Page 1

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation

Cultural Corner’s art scholarship contest winners

Swimming competition begins

Page 6

Page 24

Page 25

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

June 8, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 46

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Recently, a group of Fremont students had the chance to create their very own personal commercial, a salute to favorite things about their school… Oliveira Elementary. This opportunity came about when Jenny Inman, who teaches a combined 5th/6th grade class of diverse learners, invited her twin brother, Jeremy, a filmmaker currently living in Los Angeles, to speak to the students about his career. “I explained that as a child I enjoyed drawing and made action figures,” said Jeremy Inman. “Making independent movies is a fun career, but it also lets the students continued on page 32

Myles Gilbert and student shoot an interior classroom scene. INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

The Oliveira Eagle in “flight mode.”

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


Page 2

SUBMITTED BY TAMIE LOPEZ The Native American Studies Program through Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) is holding; “Honoring Our Youth - Powwow 2012.” Everyone is invited to this gathering on Saturday, June 9, noon to 4 p.m., at the Fremont Adult School. It will be a fun-filled afternoon for all ages with

Alameda County Library’s Annual Summer Reading Game Expands! Summer is approaching and the Alameda County Library is pleased to announce its newly expanded Summer Reading Game. For the first time, there will be games for pre-readers, children, teens and adults, so all ages are welcome to participate! This year’s theme is “Reading is So Delicious!” and ties in with other programs we’ll be featuring on healthy eating. It will run from June 11, to August 11. Library patrons can sign up and get their game board at any of the Alameda County Library's branches, including Albany, Castro Valley, Centerville, Dublin, Fremont Main, Irvington, Newark, Niles, San Lorenzo, Union City, and the Bookmobile. They will use their game board to keep track of time spent reading or completing fun activities. And of course there will be prizes and free books for participants, in addition to exciting raffle prizes! Summer reading programs are an important part of library programming because evidence shows that children typically regress academically over the long summer holiday. And, youth who practice their reading skills over the summer break return to school better

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

singing/drumming, dancing, a raffle and games, along with food and Native crafts to purchase. It has been over eight years since we held a powwow through our program. We have had such a warm welcome from the Fremont Adult School at our current location that we felt it was time to bring back the tradition. We are currently seeking Native craft vendors and high school student volunteers for

equipped to continue with their studies. Adult participation is key because research shows that the best way to get your children to read is to let them see you reading. This program is presented by the Alameda County Library, with support from the Alameda County Library Foundation. Other sponsors include Chabot Space and Science Center, Museum of Children’s Art (MOCHA), The Lawrence Hall of Science, Oakland A’s, Target and Wal-Mart. The game is open to all ages and children not yet reading on their own may count time listening to others read. For more information on the summer reading game, library open hours and special events, call the branch directly or visit our website at www.aclibrary.org. Albany 1247 Marin Ave., Albany (510) 526-3720

the day of the event. Please contact Christina C. at (530) 927-7261 if you would like to be a vendor or to volunteer. Powwow 2012 Saturday, June 9 Noon – 4 p.m. Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont Contact: Christina C. at (530)-927-7261 The community is invited to this free event.

Centerville 3801 Nicolet Ave., Fremont (510) 795-2629 Dublin 200 Civic Plaza, Dublin (925) 828-1315 Fremont Main 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 (Children’s Desk) (510) 745-1400 (General Information) Irvington 41825 Greenback Dr., Fremont (510) 795-2631 Newark 6300 Civic Terrace, Newark (510) 795-2627 Niles 150 “I” Street, Fremont (510) 795-2626

Bookmobile Visit www.aclibrary.org To see the Bookmobile schedule (510) 745-1477

San Lorenzo 395 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo (510) 670-6283

Castro Valley 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Union City 34007 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 745-1464

June 8, 2012

Proposed county budget presented to board SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Alameda County Administrator Susan S. Muranishi on Tuesday, June 5, presented a Proposed Alameda County Budget for FY 2012-13 that calls for eliminating 37 vacant positions and other reductions in order to close a funding gap of $88.1 million. Muranishi said the funding gap shows that Alameda County continues to be squeezed financially as a result of a protracted economic slump, with demand for safety net services remaining unusually high and the resources to pay for these services diminished. But she also noted that the budget gap is under $100 million for the first time in four years, which suggests that the County’s concerted efforts to lower costs are having a positive impact. While County supervisors face no small task in balancing the budget for FY 2012-13, they can take some consolation in the clear signs that sacrifices made in recent years – including a four-year freeze on costof-living increases for most County employees and community based organizations who contract with the County – are helping to stabilize County finances. Moderate upturns in the local economy, including rising real estate prices and increasing numbers of homes sold, provide some reason for optimism that the trend toward diminishing budget deficits will continue,

Muranishi said. “We fully recognize the contributions made by service providers, County departments and agencies, and our 9,000-plus employees in order to maintain essential services and keep the County on solid financial footing,’’ she said “These sacrifices have helped us immensely during some very difficult times. But let there be no doubt that the tough times continue - as evidenced by an $88.1 million budget gap for the coming year that will require some difficult decisions to close.’’ The 2012-2013 Proposed Budget is balanced and provides more than $2.6 billion in total County spending authority. It was unveiled amid signs that an economy that has been in decline for several years is at the beginning of a slow recovery. Employers are adding jobs, initial claims for unemployment have dropped and businesses appear poised to increase spending. While housing prices remain far off their peaks, some indications point to slowly rising values beginning next year. However, the direction in which the economy is headed remains uncertain, as evidenced by last week’s surprisingly dismal jobs report and revised GDP figures for the first quarter. A healthier economy would improve the County’s fiscal condition by decreasing demand for County services and continued on page 21


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Wednesdays, thru Jun 13

Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Images of Ladakh

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m.

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m. Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

Tango, Waltz, Merengue & Salsa Dance Classes 7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Beginners 7:00 p.m. / Intermediate & Advanced 8:15 p.m.

Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 657-5329

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City (510) 586-5747

Saturdays, Thru Jun 30

Wednesday, May 30 - Saturday, Jun 30

Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Continuing Events

Milpitas Library Wednesday, Apr 25 - Satur- 160 North Main St., Milpitas day, Dec 29 (408) 586-3409

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737

Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

That's Odd 12 noon - 5 p.m.

Ohlone for Kids $R

Contemporary artists Pamela Blotner and Jim Rosenau

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Thursday, Apr 26 - Sunday, Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont Jun 8

Invitational Show

12 noon - 8 p.m. (Sundays: 12 noon - 4 p.m.)

(510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Work by 32 local artists & CSUEB Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee alumni

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Thursday, May 11 - Sunday, Jun 9

6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/Art/Olive-HydeArtGallery

Saturdays, Thru Jul 7

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee $ 8 p.m.

Chanticleers Theatre 3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley (510) 733-5483 www.chanticleers.org

TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Ohlone College, Dance Studio Room 174 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-2303

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $R 10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Workout for the mind, body & spirit. Utilizes basic stretching techniques

Musical comedy about six adolescents vying for the championship

EDITOR Helen Tracey-Noren

What’s Happening’s

Presented by Science for Youth. For school-age children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Friday, May 11 - Saturday, Jun 9

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

Science Lecture for Children 2 p.m.

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Biff Jones Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

Face 2 Face: A Contemporary Portrait Exhibition 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Various disciplines

The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Thursday, Jun 7 thru Sunday, Jul 1

“The Member of the Wedding” $ Thurs - Sat 8 p.m. & Sat – Sun 2 p.m. Coming-of-age story

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Friday, Jun 8

Saturday, Jun 9

Saturday, Jun 9

Golf Tournament and Dinner Gala $R 12 noon

"The Finland Phenomenon: Inside the World's Most Surprising School System" 1:30 p.m.

Youth Summer Talent and Adult Food Competition $R 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Sunday, Jun 10

Documentary film about the best school system

Singing, dancing & art competition for children. Ethnic Indian food competition for adults

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

Near India Community Center 372 Turquoise Street, Milpitas www.gopiosv.org

Tour the nectar garden & learn to create a wildlife-friendly habitat

Friday, Jun 8-Sunday, Jun 10

Saturday, Jun 9

Saturday, Jun 9

Performance Fusion $ Fri. & Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m.

Powwow 2012 12 noon - 4 p.m.

Kayaking for Folks 50+ $R 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

Student dance pieces, poetry jam & play

Native American program event

Learn paddling techniques & safety guidelines

Sunday, June 10

Benefit for children with chronic illness & at-risk youth

Sunol Valley Golf Club 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (510) 793-5683 www.fremontrodentsociety.com

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (530) 927-7261 Christina

Butterfly and Bird Festival $ 10:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895

Kalayaan Festival 2012 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Saturday, June 9

Saturday, Jun 9

Movie Night $ 7:30 p.m.

Meet Hayward & Tri-City Shelter Bunnies 12 noon – 3 p.m.

"Mini-Monsters of the Moat" Outdoor Discoveries $R 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Kennedy Community Park 1333 Decoto Road, Union City www.KalayaanSF.org

"The Man Who Had Everything", "Friends", & "Out West"

Rabbit adoption event

Children ages 3-5 and parents make playful & scientific discoveries

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 Saturday, Jun 9

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Jun 9

Eddie & Friends in Concert 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Evening of music with Eddie Saubolle

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Fremont Pet Food Express Gateway Plaza Shopping Center 39010 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 470-1286 annemartin@harvesthomeanimal.org

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 544-3249

Hayward Neighborhood Leadership Academy R 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 9

Looking Out for One Another: Building Caring Communities

Schedule an appointment use sponsor code: ISEB

Toys and Games $ 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Children's program in the garden

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terrace, Fremont (800) 733-2767 www.iseb.org

7 4 5 3 8 9 6 2 1

3 6 2 1 7 5 9 4 8

5 1 6 9 2 4 3 8 7

8 3 4 7 6 1 2 5 9

9 2 7 5 3 8 4 1 6

6 7 8 4 5 3 1 9 2

4 9 3 2 1 7 8 6 5

2 5 1 8 9 6 7 3 4

C 8 0 3 F D 7 4 A 1 2 E 6 5 B 9

A 7 B 5 0 2 9 C 3 D 4 6 1 F 8 E

1 F 4 9 E 3 8 6 B 7 0 5 D C A 2

D 2 E 6 5 A B 1 8 F 9 C 7 4 0 3

777 B Street, Hayward (510) 583-4227 David.Korth@hayward-ca.gov Saturday June 9 - Sunday, June 10

Maddie's Matchmaker Adoptathon 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Cats, kittens, dogs, puppies, rabbits for adoption

Sudoku Solutions

1 8 9 6 4 2 5 7 3

3 6 C 7 B 4 1 0 E 8 5 9 A D 2 F

9 0 8 E 6 5 2 3 D A 7 F 4 1 C B

B 1 5 A 7 9 F D 2 4 C 3 E 8 6 0

F 4 D 2 8 E C A 1 B 6 0 9 3 7 5

6 3 9 4 2 1 0 8 5 C D A B E F 7

5 C 7 B 4 F 6 9 0 E 3 1 8 2 D A

8 E 2 1 A C D 7 F 9 B 4 3 0 5 6

0 D A F 3 B 5 E 6 2 8 7 C 9 4 1

4 5 F C 1 7 E B 9 0 A D 2 6 3 8

E A 3 0 D 6 4 2 7 5 1 8 F B 9 C

2 9 6 8 C 0 A F 4 3 E B 5 7 1 D

Sunday, Jun 10

Classic Movie Series 6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Gary Cooper stars as an American hero Mission Coffee Roasting House

Saturday, June 9

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 9

Celebrate Philippine Independence Day; food, music, entertainment

7 B 1 D 9 8 3 5 C 6 F 2 0 A E 4

Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Court, Hayward (510) 293-7200 ext. 7 www.HaywardAnimals.org Sunday, Jun 10

Laurel & Hardy Talkie Matinee $ 4 p.m. "Helping Grandma", "Brats", "Fly My Kite", & "Any Old Port"

151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

June 8, 2012 Sunday, Jun 10

Khilafat, Leadership in Islam $ 5 p.m. Panel discussion. Includes dinner

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 www.BaitulBaseer.org Sunday, Jun 10

Green Kids Conference 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Children learn how to preserve our environment

Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus 1065 La Avenida, Building 1, Mountain View www.greenkidsconference.org Sunday, Jun 10

"Murder Misdirected" by Andrew MacRae 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Book release & signing party

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 Sunday, June 10

Bob Tanem broadcast 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Radio celebrity and author

Potting soil to first 100 attendees Dale Hardware 3700 Thornton Ave., Fremont (510) 797-3700


June 8, 2012 Monday, Jun 11

"Occam's Razor" Publication Party 7 p.m. Poetry, fiction readings & open mic

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 steve.gutierrez@csueastbay.edu

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Monday, Jun 15

Jun

11-Friday,

Hayward Shoreline Summer Camp $R 9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Discover the estuary, salt marsh & shoreline. Ages 6 - 11

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 www.HaywardRec.org

Thursday, June 21

Hayward State of the City Address $R 12 noon - 1:30 p.m. Mayoral address and luncheon

California State University, East Bay New University Union 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 537-2424

Assembly approves Roman Reed spinal cord injury bill SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski’s (D-Fremont) bill to secure funding for state-of-the-art research to find treatments for spinal cord injuries and paralysis was approved by the state Assembly on May 31, 2012 by a 46-24 vote. The bill now heads to the state Senate for consideration. AB 1657 would fund the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Program, named after the Fremont Planning Commissioner and research advocate. Since its creation in 2000, the program has secured almost $80M in state funds and federal grants from the National Institutes of Health and other sources but funding from the state was

eliminated due to budget cuts. “For every dollar we put in we receive about $4 in federal research funding,” Wieckowski said. “This program provides hope for those dealing with paralysis and provides the resources necessary for our best researchers to undertake these research projects. That’s why our state’s biotech community, the University of California and our top neuroscientists support this bill.” Funding for the bill would be derived from a $1 penalty on all moving traffic violations. Traffic accidents are the leading cause of spinal cord injuries, according to the Mayo Clinic. Eight other states have enacted similar legislation to fund spinal cord research. The program is run through the University of California and

administered by the Reeve-Irvine Research Center at the University of California, Irvine. A recent study commissioned by the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control reveals that approximately 5.6 million Americans are afflicted by some form of paralysis and 1.2 million live with a spinal cord injury. Roman Reed, his father, Don, the University of California, and Boston Scientific all testified on behalf of the bill before committees in the Assembly. The bill is also supported by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, Brock Reeve, the brother of the late actor Christopher Reeve, and the California Healthcare Institute.

Page 5


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

tients and know how to make them feel at ease,” says Program Director Polly Sherman, a registered nurse who also serves as one of the breast-care specialists. “For our staff, this isn’t just a job – it’s a labor of love. It’s amazing for us to see the transformation of a patient’s spirit when she’s trying on beautiful undergarments or a wig. We try to get fun items in pretty colors so that our patients can go out feeling pretty again. “Another important aspect of our programs is that we are a non-profit organization, and we work with women to sort through the red tape of their insurance coverage,” she adds. “We also offer assistance to women who have no insurance coverage. There are a few commer-

June 8, 2012

vide its services at low- or no-cost. “We are grateful to Washington Hospital for providing us with facilities for our programs and their support of our two main fundraising efforts – the annual KEEP ABREAST Walk each September and the People With Purpose awards Providing Patients and Survivors with Help and Support luncheon in April,” she says. “This year we received more than omen who are fighting • Lymphedema Project – This project $35,000 from our People with Purpose breast cancer face multi- provides upper-body compression garluncheon, and last year’s KEEP ple struggles. The most ments to treat the swelling caused by lymABREAST Walk raised close to important, of course, is phedema, which can result from removing $100,000,” she adds. “The support from to beat the disease and survive. But lymph glands during breast cancer surgerthe community and from other organitreatments for breast cancer can actually ies. Some insurance companies, including zations that conduct fundraisers for us create other struggles, including the Medicare, do not cover these garments, so has been very gratifying. With insurance emotional impact of dealing with physiwe offer them at a substantial discount to plans cutting back on coverage and the cal scars or deformities after surgery and breast cancer survivors. high rate of unemployment, our job has the hair loss often associated become more difficult, but with chemotherapy. Helping so far we haven’t had to women overcome those strugturn anyone away.” gles is the mission of the Dr. Packard has directed HERS Breast Cancer Foundathe foundation’s efforts for tion, located in the Washingthe past four years, but she ton Women’s Center at 2500 views her current role as a Mowry Avenue in Fremont. continuation of a lifetime “When you are facing commitment. something as devastating as “I spent 20 years as a breast cancer, you need every breast cancer surgeon in bit of help and support you Brazil, and then I moved can get,” says HERS Breast to America after I met my Cancer Foundation Executive true love and got marDirector Vera Packard, M.D. ried,” she recalls. “I came “We offer a comprehensive to the foundation because array of services to help breast I was looking for a way to cancer patients and survivors continue following my feel good about themselves passion of caring for again after they’ve experienced women with breast canthe pitfalls of breast cancer.” cer. As a doctor, I cared Services offered by the for one patient at a time. foundation include: Today, our dedicated staff • Bras for Body and Soul – and volunteers now serve Private fittings for attractive over 700 women each post-surgery bras, camisoles year. We all feel that this and prostheses in a comfort- The staff and volunteers of the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation provide emotional and financial assistance to women fighting breast is the work we were able setting and compassion- cancer. They strive to be “a soft place to fall” for the women they help. meant to do.” ate environment. All fittings Appointments for are provided by one of the program’s • We Support, You Survive – A procial stores that provide some of these HERS Breast Center Foundation servfour professional breast-care specialists. gram to provide post-mastectomy unservices, but none that provides the ices are strongly encouraged, 510-790• Hair with Care – A wide selection of dergarments to underserved women who emotional and financial assistance that 1911. For more information about the wigs to help breast cancer patients and are not covered by health insurance or we do, and that’s why we like to say that foundation, including the KEEP other women going through chemother- cannot afford these products because of we are a soft place to fall.” ABREAST Walk scheduled for Septemapy to cope with disconcerting hair loss. other circumstances. Dr. Packard notes that Washington ber 29, visit www.hersbreastcancerfounThe wigs can be custom-styled by the “Our breast-care specialists, wig conHospital has provided free space for the dation.org. People interested in serving program’s two wig consultants to suit sultants and other staff and volunteers foundation at the Women’s Center since on the foundation’s board of directors each woman’s style preferences. all have great compassion for our pa2004, which helps the foundation promay call Dr. Packard at 510-790-1954

W


June 8, 2012

Zero net energy design competition SUBMITTED BY TAMAR SARKISSIAN Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) joins American Institute of Architects, San Francisco chapter (AIA SF) to announce the opening of the second annual Architecture at Zero competition for zero net energy (ZNE) building designs. ZNE buildings produce as much clean energy as they use during a year through a combination of designed energy efficiency and on-site, grid-tied renewable energy production. The Architecture at Zero competition is open to all entrants, including designers, academics, researchers and students. To help generate innovative ideas for zero net energy building designs, the Architecture at Zero competition will focus on the design of a zero net energy building and schematic design on a campus site at the University of California, Merced. International experts will judge the entries and award up to $25,000 in total prizes in October. “San Francisco American Institute of Architects is excited to see the hard work and thought that go into this year’s zero net energy building design entries,” said AIA SF Executive Director Margie O’Driscoll. “The winning designs will be those that are not only aesthetically interesting, but also create zero net energy spaces that help UC Merced continue its leadership in driving innovation.” This is the second year that PG&E and AIA SF have held the Architecture at Zero competition. The competition supports an action plan of the California Public Utilities Commission for all new residential construction in California to be zero net energy by 2020. The goal for new commercial construction is to achieve zero net energy by 2030. “The Architecture at Zero competition helps PG&E drive innovation in California’s buildings and prove the feasibility of zero net energy building technologies for our customers,” said Steve Malnight, vice president of customer energy solutions for PG&E. “This year’s competitors have the unique opportunity to focus their zero net energy building designs on a site at UC Merced’s state-ofthe-art campus.” Last year’s competition site was located in Emeryville, and the winners were Chris Parlette (Berkeley; Towards Net Zero Energy), Tom Tang and Yijie Dang (New York City; Chimera), HOK San Francisco (San Francisco; Battery Park, From Zero to Positive), Jihyoon Yoon (Harvard University; Phototactic - Ville), and Curtis Ryan, Sara Maas, Kyle Blomquist and Megan Gelazus (University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee; Ripple Effect). Competition entries will be juried by the following international experts: Bob Berkebile, FAIA, Principal, BNIM Architects; Ed Mazria, Founder, Architecture 2030; Alison Kwok, Professor, University of Oregon; Stephen Selkowitz, Program Head, Building Technologies Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deadline for entries is Oct. 1, 2012. To register or learn more, visit architectureatzero.com.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 7


Page 8

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012 Tribune Media Services

Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG) Fri. - Thu. 9:45, 11:05, 12:10, 1:35, 2:50, 4:05, 5:15, 6:25, 7:50, 9:10, 10:15

Madagascar 3: Europe's Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Most Wanted 3D (PG) Fri. -

Fri. - Thu. 12:20, 3:40, 7:00, 10:20 The Man Who Had Everything (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M. Marvel's the Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Friends (NR) Thu. 2:00, 5:20, 8:40 Out West (NR) The Dictator (R) Fri. - Wed.

11:05, 1:20, 3:35, 5:50, 8:05, 10:20 Thu. 11:05, 1:20, 3:35 Battleship (PG–13)Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 1:45, 7:15 Wed. 1:45 Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Tue. & Thu. 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:05 Fri. & Sat. 10:30, 1:40, 4:55, 8:15, 11:25 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 10:30, 1:40, 4:55, Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30 8:15 Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 11:20, 5:00, 10:15 Marvel's the Wed. 11:20

Thu. 10:25, 11:45, 12:55, 2:15, 3:25, 4:45, 5:45, 7:05, 8:30, 9:50, 10:50 Prometheus (R) Fri. - Thu. 10:40, 1:40, 3:00, 4:40, 7:40, 9:00, 10:45, 11:35 Prometheus 3D(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 2:20, 5:20, 8:20, 11:20 Fri. - Thu. 10:00, 12:00, 1:00, 4:00, 6:00, 7:00, 10:00 For Greater Glory (R) Fri. Thu. 9:55, 1:05, 4:15, 7:25, 10:35 Every Breath U Take (NR) Fri. - Thu. 9:45, 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:20 Citizen Kane (PG)Wed. 2:00, 7:00

Anna Bolena Met Summer Encore (NR) Wed. 6:30 Tue. & Thu. 11:50, 3:00, 6:10, 9:30 Snow White & the The Tempest Starring Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. The Dictator (R) Fri. - Tue. 11:35, 1:05, 2:35, 4:05, 5:35, 7:05, Christopher Plummer(NR) Thu. 7:00

Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. -

10:45, 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:30, 9:55 Thu. 10:45, 12:55, 3:05 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:05 Sun. - Tue. 2:00, 5:00, 8:00

What to Expect When You're Expecting (PG–13)

10:05

Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG) Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:15

Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted 3D (PG) Fri. -

Thu. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 Prometheus (R)Fri. - Thu. 2:40, 8:40 Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 11:15 Prometheus 3D(R)Fri. - Thu. Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. - 11:40, 1:10, 4:10, 5:40, 7:10, 10:10 Tue. & Thu. 11:00, 1:35, 4:20, 7:00, Happy Feet Two (PG) Wed. 10:00 9:40 Citizen Kane (PG)Wed. 2:00, 7:00

Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 12:15, 3:00, 5:40, Anna Bolena Met Summer Encore (NR) Wed. 6:30 8:20, 11:00 The Tempest Starring Snow White & the Christopher Plummer(NR) Huntsman(PG–13)Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 7:00

Thu. 10:35, 11:35, 12:35, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:50, 8:50, 9:50, 10:55

Safe (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 8:40 The Artist (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 10:40 Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG) Fri. - Thu. 10:30, 12:55, 3:20, 5:40, 7:45, 9:50 John Carter(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 10:50, 1:40, 4:30, 7:30, 10:15 21 Jump Street (R) Fri. - Thu. 1:05, 3:30, 5:50, 8:30 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu. 10:20, 12:45, 3:10, 6:00, 8:50 Salmon Fishing in the Yemen(PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:10,

Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG) Fri. - Tue.

& Thu. 10:40, 12:25, 2:55, 3:40, 5:25, Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:10, 1:20, 4:30, 7:40, 10:50 7:55, 8:40, 10:25

12:35, 3:00, 5:25, 7:55, 10:20 The Lucky One (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 10:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40

Marvel's the Madagascar 3: Europe's Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Most Wanted 3D (PG) Fri. & Thu. 11:50, 3:25, 6:55, 10:05 Sat. 11:30, 1:10, 2:00, 4:30, 6:10, 7:00, The Dictator (R) Fri. - Thu. 9:30, 11:10 Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 11:30, 1:10, 2:00, 4:30, 6:10, 7:00, 9:30 Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

12:25, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 9:40 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 10:15, 1:15, 4:20, 7:35, 10:55 Thu. 10:15, 1:15, 10:55 Prometheus (R) Fri. & Sat. Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. 11:30, 2:35, 5:40, 8:45, 11:35 Tue. & Thu. 10:20, 12:05, 1:00, 2:50, Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 11:30, 2:35, 5:40, 3:35, 5:25, 6:10, 8:00, 8:45, 10:40 Wed. 10:20, 1:00, 3:35, 6:10, 8:45, 8:45 10:40 Prometheus 3D(R)Fri. - Thu. Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) 10:30, 1:35, 4:40, 7:45, 10:50 Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 1:50, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45

Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45 Rowdy Rathore (NR) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 12:00, 3:30, 7:05, 10:30 Citizen Kane (PG)Wed. 2:00, 7:00

Snow White & the Huntsman(PG–13)Fri. - Tue. &

Thu. 10:05, 10:35, 11:25, 1:10, 1:45, 2:35, 4:05, 4:55, 5:40, 7:15, 8:05, 9:15, 10:10, 11:00 The Tempest Starring Wed. 10:05, 10:35, 11:25, 1:10, 1:45, Christopher Plummer(NR) 2:35, 4:05, 4:55, 7:15, 8:05, 10:10, Thu. 7:00 11:00

Astronaut (NR) Fri. 2:30 P.M. Sat. 1:30 P.M. Sun. 4:15 P.M. Wed. & Thu. 10:00, 1:00

The Dictator (R) Fri. & Sat. 10:45, 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25, 9:35, 11:45 Sun. - Thu. 10:45, 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25, 9:35 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00 Fri. - Wed. 12:35, 3:50, 7:05, 10:25 Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 10:30, 11:10, 1:05, 3:40, 4:00, Marvel's the 6:15, 8:50, 9:15, 11:25 Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 10:30, 11:10, 1:05, Wed. 11:05, 2:20, 5:40, 9:05 3:40, 4:00, 6:15, 8:50, 9:15 The Dictator (R) Fri. - Wed. Wed. 10:30, 11:10, 1:05, 3:40, 6:15, 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:35, 7:50, 10:15 8:50 Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:20 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:10 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. & 12:30, 3:45, 7:10, 10:15 Sat. 1:45, 6:45, 12:01 What to Expect When Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 1:45, 6:45 You're Expecting (PG–13) Wed. 1:45, 10:25 Fri. - Wed. 11:25, 4:40, 10:05 Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. - Snow White & the Wed. 11:15, 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:00 Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) 10:35, 11:20, 12:05, 12:50, 1:30, 2:15, Fri. - Wed. 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8:00, 10:35 3:00, 3:45, 4:25, 5:10, 5:55, 6:40, 7:20, 8:05, 8:50, 9:35, 10:15, 11:00, 11:45, Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. - 12:30 Wed. 2:15, 7:35 Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 10:35, 11:20, 12:05,

Snow White & the Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.

12:50, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45, 4:25, 5:10, 5:55, 6:40, 7:20, 8:05, 8:50, 9:35, 11:45, 1:20, 2:50, 4:20, 6:00, 7:20, 10:15, 11:00 9:00, 10:20 Wed. 10:35, 11:20, 12:05, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 4:25, 5:10, 5:55, 7:20, 8:05, 8:50, Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG) Fri. - Wed. 9:45, 10:15, 11:00 11:10, 12:50, 1:40, 4:10, 5:45, 6:40, Madagascar 3: Europe's 9:10, 10:30 Most Wanted (PG) Fri. & Sat. Madagascar 3: Europe's 11:00, 12:00, 12:30, 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, Most Wanted 3D (PG) Fri. - 4:40, 5:10, 6:00, 7:00, 8:20, 9:20, 9:50, Wed. 12:00, 2:25, 3:20, 4:50, 7:15, 10:40, 11:40 8:05, 9:45 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:00, 12:30, 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 4:40, 5:10, 6:00, 7:00, 8:20, Prometheus (R) Fri. - Wed. 9:20, 9:50, 10:40 12:20, 9:15 Prometheus 3D(R)Fri. - Wed. Madagascar 3: Europe's 11:00, 1:55, 3:10, 4:50, 6:15, 7:40, Most Wanted 3D (PG) Fri. & 10:30 Sat. 10:30, 11:30, 12:50, 1:50, 2:50, Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 3:10, 4:10, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 7:50, 8:50, For Greater Glory (R) Fri. 10:10, 11:10, 12:10, 12:30 Wed. 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:25 Sun. - Thu. 10:30, 11:30, 12:50, 1:50, 2:50, 3:10, 4:10, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 7:50, 8:50, 10:10 Prometheus (R) Fri. & Sat. 10:30, 12:15, 1:20, 3:05, 4:10, 5:55, 7:00, 8:45, 9:50, 11:35 Sun. - Thu. 10:30, 12:15, 1:20, 3:05, 4:10, 5:55, 7:00, 8:45, 9:50 Prometheus 3D(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 1:55, 4:45, 7:35, 10:25 Fri. & Sat. 11:40, 12:50, 2:30, 3:40, 5:20, 6:30, 8:10, 9:20, 11:00, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:40, 12:50, 2:30, 3:40, 5:20, 6:30, 8:10, 9:20, 11:00 For Greater Glory (R) Fri. Think Like a Man (PG–13) Thu. 10:40, 1:45, 4:50, 7:55, 11:00 Fri. - Wed. 9:35 Every Breath U Take (NR) Thu. 10:20 Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, The Best Exotic Marigold 12:01 Hotel (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Rowdy Rathore (NR) Fri. Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Thu. 11:50, 3:25, 7:00, 10:35 Fri. & Sat. 10:30, 1:40, 4:50, 8:00, 11:10 Sun. - Thu. 10:30, 1:40, 4:50, 8:00 Citizen Kane (PG)Wed. 2:00, 7:00

Secret of the Rocket (NR) Fri. 11:00 A.M. Sat. & Sun. 12:30, 2:30 Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00 Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 6:30, 8:30 Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Fri. 1:00, 3:30, 7:30 Sat. 11:30, 4:30, 7:30 Sun. 11:30, 3:30 Marvel's the Wed. & Thu. 3:00 P.M. Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. & Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00 Sat. 12:05, 3:15, 6:25, 12:30 To Be an Astronaut (NR) Sun. - Wed. 12:05, 3:15, 6:25 Thu. 12:05, 3:15 Fri. 10:00, 1:00

Anna Bolena Met Summer Encore (NR) Wed. 6:30 The Tempest Starring Christopher Plummer(NR) Thu. 7:00


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Safely recycle used light bulbs SUBMITTED BY MADDIE SMITH Local retailers in Alameda County are now making it easy for residents to recycle fluorescent light bulbs at no cost. Administered by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and StopWaste.Org, the “Bring ‘Em Back” campaign encourages residents to bring used compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs and fluorescent tubes of all shapes and sizes to participating retail locations for proper disposal. Currently, fluorescent bulbs cannot be recycled through residential curbside programs and should not be disposed of in landfills. Through “Bring ‘Em Back,” there are now 18 stores in Alameda County that will accept used fluorescent bulbs and tubes from residents. By bringing used CFLs to participating retailers, residents can be assured that they are disposing of fluorescent bulbs in a safe and environmentally friendly manner. “Most people understand they can’t throw away or recycle compact fluorescent bulbs with

their bottles and cans, but they don’t know what to do with them,” says Judi Ettlinger of StopWaste.Org. “Now there is a convenient solution for residents in Alameda County.” To encourage residents to properly recycle their used fluorescent bulbs, Pete’s Hardware (2569 Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley) will enter every resident who brings in a used fluorescent bulb or tube on Saturday, June 9 between 9 a.m.-1 p.m. into a drawing to receive a gift basket filled with state of the art energy efficiency products. “We are excited to participate in ‘Bring ‘Em Back’ and hope that, by encouraging residents to bring in their used CFLs on June 9, they will see how easy it is to properly recycle their fluorescent light bulbs and tubes going forward,” says Linda Roark, owner of Pete’s Hardware. Fluorescent lamps are a costeffective method to decrease your lighting bill and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, disposal of flu-

SUBMITTED BY RHONDA RIGENHAGEN If you’ve been thinking about adding a furry family member to your household, there’s an incentive to rescue a homeless dog or cat this weekend. As part of the Maddie’s Matchmaker Adoptathon on Saturday and Sunday, Furry Friends’ usual $90-350 adoption fee will be waived for families who bring home a pet rescued in Alameda County. In addition, Furry Friends Rescue receives a stipend ranging from $500 to $2,000 for each adoption. The generous grant from Maddie’s

orescent lamps at the end of their useful life presents a challenge as they contain small amounts of mercury vapor that should not be returned to landfill. Fluorescent lamps were banned from disposal in California landfills in 2006. Through proper disposal, 99.9 percent of spent fluorescent lamps can be reclaimed through recycling. “PG&E’s work with Alameda County makes it easier for residents to safely dispose of their energy-efficient fluorescent bulbs and tubes at the end of their useful lives,” says Jessica Waggoner, Program Manager of Government and Community Partnerships for PG&E. “Creating successful partnerships, like the ones we have forged with Alameda County, allows us to pursue our goals of helping customers reduce their energy use, while protecting the environment..” To find a list of Alameda County stores participating in “Bring ‘Em Back”, residents can visit www.BringEmBackAC.org.

Fund enables the organization to save and care for homeless animals throughout the year. Furry Friends cat showcases are 1-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the following Fremont locations: • Petco, 3780 Mowry Ave. • Petsmart, 39410 Argonaut Way (in the Hub) Dogs showcase at Pet Food Express, 39010 Paseo Padre Pkwy. (Raley’s Shopping Center) Saturday from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Visit FurryFriendsRescue.org to view available animals. Save time and pre-qualify by completing an online application.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

June 8, 2012

Dolores K. Thomas RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 30, 1923 - May 4, 2012

John B. Lough Oscar N. Mendoza RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 30, 1944 – May 26, 2012

Vicente B. Atienza RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 1, 1951 – May 27, 2012

Emmett C. Neddersen RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 9, 1928 – May 30, 2012

Everett Moses Lee Boone RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 25, 1937 – May 31, 2012

John D. Rockett RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 3, 1922 – June 3, 2012

John J. Kearns RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 1, 1937 – June 3, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 29, 1946 – May 25, 2012

Richard “Dick” L. Sira RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 24, 1934 – May 26, 2012

Maxwell P. Carranza RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 17, 1947 – May 29, 2012

John D. McCutcheon FORMER RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 2, 1948 – June 2, 2012

Joyce L. Ledbetter Cease RESIDENT OF UNION CITY January 11, 1923 – June 3, 2012

Manuel Luis Guerra RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 4, 1943 – June 3, 2012

Jumma Khan RESIDENT OF RICHMOND December 7, 1935 – June 4, 2012 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel FD 1115 (510) 793-8900 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 11 11 Page

SUBMITTED BY TACOS URUAPAN

SUBMITTED BY MARY ANDERSON

Y

ou’re reading this because you are able to get out and about and pursue the activities and interests you enjoy. And you often find yourself in the company of others who are able to do the same. But do you know any seniors whose circumstances make it difficult to participate in activities outside the home? Maybe they are frail or have difficulty walking due to balance issues or other handicaps. They may have fallen in the past and have restricted their activities as a result, becoming more at risk for falls. If this sounds like someone you know, consider telling them about the Fall Prevention program at LIFE ElderCare. At absolutely no cost, the Fall Prevention program will create a customized exercise routine to help the senior develop better balance. A nursing student will come to the senior’s home for an hour, once a week, to provide instruction on the proper way to perform each exercise. At the end of 12 weeks, many participants have remarked on how much their balance im-

proved, and also how much more confident they are about preventing a fall. So, at the end of your active day, won’t you take some time to think about someone who cannot join you in your active day and would benefit from the Fall Prevention program? We would love to add another deserving senior to our “well-balanced” team! Take a moment and give your friend a call. Here’s Sandy’s phone number: (510) 574-2087. She will answer any questions about the program and she can set the initial appointment with those who are ready to begin. Now is the perfect time. Tri City seniors, sixty years of age and older, no matter your health issues, bedridden, chair bound or simply afraid of falling… by doing custom designed exercises daily your mobility will improve. LIFE ElderCare’s Fall Prevention program includes a personalized 12-week in home exercise program, a home safety check and a medication review. Learn about the benefits towards decreasing the risk for falls and fear of falling. Is that the phone I hear ringing? I surely hope so.

Tacos Uruapan, a family owned Mexican restaurant in Hayward, has partnered with Treeview/Bidwell Elementary School to launch the Burrito Genius program. The Solorio family has a history of supporting the community in Hayward, and decided to expand their efforts by developing a program that targets students and their families. The Burrito Genius program was created to incentivize homework completion. It allows students to earn reward cards redeemable for free food. The program was launched at Treeview/Bidwell Elementary School in April 2012. More than 300 students received Burrito Genius rewards through the first month of the program. Treeview/Bidwell will re-launch the program at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year. Tacos Uruapan is interested in expanding the program throughout the school district and invites interested parents and school officials to contact Tony Solorio at tacosuruapan@gmail.com for more information. Tacos Uruapan is located at 29950 Huntwood Avenue in Hayward, and can be found online at www.tacosuruapan.net.

(Left to right) Debra Sarver, Treeview/Bidwell 4th -6th grade teacher; Jessica Bonduris, Ed.D.,Treeview/Bidwell Principal;Tony Solorio,Tacos Uruapan; and Daina Reis,Treview/Bidwell Parent/PTA Liaison.


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1.30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Auditions May 14-June 25

Newark Optimist Club “Friends of Youth” Newark Optimists have been dedicated to their mission of providing hope and positive vision to children since 1968. We meet weekly at IHOP to re-charge our Optimistic spirit. For meeting times and more info call 510-793-1498 Cougar Wrestling Camp 3rd - 8th Grade Boys & Girls Newark Memorial HS Wrestling Room Mon-Thurs 6/11-14 10AM-Noon 510-578-4620 Register at http://www.newark.org/departments/recreation-and-community-services/register-for-classes/

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Yard Sale

Women’s Show Choir/Chorus

June 2nd and 9th from 8 am to 2 pm. Activites for kids, bargains galore, food and more. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd, Fremont

Ages 18 & up. FREE Coaching All voice ranges needed. Harmony Fusion Chorus. Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mon 7pm-10pm 510-862-1073 1809 B St, Hayward www.harmonyfusion.org

Homeless Solutions

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home.

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

8 x 8 CAL SPA HOT TUB

FREE

Good running condition Large filter, new tub cover Buyer removes from premises 510-794-7463 or 510-304-4829 Photo of tub available upon request

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FCA Camp is coming! June 29 - July 3, 2012 @ UCLA 9th - 12th graders Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Football, Soccer, Sprint & Distance, Surfing, Tennis, Volleyball and Wrestling. Whitney Elliott 408 712-4112 or http://www.westernregionfcacamps.org

Cougars Girls Summer Basketball Camp

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer and Football Coaches

Page 13

Mon - Fri, July 16 -20, 9.30am -2.30pm Camp for girls 8 -15 years old All skill levels are welcome Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave, Newark www.newark.org 510-578-4620, darryl14r@aol.com

US House candidate can say he was astronaut AP WIRE SERVICE SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), A congressional candidate in California's Central Valley can note on ballots that he used to be an astronaut. A Sacramento County judge

ruled Thursday that Democrat Jose Hernandez can use the ballot designation ``astronaut.'' Hernandez is challenging freshman Rep. Jeff Denham, a Republican from Turlock, for California's 10th District seat.

BY RICHARD SANTOS

A

ccording to the Homeless Census and Survey conducted by Santa Clara County in 2007, there are more than 7000 homeless people living in the county and nearly half of them have nowhere to go when night falls. There are many reasons for the prevalence of homeless in our county, but the end result is that these individuals have to find some place to sleep. Many find refuge and set up camp in or near our creeks. In addition to posing a serious safety issue for both the homeless and other residents trying to enjoy the natural beauty of our creeks, this has presented a serious problem for the health of our watersheds. Illegal encampments result in damage to creek banks, deterioration of water quality and substantial increases in the volume of trash and debris that wind up in creeks and Bay. Often times, people turn to the Santa Clara Valley Water District with their concerns, but the reality is that the district only owns or has easement rights to 30 percent of the creeks in the county. Legally, we cannot spend taxpayers’ dollars on pri-

A Sacramento law firm had argued in a lawsuit that Hernandez's use of the moniker would violate state elections law because Hernandez has left NASA. Hernandez had flown aboard the shuttle Dis-

vately owned properties, whether they are alongside a creek or not. The district does, however, have an environmental and stream stewardship commitment and has in place a number of programs to address the issue of creek pollution and trash along our waterways. Through our Clean, Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection Plan, we have a Good Neighbor Maintenance Program which performs hundreds of creek cleanups every year. Last year, our crews removed 983 cubic yards of trash from illegal encampments. But funding is scarce and recent court rulings regarding disposal of the homeless individuals’ property have presented challenges of their own. For the majority of our illegal encampment cleanups, we partner with local governments and public safety agencies to provide security and attempt to link the homeless population with appropriate health and human services. We are contributing to an EPA-funded project that is attempting to empower the homeless themselves to be a part of the solution to creek pollution. The reality is that this is a complex problem with no easy solution. This is

covery in 2009. The Sacramento Bee reports (http://bit.ly/H3yHKG ) that Superior Court Judge Lloyd Connelly ruled that ballot designations apparently can reflect a profession or voca-

why on May 17, the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors held a special session on illegal encampments and invited a panel of experts from several other government agencies and community organizations. A number of impassioned local residents also expressed their views on this issue. Everything from fencing off creeks to finding long-term housing solutions was discussed. We all acknowledge that simply removing encampments is not a solution to the problem. After hearing public comments and statements by the panel of experts, the water district board unanimously passed a resolution to direct staff to develop a comprehensive plan to address these complex issues. The water district board recognizes that regardless of whose jurisdiction these encampments are established in, this is a community-wide problem with action and solutions required by multiple jurisdictions. We are committed to working collaboratively with other government agencies and non-governmental organizations to reduce homelessness and illegal encampments along local creeks. For more information this subject or our programs, or to watch the board

tion held during the previous calendar year. Hernandez spent two weeks at NASA in 2011 before leaving the agency. ––– Information from: The Sacramento Bee, http://www.sacbee.com

work study session, please visit www.valleywater.org. As always, I am available for questions or comments as your District 3 representative for the northern areas of Sunnyvale and Santa Clara; Alviso; Milpitas; and the north San Jose and Berryessa communities. Feel free to contact me at (408) 234-7707.


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 20 Highest $: 665,000 Median $: 196,000 Lowest $: 405,000 Average $: 397,150 ADDRESS

SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY Alameda County won its long-fought court battle in Nordyke v. King, successfully defeating a gun show operator’s challenge to its ordinance regulating firearms possession on County-owned property. The ordinance was challenged in 1999 by the Nordykes, who claimed the ordinance infringed on their constitutional rights because of its impact on their gun shows at the County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton. In the June 1, 2012 decision by an eleven-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, the Court found that “[n]o matter how broad the scope of the Second Amendment – an issue we leave to another day – it is clear that, as applied to Plaintiffs’ gun shows and as interpreted by the County, this regulation is permissible.” The Court acknowledged the exception in the ordinance that allows possession of unloaded firearms at events on the Fairgrounds provided the firearms are secured when not in the immediate possession of an authorized participant in an event. The Ninth Circuit found Alameda County’s approach to be reasonable and that the ordinance minimally regulates gun shows on the County’s own property. The Court concluded, “Plaintiffs cannot state a viable Second Amendment claim,” and affirmed the trial court’s decision dismissing all constitutional challenges to the Alameda County ordinance.

ZIP

4026 Castro Valley Boulevard 19340 Center Street 21963 Dolores Street 20540 Forest Avenue 4671 Heyer Avenue 19249 Lakeridge Road 22432 North 5th Street 19472 Parsons Avenue 17153 President Drive 17440 Redwood Road 19121 San Miguel Avenue 21098 San Miguel Avenue 4232 Seven Hills Road 20620 Stanton Avenue 2412 Stanton Hill Road 2426 Stanton Hill Road 18678 East Cavendish Drive 25509 Foggy Glen Drive 5323 Greenridge Road 22866 Princeton Place

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

295,000 434,000 230,000 300,000 292,000 450,000 650,000 220,000 335,000 405,000 475,000 383,000 280,000 196,000 405,000 430,000 595,000 460,000 443,000 665,000

3 3 2 4 3 4 8 2 4 3 3 2 3 3 2 4 2 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1356 1664 1145 2058 1556 2026 1212 1330 1982 1240 2210 1710 972 1009 2048 933 1908 1720 2042 1940

1947 1960 1949 1936 1932 1987 1910 1938 1962 1961 1915 1948 1946 1940 1958 1951 1979 1998 1972 1999

04-24-12 05-01-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-26-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-30-12 05-01-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 04-26-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-24-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 83 Highest $: 1,410,000 Median $: Lowest $: 84,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

4502 Angeles Avenue 94536 4686 Balboa Way 94536 2872 Barrington Terrace 94536 36640 Bonito Drive 94536 4646 Capitan Drive 94536 265 Chase Court 94536 38623 Cherry Lane #157 94536 36360 Coronado Drive 94536 37007 Dondero Way 94536 38033 Dundee Common 94536 3435 Foxtail Terrace 94536 1525 Gilbert Place 94536 38238 Hamlin Street 94536 296 Junipero Common 94536 38252 Kimbro Street 94536 3423 Manchester Common 94536 4073 Marshall Terrace 94536 4240 Mattos Drive 94536 37000 Meadowbrook Cn #102 94536 35698 Mission Boulevard 94536 5280 Paxton Court 94536 3546 Ramblewood Place 94536 3264 Red Cedar Terrace 94536 3334 Red Cedar Terrace 94536 4254 Ribera Street 94536 3530 Ridgemont Terrace 94536 36119 Rock Common 94536 36418 Sereno Common 94536 3573 Shadowbrook Terrace 94536 4474 Stickley Terrace 94536 1012 Walnut Avenue 94536 5723 Birch Terrace 94538

SOLD FOR BDS

369,000 180,000 495,000 390,000 310,000 630,000 146,000 420,000 380,000 200,000 84,500 585,000 500,000 345,000 637,000 410,000 361,000 640,000 260,000 386,000 595,000 457,000 160,000 180,000 515,000 385,000 386,000 365,000 450,000 549,000 210,000 131,000

4 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 5 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 2 6 3 3 4 3 3 2 2

450,000 495,578

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1399 910 1376 1136 1148 1562 789 1522 1971 1024 421 2206 1390 1440 2090 1586 1298 1728 1083 1741 1702 1302 840 840 2867 1517 1345 1632 1519 1480 1104 1006

1965 1969 1988 1955 1957 1977 1974 1953 1952 1971 1986 1984 1959 1972 1957 1976 1986 1957 1984 1980 1959 1994 1986 1986 1967 2006 2007 1973 2005 2008 1984 1970

04-30-12 04-27-12 04-24-12 04-26-12 05-02-12 04-24-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 05-01-12 04-24-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 04-26-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-24-12 04-24-12 04-30-12 04-26-12 04-27-12

40479 Blanchard Street 94538 5150 Coco Palm Drive 94538 3821 Cosmic Place 94538 3125 Estero Terrace 94538 39993 Fremont Blvd #106 94538 4689 Frontenac Park Court 94538 3451 Hart Common 94538 39352 Logan Drive 94538 41861 Maywood Street 94538 3536 Monmouth Place 94538 4502 Mowry Avenue 94538 4057 Murray Common 94538 4884 Omar Street 94538 40157 Paseo Padre Parkway 94538 39713 Placer Way 94538 3695 Stevenson Blvd#C131 94538 3695 Stevenson Blvd #D320 94538 4571 Wheeler Drive 94538 47452 Cholla Street 94539 49002 Cinnamon Fern Cn #20294539 49002 Cinnamon Fern Cn #20794539 49002 Cinnamon Fern Cn#30994539 45084 Cougar Circle 94539 46825 Crawford Street 94539 67 Delegado Court 94539 2103 Dorne Place 94539 1660 Firth Court 94539 47633 Fortner Street 94539 47345 Galindo Drive 94539 1024 Joshua Place 94539 41062 Joyce Avenue 94539 41817 Mission Cielo Court 94539 258 Paso Roble Common 94539 575 Praderia Circle 94539 820 Praderia Circle 94539 43514 Puesta Del Sol 94539 644 Saturn Avenue 94539 41438 Timber Creek Terrace 94539 47112 Warm Spring Blvd #14094539 39025 Zacate Avenue 94539 2871 Beard Road 94555 32806 Bucks Lake Lane 94555 4060 Coralline Court 94555 4016 Deep Creek Road 94555 34541 Egerton Place 94555 34577 Falls Terrace #76 94555 3044 Paine Court 94555 34593 Pueblo Terrace 94555 4631 Rousillon Avenue 94555 32581 Salton Sea Lane 94555 4163 Tanager Common 94555

290,000 365,000 353,000 640,000 240,000 500,000 420,000 408,000 613,000 290,000 450,000 256,000 425,000 370,000 492,000 152,000 278,000 450,000 670,000 489,000 450,000 395,000 1,200,000 720,000 1,010,000 790,000 1,040,000 630,000 1,410,000 1,207,000 585,000 1,225,000 696,000 520,000 725,000 760,000 605,000 686,000 345,000 670,000 915,000 400,000 510,000 478,000 505,000 430,000 510,000 290,500 510,000 345,000 308,000

3 4 4 2 4 2 5 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 1 2 3 4 3 2 2 5 5 4 3 3 3 4 4 2 5 2 3 3 3 3 2 4 5 4 4 4 3 2 3 2 3 3 3

950 1456 1514 1360 1752 1174 2166 1818 1000 1356 1389 1887 1236 1427 721 1040 1148 1964 1382 1081 1081 2612 1862 2076 1434 2139 1406 3814 2680 1116 2731 1207 1717 1904 1620 1784 1138 1937 3608 1409 1467 1750 1372 1250 1305 840 1369 1346 1240

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 63 Highest $: 702,000 Median $: Lowest $: 85,000 Average $: ADDRESS

20857 Agnes Lane 186 Alden Road 24053 Dover Lane 1674 East Street

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541

SOLD FOR BDS

209,000 163,000 135,000 360,000

3 2 2 3

1954 1961 1979 1987 1964 1996 1961 1959 1958 1960 1980 1963 1960 1963 1991 1991 1959 1971 2009 2009 2009 1988 1965 1975 1960 1988 1961 1980 1977 1972 1999 1987 1988 1979 1963 1984 1982 1978 2001 1976 1977 1987 1972 1989 1971 1988 1986 1973 1984

04-24-12 04-30-12 04-26-12 04-26-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-24-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 05-01-12 04-24-12 05-01-12 04-25-12 04-24-12 05-01-12 04-30-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-25-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 05-01-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-24-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-24-12 04-30-12

255,000 278,579

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1431 1008 1208 1788

1947 1935 1978 1972

04-25-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-26-12


June 8, 2012 18669 Hunter Avenue 1009 Imperial Place 22833 Kings Court 22906 Kingsford Way 772 Memorial Way #2 3253 Monika Lane 22160 Montgomery Street 22596 Norwood Drive 22784 Prime Avenue 20038 Ricardo Avenue 618 Staley Avenue 626 Staley Avenue 632 Staley Avenue 634 Staley Avenue 1617 Ward Street 24027 Wilcox Lane 28823 Bay Heights Road 28861 Bay Heights Road 27742 Fallen Leaf Court 27972 Farm Hill Drive 3126 Oakes Drive 25712 Spring Drive 27623 Anderson Place 27090 Belvedere Court 775 Bishop Avenue 30995 Carroll Avenue 16 Crystal Gate Court 512 Culp Avenue 29198 Dixon Street 601 Evangeline Way 175 Gold Tree Way 27729 Havana Avenue 134 Hewitt Place 29581 Highgate Drive #219 31578 Hugh Way 332 Inwood Lane 26634 Jane Avenue 32031 Kennet Street 375 Orchard Avenue 26 Raintree Court #28 737 Shawnee Court 26360 Taft Street 27843 Thackeray Avenue 26316 Ventura Avenue 26156 Adrian Avenue 27704 Calaroga Avenue 27593 Capri Avenue 26750 Contessa Street 1978 Everglade Street 2729 Naples Street 825 Quantas Lane 2545 Spindrift Circle 1293 Thornwall Lane 1431 Thornwall Lane 2080 Trafalgar Avenue 27517 Verona Avenue 1356 West Street 21228 Gary Drive #101 624 Staley Avenue

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546 94557

303,000 165,000 160,000 222,000 375,000 238,500 290,000 322,500 282,000 190,000 300,000 372,500 276,000 318,500 360,000 210,000 702,000 665,000 430,000 449,000 410,000 125,000 185,000 432,500 275,000 230,000 248,500 268,000 185,000 240,000 470,000 235,000 265,000 85,000 310,000 205,500 218,000 180,000 180,000 169,000 215,000 228,000 300,000 245,000 295,000 165,000 260,000 255,000 250,000 200,000 196,000 625,000 325,000 305,000 280,000 218,000 280,000 209,000 285,000

3 2 2 3 6 4 3 3 3 4 3 5 5 3 3 4 2 3 8 3 3 3 4 3 3 5 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 -

1156 1565 1342 1381 2645 1680 1240 2094 1156 1158 1824 1740 3133 3489 1928 1682 1914 1061 951 3168 1621 999 1670 1665 1609 1078 2529 1000 1130 643 1175 1233 1130 1031 1267 1400 1374 1165 1254 1130 1199 1119 1240 1128 1000 1128 1121 2853 1285 1561 1199 1128 1842 1282 -

1951 1982 1929 2005 1963 1980 1916 1957 1954 1952 1942 1991 2000 2000 1967 1971 1963 1967 1950 1963 1954 1955 1992 1950 2006 1955 2000 1954 1953 1988 1955 1955 1952 1951 1950 1986 1959 1954 1955 1953 1960 1955 1957 1957 1955 1957 1959 2005 1956 1956 1960 1957 1955 1982 -

04-24-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 05-02-12 04-24-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 05-01-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-24-12 05-01-12 04-25-12 05-01-12 04-24-12 04-25-12 04-25-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 05-02-12 04-26-12 04-24-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 04-24-12 04-25-12 04-26-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-26-12 04-24-12 05-02-12 04-26-12 05-02-12 04-25-12 04-24-12 04-24-12 04-30-12 05-01-12 05-02-12 04-24-12 05-02-12 04-25-12 04-30-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 05-02-12 05-01-12

Page 15

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 702,000 Median $: Lowest $: 376,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1951 Badgerwood Lane 415 Carnegie Drive 43 Curtis Avenue 2316 Dubois Street 29 Moon Shadow Drive 600 South Abel Street #202 700 South Abel Street #416

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

425,000 380,000 388,000 702,000 390,000 399,000 376,000

3 4 3 4 2 2 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1642 1156 1530 1987 1534 1309 1108

1987 1955 2005 1988 2000 2007 2007

05-16-12 05-11-12 05-16-12 05-10-12 05-15-12 05-10-12 05-16-12

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 560,000 Median $: Lowest $: 125,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

5074 Abbotford Court 94560 7317 Carter Avenue 94560 39975 Cedar Boulevard #332 94560 5941 Central Avenue 94560 6223 Dairy Avenue 94560 36092 Dalewood Drive 94560 36125 Indian Wells Drive 94560 6112 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #D94560 39965 Parada Street #C 94560 6020 Peppertree Court 94560 39632 Potrero Drive 94560 36105 Rosewood Drive 94560 36355 Shelley Court 94560 8466 Willow Place 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

401,000 410,000 125,000 237,000 310,000 290,000 350,000 259,000 190,000 375,000 340,000 379,000 460,000 560,000

4 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 4

257 Accolade Drive 1550 Bancroft Avenue #422 500 Begier Avenue 2339 Belvedere Avenue 1477 Brookside Drive 1400 Carpentier Street #204 771 Castro Street 1916 Cleveland Street 826 Dowling Boulevard 2262 Driftwood Way 252 Estabrook Street 2494 Fiji Way 345 Garcia Avenue 867 Juana Avenue 560 Kenilworth Avenue 14242 Outrigger Drive 14638 Outrigger Drive 1408 Pearson Avenue 126 Pershing Drive 256 Suffolk Drive 14381 Trinidad Road 1786 138th Avenue 1570 165th Avenue #211 16811 Carriage Lane 2112 Manchester Road 3945 Mission Way 3854 Monterey Boulevard 16900 President Drive

ZIP

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578

SOLD FOR BDS

330,000 265,000 520,000 335,000 245,000 135,000 172,500 320,000 275,500 331,000 180,000 255,000 244,000 485,000 280,000 163,000 266,000 200,000 229,000 205,000 335,000 400,000 106,000 175,000 293,000 310,000 260,000 152,000

4 3 3 4 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 4 1 2 4 3 4 2

340,000 334,714

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1818 1830 777 1447 1131 1080 1196 1394 1000 1869 1388 1464 2606 2452

1971 1999 1985 1980 1953 1960 1963 1981 1990 1985 1993 1960 1975 2000

04-27-12 05-01-12 04-25-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 04-30-12 05-02-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 04-25-12 05-01-12 04-27-12 04-24-12 04-25-12

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 38 Highest $: 520,000 Median $: Lowest $: 106,000 Average $: ADDRESS

390,000 437,143

265,000 272,711

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1627 1680 2378 1464 872 977 1011 1440 1180 1196 1200 1128 1194 2199 1284 1033 1662 1024 1085 1302 1196 2030 718 752 1689 1201 1443 748

2002 1976 1953 1963 1942 1983 1943 1944 1925 1963 1993 1961 1927 1977 1927 1988 1986 1943 1942 1943 1963 1947 1987 1953 1948 1954 1954 1941

04-26-12 05-02-12 05-02-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 05-02-12 05-01-12 04-30-12 04-26-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 05-01-12 04-26-12 04-25-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 05-01-12

AIDS fight enters new phase with prevention pill BY LINDSEY TANNER AP MEDICAL WRITER CHICAGO (AP), Condoms and other safe-sex practices have accomplished only so much. Now the 30-year battle against AIDS is on the verge of a radical new phase, with the government expected to endorse a once-a-day pill to prevent infection with the virus. Some doctors are already giving patients the drug, Truvada, to ward off infection. But Food and Drug Administration approval would expand that practice and could make the highly expensive medicine more affordable. Truvada costs around $11,000 to $14,000 a year. Approval seems likely after an FDA advisory panel Thursday endorsed the use of Truvada for prevention. In the generation-long fight against AIDS, “it's the first time we have talked about a medication for prevention of HIV,” said Dr. Lisa Sterman of Francisco, who treats HIV-positive patients. “With this recommendation, we're nearing a watershed moment in our fight against HIV,” said James Loduca, a spokesman for the San Francisco AIDS Foundation. “We know this isn't a magic bullet, and it's not going to be the continued on page 16


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

1506 Rake Court 16735 Rolando Avenue 16105 Selborne Drive 2007 Britannia Lane 1245 Chapel Avenue 15304 Churchill Street 14618 Corvallis Street 14965 Endicott Street 15148 Farnsworth Street 1667 Lanier Avenue

94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579

210,000 266,000 330,000 425,000 263,000 300,000 325,000 237,000 260,000 280,000

2 3 3 4 2 3 3 2 3 3

1144 1794 3685 2419 1114 1092 1081 924 1114 1383

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 05 Highest $: 285,000 Median $: Lowest $: 230,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

17032 Ganley Street 15805 Paseo Largavista 17431 Via Annette 1361 Via El Monte 1336 Via Madera

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

285,000 230,000 242,500 278,000 250,000

4 3 3 3 3

ZIP

35117 11th Street 33149 7th Street 3848 Amy Place 4534 Arce Street 2217 Champlain Court 32520 Christine Drive 2565 Early Rivers Court 1025 Emerald Terrace 2215 Eric Court #4 2412 Hilton Street 32684 Mirabella Drive 4596 Niland Street 5164 Rose Way 34778 Rumford Terrace 32406 Rutherford Lane 3137 San Juan Place 32389 Winchester Drive

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

385,000 220,000 215,000 805,000 625,000 325,000 430,000 391,500 158,000 370,000 640,000 840,000 675,000 277,000 333,000 340,000 670,000

3 2 3 5 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 2 4 3 5

04-27-12 04-26-12 05-01-12 05-02-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-25-12 04-25-12 04-26-12

250,000 257,100

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1635 986 1031 1250 1042

1952 1944 1953 1951 1950

04-27-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-26-12 04-30-12

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 840,000 Median $: Lowest $: 158,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1947 1960 1956 1994 1951 1950 1951 1949 1950 1957

385,000 452,912

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1675 1014 1035 3148 2693 1349 1909 1675 1003 1340 2283 3198 2226 1050 1463 1396 2850

2007 1955 1977 2007 1998 1977 1970 2006 1977 1964 1998 2004 1995 1997 1970 1968 1979

04-27-12 04-25-12 04-24-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-26-12 04-27-12 04-27-12 04-25-12 04-27-12 04-30-12 04-24-12 05-01-12 04-27-12

continued from page 15

AIDS fight enters new phase with prevention pill right prevention strategy for everyone, but it could save thousands of lives in the United States and potentially millions around the world.” Truvada has been FDA-approved since 2004 for treating people infected with the AIDS

virus. Once a drug is on the market, doctors are free to prescribe it for off-label, or unapproved, uses, and that's what some have been doing in giving Truvada to patients who are healthy but in danger of getting the virus from their partners or through risky sex.

Official FDA backing of the practice would allow Truvada's maker, Gilead Sciences Inc. of Foster City, Calif., to market it for prevention. Approval would also probably lead many more insurance companies to pay for the drug. And by widening the market for Truvada, it could prompt Gilead to lower the price. An FDA decision is expected by June 15. The FDA is also considering approving the first overthe-counter HIV test for use at home. Experts said it could help slow the spread of HIV. An estimated 1.2 million Americans and millions more around the world have HIV. Unless the virus is treated with antiviral drugs, it can turn into full-blown AIDS. Antivirals have made the disease more manageable and allowed patients to live much longer than when the epidemic began in the early 1980s. Nevertheless, about 50,000 new infections are diagnosed in the U.S. each year, a number that has held steady for about 15 years. Truvada represents “a pretty radical step, but I think it's a necessary step,” said Sterman, who prescribes it to infected patients and those who are healthy but at risk. “We've come as far as we can with condom use and safe-sex strategies.” The drug would be recommended for people at high risk of getting the virus, such as gay men with multiple sex partners, prostitutes and people whose partners are infected. In one U.S. government study of more than 1,200 men and women in Botswana, Truvada lowered the HIV infec-

June 8, 2012

tion risk by about 78 percent. Another larger study in Africa found a slightly lower rate of effectiveness, but researchers say that if used as directed, the pill can be 90 percent effective or higher. It is available as an HIV treatment in Africa and other poor regions, but Gilead is seeking approval for prevention in the U.S. only, a company spokeswoman said. Some experts have expressed concern that the use of Truvada for prevention could cause shortages in poor countries that desperately need the drug to treat infected people. Not everyone in the HIV community is gung-ho about the drug. Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, a Los Angelesbased group that calls itself the nation's largest provider of medical care for HIV, said his main concern is that patients won't take the drug as directed – once a day, while also using condoms. Misuse could create drug-resistant HIV strains and lead to more infections. The FDA panelists acknowledged that concern and said people should be tested to make sure they don't have HIV before starting Truvada. Patients who already have the virus could develop resistance to the drug. As for the drug's high cost, generic Truvada for HIV treatment is available in poor countries for as little as $9 per month, a Gilead spokeswoman said. But generic versions are not available in the United States and won't be until after Truvada's U.S. patent expires in 2021. Sterman said she hopes FDA approval leads Gilead to lower the price.

The lifetime cost of treating one person diagnosed with the AIDS virus has been estimated at more than $600,000. “It's much more cost-effective to prevent a new infection than it is to treat someone for their lifetime,” Loduca said. “Of course, the ultimate goal is a vaccine and a cure, but we're many years away from that.” Some of the more serious complications linked to Truvada include kidney and liver problems. But for some people, the risk of kidney problems ``10 years down the line may be less than the risk for acquiring HIV, which is significantly more problematic and can be fatal,'' said Jim Pickett, director of prevention advocacy at the AIDS Foundation of Chicago. Nick Literski, a government employee in Seattle, has been taking Truvada for HIV prevention for more than a year because his partner is infected. He said the drug has helped prevent the breakup of relationships like his. “Many HIV-positive men end up ending their relationships with HIV-negative men out of fear of infecting their partner,” Literski said. ––– AP Health Writer Matthew Perrone contributed to this story from Washington. ––– Online: FDA: http://www.fda.gov AIDS: http://www.aids.gov


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Doing real science with NASA

I

f all trees were blue, and every tree you had ever seen was blue, would you ask “Why are trees blue?” Maybe not. But if suddenly one day you saw a green tree, wouldn’t you ask “Why is this tree green, when all the others are blue?” That’s what happens when you discover new things. It makes you curious. It makes you want to know why one thing is this way, and another thing is that way. That’s what exploring the solar system has done for humans. Before NASA’s two Voyager spacecraft explored them in the 1970s and 80s, we didn’t know very much about Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The Voyagers revealed surprising differences among even Jupiter’s four largest moons. Io had active volcanoes. Europa was covered in ice with crazy, crisscrossing cracks. Saturn’s rings had “spokes,” and in Saturn’s atmosphere, the wind was blowing at over 1,000 miles per hour. Neptune’s moon Triton had ice volcanoes. What a bunch of weird places! Many other NASA spacecraft have orbited or flown past these and other planets, moons, comets, and asteroids in our solar system. All in all, we have learned that our solar system is

stranger and more diverse than anyone imagined. No two planets or moons look alike. Why not? Many appear to have formed in different ways. Why? And why do they orbit and rotate as they do—and where they do? Now our telescopes on Earth and in space are finding other planetary systems in our galaxy. But they have not yet found any similar to ours. Most of the gas giant planets in other solar systems orbit very close to their stars—even closer than Earth’s orbit of the Sun. Our own gas giants are way, way out there, far from our star. Why? NASA’s planetary science missions are all about figuring out our own solar system. How did it form? Why is it the way it is? Is it likely other solar systems are like ours? Just how lucky are we, anyway? Explore the solar system for yourself at The Space Place, http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/menu/solar-system. This article was written by Diane K. Fisher and provided through the courtesy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Our solar system is made up of a huge diversity of planets, moons, and other bodies. How did they form, and why are they all so different?

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

Rotary presents Fishtail Awards

(L-R) Firefighter Isaac Lorenzana, Fishing Day Chair John Jay, Milpitas Rotary President Doris Roth, Firefighter Dave Peterson, and Firefighter Bill Yamada.

SUBMITTED BY FRANK DE SMIDT Milpitas Rotary Club presented story writing Fishtail Awards to three fourth grade Alexander Rose School students, who participated with their classmates in Milpitas Rotary's Annual Fishing Day, Saturday, March 3, 2012.

Milpitas Firefighters with John Jay and student winners dressed out with their new Evinrude shirts and hats.

This year's winners were: Originality, the idea behind the story - Serenity Mosqueda; Voice, the way the story was written to keep the reader's attention to the end - Aiden Quijaro; Penmanship - Maya Soafien Milpitas Firefighters Dave Peterson, Bill Yamada, and Isaac Lorenzana assisted Chairman John Jay in this year's presentations before a school Awards Assembly held May 18.


June 8, 2012

SUBMITTED BY AILEEN CHANCO In partnership with Target through a $2,000 grant award, Music at the Mission Chamber Music Series was able to bring free live classical music performances to over 600 students in the Tri-City Area this year, through its Educational Outreach Performances Program. Horner Junior High School, St. Joseph’s School, and most recently John F. Kennedy High School, took advantage of Music at the Mission’s free Educational Outreach Performances Program for Tri-City schools and welcomed local as well as visiting artists in performances ranging from the songs of John Jacob Niles to Shostakovich’s String Quartet no. 8 and movie music from “Psycho” and “Battleship Potemkin.” “With arts education cuts in schools everywhere, Music at the Mission hopes to be able to help fill in the gaps by bringing artists and music to schools, especially in our local community. The arts ex-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

perience is not merely a fascinating form of entertainment but an essential skill that can help us develop deeper connections and understanding of the world we live in,” says director, Aileen Chanco. This grant is part of ongoing efforts by Target to strengthen families and communities throughout the country. Since 1946, Target has given 5 percent of its income to communities. Today, that giving equals more than $3 million every week. “At Target, our local grants are making a difference in communities across the country,” said Laysha Ward, President of Community Relations. “We’re proud to partner with nonprofit organizations as part of our ongoing commitment to strengthen communities where our guests and team members live and work.” Additionally, Target also gives through signature programs that are designed to inspire learning in children and families. Programs include: • Take Charge of Education®, a school fundraising program; • Target School Library Makeovers,

a program that provides year-round volunteer opportunities for Target team members to get involved with their local school; • Target Field TripSM Grants, a program that helps educators bring learning to life outside the classroom through the distribution of grants; • Target House®, serves as a home away from home for families of children receiving lifesaving treatment at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital® in Memphis. The St. Jude School Program presented by Target, is staffed with accredited teachers and helps patients stay on track academically while undergoing treatments that can last months; • Target Volunteers, a nationwide network of Target team members, retirees, families and friends who volunteer millions of hours to community projects. During the early 19th century, Mission San Jose in Fremont was considered a major center of music. Music at the Mission grew out of the desire of local community members to help develop the "old Mission" as a cultural center. Founding Director and pianist Aileen Chanco tested audience demand by presenting a concert of both classical chamber

Page 19 music and solo works in February 2005. Encouraged by the enthusiastic response and success of that first concert, she went on to present chamber music concerts performed by local as well as visiting artists. Her artistic vision was to present "a new type of chamber music series for the new century" in order to stimulate greater interest in classical music among the next generation. With the aim of encouraging audience participation and closer interaction with the artists, Aileen brought in Bill

Everett to give educational preconcert talks, began outreach performances to schools and senior citizen facilities and included "Meet and Greet the Artist Receptions" after each performance in order to enhance the concert going experience. For more information about Music at the Mission and its 2012-2013 season, visit www.musicatmsj.org. For more information about Target’s commitment to corporate responsibility, visit Target.com/hereforgood.


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12631211 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Julian Hidrogo Meza for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Julian Hidrogo Meza filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Julian Hidrogo Meza to Julian Hidrogo Meza The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-10-12, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, California 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Try City Voice Date: May 21, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2320343# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12630844 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Kellie Gayle Albanese for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Kellie Gayle Albanese filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Kellie Gayle Albanese to Kellie Gayle Justus The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-3-2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 18, 2012 WINIFRED Y, SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318994# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12630720 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: ANGELA YEE HUNG HUNG for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELA YEE HUNG HUNG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: YEE-HUNG HUNG to ANGELA YEE-HUNG HUNG The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition

for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-10-2012, Time: 8:45 A.M., Dept.: 504, Room: N/A The address of the court is 24405 AMADOR ST, HAYWARD, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: WHAT’S HAPPENING TRI-CITY VOICE Date: MAY 17, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH JUDGE of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318381#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465806 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TJ Truck and Tires Repair, 42400 Boyce Rd., Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Grutej Singh, 42400 Boyce Rd., Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538 Jaswinder Singh, 42400 Boyce Rd., Suite E, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Grutej Singh Jaswinder Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29/12 CNS-2325686# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465836 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kehleidoscope, 32728 Gilroy Ct., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Kehlei Chen, 32728 Gilroy Ct., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kehlei Chen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 31, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five

years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29/12 CNS-2325659# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465705 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SP TECH, 40894 GAUCHO WAY, FREMONT, CA 94539, County of ALAMEDA SHIRLEY CHAN, 40894 GAUCHO WAY, FREMONT, CA 94539 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ SHIRLEY CHAN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MAY 25, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22/12 CNS-2323074# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465692 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: US PREMIER TRAVEL, 40336 PACIFIC ST., FREMONT, CA 94538, County of ALAMEDA XIAOMING LIU, 40336 PACIFIC ST., FREMONT, CA 94538 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 5-25-2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ XIAOMING LIU This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MAY 25, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22/12 CNS-2322866# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465288 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Parts House, 4545 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536-5738, County of Alameda T.P.H. Inc., California, 4545 Peralta Blvd.,

Fremont, CA 94536-5738 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6/1/1970 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) T.P.H. Inc. /s/ Harry M. Walker, Sect/ Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 16, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2320250# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465429 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Guru Nanak Transport, 4279 Ogden Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Manjinder Kaur, 4279 Ogden Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Manjnder Kaur This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 18, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318788# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465193 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Terotek Professional Solutions, 263 Corte Pablo, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Frank Ruffa, 263 Corte Pablo, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Frank Ruffa This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2316752# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465247 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Carcopia LLC, 37434 Glenmoor Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Carcopia LLC, CA., 37434 Glenmoor Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Carcopia LLC /s/ Sanju Pancholi, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 15, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2316456# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464514 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: RG Talent Inc., 39120 #157 Argonaut Way, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Ramy Fashions Inc., CA, 39120 #157 Argonaut Way, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jyoti Gill, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 26, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314962# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464965 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: North Shore Creations, 4141 Stevenson Blvd. #386, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Kathleen Joyce Estores, 4141 Stevenson Blvd. #386, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

PUBLIC NOTICES true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kathleen J. Estores This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 8, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314827# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465166 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Culinary Assassin, 201 Washington Blvd. #102, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Norman Robertson, 201 Washington Blvd. #102, Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A.

I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Norman Robertson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314737# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464966 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cobalt Legal, 11768 Main Street, Sunol CA 94586, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 89, Sunol, CA 94586 Michael A. Maxey Jr., 11768 Main Street, Sunol CA 94586 This business is conducted by an individual

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael A. Maxey Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 8, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314488#

GOVERNMENT

CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that public hearings will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications: Use Permit (UP-12-004) The applicant, Chaplin’s Sports Bistro, is seeking Use Permit approval (UP-12-004) to obtain a full liquor license and expand hours of restaurant operation until 1:00 a.m. Thursdays through Sundays. The project site is located at 29200 Kohoutek Way in the MS, Special Industrial, Zoning District. Notice is also given that this project is exempt under Section 15301, Class 1, Existing Facilities, of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING Thursday, June 21, 2012 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. For further information on the above application, contact Avalon Schultz, Associate Planner, at (510) 675-5321. Written comments regarding these projects should be received by the Planning Division prior to Thursday, April 5, 2012. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART

JOAN MALLOY Economic & Director 6/8/12

Community

Development

CNS-2327492# NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Purchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFQ #901009 Remanufactured Toner and Ink Cartridges South County - Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 2: 00 p.m. at Public Works Agency, Conference Room 230, 951 Turner Court, Hayward, CA and North County - Thursday, June 21, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 11th Floor, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on July 26, 2012 County Contact: Stefanie Taylor (510) 2089610 or via email: stefanie.taylor@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 6/8/12 CNS-2325674#

continued from page 2

Proposed county budget presented to board increasing County revenues, thereby reducing deficits and program cuts. Still, the County’s finances remain constrained by housing prices that are far lower than their 2007 levels, resulting in lower property tax revenues that are the main source of the County’s discretionary funds. Though the County assessment roll grew in FY 2011-12, it was only by an anemic 0.37%. The unemployment rate in Alameda County also has dropped far below the 11.7% recorded in August 2010, but the 8.9% recorded in April remains stubbornly high. “Until we return to normal employment levels, the County will be challenged by the double-edged sword of higher demand for services and lower revenues to pay for those services,’’ said Supervisor Keith Carson, who chairs Alameda County’s Budget Workgroup. “And even if the local economy improves significantly, the poor fiscal health of the State and federal governments means funding of County services

will likely be in jeopardy for years to come.’’ With the release of the State Budget’s May Revision, the Governor has acknowledged a funding deficit of $15.7 billion, or $6.5 billion higher than the $9.2 billion gap estimated in January. Most of the increase can be attributed to dramatically lower revenue estimates. Half of the Governor’s proposals to close the State’s funding gap involve spending cuts, including dramatic reductions to health and human services programs administered by local government and the use of assets from now-defunct local redevelopment agencies. Concerns persist that the cuts coming from Sacramento won’t end there. The Governor also assumes $5.6 billion in new revenue from a package of tax hikes that will go to voters in November. His plan includes severe “trigger” cuts to K-12, higher education and the courts if voters reject the measure. While most of these “trigger” cuts

would not directly affect County services, it is possible that the Legislature would not have the inclination to cut education so severely and would instead reduce other programs and funding for County services. With regards to “realignment,’’ the State’s transfer of responsibility for many public safety and health and human services programs to counties, much uncertainty remains, including whether the County will receive adequate funding to pay for realigned services.. The Board of Supervisors and County staff continue to advocate for a more just and equitable funding formula. While these shifting responsibilities mostly involve public safety programs, Governor Brown has been clear that local government will likely be asked to assume control of yet more programs in the coming years. The Proposed Budget includes funding to provide mandated and essential services, meet debt service obligations, maintain a

minimum level of infrastructure and capital funding, and adhere to the Board’s Financial Management policies. The Proposed Budget supports a workforce of 9,060 full-time positions. The $88.1 million funding gap was determined by identifying the difference between the cost of maintaining existing programs and available financing. The Proposed Budget calls for using a combination of permanent ongoing program reductions, revenue increases, and one-time strategies to close the funding gap. Through ongoing costsaving and revenue generation efforts, County agencies/departments have offered to contribute $48.4 million in prior-year “Fiscal Management Reward” savings to help balance the FY 2012-13 Budget. Alameda County’s Fiscal Management Reward Program allows departments to carry over net savings each fiscal year to be used in subsequent years for budget balancing and to help preserve vital services.


Page 22

BARBARA ORTUTAY AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER NEW YORK (AP), – Though Facebook bans children under 13, millions of them have profiles on the site by lying about their age. The company is now testing ways to allow those kids to participate without needing to lie. This would likely be under parental supervision, such as by connecting children's accounts to their parents' accounts. Like many other online services, Facebook prohibits kids under 13 because federal law requires companies to obtain parental consent if they want to collect information about those children. Such information collection is central to Facebook. Every photo or status update a kid posts on Facebook could count as infor-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

mation collection. Many companies consider the parental-consent requirement too burdensome, so they simply ban all children under 13 instead. But that ban is difficult to enforce. In many cases, parents themselves help children skirt it by setting up profiles for them and lying about their ages. There are an estimated 7.5 million kids under 13 on Facebook, out of more than 900 million users worldwide. In a statement, Facebook noted that many recent reports have highlighted “just how difficult it is to enforce age restrictions on the Internet, especially when parents want their children to access online content and services.” “We are in continuous dialogue with stakeholders, regulators and other policymakers about how best to help parents

keep their kids safe in an evolving online environment,” the company said. Few details are available on the nature of Facebook's tests, which The Wall Street Journal reported on in Monday's editions. Relaxing the ban on younger children could be a long way off, or never get implemented, as happens with many features that Facebook tests. The report comes just two weeks after Facebook began trading stock as a public company. Its stock price has fallen in part because of concerns about its ability to keep increasing revenue and make money from its growing mobile audience. To James Steyer, the CEO of the nonprofit Common Sense Media, Facebook's discussions on permitting young kids to join is about expanding its audience – and profits.

June 8, 2012

“With the growing concerns and pressure around Facebook's business model, the company appears to be doing whatever it takes to identify new revenue streams and short-term corporate profits to impress spooked shareholders,” Steyer said in a statement. But Stephen Balkan, the CEO of another kids-and-technology nonprofit, the Family Online Safety Institute, disagrees. Balkan, who sits on Facebook's Safety Advisory Board in an unpaid position, said the company has been discussing the issue for more than a year. That's months before Facebook made regulatory filings in February for its initial public offering of stock, which took place in mid-May. “It has nothing to do with the IPO,” he said. Balkan offered some ideas

about what Facebook could look like for kids. For one, the default setting to their account could be set to “friends only” so that strangers can't see their posts. Teenagers who are 13 to 17 currently have their accounts set to “friends of friends” by default, so the under-13 restriction would be a step beyond that. In addition, parents could have final say on whom their kids become friends with on Facebook. And Facebook could even keep advertising off kids' accounts, he added. “I wouldn't be surprised if we see some movement from Facebook this before the end of the year,'' Balkan said. ``By the way I think it would be a good thing if they do it right, rather than this untenable situation of just kicking off under-13s when they discover them.”


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

AP WIRE SERVICE NEW YORK (AP), J.C. Penney Co.'s new CEO Ron Johnson told analysts Tuesday the department store chain is resurrecting the word “sale'” in promoting its monthlong events, the latest change it's making to reverse a sharp drop in customer counts and sales. Investors were spooked even more, driving shares down 4 percent Tuesday. That extended a decline seen since early February when analysts starting becoming bearish about the new pricing plan that went into effect at the start of that month. Penney has been getting rid of hundreds of sales events from last year in favor of a three-tier pricing plan that offers everyday prices, which are 40 percent lower than a year ago; monthlong discounts on select items; and Best Fridays, which are clearance events. But Penney, which is trying to wean shoppers off discounts and focus on merchandise, had been avoiding the use of the word “sale” to describe the monthlong events and instead had called them ``monthlong values'' in its marketing campaigns. That ended up confusing shoppers.

“Everything we've done hasn't been perfect ... We haven't communicated our pricing change in a way that customers understand yet,” Johnson said in an address to investors at the Piper Jaffray Consumer Conference, which was webcast. “It's just been kind of confusing.” He added, “So we're moving away from the word ‘monthlong value’ because no one really understood ... what we intend to do. It's a sale.” The move marks the latest changes Penney is making to bring shoppers back after an abysmal quarter. The department store chain, based in Plano, Texas, is adding five “Best Price Friday” sales throughout the year, which would be in addition to the sales it has on the first and third Friday of every month, according to Charles Grom, a Deutsche Bank analyst in an analyst note published last week. The first took place this past Memorial Day weekend and another is planned for Black Friday in November, Grom said. Daphne Avila, a Penney spokeswoman, declined to give details on the additional events or when they would be held for competitive reasons. The company is tweaking its advertising to better educate shoppers on the three-tier pricing plan. Penney reported last month a bigger-than-expected loss for the first quarter. Revenue also dropped 20 percent for the quarter as customer traffic slipped 10 percent. Meanwhile, revenue at stores open at least a year – a comparison used to measure a retailer's health – fell 18.9 percent. That's much steeper than the 11.4 percent drop Wall Street was expecting. Shares fell $1.00 to close at $24.27 on Tuesday. After Johnson laid out his vision for the new pricing strategy to analysts at the end of January, shares soared, peaking at $43.13 on Feb. 9. But they have since lost more than 40 percent of their value.

Assembly passes municipal bankruptcy bill SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski’s (D-Fremont) bill to improve the neutral evaluation process public entities in dire fiscal straits can use to negotiate with creditors passed the state Assembly on May 31, 2012 with a 42-24 vote. The bill, AB 1692, will now go to the state Senate. “I am proud that my colleagues stood up despite immense pressure to continue this effort to modify the neutral evaluation process,” Wieckowski said. “This bill simply makes sure the neutral evaluator can lead this process with all the relevant financial informa-

tion that is necessary. This will help the parties work to avoid bankruptcy and save the taxpayers money in the long run.” In 2011, the Legislature passed Wieckowski’s AB 506, establishing the neutral evaluation process for distressed public entities. An independent neutral evaluator, mutually-selected from a list created by the public agency, leads the process. If after 60 days, a majority of the parties believe it is worthwhile to continue, negotiations are extended for 30 days. Both Stockton and Mammoth Lakes have opted to participate in the neutral evaluation process to try to re-

duce their debt and avoid bankruptcy. “I look forward to continuing this discussion and incorporating lessons learned from Stockton and Mammoth Lakes’ experiences,” Wieckowski said. “I think we may be able to include those before the legislative session ends.” AB 1692 allows the neutral evaluator to “stop the clock” if key financial information is not forthcoming. The evaluator could also seek an independent audit to secure the information. A city could stop the process by a majority vote of its council, declare a fiscal emergency and pursue bankruptcy at any time.

Page 23


Page 24

SUBMITTED BY COACH BURMASTER Stellar seasons were recorded for both the Boys' and the Girls' JLHS Volleyball Teams this year. The Girls' Volleyball program won their first MVAL Championship since 2005 and then advanced to the CIF North Coast Section Championship tournament Quarter Finals, losing to the eventual CIF NCS Champion. The Boys' Volleyball Team finished second in the highly competitive MVAL league and then also advanced to the CIF NCS Quarter Finals, also losing to the eventual CIF NCS Champion. Both programs hosted and won their first round CIF North Coast Section matches, which many believe is the first and only time that both programs hosted and won a first round CIF NCS Championship tournament match in the same academic year! A number of JLHS Boys' and Girls' Volleyball Team student-athletes will be taking their talents to the collegiate level from both programs as follows: JLHS Girls' Volleyball Players

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Danielle "Nella" Ioramo, First Team MVAL Missouri State University - West Plains (MO), National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA), Division I Women's Volleyball Amber Zimmerman, First Team MVAL Foothill College (CA), California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) Women's Division Leilua "Lulu" Malieitulua, Honorable Mention MVAL - Chabot College (CA), California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) - Women's Volleyball JLHS Boys' Volleyball Players Neal Barrina, First Team MVAL and "Best Setter", Division I - UC San Diego, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II - Men's Volleyball Cameron Salcedo, Second Team MVAL CSU Fullerton, National Recreational Intramural Sports Association (NIRSA) - Men's Volleyball We want to wish all of our graduating student-athletes the best as they move on in their educational careers!

June 8, 2012

SUBMITTED BY MAYURI JAYARAMAN PHOTOS BY GARY WU On Saturday, June 2, the Glenmoor Stingrays welcomed the Mission Valley Barracudas to their home pool to kick off another exciting season of dual meets for the 2012 swim season. The day started with clouds covering the sky and then turned sunny before the meet concluded. The Barracudas spiritedly shouted their team’s Color Shout before the meet started. Throughout the meet, team points were very close, but in the end, the Barracudas were able to capture the win: 563 to 507. At this meet, a number of competitors improved their times; Barracuda swimmers who bettered their time by more than four seconds included: Freestyle, Srikar Voleti improved his time by 5.56 seconds; Backstroke, Keon Abdollahian, took nearly 9 seconds off his time; Oliver Swanson took 7 seconds off his time; Breaststroke Gabriella Rachal improved her time by 5.75 seconds and in individual medley - one lap of each stroke - Annie Chiang took 7.59 seconds off her time. Good job and congratulations to all of you! The Barracudas look forward to their second dual meet of the season against the Kennedy Seals at Mission Valley Swim Club in one week.


June 8, 2012

Page 25

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Cultural Corner’s art scholarship contest winners SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG NewPark Mall's Cultural Corner, wrapped up its first annual scholarship contest for high school seniors. The winners are First Place ($1,500) Jared Gochuiko from Mt. Eden High School, Second Place ($1,000) Daniel Leal from Irvington High School and Third ($500) Zhou Yang from Newark Memorial High School. "The goal of the Cultural Corner art scholarship contest at NewPark Mall is to connect the arts with our local community,

SecondPlace: Second Place winner Daniel Leal

and we are proud of all the students who participated this year," said Kelly Gardner, General Manager of NewPark Mall. Twenty-seven pieces of original artwork were submitted from April 16 to May 11, 2012 by local high school students preparing

ThirdPlace: Third Place winner Zhou Yang

to graduate. Teen artists entered art pieces including canvas, photography and sculptures. The Cultural Corner, which opened in May 2011, provides exhibit space for the work of local artisans, including painters, sculptors, photographers and digital artists. Local artists interested in displaying their work at the new Cultural Corner are invited to call Kenia Ortiz at 510-284-1600. For more information, visit www.NewParkMall.com.

FirstPlace: First Place winner Jared Gochuiko with NewPark Mall General Manager Kelly Gardner


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

Promotoras lend a helping hand

Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center promotoras conducted a neighborhood clean-up and planted trees in Decoto, Union City, in late April 2012.

SUBMITTED BY NELSON KIRK On Saturday, April 28, 2012, Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center promotoras proudly took to the streets of the Decoto neighborhood of Union City to remove

debris, pick up litter and plant trees. This project was sponsored by Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center, Kaiser Permanente Community Health Education Dept. and the City of Union City Public Works.

“Promotoras” are community members who receive specialized training to provide basic health education in the community. While most of their work entails educating target audiences about health

issues affecting their community, they also provide guidance in accessing community resources associated with health care. Promotoras are usually residents and leaders in their community, working for community-based health promotion projects or as part of a research group. Thus, they serve as liaisons between their community, health professionals and human and social service organizations. Customarily, they play the roles of advocate, educator, mentor, outreach worker, role model and translator. Claudia Del Rio and Lupe Nunez were contacts for the Promotoras. All the volunteers were helpful and cheerful and did a great job in the Decoto District. Alex Quintero and Frank Morales from Union City Public Works assisted the Promotoras The trees were planted around “Our Lady of the Rosary” to mark Arborday in Union City. Trees provide many benefits to the City of Union City: Tree foliage filters dust and can help remove toxic pollu-

tants from the atmosphere. The foliage captures and removes a wide range of smogproducing compounds such as ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, airborne ammonia and some sulphur dioxide; Mature trees improve the aesthetic environment, absorb noise, are traffic-calming, reduce stress and crime and create a peaceful place to relax or socialize; Trees provide positive mental benefits and healing qualities; Mature trees provide a sense of "home" to a neighborhood; Almost every city in our country has recorded a drop in the number of trees along its streets due to development, pollution, disease and neglect; Trees intercept rainwater, aiding soil absorption for gradual release into streams, preventing flooding, filtering toxins and impurities and extending water availability into dry months when it is most needed; and Trees cleanse ground water as it filters through their root systems.


June 8, 2012

SUBMITTED BY MILPITAS UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT PHOTO BY CINDY KITAURA

D

eanna Sainten, a sixth grade teacher at Pomeroy Elementary School in Milpitas has been selected as the district’s Teacher of the Year. Ms. Sainten, an outstanding teacher of the highest caliber, proves to be an asset to Milpitas Unified School District (MUSD) each and every day. She is a role model for students, teachers, and

parents alike, inspiring everyone she touches to strive for their personal best. A true life-long learner, Sainten continues to take trainings and classes to enhance her teaching skills. She recently obtained her masters degree as a Reading/Language Arts Specialist, received ROLA (Reading and Oral Language Assessment) training and has spent this year developing curriculum and extending Steps to Success to the next level.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ms. Sainten willingly shares her resources and expertise. Since graduating from Santa Clara University (SCU), she has been invited back each year to share her insights and valuable experience with teachers in the Teacher Credential Program. She went above and beyond the call of duty as a master teacher for one of SCU’s student teachers, meeting regularly at the crack of dawn. She exudes passion for teaching and learning as someone who deeply cares about each individual student and finds innovative ways to make connections with them. Former students regularly come back seeking assistance with middle school problems - both academic and personal. She is accessible and friendly, but firm, always holding each student to high standards - an excellent role model, especially for at-risk and minority students. There isn’t any activity that Ms. Sainten isn’t involved in at Pomeroy. In her first year of teaching, she was responsible for organizing afterschool GATE Enrichment (Gifted and Talented Education) activities. Since then Parent Education Nights, Leadership Team, The Talent Show, and Student Council have all benefited from her leadership. She is our representative for the 21st Century Teaching and Learning Committee and has organized the 6th grade picnic, 6th grade promotion, and science camp. Seeing a need for students to connect more deeply with school, Ms. Sainten created “Club 6,” a service organization in which students identify a need within the community and design projects to help fill those needs. Club 6 students have created innovative ways to encourage participation in food, clothing, toy, and book drives. Through their hard work, close to $5,000 in cash donations has been donated to Second Harvest Food Bank, local homeless shelters, Sacred Heart, Milpitas Food Bank, Glide, and the Humane Society. Deanna Sainten sets an exemplary example of a dedicated, caring, compassionate teacher. She represents the best of the Milpitas Unified School District.

Page 27


Page 28 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD The Fremont Police Department is hosting a community meeting to discuss recent criminal activity that has taken place throughout the City. Discussions will focus on residential burglaries and

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

robberies that have occurred over the last several months. This meeting will highlight activity in the Central and North (Zones 1 &2) areas of Fremont. Join us to become more informed about the recent activity and learn how we can continue to work

together in an effort to safeguard the community. Everyone is invited to attend. If you have questions about the meeting, please contact Community Engagement Specialist, Martha Matthiesen at (510) 7906979 or mmatthiesen@fremont.gov.

Community Meeting Tuesday, June 12 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont (510) 790-6979

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

C

atalytic Converters, along with copper and other metals, have become a hot commodity for thieves. Catalytic Converter theft has become popular because of their value, relative ease to steal (unbolt or cut out), and their lack of identifying markings. A Catalytic Converter is a part of the vehicles exhaust system. It helps reduce vehicle pollution. Catalytic Converters are located under a vehicle on the exhaust pipe before the muffler(s). Thieves take the stolen Catalytic Converters to metal recyclers. The recyclers pay an average of $50 per converter for the precious metals inside them. But for certain converters, they will pay up to $250. Victims pay an average of $1000 (or an average $250/$500 insurance deductible) to get the converter(s) replaced; it can cost as much as $4000. What Vehicles are targeted by Catalytic Converter Thieves? Any vehicle manufactured after 1974 can be a target. However, Trucks and SUV s (Sports Utility Vehicles) are the vehicles they target the most. They prefer

Trucks and SUV’s, because they are higher off the ground and easier to crawl under. Toyota Trucks and SUV’ in the 90’s to the late 2000’s are especially vulnerable because the Catalytic Converters are more exposed than the average converter. The thieves can quickly unbolt/cut out the converter in minutes. Some of the larger Toyota Trucks and SUV’s have two Catalytic Converters. If your Catalytic Converter has been replaced with an aftermarket Catalytic Converter within the past few years, there is a good chance it won’t be stolen. The new aftermarket Catalytic Converters don’t have as much precious metals, so thieves typically don’t take them. Where are the common places where Catalytic Converter theft occur?

Your Home Driveway or Street • Most of the Catalytic Converter thefts occur while your car is parked in your driveway or on the street in front of your house. Parking Lots • Vehicles parked in large open parking lots are targeted. A look-out will often continued on page 29

June 1 A robbery occurred at Parkwood Apartments at approximately 1:15 p.m. yesterday. The suspect pushed the victim to the ground and ripped a gold/diamond chain from the victim's neck. The suspect fled eastbound on Country Drive. Suspect was a black female juvenile 5'3" 13-15yrs, small pony tail. Commercial Burglary: Officers were dispatched to Meyer Park because the Reporting Party said his friend cut his arm. Two juveniles concocted a story regarding the injury to cover a commercial burglary into a doctor's office on Glenmoor Drive; one seriously injured his arm in the process. Both were arrested by Officer Piol and FTO Foster. At 4:10 a.m., a newer white Ford full-size pickup truck backed up to the QuikStop at Washington Boulevard & Luzon. One suspect hooked the truck to the ATM machine while the other used the truck to rip the ATM machine out. The alarm company did not notify PD until 4:29

a.m. Officer Wilson investigated. June 2 Officers were detailed to Tri City Church, 40155 Blacow Road on a monitored burglar alarm where alarm company heard movement inside. Officers arrived in a timely manner and saw a male subject flee out the back of the church. Officers Butcher and Stillitano pursued on foot and Officer Butcher saw the subject get into a vehicle and broadcast the vehicle’s plate. Investigation is on-going. June 3 CSO Allen investigated a burglary from 38600 Blacow Road. It occurred between 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Point of Entry was a rear bedroom window. Loss included jewelry, an XBOX, some electronic items and cash. Union City PD called for three cover units to Union Square apartments for a domestic violence call in which a female inside an apartment was screaming with no response at the door. When Fremont units arrived, the female was in the parking lot with UCPD but the 4-year-old daughter was still inside, possibly with the suscontinued on page 31


June 8, 2012

Page 29

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 28

watch out as a thief takes the Catalytic Converter. Auto Dealer Lots • Brand new vehicles on a Dealer Lot are targeted. The thieves have all night to steal popular Catalytic Converters while the new vehicles sit in their parking lot. Semi-Truck Auto Transport Trailer • Vehicles are targeted while they are on a Semi-Truck Auto Transport Trailer. Thieves can easily get underneath the vehicles to remove the Catalytic Converters. Preventive tips on how to help prevent your Catalytic Converter from getting stolen: The #1 way to protect your ve-

hicles Catalytic Converter is to park your vehicle(s) inside a garage or in a secure side yard. If you must park your vehicle in the driveway, motion detector lights or continuous lights illuminating your driveway may be a deterrent. Also, getting a vehicle motion detector alarm might help. Educate your friends and neighbors about Catalytic Converter theft so they can be a look-out too. Have extra metal welded to your exhaust system. Muffler shops are offering creative ways to protect your Catalytic Converter. They weld on metal to make it difficult for the Catalytic Converter to be removed. The cost is often less than your insurance deductible and defi-

nitely less than the full replacement cost (if you don’t have comprehensive insurance). Install a Catalytic Converter Protection Device. There are devices on the market that will clamp/go around your Catalytic Converter. Devices are often more expensive than welding extra metal, but for some this is the option they prefer. What if your Catalytic Converter is stolen? If your Catalytic Converter is stolen, you will know right away when you start your vehicle. It will sound like you don't have a muffler at all (like loud motorcycle mufflers). It is ok to drive your vehicle directly to a muffler/dealer shop to get the Catalytic Converter replaced. You do not need your vehicle towed to the shop.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Your garbage can tell a lot about you, such as what you eat, your recycling habits, what brands of detergent you prefer, your favorite dog food and unfortunately your most personal information. The garbage and recycling containers aren't the place for your old intact documents, statements, tax forms and anything else that has your personal information. The reason is simple; there are thieves who look through garbage and recycling bins to find just that type of information. They use this information to, in essence; become you by accessing and acquiring credit in your name. How do we stop them? Shredding It!! No documents, envelopes, forms, receipts, statements or other items containing your personal information should find their way into your garbage can until they are in a condition that they can't be read or taped back together. Shred it all! A cross-cut security shredder is your best bet as it does more than just cut long strips that can possibly be taped together. Rather, it makes cuts in at least two different directions making it nearly impossible to "recreate" the documents. Turn on those shredders and get rid of those old files the safe way!

June 2 Officer Taylor investigated a hit & run traffic collision at 7:13 p.m. in the parking lot of Safeway. Ferdinand Siquig was traced to his home in Fremont and arrested for Hit and run and driving with a suspended license. He was issued a citation and released. Officer Hogan handled a citizen’s arrest/shoplifting case at the NewPark Mall Macy’s store at 7:50 p.m. Jason Oliver of Oakland and Lena Taylor of Oakland were both arrested for petty theft. They were issued citations and released at the scene. Officer Revay observed a vehicle driving against traffic on the wrong side of the road of Newark Boulevard at 8:24 p.m. and then onto the wrong side of Thornton Avenue. After a couple of quick turns, the driver high-centered his vehicle on an island on Ruschin Drive and then fled on foot. Officer Revay was able to take the driver into custody after a short foot pursuit. Rui Silveira of Fremont) was arrested for -DUI, under the influence of drugs, resisting arrest, possession of burglary tools, hit and continued on page 31

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

Master Sudoku

1 7

Sudoku

5 8

Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

9 1

6 9

4

4

1 1 2

5 6 7

3

6 8

4 8 8

9 5 4

In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

9 21

25 6

16

16

15 4

21

12

21

3

22

9

9

3

5

10

4

23

15

7

21

10 5

19 24

18

2

3

15

6

3

22

16

14

21

23

22

7

21

23

14 15

25

21

1

16

21 16

3

12

19

22

3

4

8

5

24

10

2

9

12

19

24

16

19

14

19

13

18

16

23

21

10 4

18

21 17

3

18

23

1

19

20 4

4

21

22

14

26

16

3

21

16

14

5

22

21

16

21

15

11

21

21 18

24 3

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

22 19

8

3 1

D 3

F 6 5 1 4

4 9

7 3 letter words 5 6 Sudoku Eel Solutions 5 Jug on page 4 8 B Kid 3 1 Map 9 letter words B E Pas Anhydrous F A Pod Vestibule RAF 4 0 5 Wok 10 letter words Picaresque 4 6 4 letter words White dwarf D 1 Earn 8 0 Epic 9 B Idea Load Lynx Word Search Prep Classical Music A L T O O Yaws B I D P C Yeti Air 5 letter words Every Ideal Jumpy Mufti Rumba Yield 6 letter words Behave Eczema Hereof Isomer

1

12

23

18

19

4

19

21

4 21

4

3

21

3

1

25

21 3

14

21

21

25

4

23

8

9

25

21

3 14

25

4

A 8 7

7 letter words Exclaim Hapless Ice axes Pretzel Transom 8 letter words Hoosegow Sheepish

Alto Arnell Bach Bax Brass Bruch Bush Cage Choir Clock Copland Cui Davies Dim Dolly Drum Elijah Ernani Fine Folk Franck Glinka Hahn Ivew Jena Jig Jones Key Lalo

R U C H M T S F Z V I O L

B A C H E A S D R U M B O

R L B N A M W E L A L O S

Largo Lulu Maw Morley Mouth organ Mozart Oboe Oliver Opus Ped

O M O U T H O R G A N E O

S L E G S U N Z D N T C R

0 4 D 2 F

9 6 0 8

7 8 2 9 F 0 A 8

C B 0 D 5 E 4 7 B F 6 7 B 3 C D 8 1 A 1 D 8 E B 2 3 0 9 6 7 F D 5 5 7 A 1 C

K L P F L R J H N B A X O C K

R E I I B Y N O R E V R P H S

Piu Piz Pop Reel Rit Saxhorn Segno Set Sfz Smyth

D E N V S R S A N V I M T O M

L K E Y E U A N N E E V L I Y

A U T L K R X S J I S O E R T

R E L I J A H Z S E C P P W H

G F J U W C O P L A N D I U C

O I P O D T R A G I C A Z U S

Solo Sor Spinet Suk Ten Tragic Tune Viol Wood

G O O I A R N E L L S F I N E

F 2 A 4

P D M O R L E Y F F O L K Q J


June 8, 2012

Page 31

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 28

Fremont Police Log pect/father who did not live there. Entry was made to rescue the 4year-old. The suspect was later located hiding inside a closet under a pile of clothes. A sergeant, three units, and a K9 were out of town for approximately 40 minutes. June 4 Residential Robberies: 42900 block Everglades Park Drive; investigated by Officer Luevano Glen Haven Apts. investigated by CSO Allen—loss is electronics 33900 block Juliet Circle, investigated by Officer Lobue. Front door kick. 34000 block Webfoot Loop, investigated by CSO Senquiz—ransack. Loss is cash and jewelry. June 6 CSO Allen investigated a burglary on Hastings Street. Entry was made via a side door (kicked in), and the master bedroom was ransacked. continued from page 29

Nobbe responded to a brush fire on Thornton Avenue, west of I880 at 6:14 a.m. After the fire was extinguished, Officer Mlyniec contacted Gerardo Rojos, who was seen by ALCO Fire leaving the area of the brush fire, while he stood in the parking lot of Home Depot. He was found in possession of small quantity of marijuana and issued a citation. Officer Mlyniec investigated a forgery at 5810 Newpark Mall Road (Men’s Wearhouse) at 10:42 a.m. Three traveler’s checks were passed at the business yesterday. Officers responded at 3:26 p.m. to 34988 Newark Boule-

vard (Wells Fargo Bank) regarding the report of false check in the amount of $1978.55 attempting to be passed by a male subject by the name of Gerald Knighten of Alameda. Knighten left the business before officers arrived. Officer Homayoun located Knighten in the parking lot of CVS pharmacy nearby and attempted to stop Knighten. Knighten fled on foot a short distance until Officer Homayoun caught up with him. Knighten then turned around and took a fighting stance against Officer Homayoun. Officer Homayoun called for additional officers and was able to quickly subdue

Knighten. Knighten was positively identified through an infield show up as the suspect that attempted to pass the fraudulent check. Knighten was arrested by Officer Rollins for possession of a fraudulent check, burglary, threatening to injure a police officer and resisting arrest. He was transported to Santa Rita Jail where he was booked. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510578-4000, extension 500.

Newark Police Log run, and possession of a stolen vehicle, after it was determined the vehicle was reported stolen out of Oakland. He was booked at Santa Rita Jail. During a warrant service at the E-Z-8 Motel at 9:53 p.m., Officer Mavrakis arrested Annecia Ortega of Fremont for a Misdemeanor warrant and possession of burglary tools. Fernando Mendoza of Oakland was also contacted and arrested for his Felony warrant-(possession of drugs) and possession of Methamphetamine. Ortega was kind enough to direct Officer Mavrakis to the stolen vehicle she had just driven into the Motel parking lot resulting in an additional charge. They were booked at Santa Rita Jail. Officers responded to a report of two subjects fighting in the parking lot of Motel 6 at 2:10 a.m. While responding to the scene, one of the callers reported shots were being fired. Responding officers quickly determined that the report of gunshots was unfounded and that the two subjects who were fighting, were just playing. Unfortunately for Andrew Carris

(transient), he had a Felony warrant for domestic violence and was arrested by Officer Warren and booked at Fremont Jail. June 4 The staff at Motel 6 called at 6:55 p.m. to report a female subject was running around the Motel threatening to kill her boyfriend. Officer Johnson responded and ended up arresting Rachell Romero (transient) for being a convicted felon in possession of a stun gun, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a lipstick case knife. Michael Hinojoza (transient) was also arrested for possession of Methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. They were both booked at Fremont Jail. After responding to a domestic dispute at an apartment on Baine Avenue at 1:21 a.m., Officer Taylor arrested Marielos Martinez of Redwood City for a Misdemeanor assault warrant; Martinez was also arrested for 243(b)PC after she tried to kick Officer Taylor in the groin. She was transported and booked at Santa Rita Jail. June 5 Officer Mlyniec and FTO

Fremont General Plan receives Award of Merit The City of Fremont General Plan Update was recently recognized by the Northern California Chapter of the American Planning Association with an Award of Merit. This award recognizes a number of “best practices,” including the use of community volunteers to increase public involvement and creation of a user-friendly “Vision Book” to convey the main themes of the Plan. The City Council adopted the General Plan Update in December 2011. It calls for Fremont to become “strategically urban” in the future, with development focused near transit. More information is available at www.fremont.gov


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

continued from page 1

Jenny and Jeremy Inman discuss the assigned tasks.

know that these are people’s jobs and demonstrates ownership – a profession; it’s not just a game.” A graduate of San Jose State University’s Film Department, Jeremy had directed a kidfriendly movie, “Super Hero Party Clown,” and recently, an award-winning commercial for San Jose State that aired on ESPN (Entertainment and Sports Programming Network). After viewing the television ad, the students were asked, “If you made a commercial for Oliveira, what would you put in it?” The students pondered the question, brainstormed and then came up with a plethora of incredible ideas. “My brother and I were so impressed that we knew we had to actually make this project happen,” said teacher Inman. “Over the next few months, the kids clarified their ideas and made storyboards (illustrations) for the shots they wanted to include in the commercial,” she explained. To assist with this production, Jeremy Inman gathered a crew of several SJSU film department

students who gladly donated their time: Myles Gilbert, Ian Irwin, and Paul Early, all graduating this month. Additionally, equipment valued at over $30,000 was borrowed from the Spartan Film Studios, the non-profit film program at SJSU, tied into the Film Department. Nick Martinez, Coordinator of Film Broadcast Studio Operations, was instrumental in helping to expedite the process for the team and took part as well. Another former SJSU graduate, now a professional storyboarder, turned the students’ art renderings of their original ideas, into professional quality work. The commercial created was based on the students’ ideas. “We are hoping to give the students a hands-on, active experience and a chance to see their ideas come to life,” explained Ms. Inman. Over two days earmarked for the shoot, each student in the class - “Junior Crew” worked with the SJSU group “Senior Crew” - to learn about the four different components

necessary to create a commercial - Production, Camera, Lights, and Sound. “They’ve learned the importance of teamwork, long term planning, and how to be responsible for a particular job,” said Ms. Inman. Among the 14 vignettes filmed were: the Oliveira eagle mascot, the glee club, basketball, the school garden area and the classroom setting. For one of the scenes, shot outside, students worked with the SJSU crew to help assemble the props and background needed for the “green screen,” to create a visual effect - that of the eagle in flight. Throughout the two-day shoot, each student was able to direct his/her own storyboard idea; they took turns acting out parts, worked behind the camera, set up shots, handled the clapboard and shouted “action” or “cut.” Overall, students had a chance to see what they were good at or enjoyed the most.

“Action on the set!”

“We’re here to facilitate and keep them thinking about what they could do in life as a possible career choice,” said Jeremy. “I’ve personally gotten a lot of out it. It’s making an impact on the students.” Oliveira Principal Linda Anderson was extremely supportive of the project and student efforts. “What I love about this

A student learns camera techniques from Myles Gilbert, Paul Early and Ian Irwin.

opportunity is the ability to put “education standards” into action and show “relevance” to learning, which is why we have kids go to school. The filmmakers are releasing control to the kids [for this project],” stated Anderson. Upon its completion, each student will receive a copy of the commercial. Jeremy indicated that he will possibly use some of the behind-the-scenes footage for a documentary about the process. Ms. Inman is delighted for her students. “They’re so excited. It’s great to see them actively involved and being hands-on in their learning. This is a unique opportunity; it assists with their comprehension skills and brings imagination to real life. It’s exciting for me to see them excel in something so applicable to everyday and see this interaction with the SJSU students, to put their creative side to use.” And, she adds, “This wouldn’t have been possible without the amazing support of my mom and brother, the volunteers, students, staff and principal.”


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Health Camp for seniors SUBMITTED BY MR. KRISHNASWAMY

A free health check-up program was conducted by Indo-

their time and services included: Bhupinder Bhandari, M.D - Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology; Pradeep Kumar, M.D – Cardiology; Muhammad Khan, M.D. - Internal medicine and

American Seniors Association Fremont (INSAF) in cooperation with the Fremont Senior Center and a team of 10 doctors headed by Dr. Bhupinder Bhandari on May 22 at Fremont Senior Center. Health professionals donating

Gastroenterology Anjali Kandpal, M.D – Women’s Health; Priyanka Gudivada, M.D - Primary Care; Sukhpal Rapal, M.D - Internal Medicine and Balance screening; Jeffery Wood, M.D - Balance screening; Sam Suri, M.D - Internal Medicine & Cardiology; Kokila Patel, M.S - Physio-therapy; Ray Grimm, Ph.D - Depression Screening. Tests for blood-pressure and blood-sugar were also available for the 90 seniors who participated. Indo-American Seniors Association Fremont (INSAF) is a Cali-

fornia incorporated Non-profit organization for the seniors of Indian origin in the Tri-Cities of Fremont, Newark and Union City with around 230 seniors as members. They meet at Fremont Senior Center at 10 a.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Meetings are designed to be informative and relevant to day-today lives and facilitate social networking. INSAF officers are: Mr. Surendra Dalal (President), Mr. Krishnaswamy (Secretary), Mr. Ashok Muley (Treasurer) and Mr. Kishore Tamboli (Jt. Secretary). Many other volunteers contribute to the success of this program.

Page 33


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 8, 2012

Kidango hires new Director of Education SUBMITTED BY MARC BAKER PHOTO BY KATHLEEN NGUYEN

SUBMITTED BY IVY WU The Citizens for Better Community Foundation (CBC) is proud to announce the recipients of 2012 CBC Foundation Scholarships: Ariel Figueroa (American), Kimberly Johnson (John F. Kennedy), Emilio Ruiz (John F. Kennedy), Yicheng Sun (Mission San Jose), Nikki Murray (Robertson) and Kerry Liou (Washington). CBC Foundation was established by a group of Chinese Americans to bring more awareness and appreciation of their culture to the community. It seeks to inspire the Chinese American population to become more involved and contribute to the community-at-large mainly in the areas of education, health and business. To support education and to encourage students to go to college, CBC Foundation offers six

$1,000 scholarships to graduating seniors - one from each of the high schools in Fremont Unified School District. Since there were no applicants from Irvington High School this year, the remaining $1,000 is being awarded to the student with the next highest qualification. To be eligible, applicants must have an unweighted high school GPA of 3.0 or above and be admitted to an accredited college. Students need to demonstrate good moral character traits such as Respect, Responsibility, Compassion, Courage, Honesty, Integrity, Self-Control, Perseverance, Trustworthiness, and Gratitude, developed through trials in life. All recipients have met the criteria and have clearly shown strong moral strength. The scholarship awards were presented at the Fremont Unified School Board general meeting on June 6. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)

Kidango is excited to announce that Dr. Rebecca Hawley Pruitt has

accepted the of Director of Education position at Kidango. As Director of Education, Pruitt will work closely with Kidango’s Regional Director Team to provide support and leadership to all Kidango early education centers to ensure developmentally appropriate learning environments and experiences that meet the needs of a diverse population of children and families. With the Regional Director team, she will set a vision and goals to provide high quality program services in the care and early education of children and support for families. Pruitt has worked in the fields of Early Childhood Education, Early Intervention, Family Support Services, and Head Start/Early Head Start programming for over 15 years. She has acted in the role of Developmental Pre-K Master Teacher, Early Childhood Program Director, Early Head Start/Head Start Program Supervisor, and Early Intervention Program Manager for Non-Profit, State, and Federal programs serving the Bay Area Community at large. Previously, Pruitt oversaw Kidango’s Early Intervention Program working closely with local Regional Centers and local School Districts

throughout Alameda and Santa Clara Counties in support of families with children between the ages of 0-3 years with identified special needs and learning differences. Pruitt’s research and direct practice in the fields of Early Childhood Education, Development, Early Intervention, and Special Education has primarily focused on historically underserved racial, ethnic, linguistic, and lower socioeconomic populations in regards to issues of equitable access to quality early childhood development/education and family support programs. Additionally, Pruitt has over 12 years of experience with Early Childhood Environmental Assessment and direct Developmental Therapeutic based intervention work. She has provided services to children between the ages of 0-5 years, their parents, and extended family members in center-based, home-based, and community early learning and intervention settings. Pruitt currently works in collaboration with Mills College, Oakland and is an acting Graduate School of Education Instructor and Graduate Student Field Placement supervisor for students in completion of their MA’s (Master of Arts) with a focus on Early Childhood Education, Development, Early Childhood Special Education, and Infant/Toddler Mental health. Pruitt received her undergraduate degree in Sociology from Pitzer College, Claremont, and a Masters in Child Development with a focus on Early Intervention and Special Education from Mills College in Oakland, as well as a Doctorate in Educational Leadership/Early Childhood Education and Development, also from Mills College, Oakland. Her extensive experience in child development and strong educational background will help ensure Kidango’s early education programs continue to meet the high quality standards that they are known for.


June 8, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Hayward homes rehabilitated (L –r): Homeowner Lemlem Meharena and Alexander Tirfe (holding their daughter Milcah), Haward City Councilmember and Mayor Pro Temporare Barbara Halliday, Medhin Tesfamariam (Lemlem's mother) and twin sons (being held) Yotam and Noah.

SUBMITTED BY JO ANN DRISCOLL PHOTO BY JEFF GOODWIN, HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

H

abitat for Humanity East Bay (HEB) and the City of Hayward celebrated as a new Habitat family received the keys to their home on Thursday, May 31 at 27848 Havana Avenue, Hayward. The event marks the completion of the ninth property rehabilitated by Habitat for Humanity East Bay’s community volunteers along with the assistance from local business, contractors and corporations with funding from the federal government’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP). To strengthen neighborhoods severely affected by the sub-prime mortgage crisis, these joint efforts have helped to renovate nine abandoned and foreclosed homes in need of repair within Hayward’s Palma Ceia neighborhood. The City of Hayward and HEB received funding from California’s Department of Housing and Community Development under the first phase of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program. Following the dedication and completion of this phase of the NSP funding, a second phase for the renovation of 11 additional

homes in Hayward is underway using NSP II funding through Alameda County. Hayward City Councilmember and Mayor Pro Tempore Barbara Halliday and staff from Hayward’s Department of Housing, who have been administering the program, including Assistant City Manager Kelly Moraiu and HEB President and CEO Janice Jensen attended the ceremony at which the Tirfe/Meharena family and their three children accepted the keys to their new home. These new home owners have completed their 250-hour sweat equity-down payment for the property. Work on the home has included the demolition of three illegal and lowquality additions created at the rear of the property by previous occupants. The property’s garage had also been illegally converted and has now been renovated and restored to its intended purpose. Due to deferred maintenance, many repairs were needed on the home. The house now has a new roof; new plumbing and sewer line to the street; new fencing and landscaping; new kitchen counters, cabinets and flooring; energy efficient appliances, new water heater, new furnace and ducting; and new windows. The government and non-profit partners have chosen to work in the Palma Ceia neighborhood to make an impact in an area that has

been affected by the foreclosure crisis. HEB’s efforts to purchase vacant and bank-owned homes, and subsequent rehabilitation, aims to help to stabilize this neighborhood. Most of the nine homes have been In the Palma Ceia neighborhood within a two-block radius from the Havana Avenue property. Habitat will start work on another property in this neighborhood in June 2012 and anticipates purchasing yet another by the end of summer. Habitat East Bay is one of the Bay Area’s leading green affordable home builders. In addition to its work in Hayward, it is currently working on homes in Antioch, Bay Point and Oakland. HEB is active in other locations throughout the East Bay with more than 55 homes slated for construction or renovation. Praised for its success in creating home ownership opportunities for families with limited incomes, HEB is the largest Habitat affiliate in Northern California. It has been creating sustainable housing and revitalizing neighborhoods for over 24 years, serving more than 350 families throughout Alameda and Contra Costa County. Volunteers and homeowner applicants are needed. To learn more about Habitat East Bay or donate to the home building efforts, visit www.HabitatEB.org or call (510) 251-6304.

Page 35


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

June 8, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


June 8, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

Page 37

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510-659-1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org

Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org

Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.southhaywardumc.org

June 8, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


June 8, 2012 0

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

Page 39 31 Page

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2012-06-08  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you