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Ohlone softballers moving to CSU

Jazz in the Garden

East Bay Regional Activity Guide inside this edition

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

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Vol. 11 No. 47

June 12, 2012

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

week of fanfare introduced Fremont to Sunflower Farmers Market which opened its doors to an appreciative crowd early Wednesday, June 6. Eager shoppers, hoping to be rewarded with free groceries if within the first 200 in line, listened as Steve Black, Vice President of Operations and Store Director Kendall Jamison welcomed them to the newest addition of the chain specializing in fresh produce, organic foods, and specialty meat products. Mayor Gus Morrison, Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan and councilmembers Bill Harrison and Sue Chan greeted the crowd and watched as shoppers christened the aisles and made cash registers ring. In an ironic twist, the new Sunflower signs and private label brands will be replaced within months by the Sprouts brand. Sprouts, headquartered in Phoenix, AZ, recently completed a merger with Sunflower expanding its total store continued on page

Sunflower Vice President of Operations Steve Black receives a welcome plaque from Mayor Gus Morrison at the the Grand Opening of Sunflower Farmers Market in Fremont, June 6, as Store Director Kendall Jamison and City Councilmembers look on.

BY M.J. LAIRD Mission Trails Artists Open Studios happens the weekend of June 15-17, when 12 award-winners come together to display original art and gift items at two Fremont studios just off Mission Boulevard in

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH

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omething special was up on the morning of June 1 as visitors entered the classrooms of unsuspecting teachers, carrying colorful balloons and poster certificates.

Foundation (FEF), these grants for teacher projects in the classroom were funded through the Foundation’s annual Excellence in Education Gala held on February 24. Earlier in the school year, interested teachers had been encouraged to submit written proposals for grant consideration.

(L to R) Sherea Westra, Lara York, teacher Poonam Sharma, Debbie Amundson, Supt. James Morris and Irvington Principal Sarah Smoot.

Adriane-geisha: Adriane Dedic

Irvington High School teacher Maia Steward, (in center), is congratulated by her students.

The slightly surreptitious occasion had the anticipated surprise effect on teachers who were about to become lucky recipients of Innovative Teacher Grants. Sponsored by the Fremont Education

In May, community members, past recipients, District representatives and Foundation Board members met to read all those submitted before making the final determination of who would be awarded grants. continued on page 19

Fremont. The garden setting show is free to the public; open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Seven artists will display watercolor and mixed media paintings, digital and handpulled prints, photography, art quilts, painted gourds, wood-turned pieces, ceramics, hand-made paper, jewelry, wearable art and a range of gift items at the home studio of Denise Oyama Miller at 270 Tordo Court. At 1423 Deschutes Place, the artist studio home of Cindy Sullivan, another six artists will show abstracts, pastels, silk paintings, photography, oils, metal work, handmade felted and silk scarves, soaps, jewelry, among other items. The seeds of this art show began in 1999 when seven artists who showed their work at a local gallery came together to create an open studio show in 1999 at Sullivan's home. The next year, the all-women’s group named themselves Artists 7. They picked up a few more members, and then lost a couple, sending their numbers up and down until they returned to seven. Since their beginnings, they have expanded from one home studio on tour to two, serving refreshments and gathering a following of more than 200 family, friends, and newcomers each year. This summer event is one of four or five shows in which they participate together each year. continued on page 20

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

INDEX

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 12, 2012

What to Do on Evenings and Weekends When a Trip to the ER Isn’t Needed

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hat do you do when an illness or injury is pressing enough to require a doctor’s care, but it’s an evening or weekend, and the doctor’s office is closed? Fortunately, there’s an option that is available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day of the year—without having to go to the emergency room. “In situations that are not life-threatening, urgent care can be an ideal choice with many benefits,” explains Washington Urgent Care Medical Director Sarkis Banipalsin, M.D. Patients of all ages are seen at Washington Urgent Care on a walk-in basis with no appointment necessary, and Dr. Banipalsin and the clinic’s other physicians treat a variety of medical issues. Additionally, onsite access to X-ray and laboratory facilities helps speed the treatment process. Save Money and Time In addition to quality care, two of the most important advantages Washington Urgent Care offers are cost-savings and convenience, Dr. Banipalsin says. After all, in the event of a minor injury or illness, isn’t it often the cost and the hassle that makes us reconsider a non-emergency trip to the emergency room? Co-payments at Washington Urgent Care are generally much less than emergency room co-payments, and uninsured Washington Township Health Care District residents can receive a significant discount off their charges by paying at the time of service. “Washington Urgent Care serves as a convenient and cost-effective alternative

Dr. Sarkis Banipalsin, medical director of Washington Urgent Care, advises community members to think of urgent care the next time you or a family member needs immediate care but the situation isn’t life threatening. Located on the second floor at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont, Washington Urgent Care is open every day of the year from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

to emergency room care if it’s not an emergency situation,” Banipalsin says. “And average wait times at the clinic are less than 30 minutes.” Patients Come First What really makes the clinic stand out, though, according to Patti Coffey, R.N., nurse manager of the clinic, is the clinical team members who make each patient a priority. “At Washington Hospital and Washington Urgent Care, we practice the Patient First Ethic,” Coffey says. “Part of that standard means that we want our patients to feel good about their visit from beginning to end, because when they come to us, they don’t feel well. Our job is to help our patients feel better.”

Dr. Banipalsin says it’s worth it to think of urgent care the next time you or a family member needs care but doesn’t require a trip to the emergency room. “Local urgent care services can benefit you and your family by allowing you to access the medical care you need without the long wait time,” Dr. Banipalsin concludes. What the Clinic Treats The clinic sees patients with a wide variety of health care needs, including: • Colds, coughs, flu and flu-related symptoms • Lacerations • Injuries, such as cuts and bruises The clinic’s staff also offers occupational health care services to employers

throughout the Tri-City area through the Well for Work program, which provides: • Work injury management • Drug and alcohol testing • Pre-employment physical exams (by appointment only between 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.) • Rehabilitation services Care You Can Trust Dr. Banipalsin emphasizes that Washington Urgent Care is accredited through the Urgent Care Center Accreditation (UCCA) Program, which sets standards for urgent care facilities and measures their performance. Accreditation is awarded only to those urgent care centers that are found to be in compliance with the standards, and accreditation means that the accredited clinic practices with excellence. Open 365 Days a Year Washington Urgent Care is located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 212, on the second floor of the Washington West Building, in Fremont. Call (510) 791CARE (791-2273) for more information. The clinic is open everyday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., no appointment necessary.

When to Go to the ER Sometimes a trip to the emergency room is unavoidable. If you or a loved one is experiencing any of the following symptoms, always use your best judgment and call 9-1-1 immediately: • Chest pain • Difficulty breathing • Severe bleeding or head trauma • Loss of consciousness • Sudden loss of vision or blurred vision

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

06/12/12

06/13/12

06/14/12

06/15/12

06/16/12

06/17/12

06/18/12

Diabetes Matters: Making Diabetes a Good Fit for Health

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

Diabetes Matters: Vacation or Travel Plans?

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Women's Health Voices InHealth: Healthy Conference: Chronic Pain Pregnancy Management

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Women's Health Conference: Skin Health From Infancy to Maturity

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run! Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Brain Health for Seniors

Learn More About Kidney Disease

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Heart Irregularities Learn More About Kidney Disease

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

Weight Management for Seniors

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children (Late Start)

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Wound Care Update Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day Living with Heart Failure

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11, 2012

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

or Travel Plans? Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Inside Washington Hospital: Pediatric Care

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The PreSchool Years

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Your Concerns InHealth: Decisions in End of Life Care

The Weight to Success

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Ankle Conditions Learn More About Kidney Positivity - A Positive Diabetes Matters:Vacation

Disaster Preparedness

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Men's Health Expo 2011

World Kidney Day

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

World Kidney Day

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Brain Health for Seniors

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Learn More About Kidney Disease Prostate Enlargements and Cancer

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Approach to Managing Diabetes

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Keys to Healthy EyesInside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Wound Care Update

Approach to Managing Diabetes

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Wound Care Update

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Learn Exercises to Help Get Back On Your Feet: Lower Your Blood Pressure New Treatment Options and Slow Your Heart Rate for Ankle Conditions


June 12, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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ashington Hospital has received several top 2012 HealthGrades awards recognizing the hospital’s outstanding patient care. HealthGrades is an independent health care rating organization that reviews over 5,000 hospitals across the country exclusively on patient outcomes, with awards and achievements corresponding to superior patient outcomes. “We are proud to receive these recognitions of our continuing efforts to provide excellent patient care,” said Washington Hospital Chief Executive Officer Nancy Farber. “The awards are a result of the hard work and dedication of both staff and physicians associated with our stroke, joint replacement and neurosciences programs; as well as the efforts of all others associated with our healthcare system, Farber added. “Every employee, physician and volunteer at the hospital has played an integral part in achieving these outstanding results,” she noted.

Washington Hospital is the only hospital in the Bay Area to be named among the 100 Best in the Nation for Joint Replacement, and is also ranked the #1 Joint Replacement program in the Greater Bay Area. Additionally, the Joint Replacement program at Washington is the recipient of the HealthGrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award and ranked among the Top 5% in the Nation, both for the 6th year in a row (2007-2012). The orthopedic program at Washington Hospital has also achieved a 5-star rating from HealthGrades for Joint Replacement for 7 years in a row (2006-2012), Total Knee Replacement for 7 years in a row (2006-2012), and Total Hip Replacement for 9 years in a row (2004-2012).

Award Winning Health Care Close to Home To learn more about Washington Hospital and its award-winning programs, visit whhs.com/about/awards. “These achievements are a reflection of everyone’s dedication to providing Washington Hospital patients with the best possible care, and whose actions are reflective of our commitment to the “Patient First Ethic,” Farber said. This year Washington Hospital is a Five-Star recipient for Neurosciences and received a Five-Star rating for Back and Neck Surgery (spinal fusion) for three years in a row (2006-2012). For the second year in a row, Washington Hospital is a Five-Star recipient for Stroke Care. The hospital was also named a recipient of the 2012 HealthGrades Stroke Care Excellence Award and ranked among the Top 5% in the Nation for the treatment of stroke. These distinctions place Washington Hospital in an elite group of hospitals across the nation.

Protect Yourself Against the Sun’s Harmful Rays Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers, yet millions of Americans will expose their skin to the sun’s harmful rays this summer. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 3.5 million skin cancers are diagnosed each year in the United States. “The incidence of skin cancer is on the rise in this country,” said Dr. David Gorsulowsky, a dermatologist in private practice in Fremont and a member of the Washington Hospital Medical staff. “We have seen the numbers double and even triple for some types of skin cancer over the last 20 to 30 years.” Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, and much of this exposure comes from the sun, according to Gorsulowsky. UVA rays cause the skin to age and are linked to long-term skin damage like wrinkles. UVB rays are the main cause of sunburns and are thought to cause most skin cancers. “Each time a person is exposed to sun, more damage occurs to the important layers of the skin,” he said. “This damage is cumulative and irreversible.”

The best way to protect yourself from the sun’s damaging rays is to cover up and reduce your exposure, particularly between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.When you do go outside, use sunscreens that are water resistant so they can hold up to water and perspiration longer.

While there are many kinds of skin cancers, there are two main types: keratinocyte cancers (basal cell and squamous cell) and melanomas. Basal and squamous cell are by far the most common skin cancers. Both generally occur on parts of the body that are exposed to continued on page 4

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the sun, like the head, neck, and arms, Gorsulowsky explained. These cancers rarely spread to other organs. Early Detection “Basal and squamous cell skin cancers are much less likely to be fatal than melanomas,” he added. “But they still need to be detected and treated early because they destroy normal tissue until treated.” Melanomas can occur anywhere, but are more likely to be found in specific areas, like the chest and back for men and the legs for women. They can start in areas protected from sun. “Melanoma is much more likely to spread to other parts of the body,” Gorsulowsky said. “While it is the more deadly form of skin cancer, it can be cured in the early stages like basal and squamous cell cancers. That’s why early detection is so critical. You should have a visual inspection of your skin every year by an appropriately trained medical caregiver. People of every race and skin tone can get skin cancer, so it’s important for everyone.” He said annual skin exams are particularly important for those who have a family history of skin cancer or are at greater risk. Those at higher risk for sun-related skin cancer include people who have a large number of moles or freckles, have fair skin and light eyes, spend a lot of time outdoors, and take certain medications that increase sun sensitivity. Even if the damage to the skin doesn’t result in skin cancer, it has other negative effects, including wrinkles, blotches, and dark spots. “Sun exposure increases the rate of aging, making your face look older than its chronological years,” Gorsulowsky said. “People talk about a ‘healthy tan,’ but in the end the sun actually creates a very unhealthy look.” Cover Up The best way to protect yourself from the sun’s damaging rays is to cover up and reduce your expo-

SUBMITTED BY MILA MISHINA Hayward Municipal Band will offer free Sunday band concerts beginning June 17 and ending Sunday, July 22. Concerts are under the direction of Kathy Morelli Maier, and will feature a wide variety of musical styles including Big Band, Classical, Pop, and of course America’s “March King,” by John Phillip Sousa. All concerts are held at the Tony Morelli Bandstand in Memorial Park, behind the Hayward Plunge. Bring a blanket, picnic basket and friends to enjoy this lively afternoon of great band music.

sure, particularly between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., when UV rays are the strongest. The American Cancer Society uses the catch phrase “Slip!, Slop!, Slap!” Slip on a shirt, slop on some sunscreen, and slap on a hat. “Cover up as much skin as possible with protective clothing,” Gorsulowsky said. “Long-sleeve shirts and long pants cover much of the skin. A wide-brimmed hat can help to protect your face and neck.” He said clothing offers variable levels of protection. Thinner, lighter-colored garments offer less protection from harmful UV rays. Some companies now make clothing that is lightweight, comfortable, and protects against UV exposure, according to Gorsulowsky. He said one way to choose effective protective clothing is to look for the American Academy of Dermatology’s seal of approval on the label. In addition, sunscreen is a must to block out some of the sun’s harmful rays. Sunscreens are available in a number of forms, including lotions, creams, ointments, gels, sprays, and wipes. “You need to read the labels when you buy sunscreen and look for a product that blocks both UVA and UVB rays,” he said. “Look for a sun protection factor, or SPF, of 30 or higher. Often people think the SPF indicates the strength, but it doesn’t. It is a factor of time. An SPF of 30 means that you can receive 30 times the usual amount of exposure before turning red. Still, sunscreens do not protect against the sun’s other rays, so being sensible about the length of time in the sun is necessary.” To be effective, sunscreen needs to be reapplied often. Look for sunscreens that are water resistant so they can hold up to water and perspiration longer. He also recommends using sunscreens that have physical blockers in them like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. “The takeaway from all this is you can enjoy the great outdoors this summer,” Gorsulowsky added. “But you have to protect yourself against the sun’s damaging UV rays. You need to wear sunscreen and cover up.” For information about classes and wellness programs at Washington Hospital that can help you stay healthy, visit www.whhs.com.

The Concert Series is made possible by funding from City of Hayward and produced in cooperation with the Hayward Area Park and Recreation District. Call (510) 881-6700 or (510) 569-8497 or visit www.haywardrec.org or www.haywardmunicipalband.com for more information. Free Concert Series in the Park Hayward Municipal Band Sundays, June 17 - July 22 2:30 p.m.

Tony Morelli Bandstand in Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-6700 www.haywardmunicipalband.com


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Tri-City Stargazer JUNE 13 – JUNE 19, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Our largest planet, Jupiter, moved into the sign of Gemini last week and will remain in that sign for a full year. Jupiter is the planet of expansion, optimism, philosophy, travel and education. It generally represents improvements and growth in whatever department of life it touches. Its last sojourn through Gemini occurred between July 2000 and July 2001—review that era for comparison. Jupiter’s change of signs affects everyone, but is perceived in a different way, depending upon the sun and ascendant signs at birth. They both apply; if you know your ascendant (or rising sign) you can read two zodiac signs below. Aries (March 21-April 20): During the next year, opportunities for travel will probably increase. Relationships with siblings, roommates and/or neighbors will be more rewarding, and your overall daily attitude will become more optimistic. Focus of attention on communication—written or oral—will be highlighted. Educational opportunities are attractive and expanded. You may become a teacher in your field.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): Any effort toward becoming more acquainted with deeper parts of yourself will be well rewarded. Positive results can be achieved through psychotherapy, dream work, meditation, hypnosis and/or prayer. Assistance will come to you through unexpected (and possibly mysterious) sources. Your desire to contribute to the greater social good will increase and yield good “karma.”

Taurus (April 21-May 20): You will likely have improvements in financial income or other personal resources. This may develop either as the result of increased effort or general good luck. Optimistic attitudes concerning money could lead you to overextend your resources. Your sense of self-esteem is increased by several notches as you demonstrate what you have learned in recent years.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Effort invested in organizational or group social causes will be returned in bounty. Networking with friends and acquaintances may play an active role toward helping you attain personal goals in life. Relationships with stepchildren—and, more generally, to other people’s children—will improve and become a source of pleasure. Corporate financial resources may increase.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Jupiter in your sign will lighten any load, renew your sense of optimism, and reinforce your self-esteem. Help and cooperation of others will be more available to you, especially if you make your requests in person. The spiritual dimension of your life will improve, and travel or education becomes more prominent. The only difficulty with this transit is the tendency for weight gain.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): Any reasonable effort in the area of profession, career or social status should have favorable results during the next few months. There may be additional travel or educational/teaching opportunities associated with career endeavors. Relationships to superiors will be more supportive. Opportunities develop to improve relationships with the family of origin.

Libra (September 23-October 22): Jupiter augurs improvements and good fortune through any or all of the following: legal or ethical issues, contacts with foreign lands or people who live at a distance, the internet, higher education, teaching, publishing and long-distance travel. Events of the next year will broaden your perspective on all of life and expand your sense of connection to a larger circle of others. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Gain comes to you through areas of shared financial resources. These may include: compensation from insurance or other group holdings, increases in a partner’s income, sale of property, gains through inheritance or gifts, tax benefits, or increase in the value of stocks, bonds, or other mutually held property. Debts owed to you will be paid, whether financial or favors. Intimate life is on the upswing. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): The year brings improvements in all your most intimate relationships. This may be the year to get married or develop a beneficial business partnership. Those with client bases will note considerable expansion. The period is favorable for attracting positive assistance through professional consultants, such as doctors

or counselors. Travel and/or education are on the increase. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Jupiter will increase the physical vitality, heal anomalies, and offer improvements in work conditions. Relationships to coworkers will be enhanced, and equipment may be updated. This is the time to look for a better job—it may find you. Any type of self-improvement program, but especially those relating to the physical body, will have highly beneficial results. Many will adopt pets. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): The time has come to relax and let yourself remember how to play. All types of creative work will be enhanced. Those with children will find greater satisfaction and a more rewarding relationship in the next year. Those who want chil-

dren or a new love affair will likely be granted their wish. Give yourself permission to explore new possibilities in creative self-expression. Pisces (February 19-March 20): Jupiter will bring improvements to your domestic life. This may manifest in a new home or other property, such as a car. It especially favors home decorating or expansion projects. Domestic problems of the past may be improved or resolved during this period. Opportunities to improve and augment relationships to the family of origin will be presented.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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Counseling Corner This Counseling Corner features a guest columnist who has written a lovely and informative article on working in a Recreation District. Let me introduce her – Frances Li is an art major at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. In hopes of finding her own path, she has recently taken an interest in researching careers. Li has had a lifelong love of Harry Potter, hamburgers, and Bay Area sunsets. She was raised in the East Bay and now lives in Hayward. – Anne Chan, Ph.D.

Cool Jobs in the Tri-City Area: Hayward resident finds work satisfaction by providing opportunities for the community BY FRANCES LI Jennifer Koney’s office looks out over the beautiful Hayward shoreline; she is lucky enough to be greeted with salty breezes and a diverse range of wildlife every day. You might assume that this would be her favorite part about working for Hayward Area Recreation and Park District, but her list of favorites is surprisingly lengthy. Koney has the opportunity to provide educational and recreational programs to an array of people of all age ranges. Hayward Area Recreation and Park District has provided beautiful parks and recreation activities to the cities of Hayward, Castro Valley, San Lorenzo and unincorporated districts of Ashland, Cherryland and Fairview since 1944. Koney began working for H.A.R.D. (its local name) five years ago but her experience in recreation goes much further back. Koney’s 26 year background in recreation started with a passion for art and teaching kids. With a newly minted art school degree, Koney found herself with her first teaching job at Studio One, the City of Oakland’s arts center in north Oakland. Working there, she discovered a knack for administration and was quickly promoted to the position of Children’s Program Director. Koney then set to work creating city-wide after school and summer art programs as the full time citywide arts Program Director and Recreation Supervisor for Oakland. With this experience under her belt, she then became a Recreation General Supervisor – overseeing half of the recreation centers in Oakland. Koney’s decision to move to H.A.R.D. was motivated by a desire to be closer to her roots – working with kids and the arts. As a Recreation Supervisor, she finds that modifying her experience in recreation to naturebased programs was an easy transition. Koney oversees the nature unit, Douglas Morrisson Theatre, adult special interest classes and East Ave. summer day camps (where she is known as “Pickleweed”). Her nature unit includes Sulphur Creek Nature Center – including the wildlife rehabilitation center – and Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center. On top of being able to provide so many high quality services to the community, Koney is very happy in her position. She finds satisfaction in knowing that her

work is a benefit to society and “loves being able to provide excellent services to people that they really enjoy and want.” Jean Clark, Jennifer’s co-worker who supervises the visual arts and dance portions of the District’s cultural arts programs, is able to experience first-hand the benefits of Jennifer’s positive attitude. Clark describes her to be “extremely driven and focused” yet “compassionate and understanding which creates a wonderful working team”. At H.A.R.D., Koney has found an ideally balanced workplace that fulfills her passion for nature, arts, enriching lives and public service. H.A.R.D. offers a number of exciting and educational activities for the summer months. Some of the programs Jennifer oversees (which she describes as “the cream of the crop”) are the summer camps at East Ave. Park (Camps Tenderfoot, Potowatomi, and Vida Nueva), Wildlife Camp at Sulfur Creek, Bay Camp at the Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center, and performances of ‘Member of the Wedding’ at the Douglas Morrisson Theatre! If you’d like more information regarding H.A.R.D. programs, visit http://www.haywardrec.org/brochure.html or call (510) 881-6700. Anne Chan is a career counselor and licensed psychotherapist in Union City. She specializes in helping people find happiness in their careers, lives, and relationships. She can be reached at 510-744-1781. Her website is www.annechanconsulting.com © Anne Chan, 2012

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count to 144 with the addition of 37 existing Sunflower markets. In 2011, Sprouts acquired Henry’s and Sun Farmers Markets and continues its rapid growth, adding another six facilities – five in California including two in San Jose, one in Mountain View, one in Walnut Creek and another in Ahwatukee Arizona - this year. Sunflower stores including the Fremont operation and six more Sunflower openings – the next one June 20, 2012 in San Jose – will begin changing signs and décor in July. Conversion of the Fremont store is scheduled for October 2012. Although the transition from Sunflower to Sprout Farmers Market will entail new signage and private label design, Black says, “Most products will remain the same as they are today.” He adds that although the name will change, “One of the magical things about a farmers market is that we try to maintain a local feel; if there are local products, we like to carry them and if the ethnic composition of an area warrants a different emphasis on product mix, we try to honor that.” California openings of Sunflower in the Sacramento and Modesto markets have been well received and the same is anticipated in the Bay Area. “Our real estate team and the ‘analytics’ of the area drew us to Fremont,” says Black. “So far, the response has been very positive and we know customers will respond to the unique ‘feel’ of Sunflower especially our fresh produce, natural and organic products, yogurt, homemade sausage, olive bar, coffee, vitamins and its other unique aspects.”

Sunflower has an excellent reputation for value since its guiding concept has been and remains following the merger, to maintain a clean, intelligent and well-run operation that is not focused as much on décor as quality and modest pricing. The slogan, “serious food at silly prices” is more than a marketing tag line; it is the guiding principle for the company. Employees are trained to help customers and although there is a main warehouse for many purchases, local growers are encouraged to become part of the Sunflower family too. Black notes, for example, that local beekeepers often supply honey and nearby vineyards use Sunflower markets as a sales outlet. A unique marketing approach of Sunflower Farmers Market has been “Double Coupon Wednesday.” On that day, both the preceding and next week’s coupons are valid so shoppers are able to take advantage of two weekly specials in a single day. In the tradition of farmers’ markets held outdoors usually on a weekly basis, Sunflower employees are trained to help customers to understand the wide variety of items and give suggestions about their use. Black says that extensive business hours (7 a.m. – 11 p.m.) will help shoppers plan their trips to avoid congestion and ease traffic concerns. Sunflower Farmers Market 3900 Mowry Ave., Fremont (Prior location of Barnes & Noble) (510) 284-1050

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Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 12, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BART Police Log SUBMITTED BY OFFICER E. JENKINS, BART PD June 6 At 4:08 p.m., a BART Officer contacted a male adult victim who reported his single speed bicycle was stolen from the bike racks at Fremont Station. The victim did not know the make or model. The bike was locked with a cable at 6:45 a.m. and discovered missing at 4:00 p.m. No known leads at this time.

Fremont Police Log

Union City Police Log

SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD

SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD

June 7 Officer Tarango conducted a probation search on Porter Street involving two juvenile brothers and located a loaded .22 cal pistol in the bedroom of one of the brothers. A search of the other brother’s room uncovered a stolen Social Security Card, Driver’s license and jewelry taken during a nearby residential burglary. Both bedrooms contained gang related items. Both juveniles were arrested and taken to Juvenile Hall. Officer Lobue was searching the Hub parking lots for a missing person when he witnessed a female burglary suspect flee past him carrying loss from the Ulta Cosmetic store. Officer Lobue caught up with the suspect and arrested her for burglary. June 8 Officers responded to the 1070 block of Curtner Road on a report of an interrupted residential burglary after the homeowner confronted two males inside her

June 3 Officers responded to 34 Union Square to investigate a loud, potentially violent domestic disturbance coming from one of the apartments. Arriving officers knocked on the victim’s residence door, but initially had no answer. While preparing to force entry into the residence, the victim opened the door. Officers found that the victim had been battered and was visibly upset. A protective search of the residence revealed that her ex-boyfriend was hiding in the closet. Officers learned that the couple had been involved in a heated argument about their relationship; that turned violent when the suspect began to batter her. The suspect was arrested for domestic battery. June 4 An UCP officer responded to the Home Depot Hardware store to investigate a strong-armed robbery. The victim told the investigating officer that she had responded to a Craig’s List add

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Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD June 6 At 7:26 a.m., officers investigated a window smash auto burglary at 5464 Saint Mark Avenue. The loss was a stereo and it happened overnight. Officers took custody of a citizen’s arrest by NewPark Mall security of Patrick Jovellanos of Newark at 12:55 p.m. Jovellanos was asked to leave by Newpark Mall security personnel after causing a disturbance and then assaulted NewPark Security personnel by attempting to punch one of the security guards. He was transported to Fremont Jail and booked for Battery. Officers investigated the theft of a rear license plate at 3:28 p.m. from a residence on the 37000 block of Magnolia Street. The plate is CA #6MXS105. Officers conducted a bicycle/pedestrian stop at 12:23 a.m. on Newark Boulevard at Cedar Boulevard and arrested Mark Romero of Newark for being under the influence of drugs. While being booked at continued on page 9

Arrest of business owner for lewd and lascivious acts SUBMITTED BY OFFICER K. MOSCUZZA, MILPITAS PD In August 2011, the Milpitas Police Department received a report that Ke Neng Yang (aka Jimmy), a resident of San Jose may have sexually assaulted an eleven year old female at Happy 8 Health Center. Yang is the business owner and masseuse at Happy 8 Health Center. The alleged incident occurred when Yang was giving the victim a massage at the Happy 8 Health Center. Milpitas Police detectives completed a thorough investigation and submitted the case to the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office in February 2012. The Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office filed a complaint against Yang for committing lewd lascivious acts with a child and a warrant was issued for Yang’s arrest. On June 6, 2012, Yang came into the Milpitas Police Department and was arrested and booked into the county Jail. Anyone with information regarding this incident or any similar incidents are encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Anonymous information can be given by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Burglary Suspects Arrested SUBMITTED BY SERGEANT KEVIN CORVIN, MILPITAS PD On June 5 at approximately 11:02 a.m., Milpitas Police Department officers responded to a report of suspicious subjects in the backyard of a residence in the 2200 block of Seacliff Drive. The resident of the home heard someone knocking loudly on the front door of the residence but did not answer. Two subjects were seen climbing over the fence and entering the backyard and the resident yelled at them and they fled from the yard. The resident quickly telephoned 9-1-1 and reported the incident, provided subject descriptions, a detailed description of the vehicle in which the subjects fled and their route of escape. Milpitas Police Department dispatchers broadcast the information to patrol officers within seconds of receiving the initial 9-1-1 call. Milpi-

tas Police Department officers, heavily patrolling residential areas in order to impact an increase in residential burglaries arrived in the area of the call within three minutes. The suspect vehicle was stopped leaving the area and the three suspects within the vehicle were detained. The suspects and vehicle were identified as the people and vehicle seen at the Seacliff residence. The suspects, two 16-year old males and one 14-year old male, all San Jose residents, were arrested for attempted burglary and conspiracy, and transported to the Milpitas Police Department for further investigation. Milpitas Police Department detectives linked the subjects to two additional Milpitas residential burglaries that occurred on May 30 and an attempted residential burglary that occurred on May 29. The subjects were later booked into the Santa Clara County Juvenile Hall.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Judge Robert McGuiness has not decided if we get to move forward with our evidence that we qualify as a Newspaper of General Circulation for the City of Fremont. We will let you know as soon as we find out. Thank you again for all of your prayers and support.

Fremont Police Log home. The victim stated she was upstairs when two males entered her home via an unlocked rear door. Once inside, the suspects took an iPad and fled once they realized the homeowner was upstairs. The suspects jumped the rear fence and were last seen running toward Palo Amarillo. The suspects were described as two males, 5’08 to 5’10, wearing blue jeans, a blue t-shirt, and dark colored jacket. A search of the area failed to locate the suspects. A residential burglary (ransack) occurred on Merlot Drive. Entry was via a kitchen window; loss included valuable coins. A residential burglary occurred on Hawkins Street. Entry was via a rear window; loss included jewelry. An interrupted residential burglary occurred on Valpey Park Avenue. Upon returning home, the resident witnessed the suspect run out of the house via the back door. Entry was made through the side garage door (door kick); loss included cash. Officers were dispatched to Centerville Park on a report of a bike theft. Responding officers spotted the suspect and the bike. The suspect fled but inadvertently ran into Officer Valdes. Officer N. Johnson arrested a male for resisting arrest and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. A commercial burglary occurred at Mobile City on Thornton Avenue via a glass break.

Union City Police Log from the suspect selling an “I - PAD” for $500. The suspect agreed to meet the victim at the Home Depot store parking lot to conduct the transaction. The victim asked to open the box containing the “I-PAD” to inspect it prior to paying for it. The suspect convinced her to show him the money first. Once she held the money in her hands, the suspect grabbed the money and fled the scene in a silver Toyota Corolla with paper plates. The victim immediately found that the box was empty. The suspect was described as a black male adult between 25 and 29 years old, 6’-2” tall, and weighing about 220 pounds. June 5 Officers responded to the 34000 block of Travertine Way to investigate a possible in progress burglary. Witnesses reported seeing three juveniles ringing the doorbell to a residence. When no one answered, the suspects attempted to open a window alongside the house. The homeowner, who was in the back yard, heard the noise and scared the suspects off. A short time later, it is believed that the same suspects were seen in the area of 34000 Limestone. The subjects were described as two black male juveniles and one Indian male juvenile, all wearing backpacks. Officers responded to a residence on the 4100 block of Dyer Street to investigate an unknown disturbance. Arriving officers learned that during the disturbance an individual fired gunshots into a residence and then fled the area. Fortunately, no one was injured. This case is actively being followed up on by the investigations unit. June 6 Three suspects were detained trying to steal a car at the Union City Sports Center. A witness obtained a license plate as the suspects fled and officers are following up on leads. Two officers in an unmarked car were in the Union Landing Shopping Center on the lookout for car burglars. The officers located a suspicious vehicle, detained a suspect on searchable probation, and located a stolen laptop in the thief’s car. The laptop was stolen out of Oakland. The thief went to Fremont jail. A robbery occurred at Bakery La Mejor when an intoxicated worker attempted to steal cash from the register. The suspect was identified by co-workers and arrested by a passing patrol officer.

Newark Police Log Fremont Jail, Mr. Romero was being walked into the processing area when a pink sock fell out of his pants leg. The sock was checked and found to contain two glass pipes and a small amount of methamphetamine. Romero obtained the additional charges of possession of drugs / possession of methamphetamine smoking pipe and bringing drugs into a jail. 0105 Hours: Officers conducted a pedestrian stop on Newark Blvd at Brittany Avenue and contacted Ramil Dequinia DOB: 03-14-81 (Newark) and arrested him for 11550(a) H&Sunder the influence of drugs, 11377(a) H&S Possession of drugs and 11364.1 H&S- possession of methamphetamine pipe. He was booked into custody at Santa Rita Jail. June 7 At 4:18 p.m., officers investigated a residential burglary on the 6200 block of Brittany Avenue. A neighbor called reported seeing two doors in the open position. The loss at this time is a TV and a computer. Bicycle Patrol Officers were

conducting a security check in the area of Sunset Avenue and Ash Street at 4:20 p.m. when they came across two females coming from the yard in the 36700 block of Ash Street carrying a box of miscellaneous property. One of the females provided a false name then fled on foot from officers, but was quickly apprehended. Through diligent investigation, Officers determined both females had just burglarized the residence. Deanna Byars of Newark was arrested for burglary, possession of stolen property, providing a false name and resisting arrest. Shanna Morgan of Newark was arrested for burglary and possession of stolen property. Byars was booked at Santa Rita Jail and Morgan was booked at Fremont City Jail. Officers responded to JC Penny’s at 4:30 p.m. and accepted their citizen’s arrest of an adult female identified as Angelica Miguel of Newark. She was booked at Fremont City Jail for burglary. Officers were dispatched at 7:33 p.m. to Ann’s Chinese Food located at 35204 Newark Boule-

vard to investigate a vandalism that just occurred. Officers learned that an unhappy customer was having an argument with his significant other and decided to shatter a window as they were leaving. Officers are following up on leads. Officers were dispatched at 11:26 p.m. to the area of Clark Avenue west of Cherry Street to investigate a citizen’s report of two Hispanic males arguing in an apartment complex. The caller also reported that one of the males was possibly in possession of a handgun. Officers responded and arrived on scene in less than a minute. Officers contacted two males matching the description provided by the caller in the parking area of 6564 Clark Avenue and arrested Giovanny Zavala of Newark for possession of a loaded concealed firearm. He was booked at Fremont City Jail. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Board, commission, committee and task force vacancies SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM LENS The City of Hayward seeks individuals interested in serving Hayward. Openings exist on the following: Community Services Commission (no current vacancies); Council Economic Development Committee (no current vacancies); Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board (2 vacancies, 1 potential vacancy); Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force (5 potential vacancies); Library Commission (1 potential vacancy); Personnel Commission (1 vacancy, 1 potential vacancy); Planning Commission (2 potential vacancies). Appointees to these bodies serve in an advisory capacity to the City Council. Prospective applicants must reside within the Hayward city limits and be registered voters. Applicants for the Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board need not live in Hayward; however, they must own a business in the Downtown Business Improvement Area of Hayward and pay assessments.

Applicants for the Council Economic Development Committee must be residents of Hayward, own/operate a business in Hayward, be senior management at a corporate business in Hayward or be formally affiliated with and represent another entity or agency concerned with economic development in the City of Hayward. Certain commissions/committees/task force members will need to file a Statement of Economic Interests, Form 700. Interested individuals may obtain applications from the Office of the City Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, CA 94541, by calling (510) 583-4400 or by visiting the City’s website at www.haywardca.gov. The deadline for submitting applications is 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18, 2012. Interviews with the City Council are scheduled for Tuesday, July 24, 2012. Applicants will be notified when interview times are confirmed.

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Measure H defeated for second time SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE For the second time in just over a year, a substantial majority of New Haven Unified voters supported a parcel tax that would have helped mitigate cuts forced on the school district because of the ongoing state budget crisis, but the measure once again fell short of the two-thirds majority necessary for passage. Measure H, which would have raised approximately $3 million to help the District minimize cuts to the school year, and increases in class sizes, received 62.3 percent of the vote, falling 939 votes short of passing. A similar effort, Measure B on the May 2011 ballot, lost by 82 votes. “Once again, a large majority of voters voiced their support for our schools and our students,” Superintendent Kari McVeigh said, “but the bar for a local parcel tax is set very high. We needed everyone who supported us to get out and vote, and that obviously didn’t happen.” Voter turnout across the state was low for Tuesday’s presidential primary. Only 7,149 voters cast ballots on Measure H, compared

T

he Fremont Symphony Orchestra invites you to an afternoon of cool jazz with the Renee Deeter Trio, a super raffle of 11 hi-tech goodies, and a delicious array of small plates and wine at the elegant home of Dr. and Mrs. Gene Barrie in the Milpitas hills with stunning views of the bay. The event is Saturday, June 23 at 3 p.m., with the raffle drawing at 4 p.m. The raffle includes a 16GB iPad, two 8GB iPod touches, an iPod nano and watchband, Kindle Reader, Kindle Fire, Cyber-shot camera, Canon Compact Photo Printer, Garmin GPS, Blu-Ray PlayStation 3, 32GB Flash Drive and a

to 11,819 in last year’s special election to decide Measure B. “What’s a bit frustrating is that if everyone who had voted for Measure B has joined us again for Measure H, we would have won overwhelmingly,” Ms. McVeigh noted. “More people voted yes last year than voted either way this time.” Superintendent McVeigh said the District and the New Haven Teachers Association have been in negotiations about how to mitigate a $12 million budget shortfall for the 2012-13 school year. A tentative agreement has been reached, details of which will be announced pending the teachers vote on the proposal next week. “The teachers’ association has been a remarkable partner during this very difficult time, collaborative, and with an obvious commitment to keeping our students’ needs at the top of the priority list,” Superintendent McVeigh said. “We’ve had to work with two sets of numbers – one in hopes Measure H would pass, the other if it didn’t – and it’s just very unfortunate that we’re having to deal with that second set of numbers.” Budget projections adopted by the Board of Education in March

$100 gift certificate to Fry’s (need not be present to win). Reservations are $65 per person; raffle tickets $20 each or 3 for $50; reservation plus three raffle tickets $100. For information and reservations call (510) 371-4859 or e-mail tickets@fremontsymphony.org or visit our web site www.fremontsymphony.org. Please respond by June 15. All proceeds benefit the Fremont Symphony Orchestra. Jazz in the Garden Saturday, June 23 3 p.m. (510) 371-4859 www.fremontsymphony.org

include another increase to class sizes for the 2012-13 school year and another reduction of the instructional year. More than 100 precautionary layoff notices were issued this spring. “Our teachers have been so collaborative during our negotiations, so concerned about our students, that we hope to be able to mitigate some of those cuts, pending their vote and negotiations with our administrators and classified employees,” Superintendent McVeigh said. “It is going to require great personal sacrifice on the part of our employees, though, and I hope the community understands and appreciates that.” James Logan High School teacher and NHTA President Charmaine Banther thanked “all the advocates for our students (who) set aside their lives for the past few months to work on Measure H for our kids.” She also looked ahead to a statewide tax measure on the November ballot that would ease cuts to public education. “We’ll need to make the necessary reductions to start the school year,” she added, “and then re-group for the Governor’s tax initiative in November.”

Let’s do lunch Hayward…

and breakfast,

too SUBMITTED BY MARK SALINAS All kids, aged 18 years and younger, are eligible to free breakfast and lunch every day throughout the Summer, from June 11 to August 10, 2012. No ID required. Kids can simply visit the service site and receive a free breakfast and lunch. It’s that easy! There are 32 sites throughout Hayward, Newark, San Leandro, San Lorenzo and Union City at which meals will be served. Visit http://tinyurl.com/783db4w for a list of service sites or contact Hayward Unified School District Food Services at (510) 723-3890 ext. 28103 for a convenient location, times and availability of meals.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Summer reading, crafts and activities at your library CONTRIBUTED BY KAT BLAIR, CHILDREN’S LIBRARIAN AT THE NEWARK LIBRARY Each summer, hundreds of parents are faced with the sa.m.e two questions: How can I keep my kids occupied this summer? AND How do I make sure my child doesn’t lose the skills gained during the past school year? The Alameda County Library has the answer. Get them reading by signing up for “Reading is So Delicious!,” Alameda County Library’s 2012 Summer Reading Program. According to the American Library Association, numerous studies have shown that reading over the summer prevents the “summer slide” of learning loss that can happen when children are not in school, practicing their skills every day. Free, voluntary reading is essential to helping children become better readers, writers and spellers. During the summer, local libraries emphasize that the only rule is to read for fun. “The best thing about summer reading programs is the child is in the driver’s seat.” says Dublin Children’s Librarian Rebecca Maher. “We give them permission to read whatever they want and it all counts.” Starting June 11, prereaders/children/teens and adults can pick up their game board at the Kid Power Desk at your local Library. The game board helps them keep track of their reading over the summer, and they earn prizes along the way. Readers have until August 11 to complete the library’s reading game. In addition, there are many fun summer activities at each Library planned for all ages, almost every day. Check the Events tab at the top of our Web page at www.aclibrary.org for more specifics. Here are just a few of our Saturday listings for June 23: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. California Mortgage Settlement Relief Foreclosure Prevention Seminar: Sponsored by Alameda County Department of Consumer Affairs. Contact: CASTRO VALLEY LIBRARY, (510) 667-7900. 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Social Networking with Facebook: Prerequisite: Participants must be familiar with using the Internet and have an active email account. Registration is required. Sign up in person at the Information Desk, call Barbara at (510) 795-2627 x20, or e-mail btelford-ishida@aclibrary.org. Location: NEWARK BRANCH.

11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Yoga of Breath: Adults and seniors are invited to this introduction to the yoga of breath. Wear comfortable clothing and bring drinking water. Location: UNION CITY BRANCH. 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Stitch ‘n Inch will continue with Colette Pispisa, our teacher of all things knitted. We will be meeting every other Saturday. For all ages, even beginners! No registration is necessary, just show up with yarn and needles. Location: NEWARK BRANCH. 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. We Bought a Zoo—Movie: Contact: Susan Rosenblatt (510) 670-6283 srosenblatt@aclibrary.org. Location: SAN LORENZO BRANCH. 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Music Together: Free tickets for each session will be available at 1:15 p.m. to attend this sample music class for newborns to age 5 years of age and a parent. Contact: Children's Information Desk (510) 745-1421. Location: FREMONT MAIN BRANCH. 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Science for Youth Lecture: Join local high school students passionate about science. Contact: Children's Information Desk (510) 745-1421. Location: FREMONT MAIN BRANCH. 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Ventriloquist Steve Chaney… with “Corny Crow”. Location: UNION CITY BRANCH. 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Knit One, Purl Two: Make new friends in the community at Knit One, Purl Two. This is not a knitting class. Contact: Pam Blades (925) 803-7273 pblades@aclibrary.org. Location: DUBLIN BRANCH. 3:00 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Juan L. Sánchez MÚSICA COSMOPOLITA: Music without frontiers for a world without frontiers. Música sin fronteras para un mundo sin fronteras. No registration is necessary. Location: NEWARK BRANCH. 4:00 p.m. Japanese Storytime Contact: storytime.jp.albany@gmail.com. Location: ALBANY BRANCH in the Edith Stone Room. In addition to our events, youth ages 13 and up may volunteer for a variety of duties at the Library. There is the Kid Power program. Volunteers help everyone sign up and play the Summer Reading Game. We will need to cover all of the hours that we are open during the summer. Many of the branches also have a Reading Buddies program. where teens help elementary school-aged children with practicing their reading. Apply at the Library branch where you are interested in working, ask for a Volunteer Application at the Reference or Information Desk! And Thanks, we really appreciate your help!

Father’s Day is fast approaching and finding that special gift or outing can be a difficult thing. How about letting the Chabot Space & Science Center handle the details? Treat dad to a BBQ Tri-tip sandwich or grilled burger at the Skyline Bistro then head over to the Biology Classroom for the Solar Car Challenge. With a team of experienced builders, design and create your own Lego® "green" hot rod outfitted with solar panels. See how it handles the curves, corners, and roadblocks of a special track and obstacle course. Attendees can also try their hand at making something using Ken Denmead's book “Geek Dad” as a guide for cool activities. The Solar Car Challenge is for ages eight and up. Spend a memorable afternoon building and racing solar cars, exploring interactive exhibits, taking a hike, watching a show and looking through telescopes. Advance reservations for lunch at the Skyline Bistro are $14 for adults and $7 for children; Father's Day walk-ins are $15 for adults and $8 for children. Tickets for the Solar Car Challenge are $10 for guests plus general admission (adult admission $15.95, youths 3-12 $11.95) and $10 for members. Space is limited and advance reservations are suggested. To register call the Box Office at (510) 336-7373 or visit online at www.chabotspace.org. Father’s Day BBQ and Solar Car Challenge Sunday, June 17 BBQ: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Solar Car Challenge: 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Boulevard, Oakland (510) 336-7373 www.chabotspace.org

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June 12, 2012

How Europe's debt crisis is affecting US economy AP WIRE SERVICE BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Europe's crisis is having a broad effect on the U.S. economy. Some key areas: – Falling sales for U.S. companies. Europe buys 22 percent of the goods U.S. companies sell abroad. And U.S. companies have invested more than $2 trillion in European factories and operations. Among other companies, General Motors and Ford are losing money in Europe as middle-class Europeans cut back on auto purchases. U.S. businesses could also suffer a credit

BY PAUL ELIAS ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), When James Lee Crummel hanged himself in his San Quentin Prison cell last month, he had been living on Death Row for almost eight years – and he was still years away from facing the executioner. California's automatic death penalty appeals take so long that the state's 723 condemned inmates are more likely to die of old age and infirmities –or kill themselves – than be put to death. Since capital punishment was reinstated in 1978, California has executed 13 inmates, and none since 2006. But 20 have committed suicide, including Crummel, who abducted, sexually abused and killed a 13-year-old boy on his way to school in 1979. Another 57 inmates have died of natural causes. The ponderous pace of this process has helped make the state's death row the most populous in the nation, and it has generated critics from all quarters. Victim rights groups say the delays amount to justice denied. Death penalty opponents say the process, like execution itself, amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. And now the state's voters will get an opportunity this November to vote on a measure that would abolish the death penalty, which critics deride as an inefficient and expensive system for a financially troubled state. It took the Supreme Court four years to appoint Crummel a public defender, and it took his attorney almost that long to file his opening brief after several time extensions. Crummel's appeal was expected to consume a few more years before the high court decided the case. While most condemned inmates welcome legal delays, even those seeking a speedy resolution are stymied. Scott Peterson, who was sentenced to death seven years ago for

squeeze if troubled European banks reduce lending in the United States and pull money back home. – Banks. U.S. banks have gradually reduced their exposure to Europe. But investors are still concerned that a catastrophe in Europe could infect U.S. financial institutions. What most spooks investors is the worst-case scenario – the one that struck Wall Street in 2008: That banks would stop lending to each other over worries about each other's solvency. Once international banks lose confidence in each other, fear tends to spread quickly across oceans. The weakest

banks can topple as investors and creditors panic. – Financial markets. U.S. stock prices have fallen sharply since early May, mainly over worries about Europe. Investors have focused on whether Spain will need a bailout, the consequences if Greece leaves the euro currency union and how American banks and other companies would be hurt by a prolonged European recession. May was the worst month for U.S. stocks in two years as concerns about Europe escalated. Bank stocks have been the weakest performers in the past month: They've lost nearly 8 percent as a group.

murdering his pregnant wife Laci, is attempting to get his case before the Supreme Court as soon as possible, because he says he was wrongly convicted. Peterson's parents hired a topnotch private appellate lawyer after sentencing, while other Death Row inmates wait an average of five years each for appointment of taxpayer-funded public defenders. “We are moving at lightning speed compared to most automatic appeals,” said Peterson's attorney Cliff Gardner. “He wants to establish his innocence.” The slow wheels of death penalty appeals, and the billions of dollars spent on them over the years, are making converts of some of capital punishment's biggest backers, including the author of a 1978 ballot measure that expanded the types of crimes eligible for capital punishment in the state. Retired prosecutor Donald Heller, who wrote the 1978 proposition, and Ron Briggs, the initiative's campaign manager who now serves on the El Dorado County Board of Supervisors, say they support abolition in California because the system is too costly and hardly anyone is being put to death. “We'd thought we would bring California savings and safety in dealing with convicted murderers,” Briggs said in a statement. “Instead, we contributed to a nightmarish system that coddles murderers and enriches lawyers.” The current measure – known as the SAFE California Act – would convert all death sentences to life in prison without parole and redirect $100 million from the death penalty system to be spent over three years investigating unsolved murders and rapes. Despite the growing backlog, district attorneys continue to send murderers to death row. Five new inmates have arrived this year, and several more are expected, including Los Angeles gang member 24year-old Pedro Espinoza who was

convicted of shooting to death a high school football player. A jury recommended death for Espinoza, and a judge is scheduled formally sentence him in September. Meantime, Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley is attempting to immediately resume executions of two longtime Death Row inmates Mitchell Carleton Sims, 52, and Tiequon Aundray Cox, 46, who have exhausted all of their appeals. Sims has been on Death Row since 1987, Cox since 1986. “It is time Sims and Cox pay for their crimes,” said Cooley, who is asking that the inmates be executed with a single drug rather than the three-drug lethal cocktail now being challenged in federal and state courts. The California District Attorneys Association is backing Cooley's attempt to resume executions. Cooley argues appeals rather than trials consume the lion's share of what the state spends administering the death penalty in California. Cooley wants executions to remain on hold until after the November election. But if the death penalty is retained, he proposes a change in the law to allow the State Court of Appeal to start handling death penalty appeals rather than automatically sending every case to the Supreme Court for review. Appealing the death penalty in California takes decades for a variety of reasons. There are too few qualified attorneys to handle too many automatic death penalty appeals, resulting in inmates waiting about five years each for a public defender. Once an inmate is represented by counsel, it still takes additional years to put together the voluminous trial record that serves at the heart of the appeal. Those records often exceed 70,000 pages, according to Peterson's attorney, adding that he wouldn't be surprised if his client's record reached 80,000 pages. Gardner says he expects to file his appeal brief later this month. They estimated that $4 billion has been spent on all facets of the state's death penalty since 1978, including $925 million on appeals. California's death penalty, the authors said, is a “multibillion-dollar fraud on California taxpayers” that has seen “billions of taxpayer dollars have been spent to create a bloated system, in which condemned inmates languish on death row for decades before dying of natural causes and in which executions rarely take place.”

$2 million gambling bet puts focus on lobbyist BY MICHAEL GORMLEY ASSOCIATED PRESS ALBANY, N.Y. (AP), The sum of what the public knows about the biggest lobbying force in New York politics is a few pages of overall spending figures, generalities about purpose, and blocked-out names on a few state and federal documents. But what the Committee to Save New York does, and who pays for its powerfully spun TV commercials to boost Gov. Andrew Cuomo, became a central question this week after the New York Times recontinued on page 32


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SUBMITTED BY IRENE JORDAHL

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friendly game of pirates becomes all too real when overzealous Theodore accidentally falls into a giant sinkhole and wakes up to find himself amongst real high sea swashbucklers. Before getting back to the real world, he is forced on an epic journey with his companion Harriet the Ghost in a quest to find the notorious pirate Weird Beard and foil the mutinous Mr. Clunky Bones. Will Theodore be able to save Captain Cramp Hand's ship from falling into evil clutches and return to his friends in time for ice cream? The City of Fremont Children’s Repertory Theatre Company performs Joshua Mikel’s play, “Pi-

June 12, 2012

rates! – Theodore Thud and the Quest for Weird Beard” at the Niles Veterans Memorial Building on Friday, June 15 and Saturday, June 16 at 7 p.m. Come and watch the fun under the direction of Caitlin Dissinger and Sumayyah Gettani. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at www.RegeRec.com: Friday, June 15 at 7 p.m. (#175026) and Saturday, June 16 at 7 p.m. (#175027). Doors open half an hour before show time. These shows are for ages five and up (children must be able to sit through performances; babies and children under age five discouraged). For questions or more information call (510) 494-4300, ext. 1 or RegeRec@fremont.gov. Pirates! – Theodore Thud and the Quest for Weird Beard June 15 and 16 7 p.m. Niles Veterans Memorial Building 37154 Second Street, Fremont (510) 494-4300 ext. 1 www.RegeRec.com Tickets: $5

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troll the paths of the Oakland Zoo, wander through elephants, tigers and sun bears, lemurs, otters, and bats. Sample foods from the local dining hot spots, and free spirits from the wine and beer companies in our Bay Area. Ride on the Zoo train, fly above the habitats on the monorail, dance to music under the stars. Enjoy desserts on Flamingo Plaza. Go home smiling and know you’ve helped our local Oakland Zoo continue its wonderful programs. It’s fundraising, fun raising, and just plain wild. So don’t miss it this year’s 20th Annual Walk in the Wild: Saturday evening, June 23, 5 p.m. – 10 p.m. For tickets, go on-line to www.oaklandzoo.org or call (510) 632-9525 ext. 154. Tickets also available at the gate on June 23 (This is a child-free event).

How would you cut the state budget? SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE BARBA, LWVEA The League of Women Voters Eden Area will feature an interactive program on the state budget presented by Next 10, an independent, non-partisan organization known throughout the state for this unique program. Those who attend the League’s Annual Meeting on Saturday, June 16, 2012 at the Castro Valley Library will each use a hand-held electronic device to balance the state budget by indicating where to cut or add to one of many services such as schools, prisons, and health care. The Annual Meeting starts at 11:00 a.m. with a business meeting at 11:15 a.m. At this time there will also be a presentation to Eleanor Parker on reaching her 50th year of League membership. Castro Valley Library is at 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley.

There will be a lunch at noon and a power point presentation on “Why You Make a Difference” which motivates high school students to register and vote. The Next 10 program, called the California Budget Challenge, begins at 12:30 p.m. and will be followed by a Q&A session at 1:30 p.m. For more information and to RSVP, contact lwvea@aol.com League of Women Voters Eden Area Saturday, June 16 11 a.m. How would you cut the State Budget? Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley lwvea@aol.com

Summertime student lunch program SUBMITTED BY CARLEEN ENGLAND The following New Haven Unified School District school sites are open for free lunch meals for students, ages 18 and under, during the district’s “Food and Nutrition Services Summer Feeding.”

Elementary Schools: Cabello Elementary: 4500 Cabello Street, Union City June 26-August 2 10:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. Searles Elementary: 33629 – 15th Street, Union City July 16 - August 16 12 noon – 12:30 p.m. Guy Emanuele Elementary School: 100 Decoto Rd., Union City July 16 - August 16 12 noon – 12:30 p.m.

Alvarado Elementary School: 31100 Fredi Street, Union City July 16 - August 16 12 noon – 12:30 p.m. Hillview Crest Elementary School: 31410 Wheelon Ave., Hayward July 16 - August 16 12 noon – 12:30 p.m. Pioneer Elementary: 32737 Bel Aire Street, Union City July 16 - August 16 12 noon – 12:30 p.m. Middle School: Cesar Chavez Middle School 2801 Hop Ranch Rd., Union City June 26-August 2 12:30 p.m. - 1 p.m. All kids 18 and under can eat for free. There is no lunch service on Fridays. For more information, email Carleen England at cengland@nhusd.k12.ca.us or visit www.nhusd.k12.ca.us


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American Crown Circus is coming to town! A fantastic and spectacular show for the enjoyment of “children of all ages” will be in Newark for nine shows from Friday, June 15 through Monday June 18 The big top will be at Newark Junior High School under which star-studded acts from around the world will perform and amaze including clowns, jugglers, high wire acrobats, trapeze artists and much more… no animals – no midway - just a lot of family fun. Save $4 with every advance sale ticket: $12 for adults (13 & up) and for every adult ticket - two children 12 and under are free!

Regular ticket prices at the gate are $16 for adults (13 & up) and two children 12 and under are admitted free with each adult ticket purchased. Additional children’s tickets are $5 each. Advance sale tickets are available at The Book End, 6678 Thornton Ave., Newark in the Newark Square Shopping Center or at LOV, 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark. You may purchase with a credit card by phone. Just call (510) 793-5683 or go to LOV’s website www.lov.org. Proceeds from the circus will benefit LOV’s summer recreation program in the parks.

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Don’t miss this incredible show - a blend of circus, theatre and fantasy under the Big Top. American Crown Circus Friday, June 15 – Monday, June 18 6 p.m. & 8 p.m. (additional 4 p.m. show on Sunday) Newark Junior High School 6201 Lafayette Ave., Newark (510) 793-5683 www.lov.org www.americancrowncircus.com


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June 12, 2012

Regular Screenings and Checkups Can Prevent Disease

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etting regular medical care from a “We provide vaccinations for children and in the colon and rectum before physician who knows you is imadults,” Bodnar said. “We also work with pathey become cancerous. Screenings portant for maintaining good tients to make sure they have regular cancer for prostate and cervical cancer can health, according to Dr. Shelli Bodnar, a screenings, which can significantly reduce the help to prevent those cancers. family physician who practices at the chances of getting cancer.” “We offer routine gynecologiWarm Springs Clinic in Fremont. She is a Mammograms detect changes in breast cal services, so women can get member of the Washington Township tissue that could be cancerous. A their pap tests and annual exams Medical Foundation and the Washington colonoscopy can detect microscopic polyps at the clinics,” she added. “While Hospital medical staff. we don’t deliver babies, we “Having a medical home or provide pediatric care for regular place of care means you children of all ages, including can get more consistent care by newborns.” people who know your medical Get a Checkup history,” she said. “A primary Bodnar said children should care provider can help you get have a physical exam every year regular screenings and checkups to ensure they are experiencing so you can stay healthy.” healthy growth and developPrimary care is a term used ment and are on track with their for a health care provider who immunizations. Adults over the acts as a first point of consultaage of 50 should also have an tion for patients and can also annual exam, she said. provide continuing care. Fortu“The risk for chronic diseases nately for Tri-City residents, and other health issues starts to the Washington Township increase at age 50,” she added. Dr. Shelli Bodnar, a family physician who practices at the Medical Foundation has three “Getting a checkup every year Warm Springs Clinic in Fremont, says the Washington Townclinics that provide primary can help you stay on top of some ship Medical Foundation clinics offer a “medical home” for residents. For more information about WTMF and its care services to people of all of the risk factors. You should get local community clinics, visit www.mywtmf.com. ages: the Warm Spring Clinic, your blood pressure and cholesNewark Clinic, and Nakamura terol checked as well as your care for illnesses or minor injuries. These servClinic. blood sugar levels.” ices are provided on a walk-in basis. “At the Warm Springs While physicians at the three clinics “Urgent care services are for when you Clinic, we see adults we have can treat a wide range of medical condicome down with a bad cold, fall off a ladder, been treating since they were tions, sometimes it’s necessary to see a or cut yourself,” Bodnar said. “But if you children,” Bodnar said. specialist. Clinic doctors can refer pahave a life-threatening illness or injury, you “Many of our patients have tients to some of the best specialists in should go to the Washington Hospital emerbeen coming here for years. the area, according to Bodnar. gency room.” We provide health care serv“The Washington Township MedThe Newark Clinic is located at 6236 ices to people of all ages, from ical Foundation has top quality speThornton Avenue in Newark, the Warm newborns to the elderly.” cialists in just about every area of Springs Clinic is at 46690 Mohave Drive The clinics offer a number medicine,” she added. “Physicians and in Fremont, and the Nakamura Clinic is at of preventive services, includspecialists within the Washington 33077 Alvarado Niles Road in Union City. ing vaccinations, health screenTownship Medical Foundation work All three clinics are open Monday through ings, and physical exams. together as a team, consulting with Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Washington Township Medical Foundation has three clinics that provide Vaccinations can help to preprimary care services to people of all ages: the Warm Spring Clinic, Newark each other and providing comprehenFor more information about primary Clinic, and Nakamura Clinic. The clinics offer a number of preventive serv- sive care to our patients.” vent diseases like measles, cares services offered through the Washingices, including vaccinations, health screenings, and physical exams. Vaccinawhooping cough, influenza, The clinics also offer urgent care serv- ton Township Medical Foundation and a tions can help to prevent diseases like measles, whooping cough, influenza, pneumonia, and shingles. ices for patients who need immediate list of locations, visit www.mywtmf.com. pneumonia, and shingles.


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n 2010, California experienced its largest outbreak of whooping cough – also known as pertussis – in over 60 years. The California Department of Public Health reports there were more than 9,000 cases that year, including 10 infant deaths. And the highly contagious bacterial disease continues to circulate throughout the state and the rest of the world. “We see spikes in the incidence of whooping cough from time to time, including this year,” says Dr. Emmanuel Cepe, a family medicine specialist with Washington Township Medical Foundation. “This is a preventable disease, though, because there is a vaccine for whooping cough. I personally opted to get a booster vaccine this winter.” Whooping cough can be a serious illness for people of any age, but it is most dangerous for infants, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). It often starts out with symptoms similar to a cold, with runny nose or congestion and perhaps a mild cough or fever. After 10 to 12 days, however, severe episodes of coughing begin. In children, the coughing often ends with a “whooping” noise when they try to take a breath. The whoop noise is far less common in infants under 6 months old and in adults. Infants may experience pauses in their breathing, called apnea, which may lead to a short loss of consciousness. Older children and adults generally recover well from whooping cough, but some complications from whooping cough – especially in infants – can be severe, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH): • Pneumonia • Convulsions

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

• Seizures • Brain damage from lack of oxygen • Bleeding in the brain • Death How the Disease Spreads “Whooping cough spreads easily from person to person,” Dr. Cepe says. “When someone who has the disease sneezes or coughs, anyone who is nearby can breathe in the bacteria that spread through the air. So there is a high danger of infected people spreading the disease to other people at work or at home.” The whooping cough vaccine is not recommended for infants under 8 weeks

old, and the immunity provided by the vaccine wears off over time. The CDC recommends a series of five shots for children, with the first three shots given at 2, 4 and 6 months of age. The fourth shot is given between 15 to 18 months, and the fifth shot is given between ages 4 and 6 – usually when the child enters school. A booster vaccine is recommended around age 11 or 12, when children enter middle school. Adults should get a booster shot at least every 10 years. “People need to be sure their vaccinations are up to date,” Dr. Cepe empha-

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sizes. “It’s especially important for pregnant women and anyone who may come in contact with infants who have not yet been vaccinated – that includes parents, grandparents, siblings, day care providers and healthcare workers. When the people who are around little babies are protected from catching whooping cough, they won’t pass it on to the babies.” The pertussis vaccine is usually given in combination with vaccines for tetanus and diphtheria, two other potentially serious diseases. “In recent years, some parents have chosen not to have their children vaccinated because of misleading and unsubstantiated claims that there is a link between vaccines and autism,” Dr. Cepe says. “Parents need to know that those claims have been disproved. The dangers associated with get- Dr. Emmanuel Cepe, a family medicine specialist with Washington Township Medical Foundation, sees outbreaks of whooping cough ting whooping cough and other in the tri-city area from time to time. He recommends prevention vaccine-preventable through immunization. For more information about WTMF, visit diseases are much www.mywtmf.com. greater than any diagnosed early enough. Older children common side effects associ- and adults usually can be treated at home, ated with the vaccines. The but infants may be hospitalized for treatmost common side effect of ment since the disease is more dangerous the combination whooping for that age group. cough, tetanus and diph“Unfortunately, many people take a theria vaccine is soreness at ‘wait-and-see’ approach when it comes to the injection site.” dealing with a cough,” says Dr. Cepe. Diagnosis and Treatment “With whooping cough, it’s important to catch it early before it spreads to other Diagnosing whooping cough is not easy in the early people or progresses to pneumonia. If you stages because the symptoms have a cough that hasn’t gone away after two weeks, you definitely should call your often are similar to those of doctor. If your infant or child develops the other respiratory infections. “Symptoms of whooping whooping noise associated with the disease or if they have apnea or trouble breathing, cough can resemble those of seek medical attention right away.” asthma and bronchitis, so we do have to eliminate those possibilities when trying to determine if the patient has whooping Prevention is the Best Medicine cough,” Dr. Cepe explains. “There is no simple blood test for the pertussis bacteria, Washington Township Medical Founbut we can test to see if there is a high white dation has three clinics in the Tri-City blood cell count that indicates an infection. area that provide immunizations and priWe also can do a throat or nose swab to get mary care services to people of all ages. a mucus sample that we can check for the The Warm Springs Clinic, Newark Clinic presence of the bacteria. A chest X-ray also and Nakamura Clinic in Union City are can help to check for inflammation or fluid all open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday in the lungs.” through Friday. Walk-ins are welcome. In most cases, whooping cough can be For more information, visit effectively treated with antibiotics if it is www.mywtmf.com


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Fremont Bank customers can deliver a “win-win” through the B-CharitableSM checking account… nonprofit organizations win by receiving additional funding and customers win by supporting their favorite charity. To be part of the charitable buzz come to a local Fremont Bank office, call (800) 359-2265 or visit www.fremontbank.com/bcharitable. See how easy it is to B-CharitableSM If you think one person can make a difference Imagine what an entire community can do


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students access to research materials to help them become 21st century learners.

This year, seventeen grants were awarded to K-12 teachers whose proposals were deemed to enhance students’ learning, development, leadership, growth or creativity. Serving as the bearers of good news throughout the “surprise day” were: Sherea Westra, Vice President of FEF and Chair of Innovative Education Grants; Lara York, FEF Board of Directors and FUSD Board Member; Debbie Amundson, FUSD Director of Elementary Education and Dr. James Morris, Superintendent of Fremont Schools. According to Westra, “Each year’s giving depends on our Gala’s success. This year we gave out the most, $40, 336.72.” She adds that since its founding in 1991, FEF has awarded close to 175 Innovative Education Grants, totaling approximately $500,000 over the years. “Education is in a serious crisis in California. People don’t just pop into your classroom to award you money for innovative teaching, but that is what FEF does,” said Westra. “The shocked and excited reactions, including tears from one teacher, were rewarding to see and something that will motivate me more to raise funds at our 2013 Gala. Our students and teachers need our support for the excellence that they do in the classroom,” declared Westra.

Students become math masters by interacting with iPads during workshop time. This innovative technology will allow students to learn and reinforce fundamental number sense concepts.

Following are the grant allocations:

6.) Alexsandra Lefkort: Thornton Jr. High - $872.75 Grant Description: “Bringing Cultural Art History to Life” Technology will enhance information in the classroom environment by integrating auditory and visual modalities. All student populations and learning styles will benefit.

1.) Dawn River, Trisha Johnson: Durham Elementary - $2,295.34 Grant Description: “Making Our Smart Boards Even Smarter” Enhances students’ experience with SMART Interactive Boards through the use of SMART Response clickers. 2.) Mariapia Cowley, Joyce Aguilar: Grimmer Elementary - $2,068.73 Grant Description: “iCan Master Math”

3.) Joanne Covey: Mission San Jose Elementary - $362.32 Grant Description: “Literature Livens Math Lessons” Students comprehend math vocabulary for an upcoming math lesson when they hear a story about the concept being taught. 4.) Karrie Ware: Mission San Jose High School - $2, 182.38 Grant Description: “Biotechnology and Protein Purification in Science Curriculum” Protein purification is central to many commercial and research laboratory workflows. Spectrophotometers measure purity in laboratories. Students benefit by having practice with this necessary tool. 5.) Alicia Norling, Michelle Forbes: Harvey Green Elementary - $2,893.95 Grant Description: “iPads to Improve Fine Motor Skills” Kindergarteners will improve their fine motor skills with the use of iPads and specially designed applications.

7.) Audrey Suratos: American High School - $3,000 Grant Description: “Social Studies iPads” iPads will be used in the classroom to give

8.) Sue Troia: Mattos Elementary $325.19 Grant Description: “Learning Through Digital Comic Books” Comic Life 2 is an award-winning program that gets kids excited about writing by allowing them to create their own digital comic books. 9.) Sarah Simon: Chadbourne Elementary - $$2,968.43 Grant Description: “Integrating iPads to Improve Students’ Writing Skills and Creativity” Elementary students of today often gravitate toward the latest technology-driven activities. The integration of iPads will make writing more engaging and interactive. 10.) Rebecca Devakumar, Melanie Gavin: Irvington High School - $3,000 Grant Description: “Voyage Inside the Human Body” iPads will interactively explore the human body: the brain’s circuitry, digestive system, power of addiction on the brain, reproduction system, and fetal development. 11.) Ann Mansell, Chris Orr, Joanna Simon, Sze-lung Tsai: John Gomes Elementary - $3,000 Grant Description: “E-Beam Portable Interactive Teaching” Portable E-Beam Interactive technology allows students to learn collaboratively and provides multiple ways to interact with content as students manipulate text and graphics. 12.) Ken Peffer: American High School - $3,000 Grant Description: “Using iPads in a Social Studies Classroom” Students will be taught how to incorporate new technologies to enhance learning and engage students. 13.) Shiloh Burton: Irvington High School - $2,850.45 Grant Description: “The Saving and Passage of Time through Photography and Animation” In a critical and art-historic framework

students will deconstruct time within photography and then reconstruct it with videography, while developing advanced technical skills. 14.) Mark Taubman-Walker, Jonelle Brown, Rochelle Hooks, Harry Pabley: American High School - $2,850 Grant Description: “Three-Dimensional Teaching Works” The purpose of this grant is to replace aging and non-functioning laptops with new ones in our innovative three-dimensional teaching program. 15.) Tracy Barnett & Sharon Kirker Vallejo Mill Elementary - $3,000 Grant Description: “Clicking for Understanding” This grant will equip the sixth grade classrooms with a student response system so that teachers can check for understanding from students and they can respond anonymously. 16.) Sharon Ram – Fremont Adult School - $2,743.11 Grant Description: “ESL Distance Learning Students Connect, Collaborate and Publish” ESL Distance Learning students will use iPads to connect and collaborate with their peers. Collaborative student work will be published online. 17.) Maia Steward, Sulakshna Anand, & Poonam Sharma - Irvington High School - $2,924.07 Grant Description: “You Glo Girl! pGlo Bacterial Transformation Lab” Biology students learn advanced techniques for transforming bacteria with genes from bioluminescent jellyfish, which causes the bacteria to glow bright green! For more information on Fremont Education Foundation (FEF), visit www.fremonteducation.org or call (510) 659-2561.


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Given that the best transit route from the Sullivan studio to the Miller studio lies on Mission Boulevard, three years ago the show became known as Mission Trails Open Studios. While each artist is excited to show her work, there is a curiosity about fellow artists’ show pieces. “It is always exciting to see what wonderful things a creative mind can come up with. Viewing one thing triggers another idea and then another. It is like seeing and participating in the evolution of art: always changing, always growing, always expanding. The show is inspiring,” says Cindy Sullivan, whose work appears on Oakland Museum’s web site in “The Art of Seeing Exhibit” and at Gallery Concord. Sullivan will show a one-of-a-kind silk and wool felted scarves during the Mission Trails Artists Open Studios.

Metal-sculpture: John Ries

Melissa-olson-ceramic

hille-hatte: P. Kay Hille-Hatten

June 12, 2012

Watercolor: Marge Barta Atkins

The show also draws on a diversity of artistry, with hanging art to wearable art. For some the show has become a launch pad for holiday shopping. Judith Oyama Olson, driving down from Oregon with her artist family, raises sheep that she uses in some wool felted items. She will also show ceramic pots, porcelain buttons and gourds. Her husband, Rodney Olson, will display wood-turned bowls and lidded jars. Their daughters, Wendy and Melissa, will show mixed media paintings and ceramic sculptures, respectively. P. Kay Hille-Hatten, associated with the Olive Hyde Gallery in Fremont, will show photography and exquisite jewelry; print maker Adriane Dedic will show Geisha prints. In addition to her scarves, Sullivan will also display realistic watercolors and mixed media paintings. Husbandwife team, Kathy and John Reis, will feature their photography, oil painting and metal sculpture for this year’s

show. Susan Helmer will show silk paintings and jewelry; Francie Shaw has developed a variety of gift items, including jewelry, knitted scarves, and pin cushions. Marge Barta Atkins of Castro Valley will show mixed media abstracts, realistic watercolors, and silk scarves. While Artist 7 has created camaraderie with travels together and a focus on art as they move across the state, working as an artist is still a solitary endeavor. “Open Studios is a wonderful opportunity to share our artwork with the community we live in,” says Denise Oyama Miller, who paints in watercolors, makes art quilts and creates art-to-wear. “It provides feedback on our artwork and offers a chance to visit with other artists, friends, and neighbors.” Having offered several demonstrations and workshops prior to Open Studios, Oyama-Miller has combined mediums for mixed media collages using paper, fabric thread and paint for the show. Information on the techniques she uses often appear on her website where she has a blog: www.deniseoyamamiller.com. Spend a weekend enjoying a variety of wonderful art and supporting our local artists. Mission Trails Artists Open Studios Friday, June 15 - Sunday, June 17 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 270 Tordo Court, Fremont 1423 Deschutes Place, Fremont


June 12, 2012

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Wednesday, Apr 25 - Saturday, Dec 29

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737 Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Images of Ladakh

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m. Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

Ohlone for Kids $R

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com

Teen Summer Reading Program

Saturdays, Thru Dec 29

various times

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Visit the library for registration

Fresh produce and specialty foods

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 www.hayward-ca.gov

Farmers’ Market

Tuesday, Jun 12 - Sunday, Aug 11

Tuesday, Jun 12

2012 Summer Reading Game

Tuesday Twilights

Reading board game for all ages; prizes and free books

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Hilly 4-mile guided nature walk. Bring water, snacks & flashlight.

Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 582-2206

Wednesday, Jun 13 - Saturday, Jun 30

Tuesday, Jun 12

Spring at the Adobe: The Garden

Great Sierra Backpacking Destinations - R

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

7 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Images of spring

Expert tips on Yosemite, Inyo National Forest & Kings Canyon National Park

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Summer reading game for school age children

Learn to make your garden a local wild area

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Thursday, Jun 14 -Saturday, Aug 31

Wednesday, Jun 13

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305 Tuesday, Jun 12

The Golden Gate at 75

Resume & Interviewing Skills Workshop

11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Art exhibit celebrating the iconic bridge

Assistance with resume development & interviewing skills

Wednesdays, May 16 - Jun 13

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.AdobeGallery.org

Tango, Waltz, Merengue & Salsa Dance Classes

Saturday, Jun 16 - Sunday, Sep 9

Wednesday, Jun 13

7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

Emerging Patterns: Sea to Sky

Beginners 7:00 p.m. / Intermediate & Advanced 8:15 p.m.

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Depictions of the salt marsh landscape

Is a Reverse Mortgage Right for You?

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 shoreline@haywardrec.org

Science Lecture for Children

Monday, Jun 18-Friday, Aug 10

2 p.m.

Busy Bee Summer Camp $R

Presented by Science for Youth. For school-age children

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Saturdays, Thru Jul 7

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $R

10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Workout for the mind, body & spirit. Utilizes basic stretching techniques

Ohlone College, Dance Studio Room 174 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-2303 Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Tuesdays, Jun 12 - Sundays, Aug 3

"Reading is So Delicious!" - R

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

Tony Morelli Bandstand in Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-6766 www.haywardrec.org

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu

Saturdays, Thru Jun 30

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

Fremont Cultural Arts Council 3375 Country Drive, Fremont (510) 794-7166

Help veterans find career opportunities

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 657-5329

Sunday 10:00 AM

Variety of music including big band, classical, & pop

Restoration Lessons for Your Native Garden

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Unity of Fremont

2:30 p.m.

Watercolors by Emily Chen & woodwork by Norman Prince

Monday, Jun 13 - Sunday, Aug 11

Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

A positive path for spiritual living

11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Hayward Municipal Band Concerts in the Park

Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

Tell A Friend

Sundays, Thru Jul 22

"Impressions" and "Creations in Wood"

Adobe Art Gallery 20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley (510) 881-6735 www.AdobeGallery.org

Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tuesday, Jun 12-Friday, Jun 29

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City (510) 586-5747 Thursday, Jun 7-Sunday Jul 1

“The Member of the Wedding” $

Thurs - Sat 8 p.m. & Sat – Sun 2 p.m. Coming-of-age story

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777

Preschool age children learn phonetics, motor & social skills via music, games and water play

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 www.library.hayward-ca.gov

1:30 p.m. Using home equity to provide cash for seniors 62 and older

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Friday, Jun 15 - Saturday, Jun 16

"Pirates! - Theadore Thud and the Quest for Weird Beard" $

7 p.m. A friendly game of pirates becomes real

Niles Veterans Building 37154 Second St., Fremont (510) 612-0488 www.RegeRec.com Friday, Jun 15 - Monday, Jun 18

American Crown Circus $

Fri., Sat., & Mon. 6 p.m. & 8 p.m. Sun., 4 p.m., 6 p.m., & 8 p.m. Clowns, jugglers, high wire acrobats, & trapeze artists

Newark Jr. High School 6201 Lafayette Ave., Newark (510) 793-5683 www.lov.org

June 12, 2012

Saturday, Jun 16

Sunday, Jun 17

League of Women Voters Eden Area Meeting - R

Father’s Day BBQ and Solar Car Challenge $

11 a.m. How would you cut the State Budget? Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-0660 lwvea@aol.com

BBQ: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 16

Scenic Photo Outing

12 noon Capture the beauty of Big Sur

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Saturday, Jun 16

Hillcrest Ranch Open House

10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Friday, Jun 15 - Sunday, Jun 17

Olive oil tasting, soap making demonstrations, tour the historic orchard

Artists' Open Studio

Hillcrest Ranch 11901 Foothill Road, Sunol (925) 209-7702 www.hillcrestrancholiveoil.com

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. View watercolors, oil painting, photography, quilts & jewelry from local artists

Mission Trails Studio 270 Tordo Ct., Fremont (510) 651-8593

Sunday, Jun 17

Open House $

Solar Car Challenge: 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Lunch at the Skyline Bistro then design your own hot rod Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland (510) 336-7373 www.chabotspace.org Monday, Jun 18

Eden Information & Referral Housing Workshop - R

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Options for low income housing

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 www.library.hayward-ca.gov Monday, Jun 18 - Tuesday, Jun 19

Teaching and Learning with Monarch Butterflies $R

8:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Teacher's workshop combines classroom & field experiences

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.MonarchTeacherNetwork.o rg

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday, Jun 16

Tour the Shinn house & estate

Friday, Jun 22

Juneteenth Festival

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352

Frank Sisk Golf Tournament & Dinner $R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Food, music & children's activities

Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Rd., Hayward (510) 786-2866

Sunday, Jun 17

Folk Jam

4:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Saturday, Jun 16

Comedy Short Subject Night $

7:30 p.m. "Easy Street", "Neighbors", "Mighty Like a Moose", & "Should Married Men Go Home"

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Jun 16

Summer History Walk

10 a.m. Bring water, wear sunscreen & wear walking shoes

Prospect Hill 22380 Foothill Blvd, Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Saturday, Jun 16

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Schedule an appointment. Use sponsor code: CHURCHOFGOD1

Church of God International 4450 Enterprise Street, Fremont (800) 733-2767 Saturday, Jun 16

Computer Basics Part 1: The Essentials - R

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. No prior computer experience necessary. Hands-on instruction

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 x 7 Saturday, Jun 16

Miss India Star Scholarship 2012 Banquet Dinner Event

7 p.m. - 11 p.m. Pageant open to students ages 14 to 22. Scholarship prizes & internship opportunity

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 490-8390 www.indiawaves.com Saturday, Jun 16

School-Age Storytime

11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Children grades kindergarten - 4th listen to stories

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Saturday, Jun 16

Live Performance by Georgi & the Rough Week

7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Blues music with a rock-flair. Pre-show dinner and dessert starting at 5 p.m.

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 www.fremontcoffee.com

Bring your guitars & banjos to play and sing along

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

11:30 a.m. Benefits LOV's free summer program for Tri-City youth; space limited

Poppy Ridge Golf Course 4280 Greenville Rd., Livermore (510) 793-5683 www.lov.org


June 12, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 23

Theatre Review

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR

L

ove and a sense of belonging are universal human desires. These timeless themes are played out before us in literature and life. In The Member of the Wedding, the 1946 novel by American writer Carson McCullers, fiery tomboy Frankie Addams discovers just how difficult these desperate longings can be. McCullers adapted her novel for the stage within a few years of publication. Sixty-two years later, the play has become a hidden gem. Some have considered the story to be McCullers’ masterpiece. Set in a tiny southern town in 1945, the plot gracefully interweaves the themes of adolescence, sexuality, racism, and belonging to something larger than oneself. Frankie Addams, the central character, is a twelve-year-old girl in the liminal space that is early adolescence. The transition between childhood and adult life is an especially difficult time. In the opening of the novel, Frankie is described as a “member of nothing in the world.” Her mother died when Frankie was born. Her father is a busy shop owner. Frankie spends much of her time with the family cook, Berenice Sadie Brown, and her six-year-old cousin, John Henry. Too old for childhood games and too young for the local girls’ club, Frankie struggles to find her place. When her older brother and his new fiancée come into town for their wedding, Frankie falls in love with the bridal couple and plots to run away with them. Katy Hidalgo, a Hayward local making her debut with the Douglas Morrisson Theatre, is ex-

the eyes! The scenery is deceptively simple: a cutaway of the family home and the backyard tree. A country landscape fills the backdrop and the lighting perfectly follows the timing and mood of the scenes. While sitting in a quiet theater in Hayward, one is magically transported to a peaceful Georgia summer evening in the midst of World War II. The Douglas Morrisson Theatre (DMT) is truly a treasure. Tucked away in the Hayward hills, one would never suspect such a lovely theater hidden among the twists and turns. Keep an eye on the side street signs, as the turnoff for Ruby is easy to miss. The exterior is unassuming, but the heart of the theater is superb. The DMT is the perfect middle ground between the intimacy of smaller venues and the anonymity of larger scenes. The Member of the Wedding, playing throughout the month of June, is part of this season’s theme of “Family Portraits.” Shows remaining in the season include Doug Wright’s Grey Gardens and Arthur Miller’s All My Sons. Take a detour and come by the DMT for a memorable evening! The Member of the Wedding June 8 – July 1 Friday and Saturday:8 p.m. Sunday matinees: 2 p.m. Thursday, June 28 at 8 p.m. Special Saturday matinee June 23 at 2 p.m. with discussion to follow Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third Street, Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org

ceptional in her role as Frankie Addams. Her energy on stage ignites Frankie’s passion for life. Hidalgo’s physical expression draws the audience into young Frankie’s dramatic frustration with being excluded from becoming a third wheel to the bridal couple. As a foil to Frankie, fifth grade Ruby Buckwalter plays the tenderly mocking cousin, John Henry. She is a very talented young lady. Parallel to Frankie’s exclusion is the separation Berenice is subjected to. This is post-Civil War, precivil rights Georgia. Racism permeates the landscape. Though Berenice is the central family figure and substitute mother, she is only viewed as the hired help. She stays in the kitchen during the wedding—a servant and not a guest. Alexandrai Bond brings wonderful warmth to this dark and humorous story. Her honeyed voice captures her listeners’ hearts when she sings, “His eye is on the sparrow.” In addition to the top notch performance from the actors, scenic designer Jenn Scheller and Lighting Designer Matthew O’Donnell have created a delight for

President Shirley Borden invites State retirees to join association members for a luncheon scheduled for Thursday, June 21 at Francesco’s in Oakland. Members and guests will enjoy outstanding fellowship and discussion of events and issues of interest. Luncheon cost is $10 per person. Chapter 1, District C, representing the East Bay meets on the third Thursday of March, June, September and December.

The ancient Christian Faith alive today & here in the Tri-Cities! All services are celebrated in English

For reservations, call Rose Ryan at (510) 523-7188. More information about California State Retirees can be found at www.californiastateretirees.org State Retiree Luncheon Thursday, June 21 12 noon Francesco’s 8520 Pardee Dr., Oakland Luncheon reservations: (510) 523-7188

The Orthodox Church is Evangelical, but not Protestant. It is Orthodox, but not Jewish. It is Catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles in Jesus Christ since the Day of Pentecost over 2000 years ago. Regular Schedule Saturdays 6pm Great Vespers (Beginning of Sunday Services) Sundays 9:30am Hours & Divine Liturgy followed by common meal & Children’s Christian Education *Tuesdays 10-11:30am Father’s Café (Informal discussion with Q&A over coffee) *Wednesdays starting June 13 2-3:30pm Father’s Café 2nd Thursday of the Month Service of Intercession for those suffering from alcohol and/or drug dependence *Tuesdays May 8- June 12 – Adult Ed: The Ancient Christian Understanding of Salvation *Classes & meetings take place in our Church Offices.


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June 12, 2012

Mission Valley Barracudas beat Kennedy Seals BY: MAYURI JAYARAMAN PHOTO BY ELICE LEONG On Saturday, June 9, the Mission Valley Barracudas welcomed the Kennedy Seals to their home pool for the second dual meet of the season. The day started with no clouds covering the sky, and the air was filled with the scent of sunscreen. With the sunny sky over their heads, the Barracudas had positive and spirited thoughts buzzing in their heads before the meet started, as they knew they were competing against a strong team. Before the meet started, the Barracudas shouted their team’s Color Shout. Throughout the meet, the team points were very close, but in the end, the Barracudas were able to bring themselves to another win. The final score was 667 to 407. The Barracudas season score is now 2-0. The Barracudas were pleased to welcome their newest coach, Brittany Tan at this swim meet. Along

with her were coaches Don French and Cory Audiat making sure that the swimmers on their team showed good sportsmanship. At this meet, a number of swimmers improved their times. The following swimmers on the Barracudas bettered their time by more than four seconds: In freestyle, Jonathan Xu improved his time by over 8 seconds. In backstroke, Calvin Mei took off 5.25 seconds from his time. In breaststroke Jane Huynh improved her time by 9.01 seconds. And in indi-

Paul Moore, longtime Ohlone College baseball coach, was inducted into the Hall of Fame for Community College Baseball Coaches last month in conjunction with the Final Four state championships in Bakersfield, CA. Serving as men’s baseball coach at Ohlone for 18 years, Coach Moore took the Renegades to conference championships, regional and super regional playoffs a dozen times. According to then-coach Jordan Twohig, Moore established a winning attitude for the franchise that lead to Ohlone winning the state championship in 2010. Moore began at Ohlone College in August 1989 as a professor and men’s baseball coach. A year later, men’s baseball won the Coast Conference Championship. The wins continued in 1991, 1997, and 2002. Under his leadership, his team went to

vidual medley, which is one lap of each stroke, Mitchell Wu took off 9 seconds off his times. Also in individual medley, Cassidy Sun took off 5.27 seconds off her time. Good job everyone! Next week is going to be very tense because the Mission Valley Barracudas are going to be competing against the only team they did not beat in the 2011 championships: the San Leandro Drowning Darryls. The Barracudas will be going to San Leandro next Saturday for a very exciting meet.

the California Community College Athletics Association baseball play-offs 11 times. In 2004, the Ohlone College Renegades not only won both regionals and super regionals, but also finished third at the State Championships. “As a coach, my goals were to elevate us to a level that was collegiate and competitive… I wanted to leave the program with the possibility of getting better. Obviously they have because Ohlone is now expected to be a play-off team,” says Moore. Moore was promoted to Ohlone College Athletic Director in July 1993, and made it his mission to obtain a new wood floor for the Epler Gymnasium and provide better transportation for Ohlone College athletic teams. Both were accomplished during his tenure. He helped hire Ohlone’s first full-time trainer, a women’s soccer coach, and a men’s basketball coach. He also was instrumental in building a new fitness room, athletic weight room, training room, team rooms, and a soccer field. After retirement, in July of 2006, Moore became the president of the California Community College Baseball Coaches Association, a position he still occupies. Paul says that his “successes are all directly related to the people [he] worked with, student-athletes, colleagues, and administrators.”

Seals Loss Doesn’t Damper Spirits SUBMITTED BY TRACY UYEDA On Saturday, June 9, the Seals visited the home of the Mission Valley Barracudas to swim in their second regular season meet. What a beautiful day – the sun was shining, team spirit was high, and swimmers were ready to swim big! Looking back to last season – both teams anticipated a tough match. Last year the Seals competed strongly and were defeated by only 37 points. Assistant Coach Breanna Meagher challenged her team to come away with a win “The the last time the Seals beat the Barracudas was when Coach Zach and I were only 6 years old. Let’s go for it and break this losing streak!” The final score was announced and despite the Barracuda win (667 – 407), team spirit soared. “It was a fun meet! We swam hard and there were a lot of good swims. They’re a great team and although we lost I’m proud of how we performed!” commented Assistant Coach Desiree Fasolis. The Seals aren’t hanging their heads low – there is a lot to be proud of. High fives to swimmers who took first place in their events: Audrey Numeron, Wenti Mercado, Kyra Vickery, and Mikaela Lin (8 and Under Medley Relay), Gabriela Bermudez, Sylvia Liang, Jamie Kennerk, and Janeen Lima (15-18 Medley Relay), David Taylor (6 and Under Free, Back), Kyra Vickery (7-8 Free, Back, Fly), Bethany Kiang (6 and Under Back), Nicholas Leong (9-10 Back), Virginia Xie (11-12 Back, Fly, IM), Luke Ponssen ( 8 and Under Breast), Kyle Vickery (11-12 Breast), Emily Rozul (9-10 Fly), Hamaseh Pourhamseh (13-14 Fly), Jamie Kennerk (15-18 Fly), Mikayla Lee, Mercedes Reichel, Rachelle Moran, Lauren Taylor (11-12 Free Relay), and Joey Fraticelli, Drake Moore, Victor He, Kyle Vickery (11-12 Free Relay). The Seals won their first regular season meet against the Southgate Penguins and their record is now 1-1. Their next meet is against an always tough Newark Bluefins team. Congratulations to the Seals Swimmers of the Week: Julia Dalldorf, Phillip Taylor, Nynke Propstra, Joey Fraticelli


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Local Community College athletes drafted by Major League Baseball Congratulations to these athletes who have achieved a significant milestone in their baseball careers.

SUBMITTED BY JASON BOGGS California Community College baseball has a rich history of student athletes entering the Major League Baseball (MLB) draft with this year being no different. The 2012 MLB First Year Player Draft ended on June 6 as 60 former CCCAA student-athletes were chosen for the next level. Among the draft picks was Ryan Tella, drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the eleventh round as the 358th overall pick. Tella (Irvington H.S.) transferred from Ohlone College to the Auburn where he played his 2012 season. In 2011 with Ohlone, Tella was named the Northern California Player of the Year as a freshman, batting .425 with 20 stolen bases in 21 attempts. The centerfielder led his team to a second place finish in the State. Additional local players selected in the draft include Pitcher William LaMarche of Chabot College (Amador Valley H.S.) drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 18th round as the 550th overall pick and Center Fielder Marc Wik of Chabot College (Washington H.S.) drafted by the Houston Astros in the 21st round as the 639 pick overall.

BY DONNA RUNYON AND BIFF JONES PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Two Ohlone sophomores [and others from Head Coach Donna Runyon's program], Lauren Ermitano and Shelby Fowler, will be earning their A.A. degrees this month and become student athletes as juniors this fall in the California State University (CSU) system. Lauren Ermitano Ermitano (“Ermi”) is a 2010 graduate of Castro Valley High School and graduated from Ohlone with a 3.0 grade point average (G.P.A.). This final semester she carried 18.5 units and earned a 3.2 G.P.A. This will enable Ermitano to transfer 65 units to CSU Monterey Bay where she earned a softball scholarship in pursuit of a B.S. Degree in Kinesiology. Ermitano was primarily the team's first baseman, playing 42

of 44 games, and “clean-up” No. 4 in the batting order - hitter. She led the team in home runs with nine, RBI's with 47 and a .409 batting average. Many of her hits where of the clutch variety including a walk-off, one out, 2-run home run for a 3-2 victory over the College of San Mateo in the second game of the 2012 Super Regional post season tournament. In addition, Ermitano pitched in 15 games, starting 10 of them with a 7-2 record and a .255 earned run average. She had three complete games in the teams 31-win season and earned First Team All Coast Conference North (CCN) honors both years at Ohlone. Ermitano was the All NorCal first baseman in 2011 and has been nominated as the 2012 team Most Valuable Player which will be announced Saturday, June 16. Lauren is the daughter of Kevyn and Susan Ermitano of Castro Valley; her sister, Morgan, 15, is an avid supporter. Ermi is

SUBMITTED BY ISABELLE MCANDREWS

S

pring 2012 will be remembered for the passion with which petitioners greeted local shoppers, readers and park visitors throughout Fremont. In just nine weeks, 170 volunteers collected 13,101 signatures in a Herculean effort to protect private, open space in Fremont. The petition is the first step required to place an initiative on the November 2012 ballot to preserve the verdant open spaces in Fremont. The initiative proposes preservation of private, open space while protecting the rights of private property owners. If adopted, the initiative will permit private, open space to be re-zoned in only two ways: either by voter approval or, if a “taking” is involved, by unanimous consent of Fremont City Council. Current law permits open space to be rezoned by just a majority (3-5) of Fremont City Council members. The Protect Fremont Open Space Committee submitted 10,634 registeredvoter signatures to the Alameda County Registrar of Voters, 1,268 signatures or 114 percent more than the minimum necessary to qualify for the November 2012 ballot. The next step is for the Registrar of Voters to qualify the petition, which entails checking the signatures against the registered-voter database. The issue of open space often triggered the public’s memories of long-vanished farmlands with flourishing apricot orchards, tomato and cauliflower fields. April Ellebracht, co-President of the Open Space Committee recalls several long-term Fremont residents telling her, “You are 40 years too late!” The Protect Fremont Open Space Committee originally organized as the “Save Kimber Park” effort in March 2011 to preserve a 13-acre parcel of towering

Round Overall Athlete/Position/College/Drafted by 11

358

Ryan Tella/CF/Ohlone College & Auburn/San Francisco Giants

18 550 nesota Twins

William LaMarche/RHP/Chabot College & Long Beach State/Min-

21

Marc Wik/CF/Chabot College/Houston Astros

639

A complete list of community college draft picks can be found at: http://www.cccaasports.org/news/2012MLB%20Draft.pdf

L-R: Shelby Fowler, Ohlone Head Coach Donna Runyon, Lauren Ermitano

spending the summer working in a local business. “Lauren will be greatly missed as she was a consistent force on the softball field in games as well as practice,” said Coach Runyon. “She never said never and will not be outworked. She sets high standards for herself which makes her a terrific competitor. I am excited to see her get even better at the next level.” Shelby Fowler Fowler is a 2010 graduate of California High School in San Ramon and will graduate with a 3.0 G.P.A. In her final semester, she carried 18 units earning a 3.1 G.P.A. and will transfer 65 units to Humboldt State University in Eureka where she also will major in Kinesology on a softball schlorship.

redwoods and majestic oak trees in the Kimber Park neighborhood. The open area contains tennis courts nestled among 612 native trees and is a haven for foxes, hawks, owls, deer and other wildlife. In November 2011, the tennis club closed suddenly and is at risk of being developed into 18-26 new homes. In February 2012, Save Kimber Park became the Protect Fremont Open Space Committee whose mission expanded to preserve all 860 acres of privately-owned open space in Fremont. “We are trying to protect the overall quality of life in Fremont, not just 13 acres in Mission,” explains Ellebracht. “Our goal is to keep land that is set aside for the public’s benefit from being easily replaced with concrete and superfluous buildings,” she added. “Fremont is a general plan city, where open space has been balanced with housing and business areas. Kimber Park is one of the city’s planned communities with open space areas that were agreed when the development was approved,” said Judy Chong, a 40-year Fremont resident who collected more than 800 petition signatures.

In both years at Ohlone, Fowler was the starting catcher and was named First Team All CCN. Offensively, in 41 games played, she had 39 hits, 26 RBI's, a .612 slugging percentage with 16 extra base hits and led the team in walks. For a catcher she could really “pick-em up and layem down” as she led the team with 17 stolen bases. On defense Fowler made only two errors, none throwing, while attempting to throw out 31 would-be base stealers and making numerous pick-off attempts. Fowler was the “quarterback of the infield” calling special plays, pick-offs and where to throw the ball. She also found a way to control each pitcher and worked hard to frame pitches.

The open-space issue galvanized Fremont residents’ support. Neither surgery, disability nor rejection could deter petitioners from raising awareness of the issue. Dr. Gordon Macleod was eager to become involved with the initiative only to be side-lined because of unexpected knee surgery. Despite the surgery, Dr. Macleod grabbed his crutches and a chair to solicit signatures for a cause that he supported. Macleod has lived in Kimber Park since 1976 and remembers its open space as the centerpiece of the developer’s sales campaign. Volunteers were often asked to move their petitioning efforts to another location or to refrain from approaching patrons near entrances to retail establishments or at public parks. Volunteers’ spirits remained high; two Mission San Jose High School seniors were not easily deterred. Recently registered to vote and eager to collect signatures, Matt Farberov and Michael Kagan headed to Pacific Commons to petition Century Theatre patrons. Their enthusiasm did not wane when security guards tried to evict them.

April Ellebracht, co-President of the Open Space Committee

Shelby is the daughter of Bill and Kelly Fowler of San Ramon and has two younger brothers, Nicholas, 18 and Brandon, 14. Nicholas hopes to play baseball and matriculate at Ohlone this fall. Shelby's summer will be spent finishing up a couple of courses. “Shelby was a leader by example. She worked hard at her position and that hard work motivated others,” said Coach Runyon. “She was well disciplined in balancing her athletic and academic time, and that characteristic will help her attain success at the next level. I share Shelby's excitement as she moves on to the next level, and I think Humboldt State University is a perfect fit for her success.”

“I’m protected under the First Amendment of the Constitution,” Farberov explained to the guards. Realizing he might get arrested, Farberov turned to Kagan and both agreed to continue working the crowd for a cause in which they believe. Within moments, police officers were seen chatting with the security staff, confirming that the 18-year olds were within their rights to peacefully petition in the public venue. Relieved, the two seniors resumed their work, grateful their constitutional rights had been respected. Other Fremont residents, including Joe Macari, passionately devoted much time to raising the petition. Despite being legally blind and diabetic, Macari could be counted on to help wherever volunteers were needed. He faithfully attended community meetings and routinely sought out signatures when the petition drive was launched. Conspicuously, Macari was absent from a Kimber Park community meeting which prompted a committee member to check on him at his home. Tragically, diabetes had taken his life and the Protect Fremont Open Space group dedicated future signature-gathering in his honor. “Preserving open space is clearly important to Fremont residents and the breadth of support we received from all ages and ethnicities was inspiring.” stated Christina Broadwin, co-President of the Protect Fremont Open Space Committee. “This effort has reaffirmed my belief that individual community members, by uniting in strong numbers, can truly have a voice and make a difference.” With the petition submitted to the Alameda County Registrar of Voters, Broadwin and Ellebracht are cautiously confident that the initiative will qualify for the November 2012 ballot. A decision from the Registrar is expected on or before July 12, 2012. For more information, visit www.ProtectFremontOpenSpace.com.


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 12, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12631636 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams to Casey Jordon Williams The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: August 10, 2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 23, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2321193#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 466032 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: STEP IN FITNESS/CURVES 6335 JARVIS AVE NEWARK CA 94566, County of ALAMEDA MAMATA S DESHPNDE 5910 REMER TERRACE FREMONT CA 94555 SHRIKANT C DESHPANDE 5910 REMER TERRACE FREMONT CA 94555 This business is conducted by HUSBAND AND WIFE The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ MAMATA S DESHPANDE This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on JUN 5 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/12 CNS-2328377# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465668 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sourpuss Sweets, 38660 Pickering Terr, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Judith Ann Player, 38660 Pickering Terr, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Judith Ann Player This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 24, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/12 CNS-2328094# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465777 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Naturals 365, 48255 Turquoise St., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Aihong He, 48255 Turquoise St., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Aihong He This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2325036# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465812-814 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Pro Local Movers, 2. Bay Area Moving & Californias Movers Moving, 3. California’s Movers, 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #260, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Champions Movers Inc., 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #260, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maul Kadish This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 31, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/22, 6/26, 6/29/12 CNS-2325032# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465788 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Neesh Travels, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ravinder Singh Arora, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ravinder Singh Arora, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324438# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 465789 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Limo Alpine, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Limo Alpine LLC, California, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ravinder Singh Arora, Sole Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324434# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465644 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: California Trucking Services, 34937 Silverlock Ct., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Parminder Singh, 34937 Silverlock Ct., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Parminder Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 24, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324383# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465233 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Specialty Sales West, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda, 3984 Washington Blvd., #112, Fremont, CA 94538, Alameda Michael G. Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Nancy Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on March, 2007 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael G. Lima, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 14, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2320676# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465273 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fun Foods, 41844 Sherwood Street, Fremont, CA 94578, County of Alameda, PO Box 1515, Fremont, CA 94538 Dianne Lee Glasmacher, 41844 Sherwood Street, Fremont, CA 94578 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/15/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dianne L Glasmacher This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317524# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464939 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Hills Automotive, 300 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Mission Hills Auto, Inc., CA, 4744 Hazelwood St., Dublin, CA 94568 This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.)

/s/ --- CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317291#

CITY PROJECT NO. 06-15 FEDERAL PROJECT NO. CML-5354 (030) Proposals to provide inspection and material testing for the Union City Boulevard Corridor Improvements, Phase 1 will be received at the City of Union, Public Works Department, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California until Friday, June 29, 2012 at 5 p.m. This project includes federal funds and is subject to meeting DBE requirements. The UDBE goal for this phase of the project is 4.0%. Contact the Department of Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request a copy of the RFP. All questions should be faxed to Michael Renk, City of Union City at (510) 489-9468. City of Union City Dated: June 7, 2012 6/12/12 CNS-2328699#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Homesalot Property Management, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Timothy Crofton Real Estate, Inc., CA, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bryan Tang Designated Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317284#

CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE UNION CITY CITY COUNCIL will hold a public hearing in the Council Chambers at 34009 Alvarado Niles Road, Union City, CA on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 at 7:00 PM or as soon as thereafter, to receive and consider all evidence are reports relative to the following: A resolution initiating proceedings pursuant to the Landscape and Lighting Act of 1972 for the maintenance, operation, and servicing of public lands in the Landscape and Lighting District No. 3. ALL INTERESTED PARTIES are invited to attend said hearing and express opinions or submit evidence for or against the proposal as outlined above. FURTHER INFORMATION on the above matter may be obtained or viewed at the Public Works Department, located at 34009 Alvarado Niles Road, Union City. If a citizen wishes to challenge the nature of the above actions in court, they may be limited to raising only those issues they or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City a or prior to the public hearing. The facility is accessible to the disabled and hearing impaired. If special assistance is required, please call (510) 675-5348 so accommodations can be arranged. While not required, 48 hours notice is appreciated. DATED: June 12, 2012 City Clerk 6/12/12

GOVERNMENT

CNS-2328621#

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 27, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Fremont Police Department Wall Coverings Replacement 2000 Stevenson Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538 City Project No. PWC 8649 APN 525-1671-001-00 PRE -BID CONFERENCE : A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled for 10:00 AM, June 18, 2012, at the Police Department, 2000 Stevenson Boulevard, Fremont, California, 94538. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 6/12, 6/15/12 CNS-2329218# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on July 5, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Deep Creek Road Pedestrian Crossing Improvements City Project No. 8698 (PWC) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2329180# CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) TO PROVIDE INSPECTION AND MATERIAL TESTING FOR THE UNION CITY BOULEVARD CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS, PHASE 1

CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS CITY PROJECT NO. 12-05 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION Sealed in an envelope five copies of PreQualification Questionnaire for the prospective design/build entities entitled: REPLACE RESTROOM FACILITIES at SEVEN HILLS, KENNEDY, TOWN ESTATES, CONTEMPO and CESAR CHAVEZ PARKS, will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until TUESDAY, JULY 10, 2012, 2:00PM PST. The Contractor shall possess a Class A or B California contractor’s license as part of the requirement for pre-qualification. The complete scope of work and questionnaire documents can be obtained at City Hall, Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by downloading it directly from www.ci.unioncity.ca.us/gov/rfps.htm. SCOPE OF WORK: The City of Union City intends to contract with a Design/Build Entity to design and construct a new Restroom Facilities with storage areas at Seven Hills, Kennedy, Town Estates, Contempo and Cesar Chavez Parks. The new Restroom Facilities will replace the existing restroom facilities on the same park sites located on Florence Street, Decoto Road, Winchester Drive, Meteor Drive and Watkins Street respectively and provide a long lasting, highly durable, vandal resistant, and attractive facility that provides restroom and storage facilities for our parks. The value of the Design/Build Contract will be approximately $1,100,000. All questions should be emailed or fax to Thomas Ruark of City of Union City, email: thomasr@unioncity.org or fax to (510) 489-9468. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: June 8, 2012 6/12/12 CNS-2328610# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 26, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: 2012 Base Repair Project City Project No. 8234M (PWC) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2325517#

Proposed county budget SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Alameda County Administrator Susan S. Muranishi presented a proposed Alameda County Budget for FY 2012-13, on June 5, 2012, that calls for elimination of 37 vacant positions and other reductions to close a funding gap of $88.1M. According to Muranishi, the County continues to be squeezed financially because of a protracted economic slump, with demand for safety net services remaining unusually high and the resources to pay for these services reduced but she also noted the budget gap is under $100M for the first time in four years, which suggests that the County’s concerted efforts to lower costs are having a positive impact. While County supervisors face the task of balancing the FY 2012-13 budget, they can take some consolation that sacrifices in recent years, including a four-year freeze on cost-of-living increases for most County employees and community-based organizations who contract with the County, are helping to stabilize County finances. Moderate up-turns in the local economy, including rising real estate prices and more homes sold, provide some optimism that the trend toward smaller budget deficits will continue. The 2012-13 Proposed Budget is balanced and provides more than $2.6 bil-

lion in total County spending authority. It was unveiled amid signs of slow economic recovery. Employers are adding jobs, initial claims for unemployment have dropped and businesses appear poised to increase spending. While house prices remain considerably off their 2007-levels, some indications point to slowly rising values beginning next year. However, the economy’s direction remains uncertain, as evidenced by a surprisingly dismal jobs report and revised GDP figures for the first quarter. A healthier economy would improve the County’s fiscal condition by reducing demand for County services and increasing County revenues, thereby reducing deficits and program cuts. Low house prices result in lower property tax revenues that are the main source of the County’s discretionary funds. The County assessment roll grew by a mere 0.37 percent in FY 2011-12. Alameda County’s unemployment rate is well below the 11.7 percent recorded in August 2010 but the 8.9 percent recorded in April 2012 remains stubbornly high. “Even if the local economy improves significantly, the poor fiscal health of the State and federal governments means funding of County services is likely to be in jeopardy for years to come,” said Supervisor Keith Carson, Chair of the Alameda

County Budget Workgroup. With the release of the State Budget’s May Revision, the Governor has acknowledged a funding deficit of $15.7 billion, or $6.5 billion higher than the $9.2 billion gap estimated in January 2012. Most of the increase is attributable to dramatically lower revenue estimates. Half of the Governor’s proposals to close the State’s funding gap involve spending cuts, including dramatic reductions to health and human services programs administered by local government and the use of assets from now-defunct local redevelopment agencies. Concerns persist that the cuts identified by Sacramento will not end there. The Governor also assumes $5.6 billion in new revenue from a package of tax hikes that will go to voters in November 2012. His plan includes severe “trigger” cuts to K-12, higher education and the courts, if voters reject the measure. While most of these “trigger” cuts would not directly affect County services, it is possible the Legislature would not be inclined to cut education so severely and would instead reduce other programs and funding for County services. As for “realignment,” the State’s transfer of responsibility for many public safety and health and human services programs to counties, much uncertainty remains, in-

cluding whether the County will receive adequate funding to pay for realigned services. The Board of Supervisors and County staff continue to advocate for a more just and equitable funding formula. While these shifting responsibilities mostly involve public safety programs, Governor Brown has made it clear that local government is likely to be asked to assume control of more programs in the foreseeable future. The Proposed Budget includes funding to provide mandated and essential services, meet debt service obligations, maintain a minimum level of infrastructure and capital funding, and adhere to the Board’s Financial Management policies. The Proposed Budget supports a workforce of 9,060 full-time positions and calls for a combination of permanent, on-going program reductions, revenue increases and one-time strategies to close the $88.1M funding gap. Through on-going, cost-saving and revenue-generation efforts, County agencies/departments have offered to contribute $48.4M in prior-year “Fiscal Management Reward” savings to help balance the FY 2012-13 Budget. Alameda County’s Fiscal Management Reward Program allows departments to carry over net savings each fiscal year for use in subsequent years for budget balancing and to help preserve vital services.


June 12, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Contradictions small number of voters determined the fate of candidates and measures. Some were beneficiaries of a determined effort but others suffered because small numbers can deliver a skewed result, not necessarily the will of a majority of those affected. In Alameda County, less than a third of registered voters bothered to mark ballots either by mail or in person. This is not an encouraging sign for a representative democracy. Exactly who is representing whom?

WILLIAM MARSHAK

T

here is nothing new about contradictions in politics. Both candidates and their constituents rock back and forth on a pendulum of public interest and active participation. To verify how swiftly our focus shifts, simply take stock of what the “hot” topics were six months ago and compare them to today’s ‘cause de jour.’ On the national and international scene, concerns about the economy and international relations are in constant flux. On a given day, Wall Street is castigated, Greece is about to upend the world economy and immigration concerns are paramount. As weeks pass, the cast of heroes and villains shift and trade places. Questions of economic growth or retreat revolve around a variable set of issues that often rely on economists and pundits who stand on reasoning grounded in quicksand. Each matter is absorbed by our collective psyche which ebbs and flows with personal circumstance.

Among the levels of government that can be affected by a reasonable number of constituents, local is the most malleable. Unfortunately, many local decisions are directed by representatives who are subject to the whims of voters motivated to actually mark a ballot in a reasoned manner, or even participate in elections at all. Voter turnout at the recent June primary election was dismal and disheartening since an extremely

As the November election approaches and interest increases at local, state and national levels, participation should increase. However, some candidate selection is based on June results and therefore some of the process has already been modified. Abdication of voting responsibility at any election is shameful and removes democratic safeguards we hold so dear. On the other side of the coin, and in direct contradiction to June polling numbers, when an issue becomes so dramatically important, it can raise consciousness and activism to force a ponderous system to not only take note, but promote action. This is the story of the Open Space Initiative that began as a Fremont Kimber Park neighborhood concern. Determination and perseverance have prevailed over government dalliance and “study.” In an extreme example of citizen activism, an Open Space Initiative not only exceeded the required number of signatures to qualify for an open ballot vote in November, but it did so in record time with 10,634 registered-voter signatures that blanket the entire City.

use this as a cloak for indecision, but in this case, there is no way out – our representatives can either act for themselves, or the public will do it for them! This is the ultimate threat for politicians along with votes at the polls [they need to remember that November voting is coming soon]. Although initiatives are often flawed, they are sometimes the only way to capture the attention of those “elected,” forcing tough choices. In this situation, only two councilmembers have yet to show their true colors; on opposite sides of the political fortitude spectrum. Dominic Dutra has been clear in affirmation of a solid position based on knowledge of the development industry and Sue Chan is a picture of full retreat citing economic consequences to a family business and therefore hiding from a decision by recusal. The others have vacillated, resulting in the old standby… let’s study it. An interested, educated electorate is the most difficult obstacle for politicians since these are people not easily swayed by slogans and pretty faces. It is intriguing to watch those who have been elected to weigh and determine such matters squirm under the scrutiny and active participation of their constituents. This is why local government has the potential to be so responsive and it is with this sense of electorate purpose that our communities can be held to a high standard of achievement. Win or lose their battle, those who have steadfastly worked toward protecting Kimber Park Open Space, are an inspiration for us all.

As a result, a city council, reluctant to act decisively, has been forced into action with a requisite staff analysis compressed by a strict timeline. All initiatives face the possibility of unintended consequences, but so does every decision that looms in the future. Politicians can easily

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDITOR Helen Tracey-Noren EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Soccer ball not the only ball South Carolina gator had eaten AP WIRE SERVICE HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (AP), That alligator that was put down after it grabbed a soccer ball near some children playing on Hilton Head Island apparently had a hankering for athletic equipment. The Island Packet of Hilton Head reports (http://bit.ly/MJxtJP) that an examination shows the 13-foot alligator had eaten two baseballs, a tennis ball, two other balls, as well as 53 fishing lures and a half pound of lead sinkers. It also had eaten a 4-foot gator.

Mark Carinus with Critter Management also said the animal had eaten 48 rocks. The alligator was captured several days after it had taken a soccer ball and then spit it back. The gator was too large to relocate under state law. None of the children were injured. ––– Information from: The Island Packet, http://www.islandpacket.com

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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Hayward Unified School District Measure G (66.67 percent to pass) Yes 11,992 votes 70.52% No 5,014 votes 29.48% New Haven Unified School District Measure H (66.67 percent to pass) Yes 5,994 votes 62.51%

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Call 510-792-1054 Ask for Dolores Proposition 29 Tax on Cigarettes for Cancer Research (majority approval required) Yes 2,193,542 votes 49.60% No 2,230,666 votes 50.40%

Proposition 28 Limits on Legislators' Terms in Office (majority approval required) Yes 2,652,766 votes 61.20%

Re-districting, following Census 2010, may have favored some candidates. This is probably more noticeable in the race for the new State Assembly District 25 most of which is in Santa Clara County and part of which is in Alameda County. Milpitas Vice Mayor and former Santa Clara County Supervisor Pete McHugh narrowly beat Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (DFremont) in Santa Clara County but secured the support of only 13 percent of the ballots cast in Alameda County, where he is less well-known, pushing him into third place, District-wide, behind Arlyne M. Diamond (R).

No 1,679,049 votes 38.80%

Less than a third of registered voters within Alameda County cast their votes in the Presidential Primary on June 5, 2012.

No 3,595 votes 37.49%

Of the County’s 752,331 registered voters, 157,275 (20.91 percent) were absentee voters while only 66,750 (8.87 percent) went to the polls. A total of 224,025 (29.78 percent) ballots were cast. Clearly, an overwhelming majority of those who voted, prefer to do so by mail; absentee ballots may be cast well in advance of Election Day, starting May 7 for the June 5, 2012 Presidential Primary Election. Alameda County has approximately threeand-a-half times as many registered Democrats (423,266) as registered Republicans (114,373). In real terms, Republican turnout amounted to 37.40 percent compared to 32.95 percent by Democrats but this translates to 42,773 votes cast (29,564 votes-by-mail and 13,209 on Election Day) and 139,455 (96,795 absentee ballots and 42,660 at the polls), respectively. This might account substantially for the strong performance of Democrat candidates. Some Democrats fared badly; for some, a bad campaign and/or perceived weaknesses were the cause. Some contests appear to have attracted more interest than others, such as for

Alameda County Superior Court Judge, Office 20. A total of 171,998 people voted for one of the three contenders, Tara M. Flanagan, Andrew R. Wiener and Catherine Haley. Such attention is somewhat disquieting; there is a school of thought that judges, who are supposed to be apolitical and impartial, should not be elected. Additionally, some offices allowed votes for multiple candidates, such as up to seven for the Democratic Party Alameda County Central Committee, 20th Assembly District, or up to four for Hayward City Council. Given this, voter turnout was low. There is no definitive reason for this apathy, disillusionment with the political process or a lack of understanding about the importance of participation as voter. For most, Election Day is the only opportunity to change their elected representative and make a difference.

Election Results


June 12, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council Fremont City Council June 5, 2012 Consent: Approve plans and specifications for Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning unit replacement at Fremont Main Library and award contract to Hometown Construction in the amount of $1,045,700. Hold a public hearing to grant a 10-year extension of the Franchise Agreement with Air Prod-

ucts and Chemicals, Inc. Authorize a Memorandum of Understanding with Alameda County Health Services for reimbursement to City for expenses of services rendered. Award construction contract to Star Construction, Inc. for Fremont Skate Park in the amount of $1,434,023.85. ( 4-10; Morrison votes “Nay”) Award construction contract to Energy Express Services, Inc. for Central Park Complex lighting; $272,333.

Approve concept plan and donation of Nature Learning Center site improvement project – Donation of $100,000 from Thomas F. Faria Living Trust; $20,000 from Integrated Waste Management Funds; $39,040 from Emerging Projects Reserve. Approve side letter Memorandum of Understanding with Operating Engineers Local Union No. 3 to outsource certain park maintenance work. Ceremonial Items: Proclaim Pride Month at Sen-

natures to qualify for the November 2012 ballot. Council was briefed on possible aspects of impact and promised another, more comprehensive report on or about July 17. Council has the option of adopting the ordinance without alteration or placing the measure on the November 2012 ballot. In July, the impact of the measure on the General Plan, a discussion of “unintended consequences,” legal challenges and costs of alternatives will be discussed.

ior Center in recognition of LGBT seniors Proclaim Pride Month and acknowledge participation in Pride Parade in San Francisco Scheduled Items: First Public Hearing of FY 2012/13 Operating Budget: budget is balanced with no further expected use of Budget Uncertainty Reserve. Other Business: Report on Protect Fremont Private Open Space Initiative which appears to have enough sig-

Presidential Primary Election Results, June 5, 2012 (Sources: Alameda County Registrar of Voters and California Secretary of State) U.S. Representative, 15th Congressional District (Vote for 1) District Fortney Pete Stark (D) Eric Swalwell (D) Christopher ''Chris'' J. Pareja (DTS)

Contra Costa County

Alameda County

37,961 32,895

41.9% 36.3%

3,400 4,101

33.3% 40.2%

34,561 28,794

43.0% 35.9%

19,650

21.7%

2,699

26.5%

16,951

21.1%

U.S. Representative, 17th Congressional District (Vote for 1) District Mike Honda (D) Evelyn Li (R) Charles Richardson (DTS)

53,032 22,174 4,622

66.4% 27.8% 5.8%

Santa Clara County

Alameda County

41,594 16,679 3,562

11,438 5,495 1,060

67.3% 27.0% 5.8%

63.6% 30.5% 5.9%

California State Assembly, District 20 (Vote for 1) This District is entirely in Alameda County Alameda County Bill Quirk (D) Jennifer Ong (D) Mark Green (DTS) Luis Reynoso (R) Sarabjit Kaur Cheema (D)

16,433 13,898 11,017 9,520 3,149

Election Results

30.4% 25.7% 20.4% 17.6% 5.8%

California State Assembly, District 25(Vote for 1) District Bob Wieckowski (D) Arlyne Diamond (R) Pete ''Primo'' McHugh (D)

19,544 14,081 12,731

42.2% 30.4% 27.5%

Santa Clara County

Alameda County

10,738 9,859 10,767

8,806 4,222 1,964

DEM - County Central Committee, 20th Assembly District (Vote for up to 7) Richard Valle Ginny Demartini Ryan ''Rocky'' Fernandez Sybil R. Smith John R. Smith Vinnie Bacon Deneen Ogbeide Shobana Ramamurthi Rick Trullinger Saleacia Taylor James P. Farley Jr. Write-In

15,39912. 15,16312. 13,88511. 13,29010. 12,159 11,060 11,015 8,748 7,212 6,786 6,739 182

66% 47% 42% 93% 10.00% 9.09% 9.06% 7.19% 5.93% 5.58% 5.54% 0.15%

34.2% 31.4% 34.3%

58.7% 28.2% 13.1%

DEM - County Central Committee, 25th Assembly District (Vote for up to 3) Patricia 'Pat' Danielson Nancy Thomas Paul Sethy Jan Giovannini-Hill Sergio U. Santos Sharlene S. Mansfield Debra O. Pearson Dharminder Dewan Alex Hilke Write-In

4,132 3,437 2,128 1,628 1,302 1,042 993 666 333 33

26.33% 21.90% 13.56% 10.37% 8.30% 6.64% 6.33% 4.24% 2.12% 0.21%

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Office 20 (Vote for 1)

Alameda County Supervisor, District 1 (Vote for 1)

Tara M. Flanagan87,61550.56% Andrew R. Wiener52,09830.06% Catherine Haley32,28518.63% Write-In1,3080.75%

Scott Patrick Haggerty Write-In

Alameda County Board of Education, Trustee, Area 4 (Vote for 1) Aisha Knowles Geraldine Sonobe Write-In

12,895 11,698 196

52.02% 47.19% 0.79%

Alameda County Supervisor, District 5 (Vote for 1) Keith Carson Write-In

37,269 767

97.98% 2.02%

Represent AC Transit on Citizens Advisory Committee SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE JOHNSON Have some ideas about how to improve public transit, especially bus service? AC Transit is looking for you. Let your voice be heard by joining the Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) to make recommendations to the Alameda County Transportation Commission (CTC). The CAC serves as a liaison between the Alameda CTC and local communities and businesses in Alameda County. There is currently one vacancy on this committee representing AC Transit in discussing local transportation needs and issues. The AC Transit Board of Directors will appoint a candidate to the two-year term. To be eligible for appointment, the applicant must be an Alameda County resident and be able to attend committee meetings that are typically held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month at various locations throughout Alameda County. Additionally, four times a year the CAC hosts a transportation forum from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., directly following the CAC meeting. All meetings are open to the public. AC Transit seeks applicants who are regular users of its bus service and reside within its Alameda County service area which includes the cities of Albany, Berkeley, Emeryville,

29,513 750

97.52% 2.48%

Alameda County Supervisor, District 4 (Vote for 1) Nate Miley Tojo Thomas Write-In

30,842 11,937 286

71.62% 27.72% 0.66%

Hayward City Council (Vote for 4) Barbara Halliday Greg Jones Al Mendall Francisco Zermeño Olden Henson Peter Bufete Ralph Farias Jr Shahla Azimi Fahim A. Khan Write-In

8,091 7,098 7,035 6,782 6,267 2,500 2,292 1,969 1,602 80

18.51% 16.24% 16.09% 15.51% 14.34% 5.72% 5.24% 4.50% 3.66% 0.18%

Oakland, Alameda, San Leandro, Hayward, Fremont, Piedmont, Newark and the unincorporated areas of Castro Valley, San Lorenzo, Cherryland, Ashland and Fairview. Applications must be submitted by Friday, June 29, 2012. Applicants must provide information on which lines they ride and how often they utilize AC Transit's bus service (daily, weekly, etc.). If interested, contact AC Transit District Secretary Linda Nemeroff at (510) 891-7201 for an application, then return the completed form to her at 1600 Franklin Street, Oakland, CA 94612 or by email to LNemeroff@actransit.org. This appointment is subject to approval by the Alameda CTC. For more info about the CAC and Alameda CTC, visit www.alamedactc.org/app_pages/view/14.


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RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 7, 1922 – June 6, 2012

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Michael Toschak RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 23, 1918 – June 7, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

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ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

New Haven Unified School District personnel appointments ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE

D

r. Arlando Smith, a statewide leader in school district leadership who has worked with New Haven Unified teachers and principals for the past three years and was

instrumental in the creation of the Union City Kids’ Zone, has accepted an offer to become the District’s Chief Academic Officer. The appointment was approved Tuesday night by the Board of Education, which also approved the appointment of Nancy George, principal of the New Haven Adult School for the past eight years, as Executive Director of the Kids’ Zone. The appointments are effective July 1.

“Dr. Smith is a champion educator, someone who knows what’s best for students, both from his practical experience and because he has been on the cutting edge of inquiry and research,” Superintendent Kari McVeigh said. “And Nancy George, who has ties to so many of our Kids’ Zone families from her work with the Adult School and other programs that serve the Decoto neighborhood, is the perfect person to lead that effort.” For the past three years, Dr. Smith has provided professional development for New Haven teachers and coaching for District principals. For the past two years, he has served as facilitator for meetings of the Kids’ Zone, a consortium of agencies, organizations and service providers seeking to deliver cradle-to-career supports to the District’s most vulnerable students and their families. As a result of those efforts, the Kids’ Zone has received two grants, worth a total of more than $780,000, to launch the effort. A $175,000 grant from Alameda County Health Services will offset Ms. George’s salary and help with additional startup costs, including a comprehensive assets and needs assessment. Federal grants totaling $505,922 from the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program will help provide before- and after-school academic

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

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and enrichment services for more than 350 students -- as well as summertime intervention and enrichment activities for 200 students – at the Kids’ Zone schools: Searles and Emanuele elementaries and Cesar Chavez Middle. “Even while we struggle with budget cuts caused by the state, this is an exciting time for the New Haven Unified School District,” Superintendent McVeigh said, “and we are fortunate to be able to bring in a Chief Academic Officer who is already so familiar with both our challenges and our opportunities. “Dr. Smith is a dynamic leader who already is well-liked and well-respected in the District,” the Superintendent continued, “and he is very familiar with our classroom emphasis on literacy and our district-wide focus on equity.” An assistant professor of educational leadership and administration at San Jose State University since 2006, Dr. Smith also has served as an adjunct professor of educational leadership and leadership development at St. Mary’s College since 2007. He previously taught at John F. Kennedy University and the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as at the

New Teacher Center at UC-Santa Cruz and at Cal State-Fullerton. Dr. Smith spent seven years as principal of Gunderson High School in San Jose and two years as principal of Graham Middle School in Mountain View prior to being named coordinator of academic improvement for the Gilroy Unified School District. He has served as a school reform facilitator for both West Ed and for the Stanford School Redesign Network. A political science major, Dr. Smith received both his bachelor’s degree and his master’s degree from California State University, Fullerton. He began his career as a social studies teacher at Gladstone High in the Azusa Unified School District, where he also served as department chair and activities director and coached football and basketball. Dr. Smith earned his doctorate in Educational Leadership and Organizational Management at the University of La Verne in 2005. He is married to Dr. Wendy Gudalewicz, who is leaving New Haven at the end of the month to become Superintendent of the Cupertino Union School District. The parents of five grown children, they live in San Jose.

The Board also approved the appointments of: Jessica Wilder, assistant principal at the New Haven Adult School/Independent Study School, as Acting Principal, replacing Ms. George. Grace Kim, house principal at James Logan High School, as Assistant Principal of the District’s Independent Study School. Jennifer Nemecek, Raquel Bocage and Nancy Bui, as part-time acting assistant principals at the middleschool level. Sylvia Rabago, Mistee Hightower, Marcus Lam, Kathy Langham and Mikey McKelvey, as part-time elementary school assistant principals. Also, the Board: Received a report from the Health Education and Resource Team (HEART) on childhood nutrition, wellness, menu planning and other activities. Discussed Board cost-saving measures; specifically, forgoing reimbursement for travel and lodging to attendance at the annual California School Boards Association conference. Approved courses for the new independent studies school, including consumer mathematics, career planning, online education and digital imaging.

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June 12, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS Join award-winning photographers Cooksey-Talbott and Jacline Deridder on a scenic photo walk along the edge of Big Sur on Saturday, June 16. Most of the walking will be on level ground however, those that are brave, can climb down (10-20 ft.) to the beach. Free photo advice and tips will be provided by the experts. All levels are welcome. Meet at The Fremont Art Centre, 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles-Fremont at 12 noon and car-pool to Big Sur. Cost of gas will be shared. Dine in Carmel on the way back. Map will be posted on website: faadpg.ning.com. Wear layered clothes as the weather will vary from location to location. Wear your walking shoes and bring a hat, coat, water, snacks, camera, batteries, memory, lens hood, tripod, remote shutter release and lens kit. Participants are required to sign a Release of Liability for our trips. For questions, call Cooksey at (510) 742-0548. For details, visit faadpg.ning.com. The Third Saturday (S3) Photography Group is a free street level art outreach program sponsored by the Fremont Art Association and Cooksey-Talbott Gallery. The group offers a variety of photographic educational opportunities and field trips. It is headed by an award-winning local photographer Cooksey-Talbott. He is assisted by another awardwinning photographer, Jacline Deridder. The S3 activities are held on the third Saturday

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of each month. The lessons are free and open to all who are interested in making photographs and having a good time. Programs range in complexity

from beginner to advanced. A Release of Liability is required of all participants. The group strives to offer events of interest to wide range of photographers-please feel welcome to come and participate. For more information on the S3 program and photography classes, please go to: faadpg.ning.com/events.

Scenic Photo Outing Saturday, June 16 12 noon The Fremont Art Centre 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Share Cost of Gas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 12, 2012

$2 million gambling bet puts focus on lobbyist

vealed gambling interests gave it $2 million as Cuomo prepared to expand casino gambling. The committee was formed days after Cuomo won his seat in 2010 to combat similar organizations funded by public worker unions that fight budget cuts and tax caps. Since then, good-government groups have worried it could act almost like the powerful super political action committees, known as super PACs, which are bludgeoning presidential politics with anonymous messages that resonate with voters by flash and repetition, regardless of veracity. Last week, Cuomo made it clear the Committee to Save New York is even more powerful than a super PAC, which can't legally coordinate with a candidate. Cuomo spokesman Richard Bamberger, however, said coordination between elected officials and lobbying groups that serve them “is wholly proper, common, and necessary.”

“In many ways,” said Bill Mahoney of the New York Public Interest Research Group, “this has probably been more valuable to his governorship and his platform than a traditional super PAC would have been.” In Washington and New York, the rise of wealthy interests influencing the public, anonymously and without limits, turns postWatergate reforms upside down. It also poses uncomfortable questions to Cuomo, who campaigned against a system that “amplifies the voices of wealthy individuals and special interests'' and who, as a candidate, promised to ``make state government the most transparent and accountable in history.” The $10 million that's been spent by the Committee to Save New York allowed Cuomo to avoid spending from his formidable $14 million campaign account, which would also require disclosure of donors. In the past, the public worker

unions, raising much smaller amounts, pummeled Govs. George Pataki, Eliot Spitzer and David Paterson with TV campaign blitzes. Those governors not only lost to legislators banking on popular support for more school and health care spending, but were also left with dramatically reduced public support. “From the inception of CSNY, we have focused on a reform agenda designed to help create jobs, improve New York's economy and get state government working for the people again,” said Michael McKeon, spokesman for the Committee to Save New York. The Malaysian gambling giant Genting, one of the interests that contributed to the $2 million donation to the Committee to Save New York, outlined to Cuomo its plan for a convention center and casino at a Cuomo fundraiser in October, according to The Wall Street Journal. That's at least a breach of etiquette by most Al-

bany politicians who try not to appear to be working a deal with one hand while receiving a check with another. Three months later, Cuomo made that convention center plan a centerpiece of his State of the State speech. The Committee to Save New York, considered a so-called 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization under law, pushed Cuomo's cap on the growth in property taxes, his budget and other fiscal measures. More directly and publicly, Cuomo assembled a similar coalition of gay rights activists to focus message and funding to legalize gay marriage. “Gov. Cuomo works with many c4s on their respective issues including marriage equality c4s, campaign finance reform c4s, and CSNY on economic issues,” Bamberger said Friday. “The law on c4s allows large donations and, before Governor Cuomo's reforms, there was no disclosure of these contributions. Beginning this year, thanks

to Governor Cuomo's law, there will be disclosure of donations to lobbying c4s.” New York's ethics and lobbying reform act proposed by Cuomo and passed by the Legislature last year was billed as a historic disclosure and enforcement act. But the Committee to Save New York has refused to voluntarily identify the donors who handed over more than $17 million to push Cuomo's agenda and the state's ethics watchdog, headed by a Cuomo appointee, is writing rules that could keep most or all of those names a secret forever. “Why would we provide a grace period here?” said Susan Lerner of Common Cause-New York. “A vigorous democracy requires an informed citizenry.” ––– EDITOR'S NOTE: Michael Gormley is the Albany Capitol editor for The Associated Press and has covered New York politics for the AP for more than 10 years.

SUBMITTED BY KAREN JAYCOX The Tri-City Free Breakfast Program (TCFBP) celebrated 15 years of feeding a hot, nutritious breakfast to those in need of our community. On May 19, volunteers were treated to a lovely luncheon in the TCFBP dining room. Donated gifts for a fun raffle brought many smiles and “Thank You’s” from the 50+ volunteers attending. TCFBP thanks the community for their support of money, food and time which has made the breakfast program possible for the past 15 years. Together, we have made a difference in the lives of the homeless, low income, and seniors of our community. Breakfast is served every Mon, Wed, Fri from 7 a.m. – 9 a.m.. If you can help one day a week or one day a month, contact Rich Doberstein at (510)-683-8823 or at rich.dare2dream@sbcglobal.net. Please send tax-deductible donations to TCFBP, 4181 Irvington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538

Mary Richenbacker, Joe Mastrocola, Mary Ellen McKowen, Betty Blizel, Jim Putler (not pictured) and Steve Lewis (not pictured).

SUBMITTED BY CASTRO VALLEY VETERANS’ MEMORIAL COMMITTEE AND VFW POST 9601 CASTRO VALLEY Two years of project design and fundraising have moved the Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial closer to completion. It will be located in Castro Valley Community Park on Lake Chabot Road. The public is invited to visit the park and watch initial phases of the memorial’s construction. Visitors can enter the upper parking lot off Quail Avenue; some sidewalks and curbs have been removed and cordoned off to make way for handicap parking and a handicap entrance to the new structure. According to the project manager, grading and leveling of the site itself will begin shortly. The Memorial’s Army service stone is now completely filled with 99 veteran’s names; the overflow of other Army names will be engraved in the lower half of the Merchant Marine stone. Similarly, the Navy service stone is almost full and its overflow will be located on the lower half of the Coast Guard stone. Plenty of spaces remain for names on the Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine stones for veterans, as well as bricks for purchase by individuals and businesses. An engraved brick is a great way for everyone to participate in the Memorial, and remember loved ones. For more information and to donate to the Memorial, visit www.CVVM.info

Veterans’ Memorial moves forward

Artist’s rendering of Castro Valley Veterans Memorial


June 12, 2012

Are you a writer?

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 12, 2012

Page 34

Regan's Nursery 4268 Decoto Road, Fremont. by Hwy 880 This event is free and open to the public. Original paintings, garden mosaics & ceramics, photography, decorative gourds, fused glass, windchimes and jewelry. Indoor and Outdoor Art available at reasonable prices, to give as a gift or for your home.

SUBMITTED BY KATHLEEN ELLIOTT AND TAMIE HARKINS Fans of Hillcrest Ranch Extra Virgin Olive Oil are welcome to attend our latest, and no doubt best ever, open house. This coming June 16, from 10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m., come join in the festivities overlooking the gorgeous Sunol Valley. Along with free olive oil tastings, soap making demonstrations, self-guided tours of the historic orchard, visitors will no doubt see hawks soaring overhead in the wind currents. You might even catch a glimpse of Olive, one of our cats, as she slinks around surveying the place, casting a wary eye skywards. Ice cream with olive oil – absolutely delicious - will be served, despite what you may think. Taste to believe! The event also includes the wares of other local artisans and homemade food, made with our own extra virgin olive oil, for purchase. Not to mention scintillating conversation with your fellow olive oil enthusiasts. How do you get here? For a rare and wonderful experience, hike in! It's less than a mile, and it's a glorious walk. Park at the Foothill Road Staging Area of the Pleasanton Ridge East Bay Regional Park and then look for the map that will be tacked up on the bulletin board. The map will tell you how to get here. It's easy, and with all the olive oil and ice cream waiting at the top, it's very worth it, don't you think? If you're not in the mood for a hike, no problem! Come to 11901 Foothill Road, Sunol and catch a ride with our van that will be making regular trips up the hill to the ranch. If you have any questions, or just want to chat about how great olives are, call us at (925) 209-7702, or see what's up on our website, hillcrestrancholiveoil.com and our Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hillcrest-Ranch-Sunol/102998106434809. Hillcrest Ranch Open House Saturday, June 16 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 11901 Foothill Road, Sunol (925) 209-7702 hillcrestrancholiveoil.com

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

Exp. 7/30/12

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

$24.95+ FREON Easy Service we will check for leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only.

Exp. 7/30/12

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 7/30/12 Most Cars and Trucks

TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

$79.

$89.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 7/30/12

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 7/30/12

RADIATOR FLUSH

$29.

95

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 7/30/12

$19.

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 7/30/12

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.95 6-CYL. $49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp.7/30/12

TCV 2012-06-12  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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