Page 1

Cougars battle hard but lose second round contest

Youth Jazz Festival

Discover the Pioneer Spirit

Page 35 Page 6 Page 24

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

Vol. 11 No. 43

May 29, 2012

www.tricityvoice.com

SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER Every year since 1987, the Ohlone College Foundation has hosted a Citizen of the Year Luncheon to honor a group, organization, or individual that makes an exceptional contribution to the community, providing important services and contributing significantly to the progress or improvement of the Tri-Cities. This year, the Foundation Board has chosen to honor Dave Smith, former Mayor of Newark, as the Citizen of the YOWZA!, renaming the event in his honor for 2012. continued on page 5

Current City Manager John Becker, past City Manager and past Council Member Alberto Huezo, former Mayor David W. Smith, past City Manager and past Council Member Paul H.B. Tong, and past City Manager Richard W. Turnlund.

BY AISHWARYA THAKUR PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SMOKE SIGNAL Games, ponies, and food! All this and more are part of Mission San Jose High School’s (MSJHS) fourth annual Family Festival on June 2. Family Festival is a carnival hosted by MSJHS Leadership 2 class filled with activities and entertainment for the entire family. This year’s Family Festival will feature bungee jumping, bouncy houses, pony rides, an obstacle course, face painting, live entertainment and the highly anticipated food trucks. Although Family Festival has suffered from bad weather in the past years, it has always been a success. Laura Versigan, a member of the Family Festival planning committee, says, “Rain or shine, Family Festival will be back!” This year, Family Festival is hoping to expand with even more activities for all age

groups. Bouncy houses will entertain younger kids while teens can listen to live music by MSJHS students… all can savor delicacies from the food trucks. All money raised from this fundraiser will go toward assemblies, dances, and renovation projects at the high school. Leadership 2 class organized this event to ensure a fun day for all. To check on the schedule of events and participating food trucks, visit msjasb.org. Join in on the fun and stop by Mission San Jose High School on June 2. Don’t miss out! MSJHS Family Festival Saturday, June 2 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. MSJHS Football Field 41717 Palm Avenue, Fremont www.msjasb.org

BY MAURICIO SEGURA PHOTO BY BILL MANCEBO He was a comedian, actor, producer, writer, director, musical composer, cofounder of United Artists Pictures, and one of the first superstars of American film. After almost 80 years since retiring his iconic character of a lonely tramp, it is still one of the best recognized film characters of all time, worldwide. And his slapstick comedy influenced generations of notable comedians from The

Tickets: $10 pre-sale/$15 at the door

continued on page 33

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

INDEX

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Washington Hospital Seminar Offers Trip Tips

I

f you have diabetes, planning your summer vacation takes on new meaning, with the emphasis on planning. Globetrotting is possible for those with the chronic disease, but preparation is the key to avoiding any medical mishaps. “People with diabetes can see the world, but they have to plan for every possibility,” said Sandra Mertesdorf, a registered nurse and certified diabetes educator at Washington Hospital. “You have to plan how you and your medications will arrive safely at your destination and what services are available where you will be staying.” She will present “Trip Tips for People with Diabetes” on Thursday, June 7, from 7 to 8 p.m. It will be held at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West), in Fremont. The seminar is part of Washington Hospital’s free monthly Diabetes Matters education series. Mertesdorf will walk participants through the steps they need to take to prepare for their next trip. Every detail of the trip must be considered, she said. “You can’t count on the fact that the medications and other supplies you depend on will be available where you are going,” Mertesdorf added. “What if your flight gets delayed or your car breaks down. You need to be prepared for every possibility.” Travel Checklist She said the first thing people with diabetes should do is create a travel checklist

to make sure they will have everything they need to stay healthy. It should include all the medications and supplies needed to

May 29, 2012

there are pharmacies available where you are going, they may not carry the type of insulin or oral medication you use. Medications in other countries can have different strengths. It’s not standardized. You should also bring an extra meter and insulin pump if you use one.” She said it is best for people with diabetes to work with their health care team to make sure they have considered all the possibilities. Mertesdorf recommends they get a letter from their doctor that stipulates their medical condition and

If you have diabetes and are planning a trip or vacation this summer, don’t miss the next Diabetes Matters seminar at Washington Hospital. A certified diabetes educator will provide valuable tips to help you keep your diabetes under control while you are traveling. The seminar will take place on Thursday, June 7 from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To learn more about the services offered through the Washington Outpatient Diabetes Center, please visit www.whhs.com/diabetes.

keep their blood glucose levels under control during the trip. She will provide participants with a sample list. “You should bring everything you will need with you, including medications, glucose tablets, your meter and test strips, all your supplies,” Mertesdorf said. “Even if

includes contact information and medication requirements. Depending on the destination, certain immunizations may be needed and their physician can advise them about that as well. In addition to the letter, Mertesdorf urges people with diabetes to wear a med-

ical identification bracelet and carry a card that lists their medical condition as well as emergency contact information. She also encourages people to travel with a companion who knows about their diabetes. Schedule Changes While traveling is meant to be enjoyable, it can also be exhausting and stressful. Changes to normal schedules as well as the added activity and stress can affect blood glucose levels. Time changes have to be factored in as well. “Traveling disrupts your normal routine,” Mertesdorf said. “While that’s exciting, it can make it difficult for people with diabetes. You may be eating at different times and having foods you don’t normally eat. If you are crossing time zones, your medication schedule may need to be adjusted.” She said people with diabetes should put all their medications and supplies in their carryon bag rather than in checked luggage because the flight could get delayed, luggage might get lost, and insulin can’t go in the cargo hold. People with insulin pumps should contact the pump manufacturer to see if there are any special instructions for takeoff and landing. Mertesdorf recommends that people with diabetes check their blood glucose more often while traveling and be prepared to treat high and low blood glucose. It is also important for people with diabetes to get plenty of sleep and stay well hydrated to help keep blood glucose levels under control. She said people with diabetes should carry healthy snacks and water at all times. “There is so much for people with diabetes to think about when traveling,” she added. “Bring all your questions with you so you can be ready for your next trip.” To learn about other diabetes programs at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/diabetes.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

05/29/12

05/30/12

05/31/12

06/01/12

06/02/12

06/03/12

06/04/12

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Diabetes Matters: Making Diabetes a Good Fit for Health

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Men's Health Expo 2011 Washington Women's Women's Health Center: Cancer Genetic Conference: Chronic Pain Management Counseling

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run!

Diabetes in Pregnancy Women's Health Conference: Skin Health From Inside Washington Hospital: Infancy to Maturity Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options Learning How to Prevent for Ankle Conditions and Live with Congestive Heart Failure

Disaster Preparedness Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012 Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Brain Health for Seniors

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11, 2012

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Approach to Managing Diabetes

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

How to Maintain a Healthy Inside Washington Hospital: Weight: Good Nutrition is Patient Safety Key Minimally Invasive The Weight to Success Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Washington Township Health Care District Special Board Meeting April 25, 2012

Vitamins and Supplements How Useful Are They?

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team World Kidney Day

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting May 9th, 2012

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Living with Heart Failure

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

World Kidney Day

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Wound Care Update


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

Seminar Addresses Future in Diagnosis and Management of Stroke, How to Cope

T Free Seminar May Help You Find the Coverage You Need Because of the poor economy and company lay-offs, there are more uninsured Americans than ever before. In California, nearly one in five is uninsured. “If you are without health insurance, you are not alone, we talk to many local residents that have lost health insurance from an employer or just can not afford to pay the high premiums” observes Kristi Caracappa, Health Insurance Information Service Coordinator at Washington Hospital. The 2010 Community Health Needs Assessment estimates 12 percent of residents in Alameda County have no health insurance. The report also concludes that people who are uninsured are far more likely to delay or not seek medical care than those who have insurance. "We see these problems every day in our office," comments Caracappa, who works at the Washington Hospital Health In-

In an effort to provide helpful information about health insurance options, Washington Hospital will conduct a free public seminar covering the many health insurance plans and programs that are available to your and your family. The seminar will take place on Wednesday, June 6 from 10 a.m. to Noon at the Conrad E. Anderson M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont.Visit www.whhs.com to register.

surance Information Service, a free, confidential and unbiased service that can provide people with the information they need to make informed decisions about their health insurance or find low cost health care services to stay healthy. On Wednesday, June 6, Caracappa will present a free seminar, "Health Insurance Options: What You Need to Know." Sponsored by Washington Hospital, the class will be held in Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. To reserve your spot, go online to www.whhs.com and look under Upcoming Seminars, or call (800) 963-7070. "We will talk about different options for health insurance and what you can do if you are without it," says Caracappa. "The goal of our service at Washington Hospital is to help people get the health insurance or services they need, whether it be through low cost or free community programs or through government-sponsored programs. Our service is free and available to everyone, no matter who you are or where you live." According to Caracappa, under federal health reform young adults can now be covered by their parents' insurance plan until they are 26. Children under age 18 who don't have coverage may also qualify under the state's Healthy Families program. For those who have been without insurance due to pre-existing conditions there is a PCIP program offered through the State of California. Caracappa is a Healthy Families certified application assistant, so she can assist people in filling out the paperwork. When Health Insurance Coverage is Lost The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) gives workers and their families who lose their health benefits the right to choose to continue group health benefits provided by their group health plan for limited periods of time under certain circumstances such as voluntary or involuntary job loss, reduction in the hours worked, transition between jobs, death, divorce, and other life events. When someone goes on COBRA as an extension of previously available health insurance coverage, they may not realize how expensive it is. Caracappa recommends that you take COBRA coverage if your family can afford it. If not, she will offer suggestions on what you can do to keep your family healthy until you can obtain health insurance. During the seminar, Caracappa will also talk about insurance options for people who have exhausted their COBRA coverage, as well as those who have pre-existing conditions. Advice to Fit Your Needs People who attend the seminar on June 6 will have an opportunity to ask questions about their own health insurance needs, or they can make a free appointment with Washington Hospital’s Health Insurance Information Service by calling (800) 770-9447, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The Health Insurance Information Service Office is located in the Washington Community Health Resource Library in the Washington West building on Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Learn More If you have questions about the Washington Hospital Health Insurance Information Service or would like to learn more about health insurance coverage options, visit www.whhs.com/health-insurance or call (800) 770-9447.

here are an estimated stroke, because a better understand- activator (tPA), which is used to 795,000 annual strokes in ing of the disease is critical to dissolve blood clots and restore the United States, according achieving these better outcomes, ac- blood flow to the brain, also conto statistics in Circulation, the cording to Dr. Jain. tinues to evolve. American Heart Association (AHA) On Tuesday, June 5, during a free “These techniques have adjournal. However, stroke incidence community education seminar, Dr. vanced, and now it’s a question of appears to be declining, and studies Jain will talk about the future in diag- the approach,” Dr. Jain says. “We indicate that the rise in the can administer the tPA in number of primary and the emergency room via IV, comprehensive stroke cenor directly into the carotid ters in the United States— artery. We can also use delike the one at Washington vices to take the clot out of Hospital—as well as inthe brain’s arteries to recreasing use of acute open the channels, and we stroke therapies, and can also place stents to greater availability of evikeep the arteries open.” dence-based approaches to On the other hand, makprevent and treat stroke ing the best use of these adhave played a significant vanced medical role in the improvement. interventions available at “For residents of WashWashington Hospital reington Township, they quires that community have a distinct advantage members know what stroke in having a certified Priis and that it represents a mary Stroke Center in medical emergency that detheir community,” says Dr. mands immediate treatment Ash Jain, medical director “The numbers show of the Stroke Program at that the faster patients arWashington Hospital. rive in the ER for care, the “Our program has streambetter their outcomes are,” lined the process for diagDr. Jain concludes. nosis of stroke, beginning Life after stroke can have many challenges—including speech or moFinding Your bility difficulties—but it’s important for stroke survivors to take steps from the very moment New Normal to get back to who they were before their stroke. At an upcoming someone arrives in the ER stroke education seminar,Washington Hospital clinicians will discuss Life after stroke can or calls 9-1-1, and we con- how stroke is treated when you arrive in the ER, as well as stroke have many challenges—inrehabilitation and chronic care after stroke. To learn more about cluding speech or mobility tinue to exceed national management, attend the free seminar on Tuesday, June 5 from benchmarks for several im- stroke difficulties—but it’s impor6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 portant indicators, includ- Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Visit whhs.com or tant for stroke survivors to call (800) 963-7070 to register. ing patient and take steps to get back to community education and who they were before their treatment. We have worked very nosis and management of stroke, stroke, according to Doug Van hard to improve outcomes every with Stroke Program Coordinator Houten, R.N., who also facilitates step of the way.” Doug Van Houten, R.N., examining the Stroke Support Group at WashHe says that widening treatment issues related to life after stroke. ington Hospital. windows and impressive advanceThe Future of Stroke Care “This group meets every month ments allow for better outcomes, Dr. Jain typically begins his talk and enjoys each other’s company and particularly at Primary Stroke Cenwith a brief tutorial on stroke—its kinship,” he says. “This summer they ters—programs certified by The risk factors and why it happens—behave planned their second annual trip Joint Commission and the Amerifore exploring the details of stroke to the Alameda County Fair, and this can Heart Association (AHA)—like management and the latest informatime they have a mission. They are Washington Hospital’s. tion about medications that have recollecting food items for the Alameda But even for community memcently become available, or will County ‘Feed the Need’ Food Bank. bers living in proximity to a Pribecome available in coming years. mary Stroke Center, it’s important He points out that existing treatcontinued on page 5 for people to learn the facts about ments, such as tissue plasminogen


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 5

continued from page 3

They will be bringing boxes of collected food items for those less fortunate than themselves.” “So you see, you can still find ways to contribute after stroke.” He says that part of getting better from something like stroke is about regaining a sense of self worth, value, and ability—and actions like contributing to Feed the Need are small, but important steps for stroke survivors to get back to being who they were before stroke. Many stroke survivors struggle with not only physical challenges, but also depression as part of their recovery, Van Houten adds. “For most people, they would think nothing of it if a friend said, ‘Hey, let’s go to the fair!’ You’d just

go stroll around and have a good time. But for people in our support group attending the fair was a huge event, with many of them saying things like, ‘I haven’t had this much fun in a long time.’ Stroke survivors can become so locked into being in a withdrawn, stay-at-home mode, which just reinforces how important something like this to them.” Van Houten says stroke survivors striving for physical independence go to a rehab facility and work with rehab professionals who will push them outside their comfort zone in graduated steps. The same thing goes for mental and social rehabilitation, he points out. “You have to keep pushing yourself to try to get back to

things you enjoy, because if you stop doing something, it becomes difficult to do it again,” he says. “You have to intellectualize what you should be doing, and move forward. You can conquer your fears that way.” Free Seminar Join Dr. Ash Jain and Doug Van Houten on Tuesday, June 5, to learn more about the future in diagnosis and management of stroke, as well as coping with life after stroke. The seminar will be from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A and B, in the Washington West building at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To register, visit www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070.

continued from page 1

The Citizen of the Year Champagne Luncheon is the last major social event before summer for community members in Fremont, Newark, and Union City. Held on Saturday, June 2 at the beautiful Ohlone College Newark Center, the luncheon highlights the many accomplishments of Smith, as well as awarding more than $80,000 in scholarships to Ohlone College students. “We are so pleased to be able to honor Dave Smith for his unwavering commitment to the TriCities area over the past 33 years,” said Bob Douglass, Chair of the Ohlone College Foundation Board of Directors. “Whether he was wearing his Mayor of Newark hat, acting in his position at Ohlone College or volunteering at one of our local organizations, Dave’s impact on our community is undeniable.” The Ohlone College Foundation raises funds to provide scholarships and program support to Ohlone students and to the college. The Citizen of the Year Champagne Luncheon is the Foundation’s largest fundraising event and one of the most recognized events in the community. For more information, to purchase tickets, or to hear about sponsorship opportunities, please visit http://www.ohlone.edu/org/foundation/citizenoftheyear.html or call (510) 659-6020. Tickets are $75 each; $55 for Ohlone employees.

2012 Citizen of the Year Luncheon Honoring Dave Smith, former Mayor of Newark Saturday, June 2 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry Street, Newark (510) 659-6020 http://www.ohlone.edu/org/foundation/citizenoftheyear.html Tickets: $55 - $75


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI PHOTOS BY ROBERT WEST

W

hat do Basketry, Robotics, First Aid, Reading, Salesmanship, Plant Science, Traffic Safety, Metalwork, Horsemanship, Wilderness Survival, and Public Speaking have in common? Boy Scouts probably have a pretty good handle on all of them. Witness the vast array of skills and fun fostered by Scouting at “Tres Ranch-O-Rama” on Saturday, June 2 at Hayward’s Kennedy Park. Organized by San Leandro-based Tres Ranchos District of the Boy Scouts of America, San Francisco Bay Area Council, the event is an opportunity for Scouts to show their stuff while encouraging others to get involved. Ages seven through 18 can experience Scouting in a variety of units including Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Venture and Varsity Scouts, Explorers, and Sea Scouts. The organization strives to develop character, leadership, decision-making skills, good citizenship, and personal fitness through fun and educational activities. Tres Ranchos District includes over 80 units from Castro Valley, Hayward, San Leandro, and San Lorenzo. “It’s kind of a public appearance for us and the Scouts in general,” says Event Chair and Scoutmaster Robert West of the event. “To let them know we’re out there doing things, and this is what we do.” For many years this event was known as “Scout-O-Rama” but it was discontinued in the ‘80s. Now in its fifth year as “Tres

Ranch-O-Rama,” the exposition is rebuilding and becoming strong again. Last year, all but rained out, 200 Scouts still showed up. West says they are hoping for around 450 participants this year and representation from 20 to 45 units throughout the East Bay. Under the theme “The Pioneer Spirit,” units will set up a variety of booths to host an activity or game, displaying old world craftsmanship and pioneering skills sure to impress visitors. Previous events have included a giant sling shot, rope toss, rope bridge, woodshop demonstration on how to make a footstool, a demonstration of cooking skills to make homemade apple cobbler and a stomp rocket that launches handmade rockets. But no one truly knows what will be presented at this year’s event; many participants keep their plans hushhush until it’s time to wow the crowd. A new addition this year is the performance of skits, taken from a longstanding tradition at closing campfires. Units will perform prepared skits for judges early in the day and the best three or four will compete later on for what West calls “crowd roar.” Prizes will be awarded for Best Booth and Best Skit. Scouting units are not permitted to sell any food items but those who have worked up an appetite can check out the Kennedy Park snack bar. There will be some free snacks on hand, such as snow cones. Visitors will have an opportunity to ask questions and, if interested, sign up for Scouting; those interested can be introduced to a unit in their area.

“Tres Ranch-O-Rama” promises a great time of fun for all and a chance to witness the breadth of knowledge and skill local Scouts possess. Everyone is encouraged to come by Tres Ranch-O-Rama to learn about Scouting and explore a wide range of skills that may spark a personal interest. For more information, contact Robert West at (510) 912-0555. To learn more about Scouting in the Bay Area, visit www.sfbac.org. Tres Ranch-O-Rama Saturday, June 2 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Kennedy Park 19501 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 912-0555 www.sfbac.org Free


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 7


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

BART Police Department Log SUBMITTED BY OFFICER E. JENKINS, BART PD May 25 Officers were dispatched at 11:33 p.m. to investigate a report of a woman having been beaten by her boyfriend in the east parking lot of the Fremont station. The victim, who was chased into the station by her boyfriend, was given refuge in the agent’s booth. An officer located the suspect who had fled to the pond area adjacent to the station. An investigation determined that the suspect had battered his girlfriend numerous times, and also hit her mother who was present. No medical attention was required. The suspect was booked at the Santa Rita County Jail.

OFFICER E. JENKINS #181

Residential burglary suspect arrested SUBMITTED BY OFFICER QURESHI, MILPITAS PD On April 20, 2012, Milpitas Police Officers responded to the 1100 block of Fox Hollow Court for a report of a residence that had been burglarized. Officers checked the area and residence and determined that the suspect fled the area. During the investigation, Officers determined that the suspect smashed a rear window to gain entry into the residence between 10:15 a.m. and 1:10 p.m. The suspect took a computer, cash, electronics and clothing items. Evidence was located in the residence and MPD was eventually able to link the evidence to a Milpitas resident, James Robert Moreno. James Robert Moreno On May 18, 2012, Milpitas Police Department detectives contacted Moreno and arrested him for the residential burglary on Fox Hollow Court. Moreno was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail on one count of residential burglary. Anyone with information about this case should telephone the Milpitas Police Department at 408-5862400. Those who wish to remain anonymous can telephone the Crime Tip Hotline at 408-586-2500 or utilize the on-line crime tip form: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD May 23 Officer Eriksen investigated a vehicle burglary at 37900 Cedar Boulevard that occurred overnight. The stereo was stolen and the vehicle vandalized with paint. Officer Eriksen investigated a loss of checkbook that occurred at the Check Center on Thornton Ave. on May 9, 2012. Since then, someone has attempted to cash multiple checks from the victim’s account. At 11:57 a.m., Officer Heckman investigated a stolen vehicle from 36000 block of Worthing Drive. The vehicle (1998 Saturn SL 4D Green CA license 3XNE046) was being driven by the victim’s daughter without permission. At 9:49 p.m., a citizen called to report a possible burglary in progress at a residence on Worthing Drive; the homeowners were out of town. Responding Officers located Amy Ludlow, the estranged daughter of the homeowners exiting the back-

yard and the above listed stolen vehicle parked in the driveway. Ludlow was subsequently arrested for vehicle theft and transported to Santa Rita Jail. At 6:32 p.m., after responding to a domestic dispute at a residence on Cherry Street, Officer Saunders arrested Robin Sloan of Oakland for multiple Misdemeanor warrants. During the booking search at the Jail, Sloan tried to swallow a small baggie of Methamphetamine prompting a trip to Washington Hospital for medical clearance and the addition of an evidence tampering charge. She was transported to Santa Rita Jail. Thursday May 24 Officer Clark investigated a theft from a vehicle on the 6200 block of Zulmida Avenue at 10:08 a.m. A cellular telephone and a wallet were stolen from the victim’s unlocked Honda Accord. Officer Ramos investigated a non-injury hit and run collision at the intersection of Ruschin Drive and Newark Boulevard at 12:36 p.m. The suspect vehicle was described as a green Honda last seen southbound on Newark Boulevard from the scene of the collision. At 1:07 p.m., Community Service Officer Verandez recovered a stolen 1996 Nissan Sentra (CA license 5KUD041), originally reported to NPD, from the area of 6400 Cotton Avenue. Officers responded at 1:08 p.m. to 35425 Newark Boulevard (76 Gas Station) for a robbery just occurred. The suspect was described as a Black Male Adult, approximately 5’9” tall, heavy build, early 20’s, with a slight beard, wearing a white shirt and ball cap. The suspect held a knife below the belt line and demanded money from the clerk. The clerk gave him approximately $100 and told him to leave, which the suspect did. The suspect was last seen fleeing on foot southbound on Newark Boulevard. Officer Eriksen responded to a theft in progress at 5810 Newpark Mall (Men’s Warehouse) at 2:02 p.m. A White Male Adult pushing a baby stroller placed a suit into the stroller and walked out of the store. Justin Collins of Newark was detained behind the store by Officer Slater with the

merchandise in plain sight in the stroller. The merchandise was ultimately recovered along with items Collins admittedly stole from TJ Maxx. Men’s Warehouse refused to prosecute for the theft. All merchandise was returned to the stores and Collins was released from the scene. At 3:35 p.m., Officer Eriksen responded to an apartment at 37344 Elm Street regarding a residential burglary. The front door was forced open and the loss was gold jewelry. Officers responded to the area of 39800 Parada Street at 6:21 p.m. on a report of a robbery. The two below listed suspects approached the victim as she walked towards her residence. One suspect was armed with a small gray handgun. Loss was a purse and cell phone. The victim was not injured Suspect #1- black male, 504,120, black hooded sweatshirt/ jacket, black jeans (armed with handgun), and 16-17 years old Suspect #2- black male, 5-04, 120, black hat, black hooded sweatshirt/jacket, and black jeans, 16-17 years old Officer Jackman was detailed to the BJ’s restaurant parking lot at 9:06 p.m. on an auto burglary. Sometime between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., unknown suspect(s) broke the front window and stole two laptop computers. Officers responded to the Food Maxx 39966 Cedar Boulevard at 10:49 p.m. regarding a robbery. Two black males hit an employee in the head and stole a white IPhone 16 gig with a black case with Pittsburgh Steelers emblem on it. The victim declined medical treatment. The suspects fled in a grey Lexus or Infinity with tinted rear windows. The vehicle was driven by a female. Suspect #1- black male, black shirt, and blue jeans, age late teens Suspect #2- black male, black hooded sweatshirt/jacket, blue jeans, age late teens Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at (510) 578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 578-4000, extension 500.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Job Announcement: Executive Director LIFE ElderCare is a nonprofit organization located in Fremont and serves seniors who live in Fremont, Newark, and Union City, California. Its mission is to serve seniors by promoting healthy lifestyle choices, supporting daily well-being, and enabling independent living for as long as safely possible on behalf of at-risk individuals. Position: Executive Director. Reporting to the Board of Directors, the Executive Director has overall management of LIFE ElderCare’s operations, including four direct service programs, supervision of a staff of 11 and over 500 volunteers, execution and expansion of its mission, and strategic planning for its future. The Executive Director is responsible for managing the strategic direction of the organization that is compatible with the Board’s vision and for developing short and long-range operational plans. S/he is charged with securing sufficient resources to ensure the organization’s ongoing financial viability. S/he supports the work of the Board and its committees to establish strategic direction, desired service outcomes, and to identify potential partnerships and mutually beneficial relationships with other entities to further the organization’s mission. S/he is responsible outreach to the broad community, mar-

keting the organization’s services to potential clients and to prospective volunteers and donors. The complete job description can be found on the organizations website: www.lifeeldercare.org. Profile: The successful candidate for this position will have previous experience in the field of aging and social services, demonstrated leadership with an entrepreneurial spirit that can take the organization to the next level of excellence, experience in managing a dynamic organization who can lead the dedicated staff and volunteers in providing quality services to a vulnerable population, success in securing resources from diverse sources, high skill levels in oral and written communications. Qualifications: The candidate should have a Bachelor’s Degree, with a Master’s Degree preferred and a minimum of five years of senior management experience. Preference is given to applications from the immediate area. Please submit to lifeeldercare2012@gmail.com a covering letter, resume, completed application, and responses to the supplemental questions can be found on the website. Salary - to be negotiated based on qualifications and experience

Letter to the Editor

To the Fremont Community During the budget discussion at our School Board meeting on May 23, I got carried away with my remarks about how dysfunctional and broken our government is, and how many of our elected officials are lacking in integrity. While I still stand firm in my assertion that much of the problems we are having with the budget, policies, and their impact on education come from elected officials who act selfishly and greedily to make sure that they stay in the office or get promoted to higher office, I sincerely apologize for the way I expressed my thoughts. I want to especially apologize to my Board members who are working very hard to represent us at the state level. My retort to them was rude, unprofessional and inconsiderate. I also want to apologize to the Superintendent and staff, and all

viewers of the Board meeting, because they do not deserve to hear me ranting the way I did. I should have remembered to “be quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to become angry.” I do thank Board members and staff for their kind understanding and patience with me, and for gently reminding me that we are all working together in different capacities and at different levels for the good of our kids. There is hope for the good of our children’s future when we have people who are truly caring, willing and able to serve humbly and collaboratively. Ivy Wu Fremont Unified School District Board Trustee

SUBMITTED BY KATE DOCKINS Chipper for Parks is an educational and public awareness building initiative with a call to action for kids and their families to experience the outdoors. From playgrounds to state and national parks, families are invited to connect, celebrate, and conserve. Since its inception in 1872, The United States National Parks System has grown from a single, public reservation called Yellow Stone National Park to embrace over 450 natural, historical, recreational, and cultural areas throughout the United States. Parks are the living, breathing monuments to our nation’s history, culture, and landscape. The Park Rangers, charged with their protection, need community help as well, by way of visiting and volunteering and that’s where Let’s Go Chipper comes in. Junior Park Ranger programs are a great way to inspire our young people to care for the park systems by appreciating their beauty and fun. A great first step on Chipper’s path to the great outdoors is a playground experience, such as those supported by Let’s Go Chipper’s playground and park revitalizations and community- and classroom-based educational programs through the non-profit, Growing UP For Good. With volunteers, and as little as $500, a neighborhood playground can be re-opened, which in turn helps foster interpersonal relationships amongst kids while inspiring a more involved community. This kind of experience can inspire whole families to be conscientious explorers, leading to a state and national park hike or overnight camping trip, which connects families to the importance of conserving these facilities. With many state parks on the closure lists and national parks losing necessary revenue to operate historical landmarks and programs, the Chipper for Parks program aims to promote a new generation of park enthusiasts while increasing funds for the parks. “Chipper’s adventures not only playfully engage the learning process they excite action as children want to play, camp, explore, and help take care of each other and the environment,” says creator Stephanie Rach-Wilson. “How do you explain to a child that a park is closed?” The Chipper for Parks program empowers kids and families to make a difference by supporting their local playgrounds, state parks and national parks through involvement and the sale of Chipper for Parks embroidered badges (proceeds can be donated to their park of choice.) With each purchase of a Chipper For Parks badge, consumers receive a “Chipper Kit” filled with play-based ideas to help educate and connect in your schools and communities. Details can be found on the Chipper for Parks Facebook page. Chipper for Parks reminds families to take advantage of the “Fee Free Days” at National Parks around the country. Participating park waivers may include entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Fee Free Days for the remainder of 2012 are: June 9: Get Outdoors Day September 29: National Public Lands Day November 10-12: Veterans Day Weekend Visit http://letsgochipper.com to learn more.

Diabetes is a digestive disease SUBMITTED BY HARLEY SCHULTZ, MD Diabetes Educators of San Leandro is recognized by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) as a quality diabetes self-management education program. Sponsored by Harley S. Schultz MD and Vladimir A Titov, MD, PhD, a free diabetes support group is open to the community and meets on the first Monday of each month. At the meeting on June 4, 2012, Dr. Miles Adler, Consulting Gastroenterologist will discuss diabetes and digestion. For more information about Diabetes Educators of San Leandro, call (510) 351-1193 or email SchultzAndTitov@gmail.com Diabetes Support Group Monday, June 4 5 p.m. San Leandro Surgi-Center 15035 East 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 351-1193 SchultzAndTitov@gmail.com

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

History

Old Town Alvarado BY MYRLA RAYMUNDO

F

ormerly an old settlement dating back to l850, Alvarado was also known as New Haven and Union City. The population at the time was over 800. There were a number of substantial buildings, including the beet-sugar factory which had been in operation for many years. Alvarado was situated on the Southern Pacific Railroad line, l9 miles from Oakland. It was the first capital of Alameda County but later moved to San Leandro and then to Oakland. The first County Courthouse was located at the cor-

Typical house in Alvarado

The Old Bank

ner of Smith and Levee Streets. Alvarado was rich in salt lands and marshes, flowing artesian wells, expansive farmlands and sugar production. The area was very fertile, well adapted to the growth of all kinds of garden produce, fruit and sugar beets. Businesses of all types were well represented. The Alvarado Fire Department was founded in 1905; the Fire Station went through several building stages: engine bays were built in 1943, a front office followed in 1948 and sleeping quarters were completed in 1962. It was an All Volunteer Fire Department. Alvarado’s first postmaster was Henry Smith. It was likely that the first post office was located in his store, also the County Court house. The Post Office was later moved to a building on the corner of Smith Street and Union City Blvd. It has been in its present location on Smith Street for 40 years. When Union City was incorporated, the Decoto Post Office became the main Union City Post Office and the Alvarado Post Office became a branch. The old Alvarado Hotel or the “Alvarado Hilton”, as it was popularly known, is located on the corner of Union City Blvd. and Smith Street. Everybody, it

seems, came to the Alvarado Hotel at one time or another; senators, judges, farmers, truck drivers, policemen, executives, construction workers, doctors, mayors and transients, but mostly

Attorney Earl Warren closed “Little Tia Juana” and the town forged ahead rapidly. The leading merchant in Alvarado during those days was Mr. I.V. Ralph, with a well-stocked store of general merchandise on Levee Street. This was also the office of the Sunset Telephone; Mr. Ralph was the agent. He also owned a carpet and furniture store across the street, where he also carried a good stock of window shades, matting and upholstered goods, etc. Every afternoon, after school, a crowd of children headed for Matsumoto Grocery, the 80-yearold store in Old Alvarado to buy fistfuls of candy. Like Priego’s Market around the corner and Casada’s Market in the heart of Decoto, this store was one of the few “mom and pop” grocery stores that managed to survive suburban sprawl and the age of the supermarket. The store, managed by owner Ben Matsumoto, had become an institution in the tiny Alvarado neighborhood where it was once the community’s sole supplier of Oriental foods. Grace Handa, Ben Matsumoto’s sister, was the store manager working there since age 5. The Old Alvarado area is an historical district with older homes and buildings. Some of

Alvarado Hotel

men. Some just for coffee and others for all they could eat. Here also was the Oakland Water Company’s pumping plant. The artesian wells have been flowing for 40 years and the works had been pumping millions of gallons of water per day. By 1902, Alvarado had its first finance firm, the Alvarado Bank. Alvarado became a busy village and in the ‘20s became known as a rendezvous for “colorful parties.” Then in 1926, after a raid, District

Old Alvarado

the homes and buildings are still there, most now designated historical by the City of Union City. Editor's Note: Information and text for history columns in Tri-City Voice is contributed by area historians who may use documents and writings of others found in historical archives. Attribution to these sources will be noted when appropriate.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

New York Life receives community service award

Pictured left to right are: Alinya Charron, program director, Circle of Care, East Bay Agency for Children; Agent Paul Andrus and Corporate Vice President Jeff Polunas (holding the award) from New York Life’s Greater San Francisco General Office; East Bay Agency for Children’s Kristin Wagner, director of school & community service; and Executive Director Steve Eckert.

New York Life’s Greater San Francisco General Office received the Alameda County Mental Health Board Award for Community Service in the business category. The East Bay Agency for Children in Oakland, a nonprofit that provides low-income students with emotional and behavioral difficulties with vital mental health and specialized educational services is a grantee of New York Life’s Foundation and nominated New York Life. The award is given to mental health service consumers, family members, volunteers, professionals, businesses, media and other groups who have made an extraordinary difference in the lives of individuals whose lives are affected by mental illness.

Anand completes Eagle Scout project

Aneel Anand in white t-shirt, center Aneel was assisted by Public Works employees William Bontadelli (back row, second from left) and Craig Cutting (back row, left side).

SUBMITTED BY NELSON KIRK On April 14 and 15 2012 at Casa Verde Park, Aneel Raj Anand from Boy Scouts of America Troop 20 completed his Eagle Scout Project. Aneel and his crew of volunteers and supportive parents planted over 60 flowering trees, 140 flowering shrubs, installed a park bench, BBQ and spread over 60 cubic yards of mulch. Aneel's hard work will be enjoyed by park visitors and local residents for many years to come. Aneel was assisted by Public Works employees William Bontadelli and Craig Cutting. Eagle Scout is the highest attainable rank in Boy Scouting and requires years of dedication and hard work. Scouts must demonstrate through personal skills, leadership and commitment to their community, exceptional aptitude, motivation and perseverance and must earn 21 merit badges and complete a leadership project before achieving the Eagle rank. Less than five percent of Boy Scouts become Eagle Scouts. For over a century, Scouting has offered unique opportunities to young men for spiritual, mental and physical growth. Generations of scouts have been beneficiaries of the camaraderie and skills associated with prescribed levels of achievement. At the pinnacle of Boy Scout accomplishments is the rank of Eagle Scout. This is the highest rank in Scouting, and is a lifelong title, so, "Once an Eagle, always an Eagle.”

Leadership Academy SUBMITTED BY CITY OF HAYWARD The 2012 Community Leadership Training Workshop on June 9, 2012 is for everyone who cares about their community. The theme is Looking Out for One Another: Building Caring Communities. Participants attending this free workshop will gain access to new community-building ideas, tools and resources; leave better-prepared to survive a local disaster and its aftermath; be able to implement neighborhood crime-prevention strategies; and network with other community stakeholders. The event organizers are also accepting donations of canned food on behalf of the Alameda County Food Bank. Attendees can enjoy a free lunch and great door prizes. Students will receive community service hours for participation. Free parking is available on the second and third floors of the parking structure at B Street and Watkins Street (opposite Hayward City Hall). RSVP is required. Pre-registrants will receive a special offer on arrival. Contact Neighborhood Services Manager David Korth at (510) 583-4227 or email David.Korth@hayward-ca.gov Hayward Neighborhood Leadership Academy Saturday, June 9 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Looking Out for One Another: Building Caring Communities 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 583-4227 David.Korth@hayward-ca.gov

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

East Bay unemployment lowest in three years SUBMITTED BY SCOTT PETERSON

Payout rates include return of premium, interest and mortality credits. Rates are effective 02/06/12 Guarantees are subject to contact terms, exclusions and limitations, and the claims paying ability of (NYLIAC). This contract has no cash value and no withdrawals are permitted prior to the income start date. Income payments are guaranteed at least as long as the annuitant is living, providing the annuitant is alive on hte designated income start date. The Life Only payout option does not provide for payments to beneficiaries either prior to or after the designated income start date. 1. Based on a male annuitant, $100,000 premium and Life Only payout option, Rates are subject to change and payout will vary with age, gender, payout option selected and premium amount. Actual amounts are dependent upon interest rates in effect at time of policy issue. Income is payable for the life of the annuitant only. Certain limitations may apply to payout options, including age restrictions. NYLIAC S&P - AA+, Fitch - AAA, Moody's - Aaa, AM Best - A++ as of 08.08.2011. *Issued by New York Life Insurance & Annuity Corporation (NYLIAC) (a Delaware Corporation), a wholly owned subsidiary of New York Life Insurance Company. Available in jurisdictions where approved.

A report released May 24 by the East Bay Economic Development Alliance (East Bay EDA) shows economic recovery in the region is putting people back to work and improving the quality of life for many East Bay residents. According to the report, unemployment reached 9.3% in January 2012 – its lowest point since February 2009. Since July 20011, almost 27,000 residents of the East Bay found jobs, while employers are continuing to supply new jobs locally. Industries fundamental to the long-term strength of the East Bay, like health care and professional, scientific, and technical services are growing by some of the largest margins. “We are encouraged to see the increase in jobs and spending and hold hope that this continues,” said Keith Carson, Alameda County Supervisor and East Bay EDA Board Chair. A flood of investment capital, particularly in clean-tech and industrial energy, is helping the East Bay cement its niche in these sectors. Companies in the region received over $2.5 billion in venture capital funding over the last two years. Nearly $1 billion of this investment went to industrial energy alone, as the region furthers its reputation as the center of the country's clean-tech industry. More traditional “tech” sectors received solid funding as well. Software, biotechnology, and semiconductors together received over $1 billion in funding since 2010. The economic analysis was prepared for East Bay EDA by Beacon Economics. Dr. Christopher Thornberg, one of California’s leading economic forecasters, will present the findings at a special event Thursday, May 24 from 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. at the California Center in Pleasanton. Bank of America is the title sponsor of the East Bay Economic Outlook 2012 event which is hosted by Hacienda Business Park and the City of Pleasanton. Signature sponsors of the event include the East Bay Community Foundation and the University of Phoenix Bay Area Campus. “Strong year-over-year growth in bellwether sectors like retail trade shows that the short-run gains in the labor market are not aberrations like some had feared, but rather part of a long-term trend in the East Bay,” said Dr. Chris Thornberg, founding principal of Beacon Economics. The full report is available at: http://www.eastbayeda.org/research_facts_figures/newsletters/q uarterly/20122/EDA_Outlook2012_web.pdf The report examines many reasons to be optimistic in the East Bay as the economy continues to see post-recession growth. East Bay residents are clearly benefitting from the broader economic recovery.

May 29, 2012

Slow economy prompts wave of liberal books BY HILLEL ITALIE AP NATIONAL WRITER NEW YORK (AP), With a Democrat in the White House, a wave of books is coming out this year lamenting the slow economy and calling for substantial change. And those books are by liberals. “It's the story of the moment right now,” says Patricia Bostelman, vice president of marketing for Barnes & Noble Inc. “We have a real disparity-of-wealth issue and that tends to be a subject for books from the left, especially after Occupy Wall Street.” Call it the Occupy Bookstores movement. At least 20 current and upcoming works reflect the left's varied reactions – fatalism, disappointment, anger – to the Obama administration's handling of the economy and ongoing concerns about corporate power (too high) and government spending and investment (too low). “I published a bunch of liberal books during the (George W.) Bush administration and the theme was basically, ‘I hate Bush,’” says Chris Jackson, executive editor of Spiegel & Grau, a Random House Inc. imprint. “This time, we're dealing with the limitations of what a president can do and systematic things like the influence of the financial industry and the relationship between the 1 percent and the 99 percent.” Timothy Noah's “The Great Divergence” and Joseph Stiglitz's “The Price of Inequality” are among several new books that focus on the growing gap between rich and poor. Prescriptions for the economy are featured in a pair of best-sellers: Paul Krugman's “End This Depression Now!” and former Obama adviser Van Jones’ “Rebuild the Dream.” Some books are campaign oriented, like James Carville's “It's the Middle Class, Stupid,” while others offer information, inspiration and guidance for activists. “Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt,” co-authored by Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco and published by Nation Books, provides close accounts of some of the country's most devastated communities, “sacrifice zones.” It ends with a detailed history of the Occupy protests and a declaration that “the mighty can fall.” “Nation Books has always issued books on inequality and class, but sometimes historic events enable some books to get a greater hearing than others,” says Carl Bromley, Nation Books' editorial director. “It's like what happened during the first half of the last decade. All kinds of books about the Middle East were getting published so the public could better understand what was happening in the news.” “I think a goal for some of the books is to shape the debate and the presidential campaign,” says Drake McFeely, president of W.W. Norton & Company, which publishes Krugman and Stiglitz, both Nobel Prize-winning economists. “I think the feeling for some writers is that it would be nice if these books gave Obama the room to move more to the left than he has.” Many books were inspired directly by the protests: Noam Chomsky's “Occupy” was among a series of pamphlets released by Zuccotti Park Press, named for the downtown Manhattan park where the Occupy protests emerged. “Occupying Wall Street” was published by Chicago-based Haymarket Books and credited to several authors collectively identified as “Writers for the 99 Percent.” Other releases include “The Occupy Handbook,” with contributions from Krugman, Michael Lewis, Barbara Ehrenreich and others, and Richard Wolff's “Occupy the Economy,” issued this month by the publishing arm of San Francisco's City Lights Bookstore. “We've really seen an upsurge for these kinds of books over the past,” says Paul Yamazaki, a buyer for City Lights. “And some of the older books have taken on a new life, like Saul Alinsky's ‘Rules for Radicals.’” One longtime activist and founding Occupy organizer, David Graeber, already has written a word-of-mouth hit and has a deal with Spiegel & Grau for a book about the Occupy movement and the democratic process. Graeber, credited with coining the Occupy phrase “We are the 99 percent,” last year released “Debt: the First Five Thousand Years” through the independent Melville House Publishing. The book was widely discussed and, according to Melville House publisher Dennis Johnson, has sold around 60,000 copies. Chris Jackson of Spiegel & Grau was among those who read it. “What I loved about his book was that it wasn't just a polemic. It was also this rich history and it taught me things that I didn't know,” Jackson says. “So I already was a fan of his when the proposal for his new book came our way. It was originally going to be just about Occupy, but has evolved into a broader book. We're going into an election where people are pessimistic about the political process and the inability of the government to respond. Occupy was a movement that galvanized some widely held ideas and made them visible. So he's writing about how we can change our society, not just economically, but politically.”

Clinton, military leaders plead for sea treaty BY DONNA CASSATA ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and military leaders implored conservative Republicans on Wednesday to approve a long-spurned high seas treaty, saying it would create jobs, open a new path to oil, gas and other resources and bolster national security. continued on page 33


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Fremont Is Our Business FUDENNA BROS., INC. Leader in Small To Medium Size Office Space

FEATURED OFFICES Available Now SKS BUILDING

EXECUTIVE I

39833 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Suite G, Fremont 94538 (Across from Lake Elizabeth)

2450 Peralta Blvd., Suite 121, Fremont 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.)

• 120 square feet • 1 room office • 2nd Floor

• 321 square feet • 1 room office • 1st Floor

PARKWAY TOWERS

BLACOW OFFICE CENTER

3909 Stevenson Blvd., Suite C1, Fremont 94538 (Stevenson x Fremont Blvd.)

38950 Blacow Road, Fremont 94536 (Mowry Ave. x Blacow)

• 394 square feet • Hardwood flooring • Large store-front windows

• 360 square feet • 2 room office • Close to highway 880

PARKWAY PROFESSIONAL

EXECUTIVE II

40000 Fremont Blvd., Suite F Fremont, CA 94538 (Stevenson x Fremont Blvd.)

2140 Peralta Blvd., Suite 105 Fremont, CA 94536 (Paseo Padre Pkwy. x Peralta Blvd.)

• 668 square feet • 3 room office • Ideal for physical therapy practice

Phone: 510-657-6200

• 310 square feet • 1 room office • Perfect for start-ups

www.fudenna.com


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

BY PAT KITE

I

am never quite certain what will pop up in my garden. For example, I like going to garage sales. Next to one old home was a vacant lot with a dried up parking strip. But in that strip were poppy pods, and a few tall bright orange poppies. My garage sale friend dashed into the sale, but I stopped and started scrounging pods. Two pockets bulging-full. Happy. Early spring I sprinkled the seeds hither and yon. I have always had problems growing poppies, but there is wishful thinking. Gardeners live on hope. This week I saw, in the one dry hot sunny corner of my yard, some poppy seedlings. This was so exciting! Some people climb the Matterhorn; I was growing

poppies, although what kind I don’t know. A souvenir of a small plant adventure. Another time I joined our senior group for an outing. Next to the historic building was a hillside of unkempt weeds. But among the flotsam and jetsam I recognized masses of pink Monarda, [also called bee Balm and Horsemint]. For years I avoided Monarda because it tends to spread, and I don’t have that much garden room. But who can resist free seeds? So I clambered up the hillside and filled my purse with seeds. Inside the historic home, saner persons were savoring a homemade cookie and bracing green tea. I enjoyed dirt-covered shoes and weed-attached slacks. But I waited until spring, then sowed front and back yard. Has one sin-

SUBMITTED BY STACEY HILTON, SENIOR HELPERS The federal government recently launched a National Alzheimer’s Plan to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. Part of that plan is to find ways for struggling families to better cope with the disease, today. A new program is called Senior Gems is a step-by-step guide that teaches hands-on care providers and families how to care for loved ones through each stage of dementia and Alzheimer’s. “I'm thrilled with our government's new commitment to confront Alzheimers because it is taking a devastating toll on families across America," says Teepa Snow. "I certainly hope the researchers, with the new governmental support, will find a cure by 2025. But until and unless that happens, we can't just wait. Millions of people are living with various forms of dementia, not just Alzheimers. We are taking action by training Senior Helpers caregivers and family members in communities across the nation, how to better care for and communicate with our loved ones who are doing the best they can while living with a progressive condition that is robbing them of themselves.” Quick Do's and Don'ts of working with people who have Dementia: • Offer Supportive NOT Confrontational Communication • Emphasize what you want to have happen, NOT who’s the boss or who’s right

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details

PAT KITE

Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

gle Monarda shown up? There is always hope for even one souvenir sprig. In France, there were bright scarlet old-fashioned Hollyhocks, up a rather steep hillside adjacent to an old church. I escaped from my tour group, and sort of hiked – slipped up the hillside. I just love Hollyhocks. Cautiously I pilfered a few pods, then sat down and slipped down the hillside. I had a nice weed-covered derriere

and three pods. I am still waiting, but one never knows what will come up in a garden. “Do you want these?” a friend asks, toting over five containers of Cymbidium orchids. They have yet to bloom, but I’ve moved them several times, sprinkled with fertilizer and think how pretty they will be if they ever do bloom. At more than one estate sale, last few closing hours, I’ve asked the cost of dusty pots with

L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com. whatever is trying to grow. The vendor often charges me a dime, or just hands me a cracked pot or two of cactus, a half-demised container of geraniums, “We’re just going to throw them out.” Who could allow that? Perhaps somebody loved them. The cactus bloom, they are survivors. Like the geraniums. And every time I look at my little plant adventures, I think they are like my life. A little bit this, a little bit that, in a garden.

• Recognize the value of mistakes or ‘UH OHs’ - and turn them into new strategies and ‘AH HAs!’ • Provide short, simple information rather than asking questions you do NOT want to hear the answer to • Offer concrete and clear options or choices rather than wide open requests that require both word-finding and decision-making to answer Most seniors with Alzheimer’s can perform a task once they get started, but they may have trouble initiating or switching tasks. Their abilities fluctuate from day to day, day to night, person to person, and minute to minute. This makes it hard to exactly predict what they will or will not be able to do. It means caregivers need to be flexible and supportive rather than pointing out the errors and getting frustrated with the changing abilities. Memory failure: If an Alzheimer’s patient forgets about a doctor’s appointment, don’t say “How could you forget? I told you three times!” This is frustrating for the senior to hear and puts them on the defensive. Remember, caregiving is not about being right. Do say “I am sorry we didn’t get things worked out ahead of time for that appointment… (pause)… I thought I had said something about it, but I may not have. I will have to try to do a better job of making sure that happens, next time.” This helps break the communication barrier and helps the senior feel that you are on his/her side.

Alzheimer’s patients can’t remember new information but old memories are still intact. This is brain failure. Don’t tell your mother with Alzheimer’s to meet you at Macy’s at the mall if it has moved to a new location. She will go to where Macy’s used to be – to what is now JC Penny’s - because she can’t remember the new information that Macy’s has moved. She may even drive around for hours trying to find Macy’s in the old location. Do take your mother to the mall or hire a caregiver to take her. If you bring her there, she can’t get lost. Show and Tell: When you’re caring for a senior with dementia, it’s important to show them how to perform everyday tasks instead of telling them how to do something. It’s called show-and-tell. Don’t pull your dad with Alzheimer’s out of his seat and start leading him to the restroom. To him, that’s forceful. Do, instead, show him with your hands and verbally tell him to stand up. Then, place his hand in yours and walk along side of him (not in front of him). This shows him that you’re guiding him with acceptance, and not forcing him to do something. Don’t put a glass of juice in front of your dad’s mouth because he’ll become defensive, thinking you’re trying to force juice down his mouth. Do take that glass of juice, while at his

side (not in front of him), and with your hand in his, bring it to his mouth. He will more likely welcome that gesture and not think you’re “coming at him.” “In any situation, it’s best to use empathy and validation rather than a reality check or lies. And it’s vital that we act now because our families are suffering,” says Snow. “They don’t understand the disease - and there’s no one to teach them. That’s why we started this program; to give families answers and show them, in practical terms, how to improve the quality of life for Alzheimer’s patients and themselves, through better communication.” The primary goal is to not ASSIGN BLAME and to recognize the person is having difficulty holding onto details and information SO we are going to have to change how we go about setting things up and expecting follow through. Try to see it as a ‘learning moment’ not a frustrating problem. The trick is that person may very well remember the next appointment without a problem – the memory loss comes and goes in the early phases so you can’t depend on it either way. Learn how to PLAN for the worst and celebrate the best when it happens! Arguing with someone who is having trouble holding onto new information although they are fine with old information is not helpful. Keeping communication open and friendly is critical as you are trying to figure out how to help in ways that are acceptable and effective.

INTERVIEW BY ELIZABETH SCHAINBAUM, KAISER PERMANENTE

Kaiser Permanente had a Q&A with with Dr. Nguyen to gain a better understanding on allergies, which affect one in five Americans and account for 17 million outpatient visits a year, according to the Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America. What are allergies and why do some people get them? The body is overreacting to a harmless substance such as dust, pollen, plants, medications, or foods. Some people are born with a predisposition, and it can trigger at any time. Allergies symptoms include a runny nose, a rash, or something more life-threatening, such as a drop in blood pressure or an inability to breathe. Is there an allergy season? It depends on the area and what type of allergies you have. In Northern California, January to July is the season for people who are allergic to grass and trees such as junipers and ciders. In August and September, it’s weeds. Dust mites can be a problem yearround, but tend to be worse from October through December. Can you outgrow allergies? I wouldn’t use the word outgrow, but I think you can be in remission for whatever reason. It often happens if someone moves locations. But it can also happen if you are not stressed, eat healthy, and exercise. All those factors can help with allergies and explain why some years are worse than others. You’ve been treating allergies for 26 years, do you see any trends? More people are allergic. And it’s more of every kind of allergic reactions: hay fever,

skin such as hives or eczema, asthma. We don’t really understand why, but we think it may be because of global warming. When we have a warmer, drier climate, the grass and trees live longer, and there’s a higher pollen count because there’s no rain to wash it away. What are three good tips to alleviate allergy symptoms? Check out pollen.com to find out the pollen levels in your area. You can also use the site to look up four-day allergy forecasts for your zip code, and sign up to get email alerts. The more information you have, the better prepared you'll be to manage your symptoms. Another tip is to keep doors and windows closed and use the air conditioner. Be sure to set the AC to recirculate, and if it’s not hot outside, you can keep it in filter-only mode. Using a car air conditioner can reduce the amount of pollen you breathe in by as much as 30 percent. Room air purifiers and filters are an extremely effective way to remove pollen, animal dander, dust, and other allergens from indoor air. But doors and windows in the room where you're using one must be closed for it to be effective. What do you recommend to allergy sufferers who love the outdoors? If you love an outdoor workout, avoid the morning or early afternoon. Grasses and trees start releasing pollen at sunrise, with levels peaking in the late morning and early afternoon. I always suggest people run after work in the late afternoon or evening. I’d also recommend taking medication regularly and doing a nasal rinse during pollen season.

Allergy season depends on where you live and if you are allergic to grass, trees, weeds, or dust mites, according to Myngoc Nguyen, MD, chief of Allergy for Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center. If you are allergic to all of these things—and more and more people are—and if you come into contact with what you are allergic to, then your symptoms can last year-round.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

Letter to the Editor

Response to TCV criticism I just read the letter from Douglas Eads, Fremont, RE your problem with BANG [Bay Area News Group] and your goal to be a recognized newspaper. BANG realizes, I am sure, that you are by far the BEST local newspaper in the area. David and Goliath; you are David and BANG is Goliath. I helped get petitions signed to present to the higher authorities. Everyone I talked to was shocked that BANG wants to destroy TCV. Their comment is – without the TCV there is NO local news. I would like you to find any organization that does not want to make money. Money = survival. Money = paying reporters to get the news and not relying on a huge network like BANG. You do not make money without advertising. Your advertisers

are great. They want the word sent out about their local business via a local newspaper. They would not continue to advertise unless it works for them. And it does! Locally BANG has the San Jose Mercury and Argus plus others. Look at the front pages one day and tell me that they are local papers. Their front pages are identical. I know quite a bit about newspapers. My family was in the newspaper business for three generations. They finally were gobbled up by another Goliath and it has not been the same. We need the TCV and why shouldn’t they make a profit. AND YOU DO NOT NEED TO APOLOGIZE to Mr. Eads. Bill Leake Fremont

Life Elder Care

Death of a Salesman Tony Award-Winning Drama by Arthur Miller

May 18 – June 16 WRITTEN BY: SANDRA HALLGREN Want to get smarter? Go for a walk or a swim. For more than a decade scientists have studied the beneficial relationship between exercise and brainpower and have discovered that exercise appears to build a brain that resists physical shrinkage and enjoys enhanced cognitive flexibility. Exercise, it seems, does more to bolster thinking than thinking does. It has long been known that “enriched” environments — filled with toys and engaging, novel tasks — lead to improvements in the brainpower of lab animals. In most instances this includes a running wheel, because mice and rats generally enjoy running. Until recently, there was little research done on the effects of running versus engaging the mind in ways that don’t increase the heart rate. So, last year a team of researchers set four groups of mice into four distinct living arrangements. All the animals completed a series of cognitive tests at the start of the study and were injected with a substance to track changes in their brain structures. Then they ran, played or just lolled about in their cages for several months. Afterward, the mice were put through the same cognitive tests and had their brain tissue examined. It turned out that the toys and play, no matter how stimulating, had not improved the animals’ brains. Only one thing made a difference... a running wheel. Animals that exercised, whether or not they had any other enrichments in their cages, had healthier brains and performed significantly better on cognitive tests. Exercise seems to slow or reverse the brain’s physical decline, much as it does with muscles. Mice and rats that ran for a few weeks generally had about twice as many new neurons in their hippocampi as sedentary animals. Their brains, like other muscles, were bulking up. Exercise also seemed to make their neurons nimble. Whatever the activity, research shows that exercise needn’t be exhausting to be effective for the brain. When a group of 120 older men and women were assigned to walking for a study, they wound up with larger hippocampi after a year and performed better on cognitive tests. So the message is clear: to get smarter… get moving! If you’re a senior in the Tri-City area of Fremont, Newark and Union City and are interested in improving your balance and preventing falls, call Sandy at LIFE ElderCare 574-2087 to enroll in the free Fall Prevention program. P.S. LIFE ElderCare's in-home exercise program is offered at no cost to home-bound seniors age 60 and older. In addition, you'll receive a free home safety assessment, minor home modifications and a comprehensive medication review. These combined measures may help decrease your possibility of a bad fall. If you are concerned about falling, doing fall prevention exercises can make all the difference!

County Public Works receives prestigious national accreditation SUBMITTED BY LESLIE ROBERTSON The American Public Works Association (APWA) formally bestowed accreditation upon the Alameda County Public Works Agency (ACPWA) at the May 22, 2012 Alameda County Board of Supervisors meeting. Past APWA President, Dwayne Kalynchuk of Victoria, British Columbia presented the accreditation placque to ACPWA Director, Daniel Woldesenbet, Ph.D., P.E. The Alameda County Public Works Agency is only the third public works jurisdiction in the state of California, and one of a few in the nation, to receive APWA accreditation. The accreditation process spanned a two year time-frame, culminating with an APWA audit in March 2012. Supervisor Nate Miley, President of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Supervisor Scott Haggerty, Supervisor Keith Carson, Supervisor Wilma Chan, County Administrator Susan Muranishi, various county department heads and the public were on hand to witness the presentation. For more information about Alameda County Public Works, please refer to our website: acpwa.org.

8 pm Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays 1 pm Sundays, May 27**, June 3**, & 10 $23 General Admission $18 Srs/Students/TBA* $15 - Thursdays, All Seats $10 Bargain Thursday, May 31 *All seats $23 on Brunch Sundays and Opening Night ** Sunday Continental Brunch at 12:15 Price of admission includes refreshments, Opening Night Champagne Gala and Sunday Continental Brunches Willy Loman is a failing salesman, who cannot understand how he failed to win success and happiness. In his last days, he experiences a series of tragic, soul-searching revelations of the life he lived with his wife, sons and business associates. We discover how his quest for the “American Dream” kept him blind to the people who truly loved him. This play is a deep and revealing story that remains one of the most profound classic dramas of the American theatre.

Reservations: 510-683-9218

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay Street, Fremont www.broadwaywest.org


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

June 2012 graduation ceremonies COMPILED BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Summer is fast approaching and students are preparing for high school and college graduations. The following is a listing of local high school/college graduation ceremonies in the greater Tri-City area:

FREMONT: American High School Friday, June 15 3:30 p.m. Tak Fudenna Stadium 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont California School for the Deaf Friday, June 8 3 p.m. Large Gym 39350 Gallaudet Drive, Fremont Circle of Independent Learning Charter School Friday, June 8 7 p.m. Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Avenue, Fremont Fremont Christian School Saturday, June 2 10 a.m. Sanctuary 4760 Thornton Avenue, Fremont Irvington High School Friday, June 15 10 a.m. Tak Fudenna Stadium 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Kennedy High School Thursday, June 14 3:30 p.m. Tak Fudenna Stadium 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

Mission San Jose High School Thursday, June 14 7:30 p.m. Tak Fudenna Stadium 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

Tennyson High School Thursday, June 7 5:30 p.m. School football field 27035 Whitman Street, Hayward

Robertson High School/Vista Wednesday, June 13 5 p.m. At school site 4455 Seneca Park, Fremont

Mt. Eden High School Wednesday, June 6 6:30 p.m. Cal State Univ. East Bay 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward

Washington High School Friday, June 15 7:30 p.m. Tak Fudenna Stadium 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Fremont Adult School/Continuing Ed. Tuesday, June 5 (GED) 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 (ESL) 9:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 7 (H.S.) 7 p.m. Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Avenue, Fremont

HAYWARD: Conley-Carabello High School Monday, June 11 6 p.m. Ceremony at school site 541 Blanche Street, Hayward Hayward High School Thursday, June 7 6 p.m. Cal State Univ. East Bay, Stadium 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY EAST BAY (CSUEB): HAYWARD CAMPUS: College of Science Friday, June 15 6 p.m. CSUEB Campus, University Stadium 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) Saturday, June 16 10 a.m. (Procession begins at 9:30 a.m.) CSUEB Campus, University Stadium 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward College of Business and Economics (CBE) Saturday, June 16 4 p.m. (Procession begins at 3:30 p.m.) CSUEB Campus, University Stadium 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward College of Education and Allied Studies (CEAS) Sunday, June 17 3 p.m. (Procession begins at 2:30 p.m.) CSUEB Campus, University Stadium 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward

CSUEB CONCORD CAMPUS: Concord Campus Commencement Sunday, June 17 9 a.m. Boatwright Youth Sports Complex 800 Alberta Way at Campus Drive, Concord

MILPITAS: Milpitas High School Saturday, June 16 9:30 a.m. School football field 1285 Escuela Parkway, Milpitas Calaveras Hills High School Friday, June 15 6 p.m. Milpitas High School’s football field 1285 Escuela Parkway, Milpitas

NEWARK: Newark Memorial High School Saturday, June 9 9 a.m. NMHS Cougar Stadium 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark

UNION CITY: James Logan High School Saturday, June 9 9 a.m. Logan Stadium 1800 H Street, Union City Union City Christian Academy Wednesday, June 13 7:30 p.m. At school site 33700 Alvarado-Niles Blvd., Union City

South Bay Salt Pond Restoration SUBMITTED BY BARBARA WILCOX Laura Valoppi, chief scientist for the U.S. Geological Survey’s South Bay Salt

Pond Restoration Project, will speak about how the ponds in Hayward/Union City, Milpitas and South San Jose are being restored for wildlife and recreation.

South Bay Salt Pond Lecture Thursday, May 31 7 p.m. U.S. Geological Survey

345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park (650) 329-5000 www.usgs.gov Admission is free.


May 29, 2012

Page 17

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER The Sun Gallery is proud to host “Face 2 Face,” an exhibition celebrating and exploring Portraiture across all disciplines. Portrait painting is a genre in painting where the intent is to depict the visual appearance of the subject. Beside human beings, animals, pets and even inanimate objects can be chosen as the subject for a portrait. In addition to portrait painting, portraits can also be made in other media such as etching, lithography, photography, and even video and digital media.

Dickson Schneider, and Alex Milarodovich. In addition to the exhibiting professional artists we are proud to be showing the work of Mt. Eden High School students, organized by instructor Carrie King. Please join us for the Artists’ Reception on June 23 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. or drop by and visit while the exhibi-

“Jessica” by Christian Sioson

Historically, portrait paintings have primarily memorialized the rich and powerful. Over time, however, it has become more common for middle-class patrons to commission portraits of their families and colleagues. Today, portrait painting is still commissioned by governments, corporations, groups, clubs, and individuals.

tion is on display. The Sun Gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., and we look forward to seeing you here.

“Beauty and the Beast” by Fleur Spolidor

The Sun Gallery is excited to showcase art in all media that celebrates this tradition. Alongside traditional oil painting, watercolors and ceramics, we have some fantastic photographs, both formal and casual, capturing the spirit of the individual depicted. Artists included in the exhibition are: Fleur Spolidor, Susan Sperry, Anne Kohler, Marjorie Wagner, Farshid Namei, Debbie Parkes, Jane Neilson, Chris Triplett, Grace Rankin, Wanda Worthington Kersey, Carol Smith Myer, Patra Nesseth-Steffes, David Nesseth-Steffes, Loretta Siegel, Joanie Miller, Lynn McGeever,

Face 2 Face: A Contemporary Portrait Exhibition May 30 – June 30 Wed – Sat: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Reception for the Artists Saturday, June 23 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org Free

Fremont Bank customers can deliver a “win-win” through the B-CharitableSM checking account… nonprofit organizations win by receiving additional funding and customers win by supporting their favorite charity. To be part of the charitable buzz come to a local Fremont Bank office, call (800) 359-2265 or visit www.fremontbank.com/bcharitable. See how easy it is to B-CharitableSM If you think one person can make a difference Imagine what an entire community can do


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

Make the Appointment Today, Don’t Let Excuses Get in the Way

W

hen it comes to men’s health, make sure to take a look at all of your risk the overall number of deaths from carthere are a lot of issues to keep factors, including ones that are on the rise. diovascular disease.” track of. The good news is that “We still have a long way to go before Sometimes, according to Dr. Curran, your primary care physician can help. eliminating heart disease,” he says. “Even to improve overall health, the best preDr. Steven A. Curran, scription is not a pill at all. a board-certified family “We know without a doubt medicine physician with that obesity is a factor in diabetes, Washington Township and therefore heart disease,” he says. Medical Foundation who “Even some types of cancer have practices at Warm Springs been strongly linked with obesity. It Clinic, says the first step to is clear that diet, exercise and weight better health is a simple loss could help prevent more disease one: go to the doctor. than any medication!” “Call it a guy thing, but In fact, people diagnosed with we all know men are less pre-diabetes—those on the path to likely to visit the doctor for diabetes whose blood sugar levels worrisome symptoms, and haven’t crossed the threshold into are more likely to put off full-blown diabetes yet—can reduce routine check-ups,” he says. their risk of developing type 2 diaThis puts men at a disbetes by losing just 5 percent to 7 advantage, he points out, percent of their body weight and exparticularly because they ercising regularly, according to a often are not seeing the 2002 clinical study by the National doctor for annual exams or Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Dr. Steven A. Curran, a board-certified family medicine screenings. The question is: and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). physician with Washington Township Medical Foundation what does a routine doctor’s An advantage of going to the doc- advises men to take care of themselves and have regular office visit offer? Well, first tor regularly for routine check-ups, ac- check-ups. off, it’s a chance to talk to cording to Dr. Curran, is that you’re care of yourself.’ Sure, family responsibilithe doctor about your fammuch more likely to catch risk factors for ties, career, and all that is important, but if ily history and make sure diseases like diabetes and heart disease beyou don’t take care of yourself, it doesn’t that you’re getting screened fore they progress to the point where you really matter.” for preventable and treatneed medication to manage them. For men who haven’t been to see the able conditions. The biggest challenge for men when doctor in a while, Dr. Curran advises mak“In addition to routine it comes to better health, Dr. Curran ing an appointment to see where you stand screens for diabetes, heart says, can be their own reluctance to and go from there. disease, and a review of immake time for it. Warm Springs Clinic is located at munizations, men should “Men are very good at ignoring early 46690 Mohave Drive in Fremont. To usually consider colon canwarning symptoms. They say, ‘It’s not make an appointment, call (510) 248Diet, exercise and weight loss can help prevent many diseases. But staying chest pain, its just indigestion,’” he says. cer and prostate cancer 1065. Hours are Monday through Friday 8 healthy includes making time for regular check-ups, something that many “Men are fabulous at excuses. They’ll screens around age 50, or a.m. to 6 p.m., and walk-ins are accepted. men are reluctant to do. For men who haven’t been to see the doctor in a even sooner if a family his- while, Dr. Curran advises making an appointment to see where you stand say, ‘I’m just too busy to go to the docYour health care, your way tory of these diseases is pres- and go from there. tor,’ or ‘I don’t really need anyone’s For more information about Washingent,” Dr. Curran explains. help; I’ll just tough it out!” ton Township Medical Foundation and its When it comes to the No. 1 killer in though we are making progress, especially Dr. Curran’s answer? more than 60 board-certified physicians the United States—heart disease—Dr. in the treatment of hypertension and high “It sounds kind of silly but the most with expertise in a broad range of medical Curran says there is still a lot of work to be cholesterol, trends like increasing obesity important message I give to men somespecialties—from neurosurgery to pedidone, and he adds that it’s a good idea to and diabetes threaten to reverse progress in times is: ‘You have my permission to take atrics—visit www.mywtmf.com.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Prevention and Treatment Options for Brittle Bones “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never harm me.”

D

espite that familiar childhood chant, there actually is a word that threatens broken bones: osteoporosis. Derived from the Greek words for bone (osteon) and passage (poros), osteoporosis is a disease in which the bones become progressively more porous and brittle and more likely to break. “In younger people, the body makes more bone than it breaks down,” says Dr. Ranjana Sharma, a family medicine specialist with the Washington Township Medical Foundation. “As we age, there is less bone formation and bone breaks down more rapidly. Development of osteoporosis, which is defined as very low bone mass, is a process that takes many years, including a stage called osteopenia, in which the bone density is lower than normal but not as severe as osteoporosis.” According to the National Institutes of Health, there are approximately 1.5 million bone fractures in the U.S. each year due to osteoporosis, primarily of the hip or vertebrae in the spine. Other common osteoporosis-related fractures occur in the wrists and forearm. Complications from such fractures can cause significant health problems. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) reports that 24 percent of hip-fracture patients over age 50 die in the year following the fracture. “Osteoporosis is a ‘silent’ problem,” Dr. Sharma explains. “It has no early symptoms and people often aren’t aware they have osteoporosis until they suffer a fragility fracture. That’s why it is important for people to learn more about osteoporosis and take steps to decrease their risk factors.” Osteoporosis is more common in older women who are postmenopausal and in men over age 70, but it also can affect younger men and women. Dr. Sharma notes that in addition to advancing age there are other risk factors that can’t be

Dr. Ranjana Sharma, a family medicine specialist with the Washington Township Medical Foundation, says Osteoporosis is a ‘silent’ disease with no early warning symptoms.That is why it is important for people to learn about the disease and how to prevent it.

changed, such as: * A history of previous bone fractures. * A family history of osteoporosis. * Northern European ancestry. * Existence of certain medical conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, hypothyroidism and Lupus. “The good news is that there are numerous things we can do to reduce risk factors for osteoporosis,” Dr. Sharma says. “For example, it’s important have an adequate intake of calcium – between 1,000 and 1,500 milligrams per day – and 800 to 1,000 international units (IU) of vitaminD to help the body absorb calcium. Dairy foods such as milk, yogurt and cheese are great sources of calcium, and 15 to 20 minutes of sun exposure each day should supply your need for vitamin-D. People who are unable to get enough of these nutrients from natural sources should consult their doctor about supplements.” Dr. Sharma also recommends lifestyle changes to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis: • Getting 30 to 45 minutes of weight-bearing

exercise at least three to four times per week. • Avoiding excessive alcohol consumption. • Stopping smoking. “Certain medications, including antiseizure drugs, or prolonged use of corticosteroids such as prednisone also may contribute to osteoporosis,” she adds. “If you need to take these medications, you may want to ask your doctor about whether it is possible to reduce your dosage. People who are extremely underweight also should consult their doctor about ways to gain weight, since low weight can be a risk factor.” Dr. Sharma encourages people to follow the guidelines for bone-density screenings established by the NOF – beginning at age 65 for all women, at age 70 for all men, and at age 50 for any adult who has had a bone fracture. “Your doctor may recommend screenings earlier if you have a medical condition such as rheumatoid arthritis or if you have used steroids for a prolonged period,” she adds. “Earlier screening also might be warranted for younger post-menopausal women who are very petite.” The “gold standard” for bone-density testing is dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). DEXA screening is generally performed on the hip and spine, where bone loss can be detected in the early stages. “There are other ways to screen for bone-density loss, including a ‘quantitative’ CT scan,” Dr. Sharma says. “The CT scan, however, has the drawback of involving more radiation. Ultrasound also can be good for screening, but it is used on the heel bone, and it is not as accurate. If an ultrasound indicates low bone density, the physician generally would follow up with DEXA screening.” For people diagnosed with osteoporosis, there are medications that can be used for treatment along with the above-mentioned lifestyle changes. “These medications – known as bisphosphonates – decrease the rate of bone breakdown,” Dr. Sharma explains. “They can be taken orally on a daily, weekly or monthly basis and should be taken in the morning with plenty of water at least a half hour before eating anything. For some patients who experience adverse side effects such a stomach upset or reflux from the oral medications, we can give the medication intravenously in the doctor’s office either

Page 19

once every three months or once a year.” If bone-density screening indicates osteopenia, as opposed to osteoporosis, the physician may use a web-based fracture risk assessment tool called FRAX to help determine whether the patient might benefit from osteoporosis medicine. The FRAX score estimates the patient’s chance of breaking a hip as well as the risk of fractures to the spine, forearm or shoulder. The NOF recommends that people with a 3 percent or greater chance of breaking a hip in the next 10 years or a 20 percent or greater chance of breaking another major bone in the next 10 years be treated with bisphosphonates. “These medications can have other side effects besides digestive upsets,” Dr. Sharma cautions. “For example, they can affect kidney function and may cause vi-

Osteoporosis is more common in older women who are postmenopausal and in men over age 70, but it also can affect younger men and women. Dr. Sharma also recommends lifestyle changes to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis including getting 30 to 45 minutes of weight-bearing exercise at least three to four times per week. To find a family medicine specialist near you, visit www.mywtmf.com or call (866) 710-9864.

sion problems. In rare cases, they may cause decaying of the jaw called osteonecrosis or a fracture of the femur, which is the thighbone. As with any other medication, it’s always important to discuss any unusual side effects of osteoporosis medications with your doctor.” Your health care, your way For more information about Washington Township Medical Foundation and its more than 60 board-certified physicians with expertise in a broad range of medical specialties—from neurosurgery to pediatrics—visit www.mywtmf.com.


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Murder Misdirected A professional pickpocket picks the wrong pocket... and the adventure begins in Murder Misdirected, a new novel by local author Andrew MacRae and published by Mainly Murder Press. A book release party is being held on Sunday, June 10th from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Mission Coffee, 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing. Murder Misdirected can be purchased both in paperback and electronic form from Amazon and fine book stores everywhere. Murder Misdirected Available June 1st from Mainly Murder Press

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN Enjoy two great East Bay traditions, wine tasting and touring the historic McConaghy House. Hayward Area Historical Society teams up with Bay Area Urban Winery Tours to support local history with a fantastic wine tasting on June 2 at the beautiful Victorian-era McConaghy House. The event includes wines from many Bay Area wineries, hors d’oeuvres, live music, and tours of the historic house. Some of the wineries featured are: Rock Wall Wine Company, Cerruti Cellars, Urban Legend Cellars, Urbano Cellars Winery, and Rosenblum Cellars. Raffle tickets will also be available for purchase to win winetasting prizes at Byington Winery, Charles R Vineyards, Dashe Cellars, and others. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Call (510) 581-0223 for advance reservations. For more information, visit www.haywardareahistory.org.

Wine Tasting Saturday, June 2 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. McConaghy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Tickets: $25 advance, $30 at door

May 29, 2012


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events

Wednesdays, May 16 - Jun 13

Tango, Waltz, Merengue & Salsa Dance Classes

7:00 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. Wednesday, Apr 25 - Saturday, Dec 29

In Memory of Thomas Kinkade

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Browse through the cottage gallery

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

Smith's Cottage Gallery 37815 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-0737

Presented by Science for Youth. For school-age children

Milpitas Community Concert Band & Milpitas High Symphonic Band/Wind Ensemble

12 noon - 8 p.m. (Sundays: 12 noon - 4 p.m.)

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Milpitas High School 1285 Escuela Pkwy., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Work by 32 local artists & CSUEB alumni

Saturdays, Thru Jul 7

Wednesday, May 30

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $R

Retirement Discussion Group R

10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

7 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Workout for the mind, body & spirit. Utilizes basic stretching techniques

Balancing Risk Tolerance. Space limited. RSVP Paul Andrus

Ohlone College, Dance Studio Room 174 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-2303

One Fremont Place 39650 Liberty Street, Suite 200, Fremont (510) 207-5751

Thursdays, Thru Dec 27

Wednesday, May 30 - Saturday, Jun 30

Thursday, Apr 26 - Sunday, Jun 8

Invitational Show

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

Ohlone for Kids $R

8 a.m. Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 33450 Ninth Street, Union City Tuesday, May 29 (510) 586-5747

The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Playing with a Full Deck

Thursday, May 31

Tips for aging well. Speaker Sylvia Gandolfo, M.S.W.

American Red Cross Blood Drive

Sisters of the Holy Family 159 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 624-4581 Tuesday, May 29

"Modern Day Slaves"

That's Odd

12 noon - 5 p.m. Contemporary artists Pamela Blotner and Jim Rosenau

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/Art/Olive-HydeArtGallery Friday, May 11 - Saturday, Jun 9

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee $

8 p.m. Musical comedy about six adolescents vying for the championship

Chanticleers Theatre 3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley (510) 733-5483 www.chanticleers.org

Schedule an appointment. Use sponsor code: HAYWARD84

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (800) 733-2767

Human Trafficking Awareness Documentary

Thursday, May 31

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171

7 p.m.

Workshops, seminars, giveaways & more

Thursday, May 11 -Sunday, Jun 9

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

4 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 742-2326 www.NewParkMall.com

Various disciplines

7 p.m.

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Artists Diego Marcial Rios, Vijitha Ramesh & Amrit Ganguli

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. & Sun. 12 noon - 6 p.m.

Face 2 Face: A Contemporary Portrait Exhibition

Celebrate recovery. Meets every Thursday

Enhancing Life Senior Health Expo

Cultural Corner

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

Monday, May 8 - Sunday, May 31

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

Free from Hurts, Habits and Hang-Ups

Wednesday, May 30

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Sunday 10:00 AM

Wednesday, May 30

7 p.m.

Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Unity of Fremont

Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3207

2 p.m.

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m.

A positive path for spiritual living

Lecture examines the rise & fall of Germany and Russia

A Night of Rhythm and Melody

Images of Ladakh

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

6:30 p.m.

Science Lecture for Children

Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Tell A Friend

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 657-5329

Hitler, Stalin and the Coming of World War II

Saturdays, Thru Jun 30

Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Beginners 7:00 p.m. / Intermediate & Advanced 8:15 p.m.

Wednesday, May 30

Fremont Hills Assisted Living & Memory Care 35490 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-4200 www.fremontassistedliving.com

South Bay Salt Pond Lecture Featuring Hayward, Union City, Milpitas

U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park (650) 329-5000 www.usgs.gov Friday, Jun 1

Round 'Em Up!

7:30 p.m. Milpitas Community Concert Band goes Western

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 www.milpitascommunityconcertband.com


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

Friday, Jun 1

Saturday, Jun 2

"Murder at the KO Corral" $R

Sunday, Jun 3

Youth Jazz Festival

7:15 p.m.

11:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Mystery dinner theater.

Seven local school bands & the Jazzinators

Plein Air Paint Out $R 8:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Paint the diverse scenery of the great outdoors Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3215

Sunol Valley Golf Club 6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (925) 862-2408

New Park Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 657-0243

Friday, Jun 1 - Sunday, Jun 3

Performance Fusion $

Saturday, Jun 2

Fri. - Sat. 8 p.m. & Sun. 2 p.m. Student film, dance pieces & short play Cal State East Bay University 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118

Electrical Contractors Trust of Alameda County Safety Fair - R

Wednesday, Jun 6

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Food, information booths, raffles

Pastel landscape painter Mark Mertens

IBEW L.U. 595 Hall 6250 Village Parkway, Dublin (510) 867-0487 www.electrialcontractors.com

Fremont Art Association 37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org

Saturday, Jun 2

Friday, Jun 8

Levee Bike Tour

Celebration for Trish Nunes

10 a.m. - 1 p.m.

3:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

9-mile guided bike tour. Ages 14 & up

Retirement party honoring 33 years of service

Wednesday, Jun 1 - Saturday, Jun 30

Spatial Expressions

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Featuring Bonnie Randall Boller & Vaki Kuner

The Sun Gallery 1015 E. Street, Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-0222 x139 Saturday, Jun 2

Saturday, Jun 2 - Sunday, Jun 3

"Pioneer Spirit" Scout O Rama

Charlie Chaplin Days $

Activities and demonstrations

11:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Kennedy Park 19501 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 912-0555

Various Chaplin films, Charlie look-alike contest & pie fight

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

MSJHS Family Festival $

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fundraiser includes games & family activities

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 www.msjasb.org Saturday, Jun 2

Wine in the Bay Area $R

2 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Warm Springs Elementary 47370 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-1611

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, Jun 2

Four Brothers

5:30 p.m. An Indian tale present by youth actors

Saturday, Jun 2

Guest Artist Demonstration

Community of Christ Fremont 34050 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 792-1826 Sunday, Jun 3

Jazz meets Classical $

8 p.m. Salon series performance

Music at the Mission 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-7166 www.musicatmsj.org

Are you a writer? Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. Submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com.

Wine tasting fundraiser

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Saturday, Jun 2

2012 Citizen of the "YOWZA" Champagne Luncheon $R

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Honoring Dave Smith & spring scholarship winners

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6020

Sunday, Jun 3

California GMO Food Labeling Measure Meeting

2 p.m. - 3 p.m. Discussion of genetically engineered food labeling bills

Niles Community Park 3rd and H Streets, Fremont (510) 409- 9480 www.labelgmos.org

Send us your event information tricityvoice@aol.com


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL Performance Fusion, Cal State East Bay’s Theatre and Dance Department’s annual celebration of performance, will be divided into three distinct programs this year to better reflect the work on all of its majors, including films, two-character plays, monologues, and dance. Programs A and C will be in the University Theatre; Program B will be in the more intimate Studio Theatre, all at the university campus in Hayward. “The pieces in the University Theatre offer a wide range of subject matter from poetry jams to the plays of David Ives. And, of course, dance, as always, is a crucial part of this program, showing off the creativity of our student choreographers who must bring their pieces from conception to fully realized performances,” said Marc Jacobs, associate professor of theatre and dance. Program A, performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 1 and 2, will include “Economic Meltdown,” a dance piece by Josynn Mathis; “Mere Mortals,” by David Ives, directed by Jordan Battle; “Devastating News,” a dance piece by Shawn Hawkins; “English Made Simple,” a short play by David Ives, directed by Daniel Banatao; and “All the Way Live,” a multi-media dance piece by Sergio Suarez. Program B, performed at 2 p.m. Sundays, June 3 and 10, includes “Cindy and Julie,” a film featuring Sarah Lynn Prince; “Juliet Looks Back,” a monologue of an older (and deceased) "Juliet" reflecting on her brief life; “Is It,” a dance piece by Jay Lowman; “Bondage,” a short play by David Henry Hwang, directed by Janelle Aguirre; “The Rabbit

Hole,” by David Lindsay-Abaire, featuring Melanie Sutrathada and Joseph Loper; and “A Documentary on the Web Series ‘Theatre Class,’" by Karen Fokes, who performs in the series. Program C, performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 8 and 9, includes “Losing My Way,” a dance piece by Krystal Bates; “These Powerful Words,” a poetry jam compiled by director Tiffinee Walker; "Music Love and Dance," a dance piece by Anthony Johnson; and “The Boor,” by Anton Chekhov, directed by Janelle Aguirre. Tickets may be purchased at www.csueastbaytickets.com for $15 general admission, $10 discounts, and $5 for CSUEB students. Information is available on weekdays at (510) 885-3118. Performance information is available at: http://www20.csueastbay.edu/class/departments/theatre/performances.html. Parking is $5 on weekends after 5 p.m. on Friday, and $2 per hour on weekdays. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodation upon request. Please notify event sponsor in advance at (510) 885-3118 if accommodation is needed. Performance Fusion Program A: June 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. Program B: June 3 and 10 at 2 p.m. (Studio Theatre) Program C: June 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. Cal State East Bay University Theatre 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3118 http://www20.csueastbay.edu/class/departments/theatre/performances.html Tickets: $5 - $15

My Unique Xpressions Drama Club invites the community to attend its fourth stage production, “Four Brothers,” June 2. The club is an outlet for young kids to express their creativity in a fun and communal way. “I first started this club when my older daughter started kindergarten and I was looking for an avenue for her to show her talents in role playing. I did not find anything to my liking,” says founder Preetha Nair. “I loved acting in plays in grade school, and later on in high school and grad school was involved in production as well. I have a passion for reading and script writing. I approached a few moms who had kids the same age as my daughter and the club was born.” Classes began in February of 2010 with five kindergarteners and have grown to 14 children who will all be performing on June 2. The young actors range in age from four to nine years old; Vismaya Nair and Saanvi Goyal are pre-kindergarten; Tanvee Priyadarshan and Pranav Grandhi are in first grade; Asmita Brahme, Naina Kalra, Namita Nair, Omkar Toro, Trisha Dharmapuri, Suvali Mena, Aditi Morumganti, and Rithika Muttukuru are second graders; Meha Goyal is in third grade; and Rupali Mena is in fourth grade. Conceived and directed by Nair, “Four Brothers” is a story from India, and follows in the footsteps of previous productions. The first play was “The Blue Fox,” a folk tale from Panchatantra, followed by “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” and last year, “Persephone and the Pomegranate Seeds,” a story from Greek mythology. At the end of each play a message or moral is conveyed. “It has been very fulfilling for me to see the children learn, grow, and deliver time and time again. I also have to acknowledge the commitments of the other parents who help their children learn their lines and help me with costumes and staging,” says Nair. There is no fee for participation in My Unique Xpressions Drama Club, but a contribution of $5 per class goes toward the renting of venues and costumes. Take a journey through the East Indian countryside, glimpse the simple life and learn some life lessons. Join family and friends to show your support for our budding stars.

Four Brothers Saturday, June 2 5:30 p.m. Community of Christ 34050 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont nair.preethah@gmail.com Free

Page 23


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

Men’s Baseball

Fremont Christian tops CSD in battle of top two; falls in post-season play PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW In a matchup of the Bay Counties – General league on May 18, the top two teams met and the Fremont Christian Warriors dominated the Eagles of California School for the Deaf 15-0. Fremont Christian with a 12-0 conference record holds first place in Bay Counties – General. Subsequent action saw the Warriors add another win to their record, defeating Alameda Community Learning Center 11-9. However, the Warriors fell to the Ferndale Wildcats 8-5 in North Coast Section post-season play on May 25.

#8 Fremont Christian center fielder/pitcher Issac Liston sliding into second base.

Men’s Baseball

Cougars battle hard but lose second round contest SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW It was a great season for the Newark Memorial Cougars but the season came to an abrupt ending

as they lost a close game to the College Park Falcons in the second round of the North Coast Section playoffs, 2-1. The cougars were never out of the game, coming up with good defensive plays but lacked enough offense to overcome a one run deficit. A solid performance by Falcon Pitcher Anthony Baleto scattered five hits and recorded five strikeouts. The Cougar attack was only able to score one run in the first inning on a sacrifice fly. That slim 1-0 lead was erased in the third inning by College Park on multiple base thefts by Jefferey Miller who reached base on a walk and finally scored on an infield single. Another run in the fourth inning sealed the win for the Falcons.

Women’s Softball

Lady Cougars triumph, still on the prowl

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Lady Cougars of Newark Memorial hit the cover off the ball in their first North Coast Section (NCS) game May 23, beating the College Park Falcons (Pleasant Hill) 12-0. The Cougar attack began immediately and was unrelenting. Falcon pitching was no match for Cougar power as base runners appeared in every inning with a sprinkling of home runs to clear the bases. College Park outfielders were also caught off-guard by unpredictable winds causing multiple miscues and additional scoring opportunities. Power at the plate plus defensive balance can take the Lady Cougars a long way in this year’s NCS tournament. Against the Falcons, Cougar Pitcher Marissa Chapa turned in an outstanding performance. Next opponent for the Lady Cougars will be the Clayton Valley Eagles of Concord who defeated Northgate of Walnut Creek, 6-1.

Men's Volleyball

MSJ wins two in a row SUBMITTED BY AMY KWON Mission San Jose (MSJ) High School defeated California High School in the second round of North Coast Section (NCS) men's volleyball on May 18. The MSJ Warriors played four rounds against Cal High and came out 3-1 in the end with scores of 25-14, 25-21, 23-25, and 25-23. M. Wang had 13 kills, six digs and two blocks as where teammate T. Zhang finished the game with seven kills and seven blocks. J. Poon, also from MSJ, had 37 assists, one ace and four digs. MSJ's B. Ng ended the game with 11 kills, three aces and six blocks. MSJ also defeated Deer Valley on May 23 in four games winning 3-1 as well. Deer Valley won the first game 25-18, but after that, MSJ held on and was crowned the victor. Game two ended 25-18 in favor of MSJ. Games three and four had scores of 25-20 and 25-18 respectively. This win bumped MSJ's record to 28-7 overall. The season ended for the Warriors on May 26 when they faced a tough De La Salle Spartan squad, losing 3-0 in NCS play.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Women’s Softball

Lady Colts persevere in quarter final play SUBMITTED BY DENNIS & GIDGET James Logan Colts saw a 4-0 lead following three innings whither to a single run advantage over seven innings of play on their home field against a determined Castro Valley Trojan squad. Logan pitcher Raeann Garza pitched all seven innings with Caley Bonansea catching. The game was in doubt throughout the contest as the Trojans outhit the Lady Colts, 10-8. Next opponent for James Logan will be the California Grizzlies on May 30.

Letter to the Editor

Let’s Save the World The Tarahumara people live in northwestern Mexico. They live in small villages in Barranca del Cobre and Copper Canyon. These people run an average 26 miles per day as a part of their daily chores. They eat a daily diet rich of protein and vegetables. They hardly eat meat, using livestock as fertilizer. They don’t destroy nature and pollute their atmosphere. These amazing people are happy and healthy their whole lives. Polluting the earth began when man began to spread all over the world, built, and used more resources. One of the most known and serious effects of pollution is global warming. When we discovered oil, we, essentially, went crazy with joy. We used oil for fuel and disregarded the obnoxious, black, smelly smoke that came with burning it. Burning of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide into the air, which increases the temperature of the atmosphere. As the temperature rises, the Artic and Antarctic ice caps melt, sea level rises and millions of animals who depend on those ice caps will die; we will all drown. Along with carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC’s) released by machines like refrigerators, degrade the ozone layer - the layer in the atmosphere that protects us from ultraviolet rays (UV rays). These UV rays, unless blocked, can cause skin cancer and many other mutations in our body; we are destroying that one thing that protects us from these harmful rays. Today, plastic is part of almost all things, sometimes, even food. However, what we do not realize is that plastic is non-biodegradable and all the plastic that has been manufactured since its invention is still here on this earth. An example is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a ball of trash from all around the world, swirling in the Pacific Ocean, two times as large as Texas. As our population reaches more than seven billion, we want a place to live. We clear the land, cut down trees, pushing all

the other plants and animals out. This leaves hundreds of tress to rot and animals that called those trees home, homeless. We are in a world where we have air-conditioned cars and temperature regulated houses. Our body gets used to the artificial environments. In addition, we are obsessed with keeping ourselves sanitized at all times by using bacteria killing cleaners. If we stop being germ phobic, we may have healthier immune systems and fewer allergies. The most overused and misused living thing in the world are trees. Trees provide us with building materials to writing materials. However, we waste this precious resource. In the U.S., we use 187 billion pounds of paper every year. That is about 4 billion trees, 35 percent of the world’s trees - all of it so that we could have something to write on. Agricultural lands are overused too. Farmers clear land, removing all life and nutrients from it, and then pour fertilizers and insecticides to enrich it again. Hunters find it entertaining to kill an animal and leave its body to rot. In the United States, 200 million creatures are hunted each year. Scientists use genetic engineering to alter plants and animals so that they will be bigger, more attractive or yield more meat or milk. In the process, they are disrupting the course of evolution and altering the natural and nutrient rich species of plant and animals rather than making them better for humans. Some countries, having realized this folly, are trying to heal the environment with new technology that is environmental friendly. Since these are just beginning to emerge, their adoption is very slow and needs to be complemented with a change in our basic lifestyle. If we are to survive, we have to live our lives in similar way to the Tarahumara people. We should use only what we need and, live and grow in harmony with nature. Soumya Suresh Fremont

Sikh sports association honored SUBMITTED BY ANDREW LAMAR Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-San Leandro) honored the Sikh Sports Association of the USA and student participants from her East Bay district and throughout the state in a special ceremony on the Senate Floor on May 25, 2012. Established in 2006, the Sikh Sports Association of USA is a non-profit organization created to promote a healthy lifestyle for Sikhs and others in the communities they live in. The association builds strong relationships by engaging participants in a common goal of living active lifestyles. The association does this by organizing activities, sports and games that are open to all communities and their residents, without any discrimination of religion, community, country of origin, ethnicity, age or gender. This year marks the sixth anniversary of the annual Sikh Sports Games that are scheduled to be held in July 2012 in Union City. “I thank the Sikh Sports Association of the USA and the Sikh community for their dedication and commitment to core values of healthy living, community service, scholarship, tolerance and peace,” Corbett said. “I am glad to honor the Sikh Sports Association because it is a positive influence throughout my East Bay district and a model organization that inspires all with whom they come into contact.” Senator Corbett presented the association with a State Senate Resolution. She also recognized several Sikh Sports board members and students who joined in the recognition from the Senate Gallery. For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett

Police hold diamond swallower until evidence moves

AP WIRE SERVICE

WINDSOR, Ontario (AP), – Police in the Canadian province of Ontario say they are holding a man who is accused of swallowing a $20,000 diamond as long as it takes for him to produce the evidence. It has been nearly a week since Richard Mackenzie Matthews, 52, is alleged to have switched a diamond at Precision Jewellers and swallowed the real one. Matthews has been held at police headquarters while they wait for the 1.7-carat stone to pass through his system. Sgt. Brett Corey said Thursday that Matthews has gone to the washroom numerous times, but the diamond hasn't passed. Corey says a recent X-ray showed a pair of fake diamonds, or cubic zirconiums, stuck in the man's intestines but because a diamond is translucent, it isn't visible. He says the suspect is eager to get the ordeal over with and is co-operating. In the early stages, Corey says Matthews was being given laxative type foods, but is now being fed whatever he wants, in an effort to get things moving. Matthews is charged with theft and breach of court conditions, and is also wanted on warrants in Toronto.

Page 25


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12631636 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Stephenie Williams on behalf of Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Casey Jordon Wagner-Williams to Casey Jordon Williams The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: August 10, 2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 23, 2012 Winifred Y. Smith Judge of the Superior Court 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2321193# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12628777 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: David James Hochstetler, Jr. for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner David James Hochstetler, Jr. filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: David James Hochstetler, Jr. to David James Haynes The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 7-20-2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: May 04, 2012 /S/ WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314110#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465233 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Specialty Sales West, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda, 3984 Washington Blvd., #112, Fremont, CA 94538, Alameda Michael G. Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 Nancy Lima, 44801 Camellia Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on March, 2007 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael G. Lima, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 14, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/12 CNS-2320676# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465273 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fun Foods, 41844 Sherwood Street, Fremont, CA 94578, County of Alameda, PO Box 1515, Fremont, CA 94538 Dianne Lee Glasmacher, 41844 Sherwood Street, Fremont, CA 94578 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 05/15/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dianne L Glasmacher This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 15, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County

Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317524# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464939 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mission Hills Automotive, 300 Mowry Avenue, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Mission Hills Auto, Inc., CA, 4744 Hazelwood St., Dublin, CA 94568 This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ --- CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317291# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Homesalot Property Management, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. Timothy Crofton Real Estate, Inc., CA, 43213 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bryan Tang Designated Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 7, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/12 CNS-2317284# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 465150-151 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1) Norcal Transport, 2) Diaz Trucking Company, 1782 D Street #93, Hayward, CA 94541, County of Alameda Uriel Diaz, 1782 D Street #93, Hayward, CA 94541 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Uriel Diaz This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 10, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314478# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463916 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magnetic Magnificent Galas by Christa, 20000 Summercrest Dr., Castro Valley, CA 94552, County of Alameda Christa J. Mekki, 20000 Summercrest Dr., Castro Valley, CA 94552 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Christa J. Mekki This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 11, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314133# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464786 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heroes And Dice, 37260 Fremont Blvd. #A, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Christopher C. Roe, 37607 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 Nhat Pham, 1860 Catherine St., Santa Clara, CA 95050 Kristopher L. Faraone, 4140 Abel Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306 This business is conducted by Co-Partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Christopher C. Roe This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 03, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2314016# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464867 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Frazier’s Landscaping, 41679 Sherwood St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Raymond Frazier, 41679 Sherwood St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raymond Frazier This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 04, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2313154# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464775 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Marcelli’s Barber Shop, 31808 Alvarado Blvd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Tina Thom La, 3008 McLaughlin Ave., San Jose, CA 95121 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tina Thom La This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 2, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/12 CNS-2310146# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 464782 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Royal Palm Solutions, 119 Blaisdell Way, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Wei Hoe Chong, 119 Blaisdell Way, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Wei Hoe Chong, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 3, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/12 CNS-2310142#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463942 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ganada Korean School, 5885 Smith Ave., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Emmanuel Mission Church of Christian Missionary Alliance, California, 5885 Smith Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 4/15/12 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hyung J. Moon, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 12, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/12 CNS-2309056#

GOVERNMENT NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING BIDDERS CONFERENCES for RFP #900938 Employment Services for Limited English Speaking CalWORKs, General Assistance and Refugee Participants South County - Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 2:00 p.m. at Public Works Agency, Main Conference Room, 4825 Gleason Drive, Dublin, CA and North County - Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 10:00 a.m. at General Services Agency, Room 1107, 11th Floor, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on July 19, 2012 County Contact : Stefanie Taylor (510) 2089610 or via email: stefanie.taylor@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 5/29/12 CNS-2321626#

business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. ORDINANCE NO. 769-12 WAS PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on May 22, 2012, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Duncan, Ellis and Navarro, Vice Mayor Gacoscos, Mayor Green NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Mark Green MARK GREEN, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 5/29/12 CNS-2321171# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 19, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Patterson House Rehabilitation Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd. Fremont, CA 94560 City Project No. PWC 8766 APN 543-023-101 MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled for 2:00 p.m., Monday, June 4, 2012, at the project site at Ardenwood Historic Farm, 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont, California. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/22, 5/29/12 CNS-2316820#

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 20, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Signal Modification at Walnut Avenue and Gallaudet Drive/Cherry Lane City Project No. 8763 (PWC) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2321381# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on June 20, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: Speed Lump Installation on 6 Streets Fronting Elementary Schools City Project No. 8762 (PWC) Installation of speed lumps and related signing and striping on Emilia Lane, Maybird Circle, Darwin Drive, School Street, Sundale Drive, and South Grimmer Boulevard, and other such items not mentioned above that are required by the Plans, Standard Specifications, and/or these Special Provisions. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at www.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2321352# ORDINANCE NO. 769-12 ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY APPROVING TEXT AMENDMENT, AT-12-002, TO AMEND SECTIONS 18.36.040 AND 18.40.245 OF TITLE 18, ZONING, OF THE UNION CITY MUNICIPAL CODE TO EXEMPT SERVICE STATIONS FROM RESTRICTIONS PROHIBITING DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS WITHIN 1,000 FEET OF SENSITIVE USES The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on May 22, 2012. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was read and adopted on May 22, 2012, is available on the City’s website at: http: //www.ci.union-city.ca.us/ordinances.html. A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 AlvaradoNiles Road, Union City, California, during normal

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ABDUL KARIMI CASE NO. RP12630552 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Abdul Karimi A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Homayyn Karimi and Merwais Nabizada in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Homayyn Karimi and Merwais Nabizada be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Kyle M. Johnston, 5315 College Avenue, Oakland, CA 94618, Telephone: (510) 527-1880 5/25, 5/29, 6/5/12 CNS-2320538#

Whale that died in Puget Sound ate golf ball DOUG ESSER ASSOCIATED PRESS SEATTLE (AP), A gray whale found dead in Puget Sound had been feeding on shrimp and also had some debris, including a golf ball, in its stomach, but scientists don't know what killed the animal. The stomach examination Monday found the shrimp, woody debris, algae, pieces of rope and plastic, the golf ball and some flat spongy material, NOAA Fisheries said. The garbage was minimal and not the cause of death, which remains under investigation with tissue tests, said spokesman Brian Gorman. It's common for whales to pick up debris near urban areas because they are filter feeders. There

were no signs of trauma or entanglement on the whale, he said. The carcass was spotted Sunday on the west side of Camano Island and towed to a secure location at the Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, about 50 miles north of Seattle for the necropsy by biologists and volunteers from Cascadia Research, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Central Puget Sound Marine Mammal Stranding Network. The skeleton of the 37-foot sub adult male will be cleaned and sent to the Smithsonian Institution. “We don't get these that often that are the right size and in good shape,” Gorman said Tuesday. A representative of the Smithsonian will help oversee the cleaning, said Kristin Wilkinson, marine mammal stranding coor-

dinator for the Northwest region with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Whale skeletons, baleen and other marine mammal bones or seal and sea lion pelts, are commonly made available to schools or institutions for education and outreach, she said. Even with results of tests for contaminants and diseases, the cause of the Camano whale's death may never be known, Wilkinson said. “Sometimes we're able to put pieces of the puzzle together and other times those samples don't shed any light on cause of death,” she said. The Camano whale's death is unusual because the body was in good condition with oily blubber. The two to 10 gray whales

that typically die each year in Washington waters usually are in poor health or have lost weight. “It's puzzling, there's no apparent cause of death,” said John Calambokidis of Olympia-based Cascadia Research. “It doesn't seem to be the typically emaciated animal we normally see,” said Calambokidis, who often responds but was not with the Cascadia Research group that helped with the Camano Island whale. He noted there was less debris in the whale's stomach than in a whale that was found dead off west Seattle in April 2010. Its stomach contents included plastic bags and a pair of sweat pants. That whale's skeleton was preserved and is now on display at Highline Community College's

Marine Science and Technology Center in Des Moines. The Camano whale is the third stranded gray whale in Washington so far this year and the first in inland waters, NOAA Fisheries said. The gray whales most often die during the spring months during the migration from their breeding grounds off Baja, Mexico, to feeding grounds in the Bering Sea, off Alaska. Gray whales can pick up debris because of the way they feed, scooping up sediment from the sea floor and filtering it through baleen. They eat ghost shrimp in Washington waters, Wilkinson said. “Whatever trash and debris sitting on the sea floor in that sediment is trapped inside the mouth, and it will then swallow,” she said.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Thank You

WILLIAM MARSHAK

W

atch any award or recognition ceremony and usually the same sentiments are voiced by those on the receiving end of things. After expressing emotions of pleasure and joy, the person or persons in the limelight offer a string of ‘thanks’ to others who deserve credit for supporting whatever effort is being praised. Those mentioned - and many others - are not only an integral part of a successful process, but vital to the perseverance and fortitude necessary for most worthwhile endeavors. The same can be said in continuing efforts by Tri-City Voice (TCV) to attain ‘adjudication’ as a Newspaper of General Circulation for the City of Fremont. Last week, a group of citizens, came to the Oakland courtroom of the Hon. Robert McGuiness to witness and support TCV in legal proceedings with Bay Area News Group (BANG). The value of this response is immeasurable and deeply appreciated. This latest hearing was another in a series of maneuvers by BANG to control pricing and publication of public notices; to maintain a near monopoly of printed news in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Why is BANG spending so much time and money to attack TCV? Publication of legal notices is lucrative, a vital source of income. Without this income, many independent newspapers including TCV, have difficulty surviving. It provides funds that encourage investment in community reporting. The number of newspapers ‘adjudicated’ for a particular city is not limited to any single source. However, the courts and will of large corporations control the process. A question to be answered in our case is… Which publications will actually use funds realized from public notices to support our communities? To those who attended last week, others who attended a previous court hearing and a multitude of community members who have expressed support, all of us at TCV, especially Sharon and I, want to say ‘Thank You.’ Whether we prevail in this action is uncertain, but your validation of our efforts is invaluable. Advertisers, individuals and organizations of all types have provided the courage necessary for us to continue this arduous process. Although a few independent newspapers continue to struggle for survival, large corporate news entities are unrelenting in their efforts to remove competition. In the past, they simply bought local newspapers to expand their territory and influence. These days, however, some have focused solely on digital media and are phasing print from their strategy. The definition of “daily” in the newspaper industry is rapidly changing, hastened by newspaper associations and changing reporting bureau rules that rely on income from large media groups. For them, the antithesis of a free and open press, limiting choice and restricting

sources, is simply an economic decision. Veteran news reporters and support staff have left many newspapers – voluntarily or not – while those more accustomed to lock-step adherence to corporate bias and cut-throat economies of scale remain. Bolstered by increased and corrupted political clout, large media groups have maneuvered to influence and threaten the legislative and judicial will of communities they supposedly represent; their landscape has veered toward entertainment and homogenization that may have little to do with disseminating information specifically for cities listed on a newspaper banner. Circulation numbers touted by consortiums to advertising agencies located far from areas served are manipulated to include ‘non-branded editions’ of a controlling newspaper (look closely at local papers to see who owns them, their content and how they are cited as an “edition” of another newspaper) and digital “subscriptions.” Citizens can vote in many ways; one was clearly shown by the outpouring of support for TCV both in and outside the courtroom. Thank you for your comments, letters, proclamations, subscriptions and advertisements in our newspaper. When, in the immortal words of the fictional television character, Kojak, TCV asked “Who loves ya baby?” the response was overwhelming!

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDITOR Helen Tracey-Noren EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman

William Marshak PUBLISHER

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

Bouncy houses cushion bear's fall from tree BY JEANNIE NUSS ASSOCIATED PRESS

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP), When a black bear climbed a tree in a central Arkansas city and refused to come down, authorities turned to unconventional rescue tools: bouncy houses. Foster the Bear – named for the residential street where he holed up in a tree – wouldn't budge from his branch Monday. So, authorities turned to a local hardware store owner who rents inflatable houses and castles for children's birthday parties. They asked him to set up two of the bouncy contraptions beneath the tree. Then, wildlife officials shot the bear with tranquilizer darts. “He would slide to one side, and we're like, ‘Oh, oh, oh, he's going to come down, he's going to come down,’ “ Conway police spokes-

woman La Tresha Woodruff said. “And then he'd balance himself again.” Foster finally passed out, but he still didn't come down from his perch. Eventually, firefighters turned a hose on him until he tumbled down onto the edge of the inflatables below. The bear, about a year old, wasn't hurt, though he did land in between a blow-up castle and the other inflatable house – kind of ``like if you get something stuck between the wall and the bed,'' as Woodruff put it. Spectators who had been watching the bear in the tree for hours cheered and clapped, Woodruff said. “Foster was fine, just knocked out,” she said. Wildlife officials plan to release the bear somewhere in the Ozark Mountains. Police said the bear's big-city adventure in Conway, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) north

of Little Rock, started before he moseyed up the tree on Foster Drive. Someone had spotted the bear in a different tree on a nearby street before dawn Monday. “Somehow, he crawled down out of the tree without them seeing him and got away,” Woodruff said. Then, he managed to climb into another tree and inspire a Twitter feed, where someone posted updates – from the bear's perspective – into the night. “You ever have that dream where you're falling and then you wake up with a dart in your butt?” one post read. Another tweet summed up the bear's day out. “The cops want to shoot me,” one post read. “Fire dept says I'm too big for their cat getterdowner and 75 townies are below cheering my name.”

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

May 29, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS Home Health Care Provider's Corp. A Reliable Source Providing In-Home Health Care For the ELDERLY Since 1997 Open 24 hours 7 days a week Licensed # 038521

Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

What’s It Worth? Jewelry Fine Art Collectibles Certified Museum Specialist

U.S. History for Kids Summer Program with a Dramatic Interpretation 6 sessions $160

All Areas - 510-582-5954 Send image of object to: happidog@earthlink.net

David Makki Professional Tutoring 510-396-7643 Makkiburger@gmail.com

Spring Yard Work Trim • Weed • Haul Sprinklers • Sod Tree Trim 25 years experience Fremont/Newark/ Union City

FREE Estimates Contact John 510-284-7790

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL A BUSINESS? We have been matching buyers and sellers for 29 plus years

For a FREE and NO OBLIGATION consultation Call me TODAY!

SALES & ACQUISITIONS Tashie Zaheer CELL: 510-750-3297 Beauty Salon in South Bay Machine Tools supplier- (Estate Sale) Estate Sale- Huge price reduction Laundromat (El Sobrante) Grocery Store with Deli (San Jose) Subway Sandwich Auto body Shop (Oakland)

$69K $175K $99K $135K $99k+ Inv. $189K $85K

Protect Fremont Open Space Sign our Petition You can sign the petition at the following locations: The UPS Store

Rick’s World of Tennis

40087 Mission Blvd., Fremont CA 94539 M-F 8:30-6:30; Sat 9-5

40064 Mission Blvd. Fremont CA 94539 M-F 10-6; Sat 9-5

Library Main Entrance 10am-5pm Saturdays Lake Elizabeth near Boat Docks - Saturdays Trader Joe’s Saturdays 10-2pm

For Signature collections sites or more information:

www.protectfremontopenspace.com Paid for by: Protect Fremont Open Space Committee PAC #1346293

COMPUTER/INFO SYSTEMS Position: Full Time Experience: Required Education: Masters/Bachelors in related field Multiple openings for Computer programmers, Project Manager, Software Engineers, Programmer Analyst, Systems Analyst, Business Analyst, QA Engineers, with several of the following strong skills: C/C++/VC++/Java/Visual Basic, J2EE, ASP, QA and Client Server Testing/Web-WinRunner/Load Runner Silk/ Rational Suite/Test Director; HTML/ASP/JSP/COBRACOM/DCOM/ORACLE/SAP/DBA. Ongoing F/T positions.Travel within US may be required. EOE. Send resume to: HR Assistant:

ECalix, Inc. 44150 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538

Drivers Needed! Physicist. Research Scientist on nano tech fiber laser R&D. Wk site/Apply: Optoplex Corp, 3342 Gateway Blvd, Fremont, CA 94538.

Fremont/Hayward Make Xtra Money. Delivering phone books. Must have drivers license, own transportation, w/auto insurance. Call now!! 1-888-418-6804 www.deliveryofphonebooks.com


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Hayward City Council Hayward City Council May 22, 2012 Presentation of Hayward Youth Commission scholarship. Work Session FY 2013 and FY 2014 recommended biennial budget work session #2: departmental presentations by Finance; City Manager's Office; Human Resources; City Attorney's Office. Presentations for City Clerk's Office; Technology Services; and Library and Community Services will be carried forward to a subsequent meeting. Consent Approved plans and specifications and called for bids to be received on June 19, 2012 for new sidewalks along Franklin Avenue, Harder Road and Phillips Way. Total estimated project cost is $500,000 which is covered by the Measure B Fund (half-cent transportation sales tax administered by the Alameda County Transportation Commission) for New Sidewalks and included in the FY2013 Capital Improvement Program. Work is scheduled to last from mid-August to mid-October 2012. Summary vacation of remnant right-of-way and land exchange with the state of California (Caltrans) for a portion of Fourth Street alignment

Approved a fourth amendment of the Commercial Aviation Site Lease between the City and Hayward FBO LLC (dba APP Jet Center) and authorized City Manager to execute the amendment. The amendment means the Airport will lose $50,000 in rental income this fiscal year and create a two-year delay of incidental revenue of approximately $10,000 per annum. These one-time reductions will be offset by the Airport Operating Fund. Adopted resolutions approving agreements authorizing participation in the Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association (VEBA) Program between the City of Hayward and the Hayward Fire Officers IAFF 1909 and the Hayward Fire Chiefs Association. Filed Nuisance Abatement/Municipal Code violations with the County Recorder’s Office for nonabatable code violations. Liens of $1,686 have been filed against each of the following properties: 354 Jerrilynn Lane, 22732 First Street and 26360 Dodge Avenue. A lien of $1,494 has been filed against 26067 Eastman Court. Public Hearing Appeal of the Planning Commission’s determination that a proposed Walmart Market Grocery Store at a building formerly

occupied by Circuit City is not a permitted use consistent with Conditional Use Permit No. PL2004-0039 and the proposed grocery store is not consistent with the previous use in terms of potential for generating significant environmental impacts. The project is located at 2480 Whipple Road in the Industrial (I) Zoning District. (3 YES votes; 4 NO votes (Henson, Peixoto, Quirk, Sweeney). Public Comment Jesus Armas asked Ralf Farias, candidate for Hayward City Council, to refrain from appropriating other campaigns’ signs. One of his signs was affixed to a Measure G lawn sign. He urged Farias and his supporters to abide by standards of common decency, appropriate regulations and to advocate for his candidacy, if he is so inclined, but not at the expense of Hayward Unified School District’s (HUSD) children. Measure G, placed on the ballot by HUSD, is a $58 parcel tax that will help maintain service delivery in classrooms. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Olden Henson – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Bill Quirk – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeño - Yes

Newark Teachers of the Year: Svetlana Petriakova-Kuntz,

Volunteers June 15-June 18, 2012. Approve text amendment to re-

Newark City Council Newark City Council May 24, 2012

Newark students of the year

Newark Teachers of the year

Work Session: Discussion of the 2012-2014 biennial Budget and Capital Improvement Plan Presentations and Proclamations: Newark Students of the Year: David Romero, Bridgepoint High School; Rachel Castellino, Bunker School; Martha Arroyo, Crossroads High School; Emmanuel Franco, Graham School; Adara Smith, Kennedy School; James Rebelez, Lincoln School; Lesly Guzman, Milani School; Jacqueline Arcos, Musick School; Crystalyn dela Cruz, Newark Junior High School; Jesus Loza, Newark Memorial High School; Arainna Reyes, Schilling School; Abhinuv Uppal, Snow School.

Bridgepoint High School; Pamela Abbott, Bunker School; Gail Stringer, Graham School; Gretchen Cava, Kennedy School; Connie Piserchio, Lincoln School (also District Teacher of the Year); Michael Stollman, Milani School; Ida Lindeman, Musick School; Danielle Villa, Newark Junior High School; Victoria Arfsten, Newark Memorial High School; Anne Kaffka, Schilling School; Margaret Baylon, Snow School; Jonathan Wills, Special Education. Public Hearings: Allow conditional use permit and waive application fee for performances by American Crown Circus at Newark Junior High School sponsored by League of

quirements for a Animal Fancier’s permitting allowance of four-ofspecie maximum applying to hen chickens on residential parcel. Consent: Authorize lease agreement with Viola Blythe Community Service Center of Newark, Inc. for operation of a food and clothing distribution center at Ash Street Park Building #1 through June 30, 2013 for $1. Accept work of All Star Building Maintenance, Inc. for janitorial services to City buildings. Authorize purchase of animal control truck. Contract with TJKM Transportation Consultants for engineering and survey of citywide speed limits. Non-Consent: Status report of emergency expenditure for repair of lateral sewer line at Fire Station #27 Council Matters: Reappoint Carol McCarty to Tri-City Elder Coalition Volunteer Community Board Mayor Al Nagy Aye Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Aye Luis Freitas Aye Maria “Sucy” Collazo Aye Robert Marshall Aye

Union City City Council Union City Council Meeting May 22, 2012 Resolutions and Proclamations: Recognize John Repar for his citizen engagement and volunteer service to the City

Recognize Diane LaMountaine for contributions to the Arts in Union City Hear presentations from organizations currently receiving funding from Union City: Centro de Servicios City of Fremont Senior Services

Milpitas City Council Milpitas City Council May 14, 2012 Presentations Proclaimed May 2012 as Older Americans Month and encouraged local seniors to share their experiences and knowledge with the community; there are currently over 6,000 elder citizens in Milpitas. Consent Considered the Mayor’s recommendations and moved to appoint Sukhi Singh and Ernesto Bautista to the Telecommunications Commission. Waived the second reading and adopted Ordinance No. 227.5 prohibiting tobacco smoking in public facilities and all public parks owned and operated by the City. Currently, state law prohibits smoking within 25 ft. of playgrounds and tot lots, 20 ft. of entry ways and windows of buildings and authorizes local communities to enact additional restrictions. Authorized the City Engineer to execute a change order contract with Environmental Systems, Inc. for re-plumbing at Fire Station Three to replace the old galvanized water system with a new copper water system; also authorized a change order for additional re-piping work at Fire Station Two, for a cost not-to-exceed $35,000. Approved plans and specifications and authorized advertisement for bid proposals for Street Resurfacing Project 2013 to place rubber asphalt cape seal, slurry seal and new roadway markings on pre-determined City streets. Engineer’s Estimate for the project is $800,000. Approved plans and specifications and authorized advertisement for bid proposals for Fire Station No. One Exterior Painting Project; project is currently funded through 2011-2016 Capital Improvement Program, and will patch and re-paint the building’s exterior, metal fencing and gates and above-ground fuel tanks. Engineer’s Estimate for the project is $240,000. Authorized the City Manager to execute an agreement with the City of San Jose for Animal Control Services in the amount of $1.045M ($348,438 per year) for FY 2012-

15; to offset approximately 25 percent of $112,705 per year increase in costs; the Council approved increased animal licensing fees for dogs and cats on April 3, 2012. Services would include removal of dead and injured animals, medical and sheltering services for lost or stray animals. Awarded bid and authorized City Manager to execute a contract for Abandoned Shopping Cart Retrieval Services to Alice Wright for an annual not-to-exceed amount of $24,000; contract is for three years with two additional, one-year options to renew. Awarded bid and authorized City Manager to execute a contract with Security Code 3, Inc. for Park Restroom Security at various City parks for an annual not-to-exceed amount of $14,388, and grant annual increases per the Request for Proposal. Security Code 3, Inc. would provide security for the City’s 16 parks, including reporting vandalism, vagrancy and public nuisance or safety hazards to the Police Department; annual increases are not-to-exceed five percent without further City Council approval. Ordinances Waived the first reading and introduced Ordinances No. 208.48 and No. 239.7 to amend the Sewer, Stormwater and Urban Runoff Ordinances to reflect updated State and Federal Regulations; City of San Jose requested all Water Pollution Control Plant tributary agencies adopt minor changes to comply with US Environmental Protection Agency Requirements. Public Forum Robert Marini asked for waiver of fee for use of the weight room at the Barbara Lee Senior Center and inquired about the calculations for the water and sewage fees. Rob Means voiced concerns about a proposed Constitutional Amendment regarding corporations financing elections. Mayor Jose Esteves Yes Vice Mayor Pete McHugh Yes Debbie Giordano Yes Jose Gomez Absent Althea Polanski Yes

John Repar

Diane LaMountaine

Life ElderCare Bay Area Community Services Filipino Advocates for Justice Consent Calendar: Award contract for traffic signal installation at Dyer Street and Jean Drive Accept Public Art concept for MidPen Housing Corporation project Accept seismic retrofit of Administration Building Authorize agreement for services with Chabot-Las Positas College District for high-risk youth

Removed from Consent: Appropriate $40,000 to replace boiler at Fire Station #33 (removed from Consent by Councilmember Navarro) City Manager Reports: Appoint Emily Duncan as council representative to Youth Commission Interview Panel Accept third quarter budget report for January 1-March 31 2012 Closed Session: Adjourn to closed session on labor negotiations, existing litigation and potential litigation. Mayor Mark Green Aye Vice Mayor Pat Gacoscos Aye Jim Navarro Aye Emily Duncan Aye Lorrin Ellis Aye


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals

Dolores K. Thomas RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 30, 1923 - May 4, 2012

Gurinder Singh RESIDENT OF NEWARK December 20, 1964 – May 17, 2012

Kevin S. Knutson RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 11, 1949 - May 5, 2012

Robert J. Silva

Ta-Taur Lin

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 23, 1930 – May 20, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 21, 1916 – May 12, 2012

Geraldine Peebles

Lois A. Solomon

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 14, 1928 – May 23, 2012

RESIDENT OF NEWARK October 19, 1924 – May 12, 2012

Margaret Howden RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 3, 1922 – May 23, 2012

Richard “Rik” W. Cary, Jr. RESIDENT OF HAYWARD May 5, 1969 – May 13, 2012

Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease. Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

William Lewis

Clifton R. Bauhofer

RESIDENT OF FREMONT SDecember 30, 1926 – May 26, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 26, 1942 – May 14, 2012

Oscar N. Mendoza

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com

RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 30, 1944 – May 26, 2012

Willard S. Lewallen RESIDENT OF OAKLAND May 24, 1927 - May 15, 2012

Elsie Marie Freitas RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 28, 1917 – May 16, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE

Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, May 29 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25– 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25– 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, May 30 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apartments, 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apartments, 1300 Kentwood Lane, San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, May 31 2:00 – 2:25 p.m. Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 2:45 – 3:40 p.m. Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., San Lorenzo 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Falcon Dr. & Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Creekside Village Apartments, 3999 Sequoia Terrace, Fremont Friday, June 1 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. Kidango Grant, 879 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., San Lorenzo

Monday, June 4 1:45 – 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, June 5 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City

Obituary

Haruki Takemoto July 8, 1943 - May 14, 2012

Wednesday, June 6 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, May 30 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas

Haruki Takemoto, 68, passed away on May 14, 2012 at UCSF medical center. He was born in Rivers, AZ & grew up in Los Gatos, CA with his two sisters, Elsie & Paige & his parents, the late Haruji & Emiko Takemoto.

Haruki graduated from UC Berkeley in 1966, & later earned his Masters degree & CPA license. He was an accomplished athlete, participating on both the wrestling & judo teams at Berkeley. He met his current wife, Patricia Nakano while attending college. They were married in 1970, moved to Fremont in 1972 & to Livermore in 2003. Haruki is survived by Pat, his caring wife of 42 years. He was a wonderful father to Yumi Takemoto & husband Michael Millard & to Dean Takemoto & wife Nicole Ramos Takemoto of Fremont. He is also survived by his sister Paige Takemoto of San Jose & Elsie Pertsoni of San Francisco & by his loving granddaughter Zoey Millard. Haruki was an avid tennis player who enjoyed skiing, working in the yard, hiking, traveling, watching sporting events & working out. Haruki was dedicated to his job as the CFO & co-owner of JC Paper in Fremont for the last 18 years. Family & friends are invited to attend the memorial service on Saturday May 26th at 10:30 AM at the Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church, 32975 Alvarado-Niles Rd, Union City CA.


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 31

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

6

5 4 8 9 5 4 2 1 6 3 5 2 6 4 1 5 7 4 9 5 3 8 9 8 2

B 164

2

3

4

5

6 7

8

9

10

12

13

11

14

15 16

17 18

19 20

21

22 1

M

A

N

U

O

23 24

25

7

O D

28

15

30

T

A

T

T

S

21

P

S

34 35

L

28

H

Across 1 Disrobing (10) 3 Painting tool (5) 7 Overpower (6) 10 Process of creating young ones (12) 12 Contraction for must not (6) 14 To stive hard, go to the greatest extent (7) 16 Struck with palm of the hand (6) 17 Ordinal number for two (6) 18 Musical, dance or drama presentation (11) 20 Digger (5) 22 Achievements (15) 23 Similar in position, form or items in a working relation (13) 26 Groundwork, base structure (10) 29 Using sound judgement (8) 32 20 Questions category (7) 33 Critically examine (11) 34 Evaluating and passing severe judgement (9) 35 Melted fat of animals, also a lubricant (6) 36 Biased (7)

4 Unessential (11) 5 Draconian (5) 6 Changed (11) 8 "Peter and the Wolf" bird (5) 9 People who scientifically observe celestial bodies (11) 11 Settling by a conclusive decision (11) 13 Fish-like beings before changing to frongs (8) 15 ____ Armada (7) 17 No Clue 19 Onus (14) 21 Personally undergoing something (10) 24 Under something (7) 25 Material (9) 27 Sammy Kaye's "___ Tomorrow" (5) 28 Resistance against attack (7) 29 Yells (7) 30 Quip, part 4 (6) 31 Swindled (5)

E

T

R

16

P

P

S

X

O

F

H O

L

22

E

S

S

E

N

T

O 29

T

A

I

13

A

O G

R

P

O

X

T

R

E

M

A

Puzzle Solutions

Down 2 Bug (6) 3 Luminance, light (10)

P

H

O

A

P

O

R

D 23

N

D

E

B

E

N

M A

6

C

H

I

E

P

E

R

E

A

T

T

14

Y

I

C

R

20

A

R

E

Y

L

S 24

T

A

I

A

I

G

V

O

G

E

N

I

S

H M

I

O

30

P

L

L C

U

L

I

E

31

I

L

A W

S

I

S 17

N L

N

L A

R

I

B D

E

I

S S

S K

E

T

C O M I

5

S

N G

N 33

R

N

I

S W U

C

O

E

A

26

N

I S

L

B 163

E W S T

C 34

E

R 25

L C

C

R

F

10

N

T

O

E

S 9

B

N

R T

R

S

C

I

C

N

S

I

F

L

I

L

H

L

S

E

A

8

R

E

C K

C

12

19

R O

3

E

L I

R

E 32

U

E

E

S

36

A

S

T 27

O M

P

M

33

T

4

18

E 32

C

S

U

T

31

A

T

O M

29

S C

11

27

F O

S 26

2

E

E

S U

V

S

N G

N

S

N T

S H I

T

P

E

S

S

1 6 9 8 4 7 3 5 2

2 8 7 3 1 5 9 6 4

5 4 3 6 2 9 8 1 7

4 3 5 1 7 8 2 9 6

9 2 1 5 6 3 7 4 8

6 7 8 2 9 4 5 3 1

3 5 6 7 8 1 4 2 9

8 9 2 4 3 6 1 7 5

7 1 4 9 5 2 6 8 3

Tri-City Stargazer MAY 30 – JUNE 4, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: On June 5 we will experience what is known as “Venus transiting the Sun.” This is a rare event and usually occurs in pairs. We had the first of this pair in 2004; the second one occurs now. The previous pair occurred 121.5 years ago when women’s suffrage came to the public consciousness. It required many years to bring that to fruition.

Aries (March 21-April 20): It may be difficult to find common ground with partners, authorities, or significant others in your life during this period. You have a desire to express yourself, and the “other” seems to be recalcitrant. Do not turn this into a power play or a long-term resentment. That will not be good for your health. Tone down your anger a notch or two and say your piece. Then, let it go. Taurus (April 21-May 20): You will have many opportunities to engage socially with multiple friends and associates. This may come at a time when you naturally gravitate toward your introverted side. It might seem like way too much now, but here it is. Whatever develops harkens back to new beginnings of 2004.

on your daily routines. Circumstances at work may be in a state of flux, otherwise called a “zoo.” The state of your health is prominent. Good or bad depends on how you have been caring for yourself. A new seed is planted in your unconscious and will begin to develop slowly toward materialization in your life. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): This promises to be an unusual week. Your attention is drawn toward your community at large. People from the past may be traveling through once again. Be alert to changes in the character of these folks that have occurred since your last encounter.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): You may be easily angered on May 30. Do not accelerate yourself into an accident. Beyond Thursday, the pace and company are positive and welcome. This is a good week to be social or to focus your attention on a project that requires detail.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): You may feel somewhat edgy and irritable this week. Parts of your mind are scattered into so many corners that it is hard to pull everything together. Your boundaries are being attacked, probably at work. This may have been happening for a few months. Now is the time to let people know they cannot walk on you anymore.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): The full moon on June 4 shines a light

Libra (September 23-October 22): An incredibly bright light is

thrown into your 9th house territory. That sector includes legal activity, publishing, higher education, Internet, philosophy and travel. Any one or more of these interests is likely to be noted by the Powers That Be. As long as you have maintained good ethics, these events should go well. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Pace yourself. This is liable to be a long and challenging week. People and things may get on your nerves. You will feel better if you let things go. It may be nearly impossible to move forward right now. Use your energy to tread water and lighten up. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): There will be a full moon eclipse in your sign on June 4 at 4:12 am PDT. In days surrounding this eclipse, something important will be illuminated. How can you develop an individual identity that is authentic while simultaneously maintaining a personally rewarding relationship? Capricorn (December 22-January 19): This is an excellent time to pursue any activity that requires your mental concentration. The Goats are not always able to sit still

enough to learn theoretical information, but right now, there is a good window. Contracts and written communications, along with travel, have “Go” signals. Use caution with physical activities. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Your ability to concentrate on projects that require detail management is strong. If you focus your mind on a mentally challenging project that can have an identifiable outcome, things will move smoothly. If, instead, you focus on heavy physical labor, you must have additional help. You are subject to back and muscle strain.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): One of your planetary rulers, Neptune, turns retrograde this week. This suggests that one or more anxieties will go underground for a few months, and you will actually feel better than before. You know that sometimes your imagination is just too potent, and you react to it as though it were the real thing.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


May 29, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 1

Three Stooges, French mime Marcel Marceau, and Milton Berle to Dick Van Dyke, Rowan Atkinson, and Jim Carrey. Born in London in 1889, Charles Spencer Chaplin was destined for stardom. First taking the stage at the age of five as a fill-in for his mother, Charlie instantly developed a love for entertaining. He toured America in a Vaudeville show in 1910, but it wasn't until his second trip to the states in 1914 that he discovered the art of film making. From that moment on, a star was born that still shines brightly over the Hollywood sky. Charlie went on to make 86 films, 73 of which he directed from 1914 – 1967. Unlike most of his contemporaries, his transition from silent film to the “talkies” in 1931 was quite successful. However, the talkies did end his lonely tramp character, as Charlie reasoned that it was such a staple of the silent film era, it wouldn't have the same impact if the character was given a voice. At the height of the silent film era, Charlie, aged 26, was a worldwide film star making over

$600,000 a year, an incredible sum which made him one of the richest men in the world. Unfortunately, his personal life never shared the same success as his public life. He married four times, the longest lasting 34 years to Oona, the daughter of playwright Eugene O'Neill, and fathered 12 children. After a lifetime of making people smile, Charlie Chaplin passed away in his sleep at the age of 88 on Christmas Eve 1977. Now, each year his legacy is celebrated during Chaplin Days in Niles. “He was only here for a few months while filming for Essanay Studios,” explains Stanley Mason of Fremont. “He made about seven movies during that time, including ‘The Tramp,’ which ends with Charlie's little tramp character famously walking away down Niles Canyon Road. He also shared a small cottage, which I think still stands, with his then leading lady Edna Purviance.” Mason continues, “In retrospect, his time here wasn't the highlight of his career, but it forever put Niles on the map of Hollywood movie nostalgia. It's a beautiful place. To walk here is to

Page 33

step back in time. And to know that people like Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Broncho Billy, and others spent time and filmed movies here, makes it that much more special.” Chaplin Days will be held the weekend of June 2 and 3 with both days featuring look-a-like contests, great food, penny carnival games, and much more. Every person who dresses as Charlie or any other nostalgic Hollywood star will get a special prize. Two quarters will pay for the entrance into the Essanay Silent Film Museum throughout the day to watch one of the six movies Charlie filmed in Niles, with a special showing of one of his most famous silent films, “The Kid” on Saturday night for $5. Another highlight, co-sponsored by the Laurel and Hardy Film Appreciation Society, will be the Pie Fight of the Century at 4 p.m. on Sunday. There will be so much to do and see, this is a can't miss event for the entire family. It has been going strong for over 50 years, and is guaranteed to leave you with what Charlie dedicated his life to giving - a smile. Charlie Chaplin Days Saturday, June 2 and Sunday, June 3 11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Niles Boulevard Old Town Niles, Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.niles.org

Charlie Chaplin Days Main Activities on Niles Blvd between F & I Streets 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Co-sponsored by Niles Main Street Association and Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum Activities both Saturday & Sunday Charlie Chaplin film shorts a Edison Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont, (Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum) One- and two-reel movies filmed in Niles in 1915! Movie Tickets 50c (suggested donation) Popcorn and snacks are available Movie Schedule: 11:30 a.m. "A Night Out" 50¢ 12:30 p.m. "The Champion" 50¢ 1:30 p.m. "In The Park" 50¢ 1:45 p.m. "The Movies Go West" 50¢ 2:30 p.m. "The Jitney Elopement" 50¢ 3:30 p.m. “The Tramp” 50¢ 4 p.m. (Saturday only) "When the Movies Came From Niles" $2 7:30 p.m. (Saturday only) "The Kid" $5 – limited seating, advance ticket purchase at www.niles.org advised

Charlies all around town: on display in stores, wandering around town and even riding the steam train! (featuring Al Proietti, our “Niles Chaplin”) See train schedule at www.niles.org Penny Carnival Games: Bean Bag Toss, High Striker Sunday, June 3rd Only Lookalike Contest 2 p.m. Come dressed up like him or another movie star and win a prize! Google’s Chaplin Doodle was released on the Google website April 16, 2011 to celebrate Chaplin’s birthday – we will share it again this year right before the contest. A Salute to Slapstick Pie Fight of the Century 4 p.m. Smash a pie for a good cause! Pies to throw - $3/$5 Proceeds go toward the silent film being created in Niles by the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum. More information can be found at www.indiegogo.com/nilesfilm. Co-sponsored by the Laurel & Hardy Film Appreciation Society – Sons of the Desert - Midnight Patrol tent and Niles Pie Company!

Clinton, military leaders plead for sea treaty

continued from page 12

Clinton, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, made a rare joint appearance before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to make the case for the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea. The United States is the only major nation that has refused to sign the treaty, which was concluded in 1982 and been in force since 1994. But the committee chairman announced at the start of the hearing that he would not push for a Senate vote before the November elections. Still, Sen. John Kerry, a Democrat, ., insisted that approval of the treaty is necessary because the United States “has lived by the rules, but we don't shape the rules.” Since the Reagan administration, the U.S. has abided by the rules of the treaty, which is endorsed by 161 countries and the European Union. Clinton and the military leaders said it was now time for the U.S. to grab a seat at the table in international negotiations on navigational rights and seabed mining. “One hundred and sixty nations have acceded to it, and we say, ‘To hell with them, we're not going to participate in that,’” Panetta said. “Then 160 nations

are going to determine what happens” and the U.S. is on the sidelines. He said the United States repeatedly insists that Iran and North Korea follow international rules. Failing to approve the sea treaty, Panetta said, undermines U.S. authority. Conservative and tea party Republicans say the treaty would undercut U.S. sovereignty, force a redistribution of wealth and stand in for the Kyoto Protocol on climate change that would allow foreign countries to regulate U.S. energy. Clinton dismissed the opposition as misguided. “I am well aware that this treaty does have determined opposition, limited but nevertheless quite vociferous,” she said. “And it's unfortunate because its opposition based in ideology and mythology, not in facts, evidence or the consequences of our continuing failure to accede to the treaty.” She suggested that opponents who are wary of any U.N.-based treaty are expressing unfounded fears. “That means the black helicopters are on their way,” Clinton said. Her comments made several committee Republicans bristle.

Phoenix-area man hits $1 million jackpot six times AP WIRE SERVICE PHOENIX (AP), A suburban Phoenix man made a lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky, lucky guess in a recent multistate lottery game. An Arizona Lottery spokeswoman says the Glendale man claimed six $1 million prizes after purchasing six Powerball tickets with the same winning numbers late last month. The tickets were good for a half dozen second-place prizes. And he picked up his $6 million in winnings over the course several visits to the Arizona Lottery's headquarters in Phoenix. Lottery spokeswoman Karen Bach says the man doesn't want his identity released.

“I am one of the people who has concerns with this treaty, and I assure you that my concerns are rooted in something more than mythology. ...They are rooted first and foremost in America's national sovereignty, and I think that is not something that is to be discounted here,” Sen. Mike Lee, a Republican, said. The treaty establishes a system for resolving disputes in international waters and recognizes sovereign rights over a country's continental shelf out to 200 nautical miles and beyond if the country can provide evidence to substantiate its claims. Clinton said U.S. oil and natural gas companies now have the technology to explore the extended continental shelf, which could be more than 1 1/2 times the size of the state of Texas and rich in resources. Those companies are seeking the greatest legal certainty from the treaty before investing millions of dollars. The pact gives Arctic countries 10 years after they ratify the treaty to prove their claims under the largely uncharted polar ice cap. By failing to back the treaty, Kerry said the United States is losing ground to growing military power China as well as

Russia, which is claiming oil and other resources in the Arctic. The treaty has exposed the fault lines within the Republican Party, pitting conservative tea partyers against the pro-business faction. The treaty has the strong backing of the oil, gas and mining industries, companies such as Lockheed Martin, all the living former presidents from both parties and former and current national security officials. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce took out a full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday calling for Senate ratification. But 26 of the Senate's 47 Republicans, led by Sen. Jim DeMint, a Republican, have signed a letter pledging to oppose the treaty if it gets to the Senate for a vote. A lone Republican voice in support of the treaty was Sen. Richard Lugar, who said the question for the Senate was whether “to consign the United States to a position of self-imposed weakness in our ability to influence ocean affairs, despite the fact that no other nation has a greater interest in navigational freedoms ... or a more advanced technological capacity to exploit ocean resources.”

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com q 12 Months for $75

Subscription Form PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY

q Renewal - 12 months for $50 q Check

Date:

Name:

q Credit Card

q Cash

Credit Card #: Card Type:

Address: Exp. Date: Zip Code: City, State, Zip Code: Delivery Name & Address if different from Billing: Business Name if applicable:

q

Home Delivery

q

Mail

Phone:

E-Mail:

Authorized Signature: (Required for all forms of payment)


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

BART officially names new Fremont station SUBMITTED BY JAMES ALLISON BART customers awaiting service to Silicon Valley now have a name to go with a place: Warm Springs/South Fremont Station. The Board of Directors voted today to combine history and practicality in officially naming the future station at the end of the Warm Springs Extension, a key link in BART to San Jose. "Putting Warm Springs first in the station name memorializes the history of Warm Springs, which officially became part of Fremont when the city was incorporated in 1956,” BART Director Tom Blalock said. “Adding South Fremont to the station name separates it from the existing Fremont Station and follows BART’s naming conventions.” Director Blalock has represented District 6, which includes Fremont, for more than 17 years. Fremont City Council voted in February to endorse the name. Choosing a name for the station now is important because the Warm Springs Extension project has advanced to the point where signage and other titled materials must be ordered. The cost of the signage is contained within the $890 million project budget. The extension will add 5.4 miles of new tracks from the existing Fremont Station south to the new station at Warm Springs and South Grimmer Boulevards. The extension is expected to be open in late 2015. BART to Silicon Valley is a separate 10 mile extension that will connect Warm Springs/South Fremont Station to a station in San Jose’s Berryessa neighborhood. The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority is responsible for paying for the design, construction, operations and maintenance of the BART to Silicon Valley Extension within Santa Clara County. For more information on the Warm Springs Extension project, visit www.bart.gov/projects. For more information on BART to Silicon Valley, log on to www.vta.org/bart. ;

SUBMITTED BY DINO LABISTE En plein air is a French expression which means “in the open air,” and is used to describe paintings that have been created chiefly outdoors, rather than in the studio. Sign-up and join fellow artists for the 4th Annual Plein Air Paint Out at Coyote Hills Regional Park in Fremont on Sunday, June 3. Find inspiration in the many natural settings throughout the park; capture the light, shadow and colors of the rolling hills, marsh habitats, wildlife, various native floras, and a panoramic view of the San Francisco Bay. All two-dimensional mediums such as oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, and mixed media, will be accepted. Artists can paint any subject or scene anywhere within Coyote Hills, working from the natural landscape and not from a reference photograph or digital image. Plan on bringing your painting

supplies, an easel, chair (if needed), and additional drinking water. Hats or caps are recommended. Dress for the weather. Completed pieces must return to the Coyote Hills Visitor Center by 12:30 p.m. for an exhibition of artwork for public viewing and an optional silent auction from 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. at the Visitor Center’s lawn area. Proceeds from the silent auction will go to the individual artist with a 10 percent fee of total sales paid to East Bay Regional Park District. People’s Choice Awards will be given out at the end of the day for first, second, and third places. The Paint Out is open to ages 18 and over. Artists can paint as many paintings as they want, but each artist is limited to only one submission for exhibition. The entry fee is $15 for residents of Alameda or Contra Costa counties ($17 for non-residents) and includes registration, parking pass, a morning snack, and a light lunch (between 12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.). The registration deadline is Thursday, May 31. To reserve your spot call 1-888-327-2757, option 2, 3, or register online at www.ebparks.org., click on “Reservations/Registration,” select “EBParks Online” and type in course number 28995, then click on the magnifying glass icon on the right. Pre-registered artists must sign-in at the Visitor Center from 8 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. The artist’s canvas, paper, panel, etc. must be stamped prior to any work being done. The size of the artwork is not to exceed 30” by 30.” Artists may stamp one or more canvas, paper, panel, etc., but only one piece will be submitted for the exhibition. Non-artists can take advantage of all that Coyote Hills has to offer, while seeing some great art with the unique opportunity to purchase a freshly created artwork by great local artists. Let East Bay Regional Park District be your creative muse and help promote art in the park! For more information, call Dino Labiste at (510) 544-3215 or send an e-mail to dlabiste@ebparks.org. Plein Air Paint Out Sunday, June 3 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Road, Fremont (510) 544-3215 www.ebparks.org Entry Fee: $15

Teacher of the Year, Connie Piserchio accepts her award from Newark Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Dave Marken.

Teacher of the Year SUBMITTED BY PAM HUGHES, PRINCIPAL PHOTO COURTESY OF NEWARK UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Connie Piserchio has been selected as Newark Unified School District’s 2012 Teacher of the Year. She teaches a 5/6 blended classroom at Lincoln Elementary School. Mrs. Piserchio has been at our school for six years and has taught as part of the Newark Unified School District for eight years. She is a wonderful teacher who is dedicated to the success of her students and was chosen by her colleagues because she is an inspiring educator who is always willing to go above and beyond to help her students and her colleagues. We are very fortunate to have her as part of our Lincoln community.


May 29, 2012

BY NISHA PATEL PHOTOS COURTESY OF EAST BAY TRADITIONAL JAZZ SOCIETY On Saturday, June 2, the East Bay Traditional Jazz Society will be hosting its 12th Annual Youth

Jazz Festival at the NewPark Mall. Performances will feature Horner Junior High School, Irvington High School, Thornton Junior High School, American High School, Hopkins Junior High School, and John F. Kennedy High School. The East Bay Jazzinators will be performing during most of the breaks between each set, and Fremont Christian’s Dixie Dominus will perform during the last two breaks, to provide continuous music. Each group will be allowed 45 minutes to perform any tunes that are jazz-oriented, and even have the freedom to intermingle their personnel by bringing in other young musicians and changing their type of music. “The purpose of the event is to give jazz musicians and local high school and junior high school bands a chance to play and perform their music in public and provide a place for them to showcase their talents,” explained John Soulis, Director of the East Bay Traditional Jazz Society. The event will take place in the center court of the NewPark Mall, where during each band’s performance different members of the Jazz Society pass a “tip jar” among listeners. Each round usually brings in about $100. After the tips are counted, the Jazz So-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ciety writes a check for the collected amount onsite to the school band to help fund their other band activities. Although the annual Jazz Festival has been taking place for over a decade, this year’s performers will also feature Irvington High School that did not

perform last year. Fremont Christian School, who played in their place, will be returning to both the Fremont Jazz Festival this weekend, as well as at the Sacramento Jazz Festival. The East Bay Traditional Jazz Society sponsors the event, but it is also made possible with the help and cooperation of many other local sponsors, which include Fremont Bank, Bronco Billy’s, NewPark Mall, Lucky’s market in Mission Valley, and Mission Gold Jazz Band. Organizers are thankful to the NewPark Mall for providing a facility for two consecutive years, to John F. Kennedy High School for providing music stands, students and parents of the Jazzinators for providing the pianos and keyboards, and other community members for their continuous support. For more information on the Jazz Festival or the East Bay Traditional Jazz Society, call John Soulis at (510) 657-0243 or visit www.eastbaytradjazz.org. Youth Jazz Festival Saturday, June 2 11 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. NewPark Mall Center Court 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 657-0243 www.eastbaytradjazz.org

Band Performances: 11 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.: Horner Jr. High 11:55 a.m. - 12:35 p.m.: Irvington High School 12:50 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.: Thornton Jr. High 1:45 p.m. - 2:25 p.m.: American High School 2:40 p.m. - 3:20 p.m.: Hopkins Jr. High 3:35 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.: John F. Kennedy High School

Page 35


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

May 29, 2012

Page 36

Local students qualify for national Biology Olympiad finals SUBMITTED BY MAUREEN PALMER The Center for Excellence in Education (CEE) is pleased to announce that two greater Tri-City high school students have been selected to attend the 10th Annual USA Biology Olympiad (USABO) National Finals from June 3-15 at Purdue University. Twenty finalists were selected based on their high scores from the USABO Open and Semifinal Exams. The Center reports that nearly 10,500 students registered nationally for the USABO. During the two weeks at Purdue, the finalists will participate in intensive theoretical and practical tutorials. The high school students will study with leading U.S. biologists who are experts in the fields of cellular biology, microbiology, biotechnology, plant anatomy & physiology, animal anatomy & physiology, ethology, genetics & evolution, ecology, and biosystematics. At the conclusion of the two weeks, students take two exams, a practical and a theoretical. The four highest scoring students are named “Team USA 2012” and will represent this nation in competition with student teams from 60 countries at the International Biology Olympiad (IBO) in Singapore July 8-15. “Team USA Members have earned gold medals at the last five International Biology Olympiad competitions, including 2011 where Team USA achieved the coveted Number One position and Team in the World”, said Joann DiGennaro, President of the Center for Excellence in Education. “CEE is proud to sponsor the USABO with Purdue University and to train these high school scholars in practical and theoretical biology.” Seven national finalists are from California. Other finalists represent the states of Delaware, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia. California finalists include: Daniel Bork, North Hollywood High School, North Hollywood Nikhil Buduma, Bellarmine College Preparatory, San Jose Bryce Hwang, Foothill High School, Pleasanton Jing Liu, Mission San Jose High School, Fremont Rachel Paris, Santa Monica High School, Santa Monica Siddharth Trehan, Mira Loma High School, Sacramento Hamilton Trinh, Mission San Jose, Fremont For more information about the Center and its programs, visit CEE’s Web site, www.cee.org

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

Exp. 6/30/12

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

$24.95+ FREON Easy Service we will check for leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only.

Exp. 6/30/12

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 6/30/12 Most Cars and Trucks

TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

$79.

$89.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 6/30/12

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 6/30/12

RADIATOR FLUSH

$29.

95

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 6/30/12

$19.

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 6/30/12

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.95 6-CYL. $49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp.6/30/12

TCV 2012-05-29  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you