at the door. To learn more or to purchase tickets call (510) 537-2424 or email penny@hayward.org. A Chamber Day at the Races Friday, Nov 2 11:15 a.m. Golden Gate Fields Turf Club 1100 Eastshore Frontage Road, Berkeley (510) 537-2424 Cost: $35 per person

THEATRE PREVIEW SUBMITTED BY TROY RIVER When a schoolgirl's whisper spreads, it triggers a chain of events with extraordinary consequences. The Children's Hour, first produced in 1934 and written by award-winning playwright Lillian Hellman, is a visionary masterpiece where two headmistresses become entangled in a devastating story of deceit, shame and courage.

SUBMITTED BY IRENE JORDAHL The fall 2012 Children’s Repertory Theatre Company performs Joshua Mikel’s play, “The Monster Hunters” at the Niles Veterans Memorial Building on Friday, November 2 and Saturday, November 3. It's a typical afternoon in Bumblewood when the weekly meeting of The Monster, Ghost, Goblin, Demon, Dragon, EvilWizard Hunters Club (whose members have never caught, seen, or even tried to hunt a monster) is interrupted by a troublesome announcement: a reallive monster has been sighted in a nearby cemetery. The mismatched friends anxiously set out on their first hunt ever, only to find that they have been duped by the Secret Society of Girls Who Like to Make Bracelets Club. In the end, though, it is The Monster Hunters who will have the last laugh.

The Children's Hour is a drama of the power of lies and gossip to destroy when no one stands up to defend innocence. When this play premiered in 1934, it caused a scandal. Actresses were afraid to accept the leading roles, fearing damage to their reputations and that the play would be raided by the police. Times have changed, but the impact and implications of the situations that are dramatized in this play are still frightening and powerful.

Come watch Fremont Recreation’s child actors perform under the direction of Caitlin Dissinger, Chantalle Noelck, and Laura Ramie. Tickets are $5. To purchase go to www.RegeRec.com; for the Friday, November 2 performance enter barcode #179726, for Saturday, November 3 enter barcode #179727. Doors open half an hour before show time. These shows are for ages five and up (children must be able to sit through performances; babies and children under age five discouraged). For more information, call (510) 494-4300, ext. 1 or e-mail RegeRec@fremont.gov. The Monster Hunters Friday, Nov 2 and Saturday, Nov 3 7 p.m. Niles Veterans Memorial Building 37154 Second Street, Fremont (510) 494-4300, ext. 1 RegeRec@fremont.gov Tickets: $5

The Children’s Hour Thursday, Nov 8Saturday, Nov 17 Thursday – Saturday: 7 p.m. (Nov 8 @ 3 p.m. half price) A classic play by Lillian Hellman Theatre 70 at American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd, Fremont 510-796-1776 ext 57702 Tickets: $4-$10


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Student recognition SUBMITTED BY TRISH HARMAN-MURRAY The director, Lisa Cole, of COIL (Circle of Independent Learning) Charter School announced today that Anna Eshelman has been named a Commended Student in the 2013 National Merit Scholarship Program. Commended Students placed among the top five percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2013 competition by taking the 2011 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT). A National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) spokesperson said, “The young people recognized as Commended Students represent some of the best and brightest minds in the country as demonstrated by their outstanding performance in our highly competitive program.”

THEATRE PREVIEW SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Based loosely on the “Peanuts” characters grown to high school age, “Dog Sees God” takes the comic strip and turns it on its ear. This Ohlone College Fall Theatre production is an edgy, honest, and scathingly funny look at the issues that teens deal with today. Directed by veteran stage performer and director Michael Navarra, the play is hilarious at times, relatable at others, and frankly… a lot like high school. This production is for mature audiences only, due to profane and obscene language, explicit sexual references, and violence.

Performances will be held November 2-3, 8-10, and 15-17 at 8 p.m. The Saturday, November 10 performance will be ASL Interpreted. For tickets, call the Box Office at (510) 659-6031 or buy online at www.smithcenter.com. Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead Nov 2 - 17 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $10-$12 Event Parking: $2

SUBMITTED BY BART Thanks to assistance from the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit system can now automatically brake trains when earthquakes threaten to rattle the Bay Area, allowing perhaps tens of seconds to a minute for trains to slow down before the ground starts to shake. Implemented in August, 2012, the earthquake early warning system was created with the help of University of California, Berkeley, seismologists who hooked BART into data flowing from the more than 200 stations of the California Integrated Seismic Network throughout Northern California. Electronic signals from seismic stations travel much faster than seismic waves. For quakes outside the Bay Area, these data give BART’s central computers advance notice that shaking is on the way; for quakes in the Bay Area, it provides more rapid warning. If the messages from the seismic network indicate ground motion above a certain threshold, the central computers, which supervise train performance, apply what BART calls “service” braking, which is a normal slowdown to 26 miles per hour. The further the quake from the Bay Area, the more time trains have to slow from speeds up to 70 mph. “The earthquake early warning system will enable BART to stop trains before earthquake shaking starts and thereby prevent derailment and save passengers from potential injuries,” said BART Board President John McPartland. “We are the first transit agency in the United States to provide this early warning and intervention.” BART’s Computer Systems Engineering Manager Kevin Copley and UC Berkeley seismologist Peggy Hellweg discussed plans for a broader early warning system along the Pacific Coast that would rival Japan’s well-known earthquake early warning system which not only slows trains but alerts schools and can even automatically close valves at industrial sites. BART has long had accelerometers - devices that detect strong ground movement – in place along the tracks. They sound an alarm bell in the Central Control Facility when the local shaking exceeds a specific threshold. Supervisors then decide whether to radio train operators and tell them to initiate emergency braking to a full stop. A year ago, BART adopted automatic service braking when the system’s own shake sensors detect ground movement. That only works when shaking reaches the BART system, however. The new system gives warning as soon as shaking is detected by remote sensors which can be sooner because of the time it takes for the strong shaking to radiate from the epicenter. “We’re now taking the person out of the loop; so for an earthquake right under the BART system, we have an immediate initiation of braking without anybody having to think,” Copley said. “It’s a faster response than we would have otherwise.”

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief: Abortion: Abortion and birth control are divisive issues in politics, and they've flared up at times in this campaign despite the candidates' reluctance to dwell on them. President Barack Obama supports abortion rights. And his health care law requires contraceptives to be available for free for women in workplace health plans. Republican Mitt Romney opposes abortion rights, though he previously supported them. He says the Supreme Court ruling establishing abortion rights should be reversed, allowing states to ban abortion. He's also criticized mandatory coverage for contraception as a threat to religious liberty. Romney's ability as president to enact federal abortion restrictions would be limited unless Republicans gained firm control of Congress. But the next president could have great influence over abortion policy if vacancies arise on the Supreme Court. If two seats held by liberal justices were filled by Romney-nominated conservatives, prospects for a reversal of Roe v. Wade would increase. Afghanistan: The stakes now are similar to what caused the U.S. to invade almost 11 years ago: the threat of more al-Qaida attacks. Obama says U.S. forces must not leave until Afghan forces can defend the country on their own. Otherwise the Taliban would regain power and al-Qaida might again launch attacks from there. Rival Romney appears to share that view. What's often overlooked in the “al-Qaida returns” scenario is an answer to this question: Why, after so many years of foreign help, are the Afghans still not capable of self-defense? And when will they be? The official answer is by the end of 2014, when the U.S. and its allies plan to end their combat role. The Afghans will be fully in charge, or so it is hoped, and the war will be over, at least for Americans. Auto bailout: There's little doubt the government bailout of General Motors and Chrysler kept the automakers afloat and saved huge numbers of jobs. But there's also little chance the government will get all its money back. Taxpayers are out about $1 billion on the Chrysler rescue. GM stock is selling for less than half the price needed for the government to recover all of its nearly $50 billion investment in that company. Obama carried forward a bailout begun by his predecessor. Romney opposed it. He said the companies should have gone through a private restructuring, with certain government guarantees after they reorganized. Three years later, both companies are profitable. Chrysler has added almost 12,000 workers; GM, about 2,000. It's been estimated that 1 million jobs have been saved at automakers, parts companies and related businesses. Campaign finance: This election probably will cost more than $1 billion. Big donors who help cover the tab could gain outsized influence with the election's winner. Your voice may not be heard as loudly as a result. Recent court decisions have stripped away restrictions on how elections are financed, allowing the very rich to afford more speech than the rest. In turn, super PACs have flourished, thanks as well to limitless contributions from the wealthy – including contributors who have business before the government. Disclosure rules offer a glimpse into who's behind the money. But the information is often too vague to be useful. And nonprofits that run so-called issue ads don't have to reveal donors. Obama criticized the Supreme Court for removing campaign finance restrictions. Romney supported the ruling. Both are using the lax rules with gusto. China: The U.S. accuses China of flouting trade rules and undervaluing its currency to helps its exporters, hurting American competitors and jobs. But imposing tariffs could set off a trade war and drive up prices for American consumers.

Tensions now have spread to the automotive sector: The U.S. is seeking international rulings against Chinese subsidies for its auto and auto-parts exports and against Chinese duties on U.S. autos. Romney says he'll get tougher on China's trade violations. Obama has taken a variety of trade actions against China, but on the currency issue, he has opted to wait for economic forces to encourage Beijing to raise values. Cheap Chinese goods have benefited American consumers and restrained inflation. But those imports have hurt American manufacturers. And many U.S. companies outsource production to China. One study estimated that between 2001 and 2010, 2.8 million U.S. jobs were lost or displaced to China. Civil rights: What, exactly, is discrimination, and what should be done to fight it? This election offers choices on the answer. In areas such as mortgages, voter identification and immigration enforcement, the presidential candidates differ over how to use laws that guarantee equality and how far the Justice Department's civil rights division should go to ensure all Americans are treated fairly. The election also will shape the Justice Department's actions in continuing court cases that challenge voter ID laws passed in some Republican-led states. Opponents contend such laws unfairly discourage minority voting. Under Obama, the government has aggressively prosecuted cases where statistics show that blacks and Hispanics are hit harder than whites. Under recent Republican presidents, the Justice Department has limited its enforcement to cases with evidence of intentional discrimination – not where statistics show that minorities were broadly disadvantaged by a particular practice. Climate change: This year America's weather has been hotter and more extreme than ever before, records show. Yet the presidential candidates aren't talking about it. In the U.S. July was the hottest month ever recorded, and this year is on track to be the warmest. Scientists say that's both from natural drought and man-made global warming. Each decade since the 1970s has been nearly one-third of a degree warmer than the previous one. Sea levels are rising while glaciers and summer Arctic sea ice are shrinking. Plants are blooming earlier. Some species could die because of global warming. Obama proposed a bill to cap power plant carbon dioxide emissions, but it died in Congress. Still, he's doubling auto mileage standards and put billions into cleaner energy. Romney now questions the science of man-made global warming and says some actions to curb emissions could hurt an already struggling economy. Cybersecurity: The risk of a devastating cyberattack on the United States is real. Yet the country remains vulnerable to an electronic Pearl Harbor due to a political dispute over the role the federal government should play in securing the computer networks that control the electrical grid, water supply and other critical sectors. Obama wants the owners of essential U.S. infrastructure to meet minimum cybersecurity standards. But Republicans in Congress say the president's approach will only lead to costly, time-consuming regulations that won't reduce the risk. Romney says Obama has failed to lead on a critical national security issue. While Congress bickers, the Pentagon worries. ``The uncomfortable reality of our world today is that bits and bytes can be as threatening as bullets and bombs,'' Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told lawmakers. Debt: A sea of red ink is confronting the nation and presidents to come. The budget deficit – the shortfall created when the government spends more in a given year than it collects – has topped $1 trillion for a fourth straight year. The government borrows about 31 cents for every dollar it spends. The national debt is the total amount the federal government owes. It's risen to a shade over $16 trillion. Obama has proposed bringing deficits down by slowing spending

gradually, to avoid suddenly tipping the economy back into recession. He'd raise taxes on households earning more than $250,000 and impose a surcharge of 30 percent on those making more than $1 million. Romney would lower deficits mostly through deep spending cuts. But many of the cuts he's pushing would be partially negated by his proposals to lower top tax rates on corporations and individuals. Defense spending: At its core, the debate over how much the U.S. spends on defense gets down to this: What is it that America should be defending against? There are plenty of potential security threats on the horizon, not to mention an unfinished war in Afghanistan. The size and shape of the defense budget go a long way toward determining whether the U.S. can influence events abroad, prevent new wars and be ready for those it can't avoid. It also fuels the domestic defense industry in ways that affect the vitality of communities large and small across the country. Obama wants more restraint in military spending while Romney favors expansion. Obama also wants more focus on Asia-Pacific security, reflecting China's military modernization. But that and other elements of military strategy could come apart if Washington doesn't find a way to avoid automatic budget cuts starting in January. Economy: The job market is brutal and the economy weak. More than 12 million Americans can't find work; the unemployment rate fell in September but is still at a recession-level 7.8 percent. It had been more than 8 percent for 43 straight months. A divided Washington has done little to ease the misery. The economy didn't take off when the recession ended in June 2009. Growth has never been slower in the three years after a downturn. The human toll is staggering. Forty percent of the jobless, 4.8 million people, have been out of work six months or more – a ``national crisis,'' according to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. Wages aren't keeping up with inflation. Obama wants to create jobs by keeping taxes low for everybody but the wealthiest and with public-works spending, clean energy projects and targeted tax breaks to businesses. Romney proposes further cuts in tax rates for all income levels; he'd also slash corporate rates, reduce regulations and encourage oil production. Education: Education ranks second only to the economy in issues important to Americans. Yet the U.S. lags globally in educating its children. And higher education costs are leaving students saddled with debt or unable to afford college at all. State budget cuts have meant teacher layoffs and larger class sizes. Colleges have had to make do with less. It all trickles down to the kids in the classroom. Although Washington contributes a small fraction of education money, it influences teacher quality, accessibility and more. For example, to be freed from provisions of the No Child Left Behind law, states had to develop federally approved reforms. Romney wants more state and local control over education. But he supports some of Obama's proposals, notably charter schools and teacher evaluations. So, look for them to be there whoever wins the White House. Energy: American energy is booming and that's got consequences for the economy and the environment. Obama embraces both traditional and renewable energy sources. He's spent billions on ``green energy'' and backs a tax credit for the wind industry that Romney opposes. Romney pledges to make the U.S. independent of energy sources outside of North America by 2020, through more aggressive exploitation of domestic oil, natural gas, coal and more, and approval of the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada. U.S. dependence on imported oil has declined because of the economic downturn, improved efficiency and changes in consumer behavior. Production of all types of energy has increased, spurred by improved drilling techniques and discoveries of vast oil continued on page


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

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Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

Letter to the Editor

Research candidate voting records The stakes have never been as high as they are THIS ELECTION for the residents of Fremont. Our city is at a major crossroad in its history. There are so many key land decisions that will be made over the next four years that we, as the people that live in this great city, must go to extra lengths to educate ourselves on the candidates. Did you know that major decisions will be made on the Downtown Project, the Irvington Bart Station, 800 acres in Warm Springs near Tesla, Centerville Theater, and even the possibility of a new Performing Arts Center? Literally the future of Fremont is in OUR hands today. We have all been inundated with well- crafted messages but our role in this democratic process is to look deeper and see through the multitude of signage, propaganda and possible “strings attached” endorsements. We have to do more than put a check mark next to a name that we’ve seen lots of signs for, seen a TV commercial for or even possibly, just happen to be from your same ethnic background. Never have the stakes been this high and never has it been more important to have the right leaders at the helm. We absolutely must do more this year. Simply reading a candidate’s statement, perusing mailers or website materials is not enough. As we all know, each candidate has the ability to hire a PR person and can easily craft a message that they think you want to hear. So, what is the average voter supposed to do to make an informed decision? Probably one of the best ways to educate yourself is to watch a video online from one of the recent forums. The League of Women Voters has all their forums available online (http://www.lwvfnuc.org/public/index.shtml). These forums are very revealing as candidates have to think on their feet and respond to audience questions. Although candidates still try to echo the messages touted on their websites you are definitely able to get a sense of who they are as a person and how effective they could be at leading a diverse city of 220,000 people. Another option is to look at some important political decisions made this past year. These votes can tell you a lot about a candidate’s priorities and perspective. Specifically, an unprecedented and historic decision was made this past July. The Protect Fremont Open Space Initiative of 2012 team collected nearly 10,000 signatures from Fremont voters within 7 weeks. On July 17th, our City Council voted and in a narrow 3-2 decision voted to adopt the initiative outright instead of having it placed on the November ballot. The importance of preserving open space for the residents of Fremont was heard loud and clear… by some. The vote was not unanimous. Out of the three City Council members who voted to adopt [Mayor Gus Morrison, Dominic Dutra, Anu Natarajan], only one will remain in office after the election; two who voted to adopt (Gus Morrison and Dominic Dutra) are not running for office. Please educate yourself on all the candidates and research their voting records. It is upon us, the citizens of Fremont, to select the right leaders to bring Fremont forward. Christina Broadwin, Fremont

LIFE ElderCare

A

ccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, depression in elderly people is a widespread and serious public health concern. It has been estimated that 15% of older Americans experience depression at some point and according to the Institute on Aging, minimum estimates of suicides among the elderly in the United States range from 6000 to 10,000 annually. Rather than asking your loved one if s/he is depressed, ask: Do you feel: • nervous • empty • worthless • that you don’t enjoy things you used to • restless • irritable • unloved • that life isn’t worth living

SUBMITTED BY INDIA COMMUNITY CENTER India Community Center (ICC) presents an incredible opportunity to take a special six-week workshop series with Rachna Nivas, principal member of the world-renowned Chitresh Das Dance Company, celebrated soloist, and co-director of the prestigious Chhandam School of Kathak. Hailed as “charismatic and resplendent” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Nivas has performed in award-winning productions in cities all over the U.S. and India, including National Center for Performing Arts in

Mumbai, and National Center for Kathak Dance (Kathak Kendra) in New Delhi. She brings over 12 years of teaching experience, including lecture demonstrations and residencies at universities and schools across the U.S. Today, Nivas has emerged as a compelling leader amongst the next generation of classical Indian artists. Come discover the dynamics of this rhythmic and improvisational art form through footwork, hand movements, and storytelling, with a special emphasis on Pandit Das’ innovative technique Kathak Yoga. Participants will also gain insight to the history, philosophy and mathematics of Kathak dance and Indian culture. The six-week workshop begins Thursday, November 1; children’s workshops (ages seven and above) will run from 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. at a cost of $120, while teen and adult classes will be held from 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. for $170. For more information or to register, call ICC at (408) 934-1130 or visit online, www.indiacc.org.

Jessika Baral, in center of front row, holding square plaque.

Local student places second at national science fair SUBMITTED COURTESY OF BROADCOM FOUNDATION

Jessika Baral (age 13) and an eighth grader at Hopkins Jr. High in Fremont won the Marconi/Samueli Award for Innovation and $10,000 second place prize, for her aptitude for electrical engineering and project on eye muscles and peripheral vision. Sponsored by Broadcom Foundation, the Broadcom MASTERS competition for sixth, seventh and eighth graders, inspires future scientists and engineers to stay with science and math throughout high school.

The competition was held in Washington D.C. during the week of September 28- October 3 and winners were announced on October 2. (The top award of the $25,000 Samueli Foundation was awarded to 14 year old Raymond Gilmartin of South Pasadena.) Baral was inspired to study vision after noticing that her friends often use handheld electronic devices for long periods of time — a habit that can result in eye muscle fatigue. She decided to put her engineering skills to use creating a device to strengthen tired eye muscles and improve peripheral vision using LED lights. Through her re-

search, she found that regular exercise with the device significantly improved both peripheral vision and peripheral reading range in children and adults. Baral was selected because she demonstrates both vision and promise as an innovator, and in the spirit of radio inventor Guglielmo Marconi, has shown aptitude and skill in applied electrical engineering concepts in her science project and in the STEM challenges throughout the competition week. For more information visit www.broadcomfoundation.org/m asters and www.societyforscience.org/masters

How to Recognize Depression in the Elderly Are you: • sleeping more or less than usual • eating more or less than usual • very tired and sluggish If the answer is yes to any of these and especially if there is more than one ‘yes’, please take this seriously. Do not be afraid to chat with your health care provider about what’s happening with yourself or your loved one. They have heard it all and will be supportive of you. They WILL be interested in getting to the bottom of whatever’s bothering you or your loved one. This is the kind of thing that is important to chat about sooner rather than later. Undiagnosed and untreated depression in older individuals can affect overall dayto-day functioning. To compound the matter, there may be factors that mask signs of depression in the elderly and make it difficult for caregivers to recognize their loved one needs help. For example:

Side effects from some prescription medications can resemble symptoms of depression. Cardiovascular disease medication and hormones are among these. Caregivers may believe their loved one is only displaying signs of a drug’s side effects and not be aware that depression is a contributing factor. Depression is also often expressed through physical complaints. Furthermore, chronic medical conditions, such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, may cause a loss of appetite, sleep impairment, and lethargy. These symptoms are also expressed in depression, making it difficult to determine which should be given priority: the condition or the depression that develops as a result of the condition. The good news is that there are simple tests that can help determine if a person is experiencing depression, and there are a multitude of treatment options available. Anyone who believes their loved one needs

help with depression should discuss it with their physician. One way to help with depression is exercise. LIFE ElderCare has a proven effective Fall Prevention program available free of charge to those over the age of 60, or younger with disabilities, and living in the Tri-City area. An added benefit from exercise is just how good it can make you feel. Participants in the program report a 72% improvement in mood. Medications are reviewed for interactions and a home safety assessment is done and minor safety modifications can be made at no cost to the participant. The 12-week program is free. Call Sandy at 574-2087 for information. Note- There is a wonderful resource called the Friendship Line for seniors. For emotional support and reassurance by phone, simply call (415) 752-3778 or (800) 971-0016 and introduce yourself to a Friendship Line counselor.


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tony Ma SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE RELUCIO Eden Housing is please to announce the appointment of Anthony (Tony) Ma as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) effective October 30, 2012. Tony brings to Eden Housing nearly 30 years of financial and accounting experience, most recently from the Oakland Housing Authority, one of the largest housing authorities in the country, where he served as Director of Finance for three years. He has held several senior level positions for companies comparable in scale and operations to Eden Housing. Tony's expertise in financial management, investments and operations make him a great addition to our team. As CFO, Tony will be responsible for corporate and real estate development accounting, finance and asset management and information technology operations of Eden Housing, its affiliates and ownership entities.

Museum of Local History honors Dillon family SUBMITTED BY TIMOTHY SWENSON The Museum of Local History is hosting a Memory Lane reception for the Dillon Family and Four Winds Growers. A Memory Lane reception is an event to honor the contribution of a family and/or business to the history of Fremont. The Dillon family, owners of Four Winds Growers, has been active in Fremont for 58 years. Starting in 1954, Floyd Dillon grew dwarf citrus trees on land on Olive Avenue in Fremont. When coming to Fremont from Carmel, Floyd brought his son, Don Dillon Sr., and his family, to help with the business. Don Dillon Sr. was active in the Fremont community, serving as a Fremont City Council member and as Mayor from 1962 - 1978. Don was also President of the International Plant Propagators Society in 1982 and California's "Nurseryman of the Year" in 1987.

Don Sr.'s son, Don Dillon, is also involved in the business and was named "Nurseryman of the Year" in 1989, the youngest person given that honor. Don Jr. was also President of the California Association of Nurseries and Garden Centers in 1999. At 3 pm, Don Sr. will talk about his past experience with Fremont. A new set of displays will be unveiled detailing the history of Four Winds Growers and the Dillon Family. Memory Lane reception Saturday, Nov 10 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. The Museum of Local History 190 Anza St., Fremont (510) 623-7907 www.museumoflocalhistory.org

New portal provides crowdfunding for community projects SUBMITTED BY NANCY SAIN FundaGeek is pleased to announce the launch of our new Community Support Portal site: www.fundageek.com/community . The portal is designed to address a broad array of fund raising projects with a focus on helping whole communities, specific groups within communities, as well as individuals living in communities. The FundaGeek crowdfunding platform can be used as a resource to help push forward important projects involving community organizing, activism, mobilizing, advocacy, legal action, development and much more. FundaGeek has designed unique funding portals for technology, scientific research, inventions, education – and now community support. In the past several years, crowdfunding has seen tremendous interest from creative people in the arts, music and film, but now with FundaGeek, community support projects can be funded using crowdfunding techniques. FundaGeek’s CEO and Co-Founder Daniel D. Gutierrez says, “Community support is an expansive area that often involves projects on very tight budgets. With crowdfunding, vital community projects can keep moving forward. It is often quite challenging for community projects to get well-deserved funding. With FundaGeek, we hope to make a difference.”

SUBMITTED BY HEIDI ONTIVEROS Develop your poetic voice in a workshop with Oakland poet Judith Offer. Carefully examine poems of well-known poets, looking for the elements of each poet's style, so you can make choices of style in your own work. All interested poets of any amount of experience are welcome to this free workshop. Following the workshop, Judith Offer will serve as the guest facilitator of the peer writers’ group. Bring your own work to share if you wish to participate in the meeting. Judith Offer has published five books of poetry, and her work has appeared in many magazines and broadcast on National Public Radio.

Crowdfunding is a funding mechanism utilizing the power of crowds through social media. In the last few years over a billion dollars have been raised through crowdfunding campaigns around the world. Our Community Support portal provides the vehicle through which individuals and communities can build a project at no cost and promote it through social media over the Internet. With crowdfunding, needed funds are raised by offering “Rewards” in exchange for “Pledges.” As an example, think of NPR or PBS pledge drives where a large number of donors pledge small amounts in return for simple rewards. Donors can opt for no reward so that all the funds go to the project. One of the significant benefits of crowdfunding is that it costs nothing to try. As a byproduct of a crowdfunding campaign, there is a huge benefit of expanded, positive, public awareness for your organization or specific project being promoting. Unlike most crowdfunding sites that use the “all or nothing” funding model where funding is provided only if the goal amount is met, FundaGeek is different. Projects receive whatever funding they have attracted by the end of the campaign. We encourage the project owner to resubmit the project for a continued and on-going source of funding. There are no up-front fees to use FundaGeek.

Advance registration for the free 1 p.m. workshop is required. To register, or for more information, call (510) 881-7980. The Non Profit Resource Center is pleased to bring these free workshops from the Foundation Center to the Hayward Public Library. These workshops (Tuesdays at 1 p.m.) will cover a variety of topics of interest to people involved in nonprofits: November 6 - Getting Ready for Foundation Fundraising; November 20 Foundations and their Roles in Philanthropy. Finding Your Own Poetic Voice Saturday, Nov10 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Hayward Library 835 C Street, Hayward (510) 881-7980 www.library.hayward-ca.gov

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October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 31 – NOV 6, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The election puzzle. It is notable that at 6:04 p.m. on Election Day, Mercury turns retrograde as the voting on the Eastern seaboard comes to an end. Mercury rules ballots, tickets, and administrative details. The last time and only other time this occurred on a US election day was during the Bush/Gore election, which was not resolved until a month later when the Supreme Court settled it. On Nov. 7, 2000, Mercury shifted to direct motion at 9:28 p.m., as the Midwest vote came in. Many believed the popular vote outweighed the electoral vote, but given the established laws, that would not have mattered.

Aries (March 21-April 20): A relationship or friendship that began with gusto in Feb arrives at a point of evaluation. The question of commitment may always be an issue in this situation.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): This might be a week in which you let yourself give into chocolate bonbons and other yummy things. Self-discipline is not at its best. Avoid temptations if possible.

Libra (September 23-October 22): This is not the best of weeks for personal relationships. Someone may surprise you by making a 180º turn. Previous agreements may be broken or severely strained.

Capricorn (December 22January 19): Intensity in relationships is the theme of the week. If you are not conscious, you could be pulled into schemes of manipulation or compulsive behaviors.

Taurus (April 21-May 20): You abruptly part a relationship situation that has not been good for you. It appears that the trigger has to do with your sense of personal ethics.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You may believe that you are done with the repair projects or fixing “old” things. Unfortunately, next week you will probably find another detail in the pile.

Scorpio the Phoenix (Oct. 23 - Nov 20): It is seriously important for you to hang onto your center at this time. A relationship situation could undermine your fresh resolve.

Aquarius (January 20-February 18): You may find that you will have to go back to the beginning of a project begun in Aug. You need a license, a cer-

Sagittarius (November 22December 21): Take your time on making decisions now. Almost as soon as you do, you will change your mind and think better of it. Use this time to gather more research.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

Gemini (May 21-June 20): As Mercury, your ruling planet, turns retrograde on Election Day, an agreement that you thought you shared with your partner falls apart. More negotiation will be necessary.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): This is not the time to make final decisions on the subjects of home, property, and family. You are likely to change your mind very soon. Be with those issues for a few weeks.

tification, or some other legalistic object in order to proceed.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): Monitor your inner critic this week. It may be serving up a plate of neurotic guilt to interfere with your attitude. A better use of this energy calls for rising above the yada, yada of the droning voice. Focus elsewhere.

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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Washington Hospital receives national honor SUBMITTED BY GISELA HERNANDEZ Washington Hospital has been honored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with its Bronze Medal of Honor for its work to reduce the number of people waiting for an organ or tissue transplant. “The patient first ethic drives our actions, which is why supporting transplant donation is an important part of what we do as a community hospital,” said Nancy Farber, Chief Executive Officer of Washington Hospital Healthcare System. “This recognition was achieved be-

cause of our dedicated team of physicians, nurses and all other caregivers who understand the value of organ and tissue donation to help give the gift of life.” California Transplant Donor Network, which works with hospitals on organ and tissue donation in Northern California, joined in the recognition for that effort. “CTDN is pleased to share in recognizing Washington Hospital. What we see each day in working with them is a commitment to the idea that lives are saved and improved through organ and tissue donation. It is great to see this recognition for Washington Hospital at a national level,” said

Cindy Siljestrom, Chief Executive Officer for CTDN. About 10,000 people are waiting for organs alone in the area served by CTDN. Last year, after all possible measures to save their lives had been exhausted, Washington referred 40 patients as possible donors. As a result, four people became donors, and 11 organs were recovered. Also, there were 16 tissue donors at the hospital in 2011. Eight people potentially can be saved through a single organ donor, and that same donor can improve the lives of more than 50 people through tissue donation. People can register as a donor by going to www.ctdn.org.

David Wilkins SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE JOHNSON AC Transit has named David Wilkins, a veteran of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to head the agency’s Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Program.

Wilkins, who has domestic and international experience of developing multi-million dollar budgets, managing contracts and administering complex capital improvement programs, will be the Program Director for a BRT plan to modernize and improve East Bay bus service. “As Director, David Wilkins, brings strong credentials and a wealth of experience to our BRT program at a critical time in its development,” said AC Transit General Manager David Armijo. “His background and leadership skills are impeccable. He has supervised the delivery of large and complex projects on time and within budgets, making him the ideal person to steer the BRT project through its final design, engineering and construction phases.” Once completed, the BRT system promises to reduce travel times, traffic congestion and ozone emissions and benefit the environment. Wilkins retired from the U.S. Army Reserve with the rank of Lt. Colonel, after a long and dis-

THEATRE SUBMITTED BY KAREN SILVA PHOTO BY VICKY HANEY Chabot College Theater tackles (yet another) local, political issue

tinguished 25-year career in which he completed an 11-month tour as the Base Engineer and Director of Public Works at Bagram Air Force Base, solely responsible for the infrastructure development, life support operations and facility management of the largest military base in Afghanistan. He served as Program Manager and Project Leader for numerous other ventures, most recently as the Western Regional Director for Luster National, Inc., an international firm that specializes in the management of capital improvement programs. Highlighting Wilkins’ nearly 30-year career is his tenure as Site Manager for the Hunters Point Shipyard Redevelopment Program, a mixed-use development of 2,000 home sites and commercial space. He led a team of contractors and specialty consultants from the entitlements phase through the completion of demolition and grading. Wilkins also earned awards for his service as Program Director of the Environmental Cleanup Program at the Presidio National Park in San Francisco. There he developed and implemented the Base Cleanup Plan; developed and administered a $100M budget; negotiated cleanup and abatement actions with regional, state and federal authorities; administered cleanup actions at the former Letterman Hospital; and was honored for using innovative technologies to save more than $10M in clean up costs. “My mission here is to get the BRT designed, built and placed into operation within budget, on schedule and to the exacting standards set by AC Transit and the FTA,’’ Wilkins said. “I love a challenge and this is a significant one. I hope the community is excited about this project coming to life.” Wilkins has a B.S. in General Engineering from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, a M.S. in Environmental Management from the University of San Francisco and is a graduate of the Army’s prestigious Command and General Staff College. The BRT project is more than just a transit project. It is an economic development project that will contribute to the economy by creating local construction and construction support jobs as well as stimulate the growth of businesses along the corridor due to the new service. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 with full system-implementation in 2016.

based on our very own local crisis, the building of the Russell City Energy Center. Josh, the play's protagonist, is in the midst of two battles, one political, one private. He and his wife, Lily, are struggling to communicate, while he is busy fighting against the erection of a power

Robert Christopher and Johnna Murch star in Chabot College’s “Particulate Matter.”

in their upcoming fall semester play. Written and directed by Theater Arts instructor Rachel LePell, “Particulate Matter” explores the relationships of individuals within the context of a raging political battle—the fight over the building of a local power plant. This play is

plant in his community - he is a committed political activist. She, Lily, is a committed biologist, a Ph.D. candidate at the university in town. While engaged in this protest, Josh becomes romantically and sexually distracted by an alluring cohort, Dorrine, as well as

being under pressure by his aging mother to get a "real" job. Meanwhile, tension rises between "old school" and "new school" activist strategies; Joella wants to pound the pavement, while Luke insists on new technology and incorporating the folks from the Occupy movement. The play combines poetic drama and realism, which mirrors the intersection between the public and private, representational and presentational forms. Faculty Emeritus Dr. Dennis Chowenhill joins LePell as dramaturg. Performances run November 7 – 10 at 8 p.m., with two matinee performances on November 10 and 11 at 2 p.m. Tickets, available at the door, are $10 for students, staff, and seniors, and $15 for general admission. There is also a $2 cost for a temporary parking permit (purchase in student lot).

Particulate Matter November 7 – 11 8 p.m. (matinees 2 p.m.) Reed L. Buffington Visual and Performing Arts Center Chabot College 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6830 www.chabotcollege.edu/theaterarts

Tickets: $10, $15

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS These non-instructional, informal drop-in life drawing sessions are intended for people that have had some experience but it is not required. They are open to the public and are meant for those who would like to work on their skills and like to work at their own pace and schedule. There is no need to register or sign up for a long-term commitment. If you simply want to get more practice drawing life, these sessions are for you. The sessions will be offered on the second Thursday evening of every month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Fremont Art Association. The first session will begin on November 8. The fee will be between $15 to $20 per person—depending on the number of participants— to cover the model's fees. For details, contact Robyn at (510) 656-4939 or visit: www.fremontartassociation. New Life Drawing Sessions Second Thursday of the Month First session, November 8 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles-Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org $15-20 per person, per session

SUBMITTED BY WENDY WINSTED It’s Pajama Time Toddler Time: discover how animals sleep as we visit the hamster, dove and bat. Toddler Time, which includes animal encounters, a craft and short outdoor exploration, is a monthly program for children ages 1-3 with their caregiver. The fee is $8 per child and $3 for siblings. Choose one of the following times: Monday, November 5: 10 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday, November 6: 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Saturday, November 10: 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, November 14: 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Animal Feet Nature Class investigates different feet as we visit the opossum, chinchilla, and tortoise, and search for tracks on the trail. The fee is $10 per child and is available at the following times: Ages 3 to 5 - Monday, November 19: 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Ages 4 to 7 - Tuesday, November 6: 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Ages 4 to 7 - Monday, November 19: 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Ages 5 to 9 - Wednesday, November 14: 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Nature Classes are offered monthly and include animal visits, a nature hike and a craft project. Registration is required for all of these programs. Nature Classes Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D Street, Hayward (510) 881-6700

Drivers for Survivors receives 501(c)(3) status SUBMITTED BY SHERRY HIGGS Drivers for Survivors is now officially a 501(c)(3) nonprofit public charitable organization whose mission is to alleviate the stress associated with some of the more practical aspects of cancer diagnosis. We provide free transportation services and companionship during treatment of cancer patients, freeing them to focus on their health and essential treatments. We serve cancer patients and their families living in Fremont, Newark, and Union City. The community can help: 1) Donate time: If you have a good driving record, we would love to train you as one of our volunteer drivers. 2) Donate funds: Monetary donations are needed to support the service we provide. 3) Donate a service: Services such as advertising, marketing and printing can help us serve more cancer patients and recruit more volunteers. To help or receive free transportation services and supportive companionship during cancer treatment, please contact us at info@driversforsurvivors.org or (510) 579 - 0535.


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SWAT Team participates in regional preparedness exercise

SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN Police Officers of the UCPD SWAT Team participated in a full-scale regional preparedness exercise October 26-29. It’s the third year UCPD has engaged in the Urban Shield multi-discipline planning, policies, procedures, organization, equipment training. Urban Shield assesses the overall Bay Area’s response capabilities to test regional systems for prevention, protection, response and recovery in the area’s high threat, high-density urban area. It also evaluates the region’s existing level of preparedness and capabilities. Teams from all over the region, and several international teams, compete in training exercises throughout the weekend. During last year’s Urban Shield exercise, the UCPD team competed in a shooting competition. Due to its success in the competition, this team was the first law enforcement agency to receive a new weapon platform, the Colt CM 901, with a value over $5,000. The new weapon will be used for training purposes and is a welcome addition to UCPD’s equipment. “We are proud to send members of the Union City Police Department’s SWAT team to attend the

Burglary Report SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Residential Burglaries On October 19, 2012, at 4:00 p.m., officers responded to a residence in ‘The Trees’ area (Niles) for a report of an attempted residential burglary. Sometime between 8:30 a.m. and 11:15 a.m., unknown suspect(s) bent and removed a rear patio window screen and used some sort of

2012 Urban Shield. This exercise challenges the skills, knowledge and abilities of all who participate. But, most importantly, it provides the ongoing training needed for disaster response,” said Larry Cheeves, City Manager. The overarching goals of Urban Shield include striving for the capability to present a multi-layered training exercise to enhance the skills and abilities of regional first responders, as well as those responsible for coordinating and managing large scale events. Urban Shield is implemented to identify and stretch regional resources to their limits, while expanding regional collaboration and building positive relationships. In addition, this exercise provides increased local business and critical infrastructure collaboration. It not only improves regional disaster response capabilities, but provides a platform for national and international first responders, as well as the private sector, to work efficiently and effectively together when critical incidents occur. For more information about the Union City Police Department, visit http://www.unioncity.org/police/ucpd.htm For more information about Urban Shield, visit www.urbanshield.org

pry tool to attempt entry into the victim’s residence. Fortunately, they were unsuccessful and entry was not made. The victim’s neighbors said they did not hear or see anything unusual or suspicious. The reporting party did not want to file a report, (but did want FPD to be aware of it). On October 21, 2012, at 10:04 a.m., officers responded to the 38000 block of Logan Dr (Glenmoor) for a report of an attempted residential burglary. The reporting party stated that when she arrived home the night be-

fore, she found her front window screen on the ground beneath the window. A neighbor reported finding the screen atop the bushes outside the window at about 5:30 p.m. on 10/19/12 and attempted to contact the RP, but the RP was not home. So the neighbor then moved the screen to the ground beneath the window, so it would be less obvious to passers-by. There were no obvious signs of attempted forced entry and no loss was suffered by the RP, so this incident was reclassified as a Suspicious Circumstance.

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On October 24, 2012, at 4:04 p.m., officers responded to the 34300 block of Tupelo St (Ardenwood) to take a residential burglary report. Suspect(s) entered the backyard of the victim’s residence and removed a screen from a rear living room window. The window was either unlocked or had a weak locking mechanism, as there was no sign of forced entry. Loss is yet to be determined. On October 24, 2012, at 5:49 p.m., officers responded to the 38100 block of Farwell Dr (Glenmoor) to take a residential burglary report. Between 8:10 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., unknown suspect(s) broke the window out of side garage door and kicked open the interior door leading into the residence. Loss: jewelry, bank statements/checks, and scotch. On October 24, 2012, at 8:32 p.m., officers responded to the 2200 block of Lockwood Ave (Mission Valley) to take a residential burglary report. Unknown suspect(s) smashed victim’s rear sliding glass door, crawled into residence, and removed cash and a passport. On October 25, 2012, at 5:00 p.m., officers responded to the 38700 block of Huntington Ci (Cherry/Guardino) to take a residential burglary report. Unknown suspect(s) attempted to pry open victim’s rear sliding glass door, which shattered the On October 25, 2012, at 6:10 p.m., officers responded to the 47300 block of Rancho Higuera Rd (Vineyards/Avalon) to take a residential burglary report. Unknown suspect(s) entered via an unlocked rear door, sometime between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. House was ransacked. Loss includes jewelry (total loss is yet to be determined). On October 25, 2012, at 6:39 p.m., officers responded to the 3100 block of Baylis St (Central Downtown) to take a residential burglary report. Between 4:15 and 5:00 p.m., unknown suspect(s) entered house through an unlocked family room window and ransacked the residence. Loss: jewelry, cash, and digital camera. Auto Burglaries On 10/22/12, at 39233 Fremont Bl (in the Fremont Hub parking lot, between Elephant Bar and Target) sometime between 4:00 and 10:00

p.m. Passenger side window was smashed. Loss: Northface bag, laptop, phone chargers, and thumb drives. On 10/22/12, between 8:00 and 8:45 p.m. in PF Chang’s parking lot (43316 Christy St). Driver’s side rear window was smashed. Loss: wallet and laptop. On 10/22/12, at approximately 11:30 a.m., in Trader Joe’s parking lot (Fremont Hub). RP said he was parked “for less than 10 minutes.” Suspect(s) broke passenger side window. Loss: Samsung Galaxy cell phone. On 10/22/12, between 7:30 and 8:30 p.m. in the Applebee’s parking lot (39139 Farwell). Rear window was broken. Loss: laptop and hard drive. On 10/23/12, at approximately 2:15 a.m. in the 4100 block of Eggers Dr. (Report in progress; no further information known at this time) On 10/23/12, the RP filed an online report regarding an incident that occurred over the weekend in the 3100 block of Rodney Co (Irvington). On 10/20/12, at about 11 a.m., he noticed that his vehicle was unusually loud. Upon further inspection, he discovered that the pipes around the catalytic converters had been cut and the converters were missing. On 10/23/12, between 5:45 and 7:35 a.m. in the 24 Hour Fitness parking lot (40910 Fremont Bl). Window was smashed and vehicle was ransacked. Loss: wallet, Samsung Intensity II cell phone, cash, credit cards, ID. On 10/23/12, between 1:45 and 10:30 a.m., at 47031 Kato Rd (East Industrial). Method of entry is unknown. Loss: two suitcases (with PS3 game console, DVDs, games and clothes inside) and survey equipment. On 10/23/12, the RP filed an online report regarding an incident that occurred on 10/19/12 between 3:30 and 5:40 p.m. at 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd (Coyote Hills Regional Park). The RP stated she and two friends went out for a walk, but that their personal belongings were in the car, “covered with jackets and hidden away from plain view.” Loss: Three handbags, wallets, credit cards, cash and keys. On 10/24/12, the RP filed an online report regarding an incident that occurred between 8:00 a.m. and 1:00 continued on page 31


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Doing real science with NASA

Where Did Earth Get its Moon? BY DR. MARC RAYMAN Earth's graceful 24-hour rotation rate is one of the traits that make our planet so friendly to life. This length of time allows most parts of Earth to stay at a nice, comfortable temperature as they are bathed in sunlight during the day and darkness at night. Each planet in the solar system has its own unique rotation rate. Tiny Mercury, sizzling closest to the Sun, takes 59 Earth days to turn around just once. Venus, the second planet, rotates once every 243 Earth days. Why do Earth and the other planets rotate at all? To understand that, it will help to understand how our solar system formed. Almost five billion years ago, our solar system began as a vast cloud of dust and gas. The cloud began to collapse, flattening into a giant disk that rotated faster and faster, just as an ice skater spins faster as she pulls her arms in close to her body. The Sun formed at the center, and the swirling gas and dust in the rest of the spinning disk clumped together to produce the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. The reason so many objects orbit the Sun in nearly the same plane and in the same direction is that they all formed from this same disk. While the planets were forming, clumps of matter of all sizes often collided, and either stuck together or side-swiped each other, knocking off

pieces and sending each other spinning. Sometimes the gravity of big objects would capture smaller ones in orbit. This could be one way the planets acquired their moons. Scientists think that a large object, perhaps the size of Mars, collided with our young planet, knocking out a chunk of material that eventually became our Moon. This collision set Earth spinning faster. Scientists estimate that a day in the life of early Earth was only about six hours long. The Moon formed much closer to Earth than it is today. As Earth rotates, the Moon's gravity causes the oceans to seem to rise and fall. (The Sun also does this, but not as much.) There is a little bit of friction between the tides and the turning Earth, causing the rotation to slow down just a little. As Earth slows, it lets the Moon creep away. At the rate it is slowing, though, you won’t notice it during your lifetime. Learn more about the great variety of planets and moons in the solar system by playing the Solar System Explorer game at The Space Place. Visit spaceplace.nasa.gov/solar-system-explorer. This article was provided through the courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

The Moon’s orbit around Earth is not a perfect circle. In the picture on the left, the Moon is at its farthest from Earth (apogee) and on the right it is at its closest (perigee). Imagine how big it looked when it was first formed possibly 12 times closer to Earth! (Images courtesy of Anthony Ayiomamitis, www.perseus.gr.)

Johnny Cimino named MVROP Teacher of Year ARTICLE AND PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER, MVROP Mission Valley ROP (Regional Occupational Program) is honored to present Auto Body Painting and Refinishing program instructor, Johnny Cimino, as the MVROP 2012 Teacher of the Year. This prestigious award is given each year by MVROP to recognize excellence in Career Technical Education instruction. Johnny was presented with the award by the MVROP Governing Council on October 18, 2012. Cimino strongly believes that instructors should lead by example, must work to add personal touches in the classroom, and help all students to become good citizens in the community. As a valuable member of the Mission Valley ROP teaching staff for twenty years, he has been doing exactly this, by passing on his valuable industry experience to a diverse population of students. On a daily basis, you can find Cimino coming in early to work to open the shop, often working through lunch, and staying late four out of five days a week. If asked why he does this, he would respond by stressing that it is important to show his students that a disciplined person works until the job is completed. Cimino would go on with a shy smile, in his modest and sincere way to say, “I am proud of the work I do and I am honored to call myself a teacher. One of my greatest rewards throughout the day and year is seeing the smiles on students’ faces, knowing that they feel good about what they have accomplished.” The value of Career Technical Education is evident in Johnny’s classes since he was, at one time, a student in the very program he instructs today. This personal connection, the school’s mission, and years of experience within the Auto Body Painting and Refinishing industry provides an invaluable contribution to his students each and every year. We at Mission Valley ROP commend him for making a difference in their lives. For more information, Johnny Cimino with Senator Ellen Corbett visit www.mvrop.org


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November Guest Artist SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS Photographer Georgianna Silva, a former photo editor at the Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive, now a high school science teacher and freelance photographer, will discuss photo post-production process and demo how to create stunning artistic photo creations using tools in iPhoto, Photoshop, and Lightroom on Wednesday, November 7 at The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery. Silva has 15 years photography experience, starting as a photography editor and photographer at her university paper. She specializes in travel scenes, weddings, and newborns. Presently, she collaborates with magazines and publishers in San Francisco and the Bay Area to create travel books. To view her works visit: www.georgiannasilva.com. This informative and fun event is free and the public is welcome to attend. For details, call The FAA Centre/Gallery, (510) 792-0905. Guest Artist Demo Wednesday, Nov 7 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles-Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org Free

SUBMITTED BY CAROLYN BERKE

N

iles Pie Company is getting ready to move into our new home early in 2013. We’ve been at this pie baking biz for just over two years now, and in order to grow, we have to have our own kitchen space. We want to be more involved in the community by having a space to host

classes, events, and even a few other aspiring food businesses, and start working with more interns and schools. And to branch out into more farmer’s markets and wholesale accounts, we really need to be able to take deliveries and order in bulk. Now we’re ready to make the leap! And we need you! We’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to finance the purchase of equipment for our new kitchen. Kickstarter is a crowd-funding platform that is used to raise funds for all sorts of projects. It’s a way for community members who are excited about a project to help out in whatever way they can, without having to be a big investor. Kickstarter projects have rewards, and successful projects have rewards that really give their investors some value. To thank you for investing in Niles Pie we have everything from stickers, mugs, and T-shirts to Pie Club memberships and classes. There are rewards you won’t be able to get any other way. All contri-

butions are really appreciated. Kickstarter is the perfect vehicle for Niles Pie to use to fund our kitchen, because we would not have gotten this far without the enormous support of the people, near and far, who have helped make this happen. And when we’re settled in the new space, we are gonna have one heck of a party! The campaign amount is $25,000, and we need to hit the goal in order to receive any of the monies – it’s an “all-or-nothing” campaign, and we have until Friday, November 16 to meet the goal. This amount is the minimum we can do in order to get the equipment we need and leave enough to pay for permits and such. Please give what you can, then send it out to everyone you know, through e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, Carrier Pigeon. Progress updates, reward updates, news and pictures will be added to the campaign as we go along. So send it in, send it out, stay tuned, and sharpen your forks! There’s work to be done and pie to eat! To contribute to the Kickstarter Niles Pie Campaign visit http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/nilespieco/niles-pie-company. The Deadline is November 16. For more information, call (510) 7890393 or visit www.nilespie.com.


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Friday, Oct 19 – Saturday, Nov 10

Deathtrap $

Fri & Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m.

Continuing Events

Comedy-thriller about a struggling playwright

Monday, Sep 18 - Thursday, Nov 16

Canticleers Theater 3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley (510) 733-5483 www.chanticleers.org

Color and Light

8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Work of artist Hema Sukumar

Phantom Art Gallery at Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Tuesdays, Sep 25 - Nov 13

Mondays, Tuesdays, & Thursdays, Oct 23 - Dec 13

Saturdays, Sep 29 -Nov 17

A Single Step...Begins the Journey

Teen/Senior Computer and Gadget Help

Mon: 5 p.m. -10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Photo exhibit by participants of Advanced Portfolio Workshop

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Saturdays, Sep 29- Dec 8

Math Olympiad $R

1:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m. Students master creative problem solving techniques. Ages 7 - 11

Irvington Community Center 41885 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 791-4334 Monday, Oct 2 -Sunday, Oct 31

Pirates of Emerson $

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. (open some nights until 11 p.m. and 12 midnight) Haunted theme park

Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (925) 426-7600 www.PiratesofEmerson.com Tuesday,Oct 16–Friday, Nov 30

Grant Peterson Collection

Mon – Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Works by Jay Lewis, Larry Bendoski & Frank Wight

John O’Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Wednesday, Oct 17 – Saturday, Nov 10

Celebrando la Hermosura de la Vida (Celebrating the Beauty of Life)

11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Works centering around Dia de los Muertos

The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.com

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Various artworks from Bay Area artists

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Trained teen volunteers help older adults

Sunday 10:00 AM

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Volunteers learn reading aloud & storytelling skills for visits to Fremont Schools

9:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Unity of Fremont

Area Artists' Annual Juried Exhibit

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.adobegallery.org

Booklegger Training

A positive path for spiritual living

Thursday, Oct 20 - Saturday, Dec 1

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District 1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org

Monday, Oct 23 -Sunday, Jan 6

Mythbusters: The Explosive Exhibition $

10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Emmy-nominated television series comes to life

The Tech Museum 201 South Market St., San Jose (408) 294-8324 www.thetech.org Wednesday, Oct 24 - Saturday, Nov 10

Convergence & Divergence: Two Artists Look at Memories

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Works by Leah Virsik & Deborah Griffin

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Monday, Oct 24 - Saturday, Dec 1

Cal State East Bay Art Faculty and Staff Exhibition

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (Thurs: 2 p.m. 7 p.m.) Paintings, ceramics & sculptures

Cal State East Bay Art and Education Building 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3299


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Thursday, Oct 26 - Sunday, Nov 17

Mixed Media Craft Exhibition

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Thursday, Nov 2 - Saturday, Nov 17

October 30, 2012

Friday, Nov 2

Friday, Nov 2 - Sunday, Nov 4

Dia de los Muertos Craft (Day of the Dead) Workshop $

Religious Life Retreat

5 p.m. – 8 p.m. A fun, hands-on workshop to create a Dia de los Muertos shadowbox

Pancho Villa Event Center 1026 B St., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Dog Sees God $ Friday, Nov 2 - Saturday, Nov 3

"Peanuts" based characters deal with today's teen issues

The Monster Hunters $

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Children's Rep production for ages 6 & up

7 p.m. Fremont Veterans Hall 37154 Second St. , Fremont (510) 612-0488 (510) 494-4322

Fridays, Nov 2 - Nov 30

11 a.m. -11:30 a.m.

Hayward Chamber Day at the Races $R

11:15 a.m.

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Meet & network with other east bay chamber members

Establishing a Non-Profit Organization

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Grant seeking basics

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 (510) 881-7974 Tuesday, Oct 30

Saturday, Nov 3

8 a.m. Viola Blyth fundraiser to Feather Falls Casino

Newark Pavillion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 793-5683 (510) 794-3437 Saturday, Nov 3

Friday, Nov 2

Nature classes for 1 to 3 year olds

Tuesday, Oct 30

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335

Casino Bus Trip $R

8 p.m.

Toddler Ramble: Wonders of Water

Single Catholic women 18-40 learn about religious life and vocation

Golden Gate Fields 1100 Eastshore Frontage Rd, Berkeley (510) 559-7300 (510) 537-2424

Aditya Verma & Yihan Chen $

8:30 p.m. Master musicians from India & China

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Saturday, Nov 3

Celebrating the Splendor of Inspiring Women $

11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Friday, Nov 2

"Around the World" Dinner and Entertainment $

5:30 p.m. Music & dance from around the world to benefit HAC

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 www.haywardarts.org

Tea, luncheon, music & poetry

Community of Christ Fremont 34050 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 792-1826 (510) 793-8181

Creature of the Deep

7 p.m. Learn about the ocean habitats. For elementary aged children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Tuesday, Oct 30

How to Prepare for Earthquakes & Other Disasters - R

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Learn to build an emergency supply kit, control utilities, & use fire extinguishers

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305 www.rei.com/fremont Tuesday, Oct 30

Flu Vaccinations

1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Free while supplies last

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 264-4044 Wednesday, Oct 31

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Wax Museum

12 noon - 1:30 p.m. Students present their reports dressed as historical characters

Stellar Academy for Dyslexics 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 797-2227 Thursday, Nov 1 - Friday, Nov 3

Mill Creek Ramblers, Cowboy Bill & The Sierra Travelers

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Live Blue Grass & Country music

Mission Pizza & Pub 1572 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6858 www.missionpizza.com

CASINO DAY TRIP Fundraiser for Viola Blythe Center Day Bus Trip with Rosie’s Tours to the

“FEATHER FALLS CASINO”

Sat. Nov. 3rd 7:30 a.m. (Bus leaves at 8:00 am) the Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave. Newark $30.00 per person with $10.00 cash back on arrival There will be Bingo, Raffles, Auction and Refreshments on the bus (included) Contact Person- Debbie Caravalho (510) 794-3437 0r (510) 673-3016 Pat Schiavone 510 304-2944 Viola Blythe Center is a non-profit agency that serves the Tri-cities area (Newark, Fremont and Union City) with emergency food and clothing. Last year the Center served nearly 11,000 people.


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Satruday, Nov 3

Saturday, Nov 3

International Game Day

Hill and Valley Scholarship Bazaar $

11 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Board and card games will be available for play for school age children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Baked Goods, collectibles, homemade treasures & box lunch

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Monday, Nov 5 & Tuesday, Nov 6

Pajama Time Nature Class $R

Monday: 10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Tuesday: 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Hill and Valley Clubhouse 1808 B St., Hayward (650) 245-8473 (510) 727-9296

Ages 1-3

Saturday, Nov 3

Tuesday, Nov 6

Christian singer/songwriter performs

The Buddha

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Overdrive eBooks Workshop for iPhone/iPad R

The Man and the Legend

12:30 - 2:30 p.m.

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-2581

Learn how to get titles from the library's Overdrive service to your mobile device

Saturday, Nov 3

Bryan Sirchio in Concert

8 p.m.

Saturday, Nov 3

Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day $R

8:30 - 12:45 p.m. Hands on science and math fun

Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 683-9377 Saturday, Nov 3

Barn-to-Barn History Hike

10:15 a.m. - 1 p.m. Moderately strenuous 3.2 miles. Bring lunch and water.

Green Barn Visitor Center End of Geary Rd. , Sunol (510) 363-1684 Saturday, Nov 3

Barns, Brands, and Bovines!

1 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Celebrate Sunol's pioneer and ranching heritage with dancing, games, cooking and cake

9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov 7 – Sunday, Nov 11

Lots of treasure, snack bar, crafts

Particulate Matter $

Tropics Mobile Home Park 33000 Almaden Blvd., Union City (949)515-5100

8 p.m. (matinees: 2 p.m.)

Huge Flea Market

Sunday, Nov 4

Classical Guitarist Michael Herrera

4 p.m.

Wednesday-Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Reception: Sunday, Nov 18 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org

Sunday, Nov 4

10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Volunteers remove litter from the shoreline. All ages.

Sunday, Nov 4

Green Barn Visitor Center End of Geary Rd. , Sunol (510) 363-1684

Hike Through Bay Area History

Saturday, Nov 3

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Nature class for 3 to 5 year olds

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Nov 3

Tea & Treasures

9 a.m. - 3:30p.m. Holiday boutique and Tea, 60+ Vendors

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 Saturday, Nov 3

Bird Walk

8 a.m. - 11 a.m. Discover their patterns of behavior, migration, and habitat

Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 582-2206

Wednesday, Nov 7 - Nov 25

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Nature Detectives: November Nature Journal

25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6830 www.chabotcollege.edu/theaterarts

Showcase IV

Saturday, Nov 3

Three separate registration times for slow ramble through the valley. Must be at least 54 inches tall.

Reed L. Buffington Visual and Performing Arts Center

Live performance

Shoreline Trash Takers

11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Saturday, Nov 3

Green Barn Visitor Center End of Geary Rd. , Sunol (510) 363-1684

History Horse Rides $R

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D Street, Hayward (510) 881-6700

12 noon - 2 p.m. Adults hike through salt ponds and learn about history

Thursday, Nov 8 – Saturday, Nov 17

The Children’s Hour $

7 p.m. (Nov 8 @ 3 p.m. half-price) A classic play by Lillian Hellman American High School, Theatre 70 36300 Fremont Blvd, Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702

Sunday, Nov 4

Phil Berkowitz Band - music of the 40's, 50's and 60's

1 p.m. Presented by LOV and the Newark Arts Council

MacGregor/Bridgepoint School Auditorium 35653 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-5683 www.lov.org Monday, Nov 5

Mariah Young Reading

7 p.m. CSUEB alumna returns to read from her book

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477 Tuesday, October 30 9:45–10:15 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:45–11:15 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:15 – 3:00 Preschool Storytimes NEWARK 4:30 – 5:20 Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., FREMONT 5:50 – 6:40 Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., FREMONT Wednesday, October 31 12:45 – 2:15 Glenmoor School, 4620 Mattos Drive, FREMONT 3:50 – 4:20 California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, November 1 10:00–10:30 Preschool Storytimes SAN LORENZO 10:45–11:30 Preschool Storytimes CASTRO VALLEY 1:00 – 2:00 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 2:25 – 3:15 Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., HAYWARD Monday, November 5 9:30–10:05 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 10:25–10:55 Preschool Storytimes City UNION CITY 1:45–2:45 Delaine Eastin School, 34901 Eastin Dr., UNION CITY

4:15–4:45 Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., UNION CITY 5:15–6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, November 6 9:15–11:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, November 7 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, November 14 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


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October 30, 2012


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BOO Calendar Through October

Perry Farms Pumpkin Patch

Tue–Fri: 12noon – 7 p.m. (closed Mondays) Sat–Sun: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Working vegetable farm next to Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-6658

Corner of Bernal and Valley Ave., Pleasanton (510) 657-2121 www.PiratesofEmerson.com

Wednesday, Oct 31

Tuesday, Oct 23 – Tuesday, Oct 30

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030

Candlelighters Ghost House $

Tue – Thurs: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Fri: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sat: 2 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m. – 9 p.m. Family event for all ages

Chadbourne Carriage House Fremont Hub, Fremont Blvd. (Between Mowry Ave. & Walnut Ave. by Chili’s) (510) 796-0595 www.candlelighters.com 1801 D St., Hayward (510) 881-6700

Tuesday, Oct 23 – Wednesday, Oct 31

Pumpkin Patch Party

5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Games, jump house, dunk tank, food & entertainment

Wednesday, Oct 31

Haunted House

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Enjoy a free spooky haunted house

Blacksand Manor 5008 Blacksand Rd., Fremont (510) 651-9507 Wednesday, Oct 31

Kiddie Cartoon Halloween Cavalcade $

4 p.m. Slightly spooky vintage cartoons & film shorts

Moore's Pumpkin Patch $

Tuesday, Oct 30

10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Halloween Carnival $

Pumpkins, rides, and attractions

4 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Rowell Ranch Rodeo Park 9711 Dublin Canyon Rd., Castro Valley (510) 886-6015

Games, food & prizes

James Logan High School 1800 H Street, Union City rvenable@newhavenboosters.org

Wednesday, Oct 31

Tuesday, Oct 23 – Wednesday, Oct 31

Wednesday, Oct 31

Spooktacular hike up Red Hill to see the sunset, a Halloween skit, listen to stories by a campfire and munch on treats.

Pirates of Emerson $

7:05 p.m. - 10 p.m. (open some nights until 11 p.m. and midnight) Haunted theme park with eight walk-through attractions Alameda County Fairgrounds

Trick-or-Treating at the Fremont Hub

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Merchants give candy & goodies to children in costume

The Fremont Hub Mowry Ave. & Fremont Blvd., Fremont (800) 762-1641 www.thefremonthub.com

Boutique Calendar Saturday, Nov 3

Hill and Valley Scholarship Bazaar $

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Baked goods, collectibles, homemade treasures & box lunch

Hill & Valley Clubhouse 1808 B St., Hayward (510) 727-9296

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411

Halloween Twilight Hike $R

5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd. Fremont Registration: (888) 327-2757, option 2 Information: (510) 544-3215 or (510) 544-3220. Parking Fee: $5 per vehicle

Saturday, Nov 17 – Sunday, Nov 18

Holiday Boutique

9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Handcrafted gifts, holiday ornaments & baked goods

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335 Sunday, Nov 25

Friday, Nov 9 – Sunday, Nov 11

Open House & Gift Extravaganza

Holiday Craft Boutique

11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Handmade crafts & foods

Make gift cards, stocking stuffers & enjoy delicious treats

4911 Yellowstone Park Dr., Fremont Side Entrance – Garage Rain or Shine

Coyote Hills Visitor Center 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Sunday, November 11

Saturday, Dec 1

Hanukkah Gift Boutique

Holiday Boutique

10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Jewelry, pottery, gift baskets & more. Over 50 vendors

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont ritu_saksena@hotmail.com

SUBMITTED BY REV. JEFFREY SPENCER The general public is invited to hear Bryan Sirchio in concert on Saturday, November 3 at Niles Discovery Church. A Christian singer/songwriter with a keen intellect and a great sense of humor, Bryan sings about personal faith, social justice, honoring the earth, and compassion for the poor. His music is for kids, teens, and adults and it invites us all to reflect deeply on the choices we make. As a singer/songwriter, Bryan is committed to using inclusive language, a progressive world-view, and a theology that reflects the best of “mainline” Protestantism, the “Emergent Church” movement, and the Social Justice teachings of the Roman Catholic tradition. Please come enjoy this creative, thought-provoking, spiritmoving music. A free will offering will be accepted at the door, with $10-$20 as the recommended amount. For more information about the concert, contact Jeff Spencer at (510) 797-0895. For more information about Bryan Sirchio, go to http://sirchio.com/. Bryan Sirchio in Concert Saturday, Nov 3 8 p.m. Niles Discovery Church 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-0895

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

Sports Illustrated challenges CSD Eagles SUBMITTED BY JULIE REMS-SMARIO California’s School for the Deaf (CSD) Eagles football team is the focus of a Sports Illustrated (SI) “Underdogs” video series which can be viewed at http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/specials/underdogs/episode-6.html. SI covered CSD’s third game of the season and have challenged the players and their supporters to vote their story as the most inspirational from all nominees. Voting was launched Tuesday, October 23rd and ends at midnight on November 16th. The school with the most votes will receive $25,000 and a trip to New York to attend the Sports Illustrated Sportsman and Sportswoman of the year award ceremony. CSD students have created a video to demonstrate how the voting works at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ-BuUTsibY. Quarterback, Carlos Lopes, was interviewed about his experience playing for the Eagles after a highly successful junior year. He finished 2011 with 1423 yards passing along with 19 touchdowns and only two interceptions. Lopez has kept his team scoring at a reliable flip in 2012. The Eagles scored at least 27 points in their first three wins of the sea-

son. Again, this year, the Eagles are in another highly successful year with 8 wins and 1 loss. Another football player interviewed is Jacy Pedersen-Dike, 6’3” linebacker, who made an amazing comeback after one year hiatus from health issues, blood clots in his lungs. Instead of feeling sorry for himself, he continued to attend the games and motivated his teammates from the sidelines. This year he has a strong playing connection as a linebacker with the team’s quarterback, Carlos Lopez. CSD Athletic Director Kevin Kovacs was also interviewed about how he helped oversee the transformation of CSD’s sports program. Along with the football team’s significant improvement over the past four years, CSD also produced several incredible athletes including Michael Lizarraga, a Division I basketball player who played four years at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), and was a three-sports star at CSD before graduating in 2007. The link to vote is www.si.com/underdogs or www.si.com/underdogs/vote.html to go directly to the voting page. More information is available at: www.CSDEagles.com.

A tight battle for supremacy of FFL American Division SUBMITTED BY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW In the American Division of the Fremont Football League, the Raiders and Patriots are tightly locked in a close battle for the Division. The Patriots subdued the Bears on Saturday, October 27 while the Raiders had a bye; both teams are tied, each with a 5-1 record. Although the Patriots triumphed, the Bears were short-handed as key defensive players were sidelined with injures. However, other teams in the Division will need all the help they can get to slow down the powerful Patriots running game. Last year’s champion Raiders are playing at the same outstanding level as last year with a powerful running game and defense that has only allowed 88 points. The Raider offense has scored 200 points. With three games left in season, the American Division title is up for grabs. The final weeks will be interesting!

Women’s Tennis

Tennis Roundup SUBMITTED BY MARY BRADFORD AND JULIE NGUYEN October 19 Moreau Catholic Mariners (MC) 5, Newark Memorial Cougars (NM) 2 Singles #1 N. Dawang (MC) d. S. Hipolito (NM) 6-0, 6-0 Singles #2 A. Ma (MC) d. F. Judge (NM) 6-0, 6-1 Singles #3 I. De Leon (MC) d. S. Le (NM) 6-2, 6-2 Singles #4 T. Luu (MC) d. J. Sugayan (NM) 6-0, 6-2 Doubles #1 Bianchini/Bravo (NM) d. Drake/Young (MC) 64, 6-2 Doubles #2 Bray/Tran (NM) d. Gonzales/Omaque (MC) 64, 6-4 Doubles #3 Singh/Molina (MC) d. Scott/Soltan (NM) 2-6, 76 (7-3), (10-2)

October 22 James Logan Colts (JL) 6, John F. Kennedy Titans (JFK) 1 Singles #1 Cynthia Vu (JL) d. Mercedes Le (JFK) 6-1 6-0 Singles #2 Katarina Vidovic (JL) d. Marycon Jiro (JFK) 6-2 6-3 Singles #3 Yee Hoang (JL) d. Sammy Phan (JFK) 6-0 6-3 Singles #4 Yuumi Mazato (JFK) d. Monique Tran (JL) 3-6 6-2 6-2 Doubles #1 An Nguyen / Theresa Tran (JL) d. Joleen Burlingame / Paula Baluyut (JFK) 7-5 6-4 Doubles #2 Jessica Choro / Lily Myo (JL) d. Bella Haugen / Jeena Villamor (JFK) 6-2 6-0 Doubles #3 Helen Kao / Thini Huynh (JL) d. Jeanette Nguyen / Alejandra Cruz (JFK) 6-1 6-1 October 22

American Eagles (A) 6, Moreau Catholic Mariners (MC) 1 Singles #1 N. Dawang (MC) d. A. Patel (A) 6-2, 6-3 Singles #2 J. Zhao (A) d. A. Ma (MC) 7-5, 6-1 Singles #3 S.Bhamidipati (A) d. I.De Leon (MC) 6-4, 7-5 Singles #4 T.Agrawal (A) d. T.Luu (MC) 6-2, 6-3 Doubles #1 Li/Patel (A) d.Young/Drake (MC) 6-1, 6-2 Doubles #2 Cherukuri/Siu (A) d. Singh/Molina (MC) 6-2, 6-0 Doubles #3 Harn/Huang (A) d. Chen/Gonzales (MC) 6-0, 6-0 -10/24- Irvington Vikings (I) 6, Moreau Catholic Mariners (MC) 1 Singles #1 N. Dawang (MC) d. A.Garcia (I) 6-3, 6-0 Singles #2 J. Hoang (I) d. A. Ma (MC) 6-2, 6-1 Singles #3 S. Tan (I) d. I. De Leon (MC) 6-0, 6-0 Singles #4 C. Lin (I) d. T. Luu (MC) 6-1, 6-1 Doubles #1 V. Bao/J. Lagman (I) d.A. Gonzales/A.Young (MC) 6-0, 6-1 Doubles #2 A. Ngo/P. Thakur (I) d. Singh/Molina (MC) 6-2, 6-0 Doubles #3 A. Haidan/A. Mehta (IHS) d. A. Chen/C. Lopez (MC) 6-1, 6-0

October 24 Irvington Vikings (IHS) 6 vs Moreau Catholic Mariners (MC) 1 Singles #1 N.Dawang (MC) d.A.Garcia (IHS) 6-3, 6-0 Singles #2 J.Hoang (IHS) d. A.Ma (MC) 6-2, 6-1 Singles #3 S.Tan (IHS) d. I.De Leon (MC) 6-0, 6-0 Singles #4 C.Lin (IHS) d. T.Luu (MC) 6-1, 6-1 Doubles #1 V.Bao/J.Lagman (IHS) d. A.Gonzales/A.Young (MC) 6-0, 6-1 Doubles #2 A.Ngo/P.Thakur (IHS) d. Singh/Molina (MC) 62, 6-0 Doubles #3 A.Haidan/A.Mehta (IHS) d.A.Chen/C.Lopez (MC) 6-1, 6-0


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Newark remains undefeated in league play SUBMITTED AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Both the Newark Memorial Cougars and Washington Huskies arrived with perfect Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) standings, but only one could emerge with that record intact. The winner would retain the top spot in MVAL play at 5-0 and with an additional win, the MVAL football crown. The game started with plenty of offense. Newark showed why they are now just one game away from their first MVAL title since 1985, scoring just six minutes into the game with a 16-yard pass from Pivin to Morton capping a great show of offense and a well-balanced ground and air attack. Washington was no pushover as they fought back, countering with a welltimed pass from Kyle Malpede on a 24yard touchdown pass to Ahmed Ayrobi that gave the Huskies an 8-6 lead after a two-point conversion. Three minutes later, the Cougar line opened holes in the Husky defense for Marty Leggett as he took the ball into the end zone on a 10-yard run that gave Newark Memorial a 12-8 lead. The first half was a hard fought battle; both teams knew the probable outcome of the MVAL

championship was on the line. In the second half, the Huskies took a 1412 lead with the first play of the second quarter, a 24-yard touchdown pass from Malpede to Jones. However, the turning point of the game in favor of the Cougars came when the Huskies had the ball on the Newark 5 yard

line in the third quarter and the Cougar defense closed the door. The Huskies failed to score and fell behind with a final score: Newark Memorial 32, Washington 14. Both Quarterbacks gave impressive performances. Although Newark Memorial’s Riley Pivin threw for just 78 yards, they

included three passing touchdowns. His 7yard scamper into the end zone capped the scoring with 2:01 left in the game. Malpede, in a losing effort, was 21 of 32 with 209 yards passing and two touchdowns. His top target was Terrance Jones, who caught eight passes for 90 yards.

Newark beats American, sets up crucial match with Washington Football SUBMITTED BY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Newark Memorial Cougars beat the American Eagles 41-16 on Friday night (October 19) to set up the Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) game of the year next Friday against the Washington Huskies at Newark Memorial High School. Both teams have 4-0 records and the winner will likely claim the MVAL title. Newark put on an impressive all around football clinic as controlled the game from the beginning to end, driving down the field and running the ball for the first touchdown of the game and never looked back. The Cougar offensive line took control by opening holes for Marty Leggett; his quick speed chewed up 101 yards. Newark’s defense showed why they could be the best in the MVAL, allowing the fewest point total scored against them in the MVAL this year. The Cougar line stopped Eric Adair from admission to the open field and stymied almost all Eagle offensive efforts. Newark counter backs played their best game of the year, blocking three key passes that would have made the game much closer

Women’s Volleyball

Cross Country

Men’s Water Polo Ohlone College Volleyball James Logan vs Washington SUBMITTED BY LANCE GREEN October 23 James Logan Colts 11,Washington Huskies 10

SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR October 19 Ohlone Renegades 3, West Valley Vikings 0 (25-11, 25-11, 30-28) October 24 Ohlone Renegades 3, Skyline Trojans 0 (25-15, 25-11, 25-14) October 26 Ohlone Renegades 3, West Valley Vikings 1 (24-26, 25-14, 25-22, 25-18)

SUBMITTED BY COACH JOHN HOTCHKISS

High School Volleyball COACH STEVE BURMASTER, AND MAXPREPS October 23 Newark Memorial Cougars 3, Moreau Catholic Mariners 1 (27-25, 25-15, 21-25, 25-17 October 23 James Logan Colts 3, Mission San Jose Warriors 0 (25-22, 25-18, 25-18) October 25 Moreau Catholic Mariners 3, American Eagles 0 (21-25, 25-16, 25-9, 25-21)

Holiday business promotions workshop SUBMITTED BY TINA LAMBERT Is your business ready to make the most of the Holiday Season? Do you take advantage of holiday promotions? How to promote your business and organization throughout the holidays and beyond is the focus of a November 13, 2012 luncheon workshop co-sponsored by the Hayward Chamber of Commerce and Rubicon Programs, which operates the Eden One Stop Career Centers in Alameda County. Our presenter will be Karen Rice, Northern California Development Director for Constant Contact. Tickets must be purchased in advance as seating is limited. Cost of the event, including a light lunch, is $15. What we'll show you how to put together a PLAN to let your customers know about your holiday promotions and events; how to make your promotion timely, easy and shareable. Are you ready to create your plan?

We will give tips on how to do so in-store, through e-mail and with social media sites. We will also discuss: how to EXECUTE your plan; how to EXTEND this simple framework for continued success throughout the rest of the year; how to EVALUATE your plan so that you can continue to make your successes an on-going process. In this session, we will focus on WOWing your customers. This session is designed to give you the information you need during this hectic time but never knew where to find it! Register online at http://conta.cc/Rj7xU8 or call Tina Lambert at (510) 247-2042 or email tina@hayward.org. Holiday Business Promotions Workshop Tuesday, Nov 13 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. La Quinta Inn & Suites 20777 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward http://conta.cc/Rj7xU8 (510) 247-2042

Mission San Jose Warriors (MSJ) vs. Newark Memorial Cougars (NM) October 24 [lowest score wins] Men’s Varsity- MSJ-20; NM-37 Women’s Varsity- MSJ-16; NM-47 Boys JV- MSJ-14; NM-49 JV Girls- MSJ-20; NM-43 F/S Boys- MSJ-17; NM-44

Dictionaries and essay contest SUBMITTED BY RICK LAPLANTE For the seventh successive year, local real estate agent Sunil Sethi has made certain that every third-grade student in the New Haven Unified School District has a dictionary. Mr. Sethi and a small group of partners purchased approximately 1,000 dictionaries that they delivered to students on October 5, at each of the District’s seven elementary schools. In addition, for the second successive year, Mr. Sethi and a fellow agent, former New Haven teacher Steven Fong are inviting 3rd grade students to participate in an essay contest. The students are encouraged to write about their healthy eating habits and habits they’d like to improve. All students who submit an essay will receive a recognition award, and the essays will be published in a compilation that will be available online and offered for display in each classroom. (www.sunilsethi.com) Deadline for submissions is November 9. Partnering with Mr. Sethi and Mr. Fong again this year are local insurance agent Kristie Turner and Risha Kilaru of Prospect Mortgage. In his first year in office, County Supervisor Richard Valle also is taking part. More information is available at www.facebook.com/essaycontest or by calling (510) 388-2436.

Bills on storage tanks Submitted by Jeff Barbosa Working with local environmental health administrators across the state, Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) pushed three bills through the Legislature to increase environmental protection by closing gaps in regulatory programs. Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 1566 and AB 1701 on September 25, 2012. AB 1620 was signed on August 27, 2012. The laws focus on the Above-Ground Petroleum Storage Act (APSA), the Underground Storage Tank (UST) law and the Hazardous Waste Control Law.


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Hayward City Council October 23, 2012 Business Recognition Award for October 2012 presented to Cyclepath, Foothill Boulevard, Hayward. Accepted by Ben Schweng. Appointed and administered the oath of office to the 15member General Plan Update Task Force. Consent Authorized City Manager to execute professional services agreement (PSA) with West Yost Associates, Inc., in the maximum amount of $380,000 for the Water System Master Plan Update. Revised City’s Conflict-of-Interest Code. Authorized City Manager to execute cooperative agreement with Caltrans to use $1.4M of federal Demonstration Funds for the I-880/SR92 Landscaping Project. The Bay Area Toll Authority has provided the remaining $3M to complete the $4.4M project. There is no cost to the City. Landscape work is expected to last from July 2013 until February 2014. Approved minor revisions to the specifications and bid sheet and awarded contract to Green Growth Industries, Inc. in the amount of $766,066 for the Industrial Parkway Landscaping Improvement Project. Total estimated cost is $1M which is budgeted, in the Street System Improvements Fund, as part of the FY 2013 Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Alameda County Waste Management Authority will award a $20,000 [reimbursement] grant for Bay-friendly landscaping. Project completion scheduled for March 18, 2013. Authorized City Manager to execute a PSA in the maximum amount of $40,000 with A.T.E.E.M. Electrical Engineering, Inc. for electrical design and construction administration services for the Centex Sewer Lift Station Upgrade Project. This lift station serves the Centex Homes Development along Dobble Avenue. Total estimated project cost of $300,000 is budgeted, in the Sewer Collection System Replacement Fund, as part of the FY 2013 CIP. Project completion expected in January 2014. Authorized City Manager to execute a PSA in the maximum amount of $35,000 with Brown and Caldwell for engineering services re. the construction of shoring for the second segment of the 72-Inch Effluent Pipeline at the Water Pollution Control Facility. The total project cost of $1.082M is included in the FY 2012 CIP. Authorized City Manager to negotiate and execute a PSA with Data Ticket in the maximum amount of $100,000 for parking citation processing and collections. Appropriated$100,000 from the General Fund to fund the PSA which will be fully offset by a corresponding increase in citation fines and higher collection rates. Increased the Master Fee Schedule’s “No Parking - Street Sweeping Zone” citation fine to $75 with effect from December 1, 2012. Accepted Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Hiring Program $3,602,644 grant award from the U.S. Department of Justice to help retain nine police officer positions, originally hired for four years with $4,032,027 of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 funds awarded in August 2009, for a further four years. Amended City’s FY 2013 Salary Plan. Authorized negotiation and execution of necessary documents to accept prepayment of principal and forgive approximately $47,500 of interest on $105,000 CDBG loan for Park Manor apartments. Revised Council Member Handbook. Authorized negotiation and execution of a PSA with Carollo Engineers for design of a new cogeneration power system at the Water Pollution Control Facility in the maximum amount of $880,000. Total estimated project cost is $8.6M which is covered by the Sewer Capital Improvement Fund as part of the FY 2013 CIP. Projection completion is expected in July 2014. Approved use of the former Redevelopment Agency-controlled Operating Reserve of $300,000 toward funding replacement of windows and sliding doors in most buildings, elevator repairs and roof repairs at Tennyson Gardens. Approved transfer of specified properties from the City of Hayward to the Hayward Successor Agency; the acceptance of specified properties from the City of Hayward to the Hayward Successor Agency; and Housing Authority Resolution confirming the transfer of $1,071,056.49 from the former Low-Moderate Income Housing Fund in the Housing Authority fund balance to the Hayward Successor Agency for future redistribution under the provisions of ABx1 26 and AB 1484. Amended contract with Godbe Research to extend the Biannual Resident Satisfaction Survey from 16 minutes to 21 minutes, thus, requiring a budget increase to $28,910. Legislative Business Introduced ordinance to amend the Hayward Municipal Code relating to Nuisance Abatement on Public Property – Illegal Dumping. Mayor Sweeney moved the staff recommendation subject to an annual review, with Council and the keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force, of the ordinance’s performance and exploration of ways to improve the program. [6 YES, 1 NO (Jones)]. Public Comment Sherry Blair took the opportunity of stating that the wording of the Illegal Dumping ordinance is inadequate before the meeting turned to Legislative Business. Jim Drake complained about the camber, curbs and gutters in the vicinity of the World gas station on north-bound Foothill Boulevard. There is inadequate run-off and drainage when it rains, creating hazardous driving conditions. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Greg Jones – Yes Al Mendall - Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeno - Yes

Union City City Council October 23, 2012

Measure B-1 on November 6 ballot Adopt resolution to appropriate Safe Route to School funds for Meyers Drive sidewalk Adopt resolution to endorse Shop Local and identify Centro de Servicios as benefactor of Rainbow Rewards revenues Accept work for 2012 Slurry Seal Project City Manager Reports: Accept report of 1st Quarter

Proclamations and Presentations: Introduce new and promoted employees Presentation of Alameda County Fire Department operations and Pulse Point Application Consent Calendar: Adopt resolution endorsing Newark City Council October 25, 2012

Minutes of October 11, 2012 meeting (Freitas abstain) Presentation and Proclamations: Commending Police Commander Tom Milner who is retiring from the Newark Police Department after 29 years of service in law enforcement and 10 years with Newark. Commending Newark Days Committee members Commending Recycling Poster Design Contest Winners Proclaim November 4-10 as Retired Teachers Week Consent Calendar: Cancel City Council meeting scheduled for November 22, 2012 Accept Office of Traffic Safety “Avoid the 21” DUI enforcement campaign grant Amend 2012-2014 Biennial Budget and Capital Improvement Plan for 2012-2013 Non-consent: Enter into negotiations with Allied Waste Services for Solid Waste Collection and Recyclable Material Collection and processing services.

budget to actual results for July 1September 30 2012. Figures are in relative range of anticipation but conclusions are tentative due to lack of substantive data. Mayor Mark Green Vice Mayor Pat Gacoscos Jim Navarro Emily Duncan Lorrin Ellis

Aye Aye Aye Aye Aye

Authorize agreement with PCD for new audio/visual system in City Council Chambers including live streaming and archive services of meetings. Accelerate reversion of Property X right-of-way adjacent to Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Council Matters: Adopt Fair Political Practices Commission form Approve appointment of Planning Commissioner Dias to Community Development Advisory Committee with resulting vacancy. Councilmember Freitas noted that with dwindling cities and associated rising costs of an odd year election schedule, it is time to investigate changing Newark elections to coincide with even year voting. Successor Agency: Request appointment of Angelina Reyes to Oversight Board Accept due Diligence Review for Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund Mayor Alan Nagy Aye Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Aye Luis Freitas Aye Maria ‘Sucy’ Collazo Aye Robert Marshall Aye

Human Relations Commission honors residents

U

nion City’s Human Relations Commissioners held a special recognition ceremony on October 24, 2012 for residents nominated as examples of those who have made a difference in the community. Nominees (nominator) included: Paddy Iyer (Jonathan Pettey), Tommie Lindsey (Jaime Patino), Michele Wms-Smith (Carmen Smeester), Thomas Sims (Helen Hsu), Tracie Noriega (Sahlee Egipto), Dianaliza Ponco (Jerico Abanico) and Susana Peinado (Yesenia Molinar). Paddy Iyer is well-known as the owner of green certified Paddy’s Coffee House, host to a myriad of community activities notably, open mic and spoken word events, providing a safe environment for youth to study, showcasing local art, supporting many campaign launches. Tommie Lindsey started the nationally recognized Forensic program at James Logan High School in 1988. He has given his time and money to help those in need and the team to succeed. Michele Wms-Smith is a volunteer, community activist and Family Advocate with the Family Education and Resource Center. She is a certified facilitator for the Mental Health First Aid program and assists

the Decoto Youth Center project. Thomas Sims has dedicated many years to school site councils and leadership with the Cub Scouts. His countless hours of volunteerism have supported organizations that foster positive education and enrichment opportunities for local children and youth. Tracie Noriega is Principal of Alvarado Elementary School and Athletic Director of the Christian Youth Organization. She has been a teacher and administrator in New Haven Unified School District since 1996 and is president of New Haven Philipino-American Society for Education. Dianaliza Poncho is the site coordinator for the Building Futures Mentoring Program of the Tri-Valley and Tri-City region of the East Bay. She is the lead clinical case manager and recovery coach at the Women’s Recovery Association assisting transitional youth and all women. Susana Peinado works at Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center in Cultura y Bienestar focused on prevention and early intervention services on Mental Health for families. She is also the Religious Education Secretary at Our Lady of the Rosary Church and coordinates a youth group.

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District Awarded the Monthly Volunteer Recognition Award for September 2012 to Halston Butler for his volunteer work in the Youth Program at the Matt Jimenez Community Center (MJCC) where he has volunteered for five months. Accepted a presentation by the Castro Valley VFW Post 9601 on the construction of the Veterans’ Memorial at Castro Valley Community Park. Authorized the distribution of an RFP for cold drink vending rights and directed Staff to distribute the RFP to all known cold drink vendors, including but not limited to Pepsi, Coca-Cola, Seven-Up, Shasta,

Dr. Pepper Snapple Group and RC Cola International. Approved Change Order No. 2 in the amount of $29,507.20 for the ADA upgrade to kitchen at Hayward Area Senior Center. Accepted the completion of the contract for the ADA upgrade to the kitchen at the Hayward Area Senior Center. Approved the lease of seven new vehicles in accordance with the terms of the District’s current Lease Agreement with Enterprise Fleet Services of San Leandro. Accepted the proposal from Sherman Balch, Sr. for the renovation of

the bunkers at Mission Hills of Hayward Golf Course. Accepted, with mixed emotions, the retirement of Ron Crow, Maintenance and Construction Technician I (Aquatics), and wished him and his family happiness and good health during his retirement. Closed the meeting in honor and in memory of Michael Headrick, a District retiree who passed away on Friday, October 19, 2012; and in honor and memory of Louis Guzman, former Recreation Leader in the District’s Teen programs, who was heavily involved in the annual Battle of the Bands for many years.


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Child Advocates hires Scussel as CEO

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

“Every child needs and deserves a caring adult to support and guide them in creating their future.”- Karen Scussel, Executive Director On October 17, 2012, Child Advocates of Silicon Valley hired Karen Scussel as Executive Director. Karen has an extensive background with Child Advocates since 2000, serving as Interim Executive Director, Interim Director of Programs, Interim Director of Volunteer Services, Member of Board of Directors, Advocate Supervisor, and Advocate volunteer. Ms. Scussel has advocated for fourteen foster children, ranging in age from 3 to 19. She also has 27 years of hi-tech experience working at Agilent and Hewlett-Packard. “Karen’s passion for children is extraordinary and she brings a wide range of experience and depth to Child Advocates,” said Presiding Judge Tondreau, Santa Clara County Superior Court Juvenile Division. Child Advocates of Silicon Valley recruits, trains and supports Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) who serve the needs of children in the foster care system by providing a powerful, independent voice for the child. Founded in 1986 by Judge Leonard Edwards and a community volunteer, Child Advocates of Silicon Valley works in partnership with the Santa Clara County Juvenile Dependency Court, one of only a few recognized model courts in the United States. Find out more at www.BeMyAdvocate.org.

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Poster Design winners recognized

Illegal dumping ordinance, the right solution? Illegal dumping is a problem that negatively impacts the Hayward community, draining City resources to clear the debris. Volunteers and City staff, who battle constantly to contain the issue, are frustrated and angry. Staff believes they know the culprits. On Tuesday, October 23, 2012, staff introduced an ordinance that requires private property owners to either clear refuse dumped in the public right-of-way near their home, or business, or be fined several hundred dollars and billed for removal. If it passes at the next Council meeting, homeowners will be responsible for either bearing the costs of clearing away old cars, furniture and other debris abandoned near their property or paying the fine. The ordinance gives City employees the power to decide whom to fine, without evidence. If something is dumped near your home, you may be fined while the person across the street is not. Getting angry will not help. When questioned about the fairness of penalizing victims of someone else’s illegal activity, staff assured Council that they “know” who is guilty and who is innocent. I am troubled by the excessive discretion and concerned that abuse could occur intentionally or unintentionally. Existing laws allow the accused to see the evidence and defend himself/herself. The new ordinance requires no evidence; the accused must pay a substantial, non-refundable fee for the privilege of protesting the fine and costs. In my opinion, the excessive cost of disposing of an old mattress or couch is the real cause of illegal dumping. It costs more than $140 to take anything to the dump or transfer station. People evicted for non-payment of rent can seldom afford such an expense. Many Hayward landlords are elderly people living on social security and rental income from an extra unit or two. The only people to speak against the ordinance, besides myself and Councilman Greg Jones, were an elderly couple and a lady who carries an oxygen tank. They have been the victims of illegal dumping in front of their homes. They are physically unable to remove what was left and could not possibly be the culprits. Instead of persecuting property owners, many of whom are lawabiding citizens and, therefore, unlikely to engage in such anti-social and illegal behavior, the City of Hayward should provide an affordable solution for residents who need to dispose of junk. If you care, please contact Mayor Sweeney and the members of Hayward City Council. They will listen, if you speak up. Better still, attend the next Council meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 at City Hall, 777 B Street, Hayward, and voice your concerns during Public Comments at the start of the meeting. If the only input they receive is from staff, they are likely do as staff requests. Al Parso, President Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association, Hayward

continued from page 19

Burglary Report p.m. on 10/17/12 at 2500 Country Dr (Parkmont). The point and method of entry into his vehicle is unknown. Loss: cash, credit cards and stereo face plate. On 10/24/12, between 7:00 a.m. and 11:55 a.m. in Fremont Hospital’s parking lot (39001 Sundale Dr). Front passenger window was smashed. Loss: backpack with school textbook inside. On 10/24/12, between 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., in the Outback Steakhouse parking lot (5525 Stevenson Blvd). The reporting party returned to his rental car after dinner and discov-

Winners of 2012 Recycling Poster Contest are congratulated by Mayor Alan Nagy at Newark City Council meeting October 11, 2012. L-R: Selah Fay, Isabelle Farais, Laura Wong, Anwesha Ghosh

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN EDWARDS At the October 11, 2012 meeting of the Newark City Council, four winners of the Recycling Poster Design Contest were recognized for their artwork. The Silliman Activity & Family Aquatic Center invited artists ages 4-12 to participate and celebrate Earth and Nature Week during the summer. Of the 21 entrants, four were selected and received a free 2013 Season Pass plus having their artwork displayed at the center. First Place: Selah Fay (11) who described her poster as, “When we recycle plastic bags, can, bottles and other items, we help the earth be a cleaner and better place for us and the animals.” Second Place: Anwesha Ghosh (6) with a poster of three different colors of bins so people know what to recycle, where to recycle and why it is important to recycle. Third Place: Isabelle Farias (11) with a poster that shows how the Earth gets energy to us by recycling. The poster shows the earth, moon and stars exercising! Honorable Mention: Laura Wong (9) with a poster that shows her and her sister putting recyclable trash in the recycling bin; the birds and butterflies in the background are happy that their environment is being kept clean.

ered the rear passenger window was smashed out. Loss: laptop bag containing laptop, keys, aircard, and iPad 2. Commercial Burglaries On October 19, 2012 at 11:01 a.m., officers responded to Gordon Ball Inc. at Kato Rd/Kato Tr (East Industrial) to take a commercial burglary report. The incident occurred between 6:00 p.m. on 10/18/12 and 7:00 a.m. on 10/19/12. Unknown suspect(s) gained entry into the construction office trailer by cutting/breaking a hinge to the security bars and sliding open an unlocked window. Loss includes an inclinometer (water testing device), a projector and computer parts. On October 19, 2012 at 11:02 p.m., officers responded to Motel 6 (North), 34047 Fremont Blvd (Northgate) to take a commercial

burglary report. The reporting party stated he was gone for two hours, and when he returned, his laptop was missing. Incident occurred between 3:30 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. There were no signs of forced entry; it is unknown at this time how the suspect(s) made entry. Loss: 15” Gateway laptop. Burglary Prevention Tips Use timers so that lights, radio, and TV go on and off when you are not home (available at hardware stores for as little as $5 - 10 each). To you, leaving that window open just a crack during the day is a way to let in a little fresh air. To a burglar, it’s an invitation. Lock your doors AND windows every time you leave your home! "Remove it, lock it or lose it!" When dining out, shopping, or hitting a local park/trail, re-

member to remove all valuables from your vehicle. Take note that in almost of all the cases above, items of value had been left in the vehicle. Phones, wallets, laptops, cameras, GPS devices are not safe by simply covering them up or putting them under a seat. Recent targets: Commercial areas including Pacific Commons, Stevenson/Farwell, Mowry/Farwell (Mowry East); and recreation areas - Coyote Hills Regional Park and Don Edwards Wildlife Refuge. If you have information about one of the above listed incidents, please contact the Fremont Police Department at fremontpolice@fremont.gov or learn how to send a tip at www.fremontpolice.org/tip.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES

CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project application: Zoning Text Amendment (AT-12-004) and Update to the City’s “Policy Guidelines for Christmas Tree Sales Lots” Stanley Family Trees is proposing to amend Municipal Code Chapter 18.51, Private Institutional (PI) District, to allow seasonal sales lots in the PI District subject to Administrative Use Permit approval. The City is proposing to amend Municipal Code Chapter 18.48, Agricultural (A) District, Chapter 18.51, Private Institutional (PI) District, and Chapter 18.36, Commercial Districts, to allow seasonal sales lots in the A and PI Districts subject to Administrative Use Permit approval and to clarify that seasonal sales lots are required to comply with the policies set by the City Council. The City is also proposing a comprehensive update to the City’s “Policy Guidelines for Christmas Tree Sales Lots” to expand its applicability and to be consistent with the proposed text amendments and current City policies Notice is also given that the proposed text amendment is exempt from environmental review per Section 15061(b)(3) of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines, which is a general exemption for projects with no potential for a significant effect on the environment. CITY COUNCIL MEETING Tuesday, November 13, 2012 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. The Planning Commission reviewed this application and recommended approval to the City Council on a 5-0 vote. For further information on the above applications, contact Carmela Campbell, Planning Manager, at 510-675-5316. Written comments regarding these projects should be received by the Planning Division prior to Tuesday, November 13, 2012. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. JOAN MALLOY Economic & Community Development Director

BULK SALES NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE ESCROW NO. 12-14119-KZ NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to creditors of the within named Seller that a bulk sale is about to be made of the assets described below The name and business address(s) of the seller are: ZHIWEI RESTAURANT, INC AND JUNE CHEN, 1773 DECOTO RD, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The location in California of the chief executive office of the seller is: SAME AS ABOVE As listed by the seller, all other business names and addresses used by the seller within three years before the date such list was sent or delivered to the buyer: NONE KNOWN The names and business address of the buyer(s) are: TIAN YUAN YANG, 12481 CARMEL GARDEN, CARMEL, IN 46032 The assets to be sold are described in general as: ALL THE ASSETS of that certain business located at: 1773 DECOTO RD, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The Business name used by the seller at that location is: ZHIWEI RESTAURANT The anticipated date of the bulk sale is: NOVEMBER 16, 2012 at the office of: NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ESCROW SERVICES, INC., 5540 ALMADEN EXPRESSWAY, SAN JOSE, CA 95118 The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. If so subject, the name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is KRISTI ZUNIGA, Escrow Officer, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ESCROW SERVICES, INC., 5540 ALMADEN EXPRESSWAY, SAN JOSE, CA 95118 and the last date for filing claims shall be NOVEMBER 15, 2012, which is the business day before the sale date specified above. Dated: OCTOBER 11, 2012 TIAN YUAN YANG, Transferees LA1235524 TRI-COUNTY VOICE 10/3012 10/30/12 CNS-2398668#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12652922 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: JOSE JWENAL TORRES AND OLGA GUADALUPE BARAJAS for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JOSE JWENAL TORRES AND OLGA GUADALUPE BARAJAS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: FRANCO TORRES BARAJAS TO FRANCO TORRES-BARAJAS; JUREND TORRES TO JOSE JWENAL TORRES; OLGA BARAJAS to OLGA GAUDALUPE BARAJAS The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 02/08/13, Time: 8:45 A.M., Dept.: 504, Room: N/A The address of the court is 24405 AMADOR STREET, HAYWARD, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county:WHAT'S HAPPENING TRI-CITY VOICE Date: OCTOBER 22, 2012 WINIFRED Y SMITH JUDGE of the Superior Court 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398165# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12648642 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Mohammed Sanaullah Khan for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Mohammed Sanaullah Khan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Mohammed Sanaullah Khan to Sanaullah Mohammed Khan The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 01/04/2013, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Sep. 20, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2390195#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470671 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Five Ten Auto Sales, 36616 Newark Blvd. Suite B, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Amandeep Lal, 36616 Newark Blvd. Suite B, Newark, CA 94560

CNS#2400427

This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amandeep Lal, Principal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2399865# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470798 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mexifornia, 31679 Hayman St., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda. Jose Luis Morales, 33634 7th Street, Union City, CA 94587. Marina Morales, 33634 7th Street, Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-15-12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jose Luis Morales Marina Morales This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398918# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471057 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mighty Hauling, 3911 Cosmic Place, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Gregory Lofties, 3911 Cosmic Place, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/19/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gregory Lofties This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 19, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398902# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 471042 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PLATINUM POOL SOLUTIONS, 7198 THORNTON AVE, NEWARK, CA, 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: 35545 PROVANCE ST., NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA JUAN LOPEZ, 35545 PROVANCE ST., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10-18-12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ JUAN LOPEZ This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on OCTOBER 18, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398161# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470438-9 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SIMPLY CLEAN, SIMPLY CLEAN CARPET CLEANING, 1552 E GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566, County of ALAMEDA M. OSMAN QUDDUS, 1552 E. GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566 MARYAM ADALAT, 1552 E. GATE WAY #134, PLEASANTON, CA 94566

This business is conducted by A HUSBAND AND WIFE The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ M. OSMAN QUDDUS This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on OCTOBER 3, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20/12 CNS-2398159# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470640 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Raquels R.E. Processing & Coordination, 17113 Via Alamitos, San Lorenzo, CA 94580, County of Alameda Raquel Salmeron, 17113 Via Alamitos, San Lorenzo, CA 94580 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raquel Salmeron This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 10, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2396977# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470384 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Meshicas, 398 Lexington Ave., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Patricia Valencia, 398 Lexington Ave., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Patricia Valencia This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395824# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470493 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Premier Champagne, 22336 Meekland Ave., Unit E, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda. Johal Corp., CA, 238 Fuji Way, Hayward, CA 94544. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Johal Corp. /s/ Ravinder S. Johal, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395521# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470427 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Lavender Studio, 47854 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Chantal Vuong, 2086 Danderhall Way, San Jose, CA 95121. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chantal Vuong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 3, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395501# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470843 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shree Ganesha LLC dba Comfort Inn & Suites, 5977 Mowry Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Shree Ganesha LLC, California, 5977 Mowry Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/20/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ishuar J. Patel, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 16, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).

10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2395496# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470053 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Connecting Through Art, 4099 Tawny Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Yvonne Ming Gee, 4099 Tawny Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07/01/2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yvonne Ming Gee This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 25, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13/12 CNS-2393914# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470604 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Infinity Financial & Realty, 330 Mackintosh Terrace, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Jaime Ramirez, 330 Mackintosh Terrace, Fremont, CA 94539 Amparo J. Ramirez, 330 Mackintosh Terrace, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-11-2007 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jaime Ramirez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 9, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2392973# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470550 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Reliance Auto Sales, 37053 Cherry St., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Sunel Yusufi, 28178 Montjoy Ct., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sunel Yusufi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 08, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2391712# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470465 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Global Strategy Enterprise, 780 Gallegos Ter., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Yun-Feng Hsiao, 780 Gallegos Ter., Fremont, CA 94539. Chih-Min Wang, 780 Gallegos Ter., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yun-Feng Hsiao/CEO Chih-Min Wang/COO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 3, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2391711# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470478 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Apsara Style, 4128 Bay St., West Side, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Devika Nair, 38825 Fremont Blvd., Apt. #5, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Devika Nair This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 04, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2391386# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470506 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Operation Warrior's Foundation, Inc., 39899 Balentine Drive, Suite 200, Newark, CA 94560, County of alameda Operation Warrior's Foundation, Inc., California, 39899 Balentine Drive, Suite 200, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Sep 20, 2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mark Jones, Vice President & Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of

Alameda County on October 5, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2391065# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470211 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wraps Print, 2181 American Avenue, Hayward, CA 94545, County of Hayward; 893 Blaine Way, Hayward, CA 94544; Alameda Sorana Villanueva, 893 Blaine Way, Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/17/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sorana Villanueva, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 27, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2390944# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 465806 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: J J Truck and Tires Repair, 42400 Boyce Rd. Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538 The fictitious business name statement for the Partnership was filed on 05/30/2012 in the County of Alameda. Gurtej Singh, 42400 Boyce Rd. Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538. Jaswinder Singh, 42400 Boyce Rd. Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Gurtej Singh Jaswinder Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2012. 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2390809# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469858 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Half Moon Trucking, 39962 Cedar Blvd. #179, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Gurjant S. Gill, 39962 Cedar Blvd. #179, Newark, CA 94560. Sukhwinder Singh, 29596 Dixon St. Apt. #20, Hayward, CA 94544. This business is conducted by Co-partners. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sukhwinder Singh, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 19, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2390804# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470387 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Continental Truck & Trailer Repair, 42400 Boyce Rd., Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda PO Box 2512, Union City, Alameda, CA 94587 Harbhajan Singh, 42400 Boyce Rd., Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/02/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Harbhajan Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 2, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6/12 CNS-2390802# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 470305 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CC'S Exceptional Cleaning Service, 4035 Rector Common, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Cassandra Lee Clark, 4035 Rector Common, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Sept. 26, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Cassandra Lee Clark, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 1, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2387774# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469696 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Alderwood Apartments, 37057 Magnolia St., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda, 925 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto, CA 94303, County of Santa Clara Essex Alderwood Park Apartments L.P., 925 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto, CA 94303 Essex Apartments Valu Fund II, LP, 925 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto, CA 94303, (general partner) This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

continued on page 37


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 33

Let’s call the whole thing off

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

WILLIAM MARSHAK

I

have come to the conclusion that there is a natural corollary to the theory of right brain/left brain dominance. It is said that those dominated by their “left-brain” are logical and analytical while a right-brained person is intuitive and creative. Along with such left/right dominance, I would add additional directions and dimensions called “inward” and “outward.” Inward people constantly evaluate, creating a wide variety of scenarios and options to explore. Often, this constant desire to investigate all alternatives leads to paralysis since as one solution is found another possibility can appear and begin the process all over again. Outward people look beyond the confusion of possible outcomes, choosing a direction and path to achieve a desired result. They may however, in haste, disregard or overlook an optimal path. While all of these attributes are desirable to some degree, extremes can be limiting and stall practical applications and results. An example of the paralytic effect of these competing instincts was evident at the last meeting of the Fremont Planning Commission on October 25. The thorny issue of deciding whether Kimber Park open space land should be designated “private open space” remained a conclusion looking for a solution. It was clear that some commission members favored retention of open space in the true meaning of the word. They knew that Save Kimber Park advocates had rallied community support to place an open space initiative on the ballot with the obvious intent to include at-risk Kimber Park property within the initiative’s designation and protection.

However, Staff and the developer threw a curve by proposing a commercial concept that, while remaining within legal definitions of allowable development, appeared to violate the intent. Commissioners were caught between an unworkable and diversionary concept that, strictly speaking, was within accepted definitions and the goal of an agreement made 35 years ago between the City, developer and residents. Instead of open declarations, commissioners declined to honestly debate and settle the matter. Proposals, motions and votes that mercifully ended the session, revealed a tangled web that any self-respecting spider would disavow and discard. There was little sense or logic to a debate which centered on specific aspects of a failed concept. While Save Kimber Park advocates presented a clear case for their position, acceptance or rejection by commissioners was anything but that. Finally, as hours passed, the Fremont Planning Commission simply punted to the Fremont City Council. All in all, the Planning Commission participated in an exercise of extreme inward processing without the production of any result. In effect, they said “no” by default rather than having the courage to actually say it. Are these Fremont City Councilmembers in waiting? Will the City Council follow the same awkward and embarrassing pattern? Are we relegated to a group of left/right brain councilmembers with inward tendencies run amok? Hopefully, the context of this debacle will not predict its future. When previously confronted with this dilemma, the City Council side-stepped the issue by creating a “study area.” They hoped that compromise would be the savior for a council unable to act reasonably in a politically charged situation. It is now abundantly clear that there is little room for an amicable conclusion to this issue; evasion and non-action are no longer an

option. The Planning Commission avoided any heavy lifting involved in a clear decision but the council should not and cannot devolve into a similar incoherent discussion of specific attributes of a conceptual plan that has no relationship with reality. The commercial sports center proposed is not a viable plan when considering all elements it requires. Will the City Council continue this sham in an effort to keep at least a portion of the property in the developer’s playbook? It is time to end this once and for all. Since Councilmember Chan has consistently recused herself from participation in this discussion, that leaves four remaining votes, two have been firm supporters of Save Kimber Park and a third “got religion” during the process. There should be little doubt of an outcome… but with politicians, stay tuned!

In 1937, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers starred in the film, Shall We Dance. A duet written by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin compared differences in language and class distinction. The lyrics are appropriate in this case…

You like potato and I like potahto You like tomato and I like tomahto Let's call the whole thing off

Loading value to your Clipper card just got easier! Customers can now load monthly passes or cash value using any of the ticket vending machines at all Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) light rail stations. On July 1, 2012,

VTA went “paperless” and no longer sells the disposable, paper transit passes. Now, VTA customers pay for rides on VTA bus and light rail using the reloadable, all-in-one Clipper card. The Clipper card can hold multiple fare media specific to the transit system being used, as well as up to $300 in cash value at one time, so it’s possi-

FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Kenny Jacoby WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

VTA ticket machines adding value to Clipper cards SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

ble to travel on BART, MUNI, Caltrain and other Bay Area public transit including VTA with just one pass. For more information, call VTA’s Customer Service at (408) 321-2300, TTY (408) 321-2330 or visit www.ClipperCard.com or call Clipper Customer Service at 877-878-8883.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

October 30, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

Looking for career change? Here is a HOT one for you! Become a Full Charge Bookkeeper in 9 weeks

REGISTER TODAY

Tel: 408-531-0203

Email: Info@bookkeepingtraininginc.com www.bookkeepingtrainersinc.com

BOOKKEEPING TRAINING, INC. HELP WANTED

Child Care Coordinator Newark Unified School District is looking for a Child Care Coord. $34,835-$41,126/yr, 6hrs/day, 24 Hrs/wk. Admin Credential or a B.A. degree +12ECE units & 6-admin/Super units req. Deadline: Open until Filled; HR Dept., 5715 Musick Ave., Newark, 510-818-4242.

INTERSTATE DISTRIBUTOR

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I, Simran 27 Oct. 2000, Daughter of Mr.Sukhvir Singh/Kanwaljit Kaur, resident of 41777 Grimmer blvd Apt # N4 Fremont, CA 94538 do hereby declare: I have added my middle and last name “Kaur Dhindsa” to my name. Now my full name Is Simran Kaur Dhindsa.

Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy As To Students The Bridges Community Church-Little Lamb Ministry Preschool and Full Daycare admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships and other school administered programs. Little Lamb Ministries 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont, CA 94539

Great Rates! Great Results Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

Become a hospice patient care volunteer! Patient care volunteers provide a variety of supportive services to terminally ill patients and their families such as respite care for caregiver, companionship to the patient, run errands, do light housework and so much more! Life Springs Hospice serves the Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara and San Mateo county communities. For more information about becoming a patient care volunteer, please contact

Dawn Torre,Volunteer Coordinator 1-888-493-0734 or 510-933-2181 volunteer@lifespringshospice.com

Ohlone College Flea Market needs a

Food Vendor Call 510.659.6285 for more info


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 35

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593

CHINESE CHRISTIAN

Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org

Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org

First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810

Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

October 30, 2012

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Life Church 1699 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-483-8940 www.clife-church.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org

Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org

Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont 510-226-2800 www.resonatemovement.org ROADMAP FELLOWSHIP International Best Western Plus Inn 360 W. 'A' St.,Hayward 510-574-5663 San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL)

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140

Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com

Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net.

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org

Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 nilesdiscoverychurch.org

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org

Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org


October 30, 2012 Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860

Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org

First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer)

St. Steven Lutheran Church Meets at Grace Lutheran Church 1836 B. St., Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

Chinese Mission of Hope Evangelical-Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd, Fremont 510-938-0505 http://www.hopelutheranfremont.org/zh.html Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org

DENOMINATIONAL

Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers)

LUTHERAN

NON

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org

Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

Page 37

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.southhaywardumc.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Heavenly Christ's Church (Meets in Calvary Lutheran Church) 17200 Via Magdalena San Lorenzo 510-303-5592 Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 New Seed of Faith Ministry 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nsofm.com 510 612-4832 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL

MUSLIM

Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org

Al-Medinah Educational Center: Masjid & School 5445 Central Ave., Newark

Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com

PRESBYTERIAN

First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597

PUBLIC NOTICES under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 09/20/06 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bryan Hunt, Chief Accounting Officer of Essex Alderwood Park Apartments L.P. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2387645# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469698 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bridgepart Apartment Homes, 36826 Cherry St., Newark, CA 95460, County of Alameda. 925 East Meadow Dr., Palo Alto, CA 94303. Essex Property Trust, Inc., MD, 925 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto, CA 94303. This business is conducted by Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 09/15/88. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bryan Hunt Chiep, Accounting Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the

facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2387642# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469912 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Galaxy Trading, LLP, 1599 Marabu Way, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Susy Yu Chou Tsai, General Partner, 1599 Marabu Way, Fremont, CA 94539. William Cheng Chang, General Partner, 1599 Marabu Way, Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Sept. 11, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Susy Y. Tsai, Accountant/Partner /s/ William C. Chang, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 20, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2387368#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications: Site Development Review (SD-12-003) and Use Permit (UP-12-006) The property owner, CBK Inc., is applying for Site Development Review, SD-12-003, to convert existing service station bays and adjacent cashier / retail sales area into a convenience market.The project consists of interior renovations, a small exterior addition, and façade improvements. The project also includes exterior upgrades to the existing carwash building and gas station canopy. The property owner is also applying for a Use Permit, UP-12-006, for establishment of a convenience market. The project site is located at 31889 Alvarado Blvd. (APN: 483-0076-005-05) and is zoned Community Commercial. Notice is also given that this project is categorically exempt per Section 15301, Existing Facilities, of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines. City Council Meeting Tuesday, November 13, 2012 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. The Planning Commission reviewed this project at its October 18, 2012 meeting and recommended approval on a 5-0 vote with some minor changes to the conditions of approval.

Community

Development

10/30/12 CNS-2400431# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Health Care Services Agency, 1000 San Leandro Blvd., Suite 300, San Leandro, CA, 94577 MANDATORY NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #2012GWP HCSA Fund Development Office Grant Writers Pool Administration North County–Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at Regional Center of the East Bay, 500 Davis Street, Conference Room Davis A&B, San Leandro, CA and Thursday, November 8, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at County Administration Building, 1221 Oak Street, Room 255, 2nd Floor, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on November 28, 2012 County Contact: Naomi Hsu at (510) 667-7420 or via email: naomi.hsu@acgov.org Attendance at one Networking Conference is Mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/30/12 CNS-2399617#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION

For further information on the above applications, contact Carmela Campbell, Project Planner, at 510-675-5316. Written comments regarding this project should be received by the Planning Division prior to Tuesday, November 13, 2012.

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 http://www.missionpeakuu.org/

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (in the future home of Niles Discovery Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

continued from page 32

City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. Joan Malloy Economic & Director

Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 8th Day of November, 2012 at or after 12:00 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage

Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Chantal Ferr AA4400A 7/21/12 Stephany Demos AA4904A 7/8/12 Jennifer Russell AA8048A 8/25/12 Said Waziri B103 8/17/12 Deon Davis B132 9/12/12 Vevencio Torres B137 8/17/12 Kathleen M. Pohlman B144 7/25/12 Deon Davis B154 9/12/12 Cristian Gipson B189 8/30/12 Lamar Thomas C245-46 7/12/12 Nixon Matignas C289 8/30/12

10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2396583# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 8th of November, 2012 at or after11: 15 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Fremont, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Helen Holdun 163 9/3/12 Pernell Lowery 179 8/26/12 Helen Holdun 183 9/3/12 Melissa Costello 257U 6/10/12 James Shazzteea 274U 8/14/12 Rebecca Matthews 280U 8/27/12 Troy Eugene Thompson 281U 8/31/12 Renata Zakhvatkina 283U 8/24/12 Ralph McSerren 328 7/19/12 Melissa Costello 335 10/10/11 Sue Pokart 336 7/21/12 10/23, 10/30/12 CNS-2396577#


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 30, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

Angel Children’s Choir Accepting New Members Ages 7-14 Vocal Training - Music Theory Instrument Group Public Performance Saturday 9:30am-12Noon Newark Neighborhood Church 510-791-8555 or details www.cbncangelchildrenschoir.com

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English 7-9pm Tuesdays except 8/14 36054 Niles Blvd. 650-556-6428 Meditation, discussion, Q&A with Ajahn Guna, American Buddhist monk in Ajahn Chah Thai Forest Tradition. All are welcome. Free.

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Talent Show Irving Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave., Fremont Saturday, Nov 3 - 7pm If you have a Talent and want to perform contact us. All Are Invited ipctalentshow@yahoo.com 510-657-3133

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Women’s Ministries Christmas Boutique Fri, Oct 26th 4pm-8pm Sat, Oct 27th 9am-4pm Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark In the Dining Hall Support for community outreach including food and gift donations summer youth camp and more

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

East Bay Youth Jazz Band JAZZINATORS Tues 8/21, 9/4 & 18, 10/2 & 16 Bronco Billy’s @ Grimmer/Blacow * * 7 – 8 p.m. NO cover charge https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 for info & verify times Mission Gold Jazz Band @ Sunol Jazz Cafe 1st & 3rd Wednesdays 7 – 9 p.m.

New Life Community Church

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

"Transforming Lives" Worship Service: 4PM Sunday Community Group: 7PM Friday 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 www.newlifeeastbay.org rwong@newlifeeastbay.org contact: 510-432-9250 A church for the Tri-City!

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Jan 5, 2013 from 9:00-11:30 in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or Email Joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/F2F

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

HOME SALES REPORT

Friendship Force

Play Easybridge!

Become the speaker & leader you want to be Citizens for Better Communicators (CBC) Toastmasters Guests and Visitors welcome Saturdays 10:15am Unitek College Room 141 4580 Auto Mall Pkwy., Fremont 510-862-0893

American Legion Auxiliary

Out of work? ProNet can help you!

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

We offer no-fee job search, resume and interview workshops. For workshop schedule please call (510) 794-2442.

Are you a writer? Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.

• No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Serious Mental Illness

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Learn the world’s greatest game! Four free lessons! Everyone is welcome. Bring a partner or come alone. Marina Community Center, San Leandro, Sept. 29-1pm Ongoing classes/games Fremont & Hayward Jan Hollowell – 510-783-8678

The “NO” List:

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Caregivers of loved ones with Serious Mental Illness NAMI-Alameda County offers a free 12 week course beginning September 8th from 9:00 to 11:30 Union City. Registration required. Call Peggy Rahman at 510-825-1564 e-mail nami-ac@mhaac.org http://nami-acnews.blogspot.com http://www.namialamedacounty.org

Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee.

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 838,000 Median $: 410,000 Lowest $: 310,000 Average $: 526,611 ADDRESS

ZIP

19640 Adair Drive 17467 Almond Road 3629 Christensen Lane 18819 Crest Avenue 19551 Forest Avenue 22024 Queen Street 18344 Redwood Road 20184 San Miguel Avenue 26459 Palomares Road

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

410,000 838,000 345,000 310,000 398,000 360,000 540,000 718,500 820,000

3 3 2 3 2 2 4 4 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1390 3974 1077 1499 1756 1264 3027 2816 4702

1955 1948 1952 1949 1950 1947 1991 1939 1974

09-18-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-21-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 44 Highest $: 1,430,000 Median $: Lowest $: 136,000 Average $: ADDRESS

35703 Ballantine Place 38181 Ballard Drive 4534 Central Avenue 38725 Cherry Lane 1006 Dolphin Common 4382 Dorsey Avenue 3109 Fairfax Court 36715 Matiz Common 4281 Mattos Drive 35698 Mission Boulevard 35620 Nuttman Lane 3530 Oakwood Terrace #103 37946 Palmer Drive 5218 Reeder Court 37343 Sequoia Road 20 Snyder Way 38740 Tyson Lane #112B 38740 Tyson Lane #116B 4159 Bullard Street 5597 Butano Park Drive 5132 Curtis Street 4089 Fennel Terrace 40709 Greystone Terrace 39109 Guardino Drive #131 39199 Guardino Drive #172 41436 Millenium Terrace 4095 Murray Common 4435 Ogden Drive 41276 Roberts Avenue 4536 Val Street 4723 Valpey Park Avenue 1668 Crow Court 41936 Higgins Way 45437 Medicine Bow Way 3124 Middlefield Avenue 12 Mission Ridge Court 720 Montana Vista Court 44950 Naragansett Court 1430 Onondaga Place 286 St. Nicholas Court 41061 Valero Drive 33256 Sunriver Common 34172 Torino Terrace 3421 White Pelican Place

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555

570,000 606,080

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

663,000 627,000 650,000 471,500 560,000 636,500 455,000 270,000 830,000 540,000 740,000 255,000 650,000 560,000 136,000 585,000 338,000 335,000 338,000 435,500 380,000 755,000 462,000 139,000 175,000 522,000 290,000 570,000 470,000 430,000 600,000 935,000 816,500 875,000 810,000 1,232,500 1,430,000 1,072,000 935,000 918,000 825,000 650,000 475,000 825,000

1830 1690 2139 1543 1610 1490 1519 1166 2477 1741 2187 981 1676 1976 593 1520 1124 1124 950 1204 1512 2240 1429 693 693 1400 1389 2034 1197 1036 1368 2163 1476 1736 2039 2988 4034 2443 1948 1526 1647 1967 1387 3205

1970 1959 1965 2008 1995 1956 1972 1971 1955 1980 1986 1984 1955 1959 1986 1981 2000 2000 1954 1962 1961 2010 2007 1987 1987 2002 1980 1962 1953 1959 1964 1978 1961 1978 1957 1992 1984 1980 1979 1958 1973 1989 2007 1987

09-20-12 09-20-12 09-17-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-20-12 09-18-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-20-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-20-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-19-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-17-12 09-18-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-17-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-17-12

4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 1 2 2 3 3 3 4 2 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 6 5 4 3 4 4 3 3


October 30, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 35 Highest $: 663,000 Median $: Lowest $: 82,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

24036 Carmelita Drive 1724 Dover Place 656 Grand Terrace 575 Hampton Road 3246 Hollow Lane 22099 Lucia Street 23329 Lynn Street 1024 McKeever Avenue 259 Medford Avenue 423 Palmer Avenue 425 Palmer Avenue 1775 Panda Way #338 2555 Ralston Way 558 Staley Avenue 562 Staley Avenue 566 Staley Avenue 570 Staley Avenue 1638 Ward Street 22751 Watkins Street 2761 Chronicle Avenue 1189 Highland Boulevard 4010 Star Ridge Road 805 Climbing Rose Court 913 Folsom Avenue 238 Fuji Way 31355 Hugh Way 32271 Ithaca Street 93 Schuyler Avenue 182 Stanislaus Way 27929 Thornton Court 27804 Hummingbird Court 25930 Kay Avenue #210 2814 Seadrift Circle 2694 Spindrift Circle 21117 Gary Drive #110

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546

SOLD FOR BDS

203,000 175,000 200,000 205,000 160,000 205,000 258,000 310,500 220,000 369,500 367,000 82,000 300,000 301,500 403,500 287,000 332,000 267,000 255,000 131,000 170,000 505,000 90,500 288,000 461,000 280,000 181,000 285,000 306,000 145,000 250,000 90,000 608,000 663,000 169,000

3 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 1 2 4 2 3 5 3 3 3 2 4 1 5 4 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1138 1274 1235 947 888 1040 1474 2045 1238 898 1396 1111 1357 882 971 3239 896 1176 2140 1164 1031 1031 1497 982 1656 982 2440 2853 1070

1948 1978 2003 1940 1940 1950 1950 1936 1927 1980 1963 1941 2005 1938 1948 1960 1980 1947 1997 1955 1951 1951 1979 1986 1971 1982 2006 2004 1981

09-19-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-17-12

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 960,000 Median $: Lowest $: 193,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1624 Braly Avenue 1030 Eagle Ridge Way 24 Jacklin Place 789 Las Lomas Drive 248 Lynn Avenue 1033 Mente Linda Loop 700 South Abel Street #525 1101 South Main Street #116

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

455,000 960,000 565,000 788,000 193,000 486,000 435,000 345,000

3 4 3 4 2 3 2 2

ZIP

7195 Calais Place 94560 37657 Central Court 94560 6270 Civic Terrace Avenue #B 94560 35291 Farnham Drive 94560 6003 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #D94560 6295 Lido Court 94560 6254 Mayhews Landing Road 94560 5476 Milani Avenue 94560 6003 Peppertree Court 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

236,500 300,000 180,000 485,000 276,500 368,000 326,000 292,000 385,000

3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

BUILT

CLOSED

1040 2549 1637 2183 976 1810 1259 1013

1962 1987 1982 1981 1970 2007 2007 2007

09-27-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12 09-27-12 09-28-12 09-28-12

ZIP

1272 Begier Avenue 2415 Belvedere Avenue 625 Chetland Road 848 Dowling Boulevard 499 Estudillo Avenue #304 433 Harlan Street #104 711 Juana Avenue 1463 Marybelle Avenue 625 Pershing Drive 699 Tivoli Street 2081 167th Avenue 1649 Brockton Way 861 Crespi Drive 16690 Los Banos Street 15783 Maubert Avenue 2188 Pomar Vista Street 14045 School Street 16105 Selborne Drive 1284 Avon Avenue 14743 Bethany Street 15395 Churchill Street 2230 Gadwall Court #150 795 Lewelling Boulevard 15313 Mendocino Street 1320 Purdue Street

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

555,000 350,000 325,000 260,000 208,000 95,000 185,000 250,000 201,000 498,000 415,000 85,000 320,000 259,000 205,000 238,000 350,000 570,000 330,000 326,000 270,000 369,000 425,000 341,000 455,000

2 6 2 3 2 1 3 3 3 5 3 1 4 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 7 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1106 1476 910 1588 1408 1692 942 1110 1856

1961 1985 1985 1969 1984 1979 1953 1955 1984

09-21-12 09-21-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-20-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-20-12

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1761 1768 1172 1169 1122 659 1852 1015 1324 2524 1976 594 1656 912 1131 1196 1376 3685 1241 1081 1094 1546 2829 1166 2168

1940 1963 1930 1922 1981 1964 1925 1944 1939 2004 1950 1991 1953 1920 1994 1948 1956 1956 1953 1951 1950 1999 1924 1955 1951

09-18-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-21-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-18-12 09-19-12 09-18-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-20-12 09-19-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-18-12 09-18-12 09-20-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-21-12 09-17-12 09-21-12 09-20-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 395,000 Median $: 252,000 Lowest $: 163,000 Average $: 281,667 ADDRESS

ZIP

996 Via Honda 1639 Via Lucas 1868 Via Natal 15748 Wagner Street 17517 Wickman Place 17563 Wickman Place

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

290,000 395,000 380,000 252,000 163,000 210,000

3 4 4 3 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

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1948 1954 1955 1951 1971 1971

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UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 556,000 Median $: Lowest $: 136,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2488 Baltusrol Court 33017 Calle La Mirada Common 32258 Crest Lane 2426 Early Rivers Place 32628 Endeavour Way 1897 Flagstone Drive 35026 Lilac Loop 35032 Lilac Loop 32379 Regents Boulevard 34732 Skylark Drive #3 710 Tamarack Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

400,000 300,000 420,000 458,500 282,000 405,000 556,000 217,000 385,000 136,000 376,500

4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3

SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE POWELL Union Sanitary District (USD) has received the National Purchasing Institute’s (NPI) Achievement of Excellence in Procurement Award, recognizing the District’s Materials Management Team for excellence in principles and practices of procurement. This is the sixth consecutive year that USD has received this award. USD is one of only 29 Special Districts in the United States and one of only 40 government agencies in California to receive the award for 2012. The District obtained high scores in 19 different performance areas using criteria designed to measure innovation, professionalism, e-procurement implementation, productivity, and leadership attributes of the procurement arm of an organization.

“Our Materials Management Team is dedicated to obtaining goods and services that provide the best value to USD and our customers,” says Richard Cortes, Business Services Manager. “They also continue their proactive involvement in the District’s emergency preparedness efforts, strategic planning and use of technology to increase efficiency. This award recognizes the many contributions they make to help the USD fulfill its mission to protect the Tri-Cities and San Francisco Bay.” Union Sanitary District operates a 30 million gallon per day wastewater treatment facility in Union City and provides collection, treatment and disposal services for the Tri-City area. For more information, contact Richard Cortes at (510) 4777510 or visit www.unionsanitary.ca.gov.

Training for the future

300,000 316,556

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 25 Highest $: 570,000 Median $: 325,000 Lowest $: 85,000 Average $: 315,400 ADDRESS

Union Sanitary District receives purchasing award

455,000 528,375

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 485,000 Median $: Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: ADDRESS

258,000 272,100

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1969 1996 1971 1972 1972 1996 1978 1978 1974 1972 1958

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R-L: Jarred Cole, Fabiola Camarillo & Ben Escatel

SUBMITTED BY YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES After 16 weeks of getting up early every weekday morning, beginning in Union City and arriving in West Oakland promptly at 8 a.m. in order to actively participate in eight hours of training, Ben Escatel and Jarred Cole graduated Cypress Mandela Training Center on October 11, 2012. They are the seventh and eighth clients from Youth and Family Services of Union City (YFS) to have successfully completed the program. Cypress Mandela Training Center provides preapprentice construction and life skills training. These two young men have made mistakes in the past, but they are currently focused on making posi-

tive choices for their future in order to provide for their families and to inspire their peers who are facing similar obstacles. On their graduation, they thanked Youth and Family Services for support and for linking them with this program. These two young men are motivated to begin a career in the building trades. They are currently looking for contractors to sponsor them. These young men are prepared to embark upon this new career and represent themselves as positive examples of what Cypress Mandela and Youth and Family Services have prepared them for. If you would like to sponsor these young men in the construction trades, please contact YFS Employment Coordinator Fabiola Camarillo at (510) 675-5820.

New Haven shows progress at closing achievement gap SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Efforts to close the “achievement gap” are succeeding in the New Haven Unified School District according to results released by the California Department of Education from the 2011-12 CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam) and STAR (Standardized Testing and Results) tests. The achievement gap, for several years one of the most vexing problems in public education, is the difference in test results between high-performing students (typically Asian and white sub-groups) and lower-performing students (typically Hispanic/Latino and African-American subgroups). The gap generally is evident in scores from the CAHSEE tests, which students begin taking as high school sophomores and must pass to earn a diploma, and in the STAR results, which measure academic progress from Grades 2 through 11. In New Haven, 89 percent of African-American students passed the English/Language Arts portion of the 2011-12 CAHSEE test on their first attempt, according to results released by the state Department of Education last week. That’s up from 74 percent in 2010-11 and, more significant, identical to the District-wide percentage of students who passed on their first attempt. In addition, 84 percent of African-American students passed the mathematics portion on their first attempt, up from 66 percent last year and just four percentage points shy of the District-wide passing rate. Among Hispanic/Latino students, meanwhile, 82 percent passed the English/Language Arts portion on their first attempt, up from 78 percent last year and within six points of the District-wide passing rate. The percentage of Hispanic/Latino students passing the math portion slipped, however, from 81 to 77 percent.

The gap also is closing – not as dramatically – on the California Standards Test, the predominant part of the STAR program. “Our English/Language Arts scores have increased year after year, maybe not by leaps and bounds, but steadily and consistently, which confirms that we’re doing the right work,” Superintendent Kari McVeigh said. Other District highlights from the release of STAR scores: At Emanuele Elementary, the percentage of fifthgraders scoring at or above standards in math jumped from 49 percent in 2008-0, to 65 percent in 2009-10, to 84 percent in 2010-11. At Alvarado Elementary, the percentage of second-grade students scoring at or above standards in English/Language Arts also increased significantly for the second consecutive year, from 49 percent in 2008-09, to 57 percent in 2009-10, to 65 percent in 2010-11. At Kitayama, Pioneer and Eastin elementaries, there were examples of steady progress in English/Language Arts. At Searles Elementary, the percentage of secondgraders scoring at or above standards in math jumped 13 points and at Hillview Crest Elementary, the percentage of fifth-graders scoring at or above standards in English/Language arts jumped 22 points. At Alvarado Middle School, the percentage of sixth-graders scoring at or above standards in English/Language Arts jumped 12 points. At Cesar Chavez Middle School, the percentage of seventhgraders scoring at or above standards in English/Language Arts increased from 48 to 51 percent. At James Logan High, 90 percent of physics students scored at or above grade level, up from 75 percent last year.


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Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

Lisa Swift McKnight RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 31, 1958 – October 20, 2012

Jerry E. Flemmer RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 5, 1930 – October 1, 2012

Robert E. Alesna RESIDENT OF UNION CITY February 22, 1938 – October 21, 2012

Betty L. Meyer

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 10, 1927 – October 4, 2012

Robert C. Blair RESIDENT OF BROOKINGS HARBOR, OR July 9, 1947 – October 24, 2012

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Kanwarjit Kang RESIDENT OF MILPITAS February 24, 1949 – October 5, 2012

Stanley Richard Comstock RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 30, 1927 – October 24, 2012

Mohammed I. Shah RESIDENT OF HAYWARD November 21, 1190 – October 5, 2012

Gilbert Lopez RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 26, 1939 – October 24, 2012

June V. Tibbetts RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 24, 1931 – October 24, 2012

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Phyllis Y. Snow

510-657-1908

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 25, 1928 – October 11, 2012

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Rosemary L. Mazza RESIDENT

CHOWCHILLA, FREMONT January 24, 1926 – October 12, 2012

Holly Gettle

OF

FORMERLY OF

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 22, 1957 – October 27, 2012

Rachel R. Peres RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE March 6, 1973 - October 13, 2012

Baudilia M. Mora RESIDENT OF NEWARK May 12, 1918 – October 28, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Obituary Thomas Sass passed away on Monday October 22, 2012 at Norwalk Hospital in Hospice

Care. Born November 8, 1937 in New York City, NY to Reverend John J. Sass & Carrie Brandon Sass. Thomas attended public schools in New York City & graduated from Stuyvesant High School in June 1954 at the age of 16. After attending Hunter College for 2 years, Thomas enlisted

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Thomas Sass into the Air Force and served as a missile specialist with secret clearance, for 4 years. Upon discharge, Thomas married his childhood sweetheart in September 1960. They were blessed with 3 children: Andrea Rich, Arnita Connell & Brandon Sass. As a technician and then a degreed electronic engineer, Thomas worked for a variety of electronic firms including ITT, Viking Labs, Techtronix, Intel, Xerox, Pitney Bowes & Automated Toll Systems. These jobs provided travel and excitement for Thomas & Louise where they lived in New York City, Banham, England, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Fremont, California and Norwalk, Connecticut. Thomas took early retirement and became a substitute teacher for the Stamford Public Schools. He also taught at Mead School. Thomas got involved with the Boy Scouts fulfilling a lifetime dream to go to a Boy Scout Jamboree in Virginia. For more than

10 years, Thomas was a Commissioner with the Powahay Connecticut Yankee District. His primary goal was to encourage more minority boys to enjoy the scouting experience. He also coordinated the scouting information and recruitment days at the Norwalk YMCA. Thomas was predeceased by his parents Rev. John Sass & Carrie Sass, brother Charles Sass & sonin-law, Jeffery Connell. Survived by wife Louise P. Sass, daughters Andrea Rich, Arnita Connell & son Brandon Sass (Laurie); sisters Jeanette Boyd & Mildred Sass; grandchildren Aiden Connell, Bailey & Channel Rich, Kaitlyn & Brandon Sass Jr., nephew Rodney Boyd (Stephanie), countless other nieces, nephews, sisters & brothersin-law, cousins and many friends in Connecticut & California. A memorial service will be held on Saturday October 27, 2012 at 2 pm at the Downer Funeral Home, 31 Stillwater Ave., Stamford, Ct.

Obituary

Lisa Swift McKnight July 31, 1958 – October 20, 2012 Resident of Fremont Lisa Swift McKnight passed away peacefully on October 20, 2012 after a lengthy illness, at age 54. Lisa was born in Alameda, California to Phil and June Swift. She graduated from Washington High School in Fremont in 1976. Lisa was a Past Honored Queen and Grand Bethel Representative of Job’s Daughters, Bethel 253 in Fremont. Lisa will be forever missed by her devoted husband, Michael, her parents, Phil and June Swift, her sister, Stephanie (Jim) Curran, her 3 sons, Jacob (Shaney), Joshua and Justin Stivers. She especially adored her 2 grandchildren, Brody and Calvin Stivers. Lisa will also be missed by several aunts, uncles and numerous cousins. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, November 24, 2012 at 1pm at the First Presbyterian Church of Newark, 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark,

Obituary

In Loving Memory Thelma Daniel Thelma Rachel Mary Daniel, age 82, of Fremont, died September 28, 2012, after a long illness, with family and friends at her side. A devoted mother, Thelma is survived by her beloved sister Dawn Crist; her children: Glenn (spouse Chris), Kim (spouse Danni) and Marc; Step-daughters Marlene Cruickshank, Barbara (spouse Gene) Thompson, Susan (spouse Terry) Kelly and Thelma’s grandchildren: Andy, Caressa, Christy, Danielle (spouse Bill), Elizabeth, Heather (spouse Spencer), Katherine, Katrina (spouse Colata), Kevin, Lisa, Marcy, Roy and Scott (spouse Geneva); and many great-grand children. She was born March 10, 1930, in Bury St. Edmunds, England, to Oliver and Ethel Musk. She came to America as a young woman with her parents, where she eventually met her husband, Roy Daniel. Although he died in 1982, they shared the love of the card game of Bridge with many wonderful times and adventures together. In 1985, Thelma (at the young age of 55) went to work for a company that eventually became becomes All Property Management, she began working as a secretary for Gena Barks and quickly became very good friends with both Gena, and her daughter Janice “Jan” Atack. In 2010, she finally had to retire at age 80!. She had an infectious sense of humor and laugh who always embraced her English heritage. She was well known for her greeting to all her family and friends with “HI LOVE”, and she meant it. She was a member of the British American Club for many years. In 1984, she returned to England for the first time in many years, where she reestablished a friendship with her childhood sweat heart, Vic Bevan, also of Bury St. Edmunds. She had a deep faith in God, with strong support of her church, and was currently a member of New Hope Community Church where she had many friends. She will be missed by all, especially by her family, church family, and many friends.


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Across 4 Bamer REC can find you the best deal on _______. (5) 6_______ and collectibles at The Crystal Aerie (5) 7 Families of all _______ are invited to Fremont Christian School's Open House (6) 11 Take advantage of the back-to-school _______ at Tutoring Club (9) 13 Make this _______ special at Antique Treasures (7) 15 Unitek College is a _______ focused school (7) 18 Take a _______ dancing Newark Adult Education class (5) 19 Stephen F. Von Till & Assoc. have _______ years experience (5) 20 Harry Sherdil is a Senior _______ Advisor (9) 24 Go on a _______ day trip for Viola Blythe Center (6) 26 _______ healthier. Start with a great doctor. (4) 27 Check out the Dia de los Muertos _______ held by Hayward Area History (8) 28 EZ Auto Removal will pay $225 for any _______ car or truck (4) 29 American High School needs _______ for its Holiday Boutique (7) Down 1_______ into savings at American Cancer Society Discovery Shop (4) 2Neovision Eye Center treats skin _______ (10) 3Sousa's has the largest selection of Portuguese and

Read our Ads for the answers _______ foods (9) 5 Attend a _______ pm Alzheimer's at Alma Via of Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the Union City (7) completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a 8 Palo Alto Medical is offering Community _______ chance to win valuable prizes each month. All entries will be eligible Education Programs (6) for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize! 9 Professionally _______ oriental rugs at Furniture Rug Depot (5) MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN 10 Try the alternative to scalpel and suture _______ A SEALED ENVELOPE TO: surgery at Paseo Dental (3) TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 12 Discuss Props 30 and 38 at the Ohlone College 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 _______ Discussion (10) 13 There will be a _______ flea market at Tropics Deadline for entry is the 10th of the following month. Mobile Home Park (4) 14 Get handmade _______ at the 4th Annual HoliOnly paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per houseday Craft Boutique (6) hold.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper. 16 Check out the 1 Year Anniversary _______ at Noble Dental Care (7) 17 Get a _______ treatment at Utopia Salon (7) 21 Call 'Yogi' for a free _______ (8) 22 Check out the weekend _______ specials at BKK October 30 Puzzle Thai Cuisine (5) Name: 23 Dr. Abdollah S. Nejad, D.C. is a chiropractor with a _______. (7) 25 There are new ______ at Fremont Massage and Wellness (6) Phone: 26 With Allstate life insurance, _______ wins. (4)

PG&E Fremont employees donate company award SUBMITTED BY TAMAR SARKISSIAN Pacific Gas and Electric Company employees in Fremont have chosen the Regional Center of the East Bay to receive a $5,000 grant. This is a reward given to these employees from the utility for outstanding workplace safety performance. The 29-person Gas and Electric Metering Services group has accumulated 990 consecutive days without a lost workday case and have formed a Safety Action Team led by union employees. Team manager, Tom Gomez, who has been with PG&E for 41 years, speaks with firsthand knowledge about the evolution of safety culture in Tom Gomez received recognition on behalf of his Fremont his group. “We were team pivotal to introducing safety practices that were revolutionary when we brought them out in the 1980s,” he said, including industrial ergonomics and the Stretch and Flex program. The team chose to donate its prize money to the Regional Center of the East Bay, which helps individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism. “One of our employees’ relatives recently used this nonprofit,” Gomez said. “They were able to quickly receive an assessment and begin therapy sessions. Early diagnosis and intervention can have positive impacts on the child.” Each year, PG&E selects employees to receive the Shermer L. Sibley Safety and Health Award for their outstanding contributions to public and employee safety. Part of the award is a $5,000 grant for the nonprofit of the honored employees’ choice.

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Pereida appointed Memory Care Director at Emeritus at Atherton Court SUBMITTED BY SCOTT MCCASKEY Marissa Pereida has been appointed memory care director at Emeritus at Atherton Court. She will oversee daily programs and activities provided to residents with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other memory-impairing diseases through the Emeritus Join Their Journey program. Prior to

her new position, Pereida was the recreation services director for Golden Living Centers in Santa Rosa and Petaluma. She is a resident of Stockton. Emeritus at Atherton Court is located at 38035 Martha Avenue, Fremont operated by Emeritus Senior Living. For more information, visit: www.Emeritus.com.

Mariah Young returns to CSUEB as Distinguished Writer BY DIANE DANIEL Fiction writer Mariah Young will read from her debut collection, “Masha’alla and Other Stories,” when she returns to her alma mater, Cal State East Bay, Monday, November 5 as the first of this year's Distinguished Writers Series, presented by the English Department. The 7 p.m. reading will be in the Biella Room of the University Library, on the university's Hayward Campus. Admission will be free, and the public is invited. A book signing will follow. A native of San Leandro, who grew up in the Bay Area and Lahaina, HI, Young earned her bachelor's degree in English, with a creative writing emphasis, and a minor in political science in 2006 from CSUEB. She currently teaches writing and literature at Mount St. Mary's College and Southwest College, both in Los Angeles. “I'm very much looking forward to coming back to campus, and eager to spread the word about the fantastic English faculty, which pushed me as an academic, and helped me cultivate my writing voice,” Young said. "What a thrill to host, as the first writer in this year's series, our own alumna, Mariah K. Young, whose debut collection of

short stories has been honored by Heyday with its first annual James D. Houston award," said Susan Gubernat, CSUEB professor of English and the Distinguished Writer's series program director for this year. "Mariah has put our creative writing program on the map yet again; her writing is urgent and lyrical, and altogether compelling. Anyone interested in the East Bay as a landscape for storytelling will find our region's new Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor in Mariah Young." "Masha'allah and Other Stories," all based in Oakland, is being released November 1. The James D. Houston award for western literature, which Young has won, is named for the author

of nine novels, who taught at several universities, including Stanford, the University of California, Santa Cruz; the University of Hawaii; and his alma mater, San Jose State University. Young’s CSUEB undergraduate work, “Witness,” took first place in the R.V. Williams contest and was published in volume 22 of Occam’s Razor, published by annually by the CSUEB English Department. She also received an honorable mention for poetry in 2004. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodation upon request. Please notify the event sponsor in advance at (510) 8853151 if accommodation is needed. Campus parking is $2 per hour – payable at kiosk machines in several parking lots on the campus. Mariah Young Reading Monday, Nov 5 7 p.m. Fiction writer Mariah Young reads from “Masha’alla and Other Stories,” Biella Room, University Library Cal State East Bay 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3151 Free admission; $2 parking


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WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election supplies in North Dakota and natural gas in states such as Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and West Virginia. Critics, though, worry that hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling could harm air, water and health. Environment: If Obama wins re-election, he could get a second wind on environmental regulations that were delayed in his first term. A Romney presidency is likely to roll back what Republicans consider excessive and expensive rules. Obama achieved historic increases in fuel-economy standards and imposed the first regulations on heattrapping gases blamed for global warming. His administration tightened standards on mercury pollution from power plants and set new controls on soot. But he couldn't persuade a Democratic Congress to pass limits he promised on carbon emissions and shelved a plan to toughen health standards on lung-damaging smog. Romney questions the cause of climate change and he's criticized Obama's treatment of coal-fired power plants. He opposes treating carbon dioxide as a pollutant and wants the cost of complying with regulations given more consideration. European economic crisis: Europe is struggling to control a debt crisis, save the euro currency and stop a repeat of the 2008 financial crisis that sent the world into recession. Europe's troubles are the No. 1 threat to the U.S. economy. The biggest fear is that the 17-country eurozone will split, causing a financial crisis that will spread across the Atlantic, freeze credit and send the U.S. economy back into recession. Neither Obama nor Romney has offered plans for Europe. The U.S. government lacks the cash and the will to rescue European countries struggling with huge government debts. Obama has urged Europe to act more decisively. Romney warns that the United States will face its own day of reckoning if it can't reduce the federal debt. Many economists call for eurozone countries to assume joint responsibility for the weakest countries' debts through eurobonds; Germany has balked at the idea. Gay marriage: Both sides of the gay marriage debate agree on this much: The issue defines what sort of nation America will be. Half a dozen states and the District of Columbia have made history by legalizing it, but it's prohibited elsewhere and 30 states have placed bans in their constitutions. Obama supports legal recognition of same-sex marriage, as a matter decided by states. Romney says samesex marriage should be banned with a constitutional amendment. The debate divides the public down the middle, according to recent polls, and stirs up passion on both sides. In November, four states have gay-marriage measures on their ballots. In Minnesota, the vote is whether to ban gay marriage in the state constitution. Voters in Maine, Maryland and Washington state are voting on whether to legalize gay marriage. Thus far, foes of gay marriage have prevailed in all 32 states where the issue reached the ballot. Guns: Gun violence has been splayed across front pages with alarming frequency lately: the movie theater killings in Colorado, the Sikh temple shootings in Wisconsin, the gunfire outside the Empire State Building

and more. Guns are used in twothirds of homicides, according to the FBI. But the murder rate is less than half what it was two decades ago. Neither Obama nor Romney has had much to say about guns during the campaign. Obama hasn't pushed gun control measures as president; Romney says new gun laws aren't needed. It's getting harder to argue that stricter gun laws are needed when violent crime has fallen by 65 percent since 1993. But the next president may well fill at least one Supreme Court seat, and the court is narrowly divided on gun control. An Obama appointee could be expected to be friendlier to gun controls than would a Romney nominee. Health care: America's health care system is unsustainable. It's not one problem, but three: cost, quality and coverage. The U.S. has world-class hospitals and doctors. But it spends far more than other advanced countries and people aren't much healthier. And in an aging society, there's no reliable system for long-term care. Obama's expansion of coverage for the uninsured hits high gear in 2014. Obama keeps today's Medicare while trying to slow costs. He also extends Medicaid. Romney would repeal Obama's health care law but hasn't spelled out what he'd do instead. On Medicare, he favors the option of a government payment to help future retirees get private coverage. The risk of expanding coverage: Health costs consume a growing share of the stressed economy. The risk of not: Millions continue uninsured or saddled with heavy coverage costs as the population grows older. Immigration: An estimated 11.5 million illegal immigrants are living and often working in the United States. Figuring out what to do with them has confounded Washington for years. Lax enforcement could mean more illegal immigrants competing with citizens and legal immigrants for jobs and some social services. A tootight policy could mean farmers and others in industries that rely on the cheaper labor of illegal immigrants are left begging for workers, passing higher costs on to everyone else or going out of business. Obama backed the DREAM Act, a failed bill that would have provided a path to legal status for many young illegal immigrants. In June, Obama decided to allow as many as 1.7 million of them to stay for up to two years. Romney has said he would veto the DREAM Act, though during the second presidential debate he said he supports a path to legal status for young illegal immigrants. He would honor any work permits issued under Obama's plan to delay deportations for many young illegal immigrants but wouldn't accept new applications for the programs. Income inequality: The income gap between the rich and everyone else is getting larger, while middle incomes stagnate. That's raised concerns that the middle class isn't sharing in economic growth as it used to. Obama would raise taxes on households earning more than $250,000 a year, plus set a minimum tax rate of 30 percent for those earning $1 million or more. He also wants to spend more on education, “a gateway to the middle class.” Romney would cut taxes more broadly and says that will generate enough growth to raise all incomes. Income inequality has risen for three decades and worsened since the recession ended. The Census Bureau

SUBMITTED BY SCOTT PETERSON Small business owners may feel all alone with no one to keep them from making the critical mistake that could lead to failure or from missing the golden opportunity that could sustain their success. But East Bay entrepreneurs and businesses that attend the fourth and final 2012 Small Business Symposium at the Crowne Plaza in Union City on November 8th definitely won’t be alone as they will have an op-

found the highest-earning 20 percent earned 51.1 percent of all income last year. That was the biggest share on records dating to 1967. The share earned by households in the middle 20 percent fell to 14.3 percent, a record low. Infrastructure: Much of America's infrastructure – the interstate highway system, mass transit networks and more – is wellover half a century old and in need of serious repair and modernization. System breakdowns and bottlenecks are slowing commerce, at a cost to the economy and America's global competitiveness. The World Economic Forum put the U.S. 24th last year in the quality of its infrastructure, down from fifth in 2002. The dilemma facing any president is how to maintain critical public works when budgets are crippled. Both candidates say infrastructure is important. The divide is over how to pay for it, and which projects. Obama has favored stimulus-style spending and pushed for innovations like high-speed rail. Romney favors less federal involvement. He also shuns the idea that public-works spending is a good way to jumpstart the economy, saying decisions on projects should be based on need and potential returns. Iran: With the Iraq war over and Afghanistan winding down, Iran is the most likely place for a new U.S. military conflict. Obama says he'll prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. He hopes sanctions alongside negotiations can get Iran to halt uranium enrichment. But the strategy hasn't worked yet. Obama holds out the threat of military action as a last resort. Romney accuses Obama of being weak on Iran. He says the U.S. needs to present a greater military threat. Attacking Iran is no light matter, however. That is why neither candidate clearly calls for military action. Tehran can disrupt global fuel supplies, hit U.S. allies in the Gulf or support proxies such as Hezbollah in acts of terrorism. It could also draw the U.S. into an unwanted new war in the Muslim world. Israel: As concern intensifies over Iran's nuclear program and the rise of Islamist governments in the Middle East, America's top ally in the region, Israel, has become increasingly wary. Israel's security has been a U.S. foreign policy priority of both Democratic and Republican administrations since the Jewish state was created in 1948. Although small, Israel has significant influence in Washington and presidents of both parties have pledged their commitment to its defense. And it's always a potential flashpoint in a region that the U.S. depends on for oil. Obama has continued the strong support for Israel. Both American and Israeli officials say security cooperation is as strong as it has ever been. But the Obama administration has become embroiled in several very public spats with Benjamin Netanyahu's government. Romney sharply criticizes Obama's policy on Israel. He's friendly with Netanyahu, visited Israel in July and vows unreserved U.S. support. Labor: Unions have long been viewed as a way for workers to gain job protections, boost wages and benefits and live a middle-class life. But organized labor has been in a tailspin for decades, losing millions of members and the influence it once wielded in the workplace.

portunity to connect with forty plus resources – from free non-profit and government services to the expert advice of business professionals. With the goal of enhancing the entrepreneurial opportunities within the region by connecting small businesses and resources, the East Bay Economic Development Alliance (East Bay EDA) and its partners launched the East Bay Small Business Initiative in May targeting small local businesses from startup to mature companies. The free symposiums connect business owners at various stages of maturity (startup, young, growth and mature) with experts in starting, growing and sustaining small businesses and specific, relevant resources, including financing, business planning, marketing, human resources and legal support, via one of four concurrent, ninety-minute breakout panels that answer questions from the audience.

About 14.8 million Americans are members of labor unions. That's just 11.8 percent of the workforce – down from about a third of all workers in the 1950s. The numbers have dropped as domestic manufacturing jobs go overseas and businesses take a tougher approach against union organizers. Union leaders want Washington's help in making it easier to organize members and promote the use of union labor. They've had some success under Obama. But Romney says as president, he would reverse all of Obama's unionfriendly executive orders. And he'd seek national right-to-work legislation prohibiting unions from collecting dues from nonmembers. Missile defense: Missile technology is proliferating. It remains unclear how quickly foes like Iran and North Korea could develop a capability to reach the United States with missiles, but the U.S. says Iran is already able to hit allies in Europe. The United States is spending nearly $10 billion a year on missile defense when military budgets are stretched. But the programs have yet to prove that they can reliably knock long-range missiles out of the sky. The U.S. is deploying missile interceptors not only on home soil, but in Europe and Asia, drawing complaints from Russia and China. Moscow has said it will resist plans backed by both Obama and Romney. Romney has said he will not compromise with Russia on U.S. missile defense capabilities. And he opposes a missile-defense spending cut favored by Obama. Social Security: Unless Congress acts, the trust funds that support Social Security are on pace to run out of money in 2033, triggering an automatic 25 percent cut in benefits that millions of older Americans rely on for most of their income. That may seem far off. But the sooner Congress acts, the more time to phase in changes slowly. Social Security could be preserved for generations with modest but politically difficult changes to benefits or taxes, or some of both. Obama hasn't laid out a detailed plan for addressing Social Security. Romney proposes a gradual increase in the retirement age and, for future beneficiaries, slower growth in benefits for the wealthy. But nothing will happen without White House leadership. For millions of retired and disabled workers, Social Security is almost all they have to live on. Monthly retirement benefits are $1,237; average disability benefits, $1,111. Supreme Court appointments: With four justices in their 70s, odds are good that whoever wins in November will fill at least one Supreme Court seat. The next justice could dramatically alter the direction of a court split between conservatives and liberals. One new face could mean a sea change in how millions get health care, shape gay rights and much more. Obama already has put his stamp on the court by selecting liberal-leaning Justices Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, 50-somethings who could serve a quarter-century or more. Romney has promised to name justices in the mold of the court's conservatives. Since the New Deal, Supreme Court decisions have made huge differences in American lives, from rulings to uphold Social Security, minimum wage laws and other Depression-era reforms to ringing endorsements of equal rights. Big decisions on health care, gun rights

Breakouts are followed by a networking session that provides participants opportunities to speak directly to the resources/business professionals and other businesses. Please see our web site to register as a participant, resource partner or a sponsor: www.ebsmallbusiness.com. “What we know is that more than half of all East Bay small businesses need some kind of advice or specialized service just to survive. We want to help them thrive and grow,” said Jim Foley, Wells Fargo Bank’s Greater Bay President and leader of the effort. “By bringing them together with resources that are typically needed for each business lifecycle, we will have something to offer all businesses and can assist as many as possible.” The Small Business Symposium is endorsed by Alameda County Supervisors in the two southern districts. “I’m so pleased

and abortion have turned on 5-4 votes. Syria: Syria's conflict is the most violent to emerge from last year's Arab Spring. The fighting has escalated into a civil war that has killed more than 33,000 people in the last 20 months, according to activists. Obama wants Syrian President Bashar Assad to leave power. But he won't use U.S. military force to make that happen. Romney says ``more assertive'' U.S. tactics are needed, without fully spelling them out. The future of Arab democracy could hinge on the crisis. After dictatorships fell in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen, critics say Assad's government has resorted to torture and mass killings to stay in power. Assad's success would deny the U.S. a major strategic victory. He long has helped Iran aid Hamas and Hezbollah, destabilizing Lebanon while threatening Israel's security and U.S. interests in the Middle East. But extremists among the opposition, Assad's weapons of mass destruction and worries about Israel's border security have policymakers wary about deeper involvement. Taxes: Almost every U.S. taxpayer faces a significant tax increase next year, unless Congress and the White House agree on a plan to extend a huge collection of tax cuts expiring at the end of the year. And there's a huge debate over how to overhaul the tax code to make it simpler, with lower rates balanced by fewer deductions. Obama wants to extend Bush-era tax cuts again, but only for individuals making less than $200,000 and married couples making less than $250,000. Romney wants to extend all those tax cuts and enact new ones, dropping all income tax rates by 20 percent. Romney says he would pay for that by eliminating or reducing tax credits, deductions and exemptions. But he won't say which ones would go. Most lawmakers want a simpler tax code, but millions count on the mortgage interest deduction, child tax credit and more, making progress all but impossible. Wall Street regulation: The debate over banking rules is, at its core, a dispute about how to prevent another economic cataclysm. The financial crisis that peaked in 2008 touched off a global economic slowdown. Four years later, the recovery remains painfully slow. After the crisis, Congress passed a sprawling overhaul of banking rules and oversight. The law gives regulators new tools to shutter banks without resorting to emergency bailouts. It restricts risky lending and establishes a new agency to protect consumers from misleading marketing and other traps. The new rules also boost companies' costs, according to Romney and many in the business community. Romney believes the law is prolonging the nation's economic agony by making it harder for companies to invest and grow. He has pledged to repeal it. Obama fought for and supports the law. Associated Press writers Nancy Benac, David Crary, Tom Raum, Seth Borenstein, Robert Burns, Jack Gillum, Paul Wiseman, Carole Feldman, Mark Sherman, Matthew Pennington, Bradley Klapper, Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Daniel Wagner, Stephen Ohlemacher, Alicia A. Caldwell, Christopher S. Rugaber, Jason Keyser, Sam Hananel, Desmond Butler, Richard Lardner, Tom Krisher, Jesse Washington, Matthew Daly and Matthew Lee contributed to this report.

that this effort is providing an opportunity this year for Southern Alameda County businesses to attend and I strongly encourage area business owners and chambers of commerce to participate” said Richard Valle, an Alameda County Supervisor. Businesses in Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty’s District are also invited to participate, and both Supervisors will be participating in the event. “The Building on Our Assets report produced by the East Bay EDA in 2011 found that nearly 70% of jobs in the East Bay are created by businesses employing less than 100 people,” said Supervisor Haggerty. “Therefore, our small businesses need and deserve everything the leadership of this County and the East Bay can do to support them.” To register, learn more about the event and connect with additional resources, check our website www.ebsmallbusiness.com.


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Boschert, aka “Mr. Science,” who will be spending two full days with all classes to excite students about electricity and magnetism. Boschert’s display includes inventions and projects he has personally constructed. “I have been doing this for 15 years or so and I don’t know how I got started but I really enjoy making these things,” he says. “The school hosts a number of assemblies throughout the year, primarily related to science,” explains Mattos parent and PTA Assembly co-chair, Jody Cutaia. “This hands-on assembly is so unique and

Bob Boschert is such an amazing person.” Boschert does not charge a fee for his program. “The hands-on experience is very difficult for the teachers to provide and it just may get some kids turned on to science,” adds Boschert. A retired electrical engineer, he started his own company, Boschert Inc., in 1970. A few years later, he developed 3-lb power supplies to replace the 20-lb version, used to convert wall power, to help run computers. By 1979, his company had grown to 650 employees. Shortly thereafter, he sold it and stepped away to become a full-time

stay-at-home dad for his five children. When his children had grown, Boschert decided to share his wealth of experience to the delight of a multitude of school children over the years. Hopefully, even the youngest students will be able to understand the concepts of electricity and magnetism through hands-on play. Utilizing fascinating and delightful teaching tools, Boschert teaches to a rapt audience of young minds at Mattos during the afternoon assembly. He points out some historically significant items such as an oscilloscope - a device used to observe wave lengths of electrical signals and a Theremin, an early musical instrument invented in the 1920’s. The machine produces strange eerie sounds, evoking peals of laughter from the listening students. Boschert carefully oversees a static electricity globe generator that he created which carries a charge of 50,000 volts. With supervision, gleeful volunteers come up to touch the globe. The current makes their hair stand on end; it’s an electric atmosphere, after all! At the “magic” paper clip station, students learn about the properties of magnets. “What’s the biggest magnet?” asks Boschert. After several helping clues, the students realize that it’s the Earth. He then draws a parallel to the magnets, making a comparison to the North and South Pole. “Every magnet has two poles so that when the north end of one, for example, is put near the north end of another magnet it

would repel while opposite poles (a north and south) would be drawn (attracted) together,” Boschert explains. In another activity, he demonstrates a lightning-producing coil, then shows that electricity can be generated by a magnet passing through a coil of wire and discusses electrical functions of plus and minus. The highlight for many of the students is the “robot” which seems to follow their movements. Boschert explains, “The lights are his eyes and there’s a light sensor (infrared light) in the nose. It sees reflections and turns as it detects movement.” Afterward, students are let loose to do their own hands-on practice with the scientific activities and equipment, ably assisted by parent volunteers, their teacher and Boschert. Looking around at the animated faces of young students, all having fun while learning, Boschert says, “This younger group experiments and figures it out. They pretty well get it. Some of the older grade level classes also have their ‘ah ha’ moments.” Boschert says that he is constantly updating experiments. He thinks up new ideas and is usually able to recreate them and get them working in a month’s time. “I enjoy sharing the information and seeing the kids’ reactions. You can’t be grumpy listening to all the excited voices. Possibly most importantly, I get to live longer,” Boschert adds. “If you are retired and don’t do something, you die. This [assembly] is beneficial for me and the kids.”

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS The Fremont Art Association is pleased to present its fourth showcase of the year featuring whimsical watercolor paintings of Barbara Cronin and Jaci Daskarolis, members of The Fremont Art Association's Tuesday Painters group. The show will run from November 7 through November 25 at The Fremont Art Centre/Gallery. A variety of new works from additional member artists will complement the gallery’s fourth quarter offerings. Barbara Cronin will present delightful paintings of life scenes with an emphasis on color and texture. The artist studied ceramics and photography at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia College of Art. She also took watercolor classes at Ohlone College in Fre-

SUBMITTED BY AHNEE MIN PHOTO BY LILY DONG PHOTOGRAPHY The Asian American Cancer Support Network (AACSN) is proud to host its fundraising gala, HATWALK 2012, on Saturday, November 10, 2012. The event celebrates the value of “HATS” and the comfort they bring to cancer patients. This year, AACSN will encourage more members of the Asian American community to register as donors. Bone marrow donors help save lives. Many fatal blood cancers are treated with bone marrow transplants, if a patient’s and donor’s bone marrow match. Asian patients need Asian donors. Half-Asian patients need halfAsian donors. The likelihood of a match is very low which is why the more people register as donors, the greater the chances of a life being saved. AACSN would like to honor and support the Asian American Donor Program’s (AADP) efforts to save lives by adding names to the National donor registry. For every person swabbed at the HATWALK gala, AACSN will donate $5 to the AADP. Please join us at HATWALK 2012, meet the wonderful hearts behind the AADP and learn how you can help save a life. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. with cocktail hour and a silent auction. Dinner will start at 6:00 p.m. with a full program at 7:00 p.m. to include live entertainment by pianist Hilda Huang. Huang is the winner of the 7th International J.S. Bach Competition in Würzburg, Germany, and is a regular performer at Carnegie Hall.

Guest speaker Vivian Mabuni is a mother, author and cancer survivor and will share her inspirational journey. There is an exciting raffle drawing, culminating with AACSN’s unique fashion show of HATS modeled by volunteers, cancer survivors and those battling cancer. Featured fashion designers include Boditecture, Vie Désir By Ennie, Erica Varize and Black Cat Hats. Mention “HATWALK” to Black Cat Hats in Los Gatos and 10 percent of your hat purchase will be donated to AACSN. HATWALK 2012 will be held at the Fairmont San Jose, 170 South Market Street, San Jose. Tickets are $125 each or VIP $175. All proceeds from HATWALK 2012 and all donations made to AACSN will be used for cancer support activities including support workshops, health fairs, supporting our Dragon Boat cancer survivor team, healthcare lectures, Cancer Buddy System, multi-lingual outreach to a variety of Asian communities, mammography screening for the under-served

and care baskets for those affected by cancer. Funds will also be donated to other local cancer support groups. Additionally, everyone can support ACCN’s efforts by purchasing a HATWALK calendar for 2013, featuring stunning images by Lily Dong Photography. This event is sponsored by BMC Software, Dolby Sounds, Adelante Capital Management, Merritts Consulting and KTSF Channel 26. The catwalk will showcase millinery, make-up, coiffure and couture by Boditecture, Vie Désir By Ennie, Falosophie, Charleston Pierce, Michael Ghaly, MD from WARD76, Erica Varize and Stella & Dot. For more information, visit www.aacsn.org, or call (650) 968 8488. Tickets can also be purchased at http://hatwalk2012.eventbrite.com HATWALK 2012 Saturday, Nov 10 5 p.m. Fairmont San Jose 170 South Market Street, San Jose (650) 968 8488 www.aacsn.org

mont, received training in mechanical drafting from the College of DuPage, and was a technical illustrator for an engineering firm's litigation cases. She has worked for the Monart School here in Fremont and became a certified Monart instructor. Later, she taught drawing in the Monart style in the Fremont public schools. Cronin currently teaches autistic students at COIL, a charter school in Fremont. Jaci Daskarolis, an award-winning artist, will present a series of charming whimsical portraits of animals, some with attitude. A resident of Fremont for over 30 years and a retired educator, Daskarolis began painting 12 years ago after suffering a stroke, to exercise her brain. She started in watercolor, progressed to acrylic, collage, jewelry, and oil. The artist began painting a series of whimsical animal paintings a few years ago after hearing joyous comments from her fellow artists when she painted a humorous donkey at The FAA's Tuesday Painters group. Daskarolis finds joy in seeing others enjoying her art. A reception honoring the artists will be held on Sunday, November 18 from 1:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. at The FAA Centre. Showcase IV Wednesday, Nov 7 - Nov 25 Wednesday-Sunday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Reception: Sunday, November 18 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org Free Admission


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