Issuu on Google+

James Logan defeats #1 nationally-ranked Amador Valley in NCS championship

Local talent gets spotlight at annual competition

Page 20

Page 19

Page 24

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

June 5, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 45

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI PHOTOS BY SYED A. BILGRAMI The heat is returning to Fremont, but we’re not talking weather. Local cooks are gathering once more to see who dishes up the best chili brew at the 21st Annual Great Rotary Fremont Chili Cookoff. A big success since its first serving in March of 1992, the cookoff is a fun and festive fundraiser that brings together neighbors and communities to benefit local charities. Chili is the obvious prime order of the day with over two dozen specialty dishes on offer. Attendees can sample Niles Songbird Chili, Sgt. Slappy the Squirrel’s Machine Gun Chili, Line of Fire Chili from six-time champs continued on page 5

BY GUSTAVO LOMAS PHOTOS COURTESY OF DINO LABISTE Imagine looking outside the window just as you wake up to see a Monarch butterfly gently floating by. You had originally thought that only a nice cup of coffee would get you “up and at ‘em,” but now this simplistic sight has changed your mind. You begin to wonder about the Monarchs journey and realize just how little you know of butterflies in general. They are agile, graceful and somehow visually soothing, but just like most things, there has to be more to the story. Where do they prefer to live? Do they have any natural enemies? What do they eat? Why is it that they are not seen as much as they once were? continued on page 18 (L to R): Irvington Teacher Kim Parker, Student Angela Chen, Congressman Pete Stark

BY MAYA LITVAK PHOTO COURTESY OF SAKURA OF AMERICA Local Irvington High School student Angela Chen has been selected by a panel of judges as a winner in the U.S. Congressional Art Competition. Since 1982, the Congressional Institute has been sponsoring this nationwide high school visual arts competition each spring to encourage and recognize artistic talent. This competition provides members of Congress with a splendid opportunity to celebrate the artistic talent among their young constituents. Chen has been creating artwork since the age of five, and is currently working with Professor Bao Ping Chen of the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. The Art Competition chooses a single winner from each district within the states. Chen was selected as the champion of the Thirteenth Congressional District in California, represented by Congressman Pete Stark. She, like the 650,000 students before her, submitted her entry to her representative’s office. Her piece is a self-portrait drawn entirely with colored pencils, and is inspired by a photo taken of her while she was in New York. A panel of local artists chose her drawing to be the winner from the Thirteenth District. Sakura of America, headquartered in Hayward, has been providing “student awards,” in the form of art material supplies for the 13th US Congressional District’s annual Congressional Art Contest, since 1993. continued on page 4 Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

INDEX

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

M

assages aren’t just for spa day, they are also for real men who work hard and want to relax. Whether you sit at a desk or lift heavy objects, a good massage can make stiff muscles feel so much better. This Father’s Day, treat yourself or a special man in your life to a massage at the Washington Wellness Center. “A lot of men don’t think of pampering themselves with something like a massage,” said Laura Constantine, clinical coordinator at the Washington Women’s Center. “A massage is more than just an indulgence. It offers a number of health benefits.” In addition to feeling absolutely fantastic, massage can calm the nervous system and reduce stress and anxiety. It can also help to improve blood circulation, stimulate the lymphatic system, which aids the immune system, and prevent and relieve muscle cramps and spasms. Regular massage can help to prevent sports injuries and improve

flexibility for better athletic performance. It also triggers the release of endorphins, which help with pain. So if you experience back pain or a stiff neck, massage can help in a lot of ways. “So many men sit in front of a computer all day, which can really take a toll on your neck and back,” Constantine stated. “Massage can help you feel better after a long day at the office. Research also indicates that regular massage can help to lower blood pressure.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in three adults have high blood pressure, which increases the risk for heart disease and stroke. “If you have a stressful job or you are a busy dad, massage is a very enjoyable way to do something for your health,” she added. A 2010 study from Sweden showed that even hand and foot massage can significantly lower your heart rate, cortisol level, and insulin level, which lowers stress.

June 5, 2012

What’s the perfect gift for any Dad? How about 50 straight minutes of peace, quite and utter relaxation? Call the Washington Wellness Center at (510) 608-1301 to purchase a gift Dad can really use.

Relieving Pain and Stiffness Massage involves kneading, pressure, and fluid strokes on different areas of the body. It works on the soft tissues, relieving pain and stiffness in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments. A number of massages are offered at the Washington Wellness

Center, including Swedish massage, which uses long, fluid strokes and deep, circular motions to reduce tension, improve circulation, and relieve muscle tension. The sports massage is great after a workout. It is similar to the Swedish massage but is tailored for men who work out frequently or

are involved in sports. It helps improve flexibility, and prevent or treat injuries. Deep tissue massage works deep into the muscle to help ease and release muscular tension. It uses slower, more forceful strokes to target the deeper layers of the muscles and connective tissue. Therapeutic massage integrates neuromuscular therapy and reflexology with Swedish strokes to help relax and restore balance to the body. The hot stone massage helps the muscles relax, relieves pain, and improves circulation. Water-heated, smooth flat stones are placed in key areas like the neck and spine. If you stand on your feet all day, the foot massage may be for you. The foot reflexology is a gentle massage of the foot that helps to relieve tension. The Father’s Day special is a 50minute massage of your choice for $45 (regularly $70). Massages are offered by appointment at the Washington Wellness Center from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For your convenience, the Washington Wellness Center is open on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Washington Wellness Center is located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150 (Washington West). To schedule a massage or learn more about the Father’s Day special, call (510) 608-1301. To learn about other wellness programs at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

06/05/12

06/06/12

06/07/12

06/08/12

06/09/12

06/10/12

06/11/12

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Men's Health Expo 2011

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Think Pink 2011

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Washington Women's Center: Cholesterol and Women (Late Start)

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Disaster Preparedness

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Women's Health Conference: Pain and Rehabilitation Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

Learn More About Kidney Disease

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Learn More About Kidney Disease Prostate Enlargements and Cancer

Personal Emergency Preparedness Training

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Learn More About Kidney Disease World Kidney Day

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

World Kidney Day

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels!

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure

Learn More About Kidney Disease

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Living with Heart Failure

World Kidney Day Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11, 2012

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

IYour Concerns InHealth: Decisions in End of Life Care

The Weight to Success

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team Disaster Preparedness

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Heart Irregularities

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Diabetes Matters: Making Diabetes a Good Fit for Health

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Approach to Managing Diabetes

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Heart Irregularities

Keys to Healthy Eyes Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Community Based Senior Supportive Services Wound Care Update

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Learn Exercises to Help Get Back On Your Feet: Lower Your Blood Pressure New Treatment Options and Slow Your Heart Rate for Ankle Conditions


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

Facility’s Opening Marks the Beginning of a New Era for Joint Care

W

ashington Hospital formally opened the building that will house its new program, the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research at Washington Hospital, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house on Thursday, May 17. The Institute is a huge step forward for Washington Hospital’s award-winning joint replacement program. Today, Washington Hospital treats more than 1,200 joint replacement patients every year and is renowned for achieving consistently superior patient outcomes. Lead by co-medical directors Dr. John Dearborn and Dr. Alexander Sah, it is ranked as one of the top programs of its kind, not just in the Bay Area, but across the country. Washington Hospital has been named as a recipient of

Washington Township Health Care District board members Dr. Jacob Eapen, Patricia Danielson, RHIT, and Dr. William Nicholson join Dr. Alexander Sah, Dr. Benn Sah, and Dr. John Dearborn in cutting the ceremonial ribbon.

Facility tours were lead by volunteers and employees, including Institute for Joint Restoration and Research staff members Kristen Pulaski and Judy Gasior, R.N.

the HealthGrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award™ and Among the Top 5% in the Nation for the 6th year in a row (2007-2012), and as the best hospital for Joint Replacement in the Bay Area. “Completion of the facility represents an exciting milestone for

Washington Hospital Healthcare System’s main campus, both today and for the future,” noted Nancy Farber, Chief Executive Officer of Washington Hospital Healthcare System. “At Washington Hospital, it has been our tradition to look to the future while keeping our feet planted firmly on today’s ground.

Mobile Health Clinic Provides Quality Health Care in Your Neighborhood This summer, Washington Hospital Healthcare System's mobile health clinic, Washington On Wheels, will once again make it easy for everyone in our community to get screened for diabetes - for free.

Washington On Wheels (W.O.W) Mobile Health Clinic is providing free walkin diabetes screenings every Tuesday at the Fremont Family Resource Center (39155 Liberty Street, Fremont and four other Tri-City locations including New Haven Adult School located at 600 G Street in Union City. Washington on Wheels provides flu shots and a variety of immunizations including the Whooping Cough booster called Tdap. To see when Washington On Wheels will be in your neighborhood, visit www.whhs.com/wow or call (510) 608-3203

Washington On Wheels, or W.O.W., travels throughout the Tri-City area on a regular basis providing quality health care services to uninsured and underserved segments of the population and began providing free diabetes screenings in 2005. “One of the most important goals of W.O.W. is to improve the overall health of people in our region by increasing and expanding the reach of preventive health services, such as screenings,” explains Ruth Traylor, Washington Hospital’s community outreach director. “We want to screen as many people as possible because there’s an estimated 100,000 people in Alameda County that have diabetes and about one-third of them don’t know they have it.” continued on PAGE 14

practice and build confidence about navigating their surroundings outside the hospital. “The new facility was specifically constructed to meet the unique needs of joint replacement patients in every possible way,” said Dr. Dearborn. “All of the facility’s features are intended to support patient recovery, enabling people to resume their normal activities as quickly as possible through a direct transition from hospital to home.” The building’s overall design integrates properties of natural light and “green” features to support a healthy, healing environment for patients. “I am pleased that we also considered the health of the environment throughout the facility’s design and construction by making every possible effort to conserve

After the ribbon cutting ceremony, former patients, their families and members of the public toured the new building which houses the new Institute for Joint Restoration and Research at Washington Hospital.

In this way, we are always ready to fulfill the healthcare needs of our community.” Within the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research at Washington Hospital, related patient services are under one roof, with easy access to the main Hospital and surgical rooms. Other

features include all-private patient rooms and expansive therapy and common areas. The facility includes a semi-circular outdoor rehabilitation garden and patio area, with a range of walking surfaces and elevations. This area is specifically designed to give patients an opportunity to

and protect resources,” said Farber. The new facility for the Institute for Joint Restoration and Research at Washington Hospital will be open to patients in early June. To learn more about the award-winning joint replacement program at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/joint.


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

continued from page 1

When Chen heard the news of her recognition, she exclaimed, “I was very excited when I heard that I had won the competition, and overwhelmed when I was presented with the plane tickets.” The winner from each state is awarded two free tickets for a trip to attend the artists’ reception in Washington D.C. While there, Chen met Congressman Pete Stark and experienced the unique opportunity of having her winning artwork professionally framed and hung in the nation’s capitol where it will remain for a full year. Chen feels extremely honored to have her work displayed in the capitol, and is very appreciative of the opportunity of meeting and speaking with Congressman Pete Stark. She would also like to thank her teachers Mrs. Kim Parker and Mr. Tully Mintey for their support and wisdom throughout the competition. Chen is determined to attend an art school and major in a field relating to Entertainment Design and Concept Art. She plans on pursuing a career in the videogame and movie industries, creating characters, vehicles, and environments. Congratulations, Angela!

More bad news in state budget revisions SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE If voters reject a statewide tax initiative on the November ballot, the New Haven Unified School District faces the loss of an additional $1.3 million over previous estimates for the 201213 budget, the result of revisions to the state budget announced last week by Gov. Brown. “We now must plan to reduce our budget by more than $12 million,” Superintendent Kari McVeigh wrote in an e-mail to employees. “When the Governor announced his May budget revisions, it appeared public education had been spared further cuts, or at least those cuts would be relatively minor,” the Superintendent wrote. “But as details of the revisions became clear, it became evident that two key pieces of the funding model had been impacted.” The first is the deficit factor, the percentage by which an expected allocation of funds to a school district can be reduced based on the funding formulas specified by law. In the budget proposed in January, the Governor cited a deficit factor of 21.666 percent. In his revision, the deficit factor has been increased to 22.273 percent.

“That means our Revenue Limit, the funding we receive based on ADA (average daily attendance) has been reduced from $5,253.53 per student to $5,216.78,” Ms. McVeigh explained. “That translates to a loss of $475,104.” On top of that, the latest estimate of the additional per student loss if the Governor’s tax initiative fails has been raised from $370 per ADA to $441. That translates to a loss of $882.981. “The two factors combined equate to a loss of $1,340,085, meaning our estimated budget deficit for 2012-13 has grown from $11,123,965, at the time of our second interim report, to $12,464,050” Superintendent McVeigh wrote. The District’s deficit will shrink by about $3 million if New Haven voters pass Measure H, a parcel tax that will be decided in the June 5 primary election. And if the Governor’s tax initiative passes in November, the District will recoup about $5.5 million. “On the other hand,” Superintendent McVeigh wrote, “should the November initiative fail, the Governor’s budget authorizes additional cuts to the school year, a combined total of 15 days in 2012-13 and 2013-14, in addition to the five days per

year currently allowed. Our best thinking at this point is that it could mean at least 13 budget-reduction days in 2012-13.” The District was forced to cut the school year by five days this year, and employees took a total of six days without pay. The District has reduced the work year by three additional non-student days in its preliminary budget for 2012-13, meaning employees would lose nine days’ pay. In addition, some 70 teachers, received precautionary layoff notices this spring, as the District has been forced to plan for another increase to class sizes and the elimination of elementary school specialists (music, science, etc.) and middle school electives (music, art, etc.). Additionally, more than 30 precautionary layoff notices have been issued to administrators and classified employees. Counselors and all library/media specialists are at risk, and stipends for co-curricular and extra-curricular activities also are in jeopardy. Measure H would authorize a parcel tax of $180 per year, with citizen oversight, no funds for administrators’ salaries and exemptions available for seniors (65 and older) and the disabled (those receiving Supplemental Security Income payments). The measure, which will expire after four years, requires a two-thirds majority to pass.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 1

Holy Habaneros, Backdraft Chili by the Santa Clara Fire Department Volunteer Reserve Division, as well as entries from Super Suppers Fremont, Bad Boys of BBQ, Washington Hospital Healthcare System, and Oakland Firefighters Random Acts. An event ticket provides six tasting tickets and one voting ticket to proclaim your pick for best of the bunch. Popular vote will determine the top three winners. But chili is not the only choice for hungry visitors. A variety of other food and snacks will also be on the grounds along with cold drinks, beer, and wine. Classic rock band Full Throttle will be providing some of the day’s entertainment along with Jewels Hanson and Diablo Road, and StarStruck Theatre will give attendees a sneak peak at their upcoming show, “Legally Blonde, The Musical,” beginning July 27. Firefighters will be on hand to educate attendees through life saving demonstrations and fire safety presentations, as well as competing against other local fire stations in various tests of skill. Last year’s event exceeded the goal of $25,000 by far, bringing in a fantastic $34,000 for six local service groups. Recipients included the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation; HOPE Project Mobile Clinic through Abode Services; Tri-City Rotary Clinic, which provides medical care to Abode clients; Washington Hospital Healthcare System’s Washington on Wheels; the Martin C. Kauffman 100 Club, which provides financial support to families of fallen police and firefighters in Alameda County; and Tri-City Volunteers, whose mission is to help those in need. These services create a strong support system within the community as people work to care for each other and provide a positive and hope-filled environment for all to succeed and flourish. Join the Area 3 Rotary Clubs of Fremont for a great afternoon of food, entertainment, and raffle prizes and help make a lasting difference in our local community. Who knew a cup of chili could do so much? Tickets are $8 per person with advance registration (advance registration ends June 8 at 5 p.m.) and $10 at the gate. Ages six and under are free. For more details visit www.fremontchilicookoff.org. Great Rotary Fremont Chili Cookoff Sunday, June 10 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Saddle Rack 42011 Boscell Road, Fremont www.fremontchilicookoff.org Tickets: $8 in advance, $10 at the gate

Page 5


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Don’t Suffer in Silence, Learn About Treatment and Prevention

I

f you suffer from migraines, you’re not alone. According to the National Headache Foundation, more than 45 million people in the United States suffer from chronic, recurring headaches. Of these, 28 million—or nearly two thirds— are migraine sufferers. “Migraine headaches affect between 12 percent and 16 percent of U.S. population,” according to Vanessa Wilson, M.D., an internist who practices with Washington Township Medical Foundation. “Migraine headache pain is usually described as a dull, deep, steady pain; however, severe migraine headaches can be throbbing and volatile. Migraines typically start gradually and intensify over minutes or hours, and they’re often worsened by light, constant motion, or noise.” Dr. Wilson explains that, in addition to pain, migraines usually exhibit a host of neurological symptoms that fall outside of the scope of bad headache pain. An estimated 60 to 70 percent of people with migraines will have pain only on one side of their head. In addition to increased light and noise sensitivity, other symptoms include nausea and vomiting, as well as nasal congestion and teary eyes. “There are migraines that have what we call aura,” she says. “An aura means patients have other symptoms that actually signal that a migraine is going to start even before they experience any pain—such as flashing lights or bright spots, zigzag lines, and sometimes they even smell something different. “For some, they have numbness or tingling in hands as part of an aura, and occasionally they experience muscle weakness and a change in speech patterns.” Dr. Wilson says a number of environmental factors can bring on a migraine headache.

“We call these migraine triggers,” she says. “It could be stress, worrying, menstrual periods, birth control pills, physical exertion, fatigue or lack of sleep, head trauma, as well as foods like alcohol, chocolate, coffee, NutraSweet®, and nitrates and nitrites, which occur in preserved foods. “Even medications can trigger migraines, including those with estrogen, as well as nitroglycerin for chest pain, and certain types of blood pressure medication like hydralazine.” Perfume, smoke, or any strong odor can also trigger a migraine. Another environmental trigger is dieting, which can cause low blood sugar. Also, skipping meals, certain altitudes, and even changes in the weather can cause these headaches. So, what are some clues that you should talk to the doctor? “If it’s an ongoing, chronic problem, or newly onset, patients should be evaluated because there might be a trigger that can be easily removed or altered to help prevent future migraines,” according to Dr. Wilson. She adds that treatments can be given so that it doesn’t become a debilitating illness, which is important, because migraines tend to be a chronic issue for sufferers. “When migraines are mild, patients can be advised what to do to prevent them and taught about warning signs that indicate the need for urgent evaluation,” she says. “Medications that can cause migraines, such as those for blood pressure, can be changed. There are a lot of things patients can do, as well as triggers that can be identified.” Simple changes like getting enough sleep and not skipping meals sometimes can be enough to improve an individual’s issues

Dr.Vanessa Wilson, an internist with Washington Township Medical Foundation, works with patients to identify migraine triggers and develop a treatment plan. She advises anyone who suffers from migraines to seek help and address the problem before it becomes debilitating.

with migraines. However, Dr. Wilson says, certain types of migraine headaches can be disabling and require additional measures. “For women who experience migraines during their menstrual cycle, it’s usually when the estrogen level starts to go down,” she explains. “Depending on how severe the migraines are, there can be ways to help patients prevent the headache from happening. “These migraines typically occur two days before the menstrual period and three days after, and there’s usually a time that they can predict when their headache is going to happen. A pattern can be easily seen with patients who have regular cycles, and we can identify the timing.” Dr. Wilson advises patients to make a headache diary to see if they’re following a certain pattern with their headaches, and if the headaches are related to the menstrual cycle, she says treatments can be geared toward that particular trigger. Overall, when it comes to migraine headaches, she says the best advice is to seek help and make sure to address the problem before it becomes debilitating. “It does affect your lifestyle, and if people can be aware of what to do when they feel a migraine coming on, then they can avoid getting into patterns of overusing or abuses certain medications. And again,

W

omen face a number of health issues that are unique to being a woman. Women’s reproductive systems can affect their health needs, even if they never become mothers. “We can help women take charge of their health,” said Dr. Jing Dai, a boardcertified obstetrician and gynecologist with the Washington Township Medical Foundation and a member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “Our practice offers comprehensive OB/Gyn care, which in-

Dr. Dai advises women to stay on top of their health by getting annual checkups and regular health screenings.

Dr. Jing Dai, a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist with the Washington Township Medical Foundation, enjoys seeing and treating patients in all stages of life. For more information on the Women’s Health practice at Washington Township Medical Foundation, visit www.mywtmf.com.m

cludes a variety of screening tests and medical and surgical therapies for women, and is often recognized as one of the most progressive OB/Gyn groups in the Bay Area.” She said it’s important for women to stay on top of their health by getting annual checkups and regular health screenings like Pap tests and mammograms. The Pap test checks for cervical cancer, which has been drastically reduced since the test was introduced in the 1950s. According to Dai, women should begin having a Pap test at age 21 and have regular follow-ups depending on their age and results of their last test.

“Even if you don’t need a Pap test every year, you should still get an annual pelvic exam,” she said. “A pelvic exam helps us evaluate the size and health of the vagina, cervix, uterus, and ovaries. It is an important part of preventive health care for women. We always ask about the menstrual cycle in those visits because that is a huge indication of overall health.” She said irregular periods can be a sign of problems with the endocrine system, which secretes hormones that regulate the body, and could indicate thyroid issues, fibroids, polyps, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and cancer. “In our office, we will tailor a treatment plan for each individual patient whether it’s surgical or medical,” Dai added. Baby Talk While having a baby is an exciting event, getting good quality care during the pregnancy is important for ensuring that both mother and baby will be healthy. Dai recommends that couples who want to conceive have a preconception consultation.

June 5, 2012

“We can go through their medical and family history, talk about any health problems, and get prepared for a pregnancy,” she said. “It’s best that women be at peak health when they conceive.” But Dai said often women don’t call her office until they think they are pregnant. The first doctor’s visit should be eight weeks into the pregnancy if there are no known complications. “If they haven’t had a preconception consultation, the first visit takes about an hour,” she said. “We need to go over their medical history at that point and run some tests.” An ultrasound that captures an image of the baby inside the womb is taken on the first visit. A number of genetic screenings are also conducted to test for medical conditions like Down’s syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and SMA (a rare muscle disorder). Women should see their doctor every four weeks in the beginning of the pregnancy, she said. After 28 weeks, doctor visits should be three weeks apart and every week in the last month of the pregnancy.

there are medications that can trigger migraines also, so they need to be aware and treated appropriately.” When it comes to acute treatment for migraines, she says taking an over-thecounter medication like ibuprofen can be effective for some people, but it’s important to talk to o the doctor about the proper dosage guidelines to manage the headache best. “It’s important to rescue yourself from the symptoms so that the migraine doesn’t end up lasting for several days,” she says. “Medications that work fast—called triptans—can often relieve the headache in two hours.” She adds that depending on the frequency of migraines, she can help patients prevent them through daily medication that works to decrease frequency, intensity, and duration of the headaches. “Generally migraines are better treated if they’re treated early rather than waiting until you’re in bad shape and need higher doses of medications,” Dr. Wilson concludes. Your health care, your way For more information about Washington Township Medical Foundation and its more than 60 board-certified physicians with expertise in a broad range of medical specialties—from neurosurgery to pediatrics—visit www.mywtmf.com.

“Regular visits during pregnancy are important because we can monitor the health of both the mom and baby,” Dai explained. “We can check the heart rate of the baby, make sure the pregnancy is progressing normally, and prevent any complications.” Calling it Quits The final stage in a women’s reproductive cycle is menopause, when menstrual periods have stopped for 12 months. This happens at about age 50 to 51, although it can vary widely, she said. With menopause, the ovaries stop functioning. The ovaries produce eggs and female hormones such as estrogen, which regulate menstruation. The transition into menopause is called perimenopause. During this transitional stage, the symptoms each woman experiences may be different. Dai said scientists are still trying to figure out all the factors that influence this transition. “Perimenopause is the few years prior to menopause when women experience a variety of symptoms, which include hot flashes, low libido, irregular periods, trouble sleeping, and mood swings,” she explained. “Some women experience life-altering symptoms while other women barely notice.” Dai said that it seems to be influenced by heredity. Women should look to their mothers’ experience or that of an older sister to determine how perimenopause might be for them. Hormone replacement therapy can help to alleviate some of the symptoms, but it can increase the risk for heart disease, breast cancer, and stroke. The current protocol is to prescribe the lowest dose for the least amount of time, she said. “We try to find other ways to address the symptoms,” Dai added. “Hormone replacement therapy may be needed if the symptoms are seriously affecting a patient’s quality of life.” For more information about women’s health services offered through the Washington Township Medical Foundation and a list of locations, visit www.mywtmf.com.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ohlone Humane Society

Building a brighter future, one squirrel box at a time BY LAUREN KAWAKAMI, OHS SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR

C

ompassion for animals is a concept we adults are familiar with. Many of us support animal welfare through donations and volunteering; others lead by example through acts of kindness or lifestyle. Providing humane education to children helps them to establish a lifelong respect and empathy for all living creatures. We recently collaborated on a project with a local Junior Girl Scout troop who wanted to make a difference for wildlife. The efforts of these young ladies have had a far-reaching effect on our community… and it all began with a humble squirrel box. We first met Junior Girl Scout Troop #30323 when they visited the Ohlone Humane Society Wildlife Rehabilitation Center (OHS WRC) to earn their Wildlife

leased back to the wild, their box went with them along with a plentiful food supply for the first few days to make sure they acclimated to their new surroundings. A resounding success! Ohlone Humane Society was invited to

participate in the Girl Scouts of Northern California’s centennial celebration, the One

Junior Girl Scout Troop #30323 with Liza (troop leader), David (OHS WRC manager), Ankit and Saundra (OHS WRC volunteers)

badge. The girls so enjoyed learning about wildlife rescue and rehabilitation that they decided their Bronze Award project would benefit animals. They conferred with David Anderson, OHS WRC manager, and decided to make screech owl and squirrel boxes from scratch. After the girls approached local vendors for materials, Dale Hardware and Hulbert Lumber responded with generous donations. Both companies were so tickled by these young gals taking on a construction project that they gave the troop more than the usual allowance. Then during meetings at OHS WRC, the girls tackled challenges which included reading design plans (yes, there are patterns for owl/squirrel boxes!) to cutting and assembling plywood parts under the watchful eye of David. For most of the girls, this was their first time handling power tools and they did a fantastic job with assistance from David as well as Saundra and Ankit, OHS WRC volunteers. The troop completed their project by creating a trifold poster board and doing an oral presentation to qualify for the Bronze Award. Success! The Junior Girl Scouts’ parents, especially troop leader Liza Hintzman, are to be commended for enabling these gals to meet challenges that build self-esteem and expand their potential. Truly, the sky is the limit! The first to benefit from the owl and squirrel boxes (the designs differ only in the placement of the holes) were three orphaned baby squirrels at the OHS WRC. After spending time in an incubator and then an indoor carrier, the squirrels matured to where they could be moved to an outdoor pen. David installed one of the Junior Girl Scout boxes so the babies would have a snug and safe haven. When the squirrels were re-

Hundred Fun Hundred. 20,000 Girl Scouts from 38 states and five other countries converged on the Pleasanton Fairgrounds for a day of activities, education and fun. We joined other animal welfare organizations such as Muttville and SaveABunny in the “Critter Corner,” introducing Girl Scouts to different animals and humane programs. This was the perfect venue to feature Troop #30323’s presentation and boxes! Indeed, Girl Scouts, troop leaders and parents from different parts of the U.S. and the world were inspired by their presentation and are considering animal welfare projects for their Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards! The owl and squirrel box project has had a ripple effect through the community, beginning with the girls and spreading to their family, friends and other Girl Scout troops. While benefitting wildlife, constructing squirrel boxes has also meant building a brighter future through humane education for our children. Compassion for animals can start with the simple act of hammering a nail into a piece of wood. Ohlone Humane Society is an advocate for all animals. From the rescue and adoption of companion animals to rehabilitating injured or orphaned wildlife, we care for animals in the Tri-City area and beyond. Just as important as supporting animals is our community outreach—touching the lives of people through animal assisted therapy, spay/neuter assistance, humane education and collaborative projects like the squirrel and owl boxes. For more information about Ohlone Humane Society and our programs, call (510) 792-4587 (Advice Line) or email Info@OhloneHumaneSociety.org.

Baby squirrel getting acquainted with a Junior Girl Scout squirrel box

Page 7


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD June 1 Taco Truck armed robbery occurred at 44540 S. Grimmer Boulevard. The suspect is described as a white male, 20 yrs old, beige shirt wearing a

“Sharks” hat and armed with a pistol. He fled in a black Honda. Employees at the Transfer Station/Recycling Center on Boyce Road called after locating a grenade on the conveyor belt/sorting area. The business was evacuated and ACSO Bomb Squad responded and recovered the item. Sergeant Tang supervised the scene. Fremont PD was advised of a “man with a handgun running at

Peralta/Maple.” Officers head that way anticipating a 211 (robbery) and moments later the Taco Truck employee calls in the 211. Patrol, Traffic and Street Crimes flood the area and Officer Decker locates a possible suspect in the fruit stand parking lot near Fremont/Beard and detains the driver. The driver is positively identified as the suspect. Detectives responded and continued the investigation.

Burglary suspects arrested which are commonly used to commit residential burglaries. A third suspect, believed to be a “lookout,” was located in a parked vehicle near the victim’s

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER TRISH YOUNG, MILPITAS PD At approximately 9:18 p.m. on May 24, a victim called the Milpitas Police Department to report a suspect attempting to enter her residence. Dispatch was told that the suspects repeatedly

Yao Saechao

Chan Saechao

rang the doorbell, but she didn’t answer the door. The suspects then entered the backyard by jumping over a locked side gate.

Milpitas Police officers, including a K-9 Unit, established a perimeter around the residence. The K9 Unit alerted the suspects to exit the backyard or the dog would be released. The suspects jumped a fence and were located prowling in the backyard of a residence on Tiny Street. Two suspects, later identified as Yao Saechao and Chan Saechao, were taken into custody without incident. One of the suspects was in possession of miscellaneous items

Chanchew Saelee

residence and has been identified as Chanchew Saelee. All three suspects, Sacramento residents, were booked into the Santa Clara County main jail for attempted burglary and conspiracy. Yao Saechao was also charged with possession of burglary tools.

Union City Police Log SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD March 24 Officers responded to the area of Dyer Street near Cabello Street to investigate a strong-arm robbery. The suspect, a black male adult, grabbed a purse off the victims shoulder and fled the area. The victim was shaken up but not injured. An officer responded to a residence located on the 4800 block of Rocklin Drive to investigate an interrupted burglary. The victim told the investigating officer that he heard a strange noise inside his residence. When he exited his bedroom to investigate, he saw two black male adults running out of his house. The victim told police that his personal computer was stolen during the break-in. Unfortunately, the victim took approximately two hours to report this incident to police which increased the chances of the suspects slipping away un-noticed. Officers responded to the area of Bridgepoint Place to investigate an armed robbery. Two black males between the ages of 19 and 23 years old confronted the vic-

tim at gunpoint and demanded her purse. The victim complied and the suspects fled the area. One of the suspects was additionally described as having blond tips on his short 3-inch dreads. March 25 An officer on routine patrol in the area of Dyer Street and Alvarado Boulevard saw two subjects drinking in public. The officer stopped to investigate and found that one of the subjects had a concealed switchblade knife in his possession. The suspect was arrested for possession of a dangerous weapon. March 26 A commercial burglary occurred at 29540 Union City Boulevard in which the suspects broke into the adjacent unoccupied business that was not alarmed. The suspects then cut a hole in the sheetrock separating the two businesses to make entry to the victim’s business and stole an unknown amount of cash. Officers responded to the strip mall located on the corner of Alvarado Boulevard and Dyer Street to investigate a person brandishing a machete. Arriving officers

contacted the subject in the parking lot near the Starbucks coffee store. The subject was found to be under the influence of a controlled substance and arrested. A woman reported being sexually assaulted while attending a house party in the Seven Hills Neighborhood. The investigations unit responded, conducted a search of the residence, and arrested one of the suspects. This case is ongoing. The Burger King restaurant located on Decoto Road was robbed by a suspect described as a black male adult, about 6 feet tall who entered the store and pointed a handgun at the clerk while demanding money from the cash register. The suspect then fled the scene. March 27 Officers responded to a domestic disturbance at a residence on the 32000 block of Endeavor Way. Arriving officers found that the suspect had arrived at his exgirlfriend’s residence to visit his young child in violation of a court order. This caused an argument between the suspect and the continued on page 9

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD May 30 At 7:05 a.m., Officer Heckman responded to the 39100 block of Levi Street for a reported auto burglary. A Nissan 350 Z had its passenger window smashed and the unknown subject(s) attempted to remove the stereo causing damage to the vehicle. May 31 Officer Warren and Detective Todd stopped Ray Florez (transient) on Amador at 9:47 p.m. Florez was active to CDC parole and Officer Jackman and K-9 Eliot performed a drug sniff of the car. 7.3 grams of meth, a scale and a pipe where located in the vehicle. Florez was arrested for transportation of narcotics, parole violation, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was booked at Fremont Jail. Officers responded to McDonald’s south at 11:07 p.m. on a report of a 211 (robbery) in the parking lot involving Craig’s List. The suspect and victim met in the parking lot and the suspect pulled out a handgun and stole the victim’s phone. June 1 Officer Neithercutt arrested Jason Rivera of Newark at 3:12 p.m. for a warrant while checking on a suspicious vehicle in the area of Port Sailwood. Rivera was cited at the scene. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Judge Robert McGuiness has not decided if we get to move forward with our evidence that we qualify as a Newspaper of General Circulation for the City of Fremont. We will let you know as soon as we find out. Thank you again for all of your prayers and support.

Letter to the Editor

Support for Tri-City Voice What angers me is that it seems the Tri-City Voice is being punished for choosing to provide free copies of its newspaper as a public service. I do not feel the Tri-City Voice should be required to offer "free" copies of its newspaper to the public. However, I applaud the Tri-City Voice for choosing to make legally-required public notice information available to the public for FREE! What constitutes "substantial" subscriptions in this scenario? I feel the Tri-City Voice, if current pressure from BANG [Bay Area News Group] is supported by the Court, will be forced to change its business plan in order to survive. I do not see how a requirement for Tri-City Voice to sell more subscriptions will allow Tri-City Voice to compete (with itself ) by continuing to give out free copies. In my opinion, the public would be the ultimate loser if BANG prevails. Faye McKay, Fremont

continued from page 8

Union City Police Log

ex-girlfriends parents that escalated when the suspect began to assault family members. The suspect fled the area prior to police arrival. Later, the same night, the victims were confronted once again by the suspect while shopping at Wal*Mart in the Union Landing Shopping Center. The suspect grabbed the baby from the shopping cart and began to assault the grandfather. The family pled with the suspect to let the baby go, but to no avail. This led to the suspect and grandfather fighting in the aisles. At some point, the baby’s mother was able to secure the child. During the course of the melee, the suspect struck the grandfather with a frying pan amongst other items prior to fleeing the scene. Officers were able to talk the suspect into turning himself in at the police station the following morning. The suspect was charged with assault with a deadly weapon, child endangerment, and violation of a court order. Another domestic disturbance was reported on the 900 block of G Street. Arriving officers found a male victim bleeding from his nose. The victim advised officers that he and his new girlfriend were attending a house party when his girlfriend’s ex-boyfriend suddenly showed up and began to batter him. The suspect fled prior to police arrival. May 28 Officers responded to the 4400 block of Corto Monterey for a report of an in-progress shooting. Officers located a 21-year-old male victim inside of a residence who was suffering from gunshot wounds. The victim was transported to a local area hospital for non-life threatening injuries. The victim and suspects became engaged in a verbal altercation that escalated into a physical assault. During the physical

fight, one suspect pulled a firearm and began shooting at the victim. The suspects fled the area on foot in separate directions. A nearby Union City Community Policing Officer observed a subject who matched the suspect’s description. The officer engaged in a short foot pursuit and captured the fleeing suspect. The suspect reached into his waistband and pulled out the handgun, dropping it just in time to prevent the officer from having to shoot him. A short time later, Detectives went to a nearby residence to conduct a follow-up related to this case. When officers began to make entry into the home, the second suspect fled out the rear of the residence and began jumping nearby fences. The second suspect was captured as he attempted to flee the perimeter. The first suspect has been identified as Jabri Thibeaux, a 23-year-old Union City resident. Jabri Thibeaux was arrested for attempted homicide, conspiracy, and resisting arrest. He is being held at the Fremont Jail. The second suspect is 17-year-old juvenile male, whose name is not being released because of his age. The juvenile was arrested for attempted homicide and conspiracy. He was transported to juvenile hall .A third person was arrested for her role in this crime. She has been identified as Malysa Thibeaux, an 18-year-old Union City resident. Malysa Thibeaux was arrested for attempted homicide, conspiracy, and resisting arrest. The victim is a resident of Union City who was treated and released from the hospital.

Trish Nunes retires SUBMITTED BY IDA WONG After 33 ? years of teaching, and handing out millions of “Dungeon Dollars,” beloved P.E. teacher Trish Nunes is retiring from Warm Springs Elementary School. The community is invited to join in on a celebratory party Friday, June 8, from 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to dress up like Ms. Nunes. For more information, please join our Ms. Nunes is Retiring! Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ 247050365387511/.

Celebration for Trish Nunes Friday, June 8 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Speeches: 5 p.m. Warm Springs Elementary School Multi-Purpose Room 47370 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-1611

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

History

June 5, 2012

Garden of Allah

P

acific Mushroom Company bought property one mile north of Niles on the Hayward-Oakland highway in

and Pop White” ran the rink, checked out wood-wheeled skates and sold soft drinks to the kids. Writers, of the 1950 edition of

for “Garden of Allah, the Controversial Niles Highway nite spot,” until the hall could meet city building code and fire-safety

Garden of Allah, late 60’s early 70’s

December 1928. The Company was erecting the framework of a building about 60x100 feet to meet their needs in January 1929. The local paper reported that the first mushrooms were shipped from Niles May 30, 1929. Dances were also being held at that location, called “Garden of Allah,” at this time. A Social Dance was advertised for “the de Luce Ball Room of the Garden of Allah, Niles, for Saturday evening, July 13, 1929.” Music was to be by Brady’s sixpiece orchestra. A note at the bottom of the ad read, “If you have not been attending these dances you sure have been missing a good time.” This would indicate that dances had been held there during the past few months. A dance advertised for August 29, 1931 featured the “Boy Fields Hot Foot Players, an Oakland Chevrolet Orchestra” and noted that dances were held every Saturday night; dances continued through the thirties. The Junior Chamber of Commerce sponsored several dances here including a New Year’s Dance in 1936. Then things changed. An ad for a dance at the Niles Pavilion in 1948 noted that this was formerly the Garden of Allah. A 1949 ad for “The New Rollerhaven” noted that it was the former Garden of Allah. The famous dance hall was now a roller skating rink. The dance hall and land were reported owned by Julio and Amalia Perugi who operated a mushroom farm in the big building behind the skating rink. “Mom

the History of Washington Township, noted only that the Pacific Mushroom Company was one of the industries that had come and gone by then. No other details were given. Chuck and “Black Jack” Wayne bought the hall in 1950. They hired country artist Ed Cima to transform the Garden by painting cartoon cowboys and western scenes in a whimsical mural over the walls. He also hand painted the ceiling to look like the Taj Mahal. They tried to change the name but people wouldn’t accept it, so it remained the Garden of Allah. In its heyday, the Garden catered to rock and roll fans on Friday nights, country western

lovers on Saturdays and square dancers on Sundays. People came from all over the Bay Area and beyond to fill the hall, especially when there were well-known artists there. It was said to be “the only country dance hall in the business.” All the big western bands and stars came there. One writer referred to the hall in 1974 as “a forlorn white barn of a building.” Residents recalled the mushroom sheds and damp manure piles behind the hall as a stinking mess. A 1952 ad read “Rollerhaven, Former Garden of Allah, will Feature Roller Skating Tuesday, Friday and Saturday Evenings. At unscheduled times the rink is open for special or private parties. “An ad for a 1952 dance featured “Cottonseed Clark’s Down Home Jamboree with Ed Tate and His Western Band.” In 1957, the City of Fremont refused to issue a business license

requirements. The building was still owned by the Wayne brothers at that time. A New Year’s Eve party was held at the Garden of Allah in 1964. Less than an hour after the party closed, a fire broke out and gutted the old wooden building. It took about 45 minutes for firemen to extinguish the blaze. The new snorkel fire truck saw its first duty at this fire. Chuck Wayne said that following the fire, he locked the door and didn’t go inside for five years. A 1974 article referred to another fire that further gutted the hall. “The bandstand was still in the corner. The hat check cage and ticket booth were intact, but the roof was caved in, the windows were boarded over, and the dance hall was warped.” Chuck recalled that these five acres were where he and his wife, Johnnie Ruth, had raised their three children and where he still had an office for his trucking business. The site was zoned industrial and for sale. The city received complaints and determined it was a “dangerous building.” Chuck sold the property in 1982 and the building was demolished; the end of the famous “Garden of Allah.” The original source of the name Garden of Allah for the Niles site remains a mystery at this time although there are several possibilities. Robert Hichens, an English writer, published a novel in 1905 called Garden of Allah. The novel was adapted for a play in New York City in 1909. Stage and screen actress Alla Nazimora acted in the play in 1913 and built a mansion on Sunset Boulevard in 1919 known as “The Garden of Allah.” She later expanded the property into a complex of villas that became home to many famous people. Although we don’t know the exact source of the name for the famous Niles dance hall, it was a popular and familiar site during its heyday.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Publication party SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL Everyone is invited to the CSUEB English Department’s Annual Publication Party for the 29th annual “Occam’s Razor,” a collection of current student poetry and fiction. The gathering will get underway at 7 p.m. Monday, June 11 in the Biella Room of the University Library on the Hayward Campus. There is no charge for admission. There will be readings by poets and fiction writers appearing in the issue, an open mic, and refreshments. Copies of the new “Occam’s Razor" will be available at no cost to attendees. “Everybody is invited, all students are honored - we become one as a community of writers," said English professor Stephen Gutierrez, who is organizing the gathering with colleague Susan Gubernat. English Professor Don Markos established the magazine in 1989 with the aid of

lottery money. He continues to do the typesetting and layout that ready the book-like magazine for publication. Markos will be among the honored party guests, and the winners of a poetry contest in his name will be among the readers. Information on the party and on “Occam’s Razor” is available by contacting Gutierrez or Gubernat at steve.gutierrez@csueastbay.edu or susan.gubernat@csueastbay.edu. CSUEB English Department’s Annual Publication Party Monday, June 11 7 p.m. Cal State East Bay Biella Room of the University Library 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward steve.gutierrez@csueastbay.edu susan.gubernat@csueastbay.edu Free

The Finland Phenomenon SUBMITTED BY JANE BARK After showing American Teacher, which reveals what's wrong with many American public schools, the Tri-City Documentaries Second Saturday Series turns to exploring how our schools might be improved in The Finland Phenomenon: Inside the World’s Most Surprising School System. Finland’s education system has consistently ranked among the best in the world for more than a decade. The puzzle is, why Finland? Documentary filmmaker Bob Compton and Harvard researcher Dr. Tony Wagner decided to find out. The results of their research are captured in a much-discussed new film, The Finland Phenomenon. In the 60-minute film, Dr. Wagner guides the viewer through an inside look at the

world’s finest education system. A lifelong educator and author of the best-selling book The Global Achievement Gap, Dr. Wagner is uniquely qualified to explore and explain Finland’s success. From within actual classrooms and through interviews with students, teachers, parents, administrators, and government officials, Dr. Wagner reveals the surprising factors accounting for Finland’s rank as the #1 education system in the world.

Redwood Road lane closure

The Finland Phenomenon Saturday June 9 1:30 pm Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont (510) 797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

SUBMITTED BY BILL LEPERE

Beginning Sunday evening, June 10, the southbound lanes of Redwood Road in Castro Valley, between Jamison Way and Castro Valley Boulevard, will be closed to traffic for sanitary sewer pipeline installation. The southbound lanes will be closed Sunday evening through Friday morning from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. and will be open to traffic during the daytime hours. The closure is expected to last the weeks of June 10 through June 15, June 17 through June 22 and June 24 through June 29. During the sanitary sewer pipeline installation, no through traffic will be allowed. Limited access is available to emergency vehicles. Detour signs will be in place to guide motorists around the closure area. When travelling through the construction and detour areas, drivers are advised to exercise caution and adhere to all traffic regulations. Any changes to the construction schedule can be found on the Alameda County Public Works Agency website at www.acgov.org/pwa.

Khilafat Leadership in Islam, Political and Spiritual SUBMITTED BY SAADIA AHMED The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, which has an international scope and spans over 200 countries, categorically rejects use of violence in any form, and it divests Islam of fanatical beliefs and practices by vigorously championing Islam's true and essential teachings of moderation, acceptance, love and justice. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community offers a workable solution by reviving true Islamic teachings of peace, tolerance and brotherhood of mankind. This community is a dynamic, reformist organization within Islam which offers Khilafat as the functional leadership concept to achieve lasting peace in the world. It firmly believes that Islam offers perfect balance of life in pursuit of attending to worldly needs all the while acting righteously and fulfilling the right of Almighty God. Please join us at this special event where we discuss the role of Khilafat; Spiritual and Political Leadership in Islam. Khilafat Leadership in Islam, Political and Spiritual Sunday, June 10 5 p.m. Milpitas Community Center 457 East Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas http://www.BaitulBaseer.org

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

Bank of America hires small business bankers SUBMITTED BY BEN TANNER Bank of America has hired more than 70 small business bankers throughout Northern California to provide guidance to local small business owners. The additions are part of the company’s previously announced plan to hire approximately 1,000 small business bankers nationwide. • Bay Area – 31 hires • Fresno Area – 14 hires • Sacramento – 14 hires • San Jose and Monterey Bay – 15 hires According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there are more than 3.4 million small businesses in California. These businesses represent over 99 percent of all employers and over half (51 percent) of the private-sector workforce. In the Bay Area alone, there are more than 85,000 small and new startup companies, representing 98 percent of the city’s businesses. Additionally, according to the 2011 Index of Silicon Valley, the number of start-up companies in the Silicon Valley area continues to grow with new firm openings increasing by 48 percent, resulting in 20,200 net new business establishments, in recent years. For more information, visit www.bankofamerica.com Payout rates include return of premium, interest and mortality credits. Rates are effective 02/06/12 Guarantees are subject to contact terms, exclusions and limitations, and the claims paying ability of (NYLIAC). This contract has no cash value and no withdrawals are permitted prior to the income start date. Income payments are guaranteed at least as long as the annuitant is living, providing the annuitant is alive on hte designated income start date. The Life Only payout option does not provide for payments to beneficiaries either prior to or after the designated income start date. 1. Based on a male annuitant, $100,000 premium and Life Only payout option, Rates are subject to change and payout will vary with age, gender, payout option selected and premium amount. Actual amounts are dependent upon interest rates in effect at time of policy issue. Income is payable for the life of the annuitant only. Certain limitations may apply to payout options, including age restrictions. NYLIAC S&P - AA+, Fitch - AAA, Moody's - Aaa, AM Best - A++ as of 08.08.2011. *Issued by New York Life Insurance & Annuity Corporation (NYLIAC) (a Delaware Corporation), a wholly owned subsidiary of New York Life Insurance Company. Available in jurisdictions where approved.

Day of stunts, stagecraft on presidential campaign BY KASIE HUNT ASSOCIATED PRESS FREMONT, Calif. (AP), – Stunts, stagecraft, scripts – and a touch of the surreal – shaped the presidential campaign Thursday as Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama sought an edge on voters' No. 1 issue, the economy. On one coast, Romney made a surprise trip to the former California headquarters of solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra to accuse Obama of currying favor with campaign supporters by giving a federal loan to the green energy company that later went bankrupt. “This half-a-billion-dollar taxpayer investment represents a serious conflict of interest on the part of the president and his team,” the Republican presidential candidate said as he stood outside the shuttered company and held it up as Exhibit A of presidential missteps on the economy. He offered no proof of his claim during a visit that was shrouded in a highly unusual amount of secrecy because, aides said, the campaign feared Obama would interfere with his Republican rival's plans to appear there. At roughly the same time across the country in Boston, Obama's campaign staged its own event outside Massachusetts' Statehouse to argue that Romney's record as governor from 2003 to 2007 proves he is ill-prepared to manage the nation's economy. “Romney economics didn't work then and it won't work now,” Obama campaign strategist David Axelrod said at a news conference, pointing to a poor record of job creation, increased fees and the addition of $2.6 billion to the state's debt on Romney's watch. Axelrod's appearance attracted several dozen Romney supporters, including many who protested loudly by chanting “Where are the jobs?” and holding signs that said “Obama isn't working.” The competing events, complete with rival Web videos and

frenzied backers, made for an oddball day on the campaign trail and showed the degree to which Obama and Romney's teams are trying to undercut each other's economic credentials during the nation's slow-moving recovery, easily the top issue for voters. The jockeying also came one day before Friday's May employment report, which will offer the latest window into the nation's economy. Economists were expecting the report to say that employers added 158,000 jobs, which would be better than the past two months but well below the winter's pace of 252,000 jobs per month. They also expect no change in the unemployment rate, which was 8.1 percent in April. Obama, himself, stayed above the fray of the day, embracing an opportunity to appear presidential as his Republican rival struggled to draw attention to his campaign. The Democratic incumbent was at the White House on Thursday. He appeared with former President George W. Bush, the man he repeatedly blames for the nation's economic turmoil, for the unveiling of Bush's official portrait during a rare, nonpolitical event in an election year. But on this day, Obama had little to say about the campaign and kept a bipartisan tone during the unveiling. “We may have our differences politically, but the presidency transcends those differences. We all love this country,” Obama said as the last two Republican presidents, George W. Bush, and his father, George H.W. Bush, looked on. Romney was far more direct. He staged what amounted to almost a taunt to the president by traveling to the shuttered Solyndra plant here. His campaign didn't announce the event location or subject in advance and barred reporters from disclosing the venue until arrival. A senior Romney aide said the campaign was concerned the Obama administration would work with local officials to prevent Romney from holding an event there. Yet, for all the preparation, and underscoring the challenge of being the challenger, Romney's event was pre-empted by live cable TV coverage of the Bush portrait unveiling. Solyndra has emerged as a vulnerability for Obama because the company received $535 million in loan guarantees from Obama's Energy Department in 2009 only to go bankrupt two years later,

sparking an ongoing investigation. The loan guarantee program, designed to spur alternative energy projects, was created during the Bush administration. Republicans have been assailing Obama on Solyndra for months, partly by pointing to the connection between Obama fundraisers and the company while arguing that the president used government policies to benefit campaign supporters. Steve Spinner, a former Energy Department official, raised at least $500,000 for Obama's campaign. Emails released earlier by congressional investigators show that Spinner was actively involved in the Solyndra loan despite pledging to step aside because his wife's law firm represented the company. One of Solyndra's investors was the foundation of George Kaiser, an Oklahoma billionaire who has supported Obama. Kaiser has said he was not active in helping Solyndra receive the loan. White House records show that Kaiser was a frequent visitor to the White House. He has said he did not discuss Solyndra on those visits, although the company's name did come up at least once during one of those visits. The administration says the loan was awarded on the merits and that extensive GOP efforts have failed to turn up a “smoking gun.” The Energy Department's inspector general so far has only criticized the Energy Department for general problems with the loan program. It has not addressed charges of political cronyism. But Romney suggested a political payoff, saying: “Free enterprise to the president means taking money from the taxpayers and giving it freely to his friends.” At the Obama campaign's Boston event, Romney backers heckled Axelrod by shouting, “Solyndra, Solyndra.” “You can shout down speakers my friends, but it's hard to Etch A Sketch the truth away,” Axelrod responded, referring to a comment by a top Romney aide, Eric Fehrnstrom, about Romney shifting gears for the general election campaign. Romney used his trip to Southern California to gain another type of political capital – the endorsement of former first lady Nancy Reagan. After hosting Romney and his wife, Ann, at her Los Angeles home on Thursday, the widow of President Ronald Reagan issued a statement saying that “Ronnie”would have joined her in liking Romney's “business background and his strong principles.”

Thomas reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Matthew Daly in Washington and Bob Salsberg in Boston contributed to this report.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Fremont Is Our Business FUDENNA BROS., INC. Leader in Small To Medium Size Office Space

FEATURED OFFICES Available Now SKS BUILDING

EXECUTIVE I

39833 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Suite G, Fremont 94538 (Across from Lake Elizabeth)

2450 Peralta Blvd., Suite 121, Fremont 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.)

• 120 square feet • 1 room office • 2nd Floor

• 321 square feet • 1 room office • 1st Floor

PARKWAY TOWERS

BLACOW OFFICE CENTER

3909 Stevenson Blvd., Suite C1, Fremont 94538 (Stevenson x Fremont Blvd.)

38950 Blacow Road, Fremont 94536 (Mowry Ave. x Blacow)

• 394 square feet • Hardwood flooring • Large store-front windows

• 360 square feet • 2 room office • Close to highway 880

PARKWAY PROFESSIONAL

EXECUTIVE II

40000 Fremont Blvd., Suite F Fremont, CA 94538 (Stevenson x Fremont Blvd.)

2140 Peralta Blvd., Suite 105 Fremont, CA 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.)

• 668 square feet • 3 room office • Ideal for physical therapy practice

Phone: 510-657-6200

• 310 square feet • 1 room office • Perfect for start-ups

www.fudenna.com


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from PAGE 3

Not Knowing Can Hurt Undiagnosed, diabetes can be especially dangerous because the afflicted person isn’t taking steps to manage the condition. This can lead to serious physical consequences affecting many parts of the body, including the eyes, kidneys, heart and limbs. People with diabetes face a dramatically higher risk of heart disease, stroke, nerve disease and dental disease. “The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that we screen people that are overweight and may have other health conditions that may put them at risk,” says Sherrie Kneebone, N.P.,

June 5, 2012

the W.O.W. Mobile Clinic’s nurse practitioner. “After someone is found to have diabetes, the need for education is critical. We often refer people to the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center in Fremont where they can learn the tools to manage diabetes.” Washington Outpatient Diabetes Program If you have diabetes, The Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center can make a difference in your life. The diabetes program features a team of nurses and dietitians who are certified diabetes educators and are experts in helping each individual learn what will work to control diabetes. By focusing on the individual needs of each patient, the program has successfully guided people to better health. For more information about the program’s services, visit

Get Screened! Free diabetes and blood pressure screenings will be conducted at W.O.W.'s regularly scheduled stops: • Family Resource Center (39155 Liberty Street, Fremont) Every Tuesday: June 5, 12, 19, 26; July 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Silliman Activity Center (6800 Mowry Avenue, Newark) Second Thursday of every month: June 14 and July 12 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Fremont Senior Center (40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont) First Friday of every month: July 6 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Ruggieri Senior Center (33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City) Fourth Monday of every month: June 28 and July 23 from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. New Location! New Haven Adult School (600 G Street, Union City) June 28 and July 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

www.whhs.com/diabetes or call (510) 745-6556. Diabetes Screening Takes Just a Few Minutes The free diabetes (blood glucose) screening tests are taken using a finger-pricking device that is used to get a drop of blood. The screening takes just a few seconds and the W.O.W. staff explains each person’s results within a few minutes. To achieve more accurate results, the W.O.W. staff recommends that participants don’t eat or drink anything for 12 hours before testing; however, this is not mandatory. “If we test someone that is found to have diabetes, W.O.W. can provide the counseling and referrals for additional care,” adds Traylor. "If a patient doesn't have a primary care physician, W.O.W. staff can work with them to set up care.”

Does Your Teen Need a Whooping Cough Vaccination? If you have a child in middle or high school, he or she needs to get a whooping cough vaccination before going back to school in the fall. Whooping cough, also called pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial disease. Washington on Wheels provides flu shots and a variety of immunizations including the Whooping Cough booster called Tdap. The Washington On Wheels Mobile Health Clinic provides a host of other services, including: • Physical exams including Sports Physicals • Health screenings for blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels for diabetes • Immunizations and Flu Shots • Nutritional counseling and health education • Occupational medicine The Washington On Wheels Mobile Health Clinic accepts Medicare and Medi-Cal and some insurance plans and will provide services regardless of immigration status or ability to pay. Find out more about Washington On Wheels To learn more about the services offered by the Washington On Wheels Mobile Health Clinic, call (510) 608-3203 or visit www.whhs.com/wow. If your company is interested in utilizing the Washington On Wheels Mobile Health Clinic for occupational medicine services for your employees, please call (510) 608-1320.

Seat Belts save children’s lives SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Traffic collisions are the leading cause of death of children in the country. Sadly, more than half of the children who die in collisions are not properly restrained in child safety seats or are unrestrained altogether. Many of these children would be alive today if they had been properly restrained in seatbelts or child safety seats. Studies have shown that child safety seats are 71% effective in saving the lives of children involved in vehicle collisions. Additionally, parents need to be reminded to use a booster seat for their children. Generally, children who have outgrown child safety seats with built-in harnesses are still too small to benefit from the protection of an adult seatbelt. Booster seats allow children to sit up comfortably in the passenger seat while providing the proper restraint of a standard seatbelt. Children should never be placed in a safety seat in the front of a vehicle. All children age 12 and under should be properly restrained in the back seat. Choosing and Using Car Safety Seats Infants (Birth to 12 Months): Choose an infant safety seat or convertible seat. The baby must face back of car. Ensure strap slots are at or below shoulder level and the baby’s head does not fall forward. Harnesses should be adjusted snugly before adding blankets. The baby’s head should be placed at least 1" below top edge of seat. All seats need to be placed in the back seat Toddlers and Young Children (12 months to 8 years): Choose a convertible seat or combination seat/booster (some newer vehicles contain built-in safety seats and harnesses). Children may face forward after age one and 20 pounds. Children should sit upright with strap slots at or about shoulder level. Top strap slots must be used for most convertible seats and a top tether

strap should be used, if possible. Your child must be secured in the back seat only. Children who have outgrown the booster or harness safety seats and are at least eight (8) years can use the safety belt restraints inside the vehicle. However, children need booster seats until they can sit all the way back with their knees bent at the edge of the seat, with the lap belt on the tops of their thighs, and with the shoulder belt centered on the shoulder and chest areas. Law Regarding Child Passenger Safety Beginning January 1, 2012, children under age eight (8) must be properly buckled into a car seat or booster seat in the back seat. In addition, children age eight or older who are not tall enough for the seat belt to fit properly must ride in a booster or car seat. The previous law required that children remain in a booster seat until the age of six (6) or until they weighed sixty pounds. A child fits an adult seat belt when: • The child can sit against the vehicle seat back with his knees bent without slouching, and can comfortably stay in this position throughout the trip. • The lap belt is low on the hips touching the upper thighs. • The shoulder belt crosses the shoulder and chest without touching the face or the neck. • Never let your child put the shoulder belt behind his arm or back. In a crash, the child could sustain major injuries including head and spinal cord injuries. • If the child is placing the shoulder belt behind them, this is a sign that he may still need a booster. For more information about car seats, the new law or help in determining if your child still needs a booster seat, visit the California Department of Public Health website at http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/Pages/CPSinCalifornia-VOSP.aspx It is the responsibility of every uniformed officer to enforce violations of the California Vehicle Code, educate citizens on the importance of traffic safety and make every effort to protect drivers on City streets. These efforts, combined with the participation and cooperation of community will help ensure the safety of motorists throughout the City.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

Auto Review

Subaru Impreza: new and impressive BY STEVE SCHAEFER was eager to get my hands on the new Subaru Impreza. It seems like the car was redesigned not long ago, but the new fourth-generation version is again completely redone. This one may be the best one yet. All Imprezas boast all-wheel-

the car smarter than you… welcome in an emergency. The Impreza’s compact wagon proportions now look a bit chunkier. The face is neither pretty nor soft, but forceful and strong. The 17-inch gunmetalfinish alloy wheels are an acquired taste; I tend to like a little more sparkle (but don't care

inches longer for easier entry/exit. Despite the increase in interior space, the 2012 Impreza weighs up to 165 pounds less than its 2011 model-year counterpart (depending on model and equipment). A new electric power steering system contributes two percent increase in efficiency; lower rolling resistance tires im-

drive for safety in the wet and snow. Subaru’s system has always been intended for safety in the rain and in other low-traction situations, working completely independent of the driver’s input. The compact all-wheel-drive system is tucked in underneath the horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine and doesn’t burden the Impreza with a significant weight penalty. The four-wheel disc brakes with antilock help improve safety, as do electronic brake distribution and electronic brake force distribution. Those electronic enhancements make

much for chrome) but I know that the younger buyers Impreza is targeting are going to like them just fine. As before, you can get a sedan version of the Impreza, too, but the wagon is more practical. Drop the rear seats and you've got 52.4 cubic feet of carrying capacity - a dream for us bass-playing types. The car is the same size on the outside as the ’11 but roomier inside - that’s some clever packaging! The windshield is more raked than in the previous model, with the bottom of the front pillar moved nearly eight inches forward, resulting in a front door opening nearly five

prove the numbers a little more. The interior, with black plastic and cloth, seems unpretentious in a world of swirly shapes. The dash is padded where it is sometimes not found in other non-luxury cars. The seats show off their white stitching for a little extra sportiness and complement the black-on-white gauge cluster. The gauges, while perfectly useful and handsome, glow red at night - not as easy to see for those of us with a touch of color blindness. Subaru’s use of horizontally-opposed flat engines, not inline or vee-shaped, means it looks a little

I

different in the engine compartment. The engine sits far down, creating a low center of gravity, which aids handling. It successfully moves 3,075 pounds of automobile; neither a rocket nor a slug. The 2.0-liter engine puts out 148 horsepower and 145 lb.-ft. of torque. It’s rated by the EPA at 27 City and 36 Highway (average 30 mpg). That is a 36 percent improvement, according to Subaru. I averaged 27.3 mpg, a little lower than the official figure, but that's still pretty good. The EPA Green Vehicle Guide gives the car a 9 for Air Pollution and 7 for Greenhouse gas - excellent numbers. The car’s PZEV sticker (partial zero emission vehicle) is mounted proudly on one of the side windows. The Impreza comes in five levels, so there’s something for nearly everyone. Start with the 2.0i and work up through Premium, Limited, Sport Premium and Sport Limited models. My tester, a 2.0 Sport Premium, was very nicely equipped. The only extras were a continuously-variable six-speed automatic transmission ($1,000) and $69 worth of all-weather floor mats. In brief, the Premium adds an audio system and 16-inch alloy wheels to the base car. Limited models add leather, automatic climate control, automatic transmission, and 17-inch wheels. Sport models add those gray wheels I wasn’t keen on, roof rails, fog lamps and the allweather package. You can do fine with the base car, but stepping up takes it in different directions - you pick - or have it both ways. My test car didn’t feel like it was missing anything essential. I lived fine without the luxury features. It had heated seats, al-

though the controls were way back in the elbow area of the center console, where they are easy to activate unintentionally. That's actually how I discovered them. My tester stickered at $22,414, including shipping, but prices start at just $18,190 for the plain 2.0i model. This car is definitely on my "would be glad to own one" list. A 2.0 Premium with a five-speed manual transmission prices out at just $20,000. Today, that's a great deal. I'm favoring sky blue. My young colleague, Loni, just got a ’12 Impreza wagon and she’s thrilled with it. Go build one and enjoy your own.

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

2

3

7

8

7 6

B 165

4

5

9

1 9 4 2 8

6

10

6

11

3 12

7

7

2 1 4 6 3 7 6 9 2

5

13

14

2

15 16

17

18

19

20 21

22

23

1

U

N

D

R

E

S

S

I

2

7

25

26

D

12

M

28 30

17

S

31 33

8

F

E

L

27 29

E

22

A

35

A T

T

R

E

C O

6

A

O

C

C O M

E

E

C O

R

R

R

R

13

14

T A

N

P

E

O L

I

E E

S

P

S

26

37

F

O

31

S

Across 1 Possibilities that can help someone grow (13) 5 Verse (6) 7 Dejection at something not turning out the way it should (14) 10 Groups of wolves (5) 12 Go with (9) 13 Funny (8) 15 Make fit (6) 16 Making something relative to another (9) 18 Bring up the rear (5) 21 Operated by machinery (10) 22 Gather (7) 25 In three parts (6) 26 Positions in a hierarchy (5) 27 Openings of a chamber (5) 29 Places to eat (11) 31 Accept (5) 33 Song holder (8) 35 Therefore (7) 36 Where Santa leaves the gifts (9,8) 37 Duties (5)

R

A

E

E

N G

T

S

E

F

F

R R M

R

S

H M

P

E N

D

O

E

O

11

U H

C

32

M

27

S

16

P

E

N

N

I

U

N

D

A

T

I

N

E

B

T

F

I

I

N

E

R

A

T

E

S

H

C

T

T

I

1 6 5 7 4 9 8 7 5 2 9 6 3

C

N

S

E

S

S

P

S

A

H D

D

X P E

25

B

E

N

S

I

S

R

U

I

B S

E

R

A

T

E

S

C

A

I

S M

T

I

G

H

36

S

7 8 2 9 6 4 5 3 1

E

Y

E

V

21

R

C

L

6 1 4 3 8 5 2 9 7

E

P N

H

G

24

S

30

5

R

H

29

I

S

N G

N

33

U

A

O

E O

4

N

I

20

S

G

L

Down U L N I 1 Fuddy-duddy (3-9) 34 N C R I T 2 Symbol of hotness (6) 35 3 Without any delay (9) G R E A S E Y 4 Not natural in case of fibres (9) 6 Back up (6) 8 Spectrum of things that can happen (13) 9 The Dow, e.g. (5) 3 9 10 Ratios (11) 2 4 11 Kids and adults love to eat them (10) B 164 14 Features (15) 8 7 17 Parents' parents (12) Puzzle 19 Finger ___ (5) 6 8 20 People who make a scientific study of celestial bodies (11) Solutions 23 Crime and _____ (10) 5 3 24 Letters that make words (9) 28 Fantastic (8) 1 2 30 Beats in music (7) 4 1 32 "Nothing ___!" (5) 34 Eye drops (5)

C

I

I

D

A

A A

I

N 28

R

N

T

15

S

T T

19

B R

R O

D 18

P

L

T

P

E

A

36

E D

N

N

23

10

T

S S

P

32

34

U

9

3

N G E

24

5

E N C

T

E

N C

L

5 9 3 1 2 7 6 8 4

A

L

A

N

2 5 9 4 1 3 7 6 8

T

8 3 1 5 7 6 9 4 2

E

D

4 7 6 2 9 8 3 1 5

Tri-City Stargazer JUNE 6 – JUNE 12, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: It is time to present especially serious material for your consideration. Beginning this month through the year 2015, we have a series of seven clashes between Uranus and Pluto. Uranus represents the theme of economic and political justice. Pluto represents big money, worldly power, debt, and forces of nature. Energies were already manifesting in the Arab Spring. The wrath of nature has become increasingly destructive. Uranus and Pluto make two exact squares in 2012, two in 2013, two in 2014, and one in 2015. The first occurs on June 24—that is right now, folks. This is not Armageddon, in my opinion, but these aspects do represent the clash of powerful archetypal energies at all levels, individual to global. There will be global reorganization of politics, power, and the economy. A roller coaster ride is at hand. See more in future columns or on my website. Aries (March 21-April 20): You may have been poised for a leap, but you are waiting for the “right” moment. It is possible that this week brings the piece of information or the event that tells you the time is now. To others, the change you make might appear sudden, but it has been on your mind for a long time. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Financial activities are especially noteworthy now. You are tempted to make a purchase that is showy and probably beyond your means. It is an old habit of the Bulls to go shopping when you are feeling stressed. Leave the checkbook and credit cards at home to prevent impulsive purchases.

more than a simple raised eyebrow. One of you will be inclined to railroad the other’s point of view. The issue is over matters of control, and it may be subtle. Dig until you reach solid ground. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): A new beginning from one year ago has come to a turning point. You may not even recognize it anymore because so much time has passed. This is the time to decide to pour significantly more energy into it or quietly let it slip back into the ethers. (Clue: It is probably in the arena of friends or organizational contacts.)

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Your personal decisions may serve as a catalyst for others in your life to open up or make what appear to be sudden changes. Issues of finances and legacies are prominent. Though it may be demanded, try not to make decisions in haste.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): The Virgins usually prefer to remain on the sidelines, but right now you are bursting with the need to protect your boundaries. Pent up anger may take control. Make an effort to think before you speak. Drive very carefully. Observe yourself. You may be an accident looking for a place to happen.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): If you have felt stressed at work or with your partner, this week may bring tensions to the surface with no

Libra (September 23-October 22): The “Transit of Venus” that I wrote about last week is still significant for you. Somehow, you are in

the spotlight, and it may be a surprise to you. Contain your ego’s need to preen, and hold to your personal ethics. For some, the light will be much brighter than you wish.

identity is not at stake in this situation. You may not like what is happening, but you can choose a better time later to argue the point.

Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Think carefully about what is truly important to you at this time in your life. Do not allow old habits or rules from the past to make your decision for you. If you allow that to happen, you will truly resent the outcome. Rise above your circumstances to a level that can see beyond your ego, and the situation becomes more workable.

Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Give special attention to your driving this week. Surprises may be waiting on the roads. Otherwise, this is a great week for a getaway. Do something novel, even if you do not leave home. Your mind is open to whatever seems fresh and unique.

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): If you have been channeling your energy into a project that has positive value for many, you may be receiving recognition and applause now. If, instead, you are working on something that is purely to shine your ego, you will find that others are fighting you every step of the way. Think about it. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): You occasionally confuse what you think with who you are. There are those who will disagree with you this week. Do not let it become a battle to the death. Your

Pisces (February 19-March 20): News concerning lovers or children is favorable. Creativity is high. Take care that you not exceed the “rules” or the “law” because the probability is that you will be discovered. The same holds true concerning excesses on any other level.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


June 5, 2012

Page 17

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINA GIN PHOTO BY GARY GIN The Hayward Animal Shelter is participating in a blow-out weekend adoption event on Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10, 2012 to place all of the Shelter’s dogs, cats and rabbits into qualified homes. Free adoptions will be offered throughout the weekend though dog-licensing fees still apply to Hayward residents. More than 60 shelters and rescues in Alameda, Contra Costa and San Francisco Counties are participating in the third Maddie’s Matchmaker Adoptathon, sponsored by the Alameda-based Maddie’s Fund. In an effort to empty the shelters, Maddie’s Fund will pay each shelter or rescue group an adoption stipend ranging from $500 to $ 2,000 per pet. In 2011, 2,312 dogs and cats were placed in loving new homes during the event; 38 of those from the Hayward Animal shelter. If you have been considering adding a new family member to your home, this is the perfect time to do so. Save a life and help raise much needed funds. Please join the Hayward Animal Shelter on June 9 and 10, 2012 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. for what promises to be an exciting weekend and be sure to share news of the event with friends and family. This adoption event is sponsored by the Hayward Animal Shelter volunteers. Face painting for children will be available on Sunday for a donation. For more information about the Hayward Animal Shelter, call (510) 293-7200 ext. 7 or visit www.HaywardAnimals.org. Also visit www.MaddiesAdoptathon.org Maddie’s Matchmake Adoptathon Saturday June 9 – Sunday, June 10 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Court, Hayward (510) 293-7200 ext. 7

Fremont Bank customers can deliver a “win-win” through the B-CharitableSM checking account… nonprofit organizations win by receiving additional funding and customers win by supporting their favorite charity. To be part of the charitable buzz come to a local Fremont Bank office, call (800) 359-2265 or visit www.fremontbank.com/bcharitable. See how easy it is to B-CharitableSM If you think one person can make a difference Imagine what an entire community can do


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 1

The Butterfly and Bird Festival at Coyote Hills Regional Park is dedicated to answering these questions and more. Now in its thirteenth year, the festival continues to raise public awareness on butterflies, moths, and birds. The festival began in 1998, an idea of Jan Southworth, retired Coyote Hills Naturalist, who was inspired after reading an article that stated that in the 1940s and ‘50s there were 70 to 100 different species of butterfly found in the San Francisco Bay Area. But today, there are less then twelve due to habitat loss, pesticides, and heavy grazing. “We want to increase public awareness on how to stay truly green and give instruction on how people can create an urban garden and contribute to saving the butterflies,” says Dino Labiste, Park Naturalist for the last five years. “Even certain weeds, if left alone, can be helpful in restoring homes for the butterfly population.” Plants that butterflies need to survive and populate are called host plants; Coyote Hills has a garden dedicated to growing such plants called The Nectar Garden. It contains both native and non-native host plants alike, such as Narrow Leaved Milkweed, Showy Milkweed, and the nonnative Blood flower and Family Jewels. “We think it’s a good idea to have at least one host plant in bloom year round, which is why we have a variety here in our garden, but for an at home urban garden we recommend native plants,” Labiste says. In 2011, the park released over 500 Monarch Butterflies into the wild with the help of numerous volunteers. “It is not only host plants that need to be protected, but the butterflies themselves in their transformation state, especially the chrysalis.” Labiste says that when in the wild and in the chrysalis stage, sometimes wasps will lay eggs in the monarch chrysalis, which then will take all the nutrients away from the butterfly causing it to perish. The Nectar Garden started as a plant demonstration garden for urban living and has inspired neighboring communities and schools, even becoming a part of one school’s curriculum, motivating students to grow their own garden at school to attract wildlife. “Today if you were to ask a student what butterflies they have seen they would most likely list three different ones: orange butterfly (Monarchs), yellow butterfly (Swallowtails), and white butterfly (Cabbage Whites) so the goal of urban gardens in communities is to provide a corridor of habitats for birds and butterflies alike,” says Labiste, “as well as help people understand that there can be, and often in a home garden should be, simplicity in conservation.” The Nectar Garden is located at the Visitor’s Center. Upon entering, art tiles dedicated to the garden by children from previous years can be seen, but most likely the doorway into the garden will catch your attention first – a large circular wooden door reminiscent of something out of the Lord of the Rings with a butterfly handle. Within the garden, visitors will see plants and pathways and various donated items given by patrons wishing to help the garden thrive. “I like to watch out of the window in my office and see the birds playing in the fountain,” Labiste admitted. Who could blame him? The garden is a tranquil environment; the information and history only add to the experience. Twelve species of butterfly can be found in the garden; local and migrating birds are year round visitors too. The Butterfly and Bird Festival will have food, music, garden tours, themed activities, educational speakers, and a photo slideshow featuring photography of nature from local photographers. The event is free and open to all ages, but there is an automobile parking fee of $5. For more information call (510) 544-3220. Butterfly and Bird Festival Sunday, June 10 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org Automobile parking: $5

June 5, 2012


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

1 2 3

4

5

6 7

8 9

10

11

12

13

14

15 16

17

18

19 20

22

21

23 24

25

Must be 18 or over to enter We also need permission to print your name and picture

26 27 28 29

Great Prizes

30

31 32

Read our Ads for the answers Across 3 Skin ____ removal (6) 8 Club Sport offers a free ___ pass (5) 10 Foreclosure Tricity offers _____ rental investment opportunities (9) 12 Call Merrill Gardens for a(n) ____ tour (8) 14 Palo Alto Medical Foundation offers Community Health ____ Programs (9) 17 Celebrate ___ Day at Spin A Yarn (7) 20 Get Afghan Ice Cream here (3,3) 22 Dr. Wong will fix this (5) 23 Number of rings worn in Ippolito’s ad (3) 24 ___ & Thyme Italian Bistro (5) 25 Janet L. Laney’s profession (12) 27 Be part of the charitable ____ with Fremont Bank (4) 28 East Bay Hand and Plastic Surgery Center has a(n) ____ offer (5) 29 Bella Eye Care offers this percentage off frame and lens (3) 30 Top Flight Gymnastics has a Family Friendly Summer ___ (4) 31 Put your ___ to the test with Allstate (6) 32 Fremont _____ Society is hosting a Golf Tourna-

ment (6)

Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a Down chance to win valuable prizes each month. There are two monthly prize 1 Realtors Rajeev and Monica ____ (5) puzzles (a Tuesday edition and a Friday edition). Enter both to increase 2 Get CNA training from this Career College (7) 4 Bhindi’s ad features a(n) ____ perpetual submariner your chances of winning! All entries will be eligible for an end-of-theyear Grand Prize! (6) 5 Hotel offering what Dad really wants this year (6) 6 The ____ is over (6) 7 Operation: Hope is offering this kind of breakfast (7) 9 What Zerona removes (6,3) 11 This person owns an Army-Navy Store (4) 13 Location of the Chili Cook-Off (10) 15 Healthy ____ Healthy People (5) 16 BKK Thai Cuisine offers this free drink (4,3) 17 Life Chiropractic offers greater ____ (11) 18 Take a(n) ____ ride on the Niles Canyon Railway (5) 19 American Cancer Society Discovery Shop is now featuring apparel from this island (6) 21 Casa de ___ (4) 24 Food offered at Walk for Life 2012 (8) 26 ___ air conditioning (4)

MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Or fax to: (510) 796-2462 Deadline for entry is the 5th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper. June 5 Puzzle Name:

Phone:

Email:

large Gallery, and she is happy to talk to visitors about her process. Lodema is both student and teacher. She teaches ceramics classes at HARD and takes art ceramics classes at Chabot College.

SUBMITTED BY JEAN WITZKE Local artists and crafters have chosen the theme “Spring into Summer” for an art and craft sale to be held June 9 and 10. Cinema Place Gallery, which reopened this spring in downtown Hayward, will be the site of the event. Wild or romantic hats will be found at one of the booths where hatter Nina Starr and her daughter Heather are both offering their creations. Nina is also a painter, and her artistic bent is reflected in her romantic hats of fabric and flowers. Her daughter uses recycled throw-a-ways to create wildly imaginative creations. A well-known local potter will be throwing pots with a kick-wheel during the event. Lodema the potter is a familiar presence at the Dickens Fair, Maker Faire, and other gatherings. Her potter’s wheel will be set up and ready for work in the

Nina and Lodema will be joined by about 40 artists and crafters selling jewelry, hats, art, photography, ceramics, cards, and other hand-made goods. The event will be open Saturday, June 9 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday, June 10 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cinema Place Gallery is located on B Street, next to the theater. The popular art gallery has created a stir in downtown Hayward since it opened at the beginning of 2011. It was closed for three months when the building changed hands, but it is up and running again now. The “Spring into Summer” art and craft sale will appear between regular scheduled art shows. The event is sponsored by the Hayward Arts Council; for more information call the office at (510) 538-2787. Office hours are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Spring into Summer Saturday, June 9: 4 p.m. – 9 p.m. Sunday, June 10: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Death of a Salesman Tony Award-Winning Drama by Arthur Miller

May 18 – June 16 8 pm Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays 1 pm Sundays, May 27**, June 3**, & 10 $23 General Admission $18 Srs/Students/TBA* $15 - Thursdays, All Seats $10 Bargain Thursday, May 31 *All seats $23 on Brunch Sundays and Opening Night ** Sunday Continental Brunch at 12:15 Price of admission includes refreshments, Opening Night Champagne Gala and Sunday Continental Brunches Willy Loman is a failing salesman, who cannot understand how he failed to win success and happiness. In his last days, he experiences a series of tragic, soul-searching revelations of the life he lived with his wife, sons and business associates. We discover how his quest for the “American Dream” kept him blind to the people who truly loved him. This play is a deep and revealing story that remains one of the most profound classic dramas of the American theatre.

Reservations: 510-683-9218

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont www.broadwaywest.org


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

Student completes term on Fremont School Board BY MEKALA NEELAKANTAN PHOTOS COURTESY OF AJAY BHUTORIA The Global Organization of People of Indian Origin, Silicon Valley Chapter (GOPIO Silicon Valley) will bring various local talents to light when they host the Annual Kids and Youth Talent Competition and Adults Food Competition on June 9. Founded six years ago by Ajay Jain Bhutoria and his wife, Vinita, this anticipated event has garnered much attention in the Bay Area, bringing families together to celebrate talent, confidence, and culture.

This event was initially created as an activity for their then six-year-old son; as it grew, they realized that the event could serve as a “platform to give kids an opportunity to showcase their talents, build their confidence skills, and also remain attached to their culture and roots…” said Bhutoria. Since its creation, the competition has grown from an art contest and a public speaking contest with 30 participating children to a multitude of contests and categories that boast over 4,000 participating members across the Bay Area, with an expectation this year of around 200 youth participants. continued on page 25

ARTICLE AND PHOTO BY ANGIE WANG Meet Allison Tong: Senior at Mission San Jose High School (MSJHS), Student Brand Manager at Chipotle Bar and Grill, MSJHS Associated Student Body Vice President (ASB VP), Co-Chair of Students United for the Representation of the Fremont Unified School District, Board of Education (SURF), and Fremont Unified School District Student Board Member. As ASB VP, Tong co-leads MSJHS’s Leadership 2 (L2) class with the other ASB officers (ASBOs). The ASBOs oversee all of the events hosted by L2, including assemblies, Homecoming and Multicultural weeks, elections, and MSJHS’s annual Family Festival and Charity Fashion Show, as well as plan new ways to reach out to the student body. Tong manages over eighty clubs on campus and makes sure that they abide by the club bylaws; she also assists those interested in starting a new club, and guides them through the process. Her position at Chipotle makes it possible to incorporate special offers and coupons into school activities, as an extra incentive for participating in rallies and Friday activities. During Tong’s first two years in high school, she served as a representative of MSJHS’s Interact Club and volunteered at the Fremont Main Library. Toward the end of her sophomore year, she applied to be an officer for SURF, and returned in her junior year as SURF secretary. This year, as a senior, Tong holds the position of chairperson of the committee. She is responsible for planning and conducting SURF’s meetings, during which they discuss future events such as their annual leadership conference. As SURF chairperson, Tong has been serving as the designated Student Board Member on the Fremont Unified School District Board. She attends the bi-monthly Board meetings which are also televised and has the opportunity to address the community, giving

a student’s perspective on the issues. “I’ve always been interested in leadership activities and I was really excited about the opportunity to be a part of SURF. I wanted to give the students in our community a voice in the district by providing input from their point of view,” Tong says. And of course, working so closely with the School Board has its perks. “Knowing the school board trustees and the superintendent has given me a huge advantage in terms of making connections. They are always very welcoming and willing to help. This year, I also had the chance to attend the California School Board Association conference in San Diego where I had the opportunity to listen to many great guest speakers such as Salman Khan, the founder of Khan Academy. Through this trip, I was able to connect with the trustees and superintendent on a closer level, making me realize just how fortunate I am to have the opportunity of working with them on the Board.” In the fall of 2012, Tong will be attending the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, and will likely major in Business Management with a minor in Communications. “I would really like to own my own business at some point in the future, something that involves event planning or working in the food industry,” she adds. Her involvement and dedication to the community, with the connections she has made and her experience with professional communication and networking, are sure to bring her success wherever her future takes her. Best of luck!


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Continuing Events

Saturdays, Thru Jul 7

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $R Wednesday, Apr 25 - Saturday, Dec 29

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737

10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Workout for the mind, body & spirit. Utilizes basic stretching techniques

Ohlone College, Dance Studio Room 174 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-2303 Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Thursday, Apr 26 - Sunday, Jun 8

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups

Invitational Show

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

12 noon - 8 p.m. (Sundays: 12 noon - 4 p.m.)

Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Work by 32 local artists & CSUEB alumni

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City (510) 586-5747

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Images of Ladakh

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m. Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 586-3409

Thursday, Jun 7-Sunday Jul 1

“The Member of the Wedding” $

Thurs - Sat 8 p.m. & Sat – Sun 2 p.m.

Ohlone for Kids $R

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m. Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City Thursday, May 11 -Sunday, Jun 9

That's Odd

12 noon - 5 p.m. Contemporary artists Pamela Blotner and Jim Rosenau

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/Art/Olive-HydeArtGallery Friday, May 11 - Saturday, Jun 9

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee $

8 p.m. Musical comedy about six adolescents vying for the championship

Chanticleers Theatre 3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley (510) 733-5483 www.chanticleers.org

A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Wednesdays, May 16 - Jun 13

Tango, Waltz, Merengue & Salsa Dance Classes

7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. Beginners 7:00 p.m. / Intermediate & Advanced 8:15 p.m.

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 657-5329 Saturdays, Thru Jun 30

Science Lecture for Children

2 p.m. Presented by Science for Youth. For school-age children

Seniors' Guide to Public Benefits

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Social Security, Medicare, food stamps & general assistance information

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 www.library.hayward-ca.gov Wednesday, Jun 6

Aphasia Awareness: A Celebration! $

2:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Reception and fundraiser for the Aphasia Treatment Program

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 Wednesday, Jun 6

Backpacking Basics - R

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Covers proper gear to reach your destination

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305

Coming-of-age story

Wednesday, Jun 6

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777

Open House $

Tuesday, Jun 5 Camping Basics – R

Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

Tuesday, Jun 5

7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Learn essential camping skills & gear necessities

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305

1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Tour the estate

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352 Thursday, Jun 7

Healthy Snacks - R

11 a.m. How to make no-cook munchies

Tuesday, Jun 5

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

General Federation of Women's Club Luncheon

Thursday, Jun 7

12 noon - 2 p.m.

Sweet Violet Tea $R

All women are welcome

12 noon

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 656-2521

Jessi Stokes discusses violets. Lunch included

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

Thursday, Jun 7

Saturday, Jun 9

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

Toys and Games $

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Children's program in the garden

Saturday, Jun 9

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

"Mini-Monsters of the Moat" Outdoor Discoveries $R

Saturday, Jun 9

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 544-3249

Schedule an appointment use sponsor code: CSUEASTBAY

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (800) 733-2767 Thursday, Jun 7

Fire Restoration Continuing Education Class $

10 a.m. Classroom presentation (includes breakfast, lunch & prizes)

Larkspur Landing Hotel 40 Ranch Drive, Milpitas (408) 942-1307 Thursday, Jun 7

Tri-City Health Center Night $

7 p.m. - 11 p.m. Relax and enjoy while supporting the community clinic

Saddle Rack 42011 Boscell Rd., Fremont (510) 252-6853 Friday, Jun 8

Golf Tournament and Dinner Gala $R

12 noon Benefit for children with chronic illness & at-risk youth

Sunol Valley Golf Club 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (510) 793-5683 www.fremontrodentsociety.com Friday, Jun 8 - Sunday, Jun 10

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

"The Finland Phenomenon: Inside the World's Most Surprising School System"

Saturday, June 9

Hayward Neighborhood Leadership Academy R

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 9

Powwow 2012

12 noon - 4 p.m. Native American program event

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (530) 927-7261 Christina Saturday, June 9

Meet Hayward & Tri-City Shelter Bunnies

12 noon – 3 p.m. Rabbit adoption event

Fremont Pet Food Express Gateway Plaza Shopping Center 39010 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 470-1286 annemartin@harvesthomeanimal.org Saturday, Jun 9

American Red Cross Blood Drive - R

Saturday, Jun 9

Movie Night $

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Schedule an appointment use sponsor code: ISEB

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terrace, Fremont (800) 733-2767 www.iseb.org

7:30 p.m. "The Man Who Had Everything", "Friends", & "Out West"

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Jun 9

Eddie & Friends in Concert

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Evening of music with Eddie Saubolle

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Children ages 3-5 and parents make playful & scientific discoveries

Documentary film about the best school system

Fri. & Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m. Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118

2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

Performance Fusion $ Student dance pieces, poetry jam & play

2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895

Saturday, Jun 9

Youth Summer Talent and Adult Food Competition $R

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Singing, dancing & art competition for children. Ethnic Indian food competition for adults

Near India Community Center 372 Turquoise Street, Milpitas www.gopiosv.org Saturday, Jun 9

Kayaking for Folks 50+ $R

10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Learn paddling techniques & safety guidelines

Quarry Lakes

Looking Out for One Another: Building Caring Communities

777 B Street, Hayward (510) 583-4227 David.Korth@hayward-ca.gov Saturday June 9 - Sunday, June 10

Maddie's Matchmaker Adoptathon

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Cats, kittens, dogs, puppies, rabbits for adoption

Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Court, Hayward (510) 293-7200 ext. 7 www.HaywardAnimals.org


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Sunday, Jun 10

Sunday, Jun 10

Monday, Jun 11

Laurel & Hardy Talkie Matinee $

Classic Movie Series

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

"Occam's Razor" Publication Party

4 p.m.

Gary Cooper stars as an American hero

7 p.m.

"Helping Grandma", "Brats", "Fly My Kite", & "Any Old Port"

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Poetry, fiction readings & open mic

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Sunday, Jun 10

Khilafat, Leadership in Islam $ Sunday, Jun 10

5 p.m.

Butterfly and Bird Festival $

Panel discussion. Includes dinner

10:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Tour the nectar garden & learn to create a wildlife-friendly habitat

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 www.ebparks.org

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 www.BaitulBaseer.org Sunday, Jun 10

Green Kids Conference

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Children learn how to preserve our environment

Sunday, June 10

Kalayaan Festival 2012

10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Celebrate Philippine Independence Day; food, music, entertainment

Kennedy Community Park 1333 Decoto Road, Union City www.KalayaanSF.org

Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus 1065 La Avenida, Building 1, Mountain View www.greenkidsconference.org Sunday, Jun 10

"Murder Misdirected" by Andrew MacRae

3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Book release & signing party

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 steve.gutierrez@csueastbay.edu Monday, Jun 11 - Friday, Jun 15

Hayward Shoreline Summer Camp $R

9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Discover the estuary, salt marsh & shoreline. Ages 6 - 11

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 www.HaywardRec.org Thursday, June 21

Hayward State of the City Address $R

12 noon - 1:30 p.m. Mayoral address and luncheon

California State University, East Bay New University Union 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 537-2424

Green Kids Conference SUBMITTED BY SHANTI BALARAMAN Green Kids Now, Inc. is honored to present its Second Annual Green Kids Conference on Sunday, June 10. Our goal is to educate kids and their families on environmental issues, make them aware of available resources and opportunities, and also promote, encourage, and reward new innovative ideas. Children ages 3 to 18 years of age are encouraged to participate with their families and friends. Come and explore the latest developments and opportunities in the following areas: Education and Research, Clean Technology and Alternative Resources, Climate Science, Waste Management, Air Quality, Land / Nature Preservation, Energy / Water Conservation, and Biomimicry. Registration is mandatory for all participants, including children. Microsoft security requires that only attendees with badges are allowed to enter the building. Please register at http://greenkidsconference.org Additionally, children of any age, who are taking action and are actively involved with projects, are encouraged to exhibit and present at this conference. As an exhibitor, please register as a team, school, organization, or individual. Your innovation could earn you the Green Champ award! Exhibitor booths will be open for the duration of the conference. Visit http://greenkidsconference.org for registration or event information. Admission is Free. Voluntary donations of any amount are much appreciated. Green Kids Now, Inc. is a 501(c) (3) non-profit charity organization. Learn, Innovate, Take Action and Share! Green Kids Conference Sunday, June 10 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus 1065 La Avenida, Building 1, Mountain View http://greenkidsconference.org Email: info@greenkidsconference.org

The ancient Christian Faith alive today & here in the Tri-Cities! All services are celebrated in English

The Orthodox Church is Evangelical, but not Protestant. It is Orthodox, but not Jewish. It is Catholic, but not Roman. It isn't non-denominational - it is pre-denominational. It has believed, taught, preserved, defended and died for the Faith of the Apostles in Jesus Christ since the Day of Pentecost over 2000 years ago. Regular Schedule Saturdays 6pm Great Vespers (Beginning of Sunday Services) Sundays 9:30am Hours & Divine Liturgy followed by common meal & Children’s Christian Education *Tuesdays 10-11:30am Father’s Café (Informal discussion with Q&A over coffee) *Wednesdays starting June 13 2-3:30pm Father’s Café 2nd Thursday of the Month Service of Intercession for those suffering from alcohol and/or drug dependence *Tuesdays May 8- June 12 – Adult Ed: The Ancient Christian Understanding of Salvation *Classes & meetings take place in our Church Offices.

Page 23


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

Women’s Softball

James Logan defeat #1 nationally-ranked Amador Valley in NCS championship

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW STATISTICS BY DENNIS & GIDGET PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW

The Lady Colts were not to be denied when they met the Amador Valley Dons on June 1 at St. Mary’s College in Pleasanton for the Division 1 championship of the North Coast Section of CCS play. Ranked #1 in the nation, the Lady Dons perfect record of 26-0 was impressive and posed a daunting task for the #20 nationally ranked Colts with a 23-1 record. The game lived up to its advance billing as a collision of two powerhouse teams, leaving a scrappy James Logan team little room for error. Outstanding pitching by both teams created an epic defensive battle. Logan held a slim 1-0 lead going into the bottom of the seventh and final regular inning of play. Superb pitching and great defense had maintained the narrow margin for the Colts but holding on to the win came down to a critical play at

home plate in the bottom of the seventh inning that denied a tying run by Amador Valley. Final score: James Logan – 1 Amador Valley – 0 LOGAN: (W) Garza R – P (7 IP, 6 H, 1 K, 1 BB, 0 RA, 0 ER, 92 PC)

Bonansea – C (7 IC, 1 PB) Goulart – 0 for 3, 2 K Perez – 0 for 2, 1 BB, 1 K Reed – 1 for 3, 1 Run, 2 K Martinez – 1 for 3, 1 K Bonansea – 0 for 3, 3 K Garza R – 1 for 3, 1 RBI, 1 2B, 1 K Rodriguez – 0 for 3, 3 K

Blaquera – 0 for 2, 2 K Salazar – 0 for 1, 1 K Mattos – 0 for 1, 1 K AMADOR VALLEY: (L) Grauer – P (7 IP, 3 H, 17 K, 1 BB, 1 RA, 1 ER, 96 PC) Molina – C (7 IC)

Williams – 1 for 3 Yozzo – 2 for 3, 1 K Molina – 0 for 3 Lotoszynski – 1 for 3 Grauer – 1 for 2, 1 BB McKeehan – 0 for 3 Borchard – 1 for 3 Price – 0 for 3 Hennings – 0 for 2


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued on page 20

The Annual Kids and Youth Talent Competition and Adults Food Competition is organized by Bhutoria’s parent organization, Association for Kids and Youth Programs, and partners with Radio Zindagi 1550 AM, WomenNow TV, Indian Express, India West, India Currents,

Tri-City Voice, and NBC. GOPIO Silicon Valley, the host organization, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the “promotion of well-being of people of Indian origin,” as well as the “enhancement of cooperation and communications between Indians in the Silicon Valley as well as in

Page 25

other countries around the world.” Every year, this event attracts many dignitaries: celebrity food competition judges, city officials including State Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett and Assembly Member Bob Wieckowski, as well as other leading politicians. This year, attendees will enjoy a Talent Contest for children ages 3-12 (including singing, dancing, musical instruments, and public speaking), an art contest, science/math contests and a spelling bee. Selected winners from kids and youth competitions will receive a tour of NBC News; awards and trophies will be presented by mayors, assembly members, and city officials present on June 9. In the Adults Food Competition, par-

ticipants must cook ethnic Indian food in their home kitchens and bring it to the event for judging. There will be a meetand-greet with celebrity food competition judges and an invitation to the Radio Zindagi Show for the contest winner. All events will be recorded and broadcast on INDTV; selected winners will be featured on the TV show WomenNow on the StarPlus channel. Registration and additional information is available at: www.gopiosv.org. Kids and Youth Summer Talent Competition and Adults Food Competition Saturday, June 9 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 372 Turquoise St., Milpitas www.gopiosv.org

Senior Peer Counselors celebrate graduation BY HELEN TRACEY-NOREN Graduation ceremonies mark this time of year and for the Senior Peer Counseling Program it is no different. People of all ages and from all walks of life cele-

hours in 18 sessions designed to give them tools to help older adults deal with emotional issues including depression due to Alzheimers and dementia. Fremont Mayor Gus Morrison spoke at the graduation ceremonies, commend-

Elinor King, Marcia Prinz, Orv Rasmussen, and Barbara Rogers were given Certificates of Completion and officially deemed “Peer Counselors.” Mira Malkani also graduated but was unable to attend the ceremony.

every year who face challenges with aging by offering an empathetic ear. Peer Counselor spokesperson Rasmussen thanked the program coordinators and Mayor Morrison, commending the City of Fremont for a “wonderful

brated a very special graduation Friday, May 25 at the Fremont Senior Center. Donned in purple graduation caps and gowns, nine people were graduated from a training program aimed at alleviating depression, anxiety, and loneliness of senior citizens in the Tri-City area. This diverse group of counselors completed 54

ing the new counselors on how they have “given back [their] time and energy back into the community.” Mayor Morrison quipped, “Since I'm 76, one of you might get me soon.” Ricardo Avelino, Jeanie Bui, Sharda Chaudry, Carol Helstrom, Pat Helton,

Senior Peer Counseling started in 1991 under the guidance of Dr. Ray Grimm and is overseen by Lis Cox, L.M.F. T. The Program, offered in Fremont, Union City, and Newark, is available in 17 different languages. Peer Counselors help approximately 50 clients

senior program.” He noted that many cities are so focused on youth programs that seniors are often forgotten; he's glad Fremont is not one of those cities. “The youth are important,” said Rasmussen. “But not so important that you overlook age.”

Made Up Theatre and Make a Wish SUBMITTED BY SEAN TAYLOR

O

n Friday, May 25, Made Up Theatre delivered an improv comedy show that raised over $900 for the continued efforts of the Greater Bay Area Make A Wish Foundation. This fundraiser event marked the second collaboration between Made Up Theatre and Veronica Johnson, a longtime Make A Wish Foundation donor who has been raising funds since losing her two-yearold son Dylan Johnson on July 27, 2000. The Made Up Theatre improv fundraiser brought Veronica’s total contributions to the Make A Wish Foundation to $177, 047. “It was awesome to see so many people fill our theatre for this cause,” said Made Up Theatre co-founder Bobby August. “The show sold out months in advance, and Veronica’s phone was still ringing off the hook up until the show.” The fundraiser featured Laugh Track City, Made Up

Theatre’s popular improv comedy show, similar to the television show “Whose Line Is It, Anyway?,” that uses audience suggestions and participation to create a fast-paced and hilariously unique experience. The show began with some heartfelt words by Veronica followed by a video montage of Dylan’s life and his granted wish to meet Mickey Mouse in Disneyland. “It was quite a start to a memorable night,” said Made Up Theatre co-founder Sean Taylor. “Seeing tears turn into laughter so quickly is really exhilarating. It is an ideal way to honor one’s memory.” The show demonstrated the distinctive art of improvisation, where the Made Up Theatre performers August, Dustin Seidler, Ben Stephens, and Taylor utilized audience suggestions to inspire their games and scenes, and they even brought some willing audience members on the stage to help them. One such game had an audience member providing the movement for the four per-

formers as they did a fully improvised scene. “Everything we do is made up on the spot,” said Taylor. “The audiences that come into our theatre really shape the shows we do.” In addition to the Make A Wish Foundation, the Made Up Theatre has helped raise funds for numerous organizations, including the National Federation of the Blind of California, the American Cancer Society, and Lincoln High School in San Jose. “We love helping organizations out,” said August. “Veronica is very committed to what she does, and we strive to be just as committed as her when we do these shows.” Veronica also raises money through other fundraiser events, including her annual Dylan Johnson Memorial Bowl A Thon which will celebrate its 13th year on October 13th. The event is open to the public and is held at Hillman Cloverleaf Family Bowl in Fremont. Made Up Theatre and Veronica plan to hold another fundraiser event before the end of the year. Until then, visit www.MadeUpTheatre.com for information on their weekly improv comedy shows and fundraising opportunities. Veronica also documents her story and information about

her work with the Make A Wish Foundation at www.DylanJohnsonBowlathon.com. She plans to reach the $200,000

mark by the end of the year. After reaching that goal, Veronica has one thing to say: “Next stop, one million!”


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12631636 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams to Casey Jordon Williams The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: August 10, 2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 23, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2321193# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12628777 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: David James Hochstetler, Jr. for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner David James Hochstetler, Jr. filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: David James Hochstetler, Jr. to David James Haynes The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 7-20-2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 04, 2012 /S/ WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314110#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465777 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Naturals 365, 48255 Turquoise St., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Aihong He, 48255 Turquoise St., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Aihong He This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2325036# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465812-814 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Pro Local Movers, 2. Bay Area Moving & Californias Movers Moving, 3. California’s Movers, 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #260, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Champions Movers Inc., 47000 Warm Springs Blvd., #260, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maul Kadish This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 31, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/22, 6/26, 6/29/12 CNS-2325032# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465788 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Neesh Travels, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ravinder Singh Arora, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ravinder Singh Arora, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324438# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 465789 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Limo Alpine, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Limo Alpine LLC, California, 39800 Fremont Blvd., #124, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/30/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ravinder Singh Arora, Sole Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 30, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324434# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465644 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: California Trucking Services, 34937 Silverlock Ct., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Parminder Singh, 34937 Silverlock Ct., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Parminder Singh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 24, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/12 CNS-2324383# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465233 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Specialty Sales West, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda, 3984 Washington Blvd., #112, Fremont, CA 94538, Alameda Michael G. Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Nancy Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on March, 2007 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael G. Lima, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 14, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2320676# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465273 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fun Foods, 41844 Sherwood Street, Fremont, CA 94578, County of Alameda, PO Box 1515, Fremont, CA 94538 Dianne Lee Glasmacher, 41844 Sherwood Street,

Fremont, CA 94578 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/15/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dianne L Glasmacher This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317524# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464939 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Hills Automotive, 300 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Mission Hills Auto, Inc., CA, 4744 Hazelwood St., Dublin, CA 94568 This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ --- CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317291# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Homesalot Property Management, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Timothy Crofton Real Estate, Inc., CA, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bryan Tang Designated Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317284# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465150-151 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1) Norcal Transport, 2) Diaz Trucking Company, 1782 D Street #93, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Uriel Diaz, 1782 D Street #93, Hayward, CA 94541 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Uriel Diaz This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 10, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314478# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463916 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magnetic Magnificent Galas by Christa, 20000 Summercrest Dr., Castro Valley, CA 94552, County of Alameda Christa J. Mekki, 20000 Summercrest Dr., Castro Valley, CA 94552 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Christa J. Mekki This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 11, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b),

where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314133# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464786 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heroes And Dice, 37260 Fremont Blvd. #A, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Christopher C. Roe, 37607 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 Nhat Pham, 1860 Catherine St., Santa Clara, CA 95050 Kristopher L. Faraone, 4140 Abel Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306 This business is conducted by Co-Partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Christopher C. Roe This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 03, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314016# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464867 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Frazier’s Landscaping, 41679 Sherwood St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Raymond Frazier, 41679 Sherwood St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raymond Frazier This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 04, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2313154#

GOVERNMENT NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 26, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: 2012 Base Repair Project City Project No. 8234M (PWC) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2325517# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES RFQ #900967 Highland Hospital (ATR) Project (Phase 1) Medical Equipment: Holter Analyzer System and Electrocardiography (ECG) Machine Diagnosis System South County– Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at Castro Valley Library, Canyon Room, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, CA and North County– Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 2:00 p.m. at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 11th Floor, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on July 19, 2012 County Contact: Kai Moore (510) 208-4882 or via email: kai.moore@ acgov.orgAttendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 6/5/12 CNS-2324474# NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES RFQ #900964 OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) Toner and Ink Cartridges South County - Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 2:00 p.m. at Public Works Agency, Conference Room 230, 951 Turner Court, Hayward, CA and North County - Thursday, June 21, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 11th Floor, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on July 26, 2012 County Contact: Stefanie Taylor (510) 208-9610 or via

email: stefanie.taylor@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 6/5/12 CNS-2324156# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 20, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Signal Modification at Walnut Avenue and Gallaudet Drive/Cherry Lane City Project No. 8763 (PWC) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2321381# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 20, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Speed Lump Installation on 6 Streets Fronting Elementary Schools City Project No. 8762 (PWC) Installation of speed lumps and related signing and striping on Emilia Lane, Maybird Circle, Darwin Drive, School Street, Sundale Drive, and South Grimmer Boulevard, and other such items not mentioned above that are required by the Plans, Standard Specifications, and/or these Special Provisions. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2321352#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ABDUL KARIMI CASE NO. RP12630552 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Abdul Karimi A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Homayyn Karimi and Merwais Nabizada in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Homayyn Karimi and Merwais Nabizada be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Kyle M. Johnston, 5315 College Avenue, Oakland, CA 94618, Telephone: (510) 527-1880 5/25, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2320538#

Larry King says his talk show resumes this summer BY DAVID BAUDER AP TELEVISION WRITER NEW YORK (AP), – Larry King said Thursday that his talk show will resume this summer on the new digital network Ora.TV, earlier than he or the network had anticipated. The show “Larry King Now” will mark the startup of the network financed by Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim. Executives had originally intended to launch in the fall. But King said he wanted to “get into the political mix.'' The Democratic and Republican national conventions to name presidential nominees are this summer.

King said he expected the format of his show to be similar to ``Larry King Live,'' which aired on CNN in prime time for 25 years, and he's retained much of his old production staff. The new show will generally be 30 minutes in length, instead of an hour, although there will be flexibility to go shorter or longer depending on who's being interviewed, said Jon Housman, Ora.TV's CEO. Fresh episodes will be posted online about 5 or 6 p.m., as opposed to the 9 p.m. start time of King's TV show, although viewers will be able to watch it whenever they want. King, who's 78, said he misses the nightly show.

“The night I missed it the most, when it really hit me, was the night Osama bin Laden was killed,” he said, adding his show would have spent a week on the topic. Ora.TV said it expects King's show to set the tone for a network that will largely consist of talk shows. It will be available in multiple ways online, through streaming and apps, and at several locations beyond Ora.TV's own website. Housman said he was not ready Thursday to announce any specific distribution deals, but said it will be made clear before “Larry King Now'' starts the various ways it will be available. Ora.TV is laying the groundwork for King's return through efforts to make him

available in ventures where younger people who might be more inclined to watch a digital network will see him. For instance, King has a new skit that will be made available on the website Funny or Die next week. King wouldn't pinpoint a guest for the first night of his new show but said he's shooting high – aiming for President Barack Obama or Mitt Romney. He said he still expects to book quality guests because of his long relationships in the business, even though a digital network has less visibility than traditional TV. “It's not Harvey Glick saying ‘please come on the Harvey Glick show,’” he said.


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

Is it okay to be last?

WILLIAM MARSHAK

S

ometimes being last is an advantage and other times, not. For instance, in some games such as poker and blackjack, the advantage of watching others play and the fall of cards prior to your turn may give an indication of what is coming your way. In sports, observing previous batters and pitches in a baseball game can be instructive. But, in the game of politics, being in last position to present your ideas and position can promote a sense of “catch-up” especially when many appropriate and useful comments you were about to make have been expressed by others before you had a chance to speak. It can be disturbing – and a bit amusing – to watch the last to speak desperately attempt to add a unique twist to the conversation when they have nothing else to say. Some ramble, others repeat and, at times, the old standby of asking for an explanation for what has been spelled out in a staff report is used. While some observers are only interested in the outcome of these discussions without regard to the circuitous route taken to get to it, the process appears to need some adjustment. Many politicians are unable to simply note that they agree with prior observations and leave it at that. Usually, a mad quest for something new, no matter how silly or unrelated to the matter at hand, different wording or simply a reiteration of whatever has gone before is the result. One-upmanship begins to dominate and, fearing they will not have the last comment, the cycle can repeat. This process is heightened by the number of seated councilmembers who are candidates for election or reelection and the proximity to voting.

With today’s completion of June primary elections, November contests will begin to heat up. Declarations of candidacy have begun in earnest and although many voters will not pay close attention to campaigns until later this year, political plots, plans and maneuvers are well underway. In an unusual and confusing circumstance, the greater Tri-City area is faced with redistricting changes that have challenged even the most politically astute to understand who votes for which district and how to attract voters who have been yanked from one district to another and must now consider a new set of faces. A new set of rules will create situations in which two candidates from the same political party can compete in open voting beyond primary elections. In Fremont, Mayor Morrison and Councilmember Dutra have chosen to retire following the November election. However, the other three councilmembers are preparing for battle. As Bill Harrison and Anu Natarajan scramble for an advantage in the race for mayor, they both try to avoid too much damage and vitriol since, in the event they lose, both run from “safe” seats and will remain on council with either their opponent or someone else (Steve Cho?) as mayor. Sue Chan is hoping to rally her constituents in the face of ill-advised recusals when she fled from a tough decision on Kimber Park open space. Friendships and possible economic reprisals trumped her action as an elected official; not a ringing endorsement for responsible leadership. In the wake of the bruising battle ahead, will those left harbor resentment and carry political wounds during the next two years? How will a new council respond to the significant challenges facing the city? If one of the sitting councilmembers becomes mayor, another appointment process looms ahead. In this scenario, will the losing candidate for mayor be able to put the punches and counterpunches of a political battle behind? Those running for seats – Dutra, Chan, Morrison – vacated or at risk are wildcards and can bring an entirely new paradigm to the council. This may shake up the status quo of indecision that has been so prevalent and nowhere more evi-

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDITOR Helen Tracey-Noren

dent than in council vacillation during the Kimber Park open space versus development question which remains undecided to this day.

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

As we approach these fateful days of campaigning and oratory from candidates, will the round-robin of comment, followed by counter-comment, followed by additional comment become commonplace? Will comments and suggestions by the first to speak be enough if they are clear and concise or will everyone in this politically charged atmosphere struggle to have the last word? When is last okay?

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

A solution might be to control and change the order of comment solicited by the mayor at council meetings. Instead of moving in a specific order, questions, comments and discussion solicited from councilmembers, can be arranged so that those who usually comment first can wait and, if applicable, have the fortitude to agree without additional extended oratory. Each candidate wants and needs to make their position clear to present a reasonable choice for voters. Hopefully this will be possible in campaign literature, interviews and constituent discussions without manufacturing lengthy council meetings that degenerate into campaign rhetoric. Will Rogers once quipped, “There's no trick to being a humorist when you have the whole government working for you.” Maybe in this campaign season, we can prove him wrong and our local government can have the last laugh.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

June 5, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS Home Health Care Provider's Corp. A Reliable Source Providing In-Home Health Care For the ELDERLY Since 1997 Open 24 hours 7 days a week Licensed # 038521

Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

U.S. History for Kids Summer Program with a Dramatic Interpretation 6 sessions $160 David Makki Professional Tutoring 510-396-7643 Makkiburger@gmail.com

Physicist. Research Scientist on nano tech fiber laser R&D. Wk site/Apply: Optoplex Corp, 3342 Gateway Blvd, Fremont, CA 94538.

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL A BUSINESS? We have been matching buyers and sellers for 29 plus years

For a FREE and NO OBLIGATION consultation Call me TODAY!

SALES & ACQUISITIONS Tashie Zaheer CELL: 510-750-3297 Beauty Salon in South Bay Machine Tools supplier- (Estate Sale) Estate Sale- Huge price reduction Laundromat (El Sobrante) Grocery Store with Deli (San Jose) Subway Sandwich Auto body Shop (Oakland)

$69K $175K $99K $135K $99k+ Inv. $189K $85K

Computer System Analyst and Middleware Analyst in Newark, CA. May travel to unanticipated work sites throughout the United States. Send résumé to Service Oriented Solutions LLC, 37600 Central Court, Suite 212, Newark, CA 94560.

HELP WANTED

Overeaters Anonymous Newcomers Welcome

Martins

Overeaters Anonymous offers a program of recovery from compulsive eating using the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of OA. There are no dues or fees. For more information about meeting times, or other questions about OA, you may contact Bev at 510-783-2680 or visit the OA website at: www.oa.org.

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Wanted Hair Stylists & Beauty Supply Service people Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

Good news for California drivers SUBMITTED BY CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones today announced important changes to the California Low Cost Automobile Insurance Program. Beginning May 15, the cost of an annual premium for the program has decreased up to nine percent across California’s 58 counties and the income eligibility caps for qualifying for the program have increased, allowing more of California’s uninsured drivers to qualify for state-sponsored Low Cost Automobile Insurance. As a result of the premium reductions, the statewide average cost of an annual Low Cost Automobile Insurance policy in California is now $257.69 a year and the premiums for all California counties are now less than $350 annually. The greatest changes in premiums are in the following counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Stanislaus and Sutter. “More than 4 million cars, or 15 percent of the cars on California roads, don’t have insurance,” Commissioner Jones said. “If financial limitations have kept consumers from purchasing car insurance, these changes make Low Cost Auto Insurance a more viable option for uninsured drivers.”

Established by the legislature in 1999, the CLCA program provides liability-only insurance for less than $350 a year, and the amount could be much less, depending on the county where the consumer lives. Drivers may qualify if they: • have a good driving record • are at least 19 years old • have been continuously licensed to drive for three years • own a vehicle valued at $20,000 or less • meet the income eligibility requirements ($27,925 for one person, $37,825 for two people, up to $57,625 for a family of four) California’s Low Cost Automobile Insurance Program was established to provide income eligible persons with liability insurance protection at affordable rates as a way to meet California's financial responsibility laws. To learn more about the program, consumers can call 1-866-6028861, visit http://www.mylowcostauto.com or text “low cost” to 65374. For a full list of the new annual insurance premiums for each of the 58 counties visit the website. And to assist more California drivers, the Low Cost Web site is now offered in Spanish. The website address is: http://www.mylowcostauto.com/index-spanish.php

6-ton potato kicks off 32state road tour AP WIRE SERVICE BOISE, Idaho (AP),Call it Tuber Tour 2012. The Idaho Potato Commission is commemorating its 75th anniversary and hoping to dispel some bad press for potatoes by taking a lifelike, six-ton spud on a seven-month, 32-state tour. The Big Idaho Potato departs the state Capitol Friday morning with a ribbon-cutting ceremony by Gov. Butch Otter. The building-sized potato that was first seen at the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl will be making stops that include Chicago, New York, Washington, Denver and Los Angeles. The Idaho Statesman reports (http://bit.ly/H3f8lP ) that one stop will be outside the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where officials last year questioned whether potatoes should be included in school lunches and banned it from the food stamp program. The public can trace the route on the Big Idaho Potato's website, http://www.bigidahopotato.com


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Hayward City Council Hayward City Council May 29, 2012 Work Session FY 2013 and FY 2014 recommended biennial budget work session #3: departmental presentations by City Clerk, City Manager, Mayor and City Council, Library and Community Services, and Fire Consent Terminated amended and restated Bond Regulatory Agreement for the Waterford Apartments (former Shorewood Apartments) at 25800 Industrial Boulevard and approved related documents. The 544-unit complex will be sold for

$86.5M by Avalon Bay to Guardian/KW Hayward, LLC which plans a $3M-renovation and will no longer be required to set aside 20 percent of the units at affordable rents for low income families. The property transfer is expected to generate an additional $90,000 for the City’s General Fund Reserves. Authorized City Manager to execute revised agreement to implement the Alameda Countywide Clean Water Agreement. Public Hearing Councilmember call-up of Planning Commission approval of a proposed 44-unit condominium project at 22471-22491

Maple Court in the Central City Commercial (CC-C) Zoning Subdistrict - Conditional Use Permit Application PL-20110132 / Tentative Tract Map Application PL-2011-0133. KB Design and Consulting, Ben Wong (Applicant) / Maple Court Homes (Owner). Approved subject to no over-night parking in Municipal Parking Lot No. 5 and, if necessary, parking restrictions in surrounding streets. (4 YES votes; 3 NO votes (Peixoto, Salinas, Sweeney). Public Comment Rudy Grassechi, owner of The Cobblers, wants parking on the west side of Foothill Boulevard

(Between A Street and City Center) re-instated for his customers and those of neighboring businesses. He would like Foothill Boulevard to retain three traffic lanes and not see a fourth added. The matter will be brought back, with an analysis, for Council’s consideration. Elie Goldstein, owner of Kraski’s Nutrition, echoed Grassechi’s concerns. He also complained about the large quantities of refuse at the front and rear of the building on Foothill Boulevard. Cleanliness will help attract customers. Jim Drake complained about the continued use of power wash-

ers by Mi Pueblo Supermarket and the associated noise levels. Robin Jones, HUSD, announced that free breakfasts and lunches (no ID required) will be available from June 8 to August 10, 2012 through the “Let’s Do Lunch, Hayward… and Breakfast, Too” program which serves all children under 18 in Hayward, Union City and San Leandro and provided 130,000 meals in 2011. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Olden Henson – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Bill Quirk – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeño - Yes

Economists consider what might repair job market BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP ECONOMICS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), – The U.S. economy suddenly looks a lot weaker. U.S. employers created only 69,000 jobs in May, the fewest in a year, and the unemployment rate ticked up. The dismal jobs data will fan fears that the economy is sputtering. It also puts President Barack Obama on the defensive five months before his re-election bid. And it could lead the Federal Reserve to take further steps to help the economy. The Labor Department also said Friday that the economy created far fewer jobs in the previous two months than first thought. It revised those figures down to show 49,000 fewer jobs created. The unemployment rate rose to 8.2 percent from 8.1 percent in April, the first increase in 11 months. Job creation is the fuel for the nation's economic growth. When more people have jobs, more consumers have money to spend – and consumer spending drives about 70 of the economy. ––– Here's what The Associated Press' reporters are finding: ––– SEEKING SOLUTIONS What can be done to energize U.S. hiring? Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at California State University, said Congress and the Obama administration must work immediately to address the ``fiscal cliff'' looming at year's end. That's when the economy will be hit with higher taxes and across-the-board government spending unless Democrats and Republicans forge some compromise. Uncertainty over what will be done about the fiscal cliff will likely hang over the U.S. economy for months. “Businesses have pulled in their horns, given the growing amount of uncertainty,” Sohn said. He said Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke could also start discussing another round of Fed bond buying to try to further lower long-term interest rates. Sohn noted that more bond buying remains unlikely given how low rates are already. Still, he said, “just the fact that Bernanke is talking about more Fed bond buying would be important. What we need is a psychological lift.” – Martin Crutsinger, AP Economics Writer ––– PREDICTING MORE FED ACTION “This clearly puts the Fed back in play for a near-term easing operation,” says Jay Feldman, director of U.S. economics for Credit Suisse. Feldman expects the Fed to act at its next meeting June 19-20 – perhaps by buying mortgage-backed investments to try to push down long-term mortgage rates or by doing something unexpected. That said, mortgage rates are already hitting bottom. The average rate on the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell this week

to 3.75 percent. That's the lowest since long-term mortgages began in the 1950s. – Paul Wiseman, AP Economics Writer ––– PAIN ON WALL STREET Stocks sank after the release of the jobs report. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped more than 200 points, erasing what was left of its gain for the year and putting the index on track for its worst one-day drop since November. Economic data from Europe and Asia also came in weak, and traders sold all types of risky investments and stampeded toward the safety of U.S. government bonds. Bond prices rose sharply. And the yield on the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note touched 1.44 percent, the lowest on record. – Daniel Wagner, AP Business Writer ––– DUELING POLITICAL VIEWS White House economist Alan Krueger said that while the latest jobs report illustrated the need for faster growth, the administration welcomes any increase in jobs. “We are on a better path then we had been before the president came into office,” he said. Obama's Republican challenger, Mitt Romney countered: ``Today's weak jobs report is devastating news for American workers and American families. ...It is now clear to everyone that President Obama's policies have failed to achieve their goals and that the Obama economy is crushing America's middle class.'' – Darlene Superville, Associated Press Writer ––– GOVERNMENT ISN'T HELPING Government jobs cuts are worsening the jobs picture. The federal government shed 5,000 jobs in May. State governments cut 5,000 and local governments 3,000. Overall, governments have cut jobs in 10 of the past 12 months. Tax collections by state and local governments have been rising since mid-2009. Yet the belt-tightening continues. From January through March, government cuts reduced U.S. economic growth by 0.78 percent point to an annual pace of just 1.9 percent. “Typically, the government offers a base level of support” when the economy is weak, says Scott Brown, chief economist at Raymond James & Associates. “In this case, the government is actually contributing to the weakness of the recovery. ... You're talking about teachers getting laid off. Government worker have families. They have mortgages. They spent their paychecks.” – Paul Wiseman, AP Economics Writer ––– BIG CUTS IN CONSTRUCTION Some major industries absorbed steep job losses in May. Construction firms cut 28,000 jobs. That was the sharpest such drop in two years. Governments shed 13,000. Amusement parks, museums and casinos cut nearly 17,000 positions. Professional and busi-

ness service firms, which include high-paying positions in accounting, engineering and legal services, dropped 1,000. On a hopeful note, a few key industries created jobs. Manufacturers added 12,000. Transportation and warehousing companies created nearly 36,000. And 46,000 jobs were added in education and health care. Hotels and restaurants added roughly 9,000 jobs. – Christopher S. Rugaber, AP Economics Writer ––– CONSIDER THE `EMPLOYMENT RATE' To assess the job market, most people look at the unemployment rate. But it can be misleading. The rate can fall, for example, even if hiring is weak. This can happen when many people stop looking for work and are no longer counted as unemployed. The rate can also rise even when jobs are created, if more people start looking. The number of unemployed often rises. That's what happened in May. Then there's the “employment rate.” It measures the percentage of adults who do have jobs. And it's painting a more sobering picture. Consider: The unemployment rate has dropped almost a full percentage point from August, from 9.1 percent to 8.2 percent. That might suggest the job market is steadily strengthening. Yet the employment rate has improved only slightly in that time, from 58.3 percent to 58.6 percent. That's lower than when the recession ended, when it was 59.4 percent. So why the difference? The economy has added jobs since August – but only about enough to keep up with population growth and prevent the unemployment rate from heading up. – Christopher S. Rugaber, AP Economics Writer ––– EUROPE STILL WORSE As bad as the May employment numbers were, Americans can take solace from one thing: It's a lot worse in Europe. Unemployment in the 17 countries that use the euro currency hit 11 percent in April, the highest since the single currency was introduced in 1999, the European Union's Eurostat office reported Friday. “Europe would gladly trade places with the U.S.,” says Josh Feinman, global chief economist of DB Advisors. But Europe's problems are likely to pinch America too, by denting U.S. exports to Europe and rattling financial markets. And should the U.S. economy, the largest in the world, weaken further, that would further damage economies in Europe and Asia. – Paul Wiseman, AP Economics Writer ––– COAL WORKERS SQUEEZED A warm winter that cut electricity demand and decade-low natural gas prices have led to tough times for the coal industry. Demand for coal in the U.S. is pro-

jected to drop to the lowest level since 1992 this year. In response, coal companies are cutting back, especially in West Virginia and Kentucky, where relatively expensive coal is produced. Patriot Coal, based in St. Louis, has laid off 1,000 workers this year. Alpha Natural Resources, based in Bristol, Va., announced in February it would idle four mines and lay off 320 workers. Earlier this month, it announced it would idle another mine and slow production at one more, cutting 133 more jobs. – Jonathan Fahey, AP Energy Writer ––– COUCH-SURFING The job market remains tough even for the very educated or very experienced. Erica Johnson, 33, calls herself a ``couchsurfing Ph.D.'' because she's been sleeping on sofas in the homes of friends and relatives in Lexington, Ky. Armed with a doctorate in education policy, she'd like to work as a college administrator. But most management jobs she's pursued require more experience. Yet she's considered over-qualified for lower-level jobs. “There aren't a lot of mid-level openings,”Johnson said, after many states have cut education budgets. Phil Allen, 48, a PR professional in suburban Chicago, says he's had 70 job interviews in the past year. He gave a 20minute presentation as part of an all-day interview for one opening this spring and left thinking, “There's no way I'm not going to get this job.” “But I didn't get it,” he said. ``That's kind of a crushing thing.'' – Christopher S. Rugaber, AP Economics Writer ––– SLOW RECOVERY Nearly three years into the recovery, hiring remains weak by every historical standard. Consider what happened when companies slashed jobs in the 1981-82 recession. In September 1982, layoffs ran at an annual rate topping 4 percent. But the economy rebounded explosively. And job growth followed. By February 1984, 15 months after the recession had ended, hiring was occurring at a 6.5 percent annual pace. During the Great Recession, job cuts were even steeper. They occurred at a 6 percent to 7 percent annual rate in the winter of 2008-09. Yet since the recession officially ended in June 2009, job gains have been fitful. Hiring has only recently topped 2 percent of total payrolls – just one-third the pace after the 1981-82 recession. What's going on this time? Mainly, the economy is too weak to drive more job growth. Consumers are still cautious about spending. And the housing sector is still weak. Both are weighing on the economy more than in previous recoveries. – Christopher S. Rugaber, AP Economics Writer


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

Dolores K. Thomas

Gurinder Singh

RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 30, 1923 - May 4, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease.

RESIDENT OF NEWARK December 20, 1964 – May 17, 2012

John B. Lough

Robert J. Silva

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 29, 1946 – May 25, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 23, 1930 – May 20, 2012

Richard “Dick” L. Sira

Geraldine Peebles

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 24, 1934 – May 26, 2012

Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 14, 1928 – May 23, 2012

Ana A. Garcia

Margaret Howden

RESIDENT OF TRACY March 9, 1930 – May 27, 2012

Lana August Puchta

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 3, 1922 – May 23, 2012

Alan R. Torres

Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

William Lewis

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 19, 1961 – May 28, 2012

510-657-1908

RESIDENT OF FREMONT SDecember 30, 1926 – May 26, 2012

Maxwell P. Carranza

www.lanasestatesales.com

Oscar N. Mendoza

RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 17, 1947 – May 29, 2012

RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 30, 1944 – May 26, 2012

Manuel Luis Guerra RESIDENT OF UNION CITY July 4, 1943 – June 3, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Obituary

Edward Michael Magyar Former resident of Redwood City FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Edward passed away peacefully in his residence in Fremont on May 28, 2012 at the age of 86. Born on December 6, 1925 in Cleveland, Ohio, he was preceded in death by his parents Michael and Marie Magyar, his step-mother Julia Magyar, his wife Doris Magyar, and his sister Mary Jane Lazor. He is survived by his sister Evelyn Kilbourn, his daughters Cathy Dutton and Cindy Vanderpan, grandsons Chris and Michael Dutton, and several nieces, grand-nieces and grand-nephews. All will miss him very much. Having served a long and faithful career in the U.S. Air Force, Edward was laid to rest alongside his beloved wife in Golden Gate National Cemetery on June 4, 2012. Donations may be made in his memory to The Carter Center (www.cartercenter.org).

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, June 5 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, June 6 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave.

and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, June 7 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Ln., Fremont 4:30 – 5:15 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 So. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Fremont Please note: there will be no Alameda County Bookmobile service from June 11-22.

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060

q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 31

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 5, 2012


June 5, 2012

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Independence is a precious thing to all people and nations, and once attained is surely a cause for celebration and remembrance. Filipino communities across the nation will be doing just that when Philippine Independence Day is commemorated on June 12.

In the town of Kawit in the provence of Cavite, Philippines, General Emilio Aguinaldo, leader of Filipino revolutionary forces, declared independence from Spain on June 12, 1898. Despite the powerful claim, neither Spain, nor the U.S. recognized its authority. Spain ceded the Philippines to the U.S. later that year in the Treaty of Paris, and independence wasn’t recognized until July 4,1946 through the Treaty of Manila. Thus Filipino celebrations were observed on that already famous day, though always heavily overshadowed by the larger Independence Day fanfare of the United States. The overlapping celebrations continued until 1961 when President of the Philippines Diosdado Macapagal began working to move the holiday to June 12, the day when independence was initially proclaimed in 1898. On August 4, 1964 the change became official when Macapagal signed the Malacañang Republic Act claiming June 12 as Philippine Independence Day. This year marks the 114th anniversary of Philippine independence, and the San Francisco Philippine Consulate General office and the Bay Area Filipino American committee of community leaders are introducing a weeklong celebration with activities throughout the Bay Area. Under the theme “A New Generation of Heroes: Connect. Inspire. Empower.”, Filipino community members and leaders

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

hope to inspire young people to be leaders and generators of positive change as they work to accomplish their goals. The Kalayaan Festival 2012 will kick things off with a cultural celebration on June 10 at Union City’s Kennedy Park. A Tagalog word meaning independence or freedom, Kalayaan is a free event that will feature live performances by Radio Disney star Amber Lily, and singer and actress Stella Ruiz, stand-up comedy from Allan Manalo and Bindlestiff Studio, along with a flag ceremony and cultural dances and songs. Eskabo Daan and Arnis will deliver a Philippine Martial Arts exhibition, and local designer Crisanta Malig will share her latest fashions in a fashion parade. Delicious Filipino food will be provided by eight food trucks and other vendors, and arts and crafts exhibitors and various non-profits will also be on site. The celebration will be hosted by comedian and director Bernardo Bernardo with co-hosts Freska Griarte of Movin’ 99.7, and Anthony Rivero, host of Power ng Pinoy. Activities throughout the week include a talk on personal branding by Pocholo Gonzales in Fremont on Monday, a flag-raising ceremony on June 12 at the San Francisco Consulate Offices, a business mixer and panel discussion with three inspiring Bay Area business personalities at Fort McKinley Restaurant in South San Francisco, Comedy Night at Bindlestiff Studio in San Francisco, a lecture on the ancient Filipino script Baybayin by Christian Cabuay at the Consulate office, and a special movie/TV screening. The celebration culminates with the Gala on July 17 at San Francisco City Hall. Whatever your heritage, the Kalayaan Festival is a great opportunity to experience another culture and celebrate the freedoms that we all share as members of one community. For more information, visit www.KalayaanSF.org. Kalayaan Festival Sunday, June 10 10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Kennedy Park 1333 Decoto Road, Union City www.KalayaanSF.org Free

Page 33


June 5, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 34


TCV 2012-06-05