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Shrouded Tales: Hayward’s eerie past Page 29

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The newspaper for the new millennium

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September 25, 2012

www.tricityvoice.com

Vol. 11 No. 65

BY MAURICIO SEGURA

W

hat began over 20 years ago as a backyard neighborhood attraction in Fremont has now become a phenomenon of fright recognized nationwide as one of the best of the best. Housed at the Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton, patrons can expect blood curdling terror around every corner. Pirates of Emerson… not just your ordinary haunted house, but a haunted theme park encompassing acres of pure terror. Eight haunted walk-through attractions beginning with the original Pirates of Emerson, Mental Maze, Dark Realm, Fractured Fairytales, Scareaton, Arachno, Corn Walk, and the Bumkin Patch will have even the bravest souls shivering from head to toe. If that's not enough to fulfill one's lust for horror, attend the Carnevil, The Bone Ball, or have lives and dreams shattered by the Misfortune Teller. continued on page 15

SUBMITTED BY HERS BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION PHOTOS BY BRANDON KUANG

Pat Danielson and Linette Young prepare for Seniors’ Night Out ‘Under the Big Top’

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Friday night and for most, the options are endless. Concerts, plays, movies, comedy shows, restaurants galore - plenty of pieces to put together a pretty great night. But for some, one simple night out is the rarest of things, and the greatest of gifts. The Tri-City Elder Coalition (TCEC) is hosting its 19th annual Seniors’ Night Out with circus flair, giving all seniors in the community a chance to spend a night “Under the Big Top.” On Friday, October 5, over 300 people will gather at the Fremont Marriott Hotel to experience entertainment, food, and friendship.

The event was initially established to provide home-bound and frail seniors an opportunity for a night on the town, and has expanded into a fundraising event as well. Each year has a different festive theme with proceeds going to TCEC’s Pathways to Positive Aging projects and Personal Urgent Need Fund (PUN), helping seniors throughout the Tri-Cities with various medical and person needs. This is the only fundraising event for the PUN Fund. “There are so many seniors in our community who really don’t get out much,” says Seniors’ Night Out Chair Linette Young. People always ask her about the event and are eager to attend, saying they really look forward to it all

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation (HBCF), a professional accredited organization that supports all women with a focus on breast cancer, is promoting the KEEP ABREAST 5k Walk, 5k/10k Run and Community Expo September 29 at Quarry Lakes East Bay Regional Park in Fremont. This community fundraising event celebrates life, the life of people that have survived breast cancer, and honors those we have lost. KEEP ABREAST Walk/Run is HBCF’s biggest fundraising event of the year, which takes place every year on the last Saturday in September. The opening ceremony will consist of a musical performance by Margo LeDuc followed by continued on page 18

continued on page 23 Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 32

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 31

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 38

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INDEX


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Washington Women’s Center “Think Pink” Event Supports Women’s Health

T

oday, most women’s lives are busier and more stress-filled than ever. Their “to-do” list of work obligations and household chores, as well as family and other commitments, never ends. This includes looking after the well-being of spouses or partners, children, grandchildren, elderly relatives and friends. As a result, many women neglect their own health and well-being. There just doesn’t seem to be enough time. Women’s Health and Fitness Day is celebrated on September 26 to remind women about the importance of keeping themselves healthy and fit—not only for their own well-being, but because so many others depend on them. This event is our nation’s largest health promotional observance for women of all ages. “It’s interesting that women are so busy we need a national day to remind us to take care of ourselves,” observed Paulette Grilli, RN, health promotions manager at Washington Hospital. “On September 26, local, grass roots women’s organizations will join others across the nation to hold activities and workshops that raise women’s awareness about the importance of walking, exercise and health screenings. At Washington Hospital, we offer many of these types of events throughout the year.” The theme for this year’s Women’s Health and Fitness Day is staying in motion. Organizers want women to understand they can help themselves to stay healthy or improve their health simply by

increasing their level and frequency of regular movement and activity. “You need to ask yourself what kind of movement you like to engage in and that raises your level of joy,” added Grilli. “It could be hiking, walking, playing a sport, or playing with the kids. If you love to shop, then park further away from the mall and walk. The whole idea is to keep your mind and body in motion and in sync.” Women’s Center Offers Variety of Programs In addition to advanced diagnostic services, Washington Women’s Center offers a host of wellness, education and support activities for local women, ranging from yoga and tai chi classes and massage to noontime and evening seminars and lectures. “Studies show that movement, exercise, calming the mind, and attention to breathing can improve a woman’s mental and physical health,” said Laura Constantine, RN, the Center’s clinical coordinator. “We hold many of these types of events to meet the needs of women in our community, and we are always open to learning about and planning others.” Think Pink! On Tuesday, October 16 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., the Washington Women’s Center will hold its annual, free breast health awareness “Think Pink” event. Located in the tent atrium adjacent to the Washington West building at 2500 Mowry Ave. in Fremont, the activity will include interactive health booths and informative

Think Pink! On Tuesday, October 16 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., the Washington Women’s Center will hold its fourth annual “Think Pink” event. Located in the tent atrium adjacent to the Washington West building at 2500 Mowry Ave. in Fremont, this free event will include interactive health booths and informative mini-lectures on breast health awareness. Register online at whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

mini-lectures on related topics, such as the importance of movement. Besides enabling women to keep up with their busy schedules, staying active and in motion is a great preventative strategy. “It’s like taking care of your car,” explained Constantine. “As much as possible, we need to keep our bodies in tune to help avoid problems.” Washington Hospital supports prevention through its Ladies’ Choice program of individualized exercise in a comfortable, friendly environment. Washington Women’s Center offers traditional yoga classes, along with specialized yoga for the neck and back to help women who spend long hours in front of a computer monitor. A falls prevention and balance class is also planned. The Center works with registered dietitians who teach a 12-week “The Right Way” nutrition program for women, as well as other classes on planning and cooking healthful meals. Upcoming offerings include healthy holiday appetizers and healing winter soups. Another important preventive concept for women is to take time out for themselves on a regular basis.

Keeping your blood glucose under control can help to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. Lorie Roffelsen, a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital, will present “Top Foods for Heart Health,” on Thursday, October 4, from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. auditorium at Washington West.The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series.

She will present “Top Foods for Heart Health,” on Thursday, October 4, from 7 to 8 p.m. It will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont. The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use it properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy. When this process doesn’t work properly, glucose (sugar) levels in the blood can get too high, which damages the blood vessels. continued on page 11

Learn more, register for classes To register for classes or events, or to learn more about the Washington Women’s Center, call (510) 608-1301, or visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Free Seminar Addresses Latest in Diagnosis, Management and Life After Stroke

Washington Hospital Seminar Offers Tips for Eating a Heart Healthy Diet People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In fact, 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. “We really try to drive that point home for people with diabetes,” said Lorie Roffelsen, a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital. “Keeping your blood glucose under control can help to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke as well as eating a heart healthy diet.”

“Whatever feeds your soul and brings you happiness—that’s what you need to do,” recommends Constantine. “It doesn’t have to take a long time, but you should set aside at least 20 minutes a day to do something that gives you pleasure. It could be taking a walk outside, or reading a book or meditating.” This coming winter, to help women take time for themselves, the Women’s Center is planning to start a book club and a walking program. “Women are such doers, but many of us don’t know how to get off the merrygo-round,” commented Constantine. “At the Women’s Center, we want to help women care for themselves and others from a wholeness state, rather than a frantic state of mind. It’s all about supporting women their journey.”

Given that stroke is one of the most disabling diseases, it’s easy to assume, especially without all the facts, that it is also unavoidable. For instance, maybe you had a grandparent or other relative who suffered a stroke and passed away after. And now, all you remember is that someone told you, “Strokes are something that happen to older people.” What Is the Future of Stroke Care? “Ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, doesn’t impact only the elderly population,” says Dr. Ash Jain, M.D., medical director of Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program. “Everyone in the community should know what stroke is and how to recognize it, but it’s also important to understand that prevention and treatment are possible.” Strokes can and do happen to younger people, which means that sometimes information we hear—in childhood and as we get older—can be misleading and potentially dangerous. After all, you might think: why bother learning about something that is unavoidable? “Stroke is both highly preventable and highly treatable, but not enough people in the community have all the facts. It is very important for people to be aware of the latest developments and what’s to come in stroke care,” says Dr. Jain. “Our program, as a certified Primary Stroke Center, is always striving to achieve the most efficient means of diagnosis and proven acute management techniques that lead to the best possible outcomes for our patients.” For community members, the first step is having the right information, particularly given that something you heard about as little as five years ago may no longer be accurate. Dr. Jain points out that widening treatment windows and impressive advancements allow for better outcomes, particularly at Primary Stroke Centers—programs certified by The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association (AHA)—like Washington Hospital’s.

“It’s important that community members attend this free educational series and help themselves, their family and friends,” Dr. Jain says. “We want people to know how important it is to learn about stroke prevention and management, because it is devastating if the right actions are not taken in a timely manner.” He adds that patients have better outcomes when they seek help as soon as possible after the onset of stroke symptoms. “Residents of Washington Township have a distinct advantage in that they have a certified Primary Stroke Center in their community. We have a streamlined process for the diagnosis of stroke, beginning from the very moment someone arrives in the ER or calls 9-1-1, and we continue to exceed national benchmarks for several important indicators, including patient and community education and treatment.” What Happens After Stroke? After a stroke—once the acute management has been performed and acute rehabilitation is completed—what happens? And what does “life after stroke” mean for the patient and the caregiver, who is most often a spouse? First, it’s important to understand that the aftermath of stroke is very different than a heart attack, for instance, according to Doug Van Houten, R.N., clinical coordinator of Washington’s Stroke Program. “Heart attacks can be crippling, but not to the extent that strokes are,” he explains. “You can have a pretty bad heart attack and still lead a fairly normal life. But even after a mild stroke, you may not be able go back to work, drive, or communicate well. Even though heart problems are the No. 1 killer in the United States, strokes remain the most disabling.” Van Houten says life after stroke can present enormous challenges, including: • Loss of independence • Loss of physical movement continued on page 5


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

A classic tale of horror and suspense detailing the ill-fated experiments of young Dr. Frankenstein as he attempts to fathom the secrets of life and death. Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont, presents Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, adapted by Victor Gialanella, directed by Paula Chenoweth, September 14 through October 13. Performance times are 8 pm on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees: September 23 and 30 matinee performances begin with a continental brunch (included in price of ticket) at 12:15 pm, and the show begins at 1 pm. The October 7 performance starts at 1 pm with refreshments during intermission (included in price of ticket). For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218, or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org.

September 25, 2012


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 3

• Cognitive decline • Inability to communicate well • Dysphagia (trouble swallowing) • Changes in the relationships with friends and family • Depression “Stroke doesn’t just affect you physically, but psychologically and socially as well,” he points out. “It can affect your partnership with your spouse. All of a sudden, you have a stroke—and now your spouse is a care provider. Having to change to a care receiving/care providing relationship is tough, and the roles can change a lot from traditional roles.” The big question, though, is how to move forward despite the challenges, according to Van Houten.

“There is a delicate relationship between trying hard to improve and accepting what you can’t change,” he points out. “You have to find the good in something. There may be things that you really can’t do anymore, so you have to find creative ways to enjoy life.” “If you loved hiking before your stroke but mobility issues prevent you from doing it, maybe you can go to Yosemite and stay in the lodge and enjoy being in the middle of the natural beauty. It’s about finding a way to still enjoy the things you used to do even if you can’t do them in exactly the same way.” Van Houten notes that creativity and a positive outlook can go a long ways, and it’s important to continue striving for improvements—big or small—as well as finding meaning and enjoyment from new or modified activities or pastimes. Get the Answers To learn more about what the future holds as far as diagnosis and acute management of stroke and how to cope with life after stroke, attend the free community education seminar on Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A and B, in the Washington West building at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

Community’s Stroke Program Goes International Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program—represented by Medical Director Ash Jain, M.D., and Clinical Coordinator Doug Van Houten, R.N.—has been invited to present at the 8th World Stroke Congress in Brazil. During the past six years, the Stroke Program has treated approximately 3,000 patients and has collected extensive data on topics including mortality rates, different stroke scales for outcome, and the effect of stroke education on the community. The Stroke Program submitted five scientific abstracts, and all five were accepted for presentation at the event. This year’s World Stroke Congress will take place Oct. 10—13. For more information, visit www.world-stroke.org.

Community input sought for BRT station designs SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE JOHNSON AC Transit is hosting a series of community meetings to elicit public comments and suggestions on the design of its Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) stations. With recent approvals from the AC Transit Board of Directors and the cities of Oakland and San Leandro, the BRT project has moved into the design phase with actual construction expected to begin in 2014. The system will run from downtown Oakland to San Leandro BART, offering service every five minutes at new boarding stations that will be spaced at four- to- five- block intervals. To meet neighborhood needs and ensure community compatibility, AC Transit is holding workshops to display proposed station designs and obtain opinions from local businesses and residents on what might work best. At the meetings, the public will learn about the “kit of parts” approach to tailoring stations to neighborhoods and communities and be informed about crosswalk treatments and other amenities. A second round of meetings on neighborhood designs will be held in November 2012.

Community input will ultimately impact the stations’ preliminary designs that will be released to the public in early 2013.

Wednesday September 26 6 - 7:30 p.m. Oakland Asian Cultural Center 388 9th Street, Ste. 290 Room 4, Oakland Thursday September 27 7 - 9:00 p.m. San Leandro Senior Community Center 13909 E 14th St., San Leandro Saturday September 29 11 a.m. -12:30 p.m. 81st Avenue Library Meeting Room 1021 81st Avenue, Oakland

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

Ohlone Humane Society

Who will want me? Remembering the homeless BY NANCY LYON “My name is Adalade, at least that is what they call me now, although I remember another name when I was younger. The kind people here at the shelter where I was brought have trimmed the painful mats from my once beautiful and soft white coat and put something in my sore ears that have made them feel so much better. “I recall a time when I very young and was thought wonderful - and I gave as much love as I could to the family I thought that would love me back forever. I’m not sure what went wrong… “I tried so hard to do what they asked of me but suddenly I found myself on a busy street, I have never been out of my backyard so I don’t know what the big monsters that whizzed by were but they terrified me. The people I loved and trusted so much put me out and I think they said someone would give me a good home just before they drove way. It was very, very scary. “Some nice person pulled me out of the way of the monsters and now I’m in a place called a shelter. There are lots of other dogs, and even cats, near me and I can tell many are as confused as I am. What did we do wrong? I hear the nice people talk in soft voices and they sound worried… something about not having enough room. I’m not sure what that means but it makes me frightened again. What will happen to me?”

There are so many ‘Adalades’ crowding shelters… wonderful, loving animals who only want a chance to find a true forever home with people that value them as family. Unfortunately, desperate emails from California shelter volunteers currently flash across the Internet sending out lists of available shelter animals to everyone and anyone who may be able to prevent the death of the lives in their care. Often in vain. As part of this rush to save lives, as a volunteer at the Fremont Animal Shelter, I know it’s unending and too often, no matter how many the outreach efforts, animals… amazingly adoptable animals of all descriptions, pure and mixed breeds, die with strangers instead of with a family that would be grieving at their departure at the end of a long life. In August, the International Society for Animal Rights (ISAR) held its 21st annual Homeless Animals Day. On this day people from around the world joined together to promote awareness of the plight of homeless companion animals and in observance of the over-population of animal companions and the role of spaying and neutering to end the suffering. ISAR Program Specialist Colleen Gedrich recently commented, “ISAR launched and commemorated National Homeless Animals' Day in 1992 to enlighten society, governmental officials, and the media to the tragedy of pet overpopulation and how it can be reduced:

mandatory spay/neuter”…“while nobody really knows the exact number of cats, dogs, kittens and puppies killed in shelters and on the streets each year, it is estimated that at least approximately 3-4 million healthy animals in shelters alone are destroyed annually. The overwhelming scourge of cat and dog overpopulation remains a crisis on a global scale. There are a number of reasons why so many dogs and cats roam the streets or end up in shelters, but the bottom-line is unspayed or unneutered animals adding thousands to an already swollen overpopulation epidemic. Their offspring will have litters and then their offspring will have more; and the cycle continues. The real problem lies with society - ignorance or disregard of the problem, lack of finances to spay or neuter, backyard and puppy/kitten mills breeders – and yes some “professional” breeders - turning a profit from breeding. Add to the mix poor judgment in getting an animal in the first place. Many people are new to having a companion animal and unaware that the responsibil-

ity and costs involved are similar to having a child. Because of this, animals often get little care, and like Adalade, are tossed into the backyard and forgotten or abandoned. With difficult economic times, some are opting to relinquish their “pets” to a shelter, perhaps because they have no other choice but the impact on shelter population and euthanasia numbers grow with each incoming animal. The solution – Remember Adalade and the others at risk;

accept responsibility and spay or neuter your animal companion; don’t contribute to the killing. If you can honestly commit to the lifelong care and expense of having an animal companion then adopt from a shelter or rescue – don’t buy! UPDATE: “Our” Adalade was just adopted but please remember all the “other” Adalades waiting in shelters. They are depending on you. For information on Spay/Neuter Assistance, contact OHS at 510-792-4587.

510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont Ca. 94538-1304

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the TriCity Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organizations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today.


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

History

F

ootball in the Tri-City area goes back over 100 years. The first sanctioned game was probably the one played at Irvington on December 16, 1893 between Washington Union High School

Football

ready for football.” The muddy condition of the grounds kept the scholars from enjoying themselves, but with football practice, “they could roll around to their hearts’ content.” The Centerville boys were

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defeated the 1895 team. This was bitter medicine for Washington High and created a goal to return the favor. Washington entered the Academic Athletic League in 1898 “chiefly to get a crack at Oakland” which they defeated

Centerville WUHS football champs 1912 CAC Athletic League

football team 1894 wash hi yearbook 1891-1916

WUHS Football AAl Cal Champions 1906

and Washington College at Irvington. Washington Union High School, which opened in the Masonic Hall in Centerville in January 1892, was the only high school in southern Alameda County. Its first full year of operation was in a new three-story building built on the Overacker Ranch on Centerville-Niles road (now Peralta Boulevard). Because of its location, it was usually called Centerville High. The faculty increased from one to seven, including the principal, who taught history, algebra and geometry in addition to his administrative duties. Students began playing tennis and participating in other activities, but the real excitement came when Irving White, a San Francisco boy, enrolled at Washington High and brought with him the modern form of football which he had learned in Minnesota. The football team was again organized in the fall of 1894 with a system of training under White. The boys apparently had some experience with Rugby, but none of them had ever played a game of American football; most had never even seen one. It was reported that after the first tackle in practice, Bart Thane, stopped and asked, “Gee, did I hurt you Irv?” The boys soon began to understand football rules and strategy and developed lots of enthusiasm for the game. The Bi-Weekly, the school newspaper that came out every other Tuesday morning, reported that the players were practicing hard and some were even “letting their hair grow so as to be

ready for a game so they sent a challenge to Washington College a few miles down the road at Irvington. Washington College of Science and Industry had been organized by local farmers and educators and opened in 1872 as a commercial academy. Apparently the students at Washington College also had an interest in football as they accepted the challenge of Washington High. The game was set for December 16 at the college campus, and the two Washingtons prepared to play football. We have no details about the Washington College team, but Washington High had no uniforms: no helmets, no cleats, no pads and probably no numbers. The team appeared on the field clad in overalls with a bulge here and a bulge there where some fond sister, or perhaps anxious mother, had sewed something in to serve as padding. A reminiscing reporter noted, “While the game was not remarkable for the skill or team work shown by either side, there was all the excitement of a contest and best of all, our High School won by a score of 8 to 0. Whipple and Searles each making a touchdown.” Washington High won several games against Bay Area schools and labeled, “The Big Team.” Team members Bart Thane and James Whipple later became famous playing in the game at the University of California commemorated by the football statue on campus. Oakland High School refused to play “the Big Team” but badly

10-0. Following a highly successful season, they fought Belmont to a scoreless tie for the state championship. Most players from the championship season graduated so Washington had to rebuild. W. D. Patterson became the coach and the team finally won the Academic Athletic League championship in 1906 but lost the Northern California championship to Woodland. Graduation again took most of the members of this team, and seasons passed without a championship until 1912 when school resumed its winning ways. The 1913 team was declared by many to be the best Washington ever had.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Attempted kidnap suspect arrested GENEVA BOSQUES On September 18, 2012 at approximately 10:08 p.m., a Fremont Police Officer was flagged down by two young adult men, ages 19 and 20 years old, on Civic Center Drive near Walnut Avenue. The two young men stated that a Hispanic adult male, later identified as Robert Abeyata (a 30 year old Sacramento resident), had been aggressively following them from a nearby shopping center and was attempting to kidnap them. The victims stated that they had run away, but the suspect had followed their friend behind the Archstone Apartments, also located on Civic Center Drive. While giving Officers a description of the suspect, they noticed the vehicle exiting the far south driveway of the apartment complex; Officers attempted to stop the truck, but it took off towards Walnut Avenue at a high rate of speed. It was unknown if the suspect had successfully captured the third victim, Officers engaged in a vehicle pursuit. The pursuit ended when Officers conducted a pit maneuver disabling the vehicle near the intersection of Decoto Road and 3rd Street in Union City. The suspect fled the vehicle on foot and Officers gave chase. A K-9 was deployed and the suspect was finally taken into custody after being bit, TASED and fighting with Officers. Two Officers were treated and released from a local hospital for non-critical injuries and the suspect was also treated and released from a local hospital for injuries sustained while fighting with Officers. While interviewing the suspect, Officers learned that he was looking for companionship with one or more of the victims. The suspect was booked at Santa Rita Jail and is facing current charges of attempt kidnapping, assault with a deadly weapon, felony evading, driving on the wrong side of traffic during a pursuit and resisting arrest with injuries to an Officer.

Fremont Police schedule drug disposal day On September 29, 2012 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Fremont Police Department and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will give the public another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your medications for disposal to Fremont Police Department’s Property Unit at 1980 Stevenson Boulevard (between the police building and the animal shelter). The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. Last April, Americans turned in 552,161 pounds—276 tons—of prescription drugs at over 5,600 sites operated by the DEA and nearly 4,300 state and local law enforcement partners. In its four previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners took in over 1.5 million pounds—nearly 775 tons—of pills. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash— both pose potential safety and health hazards. Four days after the first event, Congress passed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amends the Controlled Substances Act to allow an “ultimate user” of controlled substance medications to dispose of them by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. The Act also allows the Attorney General to authorize long term care facilities to dispose of their residents’ controlled substances in certain instances. DEA is drafting regulations to implement the Act. Until new regulations are in place, local law enforcement agencies like the Fremont Police Department and the DEA will continue to hold prescription drug take-back events every few months.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD September 14 Staff at the EZ 8 Motel located a male and a female unconscious and not breathing in a room at the motel at 11:48 p.m. NPD Officers along with paramedics from the Alameda County Fire Department responded. The male and female were pronounced dead at the scene. The preliminary investigation indicates that it was either a murdersuicide or a tragic double suicide. The male was identified as a 24 year old male from Livermore. The female was identified as a 17 year old female from Pleasanton. The investigation will take several months pending the completion of the autopsy and laboratory results. Officer Williams investigated an alarm call at 4:20 p.m. that resulted in the discovery of an attempted burglary on the 36500 block of Hafner Street Entry was made through an open garage window that leads to the interior of the residence. September 15 Dispatch received multiple 9-1-1 calls at 9:50 p.m. from the Pavilion in regards to a fight in progress involving approximately 12 gang members. The first units on scene were greeted by drunken wedding reception attendees. The rest of the shift responded to assist with crowd control. Paul Greer Jr. of San Lorenzo was arrested. Officer Smith was flagged down in front of 35571 Newark Boulevard at 11:26 p.m. in regards to a family party that was getting out of control. This prompted another full response by officers who provided a civil standby until the party goers left the area and calm was restored. September 16 A CHP Officer looking for stolen cars at the Motel 6 lot at 8:18 a.m., came upon a felony vehicle, which listed a wanted Parolee-At-Large (PAL), Eric Ontiveros DOB of Hayward. Ontiveros was listed as an armed and dangerous, high-level violent security risk. CHP requested NPD to take over the investigation/surveillance. NPD set up surveillance of the vehicle and conducted investigation into Ontiveros’ possible location. Officer Nobbe was able to determine that Ontiveros was possibly in a room with his girlfriend whom he is restrained from per a court order. Fearing that she was being held in the room against her will by Ontiveros, NPD established containment and conducted a surround and callout. Contact was made with Ontiveros by sight and continued on page 29

SUBMITTED BY LT. ROGER KEENER, HAYWARD PD On September 24, 2012, at 12:56 a.m., Hayward Police Department received emergency calls reporting a shooting at the Dirty Bird Bar, 29308 Tennyson Road, Hayward. Additional calls to the police stated that the suspect fled the scene in what was described as a dark Buick or Cadillac. Responding officers located a similar vehicle on west-bound Tennyson Road, west of Mission Boulevard, and tried to make contact with the vehicle. Initial reports indicate the suspect reversed his vehicle toward the officers. With an impending collision, officers were forced to shoot the suspect to stop his actions. The suspect died as a result of the confrontation. Initial investigation and witnesses’ statements revealed that the suspect was involved in some sort of altercation at the Dirty Bird Bar where at least one patron was shot. The victim sustained a non-life threatening gunshot wound and was treated at and released from a local hospital. No officers or other subjects were injured as a result of this incident. The three officers, who were involved, have been placed on routine administrative leave pending the investigation. Anyone with information should contact Inspector Woods at (510) 293-7035.


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

LIFE ElderCare Waking heel to toe - It sounds like something your Mom would tell you to do, right? Surprisingly, correct walking is a skill many seniors lose as they get older. You may even start to “shuffle” your feet and take smaller steps, not realizing that this is putting you at greater risk for a fall. What would Mom say about that? She’d probably say, “Pick up your feet!” She would tell you to create a smooth, continuous walking motion. She’d look to see that your heel touches the floor first and your feet pass each other with one step length between strides. She’d remind you that your feet should flex and push off from the floor with no dragging or stubbing of toes, and you should keep your head up. These instructions may not be easy to follow at first – but if you want to lower you risk of falling, then you need to make it your

goal. Just focus on one element at a time. The first thing is to raise your toes when you take a step. Your Mom would tell you to practice walking heel to toe every day, even if you think you’ve mastered the technique and even if you use a walker. Finally, your Mom would tell you to call Sandy at LIFE ElderCare (510) 574-2087 to enroll in the free Fall Prevention program. The program serves seniors living in the TriCity area of Fremont, Newark and Union City who are at risk for falling and would like to improve their balance. Trained Unitek College nursing students will come to your home and instruct you on balance exercises and skillful walking. Simple and fun exercises will be selected for you and approved by your doctor before you begin. It’s easy. It’s fun… and as Mom would say, “There’s always room for improvement!” So call today.

Suspect Sketches Released in Home Invasion Robbery The Fremont Police are asking for the public's assistance in identifying two suspects (Suspect #2 and #4, see below description)

from a home invasion robbery that occurred on Saturday, September 8, 2012 in our City. We unfortunately have no additional details to release at this time and have not yet been able to determine if this was a random act or if the victim was targeted. At 11:39 a.m., on Saturday, September 8, 2012, Patrol Officers responded to a home invasion robbery that had just occurred on the 48000 block of Purpleleaf Street in Fremont. The victim, a 49 year old female from Fremont, was home alone napping in her bed when she awoke to find four Hispanic males standing around her, one of whom had a

gun. The victim tried to reach her land-line, which they grabbed from her and she then went for her cell phone, but again was unable to reach it. After taking the cell phone away from her, the men began beating her and attempted to bind her with duct tape. The woman fought for several minutes and was able to escape to a neighbor's house. The men left the house via the back fence, where they likely had a car waiting. The victim was transported to a local hospital to receive medical care for facial injuries. Suspect #1 Described as a Mexican male, late 30's to early 40's, middle age, 5'06"5'08", stocky build with a muscular chest

Letter to the Editor

Crossing guards need help I have been a school crossing guard in Fremont for five years and I believe it to be a very important job. However, I need everyone's help. At most crosswalks, we have a problem with drivers running stop signs and/or stop lights. Every day, I see drivers talking on cell phones, eating, smoking cigarettes and sometimes, doing all of the above activities at the same time while approaching stop signs. The crosswalk where I work - Nicolet and Isherwood - is extremely active in the morning as cars and pedestrians are either headed for work, American High School, Brookvale Elementary School or just using the street, some under the illusion that they are in a NASCAR race. I have informed the Fremont Police Department of the problem on numerous occasions and communicate with my supervisor, other crossing guards and parents in the area. Last week my supervisor called the Fremont PD twice. Since the police cannot be everywhere at once, all of us must be aware. Most parents that walk their children to school abide by my requests to wait at the curb, look both ways when crossing the street, advise their children not to run when crossing and wait until I tell them it is safe to cross. However, there are still parents that choose to cross on their own with little or no regard for their own or children’s safety. By doing so, they are risking their lives, their children's lives and those of the drivers. We need to work together as a community to assure our children are safe from harm when going to school, leaving school and walking home. That means that parents, drivers and children need to be aware of their surroundings at all times. Not long ago, I was talking with a parent who told me that she was scared to walk her child to school. If we all work together to eliminate these problems, our streets, children and their parents will be much safer. Conrad Bloom, Fremont

continued on page 29

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Brown signs bill allowing sale of home-cooked food

September 25, 2012

Grocery Outlet opens in Milpitas

BY HANNAH DREIER ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP),Clandestine cooks who have been selling homemade food at local stores and farmer's markets will no longer have to fear legal consequences under a bill Gov. Jerry Brown signed Friday. AB1616, known as the Homemade Food Act, will lift restrictions on the sale of home-cooked treats and impose sanitation and labeling requirements on the burgeoning cottage food industry. The bill excludes products that contain meat and cream and could quickly spoil. In a statement Friday, the Democratic governor described it as one of several bills that will “make it easier for people to do business in California.” Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Los Angeles, said he wrote the bill in response to the increasing number of people establishing businesses based on baking, cooking and pickling in home kitchens. Gatto cited the case of a Los Angeles man ordered by health officials to stop selling bread he baked each week in a backyard oven. The act establishes criteria for permitting, cleanliness and food handler training. County health officials will have the right to inspect home kitchens and take photographs, food samples and other evidence as needed. Advocates say the bill will allow the burgeoning cottage food industry go mainstream and could help people across the state supplement their income. California joins 30 other states that have similar homemade food laws.

Ribbon Cutting ceremony with Mayor Jose Esteves, store owners Tom and Tracy Hogan (Center), and Milpitas Chamber of Commerce officers, officials, and guests held on Thursday, September 12.

SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT A new Milpitas Grocery Outlet bargain market Store at 215 W. Calaveras Boulevard opened following a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Wednesday, September 12 with Mayor Jose Esteves, independent owners Tom and Tracy Hogan, Milpitas Chamber of Commerce CEO Carol Kassab, Chamber officials, store officials, and guests. Refreshments catered by Lee's Sandwiches were served as guests were exploring the new store's layout and product offerings prior to opening on Thursday, September 13. A Certificate of Recognition from Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski was displayed and a pallet of food was donated to the Milpitas Food Pantry. Glen Howes of Tilton Pacific Construction, the remodeling contractor, was introduced and the Hogans received their Milpitas Chamber membership plaque from Chamber CEO Carol Kassab. A Grand Opening Celebration on Saturday, September 15 featured free reusable grocery bags, free coffee and treats, "Magic Cart" winners, Spin and Win Wheel of Bargains, and free Face Painting by Dizzy Entertainment. Hot Dogs and Drinks, served by Milpitas High School Rotary Interact Club members, benefited the Rotary Club of Milpitas. The celebration will continue on Saturdays into mid-October.

Young illegal immigrants may get driver's licenses BY GOSIA WOZNIACKA ASSOCIATED PRESS FRESNO, Calif. (AP), When 17-year-old Alondra Esquivel needs to get from her rural central California home to classes at Fresno State University 20 miles away, she must rely on rides from her relatives or her boyfriend. continued on page 27


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continued from page 3

This excess glucose can attach to proteins in the blood vessels and alter their normal structure and function. The blood vessels can become thicker and less elastic, making it harder for blood to pass through them. In addition, according to the American Heart Association, people with diabetes often have the following conditions that compound their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. • High cholesterol causes plaque to build up in the walls of the arteries, causing a process called atherosclerosis. The arteries become narrowed and blood flow to the heart muscle is slowed down or blocked. • High blood pressure (hypertension) is dangerous because it makes the heart work harder than normal to circulate blood through the blood vessels and contributes to atherosclerosis. • Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been strongly associated with insulin resistance. Obesity and insulin resistance also have been associated with other risk factors, including high blood pressure. Less Fat, More Fiber Roffelsen will offer tips for eating a heart healthy diet that can help to reduce these risk factors. She will focus on some of the foods to avoid as well as those that should be eaten more often because they may be able to protect against heart disease. She said it’s important to reduce the amount of salt and saturated fat in your diet. Saturated fats are found in a number of common foods, including high-fat cheeses, fatty cuts of meat, whole milk and cream,

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN The history of Castro Valley will “popup” for one day in a free and fun event! The Hayward Area Historical Society (HAHS) in partnership with David Ashton of the CV Legends Facebook community and Heather Mellon, social media consultant and Castro Valley resident, announce the “Castro Valley Pop-Up Museum” on Saturday, September 29. The “pop-up” is a free, one-day event, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., at 3324 Village Drive. (the former Jordan’s Bookstore location) in Castro Village. The goal of the project is to celebrate the history of Castro Valley and encourage pride in and conversations about the community. The pop-up concept—a short-term event or business set up in a temporary or untraditional space, is not new, but adapting the idea to a history museum is. All the elements of a traditional museum—interpretive exhibits, interactivity, and lectures—are being brought to the community. Not only does the community get to see and learn a bit more about their town, but they can participate in and contribute to the historical record. Know someone in a photograph displayed? Write the person’s name down so they can be added to the

butter, ice cream and ice cream products, and palm and coconut oils. Instead, stick to low-fat dairy products like 1 percent or fat-free milk and low-fat cheeses. Buy leaner cuts of meat and eat more poultry and fish, she recommended. Use healthier types of oil like olive or canola oil. “Grill or bake your fish instead of frying it in oil,” Roffelsen said. “Substitute high-fat lunch meats like bologna and pastrami with lean turkey. And avoid processed foods, which often contain high amounts of salt and fat.” She said it’s a good idea to eat fish at least once a week, particularly the types that contain omega 3 fatty acids, which have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease. Omega 3 is found in fish like salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardine as well as nuts and seeds like walnuts and flax seed. “Some people take fish oil supplements, but you should talk to your doctor first to see if that is a good idea for you,” Roffelsen added. Fiber should also be included in the diet. She will talk about the importance of eating plenty of fiber, which is found in fruits and vegetables and whole grains. “Fiber works like a sponge in the gut to bind some of the cholesterol in the food you eat,” she explained. “Good sources of fiber are citrus fruit, oatmeal, barley, apples, and pears.” Most experts agree that eating sterol and stanol-containing foods is another way to lower your cholesterol, which helps reduce the risk of heart disease, according to Roffelsen. Plant sterols and stanols occur naturally in small amounts in many grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, and seeds and are now being added to a number of foods like margarine spreads, orange juice, and cereals. HAHS records. Have an object or photo that should have been in the show? Tell HAHS about it so they know what Castro Valley residents want to see in the future. Most unique of all, HAHS is setting up a scanning station where the public can contribute to the history of Castro Valley. Bring in your family’s Castro Valley photos of parades, houses, picnics, school functions, and family gatherings. HAHS will scan your photos, fill out a quick form, and the digital copies of the photos become a part of the HAHS collection. As curator Diane Curry says, “Since HAHS covers the entire area as part of our mission, community contributed photos will help us tell even more stories about Castro Valley. The stories you want to see.” A special lecture by the HAHS curator on the history of Castro Valley will be at noon followed at 3 p.m. by a roundtable discussion of all things Castro Valley from CV Legends. All those involved with the Castro Valley Pop-Up Museum wish to give a special thank you to Crosspoint Realty Services, Inc. and Castro Valley Rotary Club for helping make this event happen. For more information call (510) 5810223 or visit www.haywardareahistory.org. Castro Valley Pop-Up Museum Saturday, Sept 29 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 3324 Village Drive, Castro Valley (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org. Free

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September 25, 2012

Endeavour swans California skies in whirlwind tour BY ALICIA CHANG AP SCIENCE WRITER LOS ANGELES (AP), The people became the paparazzi Friday, aiming their lenses not at the latest starlet, but toward the sky to catch a glimpse of an aging superstar headed for retirement. It was the space shuttle Endeavour, zigzagging around California where it was born and where it will spend its golden years as a museum showpiece. From the state Capitol to the Golden Gate Bridge to the Hollywood sign, thousands of spectators pointed their cellphones and cameras skyward as the shuttle, riding piggyback atop a 747 jumbo jet, buzzed past. “It made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. It was historic, momentous,” said Daniel Pifko, who rode by motorcycle to a hilly peninsula north of San Francisco to snap a few pictures of the iconic bridge. Across California, throngs swarmed rooftops for one last glimpse of Endeavour airborne. Parents pulled their kids out of school. Some became misty-eyed, while others chanted “USA! USA!” as the shuttle soared overhead. Gina Oberholt screamed for joy when she spotted Endeavour from a scenic overlook in Los Angeles. She felt a bit nostalgic because her uncle had worked as a shuttle technician. “I've always had a special place in my heart for the shuttle program,” she said. Known as the baby shuttle, Endeavour replaced Challenger, which exploded during liftoff in 1986. Endeavour rolled off the assembly line in the Mojave Desert in 1991 and a year later, rocketed to space. It left Earth 25 times, logging 123 million miles. Friday's high-flying tour was a homecoming of sorts. After a nearly five-hour loop that took Endeavour over some of the state's most treasured landmarks, it turned for its final approach, coasting down the runway on the south side of the Los Angeles International Airport, where elected officials and VIPS gathered for an

arrival ceremony. As the jumbo jet taxied to the hangar, an American flag popped out of the jet's hatch. Endeavour will stay at the airport for several weeks as crew prepare it for its final mission: a 12-mile trek through city streets to the California Science Center, its new permanent home, where it will go on display Oct. 30. NASA retired the shuttle fleet last year to focus on destinations beyond low-Earth orbit. Before Endeavour was grounded for good, Californians were treated to an aerial farewell. Endeavour took off from the Mojave Desert Friday after an emotional cross-country ferry flight that made a special flyover of Tucson, Ariz., to honor its last commander, Mark Kelly, and his wife, former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. It circled the high desert that gave birth to the shuttle fleet before veering to Northern California. After looping twice around the state Capitol, it swung over to the San Francisco Bay area and Silicon Valley and then headed down the coast, entering the Los Angeles air space over the Santa Monica Pier. “Even though it was a few seconds, it was a unique experience to witness history,” said Andrew Lerner, who gathered at the pier with his parents. Derek Reynolds, a patent attorney from a Sacramento suburb, flew to Florida last year and camped out overnight on a bridge in the rain so he could view the last shuttle launch. The flyover in Sacramento was a rare opportunity to share a firsthand experience of the space program with his 5-year-old son, Jack, who he pulled out of kindergarten for the day. “I want him to experience it and give him the memory since it's the last one,” Reynolds said. Peggy Burke was among the hundreds of camera-toting tourists who jammed the waterfront along the San Francisco Bay, reflecting on the end of an era. “It's just a shame that the program has to end, but I'm so glad

they came to the Bay area especially over the Golden Gate Bridge,” she said. “Onward to Mars.” Along the flyover route, the mood was festive at times. At the Griffith Observatory, overlooking the Hollywood sign, a group of middle school children on a field trip broke out in song, giggling and belting out “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The cost for shipping and handling Endeavour was estimated at $28 million, to be paid for by the science center. NASA officials have said there was no extra charge to fly over Tucson because it was on the way. Endeavor's carefully choreographed victory lap was by far the most elaborate of the surviving shuttle fleet. Discovery is home at the Smithsonian Institution's hangar in Virginia after flying over the White House and National Mall. Atlantis will remain in Florida, where it will be towed a short distance to the Kennedy Space Center's visitor center in the fall. Still, public safety officials braced for congestion, worried that motorists would “gawk and drive” as Endeavour flew over. Traffic came to a near stop along a freeway near the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory east of Los Angeles when looky-loos pulled onto the shoulders and center median. California Highway Patrol officers came through and blared over loud speakers for people to move on. As Endeavour approached LAX, other airplanes were forced to circle and wait. Passengers on an American Airlines flight from Miami snapped pictures and rolled video out their windows as the shuttle arrived. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime event,” said pilot Doug Causey, who has been flying for 29 years. “That was a real treat to see something like that.” AP Writers Tom Verdin and Juliet Williams in Sacramento; Terry Chea in San Francisco; John Antczak in Pasadena; Greg Risling, Martha Mendoza and Raquel Maria Dillon in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Teachers unions to fight 'top-down' school reform AP WIRE SERVICE CHICAGO (AP),Seeking to capitalize on the momentum of the Chicago teachers strike, unions and allied parent and community groups promised Friday to launch a nationwide fight against government-led school reform efforts that they say are only making public education worse. American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten announced at a news conference in Washington that they plan workshops, town halls and other events in 11 cities to engage communities in finding their own solutions to improve public education. For years, unions have pushed back against government interventions in education reform, including the closure of failing schools, the takeover of others by private consult-

ants and the growth in charter schools. They say school closures put a disproportionate number of African-American teachers out of work and leave blighted communities with even fewer resources. They also decry what they say is a ``top-down'' reform effort by city leaders that fails to hear the opinions of local educators and parents. The seven-day strike in Chicago, the nation's third-largest school district, re-ignited the debate. The series of town halls, teach-ins, workshops and other events will be held in Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Minneapolis, New York, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, St. Paul and Tampa. “Our goal is to empower teachers, parents, students, clergy and other community members to act together and to drive real public education re-

form,” Weingarten said. Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis described it as a struggle to safeguard the ``public character, integrity and inherent democracy of public education.'' “The strike in Chicago, the first one in 25 years, is the first phase in our long struggle for the soul of public education in the United States,” Lewis said at the event in Washington. She railed against the focus on standardized tests and the heavy reliance on test scores in evaluating teacher performance, which became one of the main issues in the Chicago strike. Teachers in poor and violent neighborhoods felt it was an unfair measure. “Only people who do not know how to educate children want to reduce them to numbers,” Lewis said.


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September 25, 2012

Rasesh Parikh Receives Award

Rasesh Parikh was honored at Tri City Health Center Community Awards on August 9, 2012 for his dedication to healthy living. The Award was presented by Eden Domingo, a TCHC official. California state senator Ellen Corbett was present at the ceremony.

Milpitas Town Hall focuses on emergency preparedness

Middle School College Fair SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski invites students and families in the New Haven Unified School District to a Middle School College Fair from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on October 2, 2012 at Cesar Chavez Middle School, 2801 Hop Valley Ranch Road, Union City. “Our objective for this program is to reach out to students and families and provide them with important information about their college options as early as possible,” Wieckowski said. “Not only is this is an opportunity for families to be introduced to schools in the area and their academic requirements but also to learn how to financially prepare for the college journey and to take advantage of the many resources available.” With reports indicating that some high school drop outs trace their declining interest in education back to middle school, the Middle School College Fair aims to inspire students to succeed. For more information, contact Assemblymember Wieckowski’s District Office at (510) 440-9030.

SUBMITTED BY MIA BRADWAY WINTER If you live, work or go to school in the City of Milpitas, you will receive valuable information at the Milpitas Town Hall, Thursday, October 11 at the Milpitas Community Center behind City Hall. Focused on emergency preparedness, attendees will receive tips of what to do in case of a natural or manmade disaster. Milpitas, a city of 67,000 people, grows to 134,000 during working hours, five days a week. As a major thoroughfare connecting commuters to highways 237, 880 and 680, a city-wide disaster could bring traffic to a halt. Sean Simonson, Emergency Services Coordinator with the Office of Emergency Services, Milpitas Fire Department and a recognized leader in local and national emergency preparedness education and implementation, will give practical advice of what to do in a widespread emergency. This event is hosted by the Milpitas Community Advisory Commission in collaboration with the City of Milpitas and Emergency Preparedness Commission.

Middle School College Fair Tuesday, Oct 2 5 - 8 p.m. Cesar Chavez Middle School 2801 Hop Valley Ranch Road, Union City (510) 440-9030

Award-winning mystery writer Nancy Curteman will discuss her latest travel-oriented crime tale, "Murder Down Under," at the Fremont Main Library on Saturday, September 29. Local author Curteman, a former Fremont school principal, will describe why she chose Australia as the background for her novel. The event will have an Aussie air, with Australian cookies to nibble and free recipes for desserts mentioned in the book. Curteman will share inside information about characters and plot. There will be a free drawing for a signed copy of her novel.

Milpitas Town Hall ‘Emergency Preparedness’ Thursday, Oct 11 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m.) Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3071 www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov

Curteman is a member of the California Writers Club and Mystery Writers of America. She also blogs about writing and international travel. Visit her website: nancycurteman.com. Author Event Saturday, September 29 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 nancycurteman.com


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David Omar of San Jose says, “I've been going to the Pirates of Emerson for years. My girlfriend has never gone. This will be her first time. She doesn't have a clue how cool and scary it will be!” “We love to dress up,” says Jessica B. of Hayward. “It's just a bunch of us girls out for a night of fun. Even though none of us sleeps for the next three nights ‘cause we're so scared, the Pirates of Emerson has become our Halloween tradition. You won't find anything else in the entire Bay Area as scary and fun as this.” Jessica's friend Lori, also of Hayward added, “The coolest thing is that it changes every year. Just because you went last year or a few years ago, they keep changing and adding, so each time you go, it's completely different.” The Fields family (Karl, Patty, and Brian) along with

countless others, work hard all year long putting this theme park together. They plan, design, build, and transform their nightmares into everyone's reality. If you're up for a mind blowing excursion into the darkest zones of terror, the Pirates of Emerson is the place to be. Children 13 and under must be accompanied by an adult. High heels are not recommended and bare feet are not allowed. Also, no pets, service dogs or indoor photography are allowed. The entire area is wheelchair accessible. Admission is $25 on weekends and Halloween, and $20 on weekdays. Credit cards, checks, and ATM cards are not accepted at the ticket window, but tickets can be pre-purchased at www.PiratesofEmerson.com.

Pirates of Emerson September 28 - October 31 7:05 p.m. - 10 p.m. (open some nights until 11 p.m. and midnight) Alameda County Fairgrounds Corner of Bernal and Valley Ave., Pleasanton (510) 657-2121 www.PiratesofEmerson.com Admission: Weekends and Halloween $25, Weekdays $20 Parking fee: $8


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September 25, 2012

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

2

2 8

B 180

3

4

5

1 7 4 1

6 7

8

9

7

10

5 2

9 9 4

11

12

3

13

3 1 9 5 1

14

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8 7 8 2 7 4

20 21 1

22 23 25

2

U G

8

A

F

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I

17

R O

30

31

P

A P

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Tri-City Stargazer SEPTEMBER 19 – SEPTEMBER 25, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The second of seven exact Uranus/Pluto aspects is this week. As I write this column in July, I think it is possible that global events of the fall will have a dramatic impact on the outcome of the Presidential Election. Negotiations around the world will break down during this period. It is even remotely possible that one of the earth’s satellites will be hit with a coronal mass ejection that truly creates damage. Symbols suggest problems with electronics and communications equipment. Traffic may be snarled or jammed in numerous places.

Aries (March 21-April 20): This is a really challenging time for you and many others as well. You may be presented with a relationship issue that will cause you to depart a negative bond. Perhaps it is time. If this is someone you truly don’t want to lose, watch your temper and attempt to work beyond problems.

feelings about yourself and your direction in life. In some way it is important to hold onto the truth of who you are and not allow another to tell you what he/she wants you to be. It is also possible that your life is being tampered with by an authority figure. Remember that you are a far greater being than the secular world may allow.

Libra the Scales (Sep 22 - Oct. 22): Many who are upset will be seeking your solace and gift of listening. Do not overload your schedule because even you, the peaceful warrior, may feel short tempered. Drive carefully. Vehicles, tools, or other things may suddenly break. Concentrate on staying with your center.

Taurus (April 21-May 20): There are two relationships that draw your attention front and center at this time. One of them is in trouble and will create more problems at the end of the week. The other is coming to a turning point of awareness. The latter is asking you to grow in maturity if it is to continue.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Aspects particularly favor those involved in teaching or learning. Activities involving your siblings and also your local neighborhood, interests related to anything high tech or of an electrical nature flow well. You are at the hub of a wheel of communications. Others look to you for leadership.

Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Caution! Giant waves ahead! You are headed toward work and relationship troubles. Only the sharpest of concentration can help you steer through. It is best to keep your mouth shut, especially if angry. Nothing you do or say is “right”, so do not offer your opinion right now.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Those who have not been tending to investments, debts, or resources that you share with your partner may be in for a big surprise at this time. One or more of your children may spur you forward to deal with affairs of your estate. Death and after-life issues may become a topic of importance.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): Financial matters require your attention now. There could be a certain amount of drama in this department, such as a sudden need to access a large sum of money. Hold onto your natural caution. Think about this before you accept the drama at face value. Is it your drama or someone else’s?

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): Your optimistic attitude causes others to join your bandwagon and support your projects. You can envision a grand result and are able to express it in a way that others can understand. Activities involving travel, education, publication, the Internet, and church affiliation are favorable.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): You could be having unusually intense

Capricorn (December 22-Janu-

ary 19): “Shock” is the word for the week or even the month. Either you will shock others or someone may shock you. Communications are going badly, so give it some cool off time before you respond to unusual situations. Avoid the strong temptation to take control of whatever goes amiss. This is a good time to “go with the flow.” Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Anytime this fall you may discover information about yourself that you never before recognized. If there are skeletons in the family closet, it is time for expo-

sure. Drive with special care. The overall traffic is challenging this week and it is particularly so for you. Pisces (February 19-March 20): This is a week in which you must look at debt, along with taxes, estate matters, or any other type of resource that you share with others. It is possible that you have been operating under an illusion related to these matters. The truth surfaces now so that you can handle your resources with more valid information.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Award-winning humorist brings Comedy Concert to Fremont SUBMITTED BY BARBARA FRANKS Dubbed "a contemporary Mark Twain" by author Dr. Larry

Dossey, award-winning "transformational humorist" and songwriter Greg Tamblyn brings his irreverent humor and sideways view of life to Fremont on Sunday, September 30. With a list of national awards to his credit, including multiple "Best Comedy Song" awards from the emPower Posi Music Awards (the Grammys of Positive Music), Just Plain Folks Music Awards, and the Music City Song Festival, Tamblyn's unique musical wit provides the perfect dose of “conscious comic relief” from the workday blues, global anxiety, and personal challenges. His concerts feature songs like “The Top Ten Whiny Victim Love Songs,” “Self-Employment Made Harder by Difficult Boss,” “Analog Brain

in a Digital World,” “The Shootout at the I'm OK You're OK Corral,” “My Life is a Beer Commercial,” and “A Brief History of God (G-String Theory).” Tamblyn's performances have been called "psycho-spiritual experiences" that take his audience on a musical joyride into the Profound and the Absurd, the Personal and the Universal, the Psychological and the Spiritual, the Sacred and the Silly. Jack Canfield, co-author of "Chicken Soup for the Soul," says of Greg: "I'm sure you are Chicken Soup for a lot of Souls out there in the world!" As a professional songwriter in Nashville, Tamblyn appeared nationally on television, and had songs recorded by other artists from Canada to the Philippines. One of his own records, “It's Another Joyful Elvis Presley Christmas,” was named Christmas Single of the Year in Cashbox Magazine. Tamblyn was rated Best Male Vocalist in his hometown of Kansas City by The Squire Newspapers. Stories from his life and songwriting have been featured in several recent books, including "Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backwards" by Brian Luke Seaward, "Shelter for the Spirit" by Victoria Moran, and "Art and Soul" by Pam Grout. For more info about Greg Tamblyn, including free songs and videos, visit http://GregTamblyn.com. Comedy in Concert Sunday, September 30 6 p.m. Unity of Fremont Church & Niles Discovery Church 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-5234 Tickets: $15

Resource Center opens at Hayward Main Library SUBMITTED BY HEIDI ONTIVEROS The Hayward Library is proud to announce the award of a grant to open up a branch of the Non-Profit Resource Center at the Hayward Main Library. This will include several dedicated terminals, a collection of reference materials both for in-house use and to check out, and a series of free workshops. These workshops will cover a variety of topics of interest to people involved in nonprofit organizations. Non-Profit Resource Center Workshops Tuesday, Oct 2: Establishing a Non-Profit Organization Tuesday, Oct 9: Before You Seek a Grant Tuesday, Oct 16: Introduction to Fundraising Planning Tuesday, Oct 23: Direct Mail Campaign: The Nuts and Bolts Tuesday, Oct 30: Grant-seeking Basics 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7974 Trudy Toll at trudy.toll@hayward-ca.gov Free, no registration required

Parent Project will change your life SUBMITTED BY CITY OF FREMONT Parent Project is a 13-week series that teaches parents how to regain respect from their children and never argue in their home. The series teaches parents how to help their teen improve school attendance, performance, and behavior. It also helps parents deal with children who are out of control and who may be experimenting with drugs, alcohol and/or gang activities. English series begins Tuesday, Oct. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Spanish series begins Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Both workshops are located at the Fremont Family Resource Center, 39155 Liberty St., Suite A110 in Fremont. To register, stop by Youth and Family Services, 39155 Liberty Street, Suite E500. For fees, information, or scholarship requests, call Jody Montgomery at (510) 574-2148 for the English class or Luz Ponce at (510) 574-2149 for the Spanish class. Complete details at www.fremont.gov/ParentProject

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continued from page 1

the traditional release of doves by a circle of breast cancer survivors; this metaphorically celebrates survivors and those who have gone before us. The walk/run continues as many enthusiastic and excited participants – survivors, friends, family and neighbors - walk or run for the cause. A Community Expo and BBQ will follow the walk/run. “We’re proud to be celebrating the 13th year of our KEEP ABREAST fundraising event,” says Karen Jackson, Community Development Director of HERS Breast Cancer Foundation, and event chairperson. “This is a cause that has touched numerous people at one point or another. The KEEP ABREAST event supports our mission to celebrate survivorship and life while preaching our HERS acronym of hope, empowerment, renewal, and support. We are hopeful for the future, empower individuals to just keep going, renewal of spirit, and support of everyone’s journey.” All proceeds from the event will be used to benefit the programs and services of HBCF, helping women and their loved ones survive the battle with breast cancer while serving any woman regardless of financial status. If event attendance is not possible, donating is still an option and can be done through the HBCF donations page at http://hersbreastcancerfoundation.org/. HBCF is offering great prizes for achieving online fundraising goals. Incentives include a Chardonnay Cruise in Santa Cruz Harbor, gift cards to various restaurants, and HBCF branded clothing. Participants are not required to attend the event to receive the gifts; however, all dollar amounts must be received and logged at the online donations system by midnight, Wednesday, September 26. KEEP ABREAST 5k Walk, 5k/10k Run and Community Expo Saturday, Sept 29 7 a.m. Quarry Lakes Regional Park 2100 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 790-1911 http://hersbreastcancerfoundation.org/ Fees: Adults: $40, Youth (ages 11-17): $20, Children (ages 10 and under): free, if accompanied by a participating adult

"Undertaker" Kyle Green will be leading eerie tours in October for the Hayward Area Historical Society.

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN

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ctober is the season for macabre tales, and nothing is spookier than when the stories are true. Hayward Area Historical Society invites you to its three historic properties for some hist-eerie fun during their “Shrouded Tales” tours. Join “The Undertaker,” portrayed by actor Kyle Green, as he walks you through some of the area’s reportedly haunted sites, and recounts tragic tales of local families and brings to light the dark deeds of unsavory characters - all tinged by Victorian-era death traditions and superstitions, as well as accounts of paranormal activity. Due to the popularity of last year’s “Shrouded Tales” program, the Historical Society tripled the number of tours for 2013. However, space is limited for each tour, so call to make reservations for one or more of the following tours: October 4 - 6 at the San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery located at the corner of Hesperian Boulevard and College Street; October 11 - 13 at Meek Mansion located at 17365 Boston Road; and October 18 - 20 at the McConaghy House located at 18701 Hesperian Boulevard. Two tours are available each night at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Tickets are $10 and $5 for seniors, students, and Society members and must be purchased in advance. Space is limited. Call Heather at Hayward Area Historical Society at (510) 581-2516 for reservations. For additional information regarding “Shrouded Tales” contact Heather or visit www.haywardareahistory.org. Shrouded Tales October 4 - 20 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. October 4 – 6 San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery Corner of Hesperian Boulevard and College Street October 11 - 13 Meek Mansion 17365 Boston Road October 18 - 20 McConaghy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-2516 www.haywardareahistory.org Tickets: $10, $5 for seniors, students, and Society members


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD September 15 CHP called to inform FPD that they had shot two pit bulls who had been roaming on Highway 84, just east of the toll plaza. CHP had tried to corral the dogs, but the dogs became aggressive, and CHP shot the dogs. One of the dogs succumbed to the gunshots, but the other one fled east into a business park. A few hours later a security guard for the business park called to report that he had found the outstanding dog in front of a business. Officer Stillitano responded, collected the dog, and transported it to the Ohlone Veterinary Hospital. At 11:43 p.m. a reporting party called in about a large fight taking place at Mojo's (Centerville area) with chairs being thrown. 10 Units responded and the situation immediately de-escalated upon their arrival. While enroute to a fight at the Saddlerack, Officer Harvey heard an alarm in the area of 42744 Boscell Road. After clearing the fight detail, Officer Harvey returned to the alarm and found that the electronics business (AER Worldwide) had been burglarized. CSI Dexter responded and processed the scene. At 4:41 a.m., Officers responded to Hilo St. for a report of a 2-year-old not breathing. Officer Chahouati arrived in 63 seconds followed closely by Officer Gilfoy. Officer Gilfoy immediately recognized that the child had a febrile seizure (caused by a high fever) and worked to cool her down. FFD and Paramedics Plus arrived approximately three minutes later. The 2-year-old was transported to a local hospital as a precautionary measure. Great response by all who were involved! September 16 Officer Singleton responded to a traffic hazard call where he found about 100 live shotgun rounds all over the roadway. A victim was on the sidewalk near Ranch 99 Market (Northgate area) when a black male in his late 20’s grabbed the purse off of her arm and ran. The suspect was not located. Officer Chan investigated. Two SWAT Officers responded to Newark with our Bearcat. Officers respond to Ardenwood/Commerce in regard to a

possible battery in progress. The call was upgraded to strong armed robbery. Victim states that two males tried to take his cell phone and bicycle. He managed to fend them off and they were last seen heading into Union City. A “Be on the Lookout” was broadcast and UCPD stopped the two in their city. Two juvenile suspects were arrested. September 17 Officers responded to the area of Fremont Boulevard and Paseo Padre Parkway to a reported disturbance. The reporting party advised during an altercation a male was pressing a female up against a fence. Officers arrived and contacted an adult male armed with a pellet gun (handgun replica). Officer Kwok is investigating. September 18 At approximately 2:01 p.m., a domestic battery victim ran aboard an AC Transit bus after being battered near Great Salt Lake and Alvarado Boulevard. Officers arrived on scene to investigate and began searching for the suspect, an adult male Fremont resident. He was seen jumping off a roof and fleeing the area on foot. Canine Handler Lambert and Dax pursued the suspect on foot. The suspect surrendered to Officer Lambert and K-9 Dax. September 21 SRO Foote called for assistance at Walters Junior HS as someone reported seeing two males at the edge of the campus and one had a pistol. FUSD put the school on lockdown and multiple officers responded, clearing the entire area; the alleged suspects were not located. School re-opened within 30 minutes. Assault w/ deadly weapon at Mojo’s Bar. PD called regarding disturbance/fight at closing time, with a patron being struck by a vehicle fleeing the area. Officers ultimately located the suspect vehicle in Union City where an adult male is taken into custody. The victim was treated and released. Burglaries: 38700 Tyson; CSO Codey investigating Loss was a laptop & jewelry. 39059 Guardino; Officer Leopardi investigating 39939 Stevenson; Officer Torrico investigating 4555 Thornton; Officer Rodriguez investigating

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Major Injury Collision SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD The Fremont Police Department was dispatched to a major injury traffic collision on September 18, 2012 at 3:40 p.m. The collision occurred on Paseo Padre Parkway at Concho Drive in Fremont. The initial investigation revealed the following: A 20 year old man on a Suzuki motorcycle was travelling northbound on Paseo Padre Parkway and a 38 year old woman in a Honda minivan was travelling westbound on Concho Drive. The driver of the Honda drove through the intersec-

tion from Concho Drive and onto Paseo Padre Parkway directly in the path of the motorcycle rider. The vehicle and motorcycle were involved in a collision. When officers arrived, they found the 20 year old rider with severe injuries and unresponsive. The 20 year old male was transported to San Jose Regional Medical Center in critical condition. The driver of the Honda suffered minor injuries. It appears that alcohol was a factor in this collision. Anyone with information regarding the collision, please contact the Fremont Police Department at (510) 790-6800.

Families embrace holistic parenting model SUBMITTED BY HOLISTIC MOMS NETWORK

F

aced with increased chronic health conditions, rising obesity rates, and toxic environments, many parents are seeking natural and sustainable ways for their families to thrive – from education to healthcare to nutrition. Holistic Moms Network creates a space for families practicing models of parenting that are outside of mainstream norms. “Holistic parenting means consciously parenting the whole child—mind, body, and spirit in connection to the community, the world, and the environment—balanced with taking care of our own well-being as parents who are whole people,” affirms Tri-City Chapter Co-Leader Christina Byard, “We are a dynamic, nonjudgmental group of diverse families helping each other pursue solutions to issues that really matter to us and our children’s future. People share their cultural wisdom, experiences, knowledge, research, and resources and make it easier for the next person to walk that path. We respect that every family is different; it’s about making informed choices that work for your own family.” The Tri-City Chapter meets monthly on the first Tuesday of each month from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at the Fremont Main Library, Fukaya Room (2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont) and welcomes volunteer guest speakers on a variety of holistic lifestyle topics. Monthly meeting topics have included food allergies, child nutrition, green cleaning, parenting models, cloth diapering, naturopathy, holistic dentistry, natural fertility, fermentation, organic gardening, education alternatives, countering consumerism/kids and commercialism, childbirth options, breastfeeding support, and eco-friendly travel. Additionally, the group provides members with budget-friendly organic food and consumer products options. Byard explains, “Everyone has the right to quality food and we have found amazingly simple ways to afford it. HMN members combine their purchasing power and buy high ticket items together in bulk to obtain wholesale prices and hold various purchasing co-ops on all sorts of food and household items. We work with local farmers and other respected suppliers to make their superior products available to our members at affordable prices.” Holistic Moms Network is a rapidly growing national non-profit organization providing support and local resources to parents seeking holistic living, natural health, and mindful parenting. The Tri-City Chapter was founded last October by Co-Leaders Christina Byard and Lenore Ockerberg , answering a need for area parents to explore a meaningful, sustainable lifestyle within a supportive community. The chapter has quickly grown to over 40 culturally diverse members. HMN, which was founded in New Jersey in 2003, currently has more than 100 chapters across the United States with 4 chapters in the Bay Area. The Holistic Moms Network Tri-City Chapter is holding an Open House and celebrating their Chapter’s first anniversary on October 15th, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room B, 2400 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont. Parents, grandparents, and other caregivers are all welcome to attend and to join the organization. The theme, “A Walk down the Holistic Path,” will introduce attendees to topics such as pregnancy and birth support, organic/local food and nutrition, alternative health modalities, sustainable and renewable resources, mindful and gentle parenting, local and mom-owned green businesses, and more. For more information, please visit the Tri-City Holistic Moms Network website at http://tricityca.holisticmoms.org/ or contact the organization at (510) 969-0466.


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Induz provides free art education for orphan children in India and at 14 low-income schools across the Bay Area. Induz organizes events in the Bay Area to raise funds for these projects, connecting people and cultures through the magic of “The Art.” To continue with these efforts, Induz has organized a super exciting “Induz Dandiya” evening on October 6 at Centerville Junior High School in Fremont to raise funds for projects in both the U.S. and India. “Dandiya” is a traditional folk dance of India from Gujarat state played with two sticks, and is a very gracious and energetic

SUBMITTED BY RAY MITRA

S

ince the 1970s, school art and music programs across the United States have been dras-

tically cut, and the recent downturn in the economy has once again forced schools to make further cuts in the art and music curriculum. Bay Area non-profit

Participate in

Juried Photography Exhibit BY ARATHI SATISH The Fremont Cultural Arts Council (FCAC), assisted by the Community Services Department of the City of Fremont and the Fremont Library, will sponsor the 19th annual Juried Photography Exhibition November 10 - December 14, at the Fremont Main Library. Fremont residents, FCAC members, and members of Fremont photographic clubs are invited to enter their photographs for consideration. Don't miss this opportunity to share your best photos with your community! A panel of judges will select the photographs to be displayed as well as determine the Merit Award winners who will receive cash prizes. There is a small $5 entry fee per photo, and a maximum of five prints per entrant will be permitted. An opening night reception will be held Friday, November 9 from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. in the Fremont Main Library's Fukaya Room. The exhibit will continue through December 14 during regular library hours in the library's main first-floor reading area. Entry forms with detailed information are available at the FCAC office, open from 11a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays; Community Services Dept., City of Fremont, 3350 Capitol Avenue; and at libraries and many photo counters in Fremont. Information and downloadable entry forms are available at the FCAC website at: www.fremontculturalartscouncil.org. Framed photographs ready for hanging can be submitted at the FCAC office, 3375 Country Drive in Fremont on: Friday, October 19 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, October 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, October 21 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. If you have any questions, please contact Exhibit Chairman Jason Cheng at (510) 683-9536.

dance with its own style and art. The event was sold out last year; Induz brings it back again this year featuring dandiya with a spectacular laser lights display! The very popular and well-known Bay Area artist Dimple Patel and Troupe will be the DJ for the Dandiya/Garba event. There will be free childcare, free dandiya classes, and food by Chaat Bhavan. Tickets can be bought online from www.sulekha.com/Induz or by contacting Ray Mitra at (510) 875-5006 or Sanjay Saxena at (510) 449-8530. Advance ticket prices are $12 for adults and $7 for children up to 10 years old,

September 25, 2012

and $14 for adults and $8 for children if purchased at the door. Children under five are free. Induz Dandiya Saturday, Oct 6 7:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. (Free dandiya classes from 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.) Centerville Junior High School Auditorium 37720 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 449-8530 (510) 875-5006 www.sulekha.com/induz www.induz.org Tickets: $7 - $14


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Thursday, Sep 6 thru Sunday, Sep 30

"Grey Gardens" $

Thur – Sat: 8 p.m. (Sun: 2 p.m.)

Continuing Events Monday, Sep 18 thru Thursday, Nov 16

Musical tale of eccentric mother & daughter

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org

Color and Light

8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Work of artist Hema Sukumar

Phantom Art Gallery at Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Thursday, Sep 20 thru Sunday, Oct 26

Wild Things and Mild Things

Thu – Sat: 12 noon - 8 p.m. Sun: 12 noon - 4 p.m. Imaginative artwork from 24 local artists

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Thursdays, Sep 6 thru Oct 25

"Thrill the World" Dance Moves $R

6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Learn the moves & join worldwide simultaneous dance of "Thriller." Ages 13 & up

Fremont Community Center Lake Elizabeth 40000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 494-4322

Cooking from A-Z for Small Chefs $R

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Children discover cooking while learning their ABC's. Ages 3 -5

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-5541 Thursdays, Sep 13 thru Oct 18

Arabic Calligraphy Classes $R

6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Understanding pen, paper and ink

Averroes Institute 43174 Osgood Road, Fremont (510) 509-7919 www.islamicartexhibit.com Thursday, Sep 14 thru Sunday, Oct 13

Laying Down the Mark

12 noon - 5 p.m. Pencil drawings, acrylics, pen & ink, and charcoal

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov Thursday, Sep 14 thru Sunday, Oct 13

Frankenstein $

Thurs – Sat: 8 p.m. Sun: 1 p.m. Classic tale of horror and suspense detailing an ill-fated experiment

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Fridays, Sep 14 thru Oct 19

Mad Science: Preschool Earthworks $R

1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. Become a Jr. Paleontologist, learn about animals & play with water. Ages 3 - 5

Niles Program Center 470 School Street, Fremont (510) 791-4318

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Saturday, Sep 1 - Friday, Sep 28

Fall Member Show

Mon. - Thurs., 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sat. - Sun., 12 noon - 4 p.m. Paintings, porcelain & photography

San Leandro Art Association 300 Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 635-5129 Saturday, Sep 1 - Sunday, Sep 30

Art of Antoinette Martinez

6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Abstract art

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.amart84888@aol.com Tuesdays, Sep 25 thru Nov 13

Fridays, Sep 7 thru Sep 28

Booklegger Training

Toddler Ramble: Color of the Marsh

9:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Nature class for ages 1 to 3

Tuesdays, Sep 11 thru Oct 9

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Volunteers learn reading aloud & storytelling skills for visits to Fremont Schools

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Thursday, Sep 27 thru Sunday, Oct 21

Monday, Sep 8 thru Sunday, Sep 30

Fine Art Show

Student Art Exhibit

Exceptional work from artists in the Bay Area and beyond

Mon – Fri: 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Sat – Sun: 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Cultural Corner (lower level near Sears)

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 742-2326 www.NewParkMall.com Wednesday, Aug 22 - Saturday, Sep 29

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Saturdays, Sep 29 thru Nov 17

Teen/Senior Computer and Gadget Help

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

I Can See Clearly Now...

Trained teen volunteers help older adults

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Member show of photography, oil, ceramic, & sculpture

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery@comcast.net Thursday, Aug 23 - Saturday, Oct 13

New Members and Emerging Artists

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Art created by Hayward Arts Council

Saturdays, Sep 29 thru Dec 8

Math Olympiad $R

1:00 p.m. & 2:15 p.m. Students master creative problem solving techniques. Ages 7 - 11

Irvington Community Center 41885 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 791-4334


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September 25, 2012

Saturday, Sep 25

Friday, Sep 28

Saturday, Sep 29

Keep Abreast 5k Walk, 5k/10k Run & Community Expo $

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

Empower: Master of the Three Rings $

7 a.m.

8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

1 p.m. & 6 p.m.

Fundraiser for HERS Breast Cancer Foundation

Call to schedule an appointment. Use sponsor code: NEWARK

Theatrical extravaganza

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895 http://hersbrestcancerfoundation.org

Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 742-4400

Chabot Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6976 www.soulciety.org/empower

Friday, Sep 28

Saturday, Sep 29

Open Mic Night

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

Music, storytelling, comedy and more

8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Call for a reservation. Use sponsor code CVFAITH

Tuesday, Sep 25

Hiking Basics - R

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Trip planning, equipment & safety information

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305 www.rei.com/fremont Wednesday, Sep 26

FRC CalFresh/Food Stamp Clinic

1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Low income families get help applying for benefits. Call for an appointment

Fremont Family Resource Center, Pacific Room #H800 39155 Liberty St. (at Capitol), Fremont (510) 574-2000 Wednesday, Sep 26

Healthy Eating for Older Adults

1:30 p.m. Nutrition & diet guidelines for older adults, their family members & service providers

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Thursday, Sep 27

"Fremont's Got Talent" Getting Ready to Audition

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Learn what judges look for, practice poise & learn to perform in front of an audience

Fremont Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4344 Thursday, Sep 27 - Saturday, Sep 29

Mill Creek Ramblers, Prairie & Beargrass Creek

7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Live Blue Grass & Country music

Mission Pizza & Pub 1572 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-6858 www.missionpizza.com Friday, Sep 28

Lorax

8:15 p.m. Family movie night. Bring a low chair or blanket

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 Friday, Sep 28

SAVE Breakfast Eye Opener $

7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. Educating the community about domestic violence

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390 www.save-dv.org

Friday, Sep 28

San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery Clean-Up

Faith Lutheran Church 20080 Redwood Road, Castro Valley (510 582-0818

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Sep 29

Help maintain historic landmark. Water & snacks provided

Georgian Manor Holiday Boutique

San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery Corner of Usher Street & College Street, San Lorenzo (510) 581-2516 www.haywardareahistory.org

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Hand crafted arts & crafts, baked goods, and more

Georgian Manor Clubhouse 1419 Buckingham, Hayward (510) 887-4366 harlene@vipmarketing.com


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 23

Saturday, Sep 29

Monday, Oct 1

Monday, Oct 1

Castro Valley Pop-Up Museum

Community Emergency Response Team Training - R

Link to Jobs - Career Strategies

11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Learn about and contribute to Castro Valley’s history

3324 Village Drive, Castro Valley www.HaywardAreaHstory.org Saturday, Sep 29

6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Learn emergency assistance procedures for residents of Hayward or Fairview

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4948

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Learn to use library resources in your job search Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Full Moon Hike

Send us your event information tricityvoice@aol.com

7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Learn about history & Earth science on this walk

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Sep 29

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m. "Lazybones," "Felix in Love," & "Gymnasium Jim"

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Sep 29

Queen's Closet Fashion Show $

6 p.m. Benefit for local military veterans. Special guest Mrs. California 2012

Fremont Veterans Hall 37154 Second St., Fremont (510) 248-9570 fremontbsm@yahoo.com Saturday, Sep 29

Author Event

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

continued from page 1

year long. Young says this event helps the community by “filling a need for seniors who don’t have a lot to look forward to.” “Under the Big Top” aims to give them a night to remember with clowns; basket raffles; prizes

and certificates; banquet style fare; and entertainment by In Full Swing, a 15-piece orchestra comprised of seniors, sponsored by the Castro Valley Adult School. Attendees will enjoy the great yesteryear sounds of Big Band music as well as hits right up to the present day. Bay Area Event Photography will provide everyone with a commemorative picture, and attendees will be crossing their fingers in hopes of taking home the evening’s Grand Prize of an iPad, generously donated by Fremont Hills Assisted Living. Each attendee receives one free raffle ticket, and can buy additional tickets to better their chances. With all the promise of fun and excitement, there is one important factor that seniors need to enjoy this special evening you. TCEC needs community members to be escorts and sponsors so as many seniors as possible are able to attend this event. Escorts pick seniors up at their homes, take them to the event,

and return them home after the festivities. They are asked to pay for their own dinner if possible for $50, and would be helping out tremendously if they could sponsor their senior as well for $55, part of which goes to the PUN Fund. Anyone in the community is able to help by sponsoring a senior for the evening, or donating any amount they wish. Those who donate will also be entered in the drawing for the iPad, regardless of attendance. $10 will get you five chances to win the popular tablet. Young says many seniors are very reliant on Medicare and Medical who have made a lot of cutbacks in what they cover. Proceeds from the event will also go to a variety of extras where seniors need help, from dental work to the very simplest of needs, as in the case of one senior who just needed a new pillow. “Seniors in this area are struggling,” says Young. “With cutbacks there’s so much they can’t afford.”

Check our web site for local Movie Listings and information www.tricityvoice.com

As Seniors’ Night Out is a self-paid event, TCEC appreciates the aid of individuals, corporations, and companies in making a difference in the lives of our seniors. Event sponsors include Kaiser Permanente, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Washington Hospital Foundation, and Cargill Salt, who receives warm hearted thanks for being the event’s largest supporter for all 19 years. To sponsor or escort a senior, call (510) 818-9888 or e-mail SeniorsNightOut@comcast.net. Those interested in being escorts are asked to respond by Friday, September 28 at the latest. To learn more about the Tri-City Elder Coalition, call (510) 5742063 or visit www.tceconline.org. Seniors Night Out Friday, Oct 5 5:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 818-9888

Local author Nancy Curteman discusses latest novel

Ohlone College participates in federal grant for job training

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 www.nancycurteman.com Saturday, Sep 29

Tie a Wish Chinese Knotted Bracelet Workshop

2 p.m. Learn the ancient art of knot tying. Children 9 and up

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Sunday, Sep 30

Comedy in Concert $

6 p.m. Humorist and songwriter Greg Tamblyn

Unity Church of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-5234 Sunday, Sep 30

Shoreline Trash Takers

10:30 a.m. - 12 noon Volunteers pick-up litter

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Sunday, Sep 30

Discernment Group Gathering

9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Single Catholic women 18-40 learn about religious life & vocation. Lunch included

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335 www.msjdominicans.org Sunday, Sep 30

Great Sugar Dump 5k $R

8:30 a.m. Fun run & health fair

Cisco's McCarthy Campus 115 N. McCarthy Blvd., Milpitas (408) 736-8326 www.GenerationsWellness.org Sunday, Sep 30

Wine & Liberty Celebration $R

1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Meet Libertarian Party leaders. Wine tasting, food & raffle.

Westover Vineyards 34329 Palomares Rd., Castro Valley (510) 482-3521 Sunday, Sep 30

Waggin' Tails Pet Fashion Show $

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Benefit s Rocket Dog Rescue & the Hayward Animal Shelter

Good Dog Day Care 2427 Pratt Ave., Hayward (510) 324-1176

SUBMITTED BY ADOBE ART GALLERY

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE

The Adobe Art Gallery is proud to present the 35th Area Artists’ Annual Juried Exhibit, showcasing work by artists of the Bay Area art community. Artists are invited to submit entries for the show on Thursday, September 27, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., and Saturday, September 29, 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. This juried group exhibit is for artist 18 or over who reside, teach art, take art classes, or belong to art associations in the Bay Area. The exhibit is judged by San Francisco artist, Janet Jones. A graduate of the California College of Arts and Crafts, now known as the California College of the Arts, Jones worked for several years first as a painter and then as a graphic designer, before turning to printmaking, developing experimental methods and materials and combining printmaking with digital technology, collage, mixed media and book arts. Her work is in many private and corporate collections in the United States and Europe, and she is featured in the Lark publication, “Masters: Collage.” She is a member of the California Society of Printmakers, and is represented in the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts collection at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco. Artists’ reception and awards presentation will be held Saturday, October 20 from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. The public is invited and admittance is free. The 35th Area Artists’ Annual Juried Exhibit will be held October 20 – December 1 at the Adobe Art Gallery, 20395 San Miguel Avenue, Castro Valley. Exhibition hours are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. and by appointment. For more information and entry form, visit www.adobegallery.org or e-mail adobegallery@haywardrec.org.

Ohlone College is part of a large consortium of community college districts, and UC Berkeley, CSU East Bay, and public workforce systems that will collaborate on an innovative job training and job placement program for Bay Area workers funded by a U.S. Department of Labor Grant for $14,990,417. The Contra Costa College District and Los Medanos College are the consortia leaders on this grant and, in addition to the other colleges and universities, will involve the Alameda County and Contra Costa County Workforce Investment Boards, employers and labor organizations in the manufacturing industry, organized labor unions, the Career Ladders project team and the economic development department. The original design team worked under the title: Design it, Build it, Ship it. Success of the program lies in its ability to help unemployed and underemployed adults train for jobs

termed “middle skill” jobs for employers who have jobs that need to be filled. The grant was developed in cooperation with several employers. First phase of funding for this multiyear grant will be spent identifying specific programs, curriculum development, partnerships with employers, developing budgets and planning outreach efforts. The identified job sectors include transportation, logistics and advanced manufacturing. Ohlone College's involvement would most likely be in biotechnology and information technology. The program will award certificates for biopharmaceutical technician, engineering technician, supply chain systems, medical device manufacturing, transportation logistics, semiconductor design and fabrication and other. There will also be components for student services that include professional development, job search and placement that may be provided by the TriCities One-Stop Career Center. This grant is one of only five awarded by the Department of Labor to the state of California this year.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

Excellence in financial reporting City has received award for 22 years consecutively SUBMITTED BY RHEA SERRAN The City of Union City has received the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR). This is the 22nd consecutive time that the City has been recognized. The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by the City and its management. Administrative Services Director Richard Digre also recognized Supervising Accountant Gayle Okada for her hard work and dedication for preparing the awardwinning CAFR for the last 22 years. The GFOA established the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting Program (CAFR Program) in 1945 to encourage and assist state and

local governments to go beyond the minimum requirements of generally accepted accounting principles to prepare comprehensive annual financial reports that evidence the spirit of transparency and full disclosure and then to recognize an individual in achieving that goal. Reports submitted to the CAFR program are reviewed by selected members of the GFOA professional staff and the GFOA Special Review Committee (SRC) which comprises individuals with expertise in publicsector financial reporting and includes financial statement preparers, independent auditors, academics and other finance professionals. The receipt of this award is testament to the long hours and hard work by City staff to produce a high quality CAFR. The CAFR documents all of the City's financial transactions and is submitted to the State Controller for review. To view the City of Union City’s 2011 CAFR, visit www.ci.unioncity.ca.us/admin/cafr.htm

ScholarMatch – a path to college dreams BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH PHOTO COURTESY OF YVONNE WINER Yvonne Winer, a recent graduate of Hayward charter school, Leadership Public Schools (LPS), is experiencing the joys of her freshman year at UCLA, thanks to the support of ScholarMatch. The nonprofit organization, founded in 2010 by philanthropist and author Dave Eggers, utilizes the technology of an innova-

tive online platform to connect donors with students needing financial assistance to make their college dreams a reality. Through the organization’s website, potential donors can read about, view video profiles and get to know amazing scholars who need “a helping hand” for college tuition. Additionally, donors, via tax-deductible donations, invest in a student’s future. “The website is a platform for students to tell their stories and for donors to invest and contribute to scholarships,” states ScholarMatch Executive Director, Diana Adamson. “If necessary, the organization can pool together donations from a group of donors [to fund a scholarship], dependent on the student’s need.” ScholarMatch is an offshoot of “826 Valencia,” a successful writing and tutorial center begun in 2002 by educator Nínive Calegari and author Eggers, to help students ages 6 – 18, in San Francisco’s Mission District. “Over the years, there was a dramatic increase and need for more scholarships for those hopefuls graduating from the 826 Program,” says Adamson. “Dave Eggars was the impetus for the creation of ScholarMatch, a separate organization to address just scholarships,” she adds. Students, besides those previously involved with the 826 Valencia program, can be nominated for ScholarMatch by a mentor, a teacher or community organization. “The counselors at LPS called me and a few classmates into their office to tell us about the ScholarMatch program,” says Winer. “They knew each of us were the most likely to apply for the scholarship. My counselor and World History teacher nominated me.” Quite active at her high school, Winer founded “Travel For A Cause” and participated in Walk Against Genocide and Habitat for Humanity. She also earned an impressive list of honors including a Certificate of

Merit at National Young Leaders Conference in Washington D.C. (2011), Award for Excellence: English (2011) and World History (2010), and Captain Planet Award for world mindfulness (2011). The ScholarMatch application consisted of a personal statement and letter of recommendation. “I created a profile of myself for donors,” says Winer. “It was nice because it was a similar process that I used for college applications.”

Executive Director Adamson explains that the organization gives students on the “college track,” the support they need. “The organization works with the students during their senior high school year to access all resources and help fund the remaining gap need.” Additionally, ScholarMatch provides other necessary services for students such as: drop-in financial-aid assistance, help with the college application process, resume writing and various college readiness workshops. “I am so grateful to ScholarMatch. They offered a financial aid workshop in which a staff member literally sat down with my mom and I and went through each of my college financial aid reports. It was really helpful.” Winer says that relatives on her mom’s side of the family did not have the financial support necessary to attend college but she received encouragement to dream big. “Some of my friends had parents who told them to stay local for college, but my mom always told me “follow your passion” regardless of the distance it took me. Her support was the single most influential factor of my college experience.” To serve as many students as possible, ScholarMatch raises funds a year in advance of distribution. “Last year we gave out $99,000 in scholarships to 43 students,” states Adamson. “This year we are dispensing $130,000 via 70 scholarships. The goal for next year is $190,000 and 90 scholarships.” She points out that the organization needs to ensure that it doesn’t over-commit and has adequate funds to support the program. “ScholarMatch continues to support students for four years (or more) as long as they remain in good standing with the organization and their school.” Adamson adds, “Our scholarships are not guaranteed [dependent on donations], but we limit the number of students we take so that continued on page 36


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Governor Brown appoints Khanna to State Workforce Board Rebuilding and reinvigorating the state’s long-neglected Workforce Investment Board, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. announced August 27, 2012, the appointment of 30 of California’s brightest business, labor and education leaders to help put Californians back to work. Among those appointed is Ro Khanna, 35, of Fremont. Khanna has been of counsel for Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati since 2011 and was deputy assistant secretary at the United States Department of Commerce from 2009 to 2011. He was counsel at O’Melveny and Myers from 2004 to 2009. Khanna is a visiting lecturer at the Stanford University Department of Economics. The California Workforce Investment Board is a private-sector led body tasked with advising the Governor on jobs and workforce development. The Board will work closely with Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GO-Biz) to identify the needs of industry and to create career pathways that provide businesses the skilled workforce they need and while putting unemployed and underemployed Californians back to work. “To meet this skills challenge and ensure a prosperous future, we must do a much better job aligning California’s existing public education and workforce training resources with the needs of key industry sectors,” said Board Chair Mike Rossi. “This requires a robust analysis of California’s labor markets and regional economies and better coordination among all our education and training programs.”

City Hires Downtown Project Manager SUBMITTED BY CHERYL GOLDEN The City of Fremont is pleased to announce its recent hire of Jessica von Borck, who will join the City team as its Downtown Project Manager. Ms. von Borck comes to Fremont from the Town of Los Gatos where she served as the Economic Vitality Manager. Prior to that, she worked for the City of Mountain View in both urban planning and economic development capacities. Ms. von Borck's area of focus in both communities was largely related to downtown development and enrichment. As Downtown Project Manager for Fremont, she will play a key role in creating a vibrant urban mixed-use district within the City Center that will serve as a destination for the city and region. The City has positioned the Downtown as a priority area for development by committing time and resources. And as a result, Ms. von Borck will begin to coordinate internal and external partners focused on bringing the Downtown Community Plan to life. For more information about the Downtown, go to www.Fremont.gov/Downtown.

Inside look at new hospital

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

T

he first in a series of grand opening events, Eden Medical Center’s “Once in a Blue Moon” gala on September 22 was the community’s first opportunity to view the new Castro Valley hospital. The sold-out event raised funds to help update equipment and purchase new state-of-the-art technology for the facility, while giving attendees a first hand look at some of the features that make the new Eden Medical Center a 21st-century hospital. After three years of construction and numerous years of planning and designing, the facility not only boasts the latest in technology for advanced diagnosis and treatment, but is proudly green and more efficient, as well as being patient-centered. All patient rooms are private with private bathrooms and overnight accommodations for a family member, and instead of taking patients from place to place, equipment will come to them when possible. There are comfortable waiting areas on each floor, and a healing garden for patients and family members. The hospital has 130 private patient rooms, 22 private Emergency Department exam rooms, four trauma bays, a Universal Care Unit for patients needing care for 24 hours or less, with features like rooftop gardens, an outdoor dining patio, 70 new trees (with more to be added in Phase II), and a cafe with healthy, appealing food choices, food stations, and pizza ovens. Scheduled to open December 1, the seven-story, 220,000-square-foot hospital is adorned with a dramatic 125-foot 43,000 pound steel spire.

Those who missed the gala will get a second chance for an inside look when the Center hosts a Community Open House on Saturday, September 29. Attendees will see patient rooms, emergency room and trauma center, surgery areas, radiology and the latest in digital imaging. In addition to tours of the hospital, attendees will enjoy music provided by KKIQ radio station, nutrition and health information, kid’s activities, light refreshments, and an onsite, local organic chef who will be providing healthy selections available for purchase. For those concerned about the old hospital building, it will be torn down after the new facility is up and running. Ninety-nine percent of the building will be recycled, with equipment sent to different areas in need, and the building materials used to make parking lots. If you would like to see the latest in the world of health care and discover how you can receive the highest level of care and safety, check out the new Eden Medical Center. Those planning to attend the Community Open House should RSVP to 888445-8433 or fill out the request form online. For more information about Eden Medical Center, call (510) 5371234 or go to www.edenmedicalcenter.org.

Community Open House Saturday, September 29 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Eden Medical Center 20103 Lake Chabot Rd., Castro Valley 888-445-8433 www.edenmedcenter.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

Cougars top Colts in volleyball play

Logan defeats Antioch 3-0 in home opener Women’s Volleyball

Women’s Volleyball

SUBMITTED BY STEVE BURMASTER The James Logan High School girls' volleyball team made the most of their home opener, defeating Antioch High School in 3 straight games: 25-19, 25-17, and 25-7. The Colts looked sluggish in Games 1 and 2, but played well enough to win both. Antioch stayed close in each game, and even tied the score in Game 2 at 16-16 before the Colts pulled away to win. In Game 3, the Colts finally began to play to their potential by focusing more, minimizing their own errors, and making the visiting team pay whenever they sent over a "free ball". It was nice to see a fast paced attack occur multiple times with lots of success, due to everyone fulfilling their role on the team. Better passing and digging by the Colts resulted in more accurate sets to the hitters, who were in better position to attack the ball because of their great attention to detail. This match proved to be a good opportunity for Logan to utilize a lot of things that they had been working on in practice in a real game/match situation. It was very nice to see the continued progress of the team. While there is still a lot of work to do, tonight's concentration, attention to detail and high level of effort in Game 3 allowed the Colts to play at a high level. Keep up the good work!

SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER September 20 Newark Memorial played outstanding volleyball throughout the match using good defense, solid hitter coverage, tough serving, and a well-run offensive attack to keep the "Colts" off balance throughout the match. The "Colts" traded points back and forth with the Newark Cougars in the first game. After an apparent block (the ball never crossed the net) to tie the game at 22, the visiting team called timeout; the score was changed to 21-23 after the 1st referee indicated a net on a "Colt" player and the momentum shifted; it also changed the score at a very crucial point in the game. Still the "Colts" fought back to tie the game at 23-23 before dropping 23-25. Following multiple point leads, multiple times throughout the match, Newark fought back to make the game close before finally closing out the game to win 25-21. It was all Newark Memorial in Game 3 due to tough serving that forced lots of serve receive errors that put the "Colts" on the defensive time and time again. Despite starting out in a hole in Game 4 due to poor passing the "Colts" fought back to tie the game multiple times, but were unable to take the lead. Final result: Newark defeats Logan: 23-25, 25-21, 12-25, 21-25 "Go Colts"!

Mission impressive as it puts one in the win column SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Mission faced a much larger in size Marshall-San Francisco team on Saturday, September 14. They came away with a non-league win, 53-12 ending a 10-game losing streak. A new coaching staff and an impressive offense scheme based on quick ball movement made the difference. Mission scored 14 points in the second quarter and 20 in the third with a great performance by running back Ismail Shafi, who darted for 215 yards on 17 carries and two touchdowns. He racked up 124 yards by the end of the second quarter. The Warriors even recovered an onside kick which that led to a five-play, 49-yard drive and a 15-yard touchdown run for Shafi. The air, attack for mission was also impressive as Tamim Sarwary – 12 for 19 passed for 154 yards with three touchdowns His best receiver of the night was Idris Gettani, who caught four passes for 94 yards and two touchdowns. Mission, with its new offense, could be the dark horse in the Mission Valley Athletic League this year!

Washington overwhelms Mission San Jose SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Washington Huskies defense quickly took control of the game denying the MSJ Warriors of a ground or air attack. It seemed that Husky defenders were in the face of the quarterback throughout the game, either in the pocket or when scrambling. The Huskies held Mission to just 101 yards (76 yards rushing). This game may be a preview of a MVAL title contender this year as Husky quarterback Kyle Malpede completed 9 of 13 passes for 129 yards and two touchdowns. Kyle had no trouble finding his top receiver of the night, Brandon Sewell, with five receptions for 105 yards and two touchdowns. The first pass was a quick 25-yard strike that gave Washington a 7-0 lead with 10:25 left in the first quarter. The second touchdown was the result of a 27- yard pass that ended a great offensive drive, giving the Huskies a 34-0 lead with 8:36 left in the second quarter. Washington’s Nate Woudstra also had a great night with 12 carries for 77 yards and his teammate, Eddie Adams, got 60 yards on 11 runs and scored two touchdowns.

Newark dominates San Lorenzo in home opener PHOTOS BYE MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Cougars wasted no time claiming their home field as they met the San Lorenzo Rebels in their home opener. Newark won 53 to 6 by playing great all-around

football. They marched the ball down the field from the outset, introducing fans to a great night for the offense. Senior Mark Morton ran for 204 Yards as the offensive line opened holes in the San Lorenzo defense all night. Not to be outdone, the Cougar defense stepped up and put pressure on the Rebels Quarterback Andre Benson who spent his time in the game running for his life; he was sacked three times. Cougar junior defensive back Aaron Miller made a great play, picking off Benson and Newark led at the half, 18-0. The Rebels were held to just 71 yards. Marty Leggett had a great night with 66 yards Newark will be in the thick of things this year as the battle for Mission Valley Athletic League supremacy is up for grabs.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Auto Review

Scion FR-S: A halo car to stir the showroom

BY STEVE SCHAEFER

I

've eagerly awaited the arrival of the Scion FR-S. Jointly developed with Subaru, it offers buyers a real, affordable sports coupe in sales volumes that may actually be profitable. I spent a fun week with a Hot Lava orange model with a sixspeed manual transmission. This car delivers the goods, with taut handling, a short-throw transmission with the metal-on-metal precision of a Miata, and the low-slung, quick feeling you want in a car built for driving pleasure. FR-S stands for Front-engine, Rear-wheel drive, Sport. I still am not a big fan of acronymic car names, especially new ones. The Subaru is called the BRZ. I have no idea what that stands for. In my opinion, this is a car that just screams to be called a Toyota Celica, but Toyota is giving this to Scion as a "halo car." The brand needs more fresh products, too. There are Toyota historical references. The company directs us back to the beloved "hachi-roku" (8-6 in Japanese) AE86 Corolla, which offered sparkling performance at a reasonable price point. They even installed a surprisingly weighty-looking "86" chrome badge on the front fender that combines the "hachi-roku" with a horizontal piston, indicating the flat, horizontally-opposed engine (a Subaru specialty). This is the first use of this type of engine in a front engine, rear-wheel-drive configuration. Although Subaru was the main engine developer, Toyota added its special touch. Their D-

4S injection system incorporates both direct and port injection for each cylinder, one injecting fuel directly into the combustion chamber, the other a port injector located above the intake valves. Both cars share this technology,

short sections of straightaway, the steering was responsive and in the narrow sport seats, it was all grins for me. I kept it in second and third gear the whole time, and didn't need to hit anywhere near triple digits to have a blast.

and fairly upscale. Leather on the shifter and steering wheel (which tilts and telescopes) makes the proper reference to the car's classic British inspirations. A pistolgrip door pull and armrest felt just right when I wasn't busy Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

and it means that they get 200 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. of torque from just 2.0 liters of displacement, without a turbocharger. However, like turbo models, the engine uses premium fuel, which at last report from my local 76 station (not related to 86) was running a sobering $4.41 a gallon. I got 26.9 mpg, and the EPA awards the car 22 City, 30 Highway, and 25 Average. I took the car on my normal errands, but also swung by Palomares Road, a slithering stretch of north-south two-lane not too far from home. As I expected, the FR-S stayed stable in various radius turns, leaped forward in the

The car looks fierce, with sharp, eagle-eye headlamp clusters, lots of creases and character lines, and a ready-to-pounce look that suits a car with this job to do. The press notes say the profile is inspired by the Toyota 2000GT, a fine and rare car indeed. The Subaru version has a somewhat different face but is mainly distinguished by offering a few things the Scion doesn't, such as automatic climate control and a rear spoiler. The interior is appropriately proportioned, and, as a Scion, isn't lavish. The "turned plastic" dash panel looked cheap, but the overall presentation felt strong

steering and shifting. The dash cover looks "melted" over the speaker grilles - a cute touch. The FR-S comes standard with an eight-speaker AM/FM/CD/USB 300-watt Pioneer audio system. Standard features also include HD Radio™ technology and Bluetooth® connectivity. I was able to set up my phone and plug in my iPod with no problem. You really do sit low in this car, and it's hard to drop down into the seat and spring up quickly when you exit if you're not in the blush of youth. I also felt the seatbelt touching my neck, and there is no way to ad-

just it - the strap it ran through on the seat made no difference. Once you're in place, though, it's cozy and not too rough on the old posterior. There's a vestigial back seat, distinguishing it from a Miata, but it's best to flip it down and use its flat surface to carry stuff. This is a trunked coupe - not a hatchback. Pricing starts at $24,930 for the six-speed manual and $26,030 for the automatic. That puts it at the top of the Scion hierarchy, where a halo car belongs. Despite its legitimate chops as a sports coupe, it seems a bit offtarget from the basic cars on the original Scion mission - but I doubt if there is any complaining from car shoppers or Toyota and Subaru dealers.

Young illegal immigrants may get driver's licenses

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Most Californians her age can drive. But Esquivel, a college freshman, was brought illegally to the United States from Mexico when she was 7. And California has denied driving privileges to immigrants lacking legal status since 1993. “Without a license ... I have to depend on others to do the basic things,” said Esquivel, who lives in rural Parlier, Calif., has classes at the college four times a week in Fresno. “It's a big inconvenience.” But Esquivel soon could get driving privileges: She is one of an estimated million eligible for a new federal program that temporarily defers deportation and grants work permits to people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. California has the largest number of potential applicants. The new immigration policy has brought to the forefront the long-running and bitter debate over whether illegal immigrants should have access to driver's licenses. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said that each state could determine whether to issue licenses or extend other benefits to young immigrants who qualify for the deferred status. Some states, such as Oregon and Georgia, have announced that they will grant driving privileges to those eligible for the new program. Others, such as Arizona and Mississippi, have vowed to deny them. California legislators this month approved a bill that would allow an estimated 450,000 eligible young immigrants in the state to use the federal work permits at the Department of Motor Vehicles as proof of lawful presence in the country. The bill is now headed to the governor. For young people like Esquivel, foreign-born but steeped in America's language and lifestyles, the single administrative policy at the federal level, coupled with a state decision, could spell a life-changing moment – transforming school and work opportunities, daily nuisances and even social lives. In California, where the automobile is king and car-culture dominates, the change could be most profound. Nearly inaccessible without a car, the state is famous for its freeways, streets lacking sidewalks and spotty or nonexistent

public transportation. Driving is more than a practical necessity for Californians: it's a birthright. Illegal immigrants in California who can't drive face a long series of daily inconveniences and calculated risks. Some drive without a license, unable to find another way to get to work or school. Others depend on family, friends and co-workers for rides. It's especially hard on young people like Esquivel, who was raised in the U.S., but has had to miss out on the quintessential American rite of passage. She got top grades at Parlier High School, earning a merit scholarship to attend college, and plans to become an elementary school teacher. But at an age when getting behind the wheel seems pivotal, Esquivel can't drive to the mall or to see her friends, not to mention to school or work. “Sometimes I feel like going out, but I can't really do that,” she said. Esquivel was smuggled by relatives through a border checkpoint in a car with her younger sister – an experience she barely remembers. In high school, she watched classmates get driver's licenses and cars as soon as they turned 16. Esquivel and a few others could not apply because of their legal status. “It was hard,” she said. “I felt left out. They were able to do things, go places, and I couldn't.” Parlier, population 14,500, has little in the way of public transportation, stores or services. Residents drive virtually everywhere – to get to work, grocery shopping, to the doctor and to church. Esquivel's parents, who pick grapes, olives and other crops in nearby fields, don't have time to drive her places and have not allowed Esquivel to drive without a license, because it's too dangerous, she said. “If I get stopped, I could get deported,” she said. “Things like that worry them.” Numerous bills to grant licenses to those without legal status in California have failed or been vetoed by several governors over the past decade. Still, the commute to college has proved a challenge. Family members have to wait for hours while Esquivel is in class. And while the young woman's boyfriend, a U.S. citizen, also studies at

Fresno State, their schedules don't coincide. Her parents told her she might soon have to drive on her own, which fills Esquivel with dread. For the past month, she has occasionally sat behind the wheel with a relative in the passenger seat, in lieu of driving lessons. Esquivel, who is in the process of applying for the new immigration program, hopes a license will come with it. To benefit, immigrants must prove they arrived in the United States before they turned 16, were younger than 31 as of June 15, have been living in the country at least five years, are in school or graduated, and have not been convicted of certain crimes. Young immigrants who qualify won't get permanent legal residency or a path to citizenship, but will receive a work authorization card and a Social Security number. “I'm really hoping the law that allows us to drive will pass,” Esquivel said. “It would be a great relief for me.” Critics of the new immigration program say granting licenses to young immigrants like Esquivel would reward and accommodate illegal immigrants. “We're already paying for the costs of illegal immigration. Why should we pay for additional benefits?” said Bob Dane, spokesman with the Federation for American Immigration Reform in Washington D.C. “The driver's license is a breeder document which opens up a full spectrum of rights and privileges” such as access to banking accounts, credit cards and mortgages. But immigrant advocates say denying licenses to people approved under the new immigration program is illogical. “This is a common sense issue,” said Marielena Hincapie, executive director of the Los Angeles based National Immigration Law Center. “These are young people who will have valid work authorization and Social Security numbers. They will need to drive to school, to work, to medical appointments. From a policy perspective, granting them licenses makes sense.” For Esquivel, a license would also mean fulfilling another wish: driving 200 miles north to Sacramento to visit grandparents she has not seen for years.

SUBMITTED BY HAHS PHOTO BY BILL MANCEBO

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ver wondered if McConaghy House and the Meek Mansion might be haunted? Curious about the possible existence of the paranormal? The American Paranormal Research Association (APRA) will explain their work, present their findings and give everyone the chance to investigate the properties for paranormal activity. The Hayward Area Historical Society (HAHS), which manages the historic properties, will use the funds raised from this event toward their restoration. Investigations will be conducted at the Meek Mansion, 17365 Boston Road, on Friday, October 26 and at McConaghy House, 18701 Hesperian Boulevard, on Saturday, October 27, 2012, from 6:30 p.m. until 3:00 a.m. The two-night investigation is $75 per night or $100 for both. Space is limited and tickets must be purchased in advance from the HAHS. Dinner will be provided on Friday; refreshments and snacks will be available on Friday and Saturday. For more information or to reserve your spot, call (510) 581-2516 and ask for Heather. For more details about the American Paranormal Research Association, visit www.APRAParanormal.com. Voices from the Past Friday, October 26 and Saturday, October 27 6:30 p.m. - 3:00 a.m. Meek Mansion 17365 Boston Rd, Hayward McConaghy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd, Hayward (510) 581-2516 www.HaywardAreaHistory.org


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council September 18, 2012 Consent: Award contract to Gordon N. Ball, Inc. for Deep Creek Road Pedestrian Crossing improvements in the amount of $417, 013. Accept Highway Safety Improvement funds of $391,400 and transfer to Fremont Boulevard/Alder Avenue traffic signal and pedestrian crossing project. Authorize purchase order for support of software and maintenance of PeopleSoft HR/Payroll through October 30, 2013 not-toexceed $252,954.31. Authorize purchase order for software maintenance of dispatch and records management in the amount of $136,029. Approve mutual aid agreement with Menlo Park Fire Protection District. Grant variance for right-of-way dedication and street improvements on Palm Avenue. Adopt “Open for Business” pledge with East Bay Economic Development Alliance Accept Urban Area Security Initiative funds in the amount of $750,000 for disaster preparedness Replace irrigation controllers with Measure WW funds – project budget $694,000. Reject all bids for construction contract of Phase II Beacon/California/Walnut frontage Allow alteration of High Town Square Planned District to allow development of 10 dwelling units on 0.64 acres in Irvington. Approve Conditional Use Permit for a tattoo and body piercing establishment at 40985 Fremont Boulevard. Grant Laguna Commons acquisition loan in the amount of $2,946,933 for purchase of 1.45 acres at 41126 and 41152 Roberts Avenue. Funds from Affordable Housing In-Lieu Fee Fund. Settle payments and terminate water facility relocation agreement with Alameda County Water District and former Redevelopment Agency.

Scheduled Items: Approve Downtown Community Plan and Design Guidelines. Certify Downtown Community Plan Supplemental Environmental Impact Report Create a new Downtown District zone Adopt new street standards for the District Introduced as one of the “most important opportunities” in the City that will create a 110-acre “social heart,” encourage economic development and an identity for downtown. Envisioned as a transitoriented development that leverages the existing Fremont BART station and will be a sustainable model neighborhood. Goals and objectives included a “memorable,” mixed-use pedestrian-friendly development that uses its connections to transportation and streetscape to support economic vitality, energy efficiency and reflect cultural diversity. The landscape connecting with smaller blocks, open space, civic center and possibly a performing arts center, will highlight public art and visual cues. It will connect Capitol Avenue with Fremont Boulevard and increase retail and residential usage to bring new dwelling units for thousands of new residents. Attractive parking facilities will be created to accommodate visitors and residents. Building in the downtown will be “form-based” allowing diversity within pre-determined a “complete, thoughtful framework providing certainty for developers. Although “zones” of downtown will be diverse, continuity is envisioned throughout. A complete discussion and brochure of the Downtown Community Plan is available at www.fremont.gov Council Communications: Mayor Morrison appointments to Youth Advisory Commission: Sanjana Gundala, Nishtha Bhatia, Sonia Sachar Mayor Gus Morrison Aye Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Aye Bill Harrison Aye Suzanne Lee Chan Aye Dominic Dutra Aye

Hayward City Council September 18, 2012 Consent Approved plans and specifications and call for bids to be received on November 6, 2012 for Dixon Street improvements (Tennyson Road to Valle Vista Avenue). The estimated project cost is $2.55M with completion of construction scheduled for November 27, 2013. Reimbursement of $195,667 from the Park in-Lieu fee account to the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD) for Skywest Golf Course Improvements Projects and of $17,746.38 from the same account for the Silver Star Veterans Park Bocce Ball Court Reconstruction Project. Legislative Business Introduced ordinance amending City’s Municipal Code to ac-

cept fats, oils and grease (FOG) waste at the Water Pollution Control Facility (WPCF) and established fees and charges for permitting and receipt of fats, oil and grease. Revenue raised by grease-receiving station will be placed in the Wastewater Operating Fund toward WPCF operations and maintenance. Projected revenues could amount to $100,000 per annum. Public Comment Elie Goldstein, Jarrod Carozza and Ignacio Treijo highlighted the loss of business because of parking issues on Foothill Boulevard arising from the Route 238 Corridor Improvement Project. Goldstein has seen a 30 percent decline in foot traffic. Treijo has lost half of his clients. Carozza and Treijo asked if the City might have funds set aside to help suffering businesses offset their losses or for advertising and

marketing of these establishments. Jim Drake thanked the City Manager for providing access to the underground car park at City Hall after close of business. He is pleased with the curb and sidewalk improvements along Franklin Avenue but unhappy with the previously scattered refuse that the contractor assembled at a single location to enable the start of these transportation improvements. The refuse has not been removed. Charlie Peters, Clean Air Performance Professionals, informed Council that the federal Environmental Protection Agency has extended the time to consider the discontinuing the use of corn ethanol in gasoline. Peters considers production of corn ethanol increases the prices of gas, food and other corn-related products.

Fremont Human Relations Commission honors volunteers and professionals SUBMITTED BY RIPPLE LEUNG In April of this year, the Fremont Human Relations Commission re-launched the Human Relations Commission Awards Program. Since the early 1990’s, the Commission has recognized individuals and groups in the community that have made outstanding contributions in the pursuit of equality, justice, human services and human rights for all citizens. Every day, volunteers as well as organizations and those who have chosen “helping profession” work, provide others with hope and assistance. Often this work is done quietly without fanfare. HRC would like to commend and honor those who have chosen to make a difference in our community. In June, a panel of independent community judges selected four outstanding individuals and an organization for recognition: Mr. Jeevan Zutshi - Intercultural Affairs: for promoting activities and organizations which foster human rights, and encourage awareness and understanding among diverse racial and ethnic groups in Fremont and nationally. Dr. Raj Salwan - Community Action: for his many years of leadership on commissions and boards that support the work of the City and local non-profits benefitting the community. He currently chairs the board of directors for the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. He is a believer that Fremont’s greatest strength is its diversity. Ms. Marty Fraga - Human Services Professional: for her leadership at LIFE ElderCare. As a nurse and health care educator Marty works with California State University East Bay to bring fourth year nursing students to

Fremont to provide direct services to vulnerable seniors in their homes. Marty’s concern for the elderly in the community has been a life long passion and she is transmitting that passion to the next generation of young health care workers. Ms. Mary Margaret Simms - Human Services Individual: for 21 years of services as a LIFE ElderCare Meals on Wheels volunteer driver. “Mary Margaret’s wonderful sparkle and warmth of heart just seems to make the day go a little better” for seniors in the community who receive meals from her. She helps make their day brighter, proving that “living longer does not mean living less.” Abode Services - Human Services Organization: for creating programs to help families and individuals in crisis find and remain in stable housing and chart new pathways to greater self-sufficiency. The Fremont City Council will honor those being recognized for their exceptional endeavors on October 2, 2012 and featured in the Tri-City Voice, media sponsor of the awards program. The Commission encourages everyone in the community to think about “what could you do in just one day to make a difference in Fremont?” Join the HRC and others in the community on October 27, for a national day of neighbors helping neighbors – Make A Difference Day. Create a project or volunteer to help. For more information, call (510) 574-2009 or e-mail makeadifferenceday@fremont.gov. If you have questions or need additional information about the Human Relations Commission, please contact us at hrc@fremont.gov.

Join the General Plan task force SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM LENS The City of Hayward seeks individuals interested in serving on a new task force and who represent all age groups and community sectors. The General Plan Task Force will provide input to City staff during the development of the new General Plan. The General Plan is the City’s basic planning document and provides a blueprint for development, guides growth

Tuesday, Sept 25 League of Women Voters and San Leandro Chamber of Commerce 7 p.m. San Leandro Council Districts 2, 4, 6 Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd., San Leandro (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea.org Wednesday, Sept 26 League of Women Voters and Castro Valley TV 6 p.m. BART District 5 7 p.m. Castro Valley Unified School District Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea.org

and sets land use policy citywide. The purpose of a general plan is to: identify land use, transportation, environmental, economic and social goals and policies as they relate to new development; provide a basis for the City’s decision-making; provide citizens with an opportunity to participate in the planning and decisionmaking process; and inform citizens, developers, decision-makers and others of the ground rules that guide development within Hayward.

Wednesday, Sept 26 League of Women Voters 7:00 p.m. New Haven Unified School District 8:15 p.m. Assembly District 20 Hew Haven Administrative Offices 34200 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City (510) 794-5783 www.lwvfnuc.org Thursday, Sept 27 League of Women Voters 7:30 p.m. Ohlone Trustees, Area 2 8:15 p.m. Congressional District 17 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-5783 www.lwvfnuc.org

Prospective applicants must be residents of the incorporated area of Hayward. Applicants under 18 years of age must be enrolled in high school and have parent/legal guardian consent to participate. Applications are valid for one year from the date of receipt and are public record. Prospective applicants must commit to attending monthly, two-hour meetings through 2014. Interested individuals may obtain applications from the Office of the City

Monday, Oct 1 League of Women Voters 6:30 p.m. San Lorenzo Unified School District San Lorenzo Village Homes Association Hall 377 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea.org Wednesday, Oct 3 League of Women Voters 6 p.m. Assembly District 20 7 p.m. Alameda County Supervisor District 2 Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea.org Friday, Oct 5 League of Women Voters 6:30 p.m. Hayward Unified School

Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, California 94541, by calling (510) 583-4400, or by visiting www.haywardca.gov/NEWS/2012. The deadline for submitting applications is 5 p.m. on Wednesday, September 26, 2012. After an initial screening, applicants will be interviewed and appointed by the Hayward City Council in October 2012. The Office of the City Clerk will notify qualified applicants of the date and time of interviews.

District Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-9678 www.lwvea.org Wednesday Oct 10 Milpitas Community Education Endowment 7 p.m. Milpitas Mayor and City Council Barbara Lee Senior Center 40 North Milpitas Blvd., Milpitas (408) 890-7499 www.mceefoundation.org Wednesday, Oct 17 Cherryland Elementary School PTA and Eden United Church of Christ 6 p.m. Hayward Unified School District Eden United Church of Christ

21455 Birch St., Hayward (510) 582-9533. Thursday, Oct 25 Voter Education Night* 5:30 p.m. Hayward Unified School District; propositions on Hayward ballots Fairway Park Baptist Church Gym 31310 Medinah St., Hayward (510) 785-3663 southhaywardparish@hotmail.com * Sponsored by South Hayward Neighborhood Collaborative, South Hayward Parish, Community Resources for Independent Living, League of Women Voters and Fairway Park Neighborhood Association.


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Across 5 Buy _____ and collectibles for the holidays at the Crystal Aerie (5) 9 Raymond Young CPA is a former _______ agent (3) 10 Help fund Co-curricular activities for NHUSD students and win _______ seats at the Justin Bieber concert (3) 13 Antique Treasures has the largest heritage _______ showcase in the Bay Area (4) 14 Induz Dandiya 2012 features spectacular _____ dandiya (5) 15 Cartridge World will _______ all major printer brands (6) 17 Minuteman Press does envelopes & _______ (11) 18 Nothing Bundt Cakes will be your partners in _______ (9) 21 Tired of trying the usual _______ and failing? Call Butchart Health Center (5) 24 Thanks to Palo Alto Medical Foundation, the _______ is over (6) 25 Paseo Dental has the alternative to _______ & suture gum surgery (7) 27 Fremont Flowers announces their wholesale _______, Bay Area Wholesale Flowers (8) 28 Dr. Carol Tavris presents "_______ Were Made (but not by me)" (8) 29 Lynn Dental practices _______ denistry (7)

Down 1 Try the _______ beef at China Express (8) 2 Get Halloween _______ at Jack's Army-Navy Store (8) 3 Attend the Oktoberfest Tennis _______ to benefit the Save Kimber Park effort (5) 4 Cynthia G. Starkey is a _______ specialist (10) 6 Get $2 off a _______ massage at Fremont Health Spa (4) 7 Newark-Fremont Legal Center has free Family Law _______ (8) 8 Frankenstein tells a classic tale of horror and _______ (8) 10 SAVE invites you to their 10th Annual _______ Eye Opener (9) 11 The Annual Senior Health Fair features free health _______ (10) 12 Save on 2013 _______ at BJ Travel (7) 16 Home Made _______ at United Services Credit Union (5) 19 The Center for Implant Dentistry features multiple _______ technologies (8) 20 Get new _______ pianos at Piano Warehouse (5) 22 Make your _______ gift giving list now at the Georgian Manor Holiday Gift Show (7) 23 Contact Mello Insurance to rent an office space for professional or _______ occupancy (7) 26 Bob Sunshine does the _______ direction for the musical, Avenue Q (7)

Read our Ads for the answers Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. All entries will be eligible for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize! MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Deadline for entry is the 10th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper.

September 25th Puzzle Name:

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Newark Police Log via the phone. Ontiveros stated that he would not come out and made that very clear. CHP called in additional officers, Fremont PD, Union City PD and their armored vehicles. Ontiveros eventually surrendered to SWAT. Outstanding job by all involved. Thank you to CHP, Fremont PD and Union PD for the help. It is much appreciated. Officer Fredstrom investigated a burglary at the Zip-N-Out auto repair shop on Cedar Boulevard at 9:40 p.m. The loss was electronics used by the business. The suspect(s) also crashed three customer vehicles while attempting to use one of the vehicles to flee the area. September 17 Officer Homayoun investigated, at 8:40 a.m., a burglary that occurred overnight at Evergreen Oil. The loss was steel piping, copper cable and a flange. Officer Bloom handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the Home Depot at 7:55 p.m. Tim Gamble of Union City was cited at the scene for petty theft. September 18 At 2:41 p.m., Officer Slater investigated a strong arm robbery that occurred outside of Macy’s at NewPark Mall. A Hispanic

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male approached the female victim, pulled a gold chain from her neck, and then fled in a heavily oxidized burgundy Toyota Camry. The female was not injured. At 4:18 p.m., Officer Johnson recognized a vehicle associated with an extra patrol request as being stolen during a residential burglary that Officer Eriksen had investigated earlier in the day. The vehicle was occupied by four male juveniles who were subsequently detained. Officer Eriksen continued the investigation, conducting three probation searches and identifying another juvenile suspect also responsible for the burglary and the stolen vehicle. Three juveniles were ultimately booked into Juvenile Hall and a fourth was issued a citation and released to parents, the fifth juvenile was released after it was determined that he had no idea of the crimes his friends had committed. September 19 At 2:52 p.m., Officer Clark investigated an attempt burglary of a vehicle that occurred in the 35400 block of Newark Boulevard that occurred over the weekend. The reporting party had video showing an attempted bur-

glary of her vehicle. September 20 All officers responded to the 5600 block of Souza Avenue at 1:25 p.m. for a burglary that had just occurred. A neighbor witnessed the suspects exiting the front door and the descriptions are as follows: Suspect 1: Hispanic or Black male adult, 18-20 years old, with red plaid pajama pants and a black hooded sweatshirt. Suspect 2: 18-20 years old with a Black hooded sweatshirt. Suspect 3: 18-20 years old, Heavy/large build, with a black hooded sweatshirt. The residence was ransacked and the loss is unknown at this time. t 3:34 p.m., Officer Allum investigated vandalism to a residence on the 6200 block of Montcalm Ave. Unknown subject(s) threw a large marble through a second story window of the residence shattering it. This residence has been a victim to previous vandalisms. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Alecto to acquire St. Rose Hospital SUBMITTED BY RENEE SNYDER

The St. Rose Hospital Board of Trustees decided, on September 17, 2012, to execute a letter of intent for the acquisition of St. Rose Hospital by Alecto Healthcare Services LLC. "October 2012 marks the 50th Anniversary of St. Rose Hospital being a cherished part of the Hayward community but economic conditions and financial realities have put St. Rose at risk. The Board of Directors, in making this decision, relied heavily on two criteria: that St. Rose remains open and that the Mission remains intact. The Board is confident that we have met those criteria and we look forward to a future that continues the high quality of healthcare excellence, safety and compassion for which St. Rose is known," said Kathleen Streeter, Chair, Board of Trustees, St. Rose Hospital. The proposed transaction includes a commitment by Alecto to keep the mission of St. Rose Hospital the same and to serve the ethnically and economically diverse community with integrity. The Hospital will continue to accept all forms of insurance including Commercial, Medicare, Medi-Cal and members of the community who are uninsured. The valued Medical Staff will remain open and independent as they are currently structured. Alecto has also committed to working collaboratively with employees, current labor unions and management to ensure the best quality patient care experience. "We at St. Rose are delighted to see a solution to the hospital's challenges and look forward to continuing the mission of providing care to all who come through the hospital's doors," said Mak Nakayama, St. Rose Hospital’s Interim President and Chief Executive Officer. Alecto Healthcare Services LLC is newly formed and managed by President and CEO Lex Reddy. Mr. Reddy has more than 25 years of experience in the hospital industry and worked with more than 15 hospitals across California, each facing significant financial challenges upon acquisition. In each instance, Mr. Reddy improved the hospital's financial performance, ensuring that the hospital stayed open to the community in which it served. "Alecto is keenly aware of the role St. Rose plays in providing top quality health care to Hayward and the surrounding communities and that its survival is essential to the continuity of care and well-being of all who look to the hospital for care", stated Reddy. "While each hospital has its own set of challenges, the solutions always involve a strong commitment to the hospital's employees, the physicians in the community and the patients whom we serve. That is also my commitment to St Rose Hospital and the Hayward community."

Suspect Sketches Released in Home Invasion Robbery

area. He had dark brown medium length hair and a round shaped face. He was wearing a light color, possibly yellow, short sleeve crew neck t-shirt and dark, possibly black, normal fitting jeans. The jeans appeared to be well worn, but not ratty, and may have been work type pants. During the incident he held a black semi-automatic pistol in his right hand. The pistol may have been a

compact size and was described as smaller than a full frame. He was not wearing gloves or a mask. spect #2 Described as a Mexican male, and the youngest of the four suspects, appearing to be in his early 20's. He was approximately 5'06", appearing shorter than suspect #1 by 1-2", thin build and a long thin face. Suspect 2 may have had silver color braces on his teeth and had

shorter length dark brown hair and brown eyes. His skin was of medium complexion. He was wearing a gray color long sleeve tshirt or hoody (hooded sweatshirt) that was a little loose and dark color jeans. Suspect #3 Described as possibly a Mexican male in his late 30's to early 40's. He was approximately 5'07", stock build and big (muscular) across the

chest with short dark hair and a round face. He was wearing a light color short sleeve shirt and used his right fist when he struck the victim. Suspect #4 Described as a Mexican male in is Late 30's to early 40's, 5'06"-5'07, with a stocky build and a round face. He had brown hair and brown eyes and was wearing a solid color burgundy short sleeve shirt and

dark color jeans. He was the first to speak to the victim. Anyone with information related to this crime or any other crime that has occurred is encouraged to contact us via email at fremontpolice@fremont.gov, via one of our online submit-a-tip resources at www.fremontpolice.org/tip or by calling our Investigative Unit at 510-790-6900.


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12644535 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Osvaldo Paredes for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Osvaldo Paredes filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Osvaldo Paredes to Dario Oswaldo Juarez Lopez The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 11/16/12, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What Happenings City Voice - Fremont Date: Aug 21, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2379240# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12646683 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Abdullah Tareq Esmaeilzadeh for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Abdullah Tareq Esmaeilzadeh filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Abdullah Tareq Esmaeilzadeh to Abdullah Tareq Amiri The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/21/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: September 06, 2012. WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2377873# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12645369 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Diep N Le, for change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Diep N Le filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Diep N Le to Jaden Le Bui The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/7/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: August 27, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2377868# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12646687 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Abdul Rahman Esmaeilzadeh for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Abdul Rahman Esmaeilzadeh filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Abdul Rahman Esmaeilzadeh to Abdul Rahman Amiri The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/21/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94541 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: September 06, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2377859# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12647253 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Radha Suryadevara for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Radha Suryadevara filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Radha Suryadevara to Radha Sankuratri The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any

person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/21/2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: Sep. 11, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2377825# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG-12645620 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Cleofe F. Orara in behalf of Autumn Maryann Moriana-Orara for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Cleofe F. Orara in behalf of Autumn Maryann Moriana-Orara filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Autumn Maryann Moriana-Orara to Autumn Maryann Orara-Moriana The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/7/2012 (Fri), Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice - Fremont Date: Aug 28, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 9/11, 9/18, 9/25, 10/2/12 CNS-2373010# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12645210 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Rajesh Kaul, Manju Kaul for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Rajesh Kaul, Manju Kaul filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Dhruv Kaul to Dhruv - R - Kaul The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 11/30/12, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: Aug. 24, 2012 /s/ Illegible Judge of the Superior Court 9/4, 9/11, 9/18, 9/25/12 CNS-2371442#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469785 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Daphne Delos Santos Insurance Agency, 33515 Western Avenue, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Daphne Delos Santos, 37171 Sycamore St. #1024, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Daphne Delos Santos, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 18, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16/12 CNS-2381549# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469492 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Right Brain Promottionals, 4243 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda, 3984 Washington Blvd. #192, Fremont, CA 94538 Marvin Wong, 4243 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Marvin Wong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County

Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16/12 CNS-2380835# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469529 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dynamic Solutions Realty Referral, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Amanda R. Chun, 285 Spetti Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amanda R. Chun This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16/12 CNS-2380822# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469500 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: B.A. NATURAL HEALING, 650 MOWRRY AVENUE, FREMONT, CA 94536 MAILING ADDRESS: 824 SNAPPER TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94536, County of ALAMEDA SASHUANG XU, 824 SNAPPER TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94536 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ SASHUANG XU This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2378659# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468786 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CAL-TECH ENGINEERING SOLUTION, 331 WOODCREEK TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94539, County of ALAMEDA ADELES FAN, 331 WOODCREEK TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94539 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/1/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ ADELES FAN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on AUGUST 21, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2378631# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469441 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Horizon Financial Associates, 39680 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Weritworth Enterprises, Inc., A California Corporation, 39680 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1988. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ George L. Duarte, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2378114# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469298 The following person(s) is (are) doing business

as: US Realty Group & Property Managment, 38485 Fremont Blvd., Suite A, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Michel R. Harris, 3535 Mowry Ave., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/6/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michel R. Harris, Broker This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 6, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2377808# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469289 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dream Designs, 35640 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Arilyn Morales, 35640 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Arilyn Morales This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 6, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/9/12 CNS-2376234# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 469280 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Barebottom Golf and Sporting Goods, 3254 Mission View Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda The Fun Tool Store 4 Pros, LLC, California, 3254 Mission View Dr., Fremont,CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard W. Wariner, Operating Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 06, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/11, 9/18, 9/25, 10/2/12 CNS-2375727# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468869 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Nusilica, 711 Yurok Ct., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Syed Khalid Azim, 711 Yurok Ct., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Syed Khalid Azim This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 23, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/11, 9/18, 9/25, 10/2/12 CNS-2373009# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468934 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Yaadein, 4356 Queen Anne Dr., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Tarlochan S. Walia, 4505 Brookfield Dr., Sacramento, CA 95823 Anita Balkumar, 4356 Queen Anne Dr., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tarlochan Walia, Anita Balkumar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five

years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/4, 9/11, 9/18, 9/25/12 CNS-2371206# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468876 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TL Assembly, 41353 Albrae St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda 389 San Andreas Dr., Milpitas, CA 95035 Tuan Le, 389 San Andreas Ave., Milpitas, CA 95035 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tuan Le This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 23, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/4, 9/11, 9/18, 9/25/12 CNS-2369836#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFQ #901041 Tree Trimming and Removal Services North County – Tuesday, October 2, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 11th Floor, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA and South County – Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 2:00 p.m. at Public Works Agency, Conference Room, 4825 Gleason Drive, Dublin, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on October 31, 2012 County Contact : Jeff Thomas (510) 208-9613 or via email: jeff.thomas@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 9/25/12 CNS-2380708#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JASON LOUIE CASE NO. RP12645763 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JASON LOUIE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by RAYMOND LOUIE AND EVA LOUIE in the Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that RAYMOND LOUIE AND EVE LOUIE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 10-9-2012 at 9:30 A.M. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY, BERKELEY, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: FAYE LEE, ESQ., LAW OFFICES OF BRESLER & LEE, ONE DANIEL BURNHAM COURT, SUITE 270C, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109, Telephone: 415-776-7177 9/11, 9/18, 9/25/12 CNS-2375346#

Logan JV Girls’ Volleyball wins Logan Invitational SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER The Logan Colts JV girls’ volleyball team finished first in pool play with a 3-0 record (6-0 in games) earning the number one seed in the championship bracket of the inaugural Logan Invitational tournament. In the semi-finals, the Colts defeated Impact Academy (Hayward) in 25-13, and 25-15 to advance to the championship game. The championship match featured two MVAL teams squaring off: number one seeded Logan versus number two seeded Washington (who had defeated El Cerrito 25-17, 20-25, and

15-4 in their semi-final match). Both of the games were very close, but Logan pulled away near the end of the game each time to win 25-17 and 25-22 and claim the championship, Coach Matt Guzman, Logan boys’ volleyball alumnus, coached the team to an undefeated match record of 5-0 on the road to their championship. Along the way, the Colts did not drop a game, finishing with a 10-0 game record. In the first week of MVAL play, Logan lost to Newark Memorial on Thursday, by the score of 23-25, 2521, 12-25, and 21-25. Newark Memorial played out-

standing throughout the match using good defense, solid hitter coverage, tough serving, and a well-run offensive attack to keep the Colts off balance. Coach Burmaster's commented, “We learned a lot about ourselves and the areas we need to improve on in order to put ourselves in a position to win against good teams. Newark Memorial is a good team and so are we; we just need to fix a few things. We have the ability, the desire, and the enthusiasm - so, we can do this!” In the first game, the Colts traded points back and forth with Newark. After an apparent block from Logan

(the ball never crossed the net) to tie the game at 22, Newark Memorial called timeout, and the score was changed to 21-23 due to a net violation on a Colts player. The play not only changed the momentum, it also changed the score at a very crucial point in the game. Still the Colts fought back to tie the game at 23-23 before dropping it 23-25. In game two, the Colts pulled ahead with numerous multiple-point leads only to see Newark Memorial fight back to tie the game. Ultimately, the Colts were able to close it out and get the 25-21 win. It was all Newark Memorial in Game 3 due to tough serving that

forced lots of Colts’ serve-receive error, putting the Colts on the defensive time and time again. Despite a strong effort to make digs and keep the ball in play, the Colts had very few offensive opportunities to take swings. Despite starting out in a hole in Game 4 due to poor passing, the Colts fought back to tie the game multiple times, but were unable to take the lead. Missed serves hurt the Colts as they tried to get the momentum going after Newark had made several multiple point runs. Stats for Newark: Brown 24 kills, 29 digs, 2 blocks; Ward 10 kills, 6 blocks; Hadfield 35 assists, 6 aces.


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 31

Building a city

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

WILLIAM MARSHAK

C

ities do not spontaneously spring from a void. They form and evolve by absorbing the character, resources and energy of their surroundings. People congregate in areas that offer something of value such as commerce, social amenities and comfort. Many cities form from a common center that expands as their population demands. However, the history of Fremont – and its sister cities - is a bit different; its people and government have struggled with the tug of common threads woven throughout cities, historical centers and significant changes of land use. Trying to capture the complex relationships and growth of the Greater Tri-City area would be similar to developing a SimCity game multiple dimensions beyond any current version. Over and over, civic leaders have struggled with the concept of city organization, identity and regional character. As an occasional expert descends on the area with pretty pictures, maps and theories, a central question remains to be answered. Who are we?

Through a tangle of cultures, attitudes and actions, a singular identity has yet to be defined. Again, in the last iteration of Fremont’s Downtown Plan, alluring photos and architectural designs beckon, but the core of practical application along Capitol Avenue has yet to feel the impact. What do we look like? Planning for a downtown has been with us for decades, beginning when the land was designed as a land bridge between a proposed, now defunct, “foothill” freeway and Hwy 880. Even with lack of fundamental civic identification, planners have insisted on creating a public realm of “downtown.” Extension of Capitol Avenue appears to be at the heart of the plan, although spoken often, remaining a distant reality. As the City of Fremont struggles to take advantage of several development opportunities - civic and regional – the propensity to plan without action will not suffice anymore. Too often our government has relied on reaction to circumstances without examining a core concern… identity. Called “sense of place” of some, the time has come to bring our best minds together and examine who we are. At recent Fremont candidate forums, politicians and would-be politicians expressed general ideas, but few specific responses to pointed questions about the direction of the City. A new mayor and council will have an opportunity to break old habits of part-time folks who are reluctant to risk progressive ideas and plans.

Working with allied cities, school districts, and public and private entities, it is critical that our new leadership embody the spirit of creating a path of growth that blazes a viable, energetic and proactive vision for the future. Honoring the past is not the same as returning to it; understanding the present is only a prelude to the future. The office of mayor and two council seats are open this November; the direction of Fremont is truly in the hands of its citizens. It is not the time to blindly follow political allegiances or slogans. Think about your future and ask if the candidates asking for your vote hold similar visions of a future Fremont. We need strong leaders who have the will to lead and guide staff rather than take the path of least resistance, simply waiting for circumstance or others to initiate an action plan. It’s time to build a city!

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Annie Yu Kenny Jacoby

Newark Soccer Club successful at Bay Area tournaments

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

SUBMITTED BY FRANZ BRUCKNER PHOTO BY SILVIA OCHOA The Newark Explosion, a U-12 competitive team, Newark Galaxy, a U-14 competitive team, and Newark Barcelona, a U-15 competitive team, all posted great results at the recent Soccer by the Bay tournament on the peninsula. Both the Explosion and the Galaxy took 2nd place, while Barcelona took 3rd place by winning the consolation match. All of the girls played extremely well to post these results. In addition to these three success stories, the Newark U9 Pumas took 2nd place at the San Ramon Copper Select Tournament. The Pumas played extremely well in their first three preliminary games, and lost a very close match in the final

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman

ADJUDICATION:

to capture second place. Congratulations to all four of these teams for providing an outstanding weekend of soccer. Each team will be back in action on September 8 when they, along with the entire Newark Soccer Club, open their 2012 fall soccer season.

What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

September 25, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

Group Lessons: Music for Infants/Toddlers (Ages 0-2) Music for Preschoolers (Ages 3-5) Keyboard for Children (Ages 4-6 & 6-10) Kids/Youth Musical Theater (Ages 5-12) Glee Club Singers (All ages)

Home Health Care Provider's Corp. A Reliable Source Providing In-Home Health Care For the ELDERLY Since 1997 Open 24 hours 7 days a week Licensed # 038521

Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

Help Wanted Janitor Experienced Part-Time Evenings Fremont Monday - Friday Detailed Person Needed $900 per Month Call 888-528-0200 BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Saint Mary’s College celebrates 150 years! SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL MCALPIN Saint Mary’s College of California is celebrating; no make that “Gaelebrating” its 150th anniversary! The College will mark the “Year of the Gael” with a massive Gaelebration— a free public festival and open house from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on October 6. Saint Mary’s Gaelebration will include a campus carnival featuring children’s rides and attractions – a seven-story Ferris wheel – campus tours and interactive programs from various academic departments. Afternoon entertainment features performances by California acoustic soul band Alma Desnuda and the College’s music, theater and dance departments, along with athletic demonstrations, live bands and, of course, great food. Gourmet food trucks from Off the Grid will provide delicious offerings as Gaelebration

fare. It’s sure to be a “Gaelorious” time! The fun-filled day will also feature acknowledgements of the College’s 150th anniversary from visiting dignitaries and proclamations from federal, state and local civic leaders. Throughout the academic year, the College will present a host of free public events, forums and performances to honor Saint Mary’s sesquicentennial. Saint Mary’s College “150th Galebration!” Saturday, October 6 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saint Mary’s College of California 1928 St. Mary’s Road, Moraga (925) 631-4200 www.yearofthegael.com Event is free and open to the public

Tuesday, September 25 9:15–11:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, September 26 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, September 27 9:50 – 10:20 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 10:40–11:30 Preschool Storytimes NEWARK 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., NEWARK 2:00 –3:00 Graham School, 36270 Cherry St, NEWARK Monday, October 1 9:20-10:00 Preschool Storytimes – FREMONT 10:15-11:15 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 1:45 – 2:45 Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., UNION CITY 3:05 – 3:25 Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., UNION CITY 4:15 – 4:45 Greenhaven Apts., Al-

varado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., UNION CITY 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, October 2 9:45-11:05 Preschool Storytimes UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, October 3 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, October 3 1:45-3:00 Foothill School, 1919 Landess Ave., MILPITAS 3:15-3:45 Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., MILPITAS


September 25, 2012

Are you a writer?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 33

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org

New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org

Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org

New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org

Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com

Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org

Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689

Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org

East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766

Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593

CHINESE CHRISTIAN

Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org

Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org

First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810

Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

September 25, 2012

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

of Christ)

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED

EPISCOPAL

Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org

Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org


September 25, 2012 Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060 Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/

Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858

Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727

Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.southhaywardumc.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org

Alameda County Water District (ACWD) single family residential customers are currently receiving information about a new water service line protection service offered through Home Emergency Insurance Solutions (HEIS), the California subsidiary of HomeServe USA. ACWD customers living in Fremont, Newark, and Union City will have the option to sign up for a protection plan that will provide emergency assistance with unexpected repairs to the water line on the homeowner’s property. HomeServe USA, a nationwide provider of emergency home repair programs, currently serves 1 million customers across 36 states and will be working closely with ACWD to ensure that customers have convenient and affordable options for service line protection plans. Customers choosing to sign up for these plans will have access to an Emergency Repair Hotline that is accessible 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to bring locally based, licensed and insured contractors right to their home for repairs.

First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY

True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org

Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444

Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org

Water service line insurance offered to ACWD customers SUBMITTED BY FRANK JAHN

Page 35

ACWD went through an extensive selection process before choosing HomeServe as the supplier of a water service line protection service for its customers. The service is completely optional and it is up to each homeowner to determine if it is right for them. “Many customers are unaware that they are responsible for the maintenance of the water pipes that run from their water meter to their home,” said Walt Wadlow, ACWD’s General Manager. “For those who choose to sign up for this service, the concern about what to do if these pipes burst or begin to leak will be virtually eliminated.” Tom Rusin, chief executive officer of HomeServe USA, stated, “HomeServe is thrilled to be offering this optional service to Alameda County Water District customers. We are looking forward to forging a strong relationship with the District, working with their teams and supporting their customers in Fremont, Newark, and Union City.” Additional Information on the program is available at www.acwd.org.or by calling (510) 6684200. For more information about Home Emergency Insurance Solutions and HomeServe USA, please go to www.homeserveusa.com.

Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE)

For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

Angel Children’s Choir Accepting New Members Ages 7-14 Vocal Training - Music Theory Instrument Group Public Performance Saturday 9:30am-12Noon Newark Neighborhood Church 510-791-8555 or details www.cbncangelchildrenschoir.com

Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Tues 8/21, 9/4 & 18, 10/2 & 16 Bronco Billy’s @ Grimmer/Blacow * * 7 – 8 p.m. NO cover charge https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 for info & verify times Mission Gold Jazz Band @ Sunol Jazz Cafe 1st & 3rd Wednesdays 7 – 9 p.m.

New Life Community Church "Transforming Lives" Worship Service: 4PM Sunday Community Group: 7PM Friday 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 www.newlifeeastbay.org rwong@newlifeeastbay.org contact: 510-432-9250 A church for the Tri-City! Caregivers of loved ones with Serious Mental Illness NAMI-Alameda County offers a free 12 week course beginning September 8th from 9:00 to 11:30 Union City. Registration required. Call Peggy Rahman at 510-825-1564 e-mail nami-ac@mhaac.org http://nami-acnews.blogspot.com http://www.namialamedacounty.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

in Plain English 7-9pm Tuesdays except 8/14 36054 Niles Blvd. 650-556-6428 Meditation, discussion, Q&A with Ajahn Guna, American Buddhist monk in Ajahn Chah Thai Forest Tradition. All are welcome. Free.

Sat. Oct. 6th - 10am-5pm Behind Mission San Jose Dominican Sisters Olive Grove Live Music - Food - Beer/Wine Special Olive Oil & Specialty Vendors - Food Demonstrations Arts & Craft - Kids Area - Prizes Drawings - Fun www.msjchamber.org

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

Home Craft Fair October 4,5,6, Thurday 10am-6pm Friday 10am-6pm Saturday 10am-5pm 1608 Via Sarita, San Lorenzo (Follow Signs on Bockman Road) Hundreds of Handmade Gifts for Giving and Keeping

Serious Mental Illness

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

11th Annual Olive Festival

Help Eliminate Hunger & Food Insecurity Your donation is tax deductible Tri-City Volunteers 37350 Joseph Street, Fremont Mon-Fri 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Closed 12 PM - 1PM Questions Call 1-888-802-8207 tri-cityvolunteers.org

Shout out to your community

East Bay Youth Jazz Band JAZZINATORS

Meditation, Buddhism

DONATE YOUR COMPUTERS DONATE YOUR CELL PHONES

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Jan 5, 2021 from 9:00-11:30 in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or Email Joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/F2F

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th Street Union City Thursdays, 7pm - 9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

American Legion Auxiliary

Play Easybridge!

We meet the third Tuesday of every month at 7pm Niles Veterans Building 37154 2nd Street, Fremont susan.peters251@yahoo.com 510656-6848

Learn the world’s greatest game! Four free lessons! Everyone is welcome. Bring a partner or come alone. Marina Community Center, San Leandro, Sept. 29-1pm Ongoing classes/games Fremont & Hayward Jan Hollowell – 510-783-8678

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 15 Highest $: 630,000 Median $: 383,500 Lowest $: 181,000 Average $: 426,600 ADDRESS

ScholarMatch – a path to college dreams

continued frompage 24

we can come close to reaching all their goals, if not fulfilling them completely. Students remain eligible each year to receive their scholarship again and we budget accordingly.” The goal is to expand ScholarMatch beyond the Bay Area and serve the needs of even more students. All donors receive a “thank you” note from their sponsored student, usually addressed as “Dear Donor.” Twice during the academic year, students update their donor, usually after the first and second semesters. According to Adamson, “Sometimes students and donors really connect and wish to interact more directly. If that is mutually agreeable, the organization will facilitate.” She feels that this process benefits the student but also signifies intangible benefits that the donor gets as well. “All student scholarship recipients this year are first generation. It’s great for them to know someone is invested in them – a stranger helping them, supporting them, who has confidence in them. Going on this journey gives them extra confidence. The donor feels like it is their opportunity to pay it forward and give someone else a helping hand, perhaps like someone who had helped them.” This summer, in preparation for academic life at UCLA, ScholarMatch program recipient Winer participated in the “Freshman Summer Program (FSP). She says, “During the rigorous 6-week academic program, students live on campus and take three classes, depending on if they are writing intensive (like me) or science intensive. These are college courses that affect our GPA (grade point average), and we get a lot of support from the Academic Advancement Program. FSP is almost completely free for students. We are all low-income, mi-

nority, and/or first generation students.” “I adore UCLA. I had applied to seven schools and was accepted into five of them,” Accordingly, Winer says that a major consideration in her decision was that UCLA offered an adequate level of financial aid. In addition, from ScholarMatch, Winer received a scholarship of $3,913 for her first year and renewable for four years as long as she still has financial need and remains in good standing at UCLA and with ScholarMatch. Winer’s field of study is International Development, the study of countries in poverty. After UCLA, she hopes to be able to attend Columbia University for graduate studies. “I want to work in the United Nations for a few years, then branch off into the private sector to do genocide prevention work,” she says. Reflecting on this new chapter in her life, Winer comments, “The transition [from Bay Area high schooler to Southern California college student] is exactly what I needed. I wanted to explore the world, and my ambitions are finally coming to fruition. I think my transition has been really smooth because I was so desperate to experience the world. It has been exciting to meet so many new people, and I am doing well academically. Applying for scholarships is arduous, but the satisfaction of knowing how hard you worked to stay in school makes everything worth it. I am so grateful to ScholarMatch for allowing me to pursue higher education and a better life.” For more information, or to view student videos and support the efforts of the ScholarMatch program, visit www.scholarmatch.org or call (415) 652-2766.

ZIP

5322 Camino Alta Mira 94546 18212 Carlton Avenue 94546 3929 Forest Circle 94546 21859 Orange Avenue 94546 17914 Petersen Way 94546 4837 Proctor Road 94546 2487 San Carlos Avenue 94546 20200 San Miguel Avenue 94546 19140 Santa Maria Avenue 94546 4279 Seven Hills Road 94546 18410 Buren Place 94552 23369 Canyon Terrace Drive 94552 23239 Canyon Terrace Drive #494552 16615 Columbia Drive 94552 19683 Summerglen Place 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

570,000 589,000 352,500 315,000 620,000 325,000 370,000 181,000 320,000 400,000 539,000 359,000 383,500 630,000 445,000

3 4 2 2 4 4 3 2 2 3 4 2 4 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2016 2230 1212 848 2508 1260 1505 986 1165 1296 1887 1213 1607 2262 1666

1966 1947 2009 1943 1963 1949 1952 1978 1941 1953 2003 1996 1996 1988 1997

08-14-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-14-12 08-14-12 08-16-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-14-12 08-16-12 08-15-12 08-14-12 08-17-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 41 Highest $: 5,400,000 Median $: Lowest $: 145,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2686 Barrington Terrace 5128 Brophy Drive 3610 Campbell Court 933 Cherry Glen Circle #220 1160 Clay Court 3416 Deerwood Terrace #112 38010 Dover Common 4055 Eggers Drive 5124 Eggers Drive 80 Harvey Terrace 5268 Keeler Court 36008 Plumeria Way 4635 Rothbury Common #66 120 Santos Court 38780 Tyson Lane #303C 38011 Vallejo Street 35067 Vincente Court

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536

SOLD FOR BDS

368,000 641,000 471,000 235,000 750,000 145,000 180,000 260,000 689,000 353,000 556,000 569,000 250,500 859,000 225,000 371,000 425,500

1 4 2 5 1 2 2 4 3 3 3 2 4 2 3 3

475,000 662,780

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1296 1644 1503 840 2033 714 900 1200 1675 1663 1340 1628 1140 2736 1305 1455 1256

1988 1964 1976 1987 1978 1986 1971 1982 1960 1984 1956 1969 1988 1980 1982 1962 1965

08-17-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-16-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-16-12


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT 4741 Calaveras Avenue 40461 Fremont Boulevard 4645 Hedgewick Avenue 40051 June Court 4321 Margery Drive 3686 Monmouth Place 4809 Stevenson Boulevard 3767 Union Street 357 Apache Court 45511 Bridgeport Drive 47644 Gridley Court 44136 Ibero Way 44533 Japala Place 41456 Joyce Avenue 674 Praderia Circle 1632 Via Sombrio 44896 Vista Del Sol 3308 Holmes Place 32963 Lake Bluestone Street 6007 Milano Terrace #15 34313 Portia Terrace 4385 Sedge Street 34661 Tabu Terrace 34112 Via Lucca

94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

475,000 275,000 571,000 453,000 400,000 400,000 415,000 427,500 820,000 1,301,000 775,000 1,425,000 690,000 850,000 547,000 1,227,000 5,400,000 630,000 290,000 490,000 594,000 716,500 335,000 319,000

3 2274 3 1016 4 1556 3 1150 3 1107 3 1255 4 1302 2 828 3 1586 4 2830 3 1166 4 3056 3 1296 4 1788 2 1207 4 2495 6#VALUE! 5 2433 3 1060 2 1395 2 1891 2405 2 -

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 30 Highest $: 520,000 Median $: Lowest $: 105,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1755 B Street 1617 D Street 1936 Hillsdale Street 19971 Kennedy Park Place 21698 Marydee Court 428 Palmer Avenue 1775 Panda Way #224 24226 Rolling Ridge Lane 21667 Westfield Avenue 25514 Del Mar Avenue 3581 Skyline Drive 25107 Angelina Lane #27 666 Bishop Avenue 30064 Bridgeview Way 1029 Cheryl Ann Circle #67 677 Dartmore Lane #149 27979 Dickens Avenue 27624 East 11th Street 617 Garin Avenue 291 Isabella Street 24874 Joyce Street 668 Minerva Street 26472 Mockingbird Lane 158 Sierrawood Avenue 25995 Tarragon Street 346 Tippecanoe Avenue 30407 Treeview Street 2275 Bennington Lane 25077 Calaroga Avenue 1641 Southgate Street

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

273,000 320,000 417,000 325,000 141,000 322,500 149,000 432,000 351,000 270,000 469,000 189,000 190,000 520,000 105,000 135,000 326,500 130,000 275,000 310,000 290,000 325,000 300,000 460,000 360,000 315,000 350,000 305,000 349,000 310,000

3 3 4 4 2 2 4 4 4 2 3 4 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 5 4 3 3 3 3 3

ZIP

190 Barker Street 229 Bixby Drive 69 Brookstone Court 172 Carnegie Drive 403 Easter Avenue 409 Gibbons Court 1509 Kennedy Drive 2053 Mesa Verde Drive 145 Parc Place Drive 1635 Yellowstone Avenue

Highest $: Lowest $:

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

ZIP

36103 Chelsea Drive 36263 Darvon Street 37217 Edith Street 6653 Flanders Drive 6396 Mirabeau Drive 5576 Musick Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

310,000 300,467 BUILT

CLOSED

1848 1807 1917 1859 995 900 1991 1854 1152 2060 1274 1153 2485 977 1045 1396 716 1408 1130 1000 1233 1047 2360 1739 1031 1408 1107 1359 1128

1942 1934 1958 2004 1948 1980 1993 1942 1939 1976 2002 1955 1999 1979 1988 1955 1958 1958 1952 1950 1956 1952 2000 1991 1951 1958 1957 1959 1957

08-15-12 08-15-12 08-17-12 08-13-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-15-12 08-14-12 08-13-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-16-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-13-12 08-13-12 08-13-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-17-12 08-17-12

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

491,000 605,000 575,000 417,500 435,000 325,000 1,130,000 708,000 370,000 390,000

1427 1677 1653 1356 1112 1010 3695 1789 1282 1168

1957 1960 1994 1955 1959 1970 2005 1977 2005 1965

08-24-12 08-21-12 08-23-12 08-24-12 08-24-12 08-24-12 08-21-12 08-23-12 08-22-12 08-23-12

4 3 4 4 3 3 5 3 3 3

SOLD FOR BDS

430,000 375,000 350,000 389,000 349,000 405,000

3 4 3 5 3 3

ZIP

1400 Carpentier Street #132 148 Cherrywood Avenue 392 Cherrywood Avenue 2005 Clarke Street 1500 East Juana Avenue 364 Farrelly Drive 117 Harlan Street 963 Helen Avenue 2492 Lakeview Drive 1035 Midway Avenue 2117 Thomas Avenue 1456 140th Avenue 14871 Boulevard Court 2410 Cady Court 16533 Hannah Drive 2122 Pomar Vista Street 16786 Rolando Avenue 1563 Thrush Avenue

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578

SOLD FOR BDS

110,000 517,000 220,000 260,000 675,000 210,000 250,000 405,000 523,000 270,000 318,000 250,000 250,000 451,000 404,000 425,000 180,000 443,000

1 4 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 4 2 3

SUBMITTED BY ERIKA CASTILLO The Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District in conjunction with Supervisor Scott Haggerty’s office urges Alameda County residents to remain vigilant about the risk of contracting West Nile Virus (WNV). Alameda County has seen an increase in WNV positive dead birds this year compared to last. Dead birds can be an indication that WNV is present in an area, particularly dead crows, jays and birds of prey. If you come across a dead bird or tree squirrel, please report it by calling (877) WNV-BIRD or online at www.westnile.ca.gov. According to the CDC, there is no danger of contracting WNV from handling intact dead birds; however, the following procedure is suggested to keep hands clean when collecting a specimen: Turn a plastic bag insideout, and pick up the bird with the hands protected by the bag. Turn the bag right-side-out. The bag should then be tied or sealed and placed inside another plastic bag. “With the fall season now among us, the evenings have begun to cool down and people are spending more time outdoors. I would definitely urge residents of Alameda County to take all necessary precautions to prevent West Nile Virus infection. The use of products containing DEET and dressing appropriately are instrumental in warding off mosquito

bites,” said Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty. In 2012, Alameda County has had no human or horse cases of WNV, nor have any mosquitoes tested positive. Residents have reported over 400 dead birds - of those, 86 were tested and 13 were found positive for WNV, along with 1 tree squirrel. To date, California has had 1,273 dead birds test positive for WNV. There are 126 cases of human WNV infection in 23 California counties, including 6 deaths. In 2011, California had 158 human cases of WNV including 9 fatalities. “West Nile Virus activity has increased nationwide this year,” said District Entomologist Bruce Kirkpatrick. “We have increased our surveillance and control efforts throughout the County to address the increased risk this mosquito season.” Reduce the risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases by following these guidelines: DUMP/DRAIN standing water on your property because that is where mosquitoes develop. DAWN/DUSK is when mosquito activity peaks so limit outdoor activities during this time. DEFEND yourself when mosquitoes are biting by wearing long pants and long-sleeved shirts and apply insect repellent containing EPA-registered active ingredients such as

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1254 1908 1126 2060 1100 1380

1972 1971 1958 1961 1960 1947

08-15-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-16-12 08-14-12

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

809 2924 1096 1466 6396 1040 1194 1397 2019 1490 1054 1179 1832 1613 1547 2950 665 1388

1983 1940 1943 1944 1952 1941 1940 1927 1961 1942 1944 1946 1915 1959 1961 1991 1940 1946

08-13-12 08-16-12 08-16-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-14-12 08-15-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-14-12

Trade-in your family’s sugar and improve your health

SUBMITTED BY JEROME ILAGAN City of Milpitas Mayor Jose Esteves will fire the starting pistol at the City’s first Great Sugar Dump 5K run/walk on Sunday, September 30.

This combination 5K and public health event, presented by Generations Community Wellness in partnership with Kaiser Permanente, is a tailored to the whole family. Each year, the average child under 12-years old consumes 49 lbs. of sugar according to the USDA Economic Research Service. Kaiser Permanente and Generations are educating the community about the link between sugar consumption and chronic disease like Type 2 diabetes and obesity with Kaiser’s Mobile Health Van, as part of an awareness campaign.

ZIP

300 Via Coches 1623 Via Hermana 17233 Via La Jolla 17237 Via San Ardo

94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

250,000 272,000 280,000 275,000

3 3 3 3

ADDRESS

33486 13th Street 32649 Almaden Boulevard 2673 Great Arbor Way #42 2084 Kitayama Drive 2653 Nevada Street 4259 Polaris Avenue 3258 San Pablo Way 32106 Trefry Court

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

204,000 500,000 202,000 722,000 336,000 314,000 358,000 356,000

4 5 2 3 4 4 4

Great Sugar Dump 5K Sunday, September 30 8:30 a.m. Cisco’s McCarthy Campus 115 N. McCarthy Boulevard, Milpitas (408) 736-8326

q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1495 1494 1031 1431

1944 1955 1950 1951

08-16-12 08-15-12 08-16-12 08-15-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 722,000 Median $: Lowest $: 202,000 Average $:

“Sugar-rich beverages are the single largest source of calories in the American diet. The Great Sugar Dump 5K is a fun way to educate the community on the benefits of exercise and drinking water,” said Dr. Mandira Matta, Pediatrician, from Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara. Take part in the Great Sugar Dump by exchanging unwanted cans of soda or packaged sugary snacks for a free pedometer and aluminum water bottle - a community-wide effort to replace sugar for water and promote physical activity. Post-race festivities include the award ceremony recognizing the event’s Sugar Dump Champion along with the 5K winners. Revolution Foods will be on-site providing healthy snacks and Dr. Kauffman of Thrive Milpitas will offer complimentary post-race massage. Other race sponsors include YMCA, Gigamon, El Camino Hospital, The Health Trust, Urban Aquaponic Farms, Hint Water and Children’s Creative Learning Centers. “We’re a non-profit focused on physical activity and nutrition. We shall put the Generations mission into practice on September 30,” says Generations’ CEO Dan McClure. Participants should register at www.GenerationsWellness.org

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 280,000 Median $: 272,000 Lowest $: 250,000 Average $: 269,250 ADDRESS

DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, and Oil of lemon eucalyptus. DOOR/window screens should be in good repair with no tears or holes. Most people who become infected with WNV do not experience symptoms or become ill. Only about one out every 150 people infected with WNV may develop a more severe form of the illness. Adults over 50 years old and people with compromised immune systems are at increased risk of serious complications from WNV infection. Anyone who develops symptoms such as a high fever, confusion, muscle weakness, severe headaches or stiff neck should seek medical care immediately. Since horses are very susceptible to WNV and three different vaccines are available for horses, horse owners are advised to contact their veterinarians immediately about timely vaccinations. For information about mosquitoes and West Nile Virus visit our website: www.mosquitoes.org. Residents can request mosquito-larvae eating fish for their fish ponds, horse troughs, etc. by contacting our District office. We are located in Hayward at 23187 Connecticut St. Our phone number is (510)783-7744. For information concerning West Nile Virus symptoms, prevention or testing please contact the Alameda County Public Health Department at (510)267-8001.

Dump your sugar and run

375,000 383,000

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 18 Highest $: 675,000 Median $: 270,000 Lowest $: 110,000 Average $: 342,278 ADDRESS

West Nile Virus season is not over

435,000 544,650

SOLD FOR BDS

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 06 430,000 Median $: 349,000 Average $:

ADDRESS

08-16-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-16-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-16-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-15-12 08-15-12 08-13-12 08-14-12

SQFT

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 10 Highest $: 1,130,000 Median $: Lowest $: 325,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1960 1954 1963 1959 1958 1958 1960 1922 1975 1984 1962 1989 1978 1957 1988 1973 1992 1976 1970 1992 1987 1979 -

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Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing:

336,000 374,000

Business Name if applicable:

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1196 2391 903 1396 1584 1556 1708

1960 1977 1985 1972 1974 1969 1973

08-17-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-14-12 08-17-12 08-17-12 08-15-12 08-13-12

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 25, 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Jayamala Gande

Frieda P. McKnight RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 6, 1924 – September 21, 2012

RESIDENT OF INDIA September 3, 1958 – September 20, 2012

Dung Nghe

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 2, 1936 – September 20, 2012

Joy R. Morrison RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO December 22, 1927 – September 21, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

Donald Smith

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 16, 1931 – September 20, 2012

Gregory O. Tate RESIDENT OF SEATTLE, WA April 12, 1948 – September 21, 2012

Anna Chelstowski RESIDENT OF NEWARK January 14, 1924 – September 23, 2012

Donald P. Babcock

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 9, 1921 – September 23, 2012

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Obituary

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

In Loving Memory Of Leia (Marcia) Caruso

Leia (Marcia) Caruso made her peaceful transition on September 19th 2011 after a long battle with lung cancer. She was 69 years old. Mrs. Caruso was born in Denver, Colorado on September 3rd 1942 to Otto Heisterberg and Julie “Jaye” Heisterberg. The family moved to Los Angeles, CA when she was a teenager.

Leia married her soulmate, Richard Caruso in April of 1967 in Alameda and stayed in the Bay Area to raise their family. They were married for 29 years and resided in Newark. Loving mother of daughters Gina and Julie both of Fremont, Lori (Sabrina) of Oakland and stepsons, Paul Caruso of San Diego and Ronald Caruso of Oceanside, CA. Devoted grandmother of Nicole Caruso of Fremont. She worked at the Department of Rehab in Oakland and as a receptionist for Dr. Fred Scholz, DC in Fremont. She was also a long time member of Second Chance in Newark where she made many friends. Leia enjoyed reading, dancing, studying metaphysical ideas, gardening, watching her favorite TV shows and taking good care of her cats. She loved spending quality time with her friends and family as well as her beloved granddaughter Nicole, who was “the apple of her eye.” She was preceded in death by her father Otto Heisterberg, mother Julie “Jaye” Heisterberg, and younger brother Clifford Heisterberg of San Leandro, CA. The family would like to express their great appreciation to the staff of the Park Central Care Center in Fremont and the Kaiser Hospice Program in Hayward for their compassionate care. We will miss her bright smile and warm personality. She would always light up a room with her joyful spirit. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her name to the Ohlone Humane Society, 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont, CA 94538 or to the American Cancer Society, 1710 Webster Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

Obituary

Joy Morrison Joy Morrison, nee Hallenbarter, was born in San Francisco on June 2, 1936 oldest child of Frank and Carmel Hallenbarter. She grew up in the Mission District and attended St. Peter’s Academy. It was there, in 1956, that she met Gus Morrison, at that time serving in the US Navy on a ship in San Francisco. In 1959, they were married, a marriage which lasted until her death on September 20, 2012, 53 years. They moved to Fremont, with their young children, in 1963. During their entire marriage, Joy was the backbone of support for the family, caring for and raising their three children, Frank, Gloria (Ritchie,) and Heather (Meyer.) She stayed home and provided stability while Gus worked at Lockheed and became involved in local politics. Gus eventually got elected to the Fremont City Council and served a total of more than 25 years on the council, including more than 14 as Mayor. During all this time, Joy avoided the public eye. She

would often say “I give my husband to politics; I don’t need to give more.” She was a private person, content to live her life as she chose and quietly contributed to the community in ways that were important to her. Joy had a special affinity for all children, and found ways to make the lives of less fortunate children better. She organized and ran toy drives at Christmas. Always thrifty, she shopped sales after the various seasons saving purchases for the next holiday. She, made Easter baskets, filled backpacks for back to school, and donated countless toys to ensure children had new presents at Christmas. She never wanted thanks and donated most things anonymously. It was always for the children. Joy very quietly touched the lives of many, many children in our community. Joy is survived by her husband, Gus, her three children, and her three grandchildren, Garrett and Meghan Ritchie and Ainsely Meyer. Her twin Gloria Hallenbarter and younger sister Fran Buntrock, along with an

extended family of nieces, nephews, and grand nieces also survive her. In accord with Joy’s lifelong beliefs, she wanted a simple, private service. The family will honor that wish with a private memorial service. Joy often expressed concern about how much people spent on flowers at funerals, thinking that money could be used to make a child’s life better or to make some small difference in the community. In lieu of flowers, she would appreciate it if you would do something simple, a gift, a toy, a helping hand for a child in her memory. If you wish to do more, she loved the work of both Abode and the One Child Foundation, so a contribution to their efforts would please her. On behalf of Joy and her entire family, we offer thanks for all the prayers and good wishes over this last difficult month. We have always believed that Fremont is a special place, and you have proven it once again. With all of our hearts we thank you.


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Moore states: “Technology is nothing more than a tool for the artist. If the lights go out, I will find joy in the first artistic mediums as well. It is not the tool. It’s the vision creative awareness affords the artist, to share and make real and positive visions for others.” For details on this valuable event, call the FAA Centre/Gallery, (510) 792-0905, or visit: www.FremontArtAssociation.org.

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS

T

he Fremont Art Association is pleased to welcome Garrett Moore as its guest artist for the month on Wednesday, October 3 from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. at The Fremont Art Association Centre/Gallery. Moore is an international multi-media digital and fine art artist/illustrator with an extensive background. He will discuss current quality and evolution of digital print technology and demo how to prepare art for digital printing. This event is free and the public is welcome to attend. Garret Moore has been a fine artist, visual media producer, illustrator, and graphic designer for over 30 years. He has worked in computer graphics since 1983 and was one of the first published digital illustrators. One of the major positions he has held was being the chief illustrator and animator for NEC Systems Inc. where he produced animations for NEC Japan and graphics for software and web development applications. Moore has a desire to infuse new visual technologies with the sensibilities of the fine arts. While still working in digital media, Moore retains his initial skills in acrylic, watercolor, pen, ink, and other traditional mediums. His interest in photog-

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raphy, video production, astronomy, physical sciences, and alternative and esoteric understandings, fuels his visual abilities for channeling art, image, and cultural media to reach the public. The artist’s illustrations and artworks have shown in galleries from California to New York, including NASA Ames Research Center, Lawrence Hall of Science, and Hayden Planetarium. His illustrations have been published throughout the United States and Europe for books, magazines, postcards, note cards, Album/CD/DVD and media cover designs for Classical, Jazz, New Age, and more.

Newark Unified unveils new playground at Whiteford Preschool

(L to R): Superintendent Dr. Dave Marken, preschool student, and Board members Charlie Mensinger and Nancy Thomas

SUBMITTED BY LAURA JOHNSON PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH The newly renovated playground at Whiteford Preschool, 35725 Cedar Boulevard, was unveiled with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 21. Newark Unified School District is excited to celebrate the completion of the first project funded by Measure G, a $63 million dollar bond voters approved in November 2011 to modernize the schools in Newark. Among those present for the occasion were: Newark Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Dave Marken, School Board President Ray Rodriguez, Board members Charlie Mensinger and Nancy Thomas as well as Interim Director of Special Education, Charlene Okamoto. Playgrounds are important places of social interaction and physical and emotional development for children. The modernized structure allows children of all abilities to interact with one another on a variety of diverse play apparatus, and the poured-in-place rubber surfacing provides a safe, clean, and attractive environment. It is important that children engage in healthy, physically- active outdoor play every day, but it’s just as important that children experience it as simply having a good time! Superintendent Marken commented, “We are extremely pleased and thankful to the community.”

Guest Artist Demo Wednesday, October 3 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Centre/Gallery 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles-Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociatin.org Free


September 25, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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TCV 2012-09-25