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Invitation to “Wedding” at Douglas Morrisson

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

June 1, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 44

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK Every public school student from grade school through their senior year in high school knows about STAR testing. But few students, fewer parents and just a handful of others are aware its significance and effect on schools. Washington High School Assistant Principal and STAR Coordinator Lance Miller explains that in an effort to evaluate and measure effectiveness of teaching and learning at the wide variety of schools throughout California, a series of Standardized Testing And Reporting (STAR) exams are administered in math, reading, writing, science, and history to students in grades 2 through 11. Most exams are in a multiple choice format but a writing assessment is administered to fourth and seventh grade students. Schools, teachers, parents and students are informed of testing results. The philosophy of this testing is to follow the progress of each student throughout his/her primary and secondary school years, revealing strengths and weaknesses in the learning process. continued on page 32 INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012

Theater Review

SUBMITTED BY SUSAN E. EVANS The Douglas Morrisson Theatre continues its 2012 “Family Portraits” season with the rarely revived drama, “The Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers. Directed by Eric Fraisher Hayes, the play features an ensemble of Bay Area performers including Alexandrai Bond as Berenice, Katy Nealon as Frankie, Ruby Buckwalter as John Henry, Joe Fitzgerald as Mr. Adams, Dorian Lockett as T.T., Cornell WhiteCockrell as Honey, Alex Skinner as Jarvis, Alisha Ehrlich as Janice, Marsha Howard as Mrs. West, Dillon Aurelio-Perata as Barney, Bessie Zolno as Helen, and Samantha Cowan as Doris. “The Member of the Wedding” is a masterful exploration of issues of identity and of black/white race relations in the Deep South. Set in Georgia in 1945, Carson McCullers’ sensitive play deserves to be discovered anew by Bay Area theatre audiences. A poignant comingof-age drama adapted by McCullers from her own novel, the play tells the story of twelveyear old tomboy, Frankie, a restless, bored and lonely soul, jealous of her brother’s impending marriage. Playing

three-handed bridge with her seven-year old cousin, John Henry and her surrogate mother, Berenice, the black family cook, Frankie longs to

escape the summer heat with her big brother and his fiancée. She dreams of becoming the “we of me.” Premiering at the Empire Theatre on Broadway on January 5, 1950, “The Member of the Wedding” won the 1950 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play. Of the original production, John Mason Brown wrote in The Saturday Review: "Mrs. McCullers's study of the loneliness of an over-imaginative young Georgian girl is no ordinary play. It is felt, observed, and phrased with exceptional

sensitivity. It deals with the torturing dreams, the hungry egoism, and the heartbreak of childhood in a manner as rare as it is welcome … it has a magic of its own.” “The Member of the Wedding” previews on June 7, opens June 8, and runs through July 1. Shows are at 8 p.m. with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 23 there will be two performances - 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. There will also be a special post-play discussion after the Saturday matinee on June 23. Tickets are $10 for the preview, $20 for the Saturday matinee, and $28 for Thursday through Saturday evening performances and Sunday matinees. Discounts are available for seniors, students, TBA, KQED members, and groups of ten and over. The Box Office is open Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and can be reached at (510) 881-6777. Information is also available at www.dmtonline.org. The Member of the Wedding Preview: Thursday, June 7, 8 p.m. June 8 - July 1 8 p.m. (Sunday matinees: 2 p.m.) Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org. Tickets: $10 - $28


June 1, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Wednesdays, thru Jun 13

Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Images of Ladakh

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m.

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m. Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

Tango, Waltz, Merengue & Salsa Dance Classes 7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Beginners 7:00 p.m. / Intermediate & Advanced 8:15 p.m.

Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 657-5329

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City (510) 586-5747

Saturdays, Thru Jun 30

Wednesday, May 30 - Saturday, Jun 30

Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Continuing Events

Milpitas Library Wednesday, Apr 25 - Satur- 160 North Main St., Milpitas day, Dec 29 (408) 586-3409

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737

Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

That's Odd 12 noon - 5 p.m.

Ohlone for Kids $R

Contemporary artists Pamela Blotner and Jim Rosenau

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Thursday, Apr 26 - Sunday, Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont Jun 8

Invitational Show

12 noon - 8 p.m. (Sundays: 12 noon - 4 p.m.)

(510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Work by 32 local artists & CSUEB Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee alumni

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

Thursday, May 11 - Sunday, Jun 9

6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/Art/Olive-HydeArtGallery

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee $ 8 p.m.

EDITOR Helen Tracey-Noren

TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Various disciplines

Saturdays, Thru Jul 7

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $R 10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Friday, Jun 1

Ohlone College, Dance Studio Room 174 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-2303

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Face 2 Face: A Contemporary Portrait Exhibition 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Workout for the mind, body & spirit. Utilizes basic stretching techniques

Musical comedy about six adolescents vying for the championship

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Presented by Science for Youth. For school-age children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Friday, May 11 - Saturday, Jun 9

Chanticleers Theatre 3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley (510) 733-5483 www.chanticleers.org

Science Lecture for Children 2 p.m.

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Biff Jones Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

Round 'Em Up! 7:30 p.m. Milpitas Community Concert Band goes Western

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 www.milpitascommunityconcertband.com Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012

Friday, Jun 1

Saturday, Jun 2

Saturday, Jun 2

Sunday, Jun 3

"Murder at the KO Corral" $R 7:15 p.m.

MSJHS Family Festival $ 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Plein Air Paint Out $R 8:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Mystery dinner theater.

Fundraiser includes games & family activities

Electrical Contractors Trust of Alameda County Safety Fair - R 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Sunol Valley Golf Club 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (925) 862-2408 Friday, Jun 1 - Sunday, Jun 3

Performance Fusion $ Fri. - Sat. 8 p.m. & Sun. 2 p.m. Student film, dance pieces & short play

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 Wednesday, Jun 1 - Saturday, Jun 30

Spatial Expressions 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Featuring Bonnie Randall Boller & Vaki Kuner

Food, information booths, raffles

Paint the diverse scenery of the great outdoors

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 www.msjasb.org

IBEW L.U. 595 Hall 6250 Village Parkway, Dublin (510) 867-0487 www.electrialcontractors.com

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3215

Saturday, Jun 2

Saturday, Jun 2

Wednesday, Jun 6

Wine in the Bay Area $R 2 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Levee Bike Tour 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Guest Artist Demonstration 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Wine tasting fundraiser

9-mile guided bike tour. Ages 14 & up

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222 x139

Pastel landscape Mertens

Saturday, Jun 2

Saturday, Jun 2

"Pioneer Spirit" Scout O Rama 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

2012 Citizen of the "YOWZA" Champagne Luncheon $R 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Activities and demonstrations

Honoring Dave Smith & spring scholarship winners

The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6020

Kennedy Park 19501 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 912-0555 Saturday, Jun 2

Four Brothers 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 2 - Sunday, Jun 3

Saturday, Jun 2

Charlie Chaplin Days $ 11:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Youth Jazz Festival 11:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Various Chaplin films, Charlie looka-like contest & pie fight

Seven local school bands & the Jazzinators

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 657-0243

An Indian tale present by youth actors

Community of Christ Fremont 34050 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 792-1826 Sunday, Jun 3

Jazz meets Classical $ 8 p.m. Salon series performance

Music at the Mission 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-7166 www.musicatmsj.org Sudoku Solutions

Sunday, Jun 3

5 4 1 3 7 9 8 2 6

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Governor orders audit of specialty plate program

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California GMO Food Labeling Measure Meeting 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. Discussion of genetically engineered food labeling bills

Niles Community Park 3rd and H Streets, Fremont (510) 409- 9480 www.labelgmos.org

painter

Mark

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Friday, Jun 8

Celebration for Trish Nunes 3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Retirement party honoring 33 years of service

Warm Springs Elementary 47370 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-1611

BY HANNAH DREIER ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Gov. Jerry Brown has ordered an audit of California's specialty license plate program after a review by The Associated Press found there was little oversight of the $250 million raised in the 20 years since the Legislature authorized it. Elizabeth Ashford, a spokeswoman for the governor, said the administration on Tuesday asked its Department of Finance to undertake the review. She said the governor had no plans to return $3 million taken by Brown and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger from one of the specialty plate funds, a memorial plate created in honor of the victims of the 2001 terror attacks. The money was used to help close the state budget deficit. The AP review uncovered that raid and also found that there is virtually no independent oversight of how organizations spend the money.


June 1, 2012

SUBMITTED BY ALEJANDRA CARDENAS In less than a week, Sunflower Farmers Market, the fullservice natural and organic grocer known for carrying “serious food at silly prices,” will open its fourth store in the California market. On Wednesday, June 6, Sunflower will open its new store in Fremont, located at 3900 Mowry Avenue. Grand opening festivities will include special savings on groceries, exciting giveaways, food samples and more. The Sunflower Farmers Market grand opening activities in Fremont will begin with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 7 a.m., and continue throughout the day with special savings in every department. Plenty of friendly associates will be available to ring customers up and answer any questions about the new store. Some of the day’s festivities include: • The first 200 customers in line to receive a numbered card will receive a free reusable shopping bag filled with healthy

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

groceries, valued at over $50 (with purchase) • The first 10,000 shoppers will receive a free reusable grocery bag with purchase (one per customer) • Live music • Vendor booths with tasty samples • Kids’ activities • Grand opening specials on groceries Sunflower CEO Chris Sherrell says the goal of Sunflower is to help Fremont families eat healthy for less. The store will offer a large selection of fresh produce, including local and organic choices, as well as allnatural meats from grass-fed beef to handmade sausages. The market is also known for vegetarian, gluten-free, and dairyfree options. Fremont’s Sunflower will serve up fresh seafood, a bakery featuring fresh, hot French bread daily, a deli with made-to-go meals, and a large bulk selection including dozens of varieties of coffee beans. In addition, Sunflower will carry natural living health and wellness products,

from vitamins to body care, and an extensive line of private label products. “Friendly, helpful customer service is also part of the neighborhood farmers market feel,” says Sherrell. A new sale flyer highlighting weekly grocery specials will be distributed to the community each Wednesday. Customers can preview the savings online every Tuesday morning at www.sunflowermarkets.com. Every Wednesday, weekly Sunflower sale flyers will overlap, meaning shoppers can save on last week’s specials and the current week’s specials. Sunflower calls it “Double Ad Wednesday.” Sunflower opened its first California store in Roseville a year ago in May. A Modesto location followed in October, with a Sacramento (Land Park) store opening this month. Sunflower Farmers Market currently has 37 stores throughout eight states: Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Texas, California and Oklahoma. Please visit www.sunflowermarkets.com to learn more about Sunflower Farmers Market.

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June 1, 2012


June 1, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL

T

he Aphasia Tones©, a Cal State East Bay chorus comprised of persons learning to live fully with aphasia, will perform Wednesday, June 6 to raise awareness about aphasia and raise funds to support the campus Aphasia Treatment Program. “Aphasia Awareness: A Celebration!” will begin with a reception from 2:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. in the Music Building Courtyard, followed by the concert from 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. in MB 1055. The suggested donation is $5 per person. Aphasia, a communication disorder that most commonly occurs after a stroke, affects talking, understanding, reading, and writing. Nearly two million Americans are living with aphasia. The CSUEB Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders is home to a regionally and nationally recognized Aphasia Treatment Program [ATP], founded in 1996 by Professor Emeritus Jan Avent. In addition to speech and language treatment, the program includes communicative discussion groups and a book club among many

other things. Keeping with a legacy of innovation in ATP, current ATP director Ellen Bernstein-Ellis developed the Aphasia Tones© in 2009. Bernstein-Ellis notes that “access to the performing arts can be very limited following a stroke. The Aphasia Tones© allows individuals to derive the therapeutic and social benefits of singing in a group. They are empowered by being part of a community that shares common goals.” “Choir members with aphasia thrive, raise awareness about aphasia,

and inspire audiences with their joyous voices,” said Nidhi Mahendra, associate professor of CSD. Directed by graduate student clinicians Karen Fremont and Jacqui Standel, the 20-plus member Aphasia Tones©’ recent performance at the plenary session of the 2012 convention of the California Speech Language Hearing Association in San Jose brought the audience to its feet. The CSUEB performance will begin with a piano piece and introduction by

College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences Dean Kathleen Rountree, followed by several songs by the Aphasia Tones©, the presentation of a proclamation by the City of Hayward in recognition of Aphasia Awareness Month, and a video greeting from the ATP to the National Aphasia Association in honor of its 25th anniversary. Information is available at (510) 8853233 or by sending an e-mail to: ellen.bernstein-ellis@csueastbay.edu. Please allow plenty of time for parking due to special events on campus. Everyone, including those with handicapped permits, must purchase a parking permit. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodation upon request. Please notify event sponsor in advance at (510) 885-3233 if accommodation is needed. Aphasia Awareness: A Celebration! Wednesday, June 6 Reception: 2:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. Concert: 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Cal State East Bay Music Building 1055 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3233 Suggested donation: $5


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012 Tribune Media Services

The Kid (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M. Gentlemen of Nerve (NR) Work (NR)

The Dictator (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 1:20, 3:35, 5:50, 8:05, 10:20 Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 11:10, 4:25, 9:45 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30 What to Expect When You're Expecting (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:10

Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 1:20, 4:05, 6:50, 9:35 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 12:25, 2:15, 3:10, 5:00, 5:55, 7:45, 8:40, 10:30 Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 10:30, 12:40, 1:50, Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15 Snow White & the 4:00, 5:10, 7:20, 8:30, 10:40 Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Marvel's the 11:35, 1:05, 2:35, 4:05, 5:35, 7:05, Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 11:35, 2:55, 6:15, 9:35 8:35, 10:05 The Dictator (R) Fri. - Tue. & The Exorcist (R)Wed. 2:00, 7:00 Thu. 10:45, 12:55, 3:05, 5:20, 7:35, 9:50 Prometheus 3D(R)Thu. 12:01 Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:25 Battleship (PG–13)Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 10:40, 1:40, 4:40, 7:50, 11:00 The Hunger Games (PG–13) What to Expect When Fri. - Thu. 9:10 You're Expecting (PG–13) The Best Exotic Marigold Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 11:25, 2:15, 5:00, Hotel (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 7:45, 10:35 1:15, 4:05, 6:55, 9:50 Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. - 10:25, Wed. 10:25, 1:15 Tue. & Thu. 11:30, 12:50, 2:15, 5:00, Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) 6:10, 7:45, 10:30 - Wed. 10:05, 11:45, 1:25, 3:05, Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Fri. 4:45, 7:00, 8:00, 10:30, 11:15 Fri. - Tue. 10:50, 1:35, 4:20, 7:05, 9:50 Thu. 10:05, 11:45, 1:25, 4:45, 8:00, Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 12:10, 2:55, 3:25, 10:30, 11:15 5:40, 8:25, 8:55, 11:05 Marvel's the Thu. 10:50, 1:35, 4:20, 7:05 Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. - Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 10:30, 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, Thu. 10:55, 2:15, 5:35, 8:55 The Dictator(R) Fri. - Thu. 9:50, 7:30, 9:45 12:25, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 9:40 Snow White & the Huntsman(PG–13)Fri. - Tue. & Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 10:35, 11:35, 12:35, 1:40, 2:40, Tue. & Thu. 11:00, 1:40, 4:50, 7:55, 10:45 3:40, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:50, 8:50, 9:50, Wed. 11:00 10:55 Wed. 10:35, 1:40, 4:45, 7:50, 10:55 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 9:55, 1:15, 4:20, 7:35, 10:55 Rowdy Rathore (NR) Fri. What to Expect When Thu. 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30 The Exorcist (R)Wed. 2:00, 7:00 You're Expecting (PG–13) Madagascar 3: Europe's Fri. - Thu. 10:20, 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 9:45 in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. Most Wanted (PG)Thu. 12:01 Men Wed. 10:50, 12:00, 1:50, 2:55, 4:35, Madagascar 3: Europe's 5:50, 7:50, 8:45, 10:25, 11:20 Most Wanted 3D (PG)Thu. 12:01 Thu. 10:50, 12:00, 1:50, 2:55, 4:35, Prometheus 3D(R)Thu. 12:02 5:50, 7:50, 8:45, 11:20 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Thu. 12:01 Fri. - Thu. 10:10, 1:10, 4:25, 7:15, 9:55 Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 12:40, 2:20, 3:30, 5:20, 6:25, 8:10, 10:50 Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. Thu. 10:10, 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:40, Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) 10:00 Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 12:20, 2:35, 3:40, Snow White & the 7:00, 9:15, 10:20 Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Wed. 12:20, 3:40, 7:00, 10:20 9:45, 10:35, 11:25, 12:55, 1:45, 2:35, Marvel's the 4:05, 4:55, 5:40, 7:15, 8:05, 9:15, 10:15, 11:00 Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. Tue. & Thu. 11:15, 1:25, 4:45, 5:55, Crooked Arrows (PG–13) 8:05 Fri. - Thu. 10:15, 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15, Wed. 1:25, 4:45, 8:05 10:45

For Greater Glory (R) Fri. Thu. 10:00, 1:05, 4:10, 7:20, 10:35

Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. &

Sat. 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50

Every Breath U Take (NR)

Fri. - Thu. 9:45, 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:20

The Exorcist (R)Wed. 2:00, 7:00 National Theatre Live: Frankenstein (Original Casting) (NR) Wed. 7:00 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG)Thu. 12:15 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted 3D (PG)Thu. 12:05 Prometheus 3D(R)Thu. 12:01 Thu. 12:10

National Theatre Live: Frankenstein (Reverse Casting) (NR) Thu. 7:00

Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 12:30, 2:30, 3:45, 7:00, 9:05, 10:15 Marvel's the Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. -

Wed. 11:20, 1:30, 4:50, 5:45, 8:05 The Dictator (R) Fri. - Wed. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:35, 7:50, 10:15 Dark Shadows (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:10, 1:55, 4:40, 7:25, 10:25 Battleship (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 12:35, 3:50, 7:10, 10:05

What to Expect When You're Expecting (PG–13)

Fri. - Wed. 11:25, 2:00, 4:45, 7:35, 10:10 Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:40, 12:20, 2:20, 5:00, 5:40, 7:40, 10:20 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 11:05, 1:00, 1:40, 3:00, 3:40, 4:25, 6:20, 7:05, 8:20, 9:00, 9:40 Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. Safe (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, Wed. 12:00, 2:25, 5:05, 7:30, 10:15

11:00, 1:00, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 10:00, 11:00

What to Expect When You're Expecting (PG–13)

Fri. & Sat. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40, 12:15 Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40

Men in Black 3 (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:40, 12:30, 1:20, 2:15, 3:05, 3:55, 4:50, 5:40, 6:30, 7:25, 8:15, 9:05, 10:00, 10:50, 11:40, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:40, 12:30, 1:20, 2:15, 3:05, 3:55, 4:50, 5:40, 6:30, 7:25, 8:15, 9:05, 10:00, 10:50 Men in Black 3 3D (PG–13)

Fri. & Sat. 11:15, 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:40, 3:25, 4:25, 5:15, 6:00, 7:00, 7:50, 8:35, 9:35, 10:25, 11:10, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 12:05, 12:50, 1:50, 2:40, 3:25, 4:25, 5:15, 6:00, 7:00, 7:50, 8:35, 9:35, 10:25

The Artist (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 1:45, 4:30, 7:00

Chernobyl Diaries (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 5:45, 7:20, 8:00, 10:15, 12:30 Snow White & the Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 11:45, 1:20, 2:50, 4:20, 6:00, 7:20, 5:45, 7:20, 8:00, 10:15

Dr. Seuss' the Lorax (PG)

For Greater Glory (R) Fri. -

7:20, 9:30

9:00, 10:20

Snow White & the

Huntsman (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Fri. - Thu. 12:25, 2:30, 4:40, 7:10, 9:15 Wed. 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:25 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20 John Carter(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Battlefield America(PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:20, 12:05, 12:50, 2:15, Fri. - Wed. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 3:00, 3:45, 5:10, 5:55, 6:40, 8:05, 8:50, 11:30, 2:20, 5:15, 8:05 Prometheus 3D(R) Thu. 12:01 9:35, 11:00, 11:45, 12:30 (R) Fri. Thu. 21 Jump Street Sun. - Wed. 11:20, 12:05, 12:50, 2:15, 11:45, 2:10, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 3:00, 3:45, 5:10, 5:55, 6:40, 8:05, 8:50, Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. - Thu. 9:35, 11:00 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:00 Thu. 1:35, 4:30, 7:25 Thu. 11:20, 12:05, 12:50, 2:15, 3:00, The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. 3:45, 5:10, 5:55, 6:40, 8:05, 8:50, 9:35 - Thu. 12:20, 2:45, 4:55, 7:05, 9:35 Crooked Arrows (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45, 12:15 Sun. - Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 For Greater Glory (R) Fri. Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:00 Astronaut (NR) Fri. 2:30 P.M. Sat. 1:30 P.M. Sun. 1:30, 4:15

Think Like a Man (PG–13)

Secret of the Rocket (NR)

Fri. 10:00, 11:00, 12:00 Sat. & Sun. 12:30, 2:30 Wed. 11:00, 12:00

Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, Rowdy Rathore (NR) Fri. Thu. 12:30, 3:50, 7:10, 10:30 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Marvel's the Avengers (PG–13) The Exorcist (R)Wed. 2:00, 7:00

Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 2:40, 4:40, 5:50, 9:00, 11:00, 12:10 Sun. - Tue. 11:30, 2:40, 4:40, 5:50, 9:00, Skies (NR) 11:00 Wed. 11:30, 2:40, 11:00 Thu. 11:30, 2:40, 4:40, 11:00

Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 6:30, 8:30

Tales of the Maya Fri. 1:00, 5:00, 7:30 Sat. 11:30, 4:30, 7:30 Sun. 11:30, 3:30 Wed. 3:00 P.M. Thu. 10:00, 1:00, 3:00

Every Breath U Take (NR)

Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 4:30, 9:35, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 4:30, 9:35

Mysteries of Egypt (NR)

Fri. 12:00 P.M.

To Be an Astronaut (NR)

Fri. 1:00 P.M.

Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00 A.M.

Marvel's the Avengers 3D (PG–13) Fri. -

Tue. & Thu. 12:30, 1:30, 3:40, 6:50, 7:50, 10:00 Wed. 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00 The Dictator (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:05, 1:15, 2:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:45, 8:15, 9:55, 12:05 Sun. - Thu. 11:05, 1:15, 2:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:45, 8:15, 9:55

National Theatre Live: Frankenstein (Original Casting) (NR) Wed. 7:00 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (PG)Thu. 12:02 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted 3D (PG)Thu. 12:01 Prometheus 3D(R)Thu. 12:01 Thu. 12:02

National Theatre Live: Frankenstein (Reverse Casting) (NR) Thu. 7:00


June 1, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Bookworm

The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

“The Power of Habit” BY

I

f there’s one thing in the world that everyone can count on, it’s that you’ll be in your office by a certain time each morning. You get there via the same route, without fail. That’s, of course, after you get up at the same time each day and eat the same basic breakfast. And why change? Your habits have served you well, and it’s nice not to have to think much about them. So is it possible to prod others into similarly good habits? How can a visit to your business become a part of your customers’ routine? Read “The Power of Habit” by Charles Duhigg and find out. Do you remember brushing your teeth this morning? Chances are you don’t because you’ve gotten into the habit of brushing every day. Recent research indicates that over 40% of our daily actions are done by habit rather than by decision, which is why you probably don’t even recall grabbing the toothpaste. A part of your brain kicked in and did it automatically, since doing so – using a “habit loop” – saves effort by not having to think so hard. In making habit loops, says Duhigg, there are three steps. First, your brain looks for a cue, something at least a little familiar that it can use as a hint for behavior when presented with

CHARLES DUHIGG

an action. Next, it moves into a comforting routine. Lastly, it’s rewarded, which helps you remember how pleasurable that action was. Voila: your brain

“stops fully participating” in the decision to perform that task, and you’ve got a habit. “Habits are powerful, but delicate,” says Duhigg. Changing them can be done, but not without conscious effort. But how can you construct a new habit in other people? Create a craving, says Duhigg. Craving is “what powers the habit loop.” Then find the cue and define the reward. The routine will fall into place.

So you’ve managed to give up those vices you cherished, and it wasn’t easy. There were times, actually, that you really didn’t think you’d make it. “The Power of Habit” tells you why. By pulling together an abundance of anecdotes to illustrate the research he presents, author Charles Duhigg has created a book that’s as wonderfully satisfying as that first morning coffee and as enjoyable as playing on the internet for an hour. We’re alternately entertained, then schooled on how our minds work, even when damaged. It’s also quite amazing (and unsettlingly eerie) to see how big businesses use our habits to guide us into purchasing. Definitely, there’s a lot to learn from this book – I couldn’t get enough of those stories because the possibilities are so exciting - but Duhigg makes everything accessible and useable for habit-makers and habit-breakers alike. Much like a handful of potato chips, in fact, this book is hard to resist. If you’re looking to change the way things are done and habits are made, this book is what you need. “The Power of Habit” is no nail-biter, but it’s got advice you can count on. c.2012, Random House $28.00 / $32.95 Canada 373 pages

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

June 1, 2012

Dolores K. Thomas RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 30, 1923 - May 4, 2012

John B. Lough Geraldine Peebles RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 14, 1928 – May 23, 2012

Margaret Howden RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 3, 1922 – May 23, 2012

William F. Lewis RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 30, 1926 – May 26, 2012

Oscar N. Mendoza RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 30, 1944 – May 26, 2012

Edward M. Magyar FORMER RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 6, 1925 – May 28, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 29, 1946 – May 25, 2012

Richard “Dick” L. Sira RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 24, 1934 – May 26, 2012

Ana A. Garcia RESIDENT OF TRACY March 9, 1930 – May 27, 2012

Alan R. Torres RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 19, 1961 – May 28, 2012

Maxwell P. Carranza RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 17, 1947 – May 29, 2012

Vicente B. Atienza RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 1, 1951 – May 27, 2012

Emmett C. Neddersen RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 9, 1928 – May 30, 2012 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Olivia Chase RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 18, 1926 – May 30, 2012

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel FD 1115 (510) 793-8900 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont


June 1, 2012

SUBMITTED BY MARVIN BOWERMAN Hayward La Honda Music Camp, a non-profit organization, celebrates its 51st anniversary in 2012 and looks forward to welcoming students in grades 6-12 to a challenging and fun experience devoted to developing fine musicianship. Camp highlights include Band (concert band and wind ensemble), Full Orchestra and String Orchestra, Small Ensembles (all combinations), Jazz Bands (five levels), Jazz Improv-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

isation (three levels), Jazz Piano, Vocal Majors, Music Theory, Vocal Music (all-camp chorus, jazz choir), Master Classes (all instruments), Conducting, Composition, Latin Jazz and Electronic Music. Participants will have the opportunity of studying under music directors from the most successful colleges, universities and schools in the Bay Area. The residential camp runs from July 28 to August 4, 2012. "Hayward La Honda Music Camp changed my life. I first attended two years after I started

playing the oboe and it was the first opportunity I had for oneon-one oboe lessons. I learned to make reeds at this camp. These opportunities helped me enter college as a music major. This camp offers many different opportunities for the young musician. Hayward La Honda was the first chance I had to sing in a choir, take a jazz improvisation class and play in an orchestra. Every ambition I had was en-

Page 11 11 Page

couraged. Being in an atmosphere where I was surrounded by people with like interests and passions made my teen years such an enjoyable time," reflects a former participant. Recreational activities will include arts and crafts, swimming, equestrianism, canoeing, softball, archery, climbing tower, dances, zip line and hiking. The following enrollments are available: regular online tu-

ition ($725); sibling discount ($25) and Honor Band or Honor Orchestra Discount ($65). Some Scholarships are available for families with financial need.

For more information and registration, visit www.LaHondaMusicCamp.org, email LaHondaMusicCamp@yahoo.co m or call (510) 537-4871.


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club Mission San Jose Fridays at 12:15 p.m. Papillon Restaurant 37296 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 656-5056 Visit our club. See why we joined for business & fellowship and stayed to change the world.

We welcome new members

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net (510)656-2521

FREE FILMS AND PUBLIC DISCUSSIONS Screenings on the Second Saturday of each month except August 1.30pm, Niles Discovery Church 255 H Steet at 3rd 510-797-0895 www.TriCityPerspectives.org

Having trouble controlling the way you eat? Today there is a solution. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Mondays, 7:00 – 8:30 PM Centerville Presbyterian Church, Room E-204 4360 Central Ave., Fremont Teri M. 510-757-8214 www.foodaddicts.org

Auditions May 14-June 25

Newark Optimist Club “Friends of Youth” Newark Optimists have been dedicated to their mission of providing hope and positive vision to children since 1968. We meet weekly at IHOP to re-charge our Optimistic spirit. For meeting times and more info call 510-793-1498 Cougar Wrestling Camp 3rd - 8th Grade Boys & Girls Newark Memorial HS Wrestling Room Mon-Thurs 6/11-14 10AM-Noon 510-578-4620 Register at http://www.newark.org/departments/recreation-and-community-services/register-for-classes/

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org

Yard Sale

Women’s Show Choir/Chorus

June 2nd and 9th from 8 am to 2 pm. Activites for kids, bargains galore, food and more. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd, Fremont

Ages 18 & up. FREE Coaching All voice ranges needed. Harmony Fusion Chorus. Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mon 7pm-10pm 510-862-1073 1809 B St, Hayward www.harmonyfusion.org

Homeless Solutions

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments)

Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue & Thur 7 pm – 9 pm Fri 9:15 am – 11 am 1900 Mowry, 4th Fl. Fremont Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Mon @ San Leandro PD 9am-Noon Tues @ Hayward PD 1–4 pm Wed @ SAVE’s Office 9am-1pm Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home.

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Are You Troubled By Someone's Drinking? Al-Anon and Alateen are here to help. Al-Anon has but one purpose: to help families of alcoholics. We share our experience, strength, and hope. www.ncwsa.org for a meeting near you, or call (510) 276-2270, or email Easyduz@gmail.com.

8 x 8 CAL SPA HOT TUB

FREE

Good running condition Large filter, new tub cover Buyer removes from premises 510-794-7463 or 510-304-4829 Photo of tub available upon request

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com


June 1, 2012

FCA Camp is coming! June 29 - July 3, 2012 @ UCLA 9th - 12th graders Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Football, Soccer, Sprint & Distance, Surfing, Tennis, Volleyball and Wrestling. Whitney Elliott 408 712-4112 or http://www.westernregionfcacamps.org

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Union City Football & Cheer League Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline (510) 441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer and Football Coaches

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS The Fremont Art Association is pleased to welcome its June Guest Artist, Mark Mertens on Wednesday, June 6 from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. at The Fremont Art Centre. Mertens is a pastel land-

Page 13

Cougars Girls Summer Basketball Camp Mon - Fri, July 16 -20, 9.30am -2.30pm Camp for girls 8 -15 years old All skill levels are welcome Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave, Newark www.newark.org 510-578-4620, darryl14r@aol.com

scape painter noted for draftsmanship, simple composition, and dramatic effect of light. The artist will demo his skillful techniques of painting landscape in pastel. This event is free and the public is welcome. Mertens enjoys painting the varied scenery here in Northern California. Though his subject matter ranges from the rugged coastline to the Sierra Mountains, his focus is on scenery closer to home where he finds tranquility in the midst of the urban environment. Mertens grew up in Western Montana where he was fascinated by the changing light and the dramatic atmospheric effects on distant mountains—he looks for similar effects in the scenery here in Northern California and it is his aim to reflect this in his paintings. He simplifies composition and emphasizes the essence of the subject rather than the specific subject itself, to draw the viewer into the scene. Over the past ten years, the artist has shown in group exhibitions and juried competitions, receiving many awards for pastel landscapes. His pastels are in collections in the Bay Area. Mertens is a signature member of the Pastel Society of the West Coast, and a member of Group 95, California Art Club, Livermore Art Association, Hayward Arts Council, and ART Inc.

Guest Artist Demo Wednesday, June 6 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Centre 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociatin.org Free

SUBMITTED BY JACKIE JUSKO Recycle your old electronics in the most socially and environmentally-responsible way possible and help raise funds for Hopkins Junior High School in Fremont! On site to manage the event, e-waste handling innovator GreenCitizen Inc. will reward the school for every monitor or computer collected along with a portion of the proceeds of any product collected that is reused/resold. Items accepted for recycling include computer monitors, TV's, laptops, desktops, scanners, keyboards, mice, all other computer accessories, printers, DVD/VCR players, media (CD's DVD's, etc.), phones, microwaves, fridges, appliances toasters, ink cartridges, cables, etc. Almost anything that plugs into a wall is fair game! Batteries and light bulbs are not accepted. Individuals who drop off five or more acceptable elec-

tronics will also be eligible to win an iPad 2! E-waste is the fastest segment of the nation’s trash, according to the EPA. Each U.S. home has about 24 electronic gadgets according to the Consumer Electronics Association. ?About 2 million tons of unwanted electronic items accumulate every year nationwide, but less than 20 percent is recycled, according to the EPA. The rest end up in landfills here or overseas, where toxic materials such as lead, mercury and beryllium can leak, posing human health and environmental problems. E-Waste recycling Saturday, June 2 10:30 AM – 3 PM Hopkins Junior High School 600 Driscoll Road, Fremont (415) 460.9984 pr@greencitizen.com


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT

Fremont Traffic Unit hosts:

Motor Training and Skills Competition Friday June 1 and Saturday, June 2, the Fremont Police Department's Traffic Unit will host the first Motor Training and Skills Competition. Friday activities – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. will feature practice and training; Saturday – 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. - is reserved for competition. This event, open to the public, is an intense motorcycle skills competition that will be exciting for both competitors and spectators alike. We encourage everyone to come out and help support our team! Forty-two Motor Officers from 15 law enforcement agencies will test their skills as they compete on their service bikes for trophies in both challenge and slow ride courses. The obstacles will challenge a Motor Officer’s ability to maneuver around confined spaces and require skills learned through traffic enforcement. Patterns will include a time element to place a challenge on a Motor Officer’s ability to maneuver in a safe and concise manner, similar to that of enforcement riding. The event is free to the public. Food Truck Mofia will be on-site selling food beginning at noon each day. Motor Skills Competition Friday, June 1 – Saturday, June 2 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Ohlone Community College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (lower parking lot) www.fremontpolice.org/motorcomp

June 1, 2012

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 16 Highest $: 740,000 Median $: 384,000 Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: 447,594 ADDRESS

ZIP

3930 Bonsai Place 94546 20194 Butterfield Drive 94546 2339 Camino Dolores 94546 5133 Crane Avenue 94546 17072 Ehle Street 94546 18309 Joseph Drive 94546 1917 Riverbank Avenue 94546 4041 Robin Lane 94546 4854 Seven Hills Road 94546 20227 Yeandle Avenue 94546 25778 Annie Court 94552 10895 Crow Canyon Road 94552 31111 Palomares Road 94552 22851 Rancho Palomares Place94552 20010 Shadow Creek Circle 94552 5952 Skyfarm Drive 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

375,000 384,000 360,000 440,000 180,000 480,000 310,000 340,000 342,000 355,000 740,000 665,000 545,000 595,000 500,500 550,000

3 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 5 2 4 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1536 1400 1607 1763 756 1748 1773 2734 1429 1522 2820 1583 2329 2266 2130 1985

1962 1958 1960 1960 1940 1956 1963 1957 1950 1959 1998 1941 1997 1998 1988

04-16-12 04-20-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-19-12 04-23-12 04-18-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 55 Highest $: 3,394,500 Median $: Lowest $: 112,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

37631 3rd Street 94536 35885 Adobe Drive 94536 36453 Ames Terrace 94536 4150 Argyle Court 94536 36068 Ashton Place 94536 38723 Aurora Terrace 94536 4626 Balboa Way 94536 36420 Bendel Terrace 94536 38574 Canyon Heights Drive 94536 4792 Central Avenue 94536 37819 Cherry Blossom Court 94536 4648 Deadwood Drive 94536 37275 Dondero Way 94536 37874 Elliot Street 94536 3367 Foxtail Terrace 94536 4325 Gertrude Drive 94536 36076 McKeown Terrace 94536 205 Mortimer Avenue 94536 38533 Oliver Way 94536 3433 Pennsylvania Common 94536 35918 Plumeria Way 94536 4656 Rothbury Common 94536 37589 Summer Holly Common94536 41229 Alline Street 94538 41272 Alline Street 94538 5764 Antone Road 94538 4705 Doane Street 94538 5205 Farina Lane 94538 39951 Fremont Boulevard #31594538 43187 Grimmer Terrace 94538 41834 Mahoney Street 94538 4662 Montmartre Park Court 94538 42719 Roberts Avenue 94538 41663 Sherwood Street 94538 40101 Spady Street 94538

SOLD FOR BDS

372,000 326,000 310,000 385,000 607,000 220,000 183,000 335,000 297,000 335,000 744,000 380,000 235,000 700,000 150,000 450,000 335,000 630,000 400,000 241,000 612,000 345,000 500,000 590,000 608,000 433,000 335,000 399,000 220,000 360,000 586,000 504,500 335,000 550,000 350,000

3 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 4 2 3 2 4 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 3

3695 Stevenson Boulevard #D22394538 40472 Vogel Court 94538 3889 Wildflower Common 94538 3300 Wolcott Common #217 94538 47796 Avalon Heights Terrace 94539 160 Chantecler Drive 94539 41567 Erma Avenue 94539 1130 Kensington Drive 94539 44412 Martingale Court 94539 124 Mayten Way 94539 1320 Olive Avenue 94539 2346 Rutherford Lane 94539 46155 Sentinel Drive 94539 4911 Iris Terrace 94555 34661 Loreal Terrace 94555 4479 MacBeth Circle 94555 34383 Mimosa Terrace 94555 34323 Quartz Terrace 94555 4699 Rousillon Avenue 94555 4294 Tiburon Drive 94555

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1953 1957 1974 1968 1971 1980 1969 1974 1953 1953 2000 1955 1952 1954 1986 1959 1983 1977 1949 1981 1970 1988 1998 1959 1960 1963 1987 1961 1987 1986 1956 1964 1958 1959 1957

04-18-12 04-23-12 04-20-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-16-12 04-23-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-23-12 04-19-12 04-19-12 04-17-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-17-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-18-12 04-18-12 04-23-12 04-18-12 04-16-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-17-12 04-16-12

2 3 3 1 4 5 4 4 2 3 4 5 4 2 1 4 3 4 4 3

1040 950 1433 712 3374 3116 1152 2476 3389 1220 2024 7338 3034 993 634 1717 1597 1562 1600 1826

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 29 Highest $: 550,000 Median $: Lowest $: 120,000 Average $:

400,000 573,245

1460 1148 1140 1944 1849 1125 910 1240 993 1079 2092 1167 747 2003 750 1238 1213 2047 1462 944 1695 1740 1866 1251 1318 1131 1224 1078 1360 1500 1355 1684 1000 1441 1412

260,000 245,000 320,000 112,500 1,506,000 1,610,000 711,000 1,400,000 1,150,000 615,000 950,000 3,394,500 1,350,000 260,000 180,000 656,000 673,000 650,000 630,000 493,000

ADDRESS

ZIP

1494 B Street 595 Blossom Way #6 210 Bunny Court 23452 Compass Court 3025 D Street 1907 East Avenue 22575 Filbert Street 694 Kingsford Way 22773 Lorand Way 589 Meek Avenue 1104 Oakview Avenue 24071 Wilcox Lane 3425 Big Oak Court 24659 Diamond Ridge Drive 26552 Eldridge Avenue 26423 Huntwood Avenue 1145 Lovelock Way 30449 Oakmont Way 24615 Pontiac Street 637 Shepherd Avenue 24237 Silva Avenue 2343 Arf Avenue 2439 Cryer Street 2670 Cryer Street 26281 Gettysburg Avenue 27752 Hummingbird Court 25850 Kay Avenue #229 1221 Radcliff Lane 2234 Sleepy Hollow Avenue

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

263,000 130,000 495,000 480,000 235,000 300,000 190,000 230,000 270,000 375,000 395,000 253,000 550,000 129,000 243,000 205,000 275,000 307,000 249,000 370,000 280,000 131,000 275,000 246,000 300,000 216,000 120,000 315,000 329,000

3 2 9 4 3 4 2 3 4 5 5 3 5 1 3 3 3 3 3 7 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3

1501 Augusta Court 424 Coelho Street

ZIP

95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

980,000 430,000

4 5

04-19-12 04-19-12 04-16-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-17-12 04-18-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-17-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-19-12 04-19-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-19-12

270,000 281,241

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1270 1077 3904 2935 967 1612 839 1383 1774 3083 2584 2081 1875 870 1536 1142 1335 1419 1050 3087 727 1254 1107 1157 1148 1656 1007 1301 1215

2001 1989 1962 2006 1953 1919 1930 2003 1949 1940 2009 1951 1971 1991 1952 1954 1981 1955 1950 1985 1915 1970 1957 1958 1958 1971 1989 1958 1957

04-20-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-17-12 04-13-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-23-12 04-20-12 04-17-12 04-23-12 04-20-12 04-23-12 04-23-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-17-12

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 980,000 Median $: Lowest $: 400,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1991 1953 1987 1983 1998 1992 1955 1957 1989 1964 1977 1999 1980 1987 1987 1984 1991 1989 1989 1991

525,000 605,182

SQFT

BUILT

2828 2138

1985 05-04-12 1964 05-07-12

CLOSED


June 1, 2012 1402 North Hillview Drive 213 Perry Street 667 Princess Place 397 South Temple Drive 1223 Summerwind Way 537 Tirol Court 772 Vasona Street 2196 Wellington Drive 1673 Yosemite Drive

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

510,000 525,000 840,000 406,500 677,000 658,500 460,000 770,000 400,000

4 3 4 3 4 4 3 4 4

1620 1517 2206 1100 1886 2941 1277 2698 1528

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 770,000 Median $: Lowest $: 189,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

6266 Broadway Avenue 94560 6388 Broadway Avenue 94560 7348 Carter Avenue 94560 5913 Central Avenue 94560 38158 Iris Court 94560 6395 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #D94560 6196 Lafayette Avenue 94560 37074 Laurel Street 94560 35122 Lido Boulevard #K 94560 6488 Market Avenue 94560 8013 Shorehaven Avenue 94560 37360 Wedgewood Street 94560 4802 Windermere Drive 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

366,000 235,000 422,000 245,000 325,000 189,000 325,000 370,000 215,000 400,000 460,000 770,000 465,000

3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 4 3 5 3

ZIP

980 Arbor Drive 94577 127 Beverly Avenue 94577 717 Chetland Road 94577 160 Farrelly Drive 94577 854 Juana Avenue 94577 991 Lee Avenue 94577 180 West Broadmoor Boulevard94577 1561 167th Avenue 94578 710 Chico Drive #N 94578 1737 Dilleta Avenue 94578 1044 Grace Street 94578 1923 Lomita Drive 94578 14941 Peninsula Street 94578 1676 Renaissance Lane 94578 1724 Russ Avenue 94578 1743 Arena Street 94579 1763 Arena Street 94579 2259 Avocet Court 94579 15428 Jutland Street 94579 2385 Pacifica Court 94579 2337 Rocky Point Court 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

539,000 325,000 415,000 273,000 325,000 492,000 235,000 168,500 311,000 250,000 310,000 449,000 310,000 262,000 300,000 336,500 331,000 350,000 600,000 485,000 485,000

4 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 4 4 4

1405 Culver Place 16350 Emery Court 636 Via Aires 17312 Via Carmen 1369 Via Lucas 15904 Via Media

ZIP

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

176,000 260,000 263,000 346,000 200,000 240,500

2 4 3 3 3 3

366,000 368,231 BUILT

CLOSED

1382 1054 1830 1447 1117 1132 1134 1080 1076 1516 1664 3289 1681

1979 1954 2000 1980 1988 1981 1962 1961 1984 1953 1976 2000 1969

04-18-12 04-17-12 04-17-12 04-23-12 04-18-12 04-19-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-17-12 04-19-12

580 Via Mirabel 2115 Via Murietta 16026 Via Olinda

94580 94580 94580

253,000 285,000 216,500

3 3 2

1000 1164 898

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 710,000 Median $: Lowest $: 142,000 Average $: ADDRESS

35153 11th Street 4450 Alvarado Boulevard 102 Aurora Plaza 4574 Cabello Street 1752 Cottonwood Street 2215 Eric Court #3 35100 Garcia Street 4174 Glenwood Terrace #1 30305 Meridien Circle 35530 Monterra Terrace #203 4597 Niland Street 3056 San Mateo Way 32452 Seaside Drive 3556 Smith Street 523 Tamarack Drive #12 30916 Tidewater Drive 2810 Zinnia Court

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

270,000 650,000 142,000 375,000 485,000 186,000 395,500 305,000 510,000 155,000 710,000 310,000 660,000 259,000 150,000 340,000 397,000

2 4 2 3 3 3 2 3 1 4 3 4 2 2 3 3

1944 04-20-12 1957 04-19-12 1945 04-17-12

340,000 370,559

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1203 2797 688 1632 1623 1134 1627 1421 1908 695 2969 1449 2464 812 1072 1335 1668

2007 1994 1985 1976 1994 1977 1965 2001 1992 2001 2004 1971 1992 1939 1976 1978 1970

04-18-12 04-20-12 04-23-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-16-12 04-19-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-23-12 04-17-12 04-16-12 04-20-12

325,000 359,619

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2012 1376 1274 1379 1180 2396 1440 924 1139 993 1418 2184 1614 1423 1338 1107 1169 1544 3524 2388 2551

1956 1911 1930 1940 1924 1929 1941 1912 1954 1945 1947 2004 1978 2004 1947 1956 1956 1999 1956 1999 2000

04-23-12 04-17-12 04-23-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-19-12 04-18-12 04-17-12 04-19-12 04-19-12 04-17-12 04-23-12 04-17-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-19-12 04-16-12 04-20-12 04-20-12 04-18-12 04-23-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 346,000 Median $: Lowest $: 176,000 Average $: ADDRESS

05-04-12 05-08-12 05-04-12 05-04-12 05-04-12 05-07-12 05-04-12 05-04-12 05-03-12

SQFT

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 21 Highest $: 600,000 Median $: Lowest $: 168,500 Average $: ADDRESS

1978 1966 1986 1962 1991 1972 1960 1985 1966

Page 15

253,000 248,889

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1188 1536 1134 1463 1050 1000

1972 1948 1947 1953 1951 1944

04-18-12 04-19-12 04-23-12 04-16-12 04-17-12 04-18-12

It’s the 13th year of music, food, car shows, rides and family fun on B Street in downtown Hayward. This is the perfect opportunity to spotlight your business or organization to the thousands that enjoy the Summer Street Party series. Sponsored by the Downtown Business Improvement Area, the City of Hayward, and the Hayward Chamber of Commerce, the chamber office is currently accepting reservations from vendors who are expected to inhabit 100 exhibit spaces. Vendor spaces are available for the Summer Street Parties held on Thursday evenings, June 21, July 19, and August 16 from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Completed applications, with proper insurance forms and fees, will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Vendors will not be assigned a space until fees and insurance forms have been received. Pay your application fee online using Paypal, or by mailing a check with the form attached, or in person with a check or credit card at the chamber office, and submit a signed copy of the liability release form and proof of insurance. For information, visit www.hayward.org, contact the Hayward Chamber of Commerce at (510) 537-2424, or e-mail susanoc@hayward.org.This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Sunday, Jun 3 Mopar Rally Car Show 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Charity event Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 979-7941

AP WIRE SERVICE PHILADELPHIA (AP), The $412 check that DC Comics wrote to acquire Superman from Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster has sold for $160,000. Stephen Fishler, CEO of ComicConnect.com and Metropolis Collectibles, said Tuesday that the check was auctioned online to an unnamed buyer. The check is made out to Siegel and Shuster. It includes a line item for $130 showing DC paid for full ownership and rights to Superman. But a legal dispute over creator's rights to the character is still far from settled. Siegel and Shuster created Superman together while teenagers in Cleveland, Ohio, in the early 1930s. His first appearance was in “Action Comics” No. 1 in April 1938. The canceled check was saved by a DC Comics staffer in the 1970s and sat undisturbed in a desk drawer for 38 years.


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012

SUBMITTED BY ERIC NEMETH The world-famous Harlem Globetrotters are partnering with fitness club industry leader, 24 Hour Fitness, to host 120 summer skills clinics for youth across the U.S. Designed to take fans ages six to 14 behind the curtain to see the magic behind the Globetrotters’ electrifying basketball skills and tricks, participants will also learn about the importance of staying active and eating healthy. Each clinic will be conducted by current Globetrotter players. Two, three-hour clinics will be held during the following dates and times at these 24 Hour Fitness locations: • 93 Bovet Rd. San Mateo; June 25-26; 8:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. • 1610 Crane Court, San Jose; June 27-28; 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. • 4450 Norris Canyon Rd., San Ramon; June 29; 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. As part of the partnership, the Harlem Globetrotters will offer participants a voucher for a complimentary ticket to a 2013 World Tour game. Additionally, 24 Hour Fitness will offer free three-day passes and discounts on club memberships to parents of clinic participants. Registration information about the summer skills clinics can be found at www.harlemglobetrotters.com, where visitors can find a complete list of clinic locations, dates, and times. Call (800) 224-0240 or visit 24hourfitness.com for more information.


June 1, 2012

A

fter completing the first rotation of my two-year probation on Truck 51, I was placed at Fire Station 3, working on Engine 53 in Irvington, to focus on paramedic skills. The objective during this rotation of probation is to learn Alameda County Emergency Medical System protocols and gain an understanding of methods that the Fremont Fire Department (FFD) uses to deliver the highest quality of patient care possible. Even though I have about eight years of experience as a paramedic working in other EMS systems, I had to demonstrate that I could provide good patient care and have a thorough grasp of the protocols before I would be certified to work as a solo paramedic member of FFD. One aspect I admire most about FFD is its passion to deliver the highest quality patient care possible and continually progress and improve care. This trend goes all the way back to

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

the 80’s when Fremont was one of the first fire departments in the country to staff their engine companies with paramedic/firefighters to provide advance life support care to the community. A passion for excellence has continued with the use of stateof-the-art equipment and training including the Autopulse CPR board from Zoll. Fremont was one of the first EMS agencies in the country to use this device and actually helped in its development. Autopulse provides higher quality chest compressions (administered during cardiac arrest) than humans and frees a crew member to perform other critical tasks. In addition to cutting edge technology, I appreciate the importance FFD places on Emergency Medical Services; a dedicated training division ensures that line personnel receive the most up-todate instruction to maintain superior proficiency. Fortunately, during my paramedic evaluation, I had the benefit of an excellent crew to

show me the ropes. Decades of experience and their passion for EMS helped me to quickly learn the system. The rotation started with an intense experience as my first call as lead paramedic on the crew was for a traumatic cardiac arrest when an elderly female was struck by a car while crossing the street. Unfortunately, the injuries the patient received were too great to revive her. However, in several other incidents, we were able to regain a pulse and viable blood pressure in patients after sudden cardiac arrests. During these calls, our crew worked smoothly and efficiently and I witnessed the incredible advantage of the Autopulse following a cardiac arrest. After several shifts with my new crew, I began to feel comfortable in the EMS system, not only with the treatment protocols but also with our tiered system. Generally in Fremont, the fire department is first to arrive on scene following a 911 call; we start patient care and within minutes, an ambulance from Paramedics Plus (a county contracted ambulance service) arrives on scene. We transfer responsibility for patient care and transport to a nearby hospital unless the patient is extremely ill. In such cases, the fire department paramedic will ride to the hospital with the ambulance to assist. This system appears to be efficient and patient-care oriented; I believe that citizens of Fremont are the beneficiaries of top quality EMS care. Following my 20-shift paramedic rotation on Engine 53, I successfully completed a comprehensive exam including a written test and several hands-on skills evaluations. I am now certified to work as a paramedic for the Fremont Fire Department.

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SEAN BROOKS

T

he City of Hayward, in collaboration with the Hayward Public Library, will present the second annual “Taste of Hayward” event on Wednesday, June 6, 2012 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the City Hall Rotunda. There will be sample wines from more than 20 local wineries and exclusive culinary cuisine from some of the best restaurants and caterers in Hayward. Mark your calendar and purchase tickets for what will be a celebratory

June 1, 2012

event and feel free to inform friends and family so that they can also experience the fine dining choices Hayward has to offer. There event will include silent auctions, raffles and door prizes. Tickets are $30 in advance or $40 on the door and are available at Hayward Public Library, 835 C Street, Hayward. More than 375 people attended the Taste of Hayward 2011, the inaugural event, which raised in excess of $6,800 for the Hayward Public Library’s After School Homework Center. The Friends of

the Library dedicated the purchase of a book vending machine for the Center. This was truly a collaborative event with a pleasing outcome. The City looks forward to making a similar contribution on June 6, 2012 using the net proceeds generated from the event.

Taste of Hayward Wednesday, June 6 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. City Hall Rotunda 777 B St., Hayward (510) 828-7459

James D. Pachan SUBMITTED BY CLARENCE JOHNSON James D. Pachan has been named Chief Operating Officer of AC Transit. Pachan has 30 years of transit management experience, primarily at the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA), the fourth largest transit agency in the nation, where he successfully led several major projects including conversion of fare payments to smart card technology, administered capital and operating budgets and the maintenance of the agency’s fleet of more than 2,500 trains, buses and vans. “We needed someone who had proven experience with all aspects of transit operations and James has a remarkable record of success in transportation and maintenance,” said AC Transit General Manager David Armijo. “There is no greater privilege for me than to be asked to lead the 1,500 professionals who work together to deliver quality transit service to the East Bay,” said Pachan who looks forward to his new assignment. As AC Transit’s Chief Operating Officer, Pachan is responsible for all of the agency’s bus and paratransit services including vehicle and facility maintenance. During Pachan’s term at the LACMTA he was accountable for similar tasks including bus, rail and facility maintenance at several agency divisions. In that

role, Pachan restructured work responsibilities to improve service performance and accountability. He also developed and managed capital and operating budgets for all of LACMTA’s operations Pachan holds both a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree of Business Administration from California State University at Northridge. He is also a graduate of the American Public Transportation Association’s (APTA) Leadership Program.


June 1, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

Lucky ducklings rescued SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE POWELL Eleven ducklings probably weren’t feeling very fortunate after they slipped into a storm drain in a Union City neighborhood recently. A concerned resident asked the Union Sanitary District for assistance after tracking down the source of a chorus of anxious peeping in front of her home. She discovered a distressed brood gathered under the drain’s grate, but efforts to rescue them caused them to run into the pipe that led under the street. USD staff members Joe Mendoza and Joe Pereira worked with neighbors to slip a piece of cardboard through the grate to block off the main pipe’s opening, so the frightened youngsters stayed put near the curb. Mendoza and Pereira then used special tools to lift the grate, and the rescuers scooped the ducklings to There’s always one straggler: Union City residents Hadrian Cervantes (standing) safety. The entire “mission” and Leo Garcia assist Union Sanitary District employees Joe Mendoza and Joe Pereira as they lift the last duckling to safety.

took just a few minutes, once the right implements were available! Since no mama duck was in sight, the youngsters were taken toOhlone Humane Society’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, which is located next to USD’s Newark pump station. When they are old enough to fend for

themselves, the ducklings will be released in a safe area. Union Sanitary District provides collection, treatment and disposal services to the cities of Fremont, Newark and Union City. For more information about USD, call (510) 4777500 or visitwww.unionsanitary.ca.gov.

A long-handled dustpan becomes the perfect duckling retrieval device. The ducklings were scooped out of the storm drain and taken to Ohlone Humane Society’s Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Newark.


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

June 1, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12631211 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Julian Hidrogo Meza for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Julian Hidrogo Meza filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Julian Hidrogo Meza to Julian Hidrogo Meza The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-10-12, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, California 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Try City Voice Date: May 21, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2320343# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12630844 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Kellie Gayle Albanese for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Kellie Gayle Albanese filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Kellie Gayle Albanese to Kellie Gayle Justus The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-3-2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 18, 2012 WINIFRED Y, SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318994# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12630720 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: ANGELA YEE HUNG HUNG for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANGELA YEE HUNG HUNG filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: YEE-HUNG HUNG to ANGELA YEE-HUNG HUNG The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition

for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8-10-2012, Time: 8:45 A.M., Dept.: 504, Room: N/A The address of the court is 24405 AMADOR ST, HAYWARD, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: WHAT’S HAPPENING TRI-CITY VOICE Date: MAY 17, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH JUDGE of the Superior Court 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318381#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465705 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SP TECH, 40894 GAUCHO WAY, FREMONT, CA 94539, County of ALAMEDA SHIRLEY CHAN, 40894 GAUCHO WAY, FREMONT, CA 94539 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ SHIRLEY CHAN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MAY 25, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22/12 CNS-2323074# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465692 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: US PREMIER TRAVEL, 40336 PACIFIC ST., FREMONT, CA 94538, County of ALAMEDA XIAOMING LIU, 40336 PACIFIC ST., FREMONT, CA 94538 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 5-25-2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ XIAOMING LIU This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MAY 25, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22/12 CNS-2322866# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465288 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Parts House, 4545 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536-5738, County of Alameda T.P.H. Inc., California, 4545 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536-5738 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6/1/1970 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) T.P.H. Inc. /s/ Harry M. Walker, Sect/ Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 16, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2320250# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465429 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Guru Nanak Transport, 4279 Ogden Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Manjinder Kaur, 4279 Ogden Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Manjnder Kaur This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 18, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15/12 CNS-2318788# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465193 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Terotek Professional Solutions, 263 Corte Pablo, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Frank Ruffa, 263 Corte Pablo, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Frank Ruffa This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2316752# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465247 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Carcopia LLC, 37434 Glenmoor Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Carcopia LLC, CA., 37434 Glenmoor Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Carcopia LLC /s/ Sanju Pancholi, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 15, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2316456# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464514 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: RG Talent Inc., 39120 #157 Argonaut Way, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Ramy Fashions Inc., CA, 39120 #157 Argonaut Way, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jyoti Gill, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 26, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314962# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464965 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: North Shore Creations, 4141 Stevenson Blvd. #386, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Kathleen Joyce Estores, 4141 Stevenson Blvd. #386, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kathleen J. Estores This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 8, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314827# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465166 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The Culinary Assassin, 201 Washington Blvd. #102, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Norman Robertson, 201 Washington Blvd. #102, Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Norman Robertson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314737# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464966 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cobalt Legal, 11768 Main Street, Sunol CA 94586, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 89, Sunol, CA 94586 Michael A. Maxey Jr., 11768 Main Street, Sunol CA 94586 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael A. Maxey Jr.


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PUBLIC NOTICES This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 8, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8/12 CNS-2314488#

MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled for 12:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 5, 2012, at the project site, 39550 Liberty Street, Fremont, California. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/25, 6/1/12 CNS-2319730#

GOVERNMENT NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 21, 2012,at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Development Center Seismic Upgrade, HVAC Replacement, & Exterior Wall Repair 39550 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 City Project No. PWC 8752 APN 525-164-701-301

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on June 13, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461

(510) 659-6993 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A105 - ALBANO, LOURDES A146 - LOPEZ, CARMELO C129 - Silva, Roberta C257 - Wingate, LaSandra C390 - Spencer, Tiffany C409 - Karr, Marla Kay All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 25th day of May 2012 and 1st day of June 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 244-8080, Bond No. 5857632 5/25, 6/1/12 CNS-2319504# NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on June 14, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time: 9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): D028 - Mckay, Shannon E021 - Keller, Michelle P029 - Jackson, Rebekah P048 Silva, David Public Storage 08026 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2027 - ALLEN, GREGORY 2029 - Rojas, Sara 2114 - Glasson, Melissa 3034 - Campbell, Veronica 6023 - PIAIA, CARLO

9061 - Jones, Freddie Lee Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s): C022 - Wilson, Robert D043 - Jackson, Geraldine D110 - ROTOLO, SAL D152 - Lake, Brian D154 - REVITA-CAREY, MARITA E. Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A150 - TOLEDO, MARISSA C325 - Mitchell, Wanda E505 - Stein, Robert E508 - Page, Brice E521 - ALIRES, KAREN E522 Avilla, Robert E532 - Jones, Josephine E618 - Hernandez, ALEJANDRA E636 - Hernandez, Luis F440 - Dhawal, Anuj G816 - Fender, Shane Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123 (510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A053 - Rogers, Mary A060 - Reyes, Elodia A085 - ZAKRZEWSKI, JASON A227 - Ingram, Anastacia C057 - Rogers, Frances A333 - Brooks Crystal Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s):

A012 - TREPANTE, ROBIN A022 - Howland, Christina A025 - DEAN, EMILY A077 - ROMANDO, PHILL B034 - KALVIG, JOEL F049 - Espino, Lawrence A009 - Diaz, Danny All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 25th day of May 2012 and 1st day of June 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 244-8080, Bond No. 5857632 5/25, 6/1/12 CNS-2319502# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 8th Day of June, 2012 at or after 11:00 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Thornton UHaul, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Chantal Ferr AA4400 3/21/12 Eileen Dedios B103 3/27/12 Dorothy Dantes B131 3/7/12 Monica Swenson B138 3/12/12 Abdul Hamidi B242 3/13/12 Jarmal Magee B271 3/30/12 Erwin Ayran B299 4/1/12 Jack Kindig C128 3/31/12 Tristan Christensen C152 3/19/12 Fil Vazquez C170 3/24/12 Marcus Featherstone C229 3/29/12 Amy Cutlip C257 3/11/12 5/25, 6/1/12 CNS-2318661#

Seven Wieckowski bills approved SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA The Assembly Appropriations Committee passed seven bills by Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) on May 25, 2012, including a measure to fund a spinal cord injury research program named after Fremont Planning Commissioner Roman Reed. All seven bills now head to the Assembly floor for consideration. AB 1657 would raise roughly $3M for spinal cord injury research managed through the Reeve-Irvine Center at the University of California, Irvine. Researchers throughout the state can apply for grants. The bill is supported by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, Brock Reeve, executive director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and brother of the late Christopher Reeve, and several of

the state’s top neurobiologists. “The program has provided $15M in state grants and leveraged almost $64M since its inception,” Wieckowski said. “This state-of-the-art research in nerve regeneration has the potential to improve the quality of life for all those living with paralysis and debilitating neurological diseases.” The program was created in 2000 by Assemblymember John Dutra. Reed was injured, while playing in a Chabot College football game. The other Wieckowski bills approved include: AB 1534, supported by Consumer Federation of California and Consumers for Auto Reliability and Safety, among others, seeks to protect consumers from predatory auto sales practices at

“Buy Here, Pay Here” lots. It requires the lots to disclose the reasonable market value of the vehicle - much like new automobiles have displayed the Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price on all new cars since 1958. AB 1968, supported by several law enforcement organizations, would improve the protection and personal safety of probation officers or deputy probation officers by allowing them to carry firearms but only as determined by the Chief Probation Officer on a case-by-case or unitby-unit basis. It requires the Chief Probation Officer to develop a plan for arming deputy probation officers whose duties involve high-risk caseloads no later than June 30, 2013. AB 1566 reduces the regulatory burden on the owners and

operators of above-ground storage tanks (AST) that hold toxic chemicals, including petroleum, while enhancing environmental and public health protection in three ways. First, it assigns statewide oversight of the AST program to the Office of the State Fire Marshal. The AST law is the only local environmental health program lacking state oversight. It will require the State Fire Marshal to ensure consistency across federal, state and local programs. Second, it aligns state law with federal AST requirements, which will also help to ensure that the regulated community and the enforcement agencies have clear, non-duplicative requirements. Third, it makes AST penalty provisions consistent with similar state laws, such as the underground

storage tank program. AB 2529 improves the state’s drinking water by enabling the California Department of Public Health to streamline the process to correct small water system deficiencies, particularly in systems serving severely disadvantaged communities. AB 1442, supported by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce, the Sierra Club and a number of water agencies, allows healthcare facilities to use common carriers for the transportation of all unwanted pharmaceuticals. AB 1519 requires trustees of specified retirement boards to complete a minimum of 24 hours of education within the first two years of assuming office. It also requires subsequent education for every two-year period the boardmember continues to serve.


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Americans grew gloomier about the economy in May BY MAE ANDERSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK (AP) – Americans grew much gloomier about the economy in May, causing a critical measure of consumer confidence to suffer its biggest decline in eight months and ending a period of steady optimism. Worries about jobs, housing and the stock market rattled consumers, even though gas prices are falling. The latest figures suggest Americans will need to see more encouraging economic signs before their concerns start to dissipate. The Conference Board, a private research group, reported Tuesday that its Consumer

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Confidence Index fell to 64.9, down from a revised 68.7 in April. Analysts had expected the index to climb to 70. The May figure, which represents the biggest drop since October, when the measure fell about 6 points, is now at its lowest level since January. Americans are still worried about slow hiring, declining home values, the stock market and a worsening European economy that they fear will negatively affect the U.S. “Consumers were less positive about current business and labor market conditions, and they were more pessimistic about the short-term outlook,” said Lynn Franco, director of economic indicators at the Conference Board. Consumer confidence is widely watched because consumer spending accounts for 70 percent of economic activity. May's figure is significantly below the 90 reading that indicates a healthy economy. The measure hasn't been near that level since December 2007. But the latest reading is still well

above the 40 figure reached last October and the all-time low of 25.3 in February 2009. The consumer confidence measure has zigzagged so far this year, dropping in January, rising in February and holding nearly steady after that. Analysts were hoping a slight rise in May would give some credence to the idea that the economy is stabilizing. Instead, the data, which was based on a survey conducted from May 1 through May 16 with about 500 randomly selected people nationwide, suggests that “the pace of economic growth in the months ahead may moderate,” Franco said. Mark Vitner, an economist at Wells Fargo, said May's reading is disappointing but consistent with the sluggish recovery so far. “In some ways, it's a microcosm of the whole economic recovery,” he said. “Every once in a while hopes are raised that things are getting better, and then the bottom seems to fall out again.” Analysts say the inconsistent job market is preventing Americans from being more upbeat.

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Hiring picked up earlier in the year, but slowed in March and April, possibly indicating that the economy's momentum faded in early spring. Economists say a warm winter led employers to move up some hiring and accelerate other activity that normally wouldn't occur until spring. A clearer picture of the jobs market will emerge Friday, when May employment figures are due. The unemployment rate is expected to remain at 8.1 percent for May with an increase of 160,000 jobs, according to FactSet. That's above April's gains but below the growth pace set during the winter. Dana Berry, a public-relations manager in Arkansas, says she knows people who are still searching for a job, but she has seen some positive signs, like her oldest son landing a job after graduation. Gas prices are more of a concern, she said. Gasoline has dropped 27 cents per gallon since early April. The national average was $3.67 per gallon at the start of the Memorial Day weekend.

Some experts say it could fall as low as $3.50 by July 4. “I travel quite a bit, so fuel and airline expenses are something I watch closely,” Berry said. “It's a relief when the price of fuel goes down.” Mark Olwick, a designer at Microsoft in Seattle, said he still has concerns about the economy. “I'm cautiously more confident,” he said, “but there is still significant work to be done, especially around banking reform, job creation and gas price speculation.” He said he has not seen gas prices fall in the Pacific Northwest, and that led him to postpone traveling. “I'd love to have taken a road trip over the Memorial Day weekend, but when it costs me $70 for each tank of gas, there's just no way I could afford it,” he said. Adding to Americans' job concerns, the stock market in May is on track for its worst month since last September. The S&P 500 is down 4.6 percent for the month.


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But on Tuesday, Wall Street seemed to shrug off the report. The Dow Jones industrial average was up about 68 points by mid-afternoon. That indicates investors may be more confident in the economic recovery than consumers, said John Lonski, chief economist of Moody's. “Financial markets are giving short shrift to the drop in consumer confidence,” Lonski said. Investors may have been paying closer attention to the much sunnier Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan index of consumer sentiment that came out Friday. That index, which is also considered a measure of consumer confidence, jumped to 79.3 in May

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for its best reading since October 2007 – two months before the recession began. The biggest reason for the difference, economists said, was probably timing: The Conference Board finished its survey May 16, while the University of Michigan survey continues throughout the month. That means the Conference Board didn't capture all the recent declines in gas prices, and it finished just as worries about Europe's financial crisis hit a crescendo, ahead of an international summit. The markets could also have played a role. The Dow fell sharply in the first half of the month, then leveled off after May 16.

The timing “does make a difference, especially in a month where we were riding a roller-coaster,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial. Meanwhile, recent signs that an economic slowdown is spreading beyond Europe to fast-growing countries like China have raised fears that U.S. companies could pull back on hiring as demand weakens for their products. The housing market also is still weak, and many consumers are seeing their retirement investments shrink because of falling stock prices. Associated Press Writer Christopher S. Rugaber in Washington contributed to this report.

Backup power probed at ailing Cal nuke plant BY MICHAEL R. BLOOD ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES (AP),The troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant operated for three decades with equipment that might have temporarily cut off the plant's emergency power supply in the event of an earthquake, government filings revealed Tuesday. The disclosure by Southern California Edison about a possible backup power problem comes amid a probe into excessive wear on tubing that has sidelined the seaside plant for nearly four months. The company disabled the equipment, a vibration sensor, and reported to federal regulators that the problem was being analyzed as a threat to plant safety. Other back-up systems were in place during that time. “Engineers are continuing to analyze the condition and have not reached a final conclusion if the sensor would actually cause a shut-

down during an earthquake,” a company statement said. A steady supply of electricity is a critical issue at nuclear plants, which need power to control heat in the reactors. A tsunami destroyed backup generators at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant – setting off the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. At issue at San Onofre is a vibration sensor in use since 1981 on emergency diesel generators, which start if the plant's outside power is cut – a possibility during an earthquake. Engineers found the sensor – designed to protect components inside the generators during operation – might incorrectly stop them during an earthquake or an aftershock. According to records filed with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Edison engineers are looking into whether ``high vibration ... could interrupt the onsite electrical generation'' dur-

ing a temblor. If the generators fail, the plant can use battery power for up to four hours to operate steam generators to cool the twin reactors. The plant between Los Angeles and San Diego has been dark since January while investigators try to determine why tubing that carries radioactive water in relatively new steam generators eroded at an unusual rate, in some cases rapidly. Gradual wear is common in such tubing, but the rate of erosion in some tubes at San Onofre alarmed officials since the equipment is relatively new. The company has said 1,300 tubes will be taken out of service, although the number is well within the margin to allow the generators to keep operating. Edison initially targeted a June restart for at least one of the twin reactors, but that appears increasingly unlikely as investigators continue to review the widespread problem.

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Men’s Baseball

Season ends for Mission SUBMITTED BY KENNY JACOBY PICTURES SUBMITTED BY DAN MARK The Mission San Jose (MSJ) varsity baseball team’s season has come to an end, but not before reaching the quarterfinals of the Division 1 North Coast Section (NCS) championships - the first time since 1991. MSJ pulled off a major upset in their first-round NCS

game, edging out San Ramon Valley (SRV) in a nail-biter ending 3-2. SRV had been seeded fourth in NCS, while MSJ was seeded 13th. In the second round, MSJ was eliminated as they lost 13-3 to Granada, who was seeded fifth in NCS. The victory over SRV was the highlight of MSJ’s season. Brandon Facha pitched another great game, as he was able to keep the

dangerous SRV bats in check. Facha threw a complete game. After a wild first inning (SRV 2 - MSJ 1), both teams regained their composure and played great defense, and both pitchers were throwing masterfully. Neither team scored another run through the fourth inning. In the top of the fifth, however, MSJ rallied behind some solid hitting from the top of the order to put MSJ in the lead 3-2. SRV had a hit in

MSJ's Brandon Facha pitches a complete game NCS victory over San Ramon Valley and relief work against Granada.

each of the fifth and sixth innings, but Facha and MSJ’s defense kept SRV from scoring in either inning. MSJ’s carried their 3-2 lead into the bottom of the seventh inning as Facha struck out the first batter of the inning on a nasty 3-2 curveball, and MSJ upset the heavily favored SRV by a final score of 3-2. After their victory, MSJ traveled to Granada for an NCS quarterfinal game. Unfortunately for MSJ, Granada’s hitting was unstoppable, as they collected 17 hits and 13 earned runs over the course of five innings pounding MSJ’s three pitchers in a 13-3 victory limited to five innings due to the 10-run rule in effect for the NCS tournament. MSJ finished with an overall record of 13-12-1 this season, highlighted by the NCS victory over SRV. With only two senior starters, the MSJ varsity baseball team is looking forward to a productive 2013 season.

Scott Havard lines a double that ignites a two-run rally in MSJ's 3-2 NCS victory over San Ramon Valley.

Cougars Basketball Camp Newark Memorial will hold their 25th Annual Cougar Basketball Camp this year, led by Cougar Head Coach Craig Ashmore. Cougar basketball camp is scheduled for the Silliman Activity Center gym in Newark with Cougar boys’ basketball staff and current and former Cougar players. This includes 2012 North Coast Champion players Casey Norris and Palm Singh. The camp will focus on fundamentals for aspiring hoops players in the area. A fee of $79 is charged for each player enrolled. Jr. Cougar Basketball (8-12 years old) June 18-21: 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Advanced Cougar Basketball (ages 12-15) June 18-21: 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m. For more information or to sign up, contact: (510) 578-4620 or visit www.newark.org


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Lady Colts in finals

SUBMITTED BY DENNIS & GIDGET PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW James Logan Lady Colts defeated the California Grizzlies (San Ramon) in a hard fought semi-final North Coast Section contest on the softball diamond Wednesday, May 30. Garza pitched all seven innings with Bonansea calling pitches from the plate in a game that was in doubt until Logan scored two runs in the top of the sixth inning to erase a 1-0 California lead, then added an insurance run

Women’s Softball

Moreau playoff hopes end in second round BY BIFF JONES NCS girls softball play saw No. 5 seed, Moreau Catholic High School host No. 12 seed Lower Lake High School on May 23 at Larry Standley Field in Hayward in the 12 team D4 tournament. Senior Jessica Marin would get the start in the circle for Head Coach Chris Krisman. Mariners got out to a quick 6-0 lead on a run in the first inning and 5 more in the second. After Lower Lake answered with two runs in the top of the third, MC put the game out of reach on a 12-run bottom of the third inning as they sent 16 batters to the plate. Hosts would add two more runs in the fourth before LL scored two in the top of the fifth off junior reliever Kristin Hill to give the Mariners a 20-5 win shortened to 4 1/2 innings on the 10 run mercy rule. Offensively for MC it was Marin with a home run and a single; sophomore shortstop Lauren Brown a homer and two singles; junior catcher Leilani Akai a triple, two singles and she reached on an error; junior first baseman Cassidy Lyon and freshman second baseman Savannah Rosales-Brand both with 3 singles; and freshman center fielder Breana Pearsall four-for-four on four bunt singles. Quarter-final play in D4 NCS softball on Saturday, May 26 saw MC travel to Richmond to take on No. 4 seed, Salesian High School. Salesian received a bye in the first round. Marin again got the start for the Mariners. MC got on the board first with two runs in the top of first inning. Salesian answered with a run in the bottom half and added five more in the second inning for an early 6-2 lead. Mariners mounted a comeback with a run in the third and two in the fifth to close the gap to 6-5. However, that is all the visitors could muster as they fell 6-5 to end their season at 14-8.

in the top of the seventh inning. Final score was 3-1. Final competition for the North Coast Section championship will be between James Logan’s Colts and the Amador

Valley Dons of Pleasanton who defeated the Freedom Falcons 3-1. The game will be played at 5 p.m. on Friday, June 1 at St. Mary’s College in Moraga.


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June 1, 2012

Staff from Omron Scientific Technologies, Inc. volunteer on Founder’s Day at Contempo Park, Union City, May 2012.

SUBMITTED BY NELSON KIRK Each year Omron Scientific Technologies, Inc. celebrates their business anniversary, which is called Founder’s Day, by volunteering in their communities. On May 10, 2012, Omron employees planted 50 trees at Contempo Park in Union City. This is the sixth occasion on which they have donated their time and efforts to Union City. Volunteers smiled and made the most of their time, working hard. Omron’s staff is always polite and helpful and were treated to a company BBQ once the work was completed. Omron scientific Technologies, Inc. specializes in products that protect workers.


June 1, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER The Sun Gallery in Hayward presents “Spatial Expressions,” featuring the Clay Monotypes of Bonnie Randall Boller and the Sculpture of Vakil Kuner in the Ken Cook annex gallery from June 1 through June 30. Both artists use abstraction to provide another way of looking at our world. Boller says, "My abstractions come from seeing the world intimately, as if looking through a magnifying glass." She uses Clay Monotype, a painterly form of printmaking that uses liquid clay slip as the ink, printed onto a non-woven fabric substrate called Reemay. Historical layers of slip are transferred from a leather hard slab of clay onto the fabric with a wooden roller. Each print is archival and one of kind.

“Stratum” Clay Monotype by Bonnie Randall Boller

In a complementary way, Kuner uses wood, steel, and cast aluminum in abstractions of plant forms and landscapes. "I love using the contrast of machine made materials with the organic forms found in nature," says Kuner. "The interplay of materials, form, and space can evoke emotions of beauty, majesty, and sometimes the whimsy."

Spatial Expressions June 1 - June 30 Wednesday – Saturday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Artists’ Reception Saturday, June 16 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

“Four Shapes” Metal Sculpture by Vakil Kuner

Sun Gallery 1015 E Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

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Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

June 1, 2012

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Possession of Child Pornography Arrest SUBMITTED BY OFFICER A. CORPUZ, MILPITAS PD In August 2011, the Milpitas Police Department received a report that San Jose resident Johnny Urias was possibly in possession of child pornography. Milpitas Police Detectives discovered Urias was a teacher at an elementary school in the Alum Rock School District, in San Jose. In September 2011, Milpitas Police Detectives developed enough information to obtain and execute search warrants at Urias’ previous home in Milpitas, his current home in San Jose, his classroom, and vehicle. Several computers were seized during the investiga-

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD May 26 Officers were dispatched to 40868 Ingersoll Terrace where the homeowner told Dispatch that she heard glass breaking downstairs and she believes someone is inside her house. She then starts talking about a loose rabbit in the house and her husband confronting someone downstairs as she overhears, “I have a surprise for you”…Ultimately the caller was taken for a medical evaluation. Investigated by Officer Perry. May 27 Officers were dispatched to 37600 block of Carriage Circle on a report of persons in a vehicle not recognized to the neigh-

tion. The Alum Rock School District was informed of the investigation and immediately placed Urias on leave from teaching in the school district. The seized computers were sent to the Silicon Valley Internet Crimes Against Children (SV-ICAC) Task Force for forensic examination, and the investigation remained on-going. In May 2012, Milpitas Police Detectives developed probable cause to arrest Urias for possession of child pornography and manufacturing child pornography. Urias was arrested May 30 at his residence, 1400(B) Merry Lane in San Jose and booked at the Santa Clara County Main Jail, Milpitas

borhood by the caller. Ultimately, a male goes to jail for warrants. Handled by Officer Burkhammer. Clerk calls about a male in the 7-11 store on Decoto with a mask covering his face. The clerk waited for PD but decided to go back inside to assist a new customer. Arriving units could not locate the potential suspect. The clerk is still a little edgy from the last 211 there. A surveillance video will be examined to see if anything really happened. May 28 Citizens at Central Park reported a man slumped over the steering wheel of a vehicle. The doors of the vehicle were locked and the man was not responding. Officers arrived and forced entry into the vehicle to check on the welfare of the man. FFD responded and pronounced the man dead at the scene. The 44 year-old man had been exercising at the park just prior to entering his vehicle. FPD

Police Detectives have executed an additional search warrant at Urias’ San Jose residence in search of additional evidence. The Milpitas Police Department has been working closely with the San Jose Police Department and the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office. Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 5862400 or their local police department. Anonymous information can be given by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

detectives assisted with notification and the investigation. Preliminary investigation revealed no suspicious circumstances. ACSO Coroner eventually took over the case. Family members called to report that a male was extremely intoxicated and had kicked in a side door to the house. When officers arrived on Cripps Place, the male was gone. Union City PD called soon after and advised that the male had just driven into their town and hit several parked cars before abandoning his truck. UCPD tracked him down and he was arrested. Officer Lobue is pursuing a complaint. Burglaries: Centerville Jr. High. Two classrooms burglarized. Attempt near pool area at Parkway Towers. 5597 Butano Park Drive May 29 A reporting party called, saying his girlfriend is in her car at

39370 Civic Center Drive, unconscious and there are signs saying “poison gas, stay away.” There is a smell of “rotten eggs” around the car. The area was secured and Fremont Fire hazmat is called to the scene. They determined that there was still a dangerous level of hydrogen sulfide gas inside the car. The car was vented and the lethal dose quickly dropped to an acceptable level. The scene was turned over to investigations, and a body recovered by the coroner. May 30 Officers responded to 37600 Canterbury Street on a report of an interrupted residential burglary. The suspect, a Hispanic male adult, 20's, wearing a black/white jacket and jeans, attempted to enter the home by kicking in a side door. The suspect was confronted by the homeowner and fled on foot prior to entering the home. Officers were dispatched to the area of Farwell/Stevenson after receiving several 9-1-1

calls about a female being forced into a vehicle and yelling for the police. Witnesses provided a description of the vehicle as it fled the area at a high-rate of speed. As officers were responding, Detective Holguin located the vehicle in the area of Blacow and Sherwood. Detective Holguin could see a male holding a female inside the vehicle and attempted to initiate a traffic stop. The male driver refused to stop and a short vehicle pursuit ensued. The suspect eventually crashed the vehicle on Hyde Common at Prospect Terrace and fled on foot. Officers gave chase and were able to catch and detain the suspect at Hyde/Thurston. The victim and her young children were located inside the vehicle and were treated for minor injuries as a result of the collision. The 44-year-old male suspect was arrested and charged with kidnapping, false imprison-


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ment, felony hit and run, evading a police officer, and child endangerment. During the investigation, it is determined the suspect is the husband/father of the vic-

tims and the incident started as a domestic dispute. A single BMA entered Subway - Charter Square and robbed the clerk at knifepoint. After he tore

the phone from the wall he fled on foot. Employees called the Owner, who then called PD. Suspect described as a possible transient.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK POLICE DEPARTMENT May 25 At 11:33 a.m., Officer Knutson investigated a theft of jewelry from 200 Newpark Mall (Macys) that occurred on May 5. The suspect, Aaron Hickson, was arrested in Sunnyvale for theft of Jewelry from Macy’s in their jurisdiction. The Macy’s loss prevention positively identified him as the suspect from the Newark theft that occurred on May 5. Macy’s advised police that they had five incidents in different cities involving Hickson and were going to seek prosecution on all five cases. At 2:26 p.m., officers responded to the NewPark Mall food court regarding a battery that had just occurred. The parties were separated prior by arriving officers. At the end of the investigation, it was determined the victim was punched numerous times by Lisa Singh of Hayward for unknown reasons. The victim placed Singh under citizen’s arrest for the assault. Singh was transported to Fremont Jail where she was booked for assault and battery. At 10:21 p.m., officers responded to a report at Bridge Port apartments on Cherry Street about a robbery involving two males and a female. Officer Taylor met with the victim and ultimately determined that victim had previously hired a prostitute. It seems the prostitute and her two pimps came back. The victim let them into his apartment, they ate shrimp, and then the two pimps started to hit the victim,

demanding money. The incident was documented. May 26 At 12:01 a.m., Officer Ramos and Detective Todd conducted a pedestrian stop of several subjects in front of a residence in the 6100 block of Rockrose Drive. Nine adults were stripping copper wiring in the driveway of a residence. Officers located several possibly stolen items including a generator, a television, a large amount of copper wire and other miscellaneous electronics at the scene. Calls were made to local law enforcement agencies but no victims have been identified. The items were seized for safekeeping. The investigation is ongoing. At 1:31 a.m., Officers responded to a disturbance and loud party with possible gunshots heard on Long Street. Upon arrival, officers located a 20-year old victim leaving the scene, who had a facial injury from a gunshot. The victim was subsequently transported via ambulance to Eden Medical Center for treatment. He was treated and later released from the hospital. Numerous witnesses were interviewed, but versions of how the shooting occurred varied widely. Officers received conflicting information. There was a significant number of documented Norteno gang members present at the party. At this time police have no leads due to the lack of cooperation from witnesses. May 27 Officers responded to a burglar alarm at a residence in the Lake area at 3:12 p.m. Officer Nobbe

located two suspects on Worthing Drive and Edgewater Drive. During the investigation, it was determined that suspect, Erik Aromin of Union City, had entered the unlocked side gate of a house and stolen a bicycle from the rear yard. The bicycle was recovered at the scene and was released to the owners. A search of Aromin revealed numerous stolen items such as a social security card, mail, checkbooks, and other personal documents. A victim positively identified some of the items. Officer Nobbe was able to track down a total of four additional victims. Aromin was arrested for petty theft of the bicycle and possession of stolen property. At 8:24 p.m., while Officers were monitoring the crowd at the Salsa Festival at Swiss Park, Giancarlo Zapata of Hayward thought it would be a good idea to try to open the door to the K-9 patrol car. Fortunately for Zapata’s sake, Officers were just steps away and able to take him into custody before he met K-9 Ares. Zapata was obviously too intoxicated to care for his own safety and was arrested for public drunkenness. May 28 Officer Taylor was detailed to a residential burglary on Magnolia Street at 9:11 p.m. The suspect(s) broke a rear sliding door and entered the residence between 1000-2100. Officers were detailed to 5849 Jarvis Avenue (Let’s Cup Cake) on a burglary alarm at 4:47 a.m. Officer Smith arrived on scene and discovered a hole in the wall to continued on page 31

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


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June 1, 2012

Master Sudoku

Sudoku

3 9 1 8 7 6 4 3 2 6 9 1 7 9

3 letter words Aft Era Jug UFO

7

In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

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Sudoku Solutions on page 4

4 letter words Iraq Shun Stop UNIX

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4

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Stop Streets The Clock The Star Twenty-one Vingt-et-Un Whist

E M G E T W E N T Y O N E P Y


June 1, 2012 continued from page 29

the vacant business at 5845 Jarvis Avenue. It appears that the suspect(s) planned to tunnel through the buildings in an attempt to burglarize multiple businesses. The loss at Let’s Cup Cake was still being determined. There are no known suspects.

Newark Police Log May 29 Officer Homayoun responded to the parking lot of 39900 Balentine Drive (Hilton Hotel) at 6:03 a.m. for two reported auto burglaries. Both were window smashes with a possible crowbar. Both occurred between the hours of

Recycle theft suspects arrested SUBMITTED BY SGT. K. CORVIN, MILPITAS PD

Scott M. McCann

cers entered the building and heard loud noises from another area of the building. Additional officers responded to the area and took positions around the building to watch for fleeing suspects. Officers detained Fremont resident Scott M. McCann, and Livermore resident Suzanne M. Rose as they walked from the business. Officers checked the interior of the business and identified areas of extensive damage where recyclable metals

5:00 a.m. – 5:55 a.m. Officer Clark responded to 35020 Newark Boulevard regarding intentional damage to a construction site. Damage was inflicted to the windows, walls and doors. The reporting party believed it occurred over the weekend.

had been removed from the walls, ceiling, and electrical boxes. Officers also located tools that were believed to have been used in the theft of the metals. Officers located a vehicle registered to McCann at a nearby building. Officers booked McCann and Rose into the Santa Clara County Jail on charges that included burglary, conspiracy, possession of burglary tools, possession of stolen property and possession of narcotic paraphernalia. Anyone with any information regarding any suspicious or criminal activity is encouraged to immediately call 911. Anyone with any information regarding this incident is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Shooting suspects captured SUBMITTED BY CMDR MUSGROVE, UNION CITY PD

On Saturday, May 26, 2012, Milpitas Police Department officers conducted a security check at a vacant business in the 1300 (Block) of California Cr. and located two suspected burglars who were in the process of stealing recyclable metals from inside the building. Milpitas Police Officers were checking on the security of the business and located an unsecured door. The offi-

Suzanne M. Rose

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On May 28, 2012, at 12:51 p.m., Union City police officers responded to the 4400 block of Corto Monterey for a report of an in progress shooting. Officers located a 21-yearold male victim inside of a residence who was suffering from gunshot wounds. The victim was transported to a local area hospital for non-life threatening injuries. The victim and suspects engaged in a verbal altercation that became physical in nature. However, during physical fight one suspect pulled a firearm and began shooting at the victim. The suspects fled from the area on foot in separate directions. A nearby Union City Community Policing Officer observed a subject who matched the suspect’s description. The officer engaged in a short foot pursuit and captured the fleeing suspect. A short time later, Detectives went to a nearby residence to conduct a follow-up related to this case. When officers began to make entry into the home, the second suspect fled out the rear of the residence and

began jumping nearby fences. The second suspect was captured as he attempted to flee the perimeter. The first suspect has been identified as Jabri Thibeaux, a 23-year-old Union City resident. Jabri Thibeaux was arrested for attempted homicide, conspiracy, and resisting arrest. He is being held at the Fremont Jail. The second suspect is 17-year-old juvenile male, whose name is not being released because of his age. The juvenile was arrested for attempted homicide and conspiracy. He was transported to juvenile hall. A third person was arrested for her role in this crime. She has been identified as Malysa Thibeaux, an 18-year-old Union City resident. Malysa Thibeaux was arrested for attempted homicide, conspiracy, and resisting arrest. The victim is a resident of Union City who was treated and released from the hospital. Anyone with information concerning this incident should contact Union City Police Department at (510) 471-1365. Anonymous tips regarding this incident can be made by calling (510) 675-5207 or emailed to Tips@union-city.org.

The Fremont Fire Department Smoke Detector Program is seeking adult volunteers to install smoke detectors in the homes of the elderly, disabled, and low income families. The ideal volunteer will be available during normal business hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm), and have the ability to safely climb a ladder and use a cordless drill to install detectors. Hours per week will be determined based on demand but typically average eight to ten hours. If you are interested in volunteering or need additional information, please contact Amiel Thurston at (510) 494-4213 or athurston@fremont.gov.


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June 1, 2012

continued from page 1

Paul Shamieh of Papa John’s Pizza in Newark

Established by the State Legislature in 1997, STAR testing has since developed modified formats to include all students, no matter what learning challenges are involved. The State Board of Education (SBE) reports achievement levels for each pupil: Advanced, Proficient, Basic, Below Basic or Far Below Basic; composite scores that can be analyzed in many different ways are given for school performance. “Students who test at the ‘Advanced’ level in all core classes are awarded a Golden State Seal Diploma, a high honor,” says Miller.

Academic Performance Index (API) ratings are given to schools through a complex formula using a composite of California Achievement Tests, growth targets and, for high schools, the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). This is an important tool for educators and an indicator of school performance. Miller notes that in order to make sense of exam results, schools need the willing and active participation of students. “If stu-

dents do not take the test or are not motivated to concentrate on the questions, we are missing important data.” Also, the impact of lower API ratings can have a detrimental effect on college admissions for graduates since grade comparisons may favor those from highly rated high schools. Just as STAR exams are ubiquitous throughout schools, so is the love of pizza. In conversations with Washington High School Activities Director

Helen Paris, Paul Shamieh of Papa John’s Pizza in Newark agreed to donate a pizza in exchange for a can of food but also responded to Paris’ challenge to “take it up a notch.” A noticeable lack of enthusiasm for STAR testing among older students at the school was a problem. In response, a “Star Focus Group” of concerned students formed; they needed to inform others of the serious consequences of indifferent efforts, both to themselves and

Washington High School STAR focus group (Members of foucs group: Lucas Ammerman, Kyle O’Hollaren, Ryan Clark, Madison Jeong, Samantha Steadman, Abby Harrison, Inka Leprince, Akshay Mahajan, Josh Dalavai)


June 1, 2012

the school. A challenge was issued to the student body… if Washington High School achieved a 99 percent attendance level for STAR testing, Papa Johns would give a free pizza to every Washington High School student in exchange for a can of food for families in need. Motivating some students to take STAR testing seriously can be a difficult task so the Focus Group, including students from all classes – freshman, sophomore, junior and seniors, worked to encourage students to

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

attend STAR exams and raise the level of participation. They were faced with a big challenge; some students felt no reason to care and saw no impact of STAR testing on their school experience; peer pressure from older students had changed positive perceptions of STAR testing to one of indifference and students more focused on ‘life skills’ classes and electives rather than core academic subjects, saw little relevance. The focus group responded saying, “We told them that if our school ratings go

down, their favorite electives would be in jeopardy.” When free pizza was thrown into the equation, students became very interested. “They were really heated up about that.” Never underestimate the power of pizza. The Washington High School Huskies did not disappoint and 99.5 percent of eligible students showed up for STAR testing. On May 23, true to his word, Shamieh was on campus to help hand out certificates for free pizzas to a huge crowd of Husky STARs.

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Mormon Helping Hands, The Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints, volunteer in Union City for Arbor Day USA 2012.

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embers of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) provided “Helping Hands” community service throughout several communities in California on Saturday, April 28, 2012. In Union City, they planted and staked trees along Alvarado Boulevard and Fair Ranch Road to mark Arbor Day in Union City. They also installed 600 feet of drip line and spread 30 cubic yards of mulch to help the trees thrive. The project was assisted by Union City Public Works employees Bill Bontadelli and Julio Duran. The Helping Hands program was officially established in 1998 in Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Chile to identify service being done by members of the LDS Church. That same year, it was implemented on a large-scale in Brazil as part of a countrywide day of service organized by the church. It has since been used in many countries. Mormon Helping Hands operates under the direction of local stake and district presidents and bishops. The activities provide community service and are not proselytizing in nature. Mormon Helping Hands both responds to disasters such as hurricanes and gives aid aimed at improving conditions in the community for all to benefit. The LDS Church group has undertaken numerous volunteer projects in the Decoto and Alvarado Districts of Union City. Members were well-organized, productive, hard-working citizens who and have completed many great projects in Union City. A big “Thank You” to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Prepare for an emergency - respond safely to an earthquake SUBMITTED BY TAMAR SARKISSIAN

What to Do Before: Prepare an emergency plan and conduct an emergency drill. Prepare and maintain an emergency preparedness kit to be self-sufficient for at least three days, and preferably up to one week, following an earthquake. Evaluate your home. Have your building and appliances inspected to assure that they are able to withstand a significant earthquake. Know the location of your gas service shutoff valve, and how to shut off your gas supply. Most gas appliances have a shutoff valve located near the appliance that lets you turn off the gas to that appliance only. Know which of your appliances uses gas, and where the appliance shutoff valves are located. In some cases, turning off the gas at the appliances shutoff valve will suffice. Know the location of the main electric switch and how to turn off your electric supply. What to Do During: If you are indoors, stay indoors and take cover under a sturdy desk or table, or stand in an interior doorway. Stay away from exterior walls and windows, masonry veneers (such as fireplaces), tall furniture, and hanging pictures or mirrors. If you are cooking in the kitchen, turn off the stove before you take cover. If you are outdoors, get into the open away from buildings and power lines. Be alert for falling debris. If you are driving, pull to the side of the road and stop if it is safe. Move your vehicle out of the normal traffic pattern as much as possible. Do not stop on or under overpasses, bridges, or tunnel. Do not stop under or near electrical power lines, light posts, trees, or signs. Stay in your car until the earthquake is over. What to Do After: Ensure that everyone is safe. Inspect your building for damage. Do not use

electrical switches, appliances, telephones or any flame if you suspect a gas leak, because sparks can ignite gas. If you smell gas, hear gas escaping, see a broken gas line, or suspect a broken gas line, evacuate the building. Find a phone away from the building and call PG&E or 9-1-1 immediately. If it is safe to do so, turn off the gas service shutoff valve normally located near the gas meter. Do not shut off the gas service shutoff valve unless you find the presence of any one of these conditions because there may be a considerable delay before PG&E can turn your service back on. If leaking gas starts to burn, do not try to put the flame out. Evacuate the building. Call 9-1-1 and PG&E immediately. If it is safe to do so, turn off the gas service shutoff valve normally located near the gas meter. Once the gas is shut off at the meter, do not try to turn it back on yourself. Only PG&E or another qualified professional should turn the gas back on. Check for downed or damaged electric utility lines. Stay away from downed power lines and never touch wires lying on the ground, wires hanging on poles, or objects that may be touching them. Downed wires still may be carrying current and could shock, injure or even kill if touched. Check for damaged household electrical wiring and shut off the power at the main electric switch if you suspect any damage. If the power goes out, turn off all electric appliances, and unplug major electric appliances to prevent possible damage when the power is turned back on. After a major earthquake, outside help may not be available for at least three days. PG&E urges customers to prepare and learn how to respond during and after an earthquake. Useful emergency preparedness information can be found at the following websites: The American Red Cross (www.redcross.org), the California Office of Emergency Services (www.oes.ca.gov), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (www.fema.gov) and the Earthquake Country Alliance (www.earthquakecountry.info/roots/index.php).

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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

June 1, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


June 1, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St., Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510-659-1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com Holy Cross Episcopal Church Heyer and Center St., Castro Valley 510 - 889-7233 www.holycrosscv.org

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org

Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org

Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct., Union City 510-475-5377

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

June 1, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


June 1, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

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RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org United Church of Hayward 30540 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 471-4452 www.haywarducc.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com



TCV 2012-06-01