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Steampunk “Cinderella” a visual treat

Artist reception at Mission Coffee

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Vol. 11 No. 61

August 28, 2012

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SUBMITTED BY ISA POLT-JONES PHOTOS BY ALLAN MENDEZ The 12th Annual Washington Township Railroad Fair returns to Ardenwood Historic Farm over the Labor Day weekend. Presented by the East Bay Regional Park District and the Railroad Museum at Ardenwood, the centerpiece of this year's event will be the 1889 Porter Tank steam locomotive and an 1890 steam porter engine 'Ann Marie.' continued on page 17

SUBMITTED BY JOEY CAMINS Once again, the celebration of an iconic Filipino dish, Adobo, is returning for its annual visit to the Bay Area. The word, “Adobo” is the Tagalog translation of a delicious stew of marinated pork or chicken cooked with garlic, pepper, laurel leaves, and a blend of soy sauce and vinegar. Accompanied by rice, Adobo is a well-known dish

in the Filipino community and gave birth to the idea of creating an Adobo Festival. If tamales, asparagus and garlic can be the focus of festivals, why not feature Adobo at its own festival? Organizer Joey Camins created a unique, annual gathering for those who know and love Adobo and others who may be unfamiliar with the flavorful dish as well. Instead of continued on page 7

SUBMITTED BY FLOYD BUSBY PHOTOS BY BILL MANCEBO Tossing a 22-foot pole into the air would seem to be quite the task. Make that pole about 140 pounds and it would seem almost unimaginable. Then, make that pole circle 180 degrees, hit the grounds top-side first and fall straight ahead, and, well, you've done the almost impossible! This combination of strength and finesse is the tossing of the fabled "Caber," an event that will be featured at the 147th Scottish Highland Gathering continued on page 4 Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 34

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 34

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

INDEX

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Hospital Provides Award-Winning Emergency Care for Heart Attack and Stroke

H

eart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The same is true for Alameda County. Receiving high-quality, effective care for the body's hardest working muscle can mean the difference between life and death.

diac receiving centers, and only three are designated as stroke receiving centers. “Patients suffering heart attacks or strokes who are brought to Washington Hospital as a result of our designations as a receiving center get the best care available,” says Dr. Ash Jain, medical director of the Washington Led by Medical Director, Ash Jain, M.D., (left) Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program never stops striving to reach a higher level. In 2012, Washington Hospital received a Five Star Excellence Award from HealthGrades that ranked us among the top 5 percent in the nation for treatment of stroke.

For several years, Washington Hospital has been designated as both a “cardiac receiving center” and a “stroke receiving center” for Alameda County. Hospitals with these designations must have demonstrated that they have the facilities, technology and physicians needed to provide immediate diagnostic tests and the interventions necessary to save lives. There are only four hospitals in the county designated as car-

Cardiovascular Institute and the Stroke Program at Washington Hospital. Numerous studies have consistently found that early coronary angiography and angioplasty are associated with improved long-term outcomes after cardiac arrest. “To become a cardiac receiving center, you must have an interventional program that meets stringent standards of getting a heart attack patient’s arteries opened using

angioplasty within 90 minutes of arrival in the emergency room,” Dr. Jain explains. “It also is recommended that you have a cardiac surgery program available in case open-heart surgery is needed. Further, the cardiologists must be trained and qualified to perform angioplasty and other non-invasive, life-saving procedures to diagnose and treat heart attacks.” The standards for stroke receiving centers are equally stringent, he notes. “The American Stroke Association has established 10 basic core standards of care,” Dr. Jain says. “By meeting and exceeding those basic measures, we provide patients with excellent care, but we don’t stop with just the basic requirements. Our dedicated Stroke Program goes above and beyond what most hospitals have. We have specialized stroke care units that are staffed 24/7 by specially trained stroke nurses. “We also provide special training for every employee involved in stroke patients’ care, from ER staff to radiology to lab technologists,” he adds. “In addition, we are very thorough in identifying and treating other conditions that are risk factors for subsequent strokes – including diabetes and hypertension – even though that is not part of the basic requirements.”

National Quality Awards The excellent quality of Washington Hospital’s cardiac and stroke care has been recognized time and again over the years. Most recently, for the second year in a row, the hospital’s Stroke Program received a HealthGrades 5-Star Award for Stroke Care. The hospital also earned the 2012 HealthGrades Stroke Care Excellence Award and ranked among the top 5 percent in the nation for treatment of stroke. HealthGrades is an independent healthcare rating organization that reviews more than 5,000 hospitals around the country based exclusively on patient outcomes, with awards and achievements corresponding to superior patient outcomes. “The recent awards from HealthGrades are additional recognition of the excellent quality of care provided at Washington Hospital,” Dr. Jain notes. “For heart attacks and strokes, rapid treatment using proven national evidence-based standards of care can prevent or minimize permanent damage. It also could save your life. At Washington Hospital, that’s exactly the kind of timely, life-saving treatment for heart attacks and strokes you can expect.”

Recognize the Signs of Heart Attack and Stroke Treating heart attack and stroke as quickly as possible is critical for saving lives and improving the long-term outcomes for patients. If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately. Heart Attack Symptoms The classic warning signs of a heart attack include: • Pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. • Pressure or discomfort in the chest. • Acute shortness of breath that occurs with or without chest discomfort. • Pain or discomfort in one or both

arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. • Profuse sweating. • Nausea and vomiting. • Dizziness or unexplained weakness. Women who are suffering a heart attack may not complain of as much chest pain as men do. Women more often experience extreme shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting and back or jaw pain. Stroke Symptoms Someone suffering a stroke might experience symptoms such as: • Sudden numbness or weakness, almost always on one side of the body. • Sudden confusion or difficulty in speaking or understanding language.

• Sudden trouble with seeing, such as double vision, blind spots, or a “hole” in the field of vision. • Sudden trouble with walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination. • Severe, sudden headache with no known cause. People who experience stroke symptoms that go away fairly quickly may have suffered a transient ischemic attack (TIA). With TIAs, the symptoms do resolve themselves, but they can be the precursor to a major stroke. Having a TIA means you are at a much higher risk of suffering a major stroke, and you need to be evaluated right away.

Think F.A.S.T. To help remember the signs of stroke, think F.A.S.T. F. Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop? A. Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? S. Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange? T. Time: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately. If you think you or someone near you might be having a stroke: Don't drive, don't try to diagnose yourself, call 9-1-1 immediately.

Seminar Focuses on Cancer Risk Based on Family History of the Disease

If you have a history of cancer in your family - or you have a close relative that has been diagnosed - chances are you have a lot of questions. How does this impact your risk of developing cancer? What about your children? Are there tests to determine risk? Are there ways to change your risk profile? What about screenings? On Tuesday, Sept. 4, from Noon to 1 p.m., Vandana B. Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., an oncologist on the Washington Hospital Medical Staff and director of the hospital's Cancer Genetics Program, and Nicki

Chun, M.S., CGC, a genetic counselor with the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic, will present Cancer in the Family: Am I at Risk?, a free Lunch and Learn lecture at the Washington Women's Center. The program will discuss why and how genetic counseling can help individuals with a strong family history of cancer. Learn more and reduce your risk "By getting information early on and understanding their risk, people can positively impact their outcomes when it continued on page 14 Vandana Sharma, M.D., Ph.D. medical director of the Washington Hospital Cancer Genetics Program will present Cancer in the Family: Am I at Risk?, a free Lunch and Learn lecture at the Washington Women's Center. The program will discuss why and how genetic counseling can help individuals with a strong family history of cancer. The free education session will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 4, from Noon to 1 p.m. at the Washington Women’s Center located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To register, call (800) 963-7070 or register online at www.whhs.com.

Diabetes is a chronic disease that must be properly managed to avoid serious complications like heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and blindness. But if you have diabetes, you know how difficult that can be. “I think it’s very important to first understand what diabetes is and how it affects the body,” said Khalid Baig, a family physician and pathologist who is a member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “People with diabetes should learn as much as they can about the disease and how to keep it under control.” He will offer tips for managing the chronic disease at an upcoming seminar titled “Diabetes Control: Back to Basic Keys for Success” on Thursday, September 6, from 7 to 8 p.m. It will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in continued on page 9

Khalid Baig, M.D., (above) a Washington Hospital family physician and pathologist will offer tips for managing diabetes including the role of carbohydrates at the next Diabetes Matters seminar on Thursday, September 6. The free education session will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont.Visit www.whhs.com/diabetes for more information.


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& Games in Pleasanton. The International Highland Games Federation hosts the World Championships for the Professional Class in the Caber and Weight-For-Height events during this event at the Alameda County Fairgrounds, September 1-2. The pros will compete in seven international two-man teams, four from the United States and one each from Team Canada, Team Europe and Team Poland. The pros will also compete in the 38th U.S. Invitational Heavy Events Championship that coincides with the world event and includes the Men's Open Amateur Class, Women's Open Class, Women's 40+ Master Class and three Men's Master Classes. A total of 75 athletes will compete, representing 14 states and six countries.

fairgrounds with George Cavanaugh and an import from New Zealand, Steve McDonald. McDonald is New Zealand's top solo act and has sold over a million copies of his recordings in the U.S. Celtic ensemble Golden Bough will share the stage with one of the world's premier rock bagpipe instrumentalists, John MacLean Allan. These groups and soloists will perform in 45-minutes sets beginning on the hour. Two stages will host Celtic Heritage performances of the Scottish Fiddlers Rally with world famous Alasdair Fraser leading a highly charged group of fiddlers. Verlene Schermer, noted Bay Area harper and singer, headlines the Celtic Harpers with harp students joining in. Celtic Heritage includes varied groups performing Scottish Country Dancing. Singer and balladeer John Kelly performs and Kirsty Fitch entertains with Gaelic singing. Stage seven is hosted by Scottish balladeer Neil O'Neill both days. Saturday evening, immediately following the day’s closing ceremonies, the Caledonian Club of San Francisco hosts a Ceilidh (a Scottish party) at the Red Lion Pub on the fairgrounds. Steve McDonald will be the host, assisted by Neil O'Neill with special guest appearances by the U.S. Marine Band San Diego and the L.A. Scots Pipe Band. This evening of music is free; a tri-tip or chicken BBQ dinner is available: $18 for adults, and $8 for children. One day adult tickets cost $20 or $27 for a twoday ticket; children (12 - 17) cost $12; and Seniors (65+) $12. Military with active duty ID are free; ages 11 and under are free. Parking is $8. Scottish Highland Gathering & Games Saturday and Sunday, Sept 1-2 Saturday: 8 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Sunday: 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton 888-769-2345 http://www.thescottishgames.com/ Tickets: $12 - $27; parking $8

All of these athletes are at the top of their respective classes and compete at Pleasanton by invitation only. Unlike regular track and field, all of the heavy event athletes must compete in all eight categories. As an example, the pros include the 17.6 lb. Regular Stone Putt, the 26.6 lb. Braemar Stone Putt, 28 lb. Weight-For-Distance, 56 lb. Weight-For-Distance, 16 lb. Hammer, 22 lb. Hammer, 56 lb. Weight-For-Height and the Caber (Approx 22 ft. x 140 lb.). The weight of the implements differs with each class to reflect class skills; athletes are scored on each discipline. Finishing positions for each of the eight disciplines are posted with the aggregate scores to determine the overall winner. Each day, the eight events are divided into two segments. In the morning from 8:30 a.m., to 11:30 a.m. on the Athletic Field, the two Stone Putts, Weight-For-Distance and Hammer Throws are competed by all classes. In the afternoon, from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., the Weight-For-Height and Caber are contested by all classes on the track in front of the main grandstands. An abundance of musical styles will entertain audiences at the Games; seven stages of continuous entertainment. The musical cornucopia runs the gamut from individual troubadour with guitar singing Celtic folk songs to the driving, pulsating rhythm of Celtic rock bands, and everything in between. Both Saturday and Sunday entertainment begins at 10 a.m. and continues through the final sets that begin at 4 p.m. Popular Celtic rock "regulars" are back - the local and internationally known Tempest, Australia's Brother, the tribal sounds of Scotland's Albannach and the popular sounds of Molly's Revenge with guest Peter Daldry. The Browne Sisters return to the

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Despite the fact that women outnumber men in college, only 17.8% of engineering degrees in 2009 went to women, according to the American Society of Engineering Education. Women’s aspirations in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

is to… [demystify] engineering, so that these young female students can see themselves one day as engineers, computer programmers, and scientists,” a Play-Well representative said The program held two classes every day: an engineering class in the morning and a robotics class in the afternoon. The morning class, titled “Junkyard Challenge,” challenged the girls to work in teams with a looselystructured goal of creative problem solving. In one class, the girls learned

(STEM) are formed at an early age by environment, particularly a negative stereotype that boys are better suited for math and science. Play-Well TEKnologies, a national organization that uses LEGOs to promote engineering, architecture and science to children, introduces STEM fields to young girls. PlayWell initiated a week-long LEGO robotics and engineering camp at the Irvington Community Center August 13-17 geared specifically for girls between second and fifth grade. “The goal of programs such as Play-Well’s

about using gears and transmissions to make a car go faster; in another class, they had to figure out how to build a bridge that could support a specified weight. The afternoon class, titled “LEGO Robotics for Girls,” taught problem solving with a robotics program. The girls learned how programming works and to think in a logical manner. Instructor Stephanie Ueland says she noticed a big difference in a girlsonly program. “Sometimes boys can be very competitive, so you have conflicts: ‘this is my idea’ versus ‘this is my idea,’”

BY ANNIE YU PHOTOS BY CASSANDRA BROADWIN

she said. “The girls tend to work far better collaboratively… they are able to accomplish the task that much sooner.” The all-girls program uses the same core curriculum and concepts but with a slightly different emphasis and appeal. “The boys really like battling, and sometimes the girls have fun with that but sometimes they don’t,” Ueland said. “[Many] girls like to build houses, so we built awesome, really intricate castles and then we attacked them with catapults.” Both Ueland and fellow instructor Briana Headley interest in science was sparked as young students at an all-girls summer camp. “It was just all about letting us explore our excitement for science and engineering. It was very empowering,” Headley said. “I think being exposed to female scientists and female engineers as role models can be hugely inspiring,” Ueland said. “We hope to be good role models. We’re actively thinking about how to be inspiring and supportive of the girls as they’re learning.” Headley stresses the importance of female role models to young girls. When she asked a nine-year-old female student what she thought of girls in science and engineering, the girl said ‘girls aren’t allowed in science.’ “That was very upsetting,” Headley said. She noticed some girls had a similar attitude toward LEGOs, which are mostly marketed to boys. “[The girls] see that it’s targeted not to them but to somebody else… they don’t miss it,” Headley said. Ueland knows there is an obstacle for girls pursuing a STEM education, but her goal is to make it more accessible and to encourage the girls to go for it. She will be teaching another all-girls program this fall at the PlayWell Pleasanton Activity Center. “I’m inspired to be around the children,” Ueland said. “I think once they give [engineering] a shot, they’ll find that it’s not hard. It’s fun and rewarding.” For more information on future Play-Well classes, visit www.playwell.org.

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Theatre Review

August 28 2012

Steampunk “Cinderella” a visual treat

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

T

he tale of a girl named Cinderella is one well and widely known by almost everyone who has spent time on the planet. A kind girl, treated as a house slave by her stepmother and stepsisters, gets a magical trip to the ball via her Fairy Godmother, finds love with the prince, and after a little scuffle over a shoe, presto – lives happily ever after. But Curtain Call Performing Arts sparks curiosity and renewed interest in the familiar story with just one word: Steampunk. Rogers and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” was a made for TV musical that aired in 1957 and underwent remakes in 1965 and 1997. But Curtain Call’s unique and lively interpretation is one that you’ve never seen before, and the bold choice is undoubtedly the heart and success of this production. Steampunk is a genre that evolved from the industrial days of steam power, weaving machinery elements with science fiction, fantasy, and a Victorian sensibility with a punk twist. “Cinderella is a classic story that has been told in different countries for centuries. Steampunk, to me, is without a specific time period. It has the feel of some tradition in the look of it, but adds fantasy... with an edge,” says Director and Choreographer Misty Megia. “The more I researched it, the more I fell in love with the idea of the marriage of tradition with nods to today and the future. Steampunk also has this theme of watches and clock gears, which I find fit Cinderella perfectly. Time is ticking away and you have to reach for what you want in time to get it. Everything about it just fit for what I wanted to say.” The set is awash with gold, copper, and silver hues and comprised of a staircase curving up each side of a mottled wall that serves as the village square, manor house, and royal palace. Atop this wall presides a large, impressive clock to which all the lives below run. Costume Designer Andrea Gorham delivers an entrancing collection of eclectic and vintage looking getups in gray, black, brown, and navy tones with dashes of pur-

ple, red, and orange. The costumes are diverse in look but harmonious in fabulous funk, constructed of goggles, top hats, vests, corsets, watch chains, feathers, patterned tights, lace-up boots, cropped jackets, and floor length coats. Interestingly enough, Cinderella doesn’t get any Steampunk treatment herself, wearing the traditional old dress and apron cleaning outfit, a pretty ball dress, and wedding gown. One wonders what that signifies. But the look of the show isn’t the only notable difference; this version of the tale is a little more proactive. Only when Cinderella takes responsibility for her own destiny and decides to go after what she wants, does the Fairy Godmother kick in with the magic, reminding us that most of the time, miracles don’t just swirl in and change our lives, they happen when we take that first step forward. Catherine Williamson is absolute princess perfection as Cinderella. Her carriage, tone of voice, and delivery of lines is right on character, and her singing is gor-

geous. She is especially touching when she converses with her wind-up mouse friend, Charles, and imagines all that she can be in the song “In My Own Little Corner.” Chafing at the life decided for him, Matt Ono is a sweet and boyish Prince Christopher, endearing and enthusiastic in pursuit of himself and his love. Kate Offer and Alice Beittel play their parts to the comedic hilt as the hopeless and unappealing stepsisters Grace and Joy. While Beittel goes a bit overboard at times, the two are well matched and provide laughs throughout, including the great number, “Stepsisters’ Lament.” Ali Lane deals it cool and smooth as the harsh and regal Stepmother, but also gets to indulge in her own well-played comedic moments. And forget the soft and grandmotherly Fairy Godmother; who couldn’t dig a no nonsense woman in heels, purple corset, leather pants, fingerless gloves, and top hat? She states, “I never really wanted to fit in, I prefer to stand out,” and Kristina Stasi certainly does that. Super cool and

confident, Stasi brings the magic in a whole new way. With the Steampunk twist, live orchestra, and strong performances, “Cinderella” is a unique, fantasy music box experience worth seeing. And where else can you see a real pumpkin carriage? Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students and seniors, and can be purchased at http://www.cvartsfoundation.com/ or by calling the Box Office at (510) 889-8961. For more information on the show or Curtain Call, visit http://www.curtaincallperformingarts.org/ or call (510) 909-9516. Cinderella Friday, Aug 24 – Aug 31: 8 p.m. Matinees, Aug 25 & 26: 2 p.m. Castro Valley Center for the Arts 19501 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley (510) 889-8961 http://www.curtaincallperformingarts.org/ Tickets: $15 students and seniors, $25 adults


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a single location for the festival, each year it travels to different places in the Bay Area. The logo incorporates a “vinta” (a traditional Filipino boat for touring or traveling) which originated in Zamboanga City, Camins’ birthplace, to represent this mobility. This year, the Adobo Festival is coming to Union City on Saturday, September 1 and Sunday, September 2 at Veterans Park in Union City. Games and booths with exciting products and an array of mouth-watering foods await one and all. GMA Pinoy TV stars Rachelle Ann Go and Steven Silva will attend the festival and be available to “meet and greet” their fans. A highlight of the festival is the Adobo Contest, open to everyone. Contestants are asked to bring a small tray of their own home cooked original version of Adobo to compete for cash prizes and trophies. And don’t forget to be creative; think

about Adobo Sushi, Fish Adobo or Adobong Frog Legs! All can visit the Adobo Station to savor the best adobo in town. Adobo is a treat for the senses but along with the sight, taste and aroma of this dish, a variety show and Kiddie Popstar Contest (ages 4 -10) will showcase the singing prowess of future superstars. For more information on how to join the Kiddie Popstar Contest, call (650) 290-4457. A round trip ticket to Hawaii courtesy of Mango Tours and free balikbayan boxes certificates from LBC will be given away during the event. Don’t miss the 7th Annual Adobo Festival. It promises to be a fun and exciting family event with a Filipino flair… atin ito! Adobo Festival September 1 and 2 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Veterans Park 4525 Dyer St., Union City (650) 290-0542 www.pinoyparinkami.com Free

Indian Independence Day honored SUBMITTED BY ANDREW LAMAR Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-San Leandro) presented a resolution on the Senate Floor on August 21, 2012 honoring Indian Independence Day and recognizing its significance in California and across the globe. “I rise proudly to present ACR 115,” Corbett said, in introducing the measure. “To honor my district and the wonderful Indo-Americans who live within the 10th district, I have worn a salwar kameez.” The Senate passed Assembly Concurrent Resolution 115, by Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont), which proclaims August 15, 2012 as India’s Independence Day and urges all Californians to join in celebrating this national holiday in the world’s largest democracy. At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, India officially broke from British colonial rule and became independent. India’s Independence Day is celebrated by a billion people living in that nation and many others living in the rest of the world.

SUBMITTED BY JANE BARK In an oil-scarce world, we know there are sacrifices to be made in the pursuit of energy. What no one expected was that a tiny Native community living down the river from Canada's tar sands would reach out to the world for help, and be heard. For years, residents of Fort Chipewyan have been dying of rare forms of cancer. In order to protect their people, the downstream chiefs take their battle to the boardrooms of global oil companies, demanding change, and catch the attention of Hollywood's most influential filmmaker. Tipping Point Saturday, Sept 8 1:30 p.m. Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont (510) 797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Temporary closure of Silliman Aquatic Center SUBMITTED BY CITY OF NEWARK In order to repair the pool ceiling paint, the Silliman Aquatic Center will be closed beginning Tuesday, September 4. The project is projected to take up to six months to complete. During this closure, the Silliman Activity Center featuring the Fitness Area, Gym, Teen Area and Meeting Room will remain open during our regular business hours.

Alameda County announces 12th Leadership Academy SUBMITTED BY LAURA LLOYD-JENKINS Alameda County is accepting applications for its 12th Leadership Academy. This free, six-session interactive forum is for people who live, work, or own a business in Alameda County. Through presentations from top County leaders and small group exercises, the Leadership Academy provides an excellent opportunity for the community to increase their knowledge of local government. Participants learn about the wide range of services provided by Alameda County, the mission and strategic visioning initiative, and the budget development process. Participants are able to practice leadership and communication skills such as public speaking, and participate in mock budget and other public policy exercises while acquiring knowledge on how to increase their civic involvement and networking with other community members. This is also a great opportunity for County officials to hear from residents. The Academy begins October 3, 2012 and continues through March 6, 2013. Sessions are typically held the first Wednesday of each month from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at facilities throughout the County. Space is limited. Interested applicants can obtain additional information and complete an online application at www.acgov.org/adultleadership, or by contacting the County Administrator’s Office at (510) 272-6510. The application deadline is September 14, 2012.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

August 28 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BART Police Log

APPLY FOR

Citizen's Police Academy

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER E. JENKINS, BART PD August 20 At 5:06 p.m. a victim reported her beige 1997 Honda Accord stolen from the Fremont BART SUBMITTED BY station between 7:40 a.m. and 4:40 p.m., from the LT. KIMBERLY PETERSEN, FREMONT PD east lot, stall #516. August 22 Have you ever wanted to get an inside look at the A victim reported her 1996 green Honda AcFremont Police Department? Now is your opportucord 4-door vehicle was stolen while parked in nity. Beginning, Tuesday, September 18, 2012, the stall #687 between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Fremont Police Department will start its next Citizen's Police Academy Class. The Fremont Police Department is currently accepting applications for the 31st Citizen's Police Academy. The class will be limited to approximately 25 attendees, so don't delay. The free twelve session program generally meets one night each week, either Tuesday or Thursday SUBMITTED BY CHRIS COCHRAN evening, from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. and will run for nineweeks. There will be one Saturday class on October The California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS), 13th to accommodate specialized training. Particiin partnership with bars and restaurants throughpants learn about police selection and training, interout California will encourage the use of interestnal investigations, criminal law, patrol operations, ing and creative new non-alcoholic drink communications, crime prevention, crime analysis, concoctions as “DDrinks,” an alternative to just firearms training, critical incidents, narcotics, gangs, water or soft drinks for those who have the imtraffic enforcement and much more. portant role of designated sober driver. To learn more about the academy and sign up, visit DDrink recipes were submitted by 12 food www.fremontpolice.org/citizensacademy. If you have and drink establishments in Sacramento, Santa any questions, please contact Lt. Kimberly Petersen at Barbara, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, and Kpetersen@fremont.gov or call (510) 790-6869. Los Angeles. OTS has added an interactive Facebook tab to support the DDrink recipes, providing easy access to patrons who may want to recreate one of the 12 featured drinks at home. “These drinks are unique and were created by skilled bartenders throughout the state who recSUBMITTED BY ognize the importance of offering sober drivers a CAPT. STEVE SILVA, FREMONT FIRE DEPARTMENT tastier drink option rather than resorting to the usual cola or plain water. By choosing to remain The Fremont Fire Department responded to a report sober, drivers are helping to ensure that our of a large amount of black smoke coming from the roof streets are safer and lives are being spared,” said of 5307 Grant Court at 4:09 p.m. on August 15. Once Christopher J. Murphy, Director of the Office of on scene, crews reported a working fire and forced entry Traffic Safety through the front door and side gate of the residence. www.Facebook.com/CaliforniaOTS Fire crews found no fire in the structure initially, but after pulling the ceiling, found a fully involved attic fire. Ventilation holes were cut in the roof while additional crews attacked and extinguished the fire. Crews also simultaneously checked for fire extension and conducted a search for any victims. It was determined that no one was in the house and the SUBMITTED BY SGT. ERIC MELENDEZ quick work by fire crews prevented the fire from extending into the interior of the home. The fire was On August 23, 2012, at approximately 3:50 contained to one area of the home with smoke damp.m., Hayward Police Department received a 911age throughout the house. The fire was declared under call requesting their help at 655 W. Tennyson Road, control after approximately 30 minutes, with addiHayward, the address of Espinoza Jewelry Boutional time being spent on salvage of belongings and tique. overhaul. An investigation determined that the fire On arrival, they found an individual inside was accidental. Damage to the structure was $200,000 the business premises suffering from a gunshot and $75,000 to the contents. wound. There are no other victims at this time. Life-saving efforts proved unsuccessful and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. The from the downstairs living area of his apartment. In victim’s identity has not yet been confirmed and the morning when the resident awakened, he detera motive for the shooting has yet to be determined that an unknown suspect(s) entered his mined. apartment via an unlocked rear sliding patio door Investigators will focus on identifying any witand burglarized his residence. nesses to the shooting and attempt to locate any August 20 other evidence that might help them establish the The owner of the “Bharar Bazar” store located at motive for the murder and the suspect’s/suspects’ 34201 Alvarado Niles Road reported that unknown identity. suspect(s) had burglarized his store the night before. Anyone with information about this incident The incident was caught on video surveillance at 2: is asked to call Inspector Ritchie at (510) 29320 a.m. It appears that the suspect(s) made entry by 7219 or Detective Hoyer at (510) 293-7172. removing a glass panel. Investigators are attempting

Drinks for Designated Drivers

Attic fire extinguished

Help to solve homicide

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD August 19 A resident living at the Dry Creek Apartments located at 33300 Mission Boulevard reported that about 2 a.m., he had heard a slight noise coming

to identify the suspect from the video footage. A residential burglary occurred to a home on the 33000 block of 10th Street on August 19. Entry was made through an unlocked window. A residential burglary occurred to a residence on the 34600 block of Skylark Drive. Entry was made by forcibly prying open the front door. August 21 At about 2:00 a.m., officers were sent to investigate a burglar alarm sounding at the Bronco Billy’s Pizza restaurant located at 3940 Smith Street. Entry was made via a pried side entrance door. The empty cash register was later found in the area of Smith Street near Union City Boulevard. Unknown suspect(s) kicked the front glass doors to the Smith Street Convenience Market located at 3834 Smith Street and burglarized it sometime during the night. Loss was candy and cigarettes.

Blue painter's tape used by burglars SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Blue painter's tape affixed to doors may be using as a means of surveillance. A unique surveillance technique is being used by burglars in San Francisco. Police there are warning residents of one neighborhood to be on the lookout for blue painter's tape that thieves are using as a means of surveillance. It is believed burglars place the tape on doorways and that a broken tape will indicate to a potential thief that someone is home. But tape that remains untouched for days could be a sign that the resident is away on vacation. There are no known incidents of this type occurring in Newark, but be vigilant as this crime trend may spread throughout the Bay Area.


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Fremont. The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use it properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy. When this process doesn’t work properly, glucose (sugar) levels in the blood can get too high. “With elevated blood sugar levels, the lining of the blood vessels gets damaged over time,” Baig said. “Diabetes affects blood vessels throughout the body, from the brain all the way down to the feet. Every blood vessel is involved. If this damage occurs in the brain, you are more susceptible to stroke. If it occurs in the heart, it significantly raises your risk of having a heart attack. When it happens in the kidneys, it causes kidney disease. In fact, the majority of people who need dialysis treatments because their kidneys no longer work properly have diabetes.” Diet and Exercise According to Baig, understanding the complications motivates people to make the necessary lifestyle changes to keep diabetes under control, which include eating right and exercising. “Diet is the most important aspect of diabetes,” he said. “Everything you eat affects your blood sugar.” Baig will talk about the role of carbohydrates and explain the difference between simple and complex carbs. Simple carbohydrates, which include both added and naturally occurring sugars, cause blood sugar levels to increase rapidly while complex carbs, found in starchy vegetables and grains, cause a sustained increase in blood sugar levels, he said. “You need to understand how carbohydrates affect the body to develop a meal plan,” Baig added. “You can’t and shouldn’t avoid carbs, but you need to understand how they impact blood sugar. It’s important to develop a meal plan that provides a balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein. You don’t have to give up the foods you enjoy in order to control your diabetes, but you do need to plan accordingly.”

Exercise is also important in controlling diabetes and managing some of the other risk factors that can lead to complications like high blood pressure. In addition to helping with weight loss, physical activity helps the body metabolize glucose more efficiently, Baig explained. “Excessive weight gain reduces the functioning of receptors that facilitate the body’s use of glucose,” he added. “You really need to keep your Body Mass Index (BMI) below 25. That’s the magic number.” Monitor and Treat Another critical component of controlling diabetes is continued monitoring. People with diabetes need to check their blood glucose levels regularly. “Self-testing is very easy now,” Baig said. “Technology has brought us more efficient testing equipment that requires very little blood to get an accurate reading. The machines are small and easy to carry.” While a simple blood test measures blood glucose at any given moment, the A1C test measures the average blood glucose level over a two to three-month period. It is an important tool for avoiding serious complications because it indicates how well blood glucose levels are being controlled over time, he added. Taking medications properly is the final component of controlling diabetes that Baig will address. He will provide an overview of some of the medications that are available today, including those that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin, medications that reduce the production of glucose by the liver, and newer drugs that help the body’s cells use insulin more efficiently. “The bottom line is you have to get your diabetes under control before it damages your body and causes serious complications,” Baig said. “It can be difficult, but it certainly is doable. There is a lot of information and support available. Work with your doctor, talk to a dietitian, and find out everything you can about the disease.” To learn about other diabetes programs at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD August 17 At 7:44 p.m., Officers responded to a robbery that just occurred at as the victim was walking away from the Irvington Community Center. Three suspects, described as two black males and one black female, approached the victim and grabbed her purse and ran. A perimeter was set. Sergeant Harnett stopped the female suspect and Officer Macciola stopped the male suspect as both were fleeing the scene. Two juveniles were identified and arrested on scene. The stolen property was recovered.

A neighbor called to report hearing loud banging and seeing lights in his neighbor’s backyard on the 3300 Block of Cornish Court. Officers arrived and as they approached the house, Officer Sasser saw a subject inside the house peer out at them. The subject fled and jumped a fence. Officer C. Tang ped-stopped a possible suspect at Cornish/Paseo Padre. A window smash burglary was confirmed and eventually, Officer Tang's subject was identified as the victim's daughter's exboyfriend who was aware the family was out of town. He was arrested on scene; investigation is being conducted by Officer Blass. August 18 At 4:18 p.m., an adult male

was approached by two to three suspects at Niles Community Park (3rd Street). He was punched in the face several times and his cell phone stolen. Officers responded and detained three suspects. One suspect, a juvenile, is arrested. Investigated by Officer Barrett. Officer S. Hunt stopped a vehicle occupied by four young males at Peralta and Fremont. Officer Butcher provided cover. During the stop, Officer S. Hunt learned that the driver was driving on a suspended license. During a subsequent inventory search of the vehicle, a loaded handgun and marijuana was found secreted under the right front pascontinued on page 33


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August 28 2012

Washington Township History Farms and Farmers

W

ashington Township was formed in 1853, but Eastern American pioneers were already farming large tracts of the area. They had discovered that “the climate was the choicest in the whole state” and the soil was deep, rich and very fertile. The famous ship Brooklyn brought passengers who were described as “the earliest permanent American settlers in California.” Some of them became farmers in

about wiped out their empire, but they persevered. An agricultural, study committee from San Francisco visited Beard’s orchard and the farms of John and Robert Blacow in 1860. The Blacow brothers were credited with being “pioneers in the good work of stock improvement in Alameda County.” Farmers who owned over 100 acres in 1876 included Henry Curtner, R. A. McClure, George Patterson, John Stevenson, Joseph John Horner

Burdette Williams in packing shed, centerville, 1947

Watermellon harvest

Washington Township. John Horner, one of the passengers, became the most prominent farmer in the State after overcoming many obstacles. His first crop at Mission San Jose was destroyed by grasshoppers, and wild cattle ruined his planting of potatoes. However, he persisted and earned a profit of $600 in 1847. He leased land, built redwood fences to protect his crops and raised vegetables which he sold to miners and men on their way to the gold mines. John’s brother, William, joined him to help manage the expanding farming operations. By 1851, the Horner brothers reported gross incomes of some $270,000 from the sale of vegetables and fruit. John was chosen “First Farmer of California” and awarded a silver chalice. Elias Lyman Beard came to Mission San Jose in 1849 and purchased a cloudy title to some 28 acres including the orchards and gardens around the Mission. He cultivated the gardens, cared for the fruit trees, grafted and planted more trees and created a productive farm that attracted people from near and far. They came to buy trees or get cuttings for grafting. Charles Shinn wrote, “The old E. L. Beard garden home has had a name and fame second to no farm in California.” Beard joined John Horner to purchase the ex-mission land grant of some 30,000 acres. They put much of this land into wheat and potatoes and sold or leased sections to other farmers. The depression that started in 1854 just

Palmer, Earl Marshall, Simeon Stivers and Josiah Stanford. The authors of the 1878 Atlas of Alameda County noted that nearly all the farmers raised some fruit. Farmers mentioned include James Shinn, William Tyson, Zachariah Cheney, William Barry, George Emerson, W.W. Brier, John Proctor, Daniel Sanborn and Emory Munyon. “Besides cultivating fruit, Mr. Munyon makes excellent cider as he used to do when he lived in Connecticut.” By 1880 over 30% of the people in the township were of Portuguese descent, many of them farmers. They loved the soil and were great farmers. Large acreages were farmed by the Lewis Brothers. Doris Van Scoy described their life in her book, The Story of Antonio and Maria. It was predicted in 1889 that Alameda County would become the nursery center of California. Wheat culture was expected to lessen and orchards, vineyards and gardens to increase and the area would “become one of the richest and most famous fruit districts in the State.” Charles Shinn highlighted the family orchards of Joseph Nichols, B. D. Clough, John Proctor, William Sim, the Shinn family and others as being the “historical forerunner of the commercial orchards.” William Barry was waging a fight against the attack of smut on citrus fruits in the 1890’s. He presented an exhibit before the Board of Supervisors in 1898 to demonstrate the quality of Wash-

ington Township Citrus and the success of his fight. The exhibit included fruit from the orchards of C. C. McIver, C. S. Bond, John Decoto, H. A. Mayhew, James Shinn, Thomas Chadbourne and H. G. Ellsworth. The 1910 Special Edition of the Township Register mentions the 40 acre orchard of Henry Lachman but stresses the vineyards of Los Cerritos, of J. H. Whitfield, Los Amigos of Grau and Weiner and Linda Vista of Henry Stephens. It also features the Jackson-Grainger Dairy and the William Hirsch poultry farm. Japanese Americans, including the Fudenna Family, were very resourceful and successful farmers. The Williams brothers were advertised as large growers and shippers in 1947. Burdette was growing celery, tomatoes, broccoli and cauliflower on 12 farms and packing and shipping from his packinghouse in Irvington. Lee was shipping carloads of vegetables from his Centerville warehouse. His field superintendent, Tony Alameda, was recognized as a township civic leader. Lloyd Bailey operated a packing shed capable of shipping 15 carloads a day from Centerville. Other farms advertised in 1947 included the Weibel Champagne Vineyards and Kimber Poultry Breeding Farm. After World War II, housing developments began crowding out the farmers until only Mel Alameda and Joe Perry were left at the remaining farmland of the George Patterson Ranch and Ardenwood. They were described as “living ties to Fremont history.”

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History Harvesting cauliflower with horse drawn wagons, 1947


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Lauren's Ride: Golden Gate Bridge to the Brooklyn Bridge BY BELINDA MALONEY

L

auren Byrne, a 22 year old woman from Newark, CA, became a quadriplegic when she was just 15. A vibrant, talented, outgoing teenager, full of life, Lauren's world as she knew it, tumbled down around her. In a swimming pool accident, she hit her head and became paralyzed; she had broken her neck. In a wheelchair with all her dreams and aspirations coming to a halt, one might think Lauren would feel like the world had ended, but not Lauren! To her, it was just a speed bump on the road of life. Following months of hospitalization and years of physical therapy, she remains a strong, beautiful woman with a great attitude and sense of humor. Lauren did not let an accident define her; she goes to a local college, travels with family and friends, counsels other accident victims… and even plays wheelchair rugby! “We have hope she’ll someday walk again. It’s hard. You never know. You go to the hospital, and no one has any answers for you. But she’s really positive. She really motivates me. She’s never wanted people to feel bad for her. As time goes on, I think she’ll inspire people more than anything,” says her older brother John. John is a firefighting engineer in Nipomo, CA. They say that brothers and sisters share a unique blend of love, camaraderie and friendship; never more true than in this instance. John has watched Lauren struggle through recuperation and is in awe of his sister’s strength and perseverance. During a camping trip with her, he learned just how frustrated she was with her inability to

The Byrne family

drive. She wasn’t getting the classes she needed, was juggling work and school, and every appointment required a family discussion about transportation options. Feeling that Lauren's first true step toward independence would be to get herself from one place to another without depending on others, John decided to look into options. After some research and finding no available funding programs and realizing how expensive specialized vehicles are, he decided to combine his talents and love of adventure to start a fundraising campaign. John has participated in triathlons for the past few years and recently completed a 300 mile bicycle ride in three days from Nipomo to the Golden Gate Bridge, Why?, one might ask..."Just because, I'm crazy," he says. If you think 300 miles is crazy, his next endeavor is mind boggling! John will leave September 9 to ride his bicycle across the country, from the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco to the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, to raise funds for Lauren. “I posted it on Facebook to see what people thought. Within a day, there was a website with video, donation capability, maps, and I’m in total disbelief. I’m thinking, ‘Wait! This is just an idea,’” John said. “When John says he’s going to do something, he’ll do it,” Lauren said. What started off being just an idea is now a reality. John is absolutely thrilled with the outpouring of love and support. Tony Hernandez, training captain for Cal Fire San Diego, will drive a follow car to serve as John’s support crew. Cal Fire Capt. Steve Meikle, with help from the Cal Fire firefighters union, is contacting fire departments along John’s intended route to make lodging plans. Amy Jones, executive assistant with Cal Fire in Los Osos, is coordinating planning, public information and press work. Andy Meuerle of New Jersey and the man behind John’s bike will coordinate the final stages of the ride, and, of course, family and friends have been helping with just about everything, but especially getting the word out. Fluid Sports Nutrition, a San Luis Obispo-based recovery drink manufacturer, will provide supplements for the ride, and San Luis Obispo County Firefighters Benevolent Association is sponsoring the ride. John’s and Lauren’s mother, Judy Byrne, will coordinate a Nor Cal Kick off pasta dinner and fundraiser for the ride on Saturday, September 8 from 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. at Fremont Veteran's Hall located at 37154 2nd Street in Niles. All proceeds will go to "Lauren's Ride." "My husband and I are so very proud of what a wonderful, loving, and caring man John has become," says Mrs. Byrne. We'll be tracking John's journey each day, and of course I will be biting my nails for six weeks till he's safe in Brooklyn... but that's what mothers do!" “I figure if, through the course of this ride, I meet 3,000 people who are willing to donate $10 each, we’d hit our goal,” John said. If you would like to donate or learn more about Lauren's Ride, please go to www.laurensride.org. Lauren’s Ride Pasta Dinner and Fundraiser Saturday, Sept 8 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Fremont Veteran's Hall 37154 2nd Street, Niles www.laurensride.org

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Calif. protests court order for inmate reduction AP WIRE SERVICE SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Gov. Jerry Brown's administration is protesting a federal court order to provide a timetable for releasing prison inmates to ease overcrowding at state prisons. The state filed a response to the order late Friday, calling the court's demand for a timetable ``unwarranted'' and requesting a suspension of previously ordered prison crowding limits, the Los Angeles Times reported Saturday. A three-judge panel has given California until June 2013 to decrease its prison population to 137.5 percent of capacity or 112,000 inmates, but the state has said it does not expect to meet that target date and expects to lower the population to only 145 percent of capacity. That admission prompted the judges two weeks ago to issue the order for a schedule of inmate releases. The legal wrangling is the latest step in a long running lawsuit over medical and mental health care at the state's prisons. Judges in two federal courts have ruled that the poor prison health care system leads to an “unconscionable degree of suffering and death” and placed the system in the control of a court-appointed receiver. In its legal filing Friday, the government contends that the opening of a large prison medical facility in Stockton will alleviate many of the issues, eliminate the need for a receiver, and as such, said a timetable for early releases was legally inappropriate. The state also said that if it has to comply with the lower inmate population threshold, it would not be able to save money by returning 9,000 inmates housed at out-of-state for-profit prisons because it would have to pay county jails for housing more state inmates. Inmate advocates say the government is simply being intransigent. “Every step in the process, they have dug in their heels,” said Rebekah Evenson, a lawyer for the Prison Law Office, which filed the class action lawsuit 10 years ago. The state has reduced its overcrowding to 150 percent of capacity by having 24,000 low-level offenders serve time in county jails. Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com

Samsung ordered to pay Apple $1.05B in patent case BY PAUL ELIAS ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP), After a year of scorched-earth litigation, a jury decided Friday that Samsung ripped off the innovative technology used by Apple to create its revolutionary iPhone and iPad. The jury ordered Samsung to pay Apple $1.05 billion. An appeal is expected. Apple Inc. filed its patent infringement lawsuit in April 2011 and engaged legions of the country's highest-paid patent lawyers to demand $2.5 billion from its top smartphone competitor. Samsung Electronics Co. fired back with its own lawsuit seeking $399 million. The verdict, however, belonged to Apple, as the jury rejected all Samsung's claims against Apple. Jurors also decided against some of Apple's claims involving the two dozen Samsung devices at issue, declining to award the full $2.5 billion Apple demanded. However, the jury found that several Samsung products illegally used such Apple creations as the “bounceback” feature when a user scrolls to an end image, and the ability to zoom text with a finger tap. As part of its lawsuit, Apple also demanded that Samsung pull its most popular cellphones and computer tablets from the U.S. market. A judge was expected to make that ruling at a later time. After the verdicts were read, the judge sent the jury back to deliberate

August 28 2012

US Judge dismisses Infosys harassment case BY ERIKA KINETZ AP BUSINESS WRITER MUMBAI, India (AP), An Alabama judge has dismissed a whistleblower harassment case against Indian outsourcing giant Infosys Technologies despite ongoing investigations of alleged U.S. visa fraud that arose from the complaint. Infosys consultant Jack Palmer claimed he was harassed after calling attention to what he believed was systemic U.S. visa fraud at Infosys. Palmer alleged that Infosys misused short-term work visas –which are cheaper and easier to get than longterm work visas – to send Indian employees to the United States for permanent work. Infosys denies the charges of visa fraud and welcomed Monday's judgment in the Palmer case, which was filed in 2011. “We are extremely pleased to consider this matter officially closed,” Infosys chief executive S.D. Shibulal said Tuesday. “This is a reaffirmation of our position that we did not retaliate and our view that this is a company which is built on core values.” He said that, for now, Palmer remains an employee. The judgment does not address the allegations of visa fraud, which are being investigated by the Department of Homeland Security and a federal grand jury, only the allegation by Palmer that he was harassed. In his ruling on the Palmer case, Judge Myron Thompson said threatening phone calls and anti-American statements directed at Palmer were “deeply disturbing,” but did not rise to the level of harassment as defined by Alabama state law. For Palmer to have won his suit, the harassment would have had to be “so outrageous in character and so extreme in degree as to go beyond all possible bounds of decency,” the judge wrote. Palmer said he received threatening calls, along the lines of, “Why are

you doing this, you stupid American, we have been good to you,” according to the judgment. In February 2011, Palmer found a note in ungrammatical English on his computer keyboard that read, according to the judgment: “Jack: Just leave your not wanted here hope your journey brings you death stupid American.” Palmer said that as a result of the threats and languishing without work, he takes antidepressants and sometimes carries a concealed gun. “(A)n argument could be made that such threats against whistleblowers, in particular, should be illegal,” Thomson wrote. “The issue before the court, however, is not whether Alabama should make these alleged wrongs actionable, but whether they are, in fact, illegal under state law. This court cannot rewrite state law.” The judge also ruled that Palmer must bear the costs of the litigation. Shibulal declined to comment on how much the company had spent fighting the case. Infosys is also fighting a second whistleblower case in a California court, filed by a former employee who said he was harassed and threatened after alerting Infosys managers and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to visa misuse. Satya Dev Tripuraneni, an accounts manager in Infosys' Fremont, California, office who quit in March, claims that Infosys routinely brought Indian workers to the U.S. on shortterm visas to work for clients, then convinced those clients to accept fake bills that said the work was done outside the U.S. He also claims that Infosys overcharged its U.S. clients. Infosys denies wrongdoing in that case as well. “We have done an internal investigation as per our policies and norms. We have found that the claims are unfounded,” Shibulal said. “Our lawyers are preparing for the defense.” Infosys stock closed up 2.4 percent in midday trade in Mumbai.

further on two inconsistencies involving about $2.5 million in damages awarded to Apple based on products jurors found didn't infringe Apple's patents. Those deliberations were continuing. During closing arguments at the trial, Apple attorney Harold McElhinny claimed Samsung was having a “crisis of design” after the 2007 launch of the iPhone, and executives with the South Korean company were determined to illegally cash in on the success of the revolutionary device. Samsung's lawyers countered that it was simply and legally giving consumers what they want: Smart phones with big screens. They said Samsung didn't violate any of Apple's patents and further alleged innovations claimed by Apple were actually created by other companies. Samsung has emerged as one of Apple's biggest rivals and has overtaken Apple as the leading smartphone maker. Samsung's Galaxy line of phones run on Android, a mobile operating system that Google Inc. has given out for free to Samsung and other phone makers. Samsung conceded that Apple makes great products but said it doesn't have a monopoly on the design of rectangle phones with rounded corners that it claimed it created. Google entered the smartphone market while its then-CEO Eric Schmidt was on Apple's board, infuriating Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who considered Android to be a blatant rip off of the iPhone's innovations. After shoving Schmidt off Apple's board, Jobs vowed that Apple would resort to “thermonuclear war” to destroy Android and its allies. The trial came after each side filed a blizzard of legal motions and refused advisories by U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh to settle the dispute out of court. Deliberations by the jury of seven men and two women began Wednesday. Apple and Samsung combined account for more than half of global smartphone sales. Samsung has sold 22.7 million smartphones and tablets that Apple claimed uses its technology. McElhinny said those devices accounted for $8.16 billion in sales since June 2010. From the beginning, legal experts and Wall Street analysts viewed Samsung as the underdog in the case.

Apple's headquarters is a mere 10 miles from the San Jose courthouse, and jurors were picked from the heart of Silicon Valley where Jobs is a revered technological pioneer. While the legal and technological issues were complex, patent expert Alexander I. Poltorak previously said the case would likely boil down to whether jurors believed Samsung's products look and feel almost identical to Apple's iPhone and iPad. To overcome that challenge at trial, Samsung's lawyers argued that many of Apple's claims of innovation were either obvious concepts or ideas stolen from Sony Corp. and others. Experts called that line of argument a high-risk strategy because of Apple's reputation as an innovator. Apple's lawyers argued there is almost no difference between Samsung products and those of Apple, and presented internal Samsung documents they said showed it copied Apple designs. Samsung lawyers insisted that several other companies and inventors had previously developed much of the Apple technology at issue. The U.S. trial is just the latest skirmish between the two tech giants over product designs. Apple and Samsung have filed similar lawsuits in eight other countries, including South Korea, Germany, Japan, Italy, the Netherlands, Britain, France and Australia. Samsung won a home court ruling earlier Friday in the global patent battle against Apple. Judges in Seoul said Samsung didn't copy the look and feel of the iPhone and ruled that Apple infringed on Samsung's wireless technology. However, the judges also said Samsung violated Apple's technology behind the feature that causes a screen to bounce back when a user scrolls to an end image. Both sides were ordered to pay limited damages. The Seoul ruling was a rare victory for Samsung in its arguments that Apple has infringed on its wireless technology patents. Samsung's claims have previously been shot down by courts in Europe. where judges have ruled that Samsung patents were part of industry standards that must be licensed under fair terms to competitors. The U.S. case is one of some 50 lawsuits among myriad telecommunications companies jockeying for position in the burgeoning $219 billion market for smartphones and computer tablets.


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comes to cancer," according to Dr. Sharma. "Unfortunately, many people out there may not even realize that their risk for developing cancer is something they can alter, but it's true." Referred to as a cancer syndrome, this type of genetic predisposition increases a person's lifetime risk of developing cancer. "An individual diagnosed with cancer who has some family history, or women with a mother or sister diagnosed with breast cancer, or anyone diagnosed with multiple cancers, such as breast and ovarian - these individuals are our target audience when talking about heritability and cancer," Dr. Sharma says. For these individuals in particular, knowledge can make all the difference in early detection - and even avoidance of developing cancer, according to Dr. Sharma. In the past, she says patients have told her they thought they were destined to develop cancer - even die of it - because they had a family history of the disease. Dr. Sharma is adamant that this is not the case. And genetic testing has become a valuable tool in evaluating individuals' risk of certain types of cancer, as well as in taking steps to change that risk. Strategies to diagnose cancer early "When we do genetic testing, we're able to implement strategies to diagnose the cancer earlier and

sometimes even prevent it," Dr. Sharma says. "If we do test the individuals and family members, and an individual doesn't have the gene mutation - not gene then they know they don't have an increased risk, and therefore they don't have to do the more frequent screening." Dr. Sharma adds that one of the reasons she wants people to be aware of a family history of cancer is because this knowledge might change how screening is approached. Similarly, individuals diagnosed with more than two cancers are more prone to a genetic predisposition that could be shared amongst family members people whose screening schedules for cancer may change drastically based on this information. "Take, for example, the general screening schedule for colon cancer, which typically begins at age 50," she says. "If everything is normal, a person is screened five to 10 years later. However, with a strong family history, the schedule increases in frequency to one to three years. We always recommend that people with a first-degree relative who has been diagnosed begin the screening 10 years younger than the age their relative was diagnosed. We wouldn't wait until the age the cancer was found in the family member." Getting answers Stanford genetic counselor Nicki Chun recommends seeking

information rather than feeling anxious and uncertain about what the future may hold. "Many people have relatives with cancer," Chun says. "We'll discuss who might benefit from genetic testing, the basics of inherited cancer risk, what genetic tests are currently available, and what might become available in the future." She says people have a lot of unanswered questions when it comes to cancer risk, and genetic counseling is a good way of getting answers. "Two of the most common questions people have when they come to genetic counseling are: 'What caused my cancer?' and 'What does it mean for my kids and relatives?' The other outstanding question is: 'How will this affect my treatment?'" In addition to altering screening frequency, Chun says, treatment options for individuals with cancer are frequently adjusted based on knowledge about family history and genetic risk. Moreover, treatment modalities and technology also evolve quickly in the realm of cancer care, which is why it's important to seek the latest information, according to Chun.

Learn More About Genetic Testing The Washington Cancer Genetics Program offers genetic counseling for individuals concerned with the risk of an inherited cancer predisposition. To learn more about this program or to make an appointment, call (510) 608-1356 or visit www.whhs.com/cancergenetics. For more information about classes at the Washington Women's Center, call (510) 608-1301. To register for this class, visit www.whhs.com and click on the button titled “Upcoming Health Seminars.”

SUBMITTED BY IRIS MURILLO On Friday, September 7, Life Chiropractic College West will host a community block party on their campus in Hayward. The event will include live music, street performers, food vendors, face painting, kid’s activities, a bounce house, health screenings and talks. Ms. Jackie Biron, Director of Student Services, stated, “Life Chiropractic College West will hold one of the biggest health and entertainment festivals the Hayward community has ever seen!” Admission and parking are free to all attendees. The purpose of this event is to educate the public about the importance of chiropractic care and to promote the value of a healthy lifestyle. For more information, visit: www.lifewest.edu. Community Block Party Friday, Sept 7 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Life Chiropractic College West 25001 Industrial Blvd., Hayward (510) 780-4500 www.lifewest.edu

World Experience, a nonprofit teenage student exchange program, is seeking community coordinators to find host families and schools in the US for exchange students. Payments are made for home interviews, reference checks, orientations, and supervision of students and families. Coordinators can earn up to $800 dollars. Must be willing and able to pass a criminal background check and DOS (Department of State) certified. Training seminars and on line instructions are provided. Call Julie 1-800/633-6653. World Experience Teenage Student Exchange 2440 S. Hacienda Blvd., Suite 116 Hacienda Heights, CA 91745 USA (626) 330 – 5719 (800) 633 - 6653 (USA Only) www.worldexperience.org

Fremont Unified free and reduced school meals SUBMITTED BY NANCY LINDERMAN The Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) is accepting applications for free and reduced price meals. The District provides lunches at all schools and breakfast at select schools. Applications have been mailed to families whose children attend school in the District. Families who moved or are new to the District may receive an application from their school site, or apply in person at the District’s Nutrition Services Department, 4210 Technology Drive, Fremont, CA 94538. Requirements for school officials to determine eligibility for free and reduced-price benefits are as follows: For households receiving CalFresh, CalWORKs, Kin-GAP, or FDPIR benefits, applications need only include the enrolled child(ren)’s name, CalFresh, CalWORKs, Kin-GAP, or FDPIR case number, and the signature of an adult household member. For households who do not list a CalFresh, CalWORKs, Kin-GAP, or FDPIR case number, the application must include the names of all household members, the amount and source of the income received by each household member, and the signature and corresponding last 4 digits of Social Security number of an adult household member. If the household member who signs the application does not have a Social Security number, the household member must indicate on the application that a Social Security number is not available. The information households provide on the application will be used to determine meal eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by school or program officials. For more information contact Nutritional Services at (510) 659-2587.


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510-364-3736

$$788,800

30717 Canterbury Ct., Union City 94587 5 bedrooms, 3 bath, Private "country like" location Beautifully landscaped 7500 square foot lot Open flow floor plan with vaulted ceiling living room Beautiful solarium! Eat-in Kitchen with custom cabinets High counter bar, Great Room, Gas Regency Fireplace Custom entertainment center Shutters, window treatments throughout Hand sculpted wood floors Downstairs bath w/shower Laundry Room w/sink Master Suite, large bathroom, high ceilings, custom lighting 3 car garage with storage cabinets/work bench


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August 28 2012

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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5 Onus of doing a task (14) 6 Breakfast item (6) 7 Logical and rational way (10) 8 Management and accounting (14) 10 Small piece of cloth for wiping face (12) 11 Person kept in custody as a result of legal process (9) 14 Ancestry (6) 15 Features (15) 17 Some of the favorite or appealing movie stars (7) 18 Tapering mass of ice formed by freezing of water (7) 20 Enough for all (12) 23 Despot's duration (5) 24 Closest (7) 26 Clear, as a disk (5) 27 Color that has a metallic lustre (6) 29 Marsh growth (5) 31 Storeys in high rise buildings (6)

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Tri-City Stargazer AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: On the 31st we will experience what is known as a "blue moon." The blue moon occurs approximately every 2.5 years, when a second full moon shines in a single month. It happens when the first full moon is early in the month and the last full moon is four weeks later, still within the same month. The expression "once in a blue moon" is used colloquially to mean not very often or rarely. This has been part of the English language at least since the time of Shakespeare. The moon does not actually change color for a "blue moon," although it occasionally appears to change color due to dust particles in our atmosphere.

Aries (March 21-April 20): This is a week in which you can make progress on negotiations with the powers that be. It is also favorable for investments, income that you share with others, and debts owed to you. Stay within the confines of “tradition” for best results. Outrageous ideas will probably not fly. Taurus (April 21-May 20): You may be taking a sober look at one or more relationships. Even the very closest friends cannot know each other from the inside. Sometimes we forget this fact and need to become aware that we are actually separate beings, helping when we can. Sometimes our energy is too low to be there for one another. Gemini (May 21-June 20): You are moving quickly this week. On the weekend, your focus shifts to matters of home, hearth, and family. There may be a conflict between family and partner for your attention. On Monday and Tuesday, the input overload from the week may turn your brain to fuzz. Give yourself a rest. Cancer (June 21-July 21): Your heart and mind may be in conflict over just how to proceed with your

next projects. This is a good time to reorganize drawers, closets, or maybe your desk. The act of putting clutter into order will clear your mind and then the right solution is likely to surface.

thing there, or have you invented your own worry? This may be a week of multiple demands in your career. Take your time and concentrate on what must be done. This won’t last long.

and also the Internet, and participation in your place of worship. Put the Critic out of your mind, whether he is judging inwardly or pointing at someone else. He exaggerates well beyond the truth.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): This week brings more than one opportunity to attend to the mental or physical health of another. At the same time you want to maintain your good personal habits. Financial concerns require some focus and attention. You may be asked to handle money for someone else in your life.

Scorpio (October 23-November 21): You are unusually comfortable in your own skin this week. Activities involving neighbors, roommates, education or travel are all favored. You have a sense of physical strength at this time that will be especially beneficial if you are exercising or in any type of competition.

Virgo the Virgin (Aug 23-Sep 22): This is a particularly complicated week. Your calendar must be booked to the limit. Your mind is leaning toward the creative throughout this period. Meanwhile, on the weekend your mind may move into fuzz mode, due to too much input. Give yourself a mental break.

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): The Archers always prefer to see the big picture. However, at this time you are encountering the “devil in the details”. Your inspiration is moving far and wide, but the problem is in just how to get from A to Z. Or perhaps you know how, but are hoping someone else will take on this problem and resolve it for you.

Aquarius (January 20-February 18): You began a creative project in the areas of education, the law, or writing/publishing in October of 2011. The result of that effort is now apparent to you. It is probable you have used it in more ways than you initially thought. There may not be marching bands, bells and whistles, but it is a satisfying accomplishment.

Libra (September 23-October 22): Don't allow fear and pessimism to interfere with your pleasure in life. If something is nagging at you, take a clear and direct look at it. Is there really any-

Capricorn (December 22-January 19): There are green lights and good news in any of the following areas: legal interests, education, publishing, travel by long distance

Pisces (February 19-March 20): Make a special effort to keep up with keys, tickets, and other small items. Your feelings are easily injured right now. On the other hand, you may be the offender, hurting someone else. Try to stay on the planet and think carefully before you speak. If you feel "hurt", don't leap to a conclusion before you ask what the meaning is of a behavior or a comment.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


August 28 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 1

Attendees can enjoy steam train rides, hand car rides, narrow gauge speeder car rides, displays of garden railroads, model railroads, rail yard equipment displays, early days’ gas engine and tractor displays, food, the children's hobo game, and much more! Music will be provided by The Diasporta Swamp Boys, The East Bay Stompers, and The Apple Butter Brothers. Aside from trains, don’t forget to take advantage of all Ardenwood has to offer; take a tour of the Patterson House, visit the animals in the farmyard, see a blacksmithing demonstration, get a tasty treat at the country kitchen,

and learn about organic farming. Or just pack a picnic and enjoy a beautiful day on the farm! Admission is $10 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $5 for children. Ages three and under are free, and parking is free. Washington Township Railroad Fair September 1 - 3 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont 1 (888) 327-2757 www.ebparks.org Cost: $5 - $10

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Fremont Bank & Ohlone College Golf Tournament SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Join Ohlone College and Fremont Bank for the 28th Annual Golf Tournament at The Course at Wente Vineyards in Livermore and help raise funds for Ohlone’s Intercollegiate Athletic programs! The tournament is presented by FORM (Fremont Orthopedic & Rehabilitative Medicine) and is packed with entertaining activities and prizes including Longest Drive, the Vegas Hole, and Most Accurate Drive. Prizes include a new Lexus IS 250 or a $10,000 CD from Fremont Bank. Hospitality tents, including Dale Hardware’s famous BBQ, will keep players refreshed on the course. The Ohlone Athlete of the Year awards will be presented during a post-golf reception featuring award winning Wente Vineyard wine, hearty hors d’ouevres and silent and live auctions. Have a first-class day at this high-profile golf event and take pride in contributing to Ohlone College Athletics! Cost is $250 per person or $1,000 for a foursome. To register, visit www.ohlonecollegegolf.org or call (510) 659-6020. Fremont Bank & Ohlone College Golf Tournament Monday, September 24 9 a.m. 7 p.m.; 11 a.m. shotgun start The Course at Wente Vineyards 5050 Arroyo Road, Livermore (510) 659-6020 www.ohlonecollegegolf.org Cost: $250 per person or $1,000 for a foursome


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Restoring the Delta is essential to Santa Clara County SANTOS COLUMN SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT The Delta is a critical component of our water system. Here in the Silicon Valley, 40 percent of our water supply passes through the Delta. Our imported water comes from the Sierra Nevada snowmelt and rainfall that fills rivers and streams that flow toward the San Francisco Bay. Much of that mountain water flows through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to communities throughout the Bay Area. Yet, after decades of alterations, the Delta is far from the natural estuary it once was. The Delta’s 150-year old man-made network of levees is old and fragile. It is the hub of California’s water system, providing drinking water to 25 million Californians. Without an effective conservation and renewal strategy, the

Delta’s sensitive ecosystem and water transport system will continue to deteriorate, threatening the delivery of safe, reliable drinking water to the nearly 1.8 million residents that we serve. The Santa Clara Valley Water District and other public water agencies, environmental and conservation organizations, state and federal agencies, farmers and other interest groups have been working since 2006 on the Bay

Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP). These parties have spent countless hours and millions of dollars to understand the environmental science and address competing interests for Delta-conveyed water. The statewide BDCP effort is attempting to achieve water supply reliability and ecosystem restoration for the Delta. To sustain our economy and our way of life, we must find a balanced solution that restores the Delta ecosystem and assures long-term sustainable water supplies. As the name implies, the Bay Delta Conservation Plan is a comprehensive habitat conservation plan for the recovery of threatened and endangered species and benefit of the environment. New science is showing the need to address stresses on the Delta's environment, as well as the timing and quantity of flows and diversions. The BDCP pro-

poses to restore as much as 113,000 acres of tidal marsh and other habitat, an unprecedented restoration plan covering nearly the same land mass as the city of San Jose. Studies by researchers at UC Davis identified a two-thirds chance of major Delta levee failures within the next 20 years. This would not only have a major effect on the residents of the Delta, but also on our region and statewide water supply. Locally, we are continuing to reduce our reliance on the Delta. Thanks to our ongoing conservation efforts, today we use 15 percent less water than we did in 1990, even though our population has grown by 300,000 people. We also actively maintain and protect our groundwater basin, storing water underground during wet years for use during dry years. In addition, we are teaming with the city of San Jose

to construct a state-of-the-art advanced water purification facility to expand our use of locally sourced recycled water. However, we cannot solve this problem by addressing only the demand side of the equation. Nor can we attempt to force a solution that secures supplies for one stakeholder group over another. Instead, all parties must compromise to reach a balanced solution that restores the health of the Delta ecosystem and assures sustainable water supplies. To learn more about how we can all work together to restore the Delta, view our Delta brochure at www.valleywater.org. As always, I am available for questions or comments as your District 3 representative for the northern areas of Sunnyvale and Santa Clara; Alviso; Milpitas; and the north San Jose and Berryessa communities. Feel free to contact me at (408) 234-7707.


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BY ANNIE YU

I

n the past, schools regularly offered electives classes such as metal shop, ceramics and woodworking, but budget cuts have forced the termination of many of these studies. Changes in elective school curriculum has not, however, stopped 4-H, a national organization dedicated to preparing youth, age 5-19, from allowing the exploration of a plethora of extracurricular activities. Marksmanship, photography, oceanography, jewelry making, cooking, rocketry, citizen leadership, poultry, sewing, leather making, hiking, gardening and web design—the Bayside 4-H club offers all of these projects and much more. “We pick up where the schools have stopped,” says Alameda County 4-H program representative May McMann. “We all know that all work and no play is not healthy for anybody. So [the youth] are learning while having fun and also, how to balance their lives.” The four H’s are explained in the 4-H pledge: “I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service and my health to better living for my club, my community, my country and my world.” Started over 35 years ago, Bayside 4-H club has long moved from 4-H’s rural, farm animal-focused roots and adapted to Fremont’s urban environment. The club now boasts around 60 members who participate in numerous club, county and state projects. Vice president Rhea Nayak, age 15 says, “There’s so much… it’s really cool.” Every school year, club members choose their projects for the upcoming year. Project leader Janine Weston likes the flexibility saying, If you do [a project] one year and don’t want to ever do it again, you don’t have to. 4-H is the best hands-on education you can get.” Members learn responsibility, public speaking and presentation skills through participation. 13-yearold Ricky Rivera joined Bayside 4-H two years ago and developed his presentation skills through the poultry project. He says, “People ask you questions and you learn how to respond to them.” The 8th grader said it also helped prepare him to speak in front of others. “I didn’t think I would ever do this, but I talked in front of the whole school and I got elected for student council. If 4-H wasn’t part of my life, I probably

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

wouldn’t ever have built up the confidence [to talk] in front of people.” Members have an opportunity to practice presentation skills at “field days” when they showcase their projects and are judged on presentation skills. If they do well at a county-level presentation, they can move on to sectional and state competition. Ricky’s mother, Edda Rivera, says 4-H is helping her son with important life skills. While participating in the poultry project, he had to feed, clean and care for his chickens. “It encourages him to be responsible.” The club’s various projects also help members grasp where their interests lie. “You really get to learn what you want to be,” says 16year-old Ariele Silvas. “Using the experience that 4-H gave me, I was really able to pinpoint and be more specific about what I wanted to do

about quiches [in the cooking project]. I wasn’t a quiche fan, myself, but we ended up making them and I loved them… it was wonderful.” The club also promotes community service and active citizenship. Citizen leadership is a

county-wide project that allows older members to learn about government. Members who qualify may travel to Sacramento for a state focus or to Washington D.C. for a national focus. According to community club leader Beth Pratt, “[It] helps them understand politics a little bit and what’s actually going on; it’s a big opportunity.” The program’s unique youth-adult partnership means that although parents and adult leaders are around to guide, members decide what they want the club to do every year. Club members are currently trying to boost Bayside 4-H’s visibility around the community. “We don’t want to be the best-kept secret anymore. We want to be known,” says McMann. The members plan to increase their community service and to visit more schools and youth-run events in order to spread awareness of Bayside

August 28 2012

4-H. Individual members also frequently recruit friends and classmates to join. The club meets at 7 p.m. every second Monday of each month at Maloney Elementary School. Each project also conducts its own meetings once or twice each month. The $55 registration fee covers liability insurance while additional fees may be needed for select projects. Bayside 4-H club is hosting an open house Monday, September 10 at Maloney Elementary School. Anybody interested in learning more or joining the club is welcome to attend. “It makes our children contributing members of society,” says McMann. “You’re not preparing your kids to improve the world when they are adults— they’re doing it now.”

Bayside 4-H members showcase their chickens in Backyard Chicken Basics presentation at the Fremont Main Library

with my life.” Ariele, president of the club, says she learned about teamwork and leadership through 4-H. “Nowadays a lot of kids might be scared to speak in public… but 4-H really encourages you to know when it’s time to be listener or a follower, or when it’s time to be a leader.” With over 1,100 members and leaders in Alameda County, 4-H programs, members often develop better social skills as they meet new people and make friends. “I’ve learned how to actually get along with more people,” says 16-yearold Kayla Colglazier. “There was someone who wanted to learn Club members volunteer on Coastal Cleanup Day

Bayside 4-H Open House Monday, Sept 10 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Maloney Elementary School 38700 Logan Drive Fremont www.bayside4h.org


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesday, Aug 22 - Saturday, Sep 29

Continuing Events Wednesday- Saturday, Thru Dec 29

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737 Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Tuesday, Aug 28

I Can See Clearly Now...

American Red Cross Mobile Blood Drive - R

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Member show of photography, oil, ceramic, & sculpture

Schedule an appointment & use sponsor code: CHABOT

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery@comcast.net

Chabot College, Balcony Room 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (800) 733-2767 Wednesday, Aug 29

Thursday, Aug 23 - Saturday, Oct 13

Student Artist Series $

New Members and Emerging Artists

Recital B: an oral interpretation of articulating identity

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 www.csueastbaytickets.com

Art created by Hayward Arts Council

Foothill Arts of the Bay 22394 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 538-2787

12 noon

Saturday, Sep 1 - Friday, Sep 28

Wednesday, Aug 29

Fall Member Show

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Mon. - Thurs., 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sat. - Sun., 12 noon - 4 p.m.

Health care services, health screening & transportation services

Paintings, porcelain & photography

San Leandro Art Association 300 Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 635-5129

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600

Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

Saturday, Sep 1 - Sunday, Sep 30

Thursday, Aug 30 - Monday, Sep 3

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Art of Antoinette Martinez

Circus Vargas $

6 a.m. - 9 p.m.

4:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups

Abstract art

Trapeze artists & daring performers

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.amart84888@aol.com

Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 945-4022 www.circusvargas.com

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Tuesday, Aug 28

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City (510) 586-5747

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, Jun 14 -Saturday, Aug 31

The Golden Gate at 75

Four Seasons of Health Expo

Thursday, Aug 30

Healthy Minds and Healthy Bodies Cooking demonstration & advice on growing produce

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Schedule an appointment & use sponsor code: STROSE

St. Rose Hospital 27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (800) 733-2767

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Art exhibit celebrating the iconic bridge

Tuesday, Aug 28

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.AdobeGallery.org

School-Age Storytime

Saturday, Jun 16 - Sunday, Sep 9

Emerging Patterns: Sea to Sky

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Depictions of the salt marsh landscape Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

2:30 p.m. Kindergarten to 4th grade

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

$2,200 - $2,500!!! Move in by September 30th

Wednesdays, Jul 11- Aug 29

Algebra & Geometry Summer Tutoring

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Trained teen volunteers provide drop-in help

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Mon, Aug 1-Sunday, Aug 31

Painters Exhibition

Mon. - Fri., 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. & Sat. - Sun., 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Watercolor paintings & rice paper collage works

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Thursday, Aug 3 - Sunday, Sep 1

In Full View

12 noon - 5 p.m.

A positive path for spiritual living

Features paintings in a variety of media, styles & subjects

Unity of Fremont

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov

Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

www.stage1theatre.orgTues Tuesdays, thru Dec 25

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

American Buddhist monk teaches & answers questions

Buddhanusorn Buddhist Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.watbuddha.org

Join us for fun day in the Sun!

FAMILY & FRIENDS

BBQ

Tuesday, August 30th ● 12 -2 pm

FREE EVENT ● Food & Entertainment RSVP by Thursday, August 23rd


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Thursday, Aug 30

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Schedule an appointment & use sponsor code: KAISER84FRE

Kaiser Permanente Fremont Medical Center 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (800) 733-2767

August 28 2012 Saturday, Sep 1 - Monday, Sep 3

Saturday, Sep 1

Washington Township Railroad Fair $

2 p.m.

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Train rides, farm activities, food, music, & demonstrations

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 www.ebparks.org

Friday, Aug 31

The Rocky Horror Picture Show $

Saturday, Sep 1

8:30 p.m.

2 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Interactive movie musical sing-along

Live music & California-brewed beer

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Hayward Area Historical Society Museum 22380 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (501) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Blues and Beer $

Saturday, Sep 1

Nature Detectives: September Sticklebacks

Saturday, Sep 1 -Sunday, Sep 2

11 a.m. - 12 noon Nature Class for 3 - 5 year olds

10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

Union City Veterans Park 4525 Dyer Street, Union City www.pinoyparinkami.com

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Adobo Festival Filipino food, music & entertainment.

Saturday, Sep 1

International Turkey Vulture Awareness Day

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Learn why these birds are vital to our ecosystem. For all ages

Send us your event information tricityvoice@aol.com

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747

Science Lecture for Children For school age children

Saturday, Sep 1-Sunday, Sep 2

Scottish Highland Gathering & Games $

8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Music, food, & feats of strength

Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (925) 426-7600 www.thescottishgames.com Saturday, Sep 1

Mind and Meditation

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Workshop on calmness of mind & increasing energy

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 709-9209 Saturday, Sep 1

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m. "The Toll Gate," "Futuritzy," & "Line's Busy"

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411


August 28 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Sunday, Sep 2

Monday, Sep 3

Ohlone Village Site Tour

Labor Day Fun

10 a.m. - 12 noon & 1:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

10 a.m. - 12 noon & 1:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

Tour a model village

Sack race, egg relays, tug-o-war & other activities

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Engagement Lauren Nicole Inglish and Todd David Kohli

The engagement of Lauren Nicole Inglish and Todd David Kohli is being announced by the couple's parents, Loren and Betty Inglish of Fremont, California and James and Susan Kohli of Parrish, Florida. Todd proposed to Lauren, in Rome, while they were on an extended European vacation. Lauren is a graduate of Washington High School, Fremont and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Todd is a graduate of Pennsbury High School and The Pennsylvania State University. They are both employed at AECOM in San Francisco. The couple plans a 2013 wedding.

SUBMITTED BY BONNIE FREY Congregation Shir Ami will host its annual Labor Day Barbecue on Monday, September 3, from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m. in Castro Valley. This will be a fun event for the whole family with delicious food, Israeli dancing, children's activities and a raffle. The proceeds raised will benefit our religious school. Come meet your local Jewish Community and find out about our great programs. We encourage everyone who might be interested in learning about our congregation to attend. Congregation Shir Ami is a small, friendly, Reform synagogue in Castro Valley. We offer Shabbat and holiday services and celebrations, active women’s group, Religious School with bar/bat mitzvah training, adult education, teen programs, social action projects, and more. Interfaith families welcome. Tickets are $15 per adult, $6 per child (aged 12 and under) and free for prospective members. RSVP, if you would like to attend. Contact Bonnie or Barbara at membership@congshirami.org or call (510) 537-2066 after 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.congshirami.org/ Labor Day Barbecue Monday, September 3 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Avenue, Castro Valley (510) 537-2066 membership@congshirami.org

Milpitas Community Concert Band celebrates 20 years of music! SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN PHOTO BY THEODORE ARMSTRONG Join the Milpitas Community Concert Band (MCCB) this season as they celebrate 20 years of music and entertainment in the City of Milpitas! Be a part of this anniversary year at any or all of their public performances, which include three exciting concerts and performances at Milpitas’ Tree Lighting, Veterans and Memorial Day Ceremonies. The 2012-2013 Season will be kicked off with their fall concert on Friday, December 7, at 7:30 p.m. in the Milpitas Community Center with “The Prince and the Piper,” an evening of music that will transport you to Europe with the beautiful music of some of its most famous composers. This season is sponsored in part by the Milpitas Post. Interested in playing? The MCCB is actively inviting musicians from all over the Bay Area to join. The Milpitas Community Concert Band meets Thursday evenings, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. at the Milpitas Community Center (457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas). Annual registration is only $30. Musicians with at least two years’ experience in woodwind, brass and percussion instruments are invited to join. We welcome students, adults, and senior citizens to come make music. Even if you haven't touched that old clarinet in the garage for decades, dust it off and join us! Rehearsals start Thursday, September 6, 2012. See you there! For more information contact Parks and Recreation Services at (408) 586-3210.

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August 28 2012

Abad signs basketball letter of intent SUBMITTED BY BETH CORMACK Emmanuel Dwight Abad of Union City has signed a letter of intent to play men's basketball at Bethany College for the 20122013 academic year. Abad, a five-foot-nine guard, is transferring to Bethany from Las Positas Community College. His sophomore statistics include 15 points per game, 2.0 rebounds per game and 3.4 assists per game. Abad shot 40% from the field and 84% from the free throw line. Prior to college, Abad attended James Logan High School, where he played basketball all four years. Head Men's Basketball Coach Clair Oleen says, "Dwight Abad joins us from Las Positas Community College, where Coach Tony Costello has brought the basketball program to be among the elite in one of the toughest conferences in California. Dwight is a point guard who can really shoot, penetrate, and pass well. We really like Dwight's positive composure and leadership qualities. He is an excellent teammate." Abad, the son of Dorothy Abad, is majoring in accounting. More information about Bethany College at: www.bethanylb.edu Athletic program information at: www.bethanyswedes.com

Johnny be Good Wins Hoops Classic

Johnny be Good – pictured left to right: Coach Glenn Pon, Deven Wani, Tyler Pon, Adanael Valle, Kyle Alcosiba, Josh Ramirez

SUBMITTED BY CANDY ALCOSIBA On Saturday, August 18, the San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church held its annual 3 on 3 Hoops Classic Tournament at the Alameda Point Gym in Alameda. The tournament of about ten divisions consists of adults and youth from a wide area, growing in popularity every year. Guest speakers add to tournament popularity and this year, Oakland Raiders Stefan Wisineiwski delivered a testament of his faith and commitments bringing encouragement to the athletes. For the second year, Pastor and Coach Glen Pon represented Fremont Christian School with players of the Fremont Christian junior high basketball team. After taking first place in the tournament last year, they knew they were the team to beat and they had a title to defend. But with more teams involved and much tougher competition, they would have to work hard throughout the day to accomplish their goal. The Johnny be Good team of Josh Ramirez, Kyle Alcosiba, Tyler Pon, Adanael Valle and Deven Wani proved to be an unstoppable powerhouse at the tournament. Coach Pon was not worried, “We began practice in early July and worked hard.” He said. “We have a nice mixture of players who have been there before and all players have their own individual strengths, and know how to play team ball, as well as know how to take advantage of mismatches and opening.” Things got off to a shaky start for

Johnny be Good – a name in honor of their summer English homework assignment. They faced what would prove to be their toughest competition in the tournament, team Redemption. Redemption gave Johnny be Good no slack and dominated offensively throughout the game. Losing 21-8, the Johnny be Gooders were in need of some team redemption. And although the loss was tough on the team, Coach Pon remained confident, “It’s better to lose the first one, than the last one.” He told the boys after their defeat. “I did not worry about the first game lopsided loss knowing that we will get better with each game and may face them again in the playoffs.” said Pon. Realizing they were not playing their best, and the title could be at risk, they came back for their second game against the Fab Four. Tyler Pon had an amazing game scoring three back-to-back three pointers tilting the scoreboard early on in the game. But as always with the Fremont Christian players, wins are a collaborative effort and every player contributed to their 21-6 victory over their opponent. Closing them down early on restored their confidence, and that was all they needed. The game three win over Sunset was a victory that solidified Johnny be Good’s presence in the tournament. While each player did their part in the game it was Josh Ramirez drove the score up quickly with ten of the 21-6 victory. Great defense by Kyle Alcosiba and Adanael Valle made the shots possible.

Game four, and the first game into the single elimination bracket, Johnny be Good was facing the Dream Team. Ramirez and Pon scored 16 points between them while Alcosiba, Wani and Valle supplied the balance of points and sealed the fate of the game with a final score of 21-10. Game five against Sunset was a dominating victory for the Johnny be Gooders. This time Alcosiba was among the high point scorers with 8 points along with Ramirez who scored 6. The 21-6 triumph put them in the championship bracket where they would face off, yet again, with the Redemption. The final game of the day was an intense battle between two extremely strong teams. The Redemption, who may have thought they knew Johnny be Good’s game, was in for an immediate shock. Running the scoreboard up early on, the team settled in with a 17 to 10 lead. However, the Redemption was ferociously fighting back as they wanted the title as much as Johnny be Good. But Tyler Pon made the last shot of the day, a 3-pointer that was shot far beyond the 3-point line. Once the team digested what had just happened, smiles, shrieks and hugs were the scene as the Johnny be Gooders, from Fremont Christian School won their second title. “Every member of the team is equally important to the team.” Kyle Alcosiba said. “We lose together and we win together, we are a team.” The victory is sweet and the Johnny be Gooders will be back next year to defend their title.

Defense dominates as Eagles triumph SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW In a game of defense, American High’s Eagles came out on top after a scoreless battle with the Arroyo Dons of San Lorenzo until the fourth quarter. Although stingy on defense, American’s offense sputtered. Finally, after a superb defensive effort allowing only 46 years to Arroyo and

early season jitters that plagued both teams, Matthew Ried scored the game-winning touchdown that seemed to take the heart out of the Arroyo team; Anthony Wellington added another. Final score: American 12, Arroyo 0. Next up for the 1-0 Eagles is the Granada Matadors of Brentwood, also 1-0, in a non-league contest Friday, August 31.


August 28 2012

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Page 25

Logan football kicks off preseason with dominant win SUBMITTED BY: VISHAK MENON PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW James Logan pushed past their first preseason opponent with a win over Reed High School from Sparks, Nevada on Saturday, August 25. Although the game was still close at halftime, strong performances from quarterback Jeffrey Prothro Jr. and wide receiver/defensive back Karsten Wethington allowed Logan to take over in the second half and finish with a 40-24 victory. Reed was Logan’s first independent league opponent, after having dropped out of MVAL, where they won the last five of six league titles. The Reed Raiders, led by quarterback Mark Nowaczewski, are also coming off a dominant performance last year

Theatre

where they were undefeated in league play. However, in the first few minutes of the game it became clear who was in control. The Raiders’ first offensive play resulted in an interception by Logan running back/linebacker Warren Miles Long, who recently committed to play football for Northwestern University. On Logan’s next possession, Long put the first points on the board on a rushing touchdown, moving the Colts into the lead, 7-0. After the first quarter, Logan led Reed 7-6. In the second quarter, a few strong rushes by running back/outside linebacker Scott Kao set up running back/defensive back Damond Beasley for a touchdown, increasing Logan’s lead to 13-6. On the defensive end, some costly penalties

against Logan allowed the Raiders to gain yardage and advance yet again, setting up Nowaczewski for another touchdown. This left the score at 1312 with Logan still in the lead going into halftime. In the third quarter, Logan hit the ground running. Wethington returned the kickoff for an amazing 93yard touchdown. Reed responded

with a quarterback sneak for a touchdown to keep the game close at 1918, but Logan would take over the game after that. Prothro Jr. showed off some of his own running skills with a touchdown run for 38 yards and another near the end of the quarter for 60 yards. In between, an interception from Wethington allowed Prothro Jr. to pass to wide

“Grey Gardens”

SUBMITTED BY SUSAN E. EVANS PHOTO BY TERRY SULLIVAN

wary of turning “Grey Gardens” into a musical, even though music was a fundamental part of the women’s lives. He didn’t want to “domesticate” the story or dilute its subversive edge. Composer Scott Frankel was similarly drawn to the challenge: “I was at-

The Douglas Morrisson Theatre continues its 2012 “Family Portraits” season with “Grey Gardens,” the humorous and heartbreaking Broadway hit musical about Big Edie and Little Edie Bouvier Beale, the eccentric aunt and cousin of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Nominated for 10 Tony Awards and winner of three, “Grey Gardens” features book by Doug Wright (“Quills,” “I am My Own Wife”), music by Scott Frankel, and lyrics by Michael Korie. “Grey Gardens” is based on the 1975 film “Grey Gardens” by David Maysles, Albert Maysles, Ellen Hovde, Muffie Mayer, and Susan Froemke, and it is the first Broadway musical ever to be based on a documentary. The Maysles film tells the story of Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale (“Edith” or “Big Edie”), aunt to Jacqueline Bouvier Jenifer Tice as Edith Bouvier Beale ("Little Edie") Kennedy Onassis, and her daughter tracted to this project because of the (“Edie” or “Little Edie”), who lived in their decaying, flea- and vermin-infested [documentary’s] unique blend of humor, heartache and humanity. It has East Hamptons mansion, Grey Gardens, with dozens of cats, raccoons, and always resonated strongly with me. And the prospect of the first live racmountains of garbage. Thirty years before, Little Edie had been a debutante, a coon on a legit stage is irresistible …” The musical which emerged from the model, and a self-described singer. In their film, the Maysles brothers are care- creative team of Wright and Frankel, ful to treat Big Edie and Little Edie with along with lyricist Michael Korie, folrespect, revealing their eccentricities but lows the descent of the two Edies from their glory days at the top of high sociavoiding mockery and caricature. ety, wealthy and sophisticated, to a “I was fascinated by the movie,” penniless existence at the dilapidated says playwright Doug Wright. “I was Grey Gardens. haunted by it, I was repelled by it, I Directed by Michael Ryken, the was touched by it – I found it hysteriplay features an ensemble of Bay Area cally funny at times.” But Wright was

performers including Jenifer Tice as Edith Bouvier Beale (“Little Edie”), Chris Macomber as Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale (“Big Edie”), Melissa Heinrich as Young “Little Edie” Beale, Alexander Murphy as Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., J. Scott Stewart as George Gould Strong, Tom Reilly as J.V. “Major” Bouvier (and as Norman Vincent Peale), Reg Clay as Brooks Sr. and Jr., Julia Franks as Jacqueline “Jackie” Bouvier and Jax Franks as Lee Bouvier. Vocal direction is by Pamela Hicks and musical direction by Marianna Wolff. At its core, “Grey Gardens” tells the story of a mother and daughter’s co-dependence and struggles - a wonderfully weird and poignant family portrait. “Grey Gardens” previews on September 6, opens September 7, and runs through September 30 at the Douglas Morrisson Theatre in Hayward. A post-play discussion will be held after the Saturday matinee on September 22. The preview show is $10, $20 for the 2 p.m. Saturday matinee, and $28 for Thursday through Sunday performances. The Box Office is open Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and can be reached at (510) 881-6777. Information is also available at www.dmtonline.org. Grey Gardens September 6 - 30 8 p.m., 2 p.m. matinees Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Tickets: $10 - $28

receiver/defensive back Amalani Fukofuka for yet another touchdown which broke the game open. Devin Gray caught his third touchdown of the game for the Raiders in the fourth quarter, but Logan’s high-powered offense proved too strong to overcome. Logan went home with the victory by a final score of 40-24.

Federal lunch and food programs for schools SUBMITTED BY CARLEEN ENGLAND New Haven Unified School District (NHUSD) participates in child nutrition programs offered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The school district receives funding providing nutritious meals for breakfast, lunch and snacks to NHUSD students. Parents who have children in the district are encouraged to fill out a meal application to determine the eligibility category for school meals. The information that parents provide is confidential and will be used only for eligibility determinations and verification of the data. To determine your eligibility for the meal program, you must apply and provide information regarding household size and income. Households that receive Food Stamps, California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKS), or Kinship Guardian Assistance Payment Program (Kin-GAP) will be notified of their child’s automatic eligibility to receive free meals, and do not need to apply unless they do not receive our notification. These children will be provided free meal benefits unless the school is contacted and the free meals are declined. 2012-2013 Meal Applications will be available online on the Food & Nutrition page of the district website: www.nhusd.k12.ca.us. If you require a paper application, they will be available at all school sites, the District Office, and at the office of Food & Nutrition Services located at 2831 Faber Street Union City, California 94587. Should you have questions please contact Food and Nutrition Services at (510) 475-3992, ext 60746.

Eagle Scout project completed SUBMITTED BY CITY OF UNION CITY

O

n August 3, Ryan Cooper from Boy Scouts of America Troop 273 and his crew of volunteers completed his Eagle Scout project with the City of Union City Public Works. Ryan built a tree nursery for the city, this new setup for staging and watering the plants for future City plantings has a good design and efficient arrangement. Ryan and his fellow scouts learned how to lay in landscape fabric and recycled base rock to handle drainage and prevent weeds. They also set posts in a straight line, attached cable, drip lines and emitters and hooked them into automatic irrigation valves and a controller. Ryan and his fellow scouts understand the importance of trees: • Trees intercept rainwater aiding soil absorption for gradual release into streams, preventing flooding, filtering toxins and impurities, and extending water availability into dry months when it is most needed. • Trees cleanse ground water as it filters through their root systems. • Water from roots is drawn up to the leaves where it evaporates. The conversion from water to gas absorbs huge amounts of heat, cooling hot city air. • Trees help offset the "heat island" effect resulting from too much glass and concrete. A one-degree rise in temperature equals a 2% increase in peak electricity consumption. The Boy Scouts of America are one of our main driving forces for planting trees in Union City. Most of our Eagle Scout projects are dedicated to planting trees in neighborhood parks and along boulevards and roadsides. These young men have become stewards in our urban forest and we owe them and their parents a lot of appreciation. Alex Quintero and Matt Bauchou from U.C. Public Works assisted Ryan with this project.

Ryan Cooper is third from right


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August 28 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12642179 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Wen-Hsin Chang for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Wen-Hsin Chang filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Wen-Hsin Chang to Hailey Rae Chang The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: December 28, 2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: August 3, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 8/14, 8/21, 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2359429# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12641920 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Diana Whangmeowsue Hu for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Diana Whangmeowsue Hu filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Diana Whangmeowsue Hu to Miaoshu Diana Huang The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: Nov. 2, 2012 (Fri), Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: Aug. 3, 2012 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 8/14, 8/21, 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2358784#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468754 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Taggar Trucking, 44790 S. Grimmer Blvd., Ste. 103, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda, 37950 Fremont Blvd., #29, Fremont, CA 94536, Alameda County Rajvinder Kaur, 37950 Fremont Blvd., #29, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 8-20-2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rajvinder Kaur This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 20, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/28, 9/4, 9/11, 9/18/12 CNS-2367351# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468722 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shailesh Gandhi dba the UPS Store #1805, 3984 Washington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Shailesh Gandhi, 38400 Garway Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shailesh Gandhi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 20, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/28, 9/4, 9/11, 9/18/12 CNS-2367092# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468671 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Clicksology, 34748 Hemet Common, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Clicksology LLC, California, 34748 Hemet Common, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as

true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael Delos Reyes, Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 16, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/28, 9/4, 9/11, 9/18/12 CNS-2366312# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468204-205 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. S.W.I.R. L, 2. The Switchers, 1188 Huron Lane, Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda Yvetta Doll Franklin, 1188 Huron Lane, Hayward, CA 94545 Ramona L. Thomas, 28826 Bayheights Rd., Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by a joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on August 06, 2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yvetta D. Franklin, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 06, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/21, 8/28, 9/4, 9/11/12 CNS-2363585# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468007 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Snow Fall Ice Cream, 4308 Ogden Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 39900 Blacow Road #28, Fremont, CA 94538 Jarnail Singh Lakha, 39900 Blacow Rd. #28, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jarnail Singh Lakha This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 31, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/14, 8/21, 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2360315# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 468042 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magic Clipper, 20 Fremont Hub Courtyard, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Jackie Tran, 39383 Sutter Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jackie Tran This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 31, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/14, 8/21, 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2359427# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467906 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mowry Plaza Pharmacy, 668 Mowry Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Mowry Plaza Pharmacy, Inc., California, 668 Mowry Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on August 1, 2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Amarjean Kaur Basrai, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 26, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/14, 8/21, 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2358980# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467738 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Adapt Certification Service, Inc., 6803 Central Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Adapt Certification Service, Inc., 6803 Central Ave., Newark, CA 94560 California Corporation This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

under the fictitious business name or names listed above on June 6, 2007 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tim Kirkland, Secretary /Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 23, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2358455# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467605 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Tri-City Plastics, Inc., 6803 Central Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Tri-City Plastics, Inc., 6803 Central Ave., Newark, CA 94560 California Corporation This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Jan. 1, 2001 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tim Kirkland, Secretary/Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 18, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2358449# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467925 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Maluhia, 2803 Dune Circle, Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda Elenoa Kalei Aipoalani, 2803 Dune Circle, Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Elenoa Kalei Aipoalani This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2357568# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467917 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Dinfamous Productions, 3851 Oakes Drive, Hayward, CA 94542, County of Alameda Danielle D Cartier, 3851 Oakes Drive, Hayward, CA 94542 Don K Wycoff, 2756 Bal Harbor Ln., Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by a General Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on June 22, 2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Danielle D Cartier, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 26, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2357093# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465020-21 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Burnt Sushi LLC, 2. Burnt Sushi, 31383 Santa Ana Way, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Burnt Sushi LLC, 31383 Santa Ana Way, Union City, CA 94587; CA This business is conducted by a limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/3/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Stephen D Chappell, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 8, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2356923# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467940 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

vided, NHAS remains committed to its mission of Classes begin on empowering stuSeptember 10, 2012; registration in progress dents to become productive lifeSUBMITTED BY NHAS long learners able to communicate clearly, collaborate with others and solve problems New Haven Adult School (NHAS), a effectively. The Adult School enables students WASC accredited center for career and educato achieve their individual goals by helping tional training at 600 G Street, Union City, has them transition from English language classes been committed to excellence in educational into the High School Diploma program and services for adult learners and their families since 1980. Although the recent economic crisis the career skills training center. In September 2012, NHAS will continue to has required the Adult School to greatly reduce offer courses in the following areas: the quantity and variety of services once pro-

Adult School educational services

Better Living Residential Care, 3934 Haven Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Bernhard T. Taloma, 3934 Haven Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bernhard T. Taloma, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2356626# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 467845 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Global Trades, 38400 Garway Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Shailesh Gandhi, 38400 Garway Dr., Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shailesh Gandhi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 25, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/12 CNS-2356623#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE UNION CITY, CITY COUNCIL will hold a public hearing in the Council Chambers at 34009 Alvarado Niles Road, Union City, CA on Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 7:00 PM or as soon as thereafter, to receive and consider all evidence are reports relative to the following: A resolution designating 24 hour -7 days a week permit parking only on: Tamarack Drive (From west property lines of 663 and 660 Tamarack to north terminus of the road ), Palmetto Drive (from west property line of 38157 Palmetto to the intersection of Palmetto and Tamarack.) ALL INTERESTED PARTIES are invited to attend said hearing and express opinions or submit evidence for or against the proposal as outlined above. FURTHER INFORMATION on the above matter may be obtained or viewed at the Public Works Department, located at 34009 Alvarado Niles Road, Union City. If a citizen wishes to challenge the nature of the above actions in court, they may be limited to raising only those issues they or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City a or prior to the public hearing. The facility is accessible to the disabled and hearing impaired. If special assistance is required, please call (510) 675-5346 so accommodations can be arranged. While not required, 48 hours notice is appreciated. DATED: August 20, 2012 City Clerk 8/28/12 CNS-2367855#

PROBATE AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ANITA WAIPING NG CASE NO. RP12638015 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Anita Waiping Ng A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Doris Wai Han Ng in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Doris Wai Han Ng be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on September 18, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of

Computer Training in MS Office 2010 for beginner through intermediate skill levels; Healthcare training classes (CMA, Pharmacy Tech, and other Continued Ed opportunities); English As a Second Language (ESL) for literacy through Intermediate High levels; High School Diploma program for adults 18 years and older; GED Test Preparation class; Yoga with Shubhangi ; Traffic Violator School. Additionally, NHAS hosts the Migrant Education (Programa Migrante), an on-site educational service for Pre-K thru 12 migrant students. The Adult School also provides pre-

the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: John P. McGrath, 1940A Tice Valley Blvd., Walnut Creek, CA 94595, Telephone: 925-938-6107 8/28, 9/4, 9/11/12 CNS-2367999#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on September 18, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461 (510) 659-6993 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A035 - Bajwa, Paul A079 - Mabury, May A081 - Gonzalez, Michelle A146 - LOPEZ, CARMELO A158 - MC DOWELL, LEQUAWN A175 - Demaderios, Joel B065 - GROCOCK, SUSAN C087 - Ghoddousi, Farhad C253 - Christopher, Ryan C286 - Hypolite, La Tasha C306 - Mederas, Betty All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 28th day of August 2012 and 4th day of September 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2368834# NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on September 19, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time: 9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A124 - MATIAS, PEGGY C100 - Errickson, David E059 - White, Tyran Public Storage 08026 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2041 - Powell, John 2058 - ISHAQ, SUHEIL 2147 - Brew, Mary 2151 - Sanghera, Michael 2184 - China Sunergy (US)Clean Tech Inc 7034 - Washington, Joy 9005 - Santa Maria, Yvonne Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s): C048 - Hardy, Ralph C066 - Pivin, Amy C079 - Ruelas, Marcela C102 - MARQUEZ, MARGARET C008 - Esposito, Luchino D080 - Jones, Ron Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A105 - Valenica, Micheal A159 - Nadeemullah, Najeeb B230 - Ross, Linda E516 - Warren, Jeffrey E522 - AVILLA, ROBERT E564 - Bierch, Leigh E601 - PUMARES, SHERRY E618 - Hernandez, ALEJANDRA E624 - Gooch, Christopher E636 - Hernandez, Luis Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123 (510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A021 - NEAL, NINA A032 - Oravillo, Lourdes A053 - Rogers, Mary A060 - Reyes, Elodia A094 - Oneill, Sara A235 - Ferguson, Jesse C057 - Rogers, Frances C061 - Jones, Robert D025 - Holland, Joel Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): D029 - Bowles Sr., Charles D051 - Demetro, Rick E039 - Elfeky, Nader E043 - bowles, pennie E065 - Sanders, David F066 - Lay Jr., David E037 - Reed, Michael All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 28th day of August 2012 and 4th day of September 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2368832# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction:on the 13th Day of September, 2012 at or after 12:00 pm pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Chantel Ferr AA4400A 6/21/12 Stephany Demos AA4904A 6/8/12 Roderick Thomas AA7220B 6/29/12 Monica Swenson B138 6/12/12 Walt Summerlin B190 7/3/12 Teresa Healy B210 6/26/12 Rodel Marquez B278 7/6/12 Anita Brown B279 6/5/12 Hashina Brumfield B300 6/12/12 Oliver Allen C118 6/15/12 Lamar Thomas C245-46 6/12/12 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2368643# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 13th of September, 2012 at or after11:15 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Fremont, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Melissa Costello 257U 3/10/12 Catina Murphy 317 2/17/12 Melissa Costello 335 9/10/11 Arletha Mariland 347 4/21/12 8/28, 9/4/12 CNS-2368609#

employment skills verification tests in typing, data entry, MS Word (2003/2007), MS Excel (2003/2007), Basic Computer Skills testing for Allied Healthcare students and more. At this time, NHAS offers classes Monday through Thursday, 8:30a.m. - 3:00 p.m. and on Tuesday and Thursday, from 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Online classes are available, allowing learners to access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection. Registration is in progress for new classes scheduled to begin September 10, 2012. For more information, call (510) 489-2185 or visit http://adsweb.nhusd.k12.ca.us/ or FaceBook at www.facebook.com/nhadultschool.


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Grand Plans

WILLIAM MARSHAK “May you have the hindsight to know where you've been, The foresight to know where you are going, And the insight to know when you have gone too far” Irish Blessing

D

uring the recent Fremont City Council’s discussion of the merits of adopting the Private Open Space Initiative prior to inclusion on the November election, comments were made questioning the wisdom of the initiative process in general and associated problems of unintended consequences. While these sage observations were considered by the council, the die had already been cast by voter signatures on a petition; the council grudgingly – by a 3-2 vote – spared the City from a costly, divisive and possibly disastrous campaign for the lone councilmember asking for reelection. This issue, preservation of open space, closely linked to the current Kimber Park private open space battle, strikes a harmonious chord with many voters in the Tri-City area. At the root of this disagreement is another, less obvious tension – government versus private control of property and policy. While special interests can detour and undermine the public sector, the same can be done by special interest groups using the initiative process. So, which way is best?

My answer is that neither has a lock on validity; both require intense scrutiny of their arguments pro or con. Voters will soon be faced with propositions and measures on the November ballot, some proposed by legislative fiat and others through different processes. The positive or negative aspects of these proposals may not lie in the source, rather the context and intended consequence. Of course, unintended consequences are of major concern as well, but those are often the purview of hindsight. As the saying goes, “Hindsight is 20/20.” It provides simple answers and explanations to many complex issues which have yet to unfold. No one seems to have all the answers to the future, even politicians who make such claims, at least when asking for votes. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher summed it up for the public arena saying, “The wisdom of hindsight, so useful to historians and indeed to authors of memoirs, is sadly denied to practicing politicians.” Even though we usually do not have the luxury of hindsight, adequate review and preparation before some decisions are made can help avoid regret. Slated for Planning Commission consideration last week was the grand plan of a regional park in place of the recently abandoned Dumbarton Quarry. In use since 1970 to provide aggregate rock for infrastructure throughout the Bay Area, the 300 foot deep pit was envisioned as a recreational lake coupled with reclamation of surrounding land for camping and trail connections to adjacent Coyote Hills Regional Park. Extensive plans were unfurled to promote this unique concept of a local, overnight camping facility. The idea was grand, but when quarry operations ceased in 2007, the lake concept began to evaporate; the current staff

report noted, “…the planned lake had no identified water source or drainage.” Obstacles have been blamed on “changes in environmental and regulatory conditions but filling a pit of this size and determining how to provide drainage for such a massive amount of water was always a factor. The new plan is to send a daily average of 100 truckloads of fill to this site for the next 12-17 years. Lakeside campgrounds, boating, fishing… gone, at least in my actuarial lifetime. So much for planning experts imbued with 20/20 foresight. Ideas will continue to flow, some great in hindsight, others not so good, but each of us has the obligation to question and expand these concepts, sometimes requiring an overhaul of brilliant ideas. The question of a lake for the Dumbarton regional park may not have to be an either-or proposition. What about other uses for a partially filled pit instead of simply filling it completely? A smaller lake or reservoir, even an amphitheater has been suggested. Since the timeframe for filling this immense pit is over a decade, now is time to be a bit more creative. Put in context, the value of hindsight is not to limit ideas but shape them for intelligent scrutiny over time. Grand plans should be flexible enough to transform over time, allowing future generations to mold them. Ideas from the public and private sector are welcome!

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Cassandra Broadwin Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang

INTERN Annie Yu Kenny Jacoby

William Marshak PUBLISHER

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

Senate committee passes bill to fund spinal cord injury research SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA A bill by Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont), to fund cutting-edge spinal cord injury research in California, was approved on August 6, 2012 by the Senate Appropriations Committee on a 4-2 vote. The bill, AB 1657, now goes to the Senate floor. “This is a great day for the 650,000 Cali-

fornians living with paralysis,” Assemblyman Wieckowski said. “Progress in spinal cord injury research opens the door for gains against other neurological conditions. This bill will help sustain California’s leadership in the biosciences.” AB 1657 will provide funding for the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act, established in 2000. The program is run

through the University of California and administered out of the Reeve-Irvine Research Center at the University of California, Irvine. It provides key initial grants to top neurologists throughout the state for groundbreaking research. The funding would be provided through a $1 penalty on all moving traffic violation convictions. Traffic accidents are the primary cause of spinal cord injuries.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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Great Prizes

29 30 31

Read our Ads for the answers Across 1 Proper Cuts offers _______ facials (7) 4 Save on _______ flights with Let's Fly Cheaper (8) 5Sunsational Sunrooms can help you expand your _______ (8) 8 Best Institute offers tutoring for _______ (7) 10 BJ Travel can help you see the _______ (5) 11 American Animal Care Center cares for dogs, cats, birds, and _______ (7) 13 Affordable Engineered Stone won't scratch or ________ (5) 14 Protecting your _______ is Bill Stone's business (10) 16 Shiva Beauty Salon offers _______ makeovers (6) 17Get _______ at Alma Via of Union City (9) 21 Smile Plus Dentistry offers a free professional teeth whitening _______ (3) 22 Classic Sauna products has both _______ and traditional saunasEnjoy live entertainment and ________ at Ginger Bar & Grill (8) 23 Ippolito's Newark Jewelry Center does sales, service, and _______ (7) 24 Lynn Dental does _______ dentistry (7) 26 Get Health Care for the _______ at Home Health Care Provider's Corp. (7) 28 Enjoy live entertainment and ________ at Ginger Bar

& Grill (7) 29 Play golf and raise funds for Ohlone College _______ (9) 30 _______ into the past at the Museum of Local History (4) 31 Get pain relief, not _______, at Knee Centers (7) Down 2 Von Till & Associates offers free _______ for wills and trusts (12) 3 Niles: The _______ of Fremont (5) 6 Get specialty _______ at Amia Bakery (5) 7 R&S Erection specializes in garage doors and _______ (9) 8 Sunshine Graphics offers _______ printed t-shirts (6) 9 Enroll in Newark _______ Education classes (5) 12 Flamingo's Flooring will bring the _______ to you (7) 14 John Juarez' profession (7) 15 Get a free _______ vase for your teacher at Fremont Flowers (3) 18 Randhawa Dental is committed to _______ (10) 19 Fujita Graphics offers _______ for your graphic needs (9) 20 Elite Cleaning & Events can clean your _______ (6) 25 Save your _______ with Fabian Evans (6) 27 Get a personalized _______ tag at Jack's Army-Navy Store (3)

Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. All entries will be eligible for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize! MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Deadline for entry is the 10th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper.

August 28th Puzzle Name:

Phone:

Email:


August 28 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 29

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

St Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100 St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Bay Area Dream Center 22100 Princeton St., Hayward Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

August 28 2012

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hillside Alliance Church 944 Central Blvd. Hayward (510) 889-1501 www.hillsidealliance.org Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org Resonate Church at the Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776 Filipino-American Evangelical UCC Meets at: Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 510-487-3891 www.faeucc.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org

HINDU TEMPLE

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org


August 28 2012 Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060 Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvaryslz.org Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD August 16 At 6:28 p.m., officers responded to JC Penney’s on a report of a theft. Officers arrested Calia Webb of Union City for burglary. She was booked at Santa Rita Jail. August 17 At 3:56 p.m., officers responded to TJ Maxx on a report of a theft. Officers arrested Arealia Dabeny of Newark for petty theft. She was cited and released at the scene. August 18 At 1:41 p.m., officers responded to JC Penney’s on a report of a theft. Officers arrested Celeste Karp of Union City for petty theft. She was booked at Fremont City Jail. August 21 At 10:44 a.m., officers investigated an auto burglary that occurred overnight in the 7000 block of Mayhews Landing Road. The loss was a GPS unit.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

August 24 Officer Sandoval followed a LowJack hit on a stolen car at 6:42 a.m. The car was located on top of a tow truck behind 37345 Blacow Road, Fremont. The vehicle was confirmed stolen out of Oakland PD. Officers attempted to contact the business the tow truck is registered to (Daybreak Metro, Inc) but were unsuccessful. The stolen vehicle (with the tow’s dolly) was ultimately recovered. Several hours later, the owner of Daybreak Metro Inc, responded to NPD and recovered his tow dolly. Officer Taylor responded to Macy’s at 6:42 p.m. and accepted the Citizen’s Arrest of a shoplifter. Jennifer Okuna of Fremont who was issued a citation for petty theft and was released at the scene. Officer’s Revay and Mavrakis were sent to a welfare check on the 37200 block of Magnolia Street at 7:13 p.m.. The caller advised her 60year-old roommate was locked upstairs in his bedroom. She decided to call the police because she had not seen nor heard from him since 10:30 p.m. on Thursday night at which time he was drunk. Upon arrival, officers learned the roommate had been

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MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

binge drinking, struggling with medical issues, does not have any type of a phone and keeps a shotgun by his bedroom door. ALCO fire was summoned to stand by for potential medical needs and for the use of one of their ladders. With the assistance of fire personnel, Officer Kimbrough climbed the ladder to peer into the bedroom of the roommate. Officer Kimbrough confirmed the roommate was inside of his bedroom and officers were able to force entry into the room, and contact the male before he was able to arm himself with his shotgun, which was recovered fully loaded nest to the door. The male was transported to a local hospital for treatment of his medical issues and the shotgun was also seized for safekeeping. Officer Warren initiated a traffic stop on N/B Interstate 880 south of Decoto Road at 12:16 a.m. The driver exited onto Decoto Road and just prior to coming to a complete stop, Officer Warren observed the right front passenger of the vehicle lean his upper body out of the window and throw a “gun” outside of the car. Officer Warren requested emergency assistance from other officers, as he held all (4) occupants of the vehicle at gunpoint

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597

Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

until additional officers could get to his location. Once officers arrived, a high-risk stop was conducted with the help of Fremont PD who had shut down traffic for us. All (4) occupants exited the vehicle without incident and the gun; a loaded revolver was recovered. The driver of the vehicle was identified as Parolee Ryan Taylor of San Lorenzo. The front passenger; who threw the gun out of the window was identified as Parolee Richard Partida of Union City. The rear passengers were identified as Anthony Quinones of Modesto and a juvenile male from Newark. Richard Partida admitted to possessing the gun and throwing it outside of the car. Anthony Quinones and the juvenile were released at the scene. California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation CDCR granted a parole violation hold on Ryan Taylor and Richard Partida was charged with destruction of evidence, convicted felon carrying a concealed firearm, Violent Felon in possession of a firearm, carrying loaded firearm in a public place and parole violation. Taylor and Partida were both booked at Fremont Jail.

August 25 Officer Geser investigated a residential burglary at 9:11 p.m. in the 36000 block of Bayonne Drive. This burglary occurred between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. Entry was made via a rear window and the loss was determined to be a safe containing jewelry and cash. Officer Taylor was sent to Mehran Restaurant (Mowry School Road) at 9:52 p.m. to investigate what was initially reported as an assault with a deadly weapon that had just occurred between two party goers. Due to the amount of people associated with the parties in the complex, a majority of the shift also responded to assist. In the end; the assault with a deadly weapon was unfounded and the two adult males parted ways. Officer Revay investigated a forgery in-progress at Macy’s at 9:08 p.m. A female later identified as Holly Mikaele of San Leandro had attempted make a payment on a friend’s Macy’s account with a fraudulent check. Officer Revay contacted Mikaele who admitted her wrongdoing; he also located what appeared to be stolen property on Mikaele’s continued onpage 33


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

August 28 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club

We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont

First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1:30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

COME JOIN US FOR THE JEWISH NEW YEAR

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Services and programs for all ages. High Holiday Season begins Sept 8th. We welcome you to explore Temple Beth Torah, an inclusive Reform community. For details, call us or visit web page www.bethtorah-fremont.org (510) 656-7141

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer & Football Coaches

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Friendship Force

Meditation, Buddhism

Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

in Plain English 7-9pm Tuesdays except 8/14 36054 Niles Blvd. 650-556-6428 Meditation, discussion, Q&A with Ajahn Guna, American Buddhist monk in Ajahn Chah Thai Forest Tradition. All are welcome. Free.

New Life Community Church "Transforming Lives" Worship Service: 4PM Sunday Community Group: 7PM Friday 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 www.newlifeeastbay.org rwong@newlifeeastbay.org contact: 510-432-9250 A church for the Tri-City! Caregivers of loved ones with Serious Mental Illness NAMI-Alameda County offers a free 12 week course beginning September 8th from 9:00 to 11:30 Union City. Registration required. Call Peggy Rahman at 510-825-1564 e-mail nami-ac@mhaac.org http://nami-acnews.blogspot.com http://www.namialamedacounty.org

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

League of Filipino American Veterans Annual Picnic Kennedy Park Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Sat., Sept 8 - 7am - 6pm Call Sam Manalo 510-565-4371 or Rober Gulen 510-429-0603

11th Annual Olive Festival

Accepting New Members Ages 7-14 Vocal Training - Music Theory Instrument Group Public Performance Saturday 9:30am-12Noon Newark Neighborhood Church 510-791-8555 or details www.cbncangelchildrenschoir.com

Sat. Oct. 6th - 10am-5pm Behind Mission San Jose Dominican Sisters Olive Grove Live Music - Food - Beer/Wine Special Olive Oil & Specialty Vendors - Food Demonstrations Arts & Craft - Kids Area - Prizes Drawings - Fun www.msjchamber.org

Victim & Witness Services court finds would not act in the best interests of a minor victim" (Cal. Const., art. I, § 28(e)). The Victims & Witness Services Unit of Alameda County offers crime victims and their families support and information at every stage of the criminal process. Victims have rights, and the Alameda County District Attorney along with the Newark Police Department is committed to ensuring that those rights are protected. The Victims & Witness Services Unit provides appeal notification to victims and their families, as well as assistance and outreach when the District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting a case. For more information on this service visit http://www.alcoda.org/victim_witness/

Newark Unified School District rocks the house

On August 23, Newark Unified School District (NUSD) had an organizational kick-off to start the 2012-13 school year. In attendance at the event, held at the Newark Memorial High School Commons, were 400 teachers, classified personnel, Board and community members as well as district leaders. The excitement was contagious! The morning began with a beautiful continental breakfast prepared by Newark Unified School District’s Child Nutritional Services. After everyone had time to reconnect, guests were introduced and welcomed back by the Board Vice President Jan Crocker, Newark Teachers Association Representative Jacob Goldsmith, California School Employee Association Representative Mary Grundmann, and Newark Man-

agement Association President Kathleen Waffle. Mr. Erwin, Senior Director of Human Resources introduced thirty new teachers, classified and management staff to the Newark Unified School District family. Dr. Dave Marken, Superintendent, then challenged the gathering with startling statistics, a touch of humor, and the encouragement to work together for the benefit of Newark Unified School District’s students. All staff members received a “Team NUSD” shirt to show our collective solidarity to improving student learning. The shirts were gifted generously by the KNN and De La Rosa firms. In addition, leadership created eleven gift baskets as raffle prizes for staff. The event ended with all leadership singing to our amazing group of educators, “You are Transformational.” Great start, moving toward a great year!

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com. ShaBarbeque?=Shabbat plus Barbeque Temple Beth Torah invites you to casual outdoor Shabbat Services followed by a BBQ picnic dinner. (We provide the coals, you bring the rest.) Fri. 8/31 at 6:30pm Also, Barbershop Quartet, For details see www.bethtorah-fremont.org or call (510) 656-7141

Serious Mental Illness

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Angel Children’s Choir

SUBMITTED BY LIZ WARREN

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Tues 8/21, 9/4 & 18, 10/2 & 16 Bronco Billy’s @ Grimmer/Blacow * * 7 – 8 p.m. NO cover charge https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 for info & verify times Mission Gold Jazz Band @ Sunol Jazz Cafe 1st & 3rd Wednesdays 7 – 9 p.m.

October 4,5,6, Thurday 10am-6pm Friday 10am-6pm Saturday 10am-5pm 1608 Via Sarita, San Lorenzo (Follow Signs on Bockman Road) Hundreds of Handmade Gifts for Giving and Keeping

Are you a crime victim? A 'victim' is defined under the California Constitution as "a person who suffers direct or threatened physical, psychological, or financial harm as a result of the commission or attempted commission of a crime or delinquent act. The term 'victim' also includes the person's spouse, parents, children, siblings, or guardian, and includes a lawful representative of a crime victim who is deceased, a minor, or physically or psychologically incapacitated. The term 'victim' does not include a person in custody for an offense, the accused, or a person whom the

Shout out to your community

East Bay Youth Jazz Band JAZZINATORS

Home Craft Fair

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness starting Aug 30, 2012 from 6:30-9:00pm in Union City. Registration required. Contact: Michele at 510-790-1010 or Email michele@mhaac.org http://UCevening.blogspot.com http://www.NAMI.org/f2f

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 12 Highest $: 795,000 Median $: 530,000 Lowest $: 375,000 Average $: 547,667 ADDRESS

ZIP

4477 Belmont Way 4481 Belmont Way 4596 Ewing Road 4976 Kathleen Avenue 2487 McLoud Avenue 5035 Rahlves Drive 17081 Sabina Court 19002 Stanton Avenue 5182 Abbeywood Drive 5818 Gold Creek Drive 19233 Mt. Lassen Drive 7668 Pineville Circle

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

560,000 563,000 550,000 401,000 517,000 440,000 375,000 530,000 485,000 795,000 655,000 701,000

3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 5 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2040 2272 2175 1280 2044 1160 1200 2346 1538 2527 2327 2732

1963 1961 1966 1954 1958 1953 1960 1976 1998 1997 1989 1992

07-18-12 07-18-12 07-18-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-18-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-23-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-23-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 47 Highest $: 1,790,000 Median $: Lowest $: 186,000 Average $: ADDRESS

888 Cherry Glen Circle 38702 Chimaera Circle 35756 Conovan Lane 4075 Lorenzo Terrace 4436 Mattos Drive 48 Montalban Drive 37482 Parish Circle #19F 2528 Parkside Drive 37806 Peachtree Court 38450 Redwood Terrace 36600 Reynolds Drive 38018 Stenhammer Drive 3326 Sutton Loop 132 Sycamore Street 41149 Ellen Street 40973 Fairmont Terrace 42572 Gage Court 40821 Ingersoll Terrace 43033 Mayfair Park Terrace 4317 Millard Avenue 4614 Montecarlo Park Court 43621 Montrose Avenue 40359 Paseo Padre Parkway 3695 Stevenson Blvd #C127 4726 Victoria Avenue 2563 Abaca Way 1962 Briscoe Terrace 2728 Capitola Terrace 48358 Conifer Street 137 El Dorado Common 43238 Giovanni Terrace 43276 Giovanni Terrace 1732 Marabu Way 45437 Medicine Bow Way 42685 Montevideo Court 43862 North Moray Street 53 Pagosa Way 752 Topawa Drive 41918 Via San Gabriel

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539

529,000 572,606

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

265,000 515,000 705,000 286,000 760,000 566,000 235,000 600,000 885,000 325,000 525,000 280,000 544,500 365,000 500,000 529,000 500,000 186,000 410,000 316,000 555,000 380,000 429,000 260,000 369,500 692,000 565,000 1,790,000 630,000 401,000 494,000 561,000 1,005,000 790,500 990,000 860,000 746,000 733,000 1,190,000

724 1384 2402 1126 2872 1627 942 1576 2591 1400 1980 841 1680 1159 1318 1428 1412 1188 1500 1077 1916 1314 1236 1040 1454 1370 1314 3561 1298 957 1196 1196 2244 1736 2313 2071 1655 1784 2459

1987 1996 1985 1972 1958 1984 1989 1963 2001 1982 1973 1947 1964 1965 1960 2009 1958 1987 1986 1955 1964 1962 1976 1991 1962 1971 1972 1995 1963 1970 2006 2006 1977 1978 1992 1989 1978 1976 1963

07-23-12 07-19-12 07-18-12 07-24-12 07-19-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-24-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-18-12 07-24-12 07-20-12

2 3 4 3 5 3 2 3 4 2 4 2 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 2 2 4 3 4 4 4 4 4


August 28 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 33

continued from page 9

HOME SALES REPORT 131 Wenatchee Common #14 46820 Winema Common 34134 Auden Court 33665 Bardolph Circle 34303 Bodkin Terrace 4387 Othello Drive 5495 Ridgewood Drive 5300 Tacoma Common #124

94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

325,000 285,000 525,000 620,000 565,000 659,000 780,000 415,000

2 2 3 3 3 3 4 2

936 897 1305 1480 1755 1494 2039 1250

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 27 Highest $: 660,000 Median $: Lowest $: 95,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

22725 7th Street 18321 Bengal Avenue 428 C Street 1933 East Avenue 301 Lansing Way #3 1745 Panda Way #94541 2452 Reyna Drive 23320 Santa Clara Street 21116 Santos Street 22135 Sevilla Road #29 602 Staley Avenue 343 Williams Way 2756 Gamble Court 3763 Oakes Drive 28079 Ziele Creek Drive 100 Boardwalk Way 30125 Bridgeview Way 29627 Desert Oak Court #21 945 Fletcher Lane #B210 334 Murray Drive 25984 Regal Avenue 1080 Silver Maple Lane 894 St. Bede Lane 26561 Sunvale Court 24555 Eden Avenue 27748 Hummingbird Court 27760 Miami Avenue

Highest $: Lowest $: ADDRESS

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545

278,000 235,000 281,500 451,000 125,500 170,000 465,000 220,000 300,000 175,000 271,000 370,500 349,000 511,500 429,000 235,000 515,000 95,000 131,500 230,000 280,000 660,000 235,000 126,500 200,000 205,000 200,000

2 3 3 4 2 2 4 3 2 3 3 4 3 4 1 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 3

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

655,000 240,500 685,000 369,000 443,000 875,000 505,000 225,000

3 3 4 2 6 4 3 1

ZIP

7112 Arbeau Drive 36624 Bishop Street 5563 Civic Terrace Avenue 6427 Escallonia Drive 6641 Flanders Drive 37799 Goldenrod Drive 8160 Juniper Avenue 37366 Oak Street 39801 Potrero Drive 35897 Tozier Street

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

415,000 275,000 345,000 460,000 355,000 370,000 300,500 370,000 409,000 310,000

3 3 3 4 3 4 3 6 4 3

235,000 286,852 BUILT

CLOSED

1266 1090 1632 2759 1019 1335 2222 1041 1229 1171 1819 2677 1827 1156 2485 579 747 951 1059 2958 1148 1200 1448 1656 1000

1993 1951 1917 1949 1991 1978 2000 1950 1948 1982 1987 1969 1989 1986 1999 1985 1986 1950 1952 1999 1958 1985 1991 1971 1955

07-23-12 07-18-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-23-12 07-23-12 07-23-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-24-12 07-18-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-18-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-24-12

443,000 499,688

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2045 1180 1868 1350 1958 2851 1253 932

2006 1971 1992 1984 1964 1993 1960 2007

07-24-12 07-27-12 07-27-12 07-23-12 07-24-12 07-24-12 07-27-12 07-27-12

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 10 Highest $: 460,000 Median $: Lowest $: 275,000 Average $: ADDRESS

07-18-12 07-19-12 07-24-12 07-18-12 07-24-12 07-19-12 07-24-12 07-19-12

SQFT

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 8 875,000 Median $: 225,000 Average $: ZIP

791 Claridad Loop 1514 Clear Lake Avenue 1430 Cuciz Lane 746 Jennifer Way 844 Lexington Street 46 Meadowland Drive 476 North Abbott Avenue 700 South Abel Street #410

SOLD FOR BDS

1985 1970 1983 1987 1979 1989 1989

355,000 360,950

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1879 1008 1600 1522 1308 1391 1080 2266 1720 1290

1975 1958 1987 1964 1961 1969 1961 1962 1995 1975

07-19-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-20-12 07-18-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-24-12 07-19-12

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 22 Highest $: 520,000 Median $: 237,000 Lowest $: 101,000 Average $: 271,659 ADDRESS

ZIP

1476 Ardmore Drive 94577 2196 Buena Vista Avenue 94577 297 Garcia Avenue 94577 2530 Outrigger Drive #213 94577 1734 Pacific Avenue 94577 168 Stratford Avenue 94577 1606 Timothy Drive 94577 2131 Trombas Avenue 94577 1054 Victoria Avenue 94577 533 Victoria Court 94577 237 West Broadmoor Boulevard94577 16280 Foothill Boulevard 94578 16223 Lyle Street 94578 16271 Miramar Place 94578 14871 Olivia Street 94578 2557 San Leandro Boulevard 94578 16389 Saratoga Street #305E 94578 1657 Thrush Avenue 94578 1420 Thrush Avenue #49 94578 1218 Coe Avenue 94579 14718 Fisk Court 94579 2026 Seaspray Court 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

520,000 235,000 248,000 211,500 380,000 260,000 216,000 310,000 237,000 220,000 225,000 395,000 410,000 200,000 289,000 118,000 101,000 162,000 119,000 315,000 315,000 490,000

3 2 2 2 5 2 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1811 992 921 1033 1748 1252 1015 1236 1166 1122 1577 1420 1490 1513 1342 982 947 887 749 1477 1081 2255

1959 1946 1946 1986 1951 1926 1944 1943 1920 1915 1926 1946 1954 1985 2004 1980 1981 1947 1994 1951 1951 1997

07-20-12 07-24-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-18-12 07-24-12 07-24-12 07-18-12 07-18-12 07-20-12 07-20-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-19-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-24-12 07-20-12 07-19-12 07-20-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 5 Highest $: 320,000 Median $: 283,000 Lowest $: 263,000 Average $: 291,200 ADDRESS

ZIP

15820 Paseo Del Campo 1012 Via Honda 1605 Via Lobos 17015 Via Pasatiempo 15947 Via Pinale

Highest $: Lowest $: ADDRESS

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

283,000 275,000 263,000 320,000 315,000

3 3 3 4 3

94580

SOLD FOR BDS

283,000

3

BUILT

CLOSED

1294 1664 1200 1568 1000

1944 1948 1955 1947 1944

07-18-12 07-23-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-20-12

ADDRESS

33229 8th Street 34758 Chesapeake Drive 4291 Hanford Street 32516 Jean Drive 2572 Lambert Court 2640 Teal Lane

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

400,000 587,500 448,000 400,000 455,000 315,000

5 4 4 4 4 2

920,000 920,000

SQFT

BUILT

1294

1944 07-18-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 6 Highest $: 587,500 Median $: Lowest $: 315,000 Average $:

senger seat. An 18 year old adult male from Fremont was arrested for possession of a loaded/concealed firearm. At 1:15 a.m., a couple returning home to their residence on Jacaranda Drive noticed that their backyard gate was open. As the female, went to close the gate she was confronted by a male leaving her backyard. He pushed by her and fled into the night. A rear window was found open and several laptops missing from inside the home. Suspect described as a light skinned male, 5’10”, thin build, with spiky hair, wearing dark clothing and white gloves. Investigated by Officer Madsen. August 19 Victim posted his Macbook Pro computer for sale on Craigslist. While waiting to meet the prospective buyer at Mountain Mike’s Pizza (3952 Washington Blvd), around 8:30 p.m., he was accosted by a suspect with a silver handgun. He was punched in the head and lost his laptop to the suspect described as an adult male in his 20’s, 5’10’, thin, braided or pony-tailed rows, and had bad teeth. Officers were dispatched to a burglary attempt at 3:12 p.m. Suspects attempted pry to a rear bathroom window on Andromeda Circle. At 3:49, officers were dispatched to a residential burglary on Joshua Court. The suspect(s) pried the rear sliding glass door, loss was jewelry and small items. At 10:34 p.m., a victim called to report that two black male adults armed with a handgun pushed him and tried to make him get into their car near the Waterstone Apartments. Officer Austin spotted a possible suspect vehicle traveling west on Sundale Drive with two similar occupants. The occupants in the vehicle were positively identified as the suspects. A Pellet gun was located in the vehicle along with a

cell phone from an additional robbery earlier (at the Heritage Apartments). The victim from the earlier robbery also positively identified the suspects. A 20 year old adult male from Union City and a 19 year old adult male from Newark were arrested and booked for robbery. August 20 A man (victim) waiting at the bus stop near the CVS store at the Fremont Hub was approached by another man who was driving in a vehicle. The two men became involved in an altercation and the man in the car (suspect) assaulted the victim with a baseball bat. The suspect fled in the suspect vehicle. The victim was treated at a local hospital for injuries to his head. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male adult, bald, wearing a red shirt. The suspect vehicle was described as a gold or silver 80's Honda. Officers later located the suspect vehicle on Bell Street. A 20-year old adult male was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon. Officer Snyder investigating. August 21 A commercial burglary was reported at Mex Cal Taqueria, 34000 block of Fremont Boulevard. August 22 Officers were dispatched to the 39600 block of Mission Boulevard to investigate a commercial burglary. The suspect(s) entered the office building via unknown method and then broke into the office through a floor-to-ceiling window. Paperwork was missing. At 2:54 p.m., officers were dispatched to a robbery call on the 39000 block of California Street. The victim was walking to work in the parking lot, when the suspect approached him and asked him where the library was. The victim began using his phone to search for the library, and the suspect struck him with a closed fist multiple times. The suspect is described as a black

continued from page 31

Newark Police Log person. Officer Revay is following up with a potential victim on the property. Mikaele was booked at Santa Rita Jail. At 11:11 p.m., Officer Taylor investigated a residential burglary in the 37200 block of Oak Street. This burglary occurred between 8:00 p.m. and 11:05 p.m. on August 25th. The victim discovered their front door unlocked and an entry point was unknown. The loss in this case was cash. August 26 Officer Eriksen contacted Tamela McHugh of Newark at 1:36 p.m. who was panhandling by Mowry Avenue. McHugh is an arson registrant, who has not been in com-

Dumbarton Bridge closure Labor Day weekend SUBMITTED BY EFFIE MILIONIS

SQFT

SUNOL | TOTAL SALES: 1 920,000 Median $: 920,000 Average $: ZIP

15820 Paseo Del Campo

SOLD FOR BDS

Fremont Police Log

CLOSED

400,000 434,250

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2142 1997 1727 1946 1909 1188

1955 2000 1985 1973 1970 1983

07-24-12 07-20-12 07-18-12 07-19-12 07-20-12 07-20-12

The entire Dumbarton Bridge will be closed during Labor Day weekend – September 1-3 - to complete another major element of the seismic retrofit project. Over the threeday closure, Caltrans will replace the expansion joint on the eastern side of the bridge across all six lanes of traffic. During the closure, motorists are encouraged to take public transit or alternate driving routes. Motorists should allow extra time for travel and use other bridges, including Highway 237 and Hwy 92 via the San Mateo Bridge. For the past few months, nightly lane closures have allowed crews to access inside and underneath the bridge deck to complete work while traffic continues to flow overhead. The first full closure of the bridge occurred over Memorial Day weekend 2012, when crews replaced the western expansion joint. Pre-closure activities for the upcoming closure will continue until Labor Day weekend 2012. Get the latest construction and closure updates at DumbartonBridgeInfo.org, and the latest information on transit and transportation options at 511.org.

male adult, 25 years old, 6'0", medium build, short hair, wearing a blue shirt. At 2:20 a.m., officers responded to Northgate Savoy Apartments (34000 block of Paseo Padre) to investigate a robbery that had just occurred. A black male adult suspect threatened to shoot the victim, a 19 year old female from San Jose, if she didn’t give him her “stuff.” The suspect grabbed a backpack forcefully from her arm. Loss was a backpack with a laptop inside. The suspect fled on foot. An older white van was seen in the area, but can't be confirmed that it was associated with the suspect. August 24 Officer Layfield conducted a follow-up regarding an online report that listed a lost or stolen cellular phone and responded to 33700 block of Union City Boulevard where he conducted a search for the phone. The phone was recovered and a male was arrested for misappropriation of lost or stolen property. Officers responded to Nuttman Lane to a reported residential burglary in progress. A 16 year old female and her 10 year old brother called 911 after seeing three males breaking into their house. The juveniles hid in a locked closet upstairs and remained on the phone with dispatch. The three suspects made entry into the house and heard the juveniles in the locked closet. The suspects banged on the closet door and demanded they come out, just as the officers arrived on scene. The suspects saw the police outside and fled the house in three different directions on foot. Officers on scene were able to set a hasty perimeter that contained the suspects. All three adult suspects were arrested after several short foot pursuits. The last suspect gave up during Officer Lambert’s canine search announcement. The suspect vehicle on scene had stolen property from a Newark burglary earlier today.

pliance of the requirements. Officer Eriksen arrested McHugh and booked her into Santa Rita Jail. At 4 p.m., Officer Erisken investigated a stolen vehicle from the 6200 block of Mockorange Court. The car was stolen August 12, 2012. The victim vehicle is a 2000 Kia Sephia 4/D Silver, License #4FOB329 Panhandlers were out in force today on Mowry Avenue. However, so were Officers Eriksen and Katz. In the last two days, Officers Eriksen and Katz cited four panhandlers, arrested one and contacted and warned about 810 others. We will continue proactive contacts, citations and arrests to help stop the influx of panhandlers in this area. Thank you to the citizens who reported this activity to us over the past several weeks. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 578-4965.

Bilingual poll workers need for November election SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Bilingual Poll Workers are needed for the November 6, 2012 General Election to work at the polls in Alameda County. Poll workers earn between $110 and $180 for their service. Bilingual Poll Workers must be fluent in English & Chinese, English & Spanish, English & Filipino/Tagalog or English & Vietnamese. Must also be a registered voter and attend a mandatory training prior to Election Day. In addition to gaining the rewarding experience of being part of the election process, bilingual poll workers will be paid an extra amount for their Election Day service, including an additional bilingual poll worker training and fluency assessment. Visit our website at http://www.acgov.org/rov/workers.htm for more information and to fill out an application or contact the Registrar of Voters office at (510) 272-6971. 1225 Fallon Street • Oakland, California 94612-4283 • (510) 272-6973 • Fax (510) 2726982 • TDD (510) 208-4967


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

August 28 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

Jimmie “Sue” Davidson

Helen B. Bridge RESIDENT OF HAYWARD December 21, 1943 – August 22, 2012

RESIDENT OF GRIDLEY December 28, 1940 – August 14, 2012

Stephen H. Davis

Benjamin M. Paredes

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 28, 1956 – August 23, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT Aril 20, 1930 – August 15, 2012

So Jin Han

Dorothy E. Van Aken

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 24, 1915 – August 15, 2012

RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON July 6, 1928 – August 23, 2012

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Albina Grasmuck RESIDENT OF TEXAS August 12, 1918 – August 17, 2012

Chapel of the Roses

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

Eileen B. Starks

(510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 21,1922 – August 21, 2012

510-657-1908

Marie R. Bough

www.lanasestatesales.com

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

RESIDENT OF LIVERMORE April 3, 1918 – August 22, 2012

Deborah L. Carruth RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 13, 1957 – August 24, 2012

Walter Wageman RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 10, 1924 – August 24, 2012

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Caterina S. Ferrante RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 17, 1941 – August 25, 2012

Irene W. Oliveira

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 21, 1919 – August 26, 2012

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

New Haven Unified Board of Education update SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE The Board of Education recently approved Decoto School for Independent Study as the name for the District’s new school for independent study students, which will open this fall on the campus of the New Haven Adult School. Two names – Decoto School for Independent Study and Itliong-Veracruz School for Independent Study – were forwarded to the Board by the Facility Names Committee, a group a five community members appointed by the Board to consider suggestions and make recommendations. The committee, which met in June, considered 10 names suggested by the community and was charged with recommending no more than three possibilities to the Board. The name Decoto was suggested in part because the District closed Decoto Elementary School, located on the same site, when nearby Emanuele Elementary opened in 1998. The school dates back to the 1870s, and the current auditorium has been in use since 1925, although most of the rest of the campus was built in the 1950’s.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, August 28 Friday, August 31 No Service Monday, September 3 No Service Tuesday, September 4 9:15–11:00 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Preschool Storytimes FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, September 5 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO

3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, September 6 9:50 – 10:20 Preschool Storytimes - FREMONT 10:40–11:30 Preschool Storytimes - NEWARK 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., NEWARK 2:00 –3:00 Graham School, 36270 Cherry St, NEWARK Friday, September 7 9:45 – 10:15 Preschool Storytimes - SAN LEANDRO 10:30 – 11:30 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 11:45 –12:15 7TH Step, 475 Medford Ave., HAYWARD 2:00 –3:00 Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., SAN LORENZO

Wieckowski appointed chair of Judiciary Committee SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assembly Speaker John Perez (D-Los Angeles) has appointed Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) the new chair of the Assembly Judiciary Committee. The Speaker announced his new committee chairs on August 8, 2012.

“I am honored to take over as the new chair of the Assembly Judiciary Committee,” Wieckowski said. “I have enjoyed serving with Chairman [Mike] Feuer on the committee as a member and look forward to working with the Judiciary consultants in this new position. I appreciate the Speaker giving me the opportunity to lead this important committee.”

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Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060

The name Itliong-Veracruz was submitted in honor of Filipino-American labor leaders Larry Itliong and Philip Veracruz, contemporaries of Cesar Chavez and fellow organizers of the 1965 Delano grape strike that led to the organization of the United Farm Workers movement. Board members asked that time be set aside at a future meeting to consider naming another District facility in honor of the Filipino community. Also, the Board: Heard a presentation from KNN Public Finance, the District’s financial advisor. With KNN’s help, the District in June moved to refund some of its outstanding general obligation bonds, taking advantage of historically low interest rates in the municipal bond market. Although the savings will not help mitigate the District’s current budget issues, it does help taxpayers by generating more than $4.1 million in present value savings. Four refunding issuances since 2000 have reduced future debt service obligations by more than $25 million. Observed a moment of silence in memory of the victims of the recent mass shootings at a theater in Colorado and the Sikh gurdwara in Wisconsin.

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August 28 2012

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR

I

nspiration and beauty are often borne out of the difficulties of life. Such was the case for local budding artist, Antoinette Martinez. A child of the ‘70s, Martinez spent her early childhood years in Pacifica.

Today, she divides her time between her work at a professional services company in Los Gatos and furthering her artistic endeavors. During the month of September, Martinez will be featured in an exhibit and special reception at Mission Coffee in Fremont. Martinez describes her childhood as one filled with days of fishing and hanging out at the beach with friends. The leisurely days changed once the family moved to

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Hayward when she entered junior high school. Adult life brought its own hardships with the tragic loss of her brother and two job layoffs. Though Martinez loved art as a child and took art classes all through high school, she became world-weary with the devastating losses she experienced. “The light

goes out when tragedy hits. You lose your gifts. They’re still there, but lying dormant.” Martinez’s interest in becoming a professional artist began when she studied Graphic Design at Silicon Valley University. She designed some logos for a few jobs, but then got mired in the details of life, being a mother, and working. At one point she found herself back home, living with her parents after 20 years of being out of the nest. Martinez

chose to use this time well, writing regularly in a journal of all the dreams she hoped to accomplish one day. The light is coming back now for Martinez, who is successfully rebuilding her life. She has experienced a new awakening and is rediscovering her gifts as an artist. That journal list now has many items checked off. One of the most amazing accomplishments for Martinez came in the form of a trip to New York. Martinez entered the Art Takes Times Square competition produced by Artists Wanted, an online professional portfolio site for artists to share their work. Art Takes Times Square drew tens of

thousands of artists from all over the world, and Martinez’s work was chosen for recognition and is being featured in the publication on the event. Last fall, Martinez had the privilege of participating in a San

A classic tale of horror and suspense detailing the ill-fated experiments of young Dr. Frankenstein as he attempts to fathom the secrets of life and death. Purchasing cadavers from two unsavory grave robbers, he gives life to a creature both hideous and touching – and so physically powerful and mentally twisted that he soon brings death or destruction to all who stand in his way. Brooding terror and shock are blended with questions of the morality and danger of unrestrained scientific inquiry. Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont, presents Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, adapted by Victor Gialanella, directed by Paula Chenoweth, September 14 through October 13. Performance times are 8 pm on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees: September 23 and 30 matinee performances begin with a continental brunch (included in price of ticket) at 12:15 pm, and the show begins at 1 pm. The October 7 performance starts at 1 pm with refreshments during intermission (included in price of ticket). For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218, or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org.

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Francisco art-based rally, Artists Against Rape, sponsored by San Francisco Women Against Rape. The painting she produced for the rally portrayed a woman who became one with her oppressor, smiling through tragedy, as is sometimes the case when victims feel they must hide their feelings of shame. This work is also being published in a book based on the work of the San Francisco group. Martinez’s work is vibrant and full of life. She says of her art, “What drives me is my love of color and of the world and everything I see.” Her strong faith flows as a theme through several of her paintings. She says that she felt an inner impression, the leading of God, guiding her towards painting. Initially trained in watercolors, Martinez has branched out to acrylics and is trying a new technique for the paintings that will be displayed at Mission Coffee throughout September. A special reception is being

held on Sunday, September 9 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wine, coffee, and music will tempt the taste buds and soothe the soul as participants mingle and meet the artist. Tickets for an auction of one of Martinez’s paintings will be available for $5. As art programs in local schools dwindle, community support of local artists becomes more crucial. Come by Mission Coffee and meet a gifted, glowing local artist! Art of Antoinette Martinez September 1 - 30 Mon-Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat-Sun: 6 a.m. – 9 p.m. Artist Reception Sunday, September 9 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mission Coffee 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 693-0627 RSVP to www.amart84888@aol.com


August 28 2012

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