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A somber joyful day

Spring Photo Walk Page 31

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

BY JESSICA NOËL FLOHR

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here can foodies, fans of Hollywood and parents find common ground? At the 17th Annual Taster’s Showcase presented by Kidango. This annual event benefits early childhood development services offered by Kidango throughout the Bay Area. Local restaurants, wineries, and businesses have offered their services to make this an exceptional event. Auctions, entertainment, and delectable treats await! The theme this year is “Celebrating the History of Old Hollywood.” Fremont’s Niles District was an inspiration for the Hollywood we know today, a local legacy

for generations that followed and those yet to come. In the same way, the vital educational and developmental services provided by Kidango are leaving a legacy for future generations as well. Showcase attendees will spend the afternoon mingling with celebrity impersonators and drifting from booth to booth to sample tasty offerings from local restaurants and wineries. Some of the 24 participants include: Elliston Winery, Federico’s Tapas and Wine Bar, Fenestra Winery, Papillon, Spin A Yarn Steakhouse, Massimo’s, and many more. A panel of judges led by Carmel, California, chef and author Mary Chamberlin will oversee a competition for the best presentation in food and beverage. Chamber-

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lin trained in Paris at Le Cordon Bleu and La Varenne. She has published several culinary books including “The Traveling Soup

April 17, 2012

Pot: A Savory Journey Through Many Lands.” In addition to many fabulous foodie delights, attendees at this business casual event will have the chance to bid on numerous vacation packages and other treats in a live auction. Sure to be a hit is a seven-day stay at a villa in Jamaica. Other auction items rounding out the list are a one-week stay in Tahoe at the Tahoe Keys Resort, a threenight stay at Gray Eagle Lodge, a year-long family membership for four at the Walt Disney Museum in

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San Francisco and a private tour of the museum for eight. Attendees can also bid on gift baskets created by Kidango center families. Each basket has a movie-related theme, such as a breakfast item basket named after “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” Taster’s Showcase is the organization’s major fundraising event. Proceeds go toward enhancing the local centers’ programs, purchasing supplies, and subsidizing field trips for students. continued on page 15

BY M. J. LAIRD PHOTOS COURTESY OF KEVIN YEE AND JOHN DUTRA For 20 years, members of Citizens for Better Community have invested time and money into the Tri-City area using money raised annually through a single fundraiser, its Spring Celebration. This year’s theme is “Cocktails and Couture: A Night of Glamour.” Set for Saturday, April 21, the evening will feature a runway fashion show as dinner entertainment. Fashions will include both traditional Asian dress and modern clothing for both men and women; local residents will act as models. The fashion show will include designs from New York-based architect and fashion designer Teddy Lee, who won Lifetime Network’s fashion competition “24 Hour Catwalk.” Lee, formerly from the San continued on page 18

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK Trips to other cities to enjoy a first class movie in a first class movie theater will soon be an option for Fremont residents rather than a requirement. Beginning Friday, April 20, Cinemark will open its state-of-the-art, 16-screen, theatre as one of the premiere destinations of “The Block” at Pacific Commons. Cinemark USA, Inc. has pulled out all the stops in design and preparation of the “Century at Pacific Commons.” Marketing Director Bryan Jeffries noted that although his organization has theaters in Union City and Milpitas, Fremont is a prime location as well. Described as “a great community,” Jeffries noted that at the Fremont Century Theater, unlike other theaters in which newer innovations are added piecemeal to an existing facility, innovations have been incorporated into initial construction. Called “Next-Gen design,” the theater is expected to be a prototype for how theaters are built in the future. A showpiece of this newer technology is an XD (Extreme Digital) auditorium featuring a fourth wall – wall-to-wall, floor-to-ceiling screen – with plush, adjustable seating with expanded leg room, digital projection, JPL surround sound for both 2-D and 3-D images. Remaining screening rooms, although smaller in size will feature the same concept of a floor-toceiling, wall-to-wall screen and similar approaches to additional continued on page 18

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 23

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

Washington Hospital Offers Leading-Edge Cancer Care Most people fear a diagnosis of cancer, yet convincing them to be screened for one of the most preventable cancers there is can be difficult. Colorectal cancer is common, yet highly preventable. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 143,000 people in this country will be diagnosed with the disease this year alone. “Let’s be serious, the screening for colorectal cancer is not a walk in the park, but it’s not that bad either and it can save your life,” said Dr. Arun Srivatsa, a local gastroenterologist and member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “With new technology, our ability to detect colorectal cancer is better than ever. Washington Hospital’s affiliated surgery center has the most up-to-date high-definition imaging equipment for colonoscopy and is the only facility in the Tri-City area that offers this. High definition provides more details and we can see polyps much easier.” Most of the time, colorectal cancer begins as a microscopic polyp on the wall of the colon, part of the large intestine, or in the rectum, he explained. A colonoscopy is a screening method that allows physicians to see the inside the rectum and colon using a small tube with a camera on the

Thanks to high-definition diagnostic tools, Dr.Arun Srivatsa, (above) a Washington Hospital gastroenterologist, can better detect colorectal cancer.Washington Hospital’s affiliated surgery center has the most up-to-date high-definition imaging equipment for colonoscopy. To learn more about treatment options for colorectal cancer, visit www.whhs.com/eus

The Sandy Amos, R.N. Infusion Center works to ensure that cancer patients receive the highest level of care. Shari Kellen, R.N., (above) the Center’s coordinator, helps connect patients to the care and services they need such as support groups, nutrition education services, and counseling. Visit www.whhs.com/infusion-center for more information.

tip. If polyps are present, they are usually removed during the colonoscopy, preventing them from becoming cancerous. Get Screened “Both men and women should get a colonoscopy beginning at age 50,” Srivatsa

said. “But the good news is you won’t need to have another one for five to 10 years depending on if you have polyps. It takes polyps that long to develop into cancer. If you are at high risk for colorectal cancer, your physician may want you to start screening before age 50.” If you have a strong family history of colon cancer or were diagnosed with colon cancer under the age of 50, you may want to talk to your doctor about a referral to the Washington Hospital Cancer Genetics Clinic. Colorectal cancer can be hereditary and there is a gene mutation that can indicate whether you are at risk, Srivatsa said. But it’s not really clear what causes colorectal cancer and screening is the best way to prevent it. “Eating right, exercising, and avoiding tobacco and excessive drinking can help to reduce your risk,” he added. “Eating too much red and processed meat seems to raise your risk for the disease. A diet rich

in fruits and vegetables and fiber seems to lower the risk.” Generally there are no symptoms associated with colorectal cancer until the cancer is at a more advanced stage. That’s why it’s important for healthy people to be screened. “People think they are not going to get colorectal cancer because they feel good, eat well, and are regular,” Srivatsa said. “But that’s a myth. By the time you have weight loss, belly pain, and bleeding, the cancer has progressed. With a colonoscopy, we can actually stop the development of cancer before it starts.” About 30 percent of people over age 50 have polyps and about 5 percent of those will develop into cancer, he added. Death rates from colorectal cancer have dropped significantly for both men and women in the last 20 years due to screening and more effective treatments, according to the American Cancer Society. continued on page 4

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

04/17/12

04/18/12

04/19/12

04/20/12

04/21/12

04/22/12

04/23/12

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Think Pink 2011

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 14th, 2012

Women's Health Conference: Skin Health From Infancy to Maturity

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Positivity - A Positive Minimally Invasive Surgery Approach to Managing for Lower Back Disorders Diabetes Washington Women's Center: Cholesterol and Women

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life Men's Health Expo 2011 Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run!

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children

Inside Washington Hospital: Inside Washington Hospital: Washington Township Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders Center for Sleep Disorders

Women's Health Conference: Pain and Rehabilitation

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Heart Irregularities Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11, 2012

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Diabetes Health Fair 2011: Marvelous Meals in Minutes

Disaster Preparedness What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Wound Care Update

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 14th, 2012

Living with Heart Failure

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Learn About Nutrition for Insurance Information for a Healthy Life People with Diabetes

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Insurance Information for People with Diabetes

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

World Kidney Day Men's Health Expo 2011

Diabetes Matters: Making Diabetes a Good Fit for Health

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 14th, 2012

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 14th, 2012

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11th, 2012

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting April 11th, 2012

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

The Weight to Success

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Weight Management for Seniors

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challengess

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Cyberbullying - The New Schoolyard Bully

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Voices InHealth: Update on the Journey to Magnet Status

Learn How to Eat Better! (Late Start)

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Get Back On Your Feet: Inside Washington New Treatment Options for Hospital: The Green Team Ankle Conditions Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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very day Washington Hospital counts on volunteers to provide added support for patients, visitors and families. Whether it's greeting a visitor, comforting a patient or other countless duties, volunteers provide that added something special that patients, visitors and staff appreciate and value. National Volunteer Week (April 15-21) is a special opportunity to honor volunteers who devote their time, energy and talent to serving the community. Washington Hospital is fortunate to have a diverse group of more than 600 dedicated people who volunteer their time throughout the year. Couple Volunteers Together There are many reasons why people may decide to volunteer, but for longtime Fremont residents Dave and Ellie Scandling, the value of supporting their community hospital is one of the reasons they became volunteers. ”We feel that Washington Hospital is our community’s hospital,” says Dave. “Our desire is to give back to the community, meet people and serve others.”

National Volunteer Week (April 15-21) is a special opportunity to honor volunteers who devote their time, energy and talent to serving the community.Washington Hospital is fortunate to have a diverse group of more than 600 dedicated people who volunteer their time throughout the year. To learn more about volunteering at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/volunteer or call (510) 791-3465.

Dave and Ellie Scandling have been volunteering at Washington Hospital since 2010 and they both enjoy taking baby photos and supporting Hospital staff and the community members they come into contact with.

The Scandling’s have been volunteering at Washington Hospital since 2010 and they both enjoy supporting the Hospital staff and community members they come into contact with. ”My wife and I like taking baby photos through the New Born Photography program,” says Dave. “Photos create memories and it’s great to share a beautiful moment with the parents and the babies.” The Scandling’s say that volunteering has heightened their appreciation as to just how important volunteers are to the many facets of the hospital. ”We find volunteering to be a positive experience and we enjoy playing a role in the hospital’s success,” they say. “When people look at you and say thank you, that’s what volunteering is all about.”

What Makes a Good Volunteer? The Scandling’s say a good volunteer is accountable to the tasks, really enjoys people, accepts directives from staff and wants to be a quality ambassador for the hospital. “We’ve even recruited a friend to volunteer and she really enjoys volunteering her time,” adds Ellie. “Volunteers play an important role in Washington Hospital’s daily operation and we’ve also made some great friends along the way.” In honor of National Volunteer Week, take time to consider volunteering your time. There are many different types of volunteer opportunities available through the Washington Hospital Service League, and to make it even easier to volunteer, the hospital has implemented a "Random Staffing" program, which enables trained volunteers to go online and choose a time

and day that is convenient for them to donate their time. Volunteers with Washington Hospital's Service League have a number of exciting volunteer opportunities throughout the hospital, including: • Baby Photos - Take baby photos for parents who are very happy to see baby's first picture. • Patient Feeding - Assist staff with feeding patients who need social interaction, or whose medical condition makes it difficult to feed themselves. • Emergency Room - Provide emotional support to patients and their families in the emergency room. • Community Health Resource Library Assist visitors in finding answers to their health-related questions. Service League volunteers also: • Greet patients and visitors • Discharge patients • Deliver flowers • Sell items in the gift shop • Keep concerned friends and families updated on patient status • Assist at the Radiology Oncology Center • Play piano in the main hospital lobby • Make puppets for children • Take families on tours of the hospital's Birthing Center • Act as coaches for patients in Center for Joint Replacement • Assist at public lectures and health screenings. In addition to the Service League's volunteers, Washington Hospital also benefits from the dedication of a number of other vital volunteers, including: • Officers of the Washington Hospital Employees' Association (WHEA), who spearhead community projects to help local nonprofit organizations.

• Hospice Volunteers, who provide a special gift of time by providing support and relief to caregivers of terminally ill patients by helping with tasks, visiting and making phone calls. • Washington Hospital Healthcare Foundation Volunteers, who provide support to the foundation's many charitable events. • The Mended Hearts Board, which organizes educational meetings, lunches and social events for people in the community and the Mended Heart Volunteer Visitors who have had heart surgery and choose to volunteer their time visiting current heart surgery patients and their family members in the hospital. • Hospital Chaplains, spiritual care volunteers who provide spiritual counseling and comfort to patients and family members in the hospital.

Become a Volunteer Prospective volunteers are welcome to attend a monthly volunteer information session at Washington Hospital where they will be informed about current volunteer opportunities and requirements for volunteering. Applications are provided at the information session. Volunteers who meet the health, age and background screening requirements must attend an orientation to learn about the hospital's mandatory safety program. The next volunteer information meeting will take place on Friday, May 18, from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A & B, located at 2500 Mowry Ave. (Washington West) in Fremont. For more information about becoming a Washington Hospital volunteer, call (510) 791-3465 or visit www.whhs.com/volunteer.

Fremont Police Department Presents Free Seminar About Cyber Bullying, Digital Safety So much of our daily life revolves around the Internet and wireless technology—status updates, text messages, tweets. And the same is true for many children and teenagers. However, as the Internet and technology have evolved, so have the means to abuse them, raising the question: how do we protect kids and teenagers from a range of digital threats, from cyber bullying to online predators? Next Monday, April 23, from 6 to 8 p.m., Fremont Police Department Sergeants Jim Koepf and Gregg Crandall will present a special Health & Wellness seminar focusing on cyber bullying and digital safety in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West building) across the street from Washington Hospital in Fremont. The Internet has changed the way people interact, and the schoolyard bullying that many parents remember from their

own childhood has changed, according to Sgt. Crandall. “Back in my day and my parents’ day, two kids got in a beef, and they fought on the playground—and that was the end of it,” he says. “It’s different today. The Internet has grown to be a monster if it’s not used for what it’s supposed to be used for—to stay in contact with friends or relatives—when it comes to social media. Myspace started it all, and now Facebook. We’ve solved so many cases off of Facebook, from playground brawls to gang issues. “The lure of the Internet when using it for bad things is being anonymous.” Lucy Hernandez, Operations Coordinator for the Community Health Resource Library at Washington Hospital, who was responsible for organizing the upcoming talk, points out that cyber bullying can have long-term consequences. “Bullying in addition to cyber bullying can lead adolescents to depression and other

How do we protect children and teenagers from a range of digital threats, from cyber bullying to online predators? Join Fremont Police Department Sergeants Jim Koepf and Gregg Crandall on Monday, April 23 at a Washington Hospital seminar focusing on digital and internet safety. Parents and teens will learn how to recognize the warning signs of cyber bullying and many important digital safety tips. The free lecture will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A, B & C at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com.

psychological problems,” she notes. “In some cases, cyber bullying has led students to substance abuse, violence, and even suicide. The effects of bullying can last a lifetime; therefore, such behavior should be dealt with during developmental stages.” Sgt. Crandall says that in the past he and Sgt. Koepf—who serves as the department’s School Resource Officer—worked together as part of a taskforce on sexual assault and child abuse in connection with

Sunnyvale Police Department. After Sunnyvale’s department put together a public service address about Internet safety, geared toward parents and their kids, he and Sgt. Koepf got permission to adapt the presentation for community members in the Tri-City area. “The presentation that we do talks about not only cyber bullying but also takcontinued on page 11


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Infusion Center “Once colorectal cancer is diagnosed, it is treated with a combination of surgery and possibly chemotherapy,” said Dr. Vandana Sharma, a local oncologist and a member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “If the cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, we can treat it with surgery alone. However, if the cancer is very advanced or has spread outside of the colon, then chemotherapy is needed.” Tri-City residents have access to state-of-the-art cancer care at Washington Hospital’s Sandy Amos, R.N. Infusion Center. The center provides the latest cancer treatments and was designed with the patient in mind, Sharma said. Patients are treated in a private infusion area with internet access and a personal television. It’s a

comfortable setting for both the cancer patient and their caregiver, she added. “It’s really a wellness center for patients,” she said. “With colorectal cancer, the treatment course can be long, requiring an IV drip every two to three weeks for six months or longer. That’s why it’s so important to make patients as comfortable as possible and make sure their needs are met.” About 30 percent of the colorectal patients diagnosed at Washington Hospital present with stage III disease, which means they will need chemotherapy for six months, according to Sharma. She said 16 percent are diagnosed with stage IV cancer, which is more advanced, and will require chemotherapy for the rest of their lives to slow the progression of the disease.

The Infusion Center is a centralized place where cancer patients’ health care team can coordinate their medical care, Sharma explained. They have access to a nurse navigator who can connect them to the care and services they need such as support groups, nutrition education services, and counseling. “We offer world-class cancer prevention and treatment services right here in the Tri-City area,” she added. “You don’t have to travel to other destinations; the best cancer care available today is here in your own backyard.”

Learn More About Washington Hospital’s Cancer Care Services For more information about cancer prevention and treatment services available at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/cancer. To learn more about the Sandy Amos, R.N. Infusion Center, visit www.whhs.com/infusion-center.

BART rolls out new, easier-to-clean seats SUBMITTED BY BART BART showcased its latest seats on April 3, 2012, by rolling out a four-car train outfitted with brand new, easier-to-clean seats. The special train made a quick journey between 19th Street and Montgomery Street stations and back, picking up passengers along the way. “You spoke and BART listened,” BART Board President John McPartland said. “Eighty-one percent of those who participated in last summer’s Fleet of the Future ‘Seat Labs’ ranked cleanliness as Very Important and when comparing vinyl, fabric and hard plastic seats, 62 percent of those surveyed rated the vinyl test seats as their favorite.” Rather than continue to replace damaged and worn seats with the existing hard-to-care-for wool fabric, the BART Board approved a switch to an alternative material that meets smoke, fire and toxicity standards.

The seat makeover is an interim step before BART begins to replace its aging fleet and gives riders a taste of the new car experience. In March 2012, BART began replacing existing wool seat assemblies in 100 cars with a brand new type of seat material. These train cars will be integrated into the existing fleet - a few cars at a time until 100 cars are achieved. Before BART purchases more seats, on-board surveys will be conducted to determine whether or not customers give the new material their approval. The survey period is expected to run between April 21 and May 2, 2012. If results of these rider surveys are positive, BART will outfit up to an additional 100 cars with the new seat material. The results will also help BART design seats for its Fleet of the Future that will replace its oldest-in-the-nation fleet. The BART Board allocated

$1,945,234 to replace seats in up to 200 train cars. To identify the cars with new seats, passengers should look for exterior decals near the center doors that say “New BART Seats on Board.” When a BART survey taker is on-board one of these cars, they will ask riders for feedback by completing a survey form. The survey is available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese. Customers can also email feedback to seats@bart.gov. To learn more about the new seats, visit http://tinyurl.com/82thmfd. To view a photo gallery showing the dismantling of old seats and installation of new ones, visit the SFBART blog at http://tinyurl.com/8896m3z. For more information about the Fleet of the Future project to replace BART's aged train cars, visit www.bart.gov/cars


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

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The Boy Scout Oath, memorized by every scout, emphasizes honor, duty and loyalty. Unfortunately, not everyone subscribes to these ideals. Recently, during spring break, vandals broke into meeting, training and storage room on the Centerville Junior High School campus used by Mission Peak Council Boy Scouts. Their intention was less than honorable as they left mayhem and destruction in their wake. Graffiti was left on whiteboards and fire extinguishers were discharged within the room; tents, backpacks, emergency supplies, a bullhorn and other items were stolen or destroyed. A large cleanup effort was required to restore the rooms for use. In addition, a California flag was removed and an American flag defaced. Estimated loss is $1,000 $1,500 although the total damage has not been fully assessed. Anyone who can assist financially or help replace stolen items is asked to call Scoutmaster Steve Kay (510) 453-6927. Much of scouting is a volunteer effort and operates with very little funding. This is a serious loss for local scouting; community support would be appreciated.

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation awards luncheon The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation will hold its Annual People with Purpose Awards Luncheon, on Thursday, April 26. The event takes place at the Sheraton San Jose Hotel, from 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m. This year’s event will be honoring three individuals and one company who have made a difference in the lives of breast cancer survivors in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. This year’s honorees are: Pamela Priest Naeve - Cancer Prevention Institute of California (CPIC) Director, Community Education Ilene Scharlach, PhD - Cancer Support Community (CSC) Therapist Facilitator - East Bay Kathryn Hesser, RN, CBPN-IC - Retired Washington Women’s Center Coordinator Dutra Enterprises, Inc. Guest speaker will be Sue Glader, breast cancer survivor and 2011 Moonbeam Children’s Award winning author of Nowhere Hair. HERS luncheon Thursday, April 26 11:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Sheraton San Jose Hotel 1801 Barber Lane, Milpitas www.hersbreastcancerfoundation.org karen@hersbreastcancerfoundation.org $65.00 each - includes three-course lunch and an autographed copy of Nowhere Hair.

April 17, 2012


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

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unday, April 22 marks the 42nd anniversary of Earth Day, a worldwide event dedicated to increasing awareness and aid to preserve the natural beauty and resources of our planet, we call Earth. After witnessing the destruction caused by the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California, U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson saw a need to raise public awareness of air and water pollution. He pitched his idea for a “national teach-in on the environment” to the media and created a staff of 85 members to promote events across the country. The inaugural Earth Day in 1970 saw millions of Americans coming together over concerns about pesticides, toxic dumps, pollution from factories and power plants, oil spills, the loss of wilderness, and the extinction of wildlife. It was this bold first step that led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts. Earth Day became a global event in 1990, uniting 200 million people in 141 countries and raising environmental issues to the world stage. Concerns still abound; issues including climate change and clean energy are the focus for thousands of environmental groups around the globe who work every day to make our planet a better place. Earth Day extends the theme of environmental awareness and action to everyone by promoting actions each person can take every day to protect and preserve our world. In observance of Earth Day, local organizations will come together in an educational expo to promote a greener and friendlier environment. Presented by Washington Hospital and the City of Fremont, “Let’s Go Green Together!” invites attendees to meet with eco-friendly experts to learn about recycling and waste reduction, gardening and composting, saving energy at home, sustainability programs, and healthy eating through Farmers’ Markets. A free residential drop-off for syringes and needles (in approved containers) is scheduled pluse confidential document shredding, disposal of unused and unwanted medications, a mercury thermometer exchange, free lamp exchange, and donation of eyeglasses. A Farmer’s Market will also be onsite offering locally grown produce. Kids will enjoy eco-tainment, face painting, Earth Day art, and other free games and activities. For a great start to Earth Day, volunteer for the Annual Creek Cleanup from 9 a.m. to noon at Stiver’s Lagoon in Central Park. Let’s Go Green Together! Saturday, Apr 21 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 797-1111 www.whhs.com/green Ohlone College hosts a week of activities, talks, and demonstrations dealing with the state of the environment and how to live sustainably at both Fremont and Newark campuses. Visit the website for each day’s event hours and details. Earth Week April 16 - 19 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6000 www.ohlone.edu/org/sustainability/earthweek.html Learn about how to care for our planet and make changes that will conserve, protect, and sustain it for future generations. Create your own litter bug, enjoy an environmental puppet show (11:40 a.m. and 3:40 p.m.) and play recycling games. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Saturday, April 21 9:30 a.m. - noon, 1:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. Coyote Hills 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Discover the truths about oak trees at Lake Chabot and make the world a better place one tree at a time. Participants will receive a “Habitat Helpers” patch for their efforts. Registration is required (class code #28904). $5 parking fee per vehicle. Habitat Helpers Saturday, April 21 9 a.m. - noon Lake Chabot 17600 Lake Chabot Rd., Castro Valley 1-888-327-2757 option 2 www.ebparks.org/parks/lake_chabot Celebrate Earth Day by responsibly disposing of unwanted electronics at Eden Gardens Elementary Electronics Recycling Event. Bring computers TVs, cellphones, and old electronics. Eden Gardens Elementary Electronics Recycling Event Saturday, April 21 9 a.m. - noon Eden Gardens Elementary 2184 Thayer Ave., Hayward www.metechrecycling.com Kids ages eight and up can celebrate Earth Day by creating cards, bookmarks, or signs out of recycled paper. Decorate your creation with food coloring, non-toxic paint, or leaves and flowers. Seeds can be added to a paper pulp mixture to make gifts that can be planted to grow native flowers. Recycled Earth Day Cards Sunday, April 22 Noon to 1 p.m. Hayward Regional Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Cost: $5 Join Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge and Save the Bay for Earth Day. Latex gloves and trash bags will be supplied. Wear sturdy shoes, a hat, and sunscreen, and prepare to get dirty and have fun! Reservations are required and minors must be accompanied by an adult. Earth Day Cleanup Saturday, April 21 9 a.m. - noon Ravenswood Point, East Palo Alto (510) 463-6809 (510) 792-0002 www.savesfbay.org Reservations required

SUBMITTED BY RIANA DADLANI As part of its commitment to offer improved nutritional menu selections to customers, McDonald’s is launching the “Happy Meal Chefs” contest. This unique opportunity gives parent-and-child teams the opportunity to help create and test new, nutrition-minded Happy Meal choices alongside McDonald’s Executive Chef Dan Coudreaut. Every McDonald’s Happy Meal now automatically includes apple slices and a new kidsize fry. However, they continue to develop and test new menu offerings, and this contest provides the ability for kids to create their own Happy Meal. The contest runs until April 18, 2012 and will award two “Happy Meal Chefs” titles as well as send the top 10 finalists and their families to the London Olympics. Participants must answer a brief questionnaire and submit a short video online that creatively showcases their family mealtime. They’re also encouraged to learn about and feature recommended food groups from the USDA’s MyPlate, the balanced-eating symbol based on federal dietary guidelines. Parents or legal guardians with kids ages eight to 11 are eligible to enter online at the Happy Meal Chefs contest page: https://happymealchefs.mcdonalds.com/

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Commander Douglas retires

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Commander Bob Douglas is retiring from the City of Newark after serving over 30 years in law enforcement, with over 28 years as a member of the Newark Police Department. Bob’s last day with the department was Thursday, April 12, 2012. Bob began his career in law enforcement with the Town of Los Gatos as a Police Cadet and in 1981, was promoted to the position of Community Service Officer. Hired as a Police Officer by the Newark Police Department on November 16, 1983, Bob served as a Field Training Officer, Property Crimes/Fraud Detective, Reserve Officer Coordinator, Citizen Police Academy Instructor, PR-24 Baton Instructor, Defensive Tactics Instructor, and was involved in the Police Activities League Youth Golf Program. Appointed as the first K9 handler since the K9 program dissolved previously in the 1960’s, Bob and his K9 partner Drago served seven years together until Drago’s retirement in 1998. Bob was recognized by his peers as the Police Officer of the Year in both 1991 and 1998. Bob served a five month term as Acting Sergeant until his official promotion to the rank of Sergeant on February 25, 2002. He was assigned to the Patrol Division and served two terms as the Detective Sergeant. For two years he was in charge of the Field Training Program for new officers and received the Winter 2002 Police Department Employee of the Quarter Award and City of Newark Pride Award in 2006.

A graduate of the Sherman Block Supervisory Leadership Institute (SBSLI) August 26, 2005, he was trained in that program designed to stimulate personal growth, leadership, and ethical decision-making in California law enforcement front-line supervisors. Bob was promoted to Police Lieutenant on November 1, 2008 and served in that capacity as the Administrative Lieutenant. On January 1, 2009, the Lieutenant position was reclassified to the rank of Police Commander. As Administrative Lieutenant and Commander he has been in charge of the Training Division, Recruiting and Hiring Process, Detective Division, Record Division, Dispatch, Internal Affairs, Property/Evidence, Red Light Photo Enforcement, and served as the department’s Public Information Officer (PIO). On March 29, 2010 Bob was awarded the Chiefs Challenge Coin of Special Recognition, along with his fellow commanders, for outstanding work, loyalty to the organization, and tireless efforts in the development and promotion of the Newark Police Department’s mission, vision, and values. This coin is issued only to members who consistently perform at the exemplary levels or rise above with a single act of excellence. Bob plans on spending his retirement honing his golf game, traveling, and watching Idaho State Softball. The City of Newark staff wants to thank Commander Douglas for his dedication to the city and law enforcement profession for the past 30 years. We hope that he enjoys a long and fulfilling retirement.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD April 13 Officer Hollifield was dispatched to a late reported robbery that occurred last night at The Corner Store. The clerk attempted to stop a beer run and was assaulted by two suspects who also stole his phone. Both suspects matched the descriptions of two who were arrested the previous night for a street robbery. A photo-line-up was conducted and one of the suspects was identified. Officer Harvey was dispatched to Washington Township Hospital for a stabbing victim. The victim said he was near Crossroads Center liquor store when he got “mad-dogged” by two subjects. Later as the victim walked home along Sundale Drive he was set upon by the two suspects who wanted to know if he was "bangin’." The victim tried to run but was stabbed in the back sustaining non lifethreatening injuries. Officer Fuellenbach and FTO Luevano responded to a suspicious circumstance at the 4900 block of Creekwood Drive after a neighbor noticed the front door was open. Upon arrival, they determined it was a residential burglary. A female walking in the area of Paseo Padre Parkway and Milton Street was confronted by a Hispanic adult male 16-years-old, wearing a red sweatshirt. The suspect snatched the victim’s IPod and fled toward North Gate Savoy Apartments. Officer Hamblin and Field Training Officer Blass spotted a stolen vehicle and ob-

served a male get into it as they cruised through the Motel 6 north parking lot. They followed the vehicle onto I-880 and stopped it on Whipple. The driver and lone occupant complied with the officers and arrested for possession of a stolen vehicle. April 14 Officer Merrill investigated a report of a strongarmed robbery that occurred on April 13. The victim reported she was walking northbound on Bell Street from Mowry Avenue, when an unknown male approached her from behind and grabbed her purse. The suspect fled on foot toward Fremont Boulevard with the victim’s purse. The victim was unable to provide a description of the suspect. CSO Anders investigated a residential burglary that occurred on Eric Street after an unknown suspect(s) entered the home via a back door. Once inside, the suspect(s) stole cash. Officers were dispatched to Wisteria Drive for an in-progress theft (gas siphoning). The suspects fled upon officer arrival. A search was conducted with negative results. Officer Butcher investigated. April 15 Officer Hartman and FTO Bocage responded to Subway, 34115 Fremont Boulevard on a report of a disturbance between a 32-year-old male and several customers inside the business. According to an employee, the male picked up several chairs and threw them at customers. When officers arrived, they contacted an adult male and arrested him for assault with a dangerous weapon. The employee or customers were not injured as a result of the assault. Union City Police Department requested our assistance with priority 1 calls for service in their city due to a utility explosion. No injuries occurred but all UCPD units were tied up. We dropped to Level 1 Service Reductions from 5:15 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. However, UCPD did not have any priority 1 calls and we were not needed. Units responded to the East West Bank on Fremont Boulevard regarding a robbery. The reporting party said there was an adult female crying and saying her 8-year-old child was robbed. Turns out the child was robbed of his Nintendo DS game by a suspect described as a Hispanic or Black male wearing a hooded sweat jacket. Units saturated the area and made several stops with negative results. Officer Ferrara investigated.


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help There has been fantastic community support We qualify for adjudication and have filed to go to court.

The bad news is the Bay Area News Group/MediaNews has filed to stop us again and they have filed to change the judge.

The Bay Area News Group MediaNews is trying to convince the Judge not to let us go to court. Bay Area News Groups opposition is based on maintaining a financial monopoly. We need the community to go to court to observe and show support for Tri-City Voice.

We will give you the court information as soon as we get it.

Papers owned by Bay Area News Group The Argus

The Valley Times

Fremont Bulletin

San Ramon Valley Times

Milpitas Post

East County Times

Tri-Valley Times

Santa Cruz Sentinel

The Daily Review

Marin Independent Journal

The Oakland Tribune

The Pacifica Tribune

The San Jose Mercury News

The Daily News

Walnut Creek Journal

Alameda Times-Star

THE HILLS

Jobs, Careers & Education

Contra Costa Times

Scene Magazine

San Mateo County Times

and many more

Qualifications to become a “Newspaper of General Circulation” are quite simple. A portion of the California Government Code that outlines one method of “adjudication” is Section 6000. Tri-City Voice easily meets all of these requirements. The code states: A “newspaper of general circulation” is a newspaper published for the dissemination of local or telegraphic news and intelligence of a general character, which has a bona fide subscription list of paying subscribers, and has been established, printed and published at regular intervals in the State, county, or city where publication, notice by publication, or official advertising is to be given or made for at least one year preceding the date of the publication, notice or advertisement. Listed in order, the following are the requirements… 1) Distribute news of general interest…TCV qualifies 2) Have a valid paid subscription list…TCV qualifies 3) Printed and published in the City of Fremont for at least one year… TCV qualifies That’s it! Those are the requirements under Section 6000 to become a Newspaper of General Circulation.

SUBMITTED BY BART BART has been thinking about the environment since before we carried our first passenger in 1972. For example, ours are the lightest subway cars in the world, so they consume less energy. We are also 100 percent electric and source two-thirds of that power from clean hydro and renewable energy sources. We think about the environment, today, and will think about it, tomorrow. Right now, BART is planning the Fleet of the

Future, new rolling stock that will further our commitment to environmental responsibility. Enter the BART Blue Sky contest for a chance to win a $500 Clipper Card. Simply log-in to Facebook and vote for your favorite initiative managed by BART Blue Sky Non-Profit partners. The non-profits that receive the most votes will win valuable exposure in front of BART's 360,000+ daily, weekday riders for their organization and YOU have a chance to win a $500 Clipper Card just

for voting. You can only vote once, so make it count. The deadline to cast your vote is Friday, May 4, 2012. Visit http://tinyurl.com/7ov3hj5. Additionally, join us at the Blue Sky Festival (www.bart.gov/guide/bluesky/festival.aspx) at Justin Herman Plaza from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, 2012. Free live music, environmental exhibits from over 50 organizations, ecoconscious carnival games and free $6 BART tickets to the first 5,000 people who get six stamps on their Blue Sky Passport. For more information, visit www.BART.gov

Every 15 Minutes SUBMITTED BY SEAN SIMONSON, MILPITAS OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES The City of Milpitas will be conducting an Every 15 Minutes Program on April 18th and 19th. The Every 15 Minutes program is a two-day program focusing on high school seniors, which challenges them to think about drinking, driving, personal safety, the responsibility of making mature decisions and the impact their decisions have on family, friends, and many others. Students will witness the extrication of victims from a simulated DUI traffic collision who will then be transported, via helicopter, to Santa Clara Valley Medical Center where they will follow steps to attempt to save the patient which will ultimately be unsuccessful.

Traditionally this program focuses on the morbid effects of teen drinking and driving. A unique first-of-its-kind element has been added to this particular event. Participants will not only see the deadly effects, but will witness the surviving effects of driving under the influence. They will tour the Santa Clara County Valley Medical Center’s Spinal/Neurological Unit, Brain Injury Unit and Critical Intensive Care Unit to see first-hand the devastating effects of teen drinking. There will also be a panel of disabled people sharing their story with the participants at the conclusion of the April 18th activities. On April 19th the program will conclude with a keynote presentation to the entire senior class of Milpitas High School and to those who participated in the previous day’s events.

This program is in partnership with the City of Milpitas Police, Office of Emergency Services, Fire Department, and Milpitas High School, along with the Milpitas Unified School District, CALSTAR, Rural Metro Ambulance, Santa Clara County Valley Medical Center, Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office and the Santa Clara County Coroner’s Office. The program’s name - “Every 15 Minutes” is derived from the fact that in the 1990’s someone in the U.S. died in an alcohol-related traffic collision every 15 minutes. The implementation of state laws and community programs has reduced this statistic to every 30 minutes - a figure that is still unacceptable. For further information please contact Sean Simonson with the Milpitas Office of Emergency Services at (408) 586-2810.

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BY MAURICIO SEGURA

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ummer is just around the corner, and here in California that means fun in the sun, but more importantly, fun on the water. While many choose swimming as their recreation of choice, others find that being above the water is much more enjoyable. Think about kayaking or paddleboating down a lazy lake or river, the soothing sights and sounds of nature enveloping you as the time leisurely passes by into relaxing memories. Maybe the ocean is your forte, an early morning kayak along the coast, possibly interacting with a pod of dolphins or the mighty splendor of a migrating Humpback singing beyond the fog. For the more adventurous, heading down a whitewater river is a rush like no other. Whatever scenario appeals most, the right equipment is what's going to make it happen. Will you need a canoe, a kayak, or paddleboat for your adventure? Which style or model is the best choice? And what about beginners who simply need lessons? The 2012 Bay Area Paddlefest will answer all those questions and more. Coming to the Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area in Fremont on April 21 and 22, the 3rd Annual Bay Area Paddlefest is the largest expo of its kind in California. With classes, equipment sales, and hands on testing of hundreds of canoes, kayaks, and paddleboats by leading manufacturers, this will be an entertaining event for the entire family. A demo day pass will allow the ticket holder into the exhibit area to try out unlimited demos in and out of the water. For an additional fee, one can obtain the

April 17, 2012

classes day pass, which also gives access to day classes and clinics. On water classes will include beginner intros to kayaking (launching, landing, and basic strokes), canoeing (the forgotten craft of family fun, camping, fishing, and travel), and stand-up paddleboating. Advanced kayakers can learn more difficult stroking techniques, and self and assisted rescues in case of capsizing. Kids will learn water techniques while playing games, and the fitness conscious can try surfski paddling made popular by the 1980s TV show “Magnum PI.” In On-Land Clinics, pros will be at hand to instruct on the various designs and purposes of each type of boat to determine which is the best for each person. Also, what you wear is as important as what you ride, so an introduction to paddling clothing will be essential. And last, but not least, fishing is a paddleboat pastime, and instructors will teach the ins and outs of this side of the sport in detail. As a side class, Helen Wilson will be teaching the art of kayak rolling. These classes are only available for groups of 10 with prior registration at the cost of $60. Aside from the classes, the big draw is being able to try out all the demos. With over 50 exhibitors including Sunrise Mountain Sports, Rivers For Change, Pyranha, Mad River Canoes, Feathercraft, Dagger Kayaks, Bay Area Sea Kayakers, Hurricane Aqua Sports, North Shore Kayaks, and Outback Adventures, there will be literally hundreds of boats and gear to try out. Currently no food vendors are scheduled to appear, though organizers are planning to supply free hotdogs. Snack vending machines are available throughout the park, but bringing your own lunch is definitely allowed.

Families with dogs are welcome to bring them along to play in the park, but not along the swimming and exhibition areas. With all the boats to test out, there won't be a need for anyone to bring their own. However, you may bring your boat, but please remember that Quarry Lakes will charge both a launching fee as well as an invasive species inspection fee upon entrance to the park. So whether a seasoned kayaker or a novice still learning how to keep balance, the 2012 Bay Area Paddlefest is a day to take your boating experiences up a few notches. “You can try out as many new crafts as you want while meeting people and making new friends who share a love of paddelboating,” says Regina Casassa of East Bay Parks District. It will be a weekend of fun for the entire family that you won't want to miss. -Demo Only Day Pass $15 – This pass allows you entry to the exhibit area and unlimited demos of boats and SUPs. -Classes Day Pass $30 – Along with entry to the exhibit area and access to unlimited demos, this pass also allows you to take an unlimited number of classes. -Kids 15 and under get a free Class Day Pass with paying adult entry (up to two kids free with each paying adult entry). -Helen Wilson Rolling Clinics $60 (includes demo fee) - 10 spots are available at each clinic and pre-registration is required. Call California Canoe & Kayak at 1-800-366-9804 to sign up. Quarry Lakes charges a parking fee (currently $5) for each vehicle. For more information, please call (510) 544-3130. Bay Area Paddlefest Saturday and Sunday April 21 and 22 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Quarry Lakes Regional Recreational Area 2100 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 544-3130 www.thebayareapaddlefest.org Cost: $15 - $30

Green Button App Contest SUBMITTED BY PG&E After seeing the potential for customers to save energy and money by downloading personal energy data through its Green Button service, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is supporting further industry innovation by sponsoring a nationwide search for the best Green Button energy apps. The Apps for Energy contest is a partnership with the White House, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. technology firms. Developer finalists who create the winning apps for phones and computers will take home part of a $100,000 cash prize from sponsors PG&E, Itron and the DOE, as well as national bragging rights. “Green Button will arm millions of Americans with information they can use to lower their energy bills,” said Nancy Sutley, Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “Innovative

tools like these are good for our economy, good for the health of our communities, and an essential part of our approach toward a secure and clean energy future that works for Americans.” The DOE has long supported energy innovation, driving a nationwide push for more renewable energy sources and encouraging every American to become more engaged with how they use energy. App developers will be able to participate by registering at challenge.gov and submitting a description, video, photos, and a link to their app. The website energy.gov/developer will be the main resource page for developers. PG&E customers with an electric SmartMeter™ and a My Energy account can log on at pge.com/myenergy, click on the Green Button icon, and download up to 13 months of their hourly electric usage data. For more information, visit http://www.pge.com


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ing advantage of someone online,” Sgt. Crandall says. “Fremont Police Department has been involved in solving many cases where we’ve shown up at somebody’s house at 11 p.m., and a girl is in her room with a laptop and the Internet talking about suicide because somebody bullied her online, or somebody said to her, ‘If you don’t help me cheat, I’m going to say something bad about you.’” Sgt. Crandall says it’s easy for predators to take advantage of kids and teenagers online, and the seminar will address steps to take for parents and their children to protect themselves. “We talk about things like making sure that kids have everything set to private when they’re using Facebook,” he says. “For instance, why do you have to put up your birthday and school you go to for everyone to see? If I’m a bad guy, all I have to do is look at their information online and show up at their softball game. “Unfortunately, as law enforcement, we have to think like this to keeps kids safe.” Sgt. Crandall says that next week’s talk is geared toward anyone in the community with access to the Internet—including kids, parents, and even those with a school-age niece or nephew.

“The seminar takes an interactive approach, and we’ll send everybody away with a family contract, which is a one-page ‘I will do this; I won’t do that’ agreement that family members can sit down and fill out and put it on the refrigerator,” he says. “We’re never going to be able to catch all the online predators, but if we can save one kid from the effects of cyber bullying or online predation, then we’ve done our job.” Hernandez adds that teachers, administrators, and parents should be aware of behavior changes in students who have been bullied or harassed. “Many adolescents have a digital life, and for many adults, social networking sites are a whole new and unfamiliar world, thus making it difficult to identify and manage the effects of cyber bullying among their students,” she says. “Additionally, many adolescents may have trouble reading social signs and do not know what they are doing is hurtful. This seminar will educate school officials and parents on the warning signs of cyber bullying and demonstrate to adolescents its long-lasting negative consequences.” Taking Online Safety Seriously To find out more about digital safety, including identifying and preventing cyber bullying, join Sgts. Crandall and Koepf next Monday, April 23, from 6 to 8 p.m., in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West building) across the street from Washington Hospital in Fremont. To register, call (800) 963-7070 or visit www.whhs.com.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT/NEWARK YMCA On Saturday, April 21 at 8 a.m., the Fremont/Newark YMCA celebrates Healthy Kids Day®, a free community event aimed at helping families with children engage in fun, interactive, and educational opportunities to improve health and well-being. As part of the Y’s commitment to strengthening community by addressing critical gaps in health and education, Healthy Kids Day will encourage kids and their caregivers to commit to keeping the body and mind active now and throughout the summer. A voluntary, inaugural Healthy Kids Day Fun Run/Walk will kick-off the day. The 5K cost is $15 per entry for those who wish to participate. Proceeds from the 5K Fun Run/Walk will benefit youth in our community. Scholarships are available for families with multiple members who wish to participate in the run/walk. The 5K will be around beautiful Lake Elizabeth in Fremont and will conclude with refreshments at the finish line. All racers will receive a race day T-shirt. After the run we encourage all participants to visit the numerous booths providing interactive and engaging activities. In addition, child and youth performers will provide entertainment throughout the day at the Lake Elizabeth Pavilion. Booths for Healthy Kids Day open promptly following the 5K at 9 a.m. Vice Mayor of Fremont Anu Natarajan will introduce the first activities. The booths will consist of local organizations from around Fremont and Newark with a child-friendly focus. An abundance of information for family resources will be provided from the surrounding Tri-City area. Activities, games, and free give-a-ways will be available at the booths. Those participating at the top of each hour between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the 15-minute long fitness activities will automatically be entered in a raffle at the end of the event. Alameda County District Two Supervisor Nadia Lockyer is supporting the Fremont/Newark YMCA Healthy Kids Day, providing Oakland Athletics tickets for the raffle taking place throughout the day. “Central and Southern Alameda County have high youth obesity rates and getting kids active is vital to addressing this issue. Events like Health Kids Day provide an opportunity for families to be active with their children and promote active and healthy living,” said Supervisor Lockyer. This year, the Fremont/Newark YMCA would like to thank Washington Hospital Healthcare System and Washington Township Medical Foundation for their generous support of Healthy Kids Day. For more information or to register online for the 5K Walk/Run, call (510) 657-5200 or visit www.fremontymca.org. Healthy Kids Day Saturday, April 21 8 a.m. Lake Elizabeth 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 657-5200 www.fremontymca.org Cost: $15 for 5K run/walk participants

Public hearing on seismic safety in public schools SUBMITTED BY DANIEL TORREZ A December 2011 state audit that found there are significant gaps in the state’s oversight of school construction and seismic safety projects. The California Field Act mandates seismic safety standards for the design, construction and renovation of all K-12 public school and community college buildings in the state. California has more than 15,000 fault lines and experiences more than 37,000 earthquakes, on average, each year. One of the state’s most notorious and potentially dangerous fault lines, the Hayward Fault, runs through the East Bay’s most populated cities. We must make sure our children are safe and public school buildings meet state seismic standards. Senate Hearing on seismic safety and construction oversight of public schools Friday, April 20 10 a.m. Canyon Middle School 19600 Cull Canyon Road, Room D-11, Castro Valley (916) 651-4010

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4G network activated SUBMITTED BY GEORGE ROSS AT&T has turned on its 4G LTE network in Fremont, Hayward and Newark bringing customers the latest generation of wireless network technology. AT&T 4G LTE provides Faster speeds, Faster response time, new devices. “We continue to see demand for mobile broadband skyrocket, and our 4G LTE network in Fremont, Hayward and Newark responds to what customers want from their mobile experience — more, faster, on the best devices,” said Terry Stenzel, AT&T’s vice president and general manager for Northern California and Northern Nevada. AT&T has launched 4G LTE in 32 markets nationwide.

Brown urges lawmakers to 'man up' on budget cuts BY HANNAH DREIER ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Gov. Jerry Brown urged lawmakers on Friday to “man up” and pass his proposed spending cuts, a choice of words that rankled some female lawmakers and advocates for the needy. During an interview with San Francisco radio station KGO, Brown reiterated his hope that the Democratically controlled Legislature would approve the billions of dollars in cuts he proposed in January to help close the state's deficit, including additional rollbacks to social service programs. The Democratic governor had asked that cuts be enacted by March, but legislative leaders decided to wait until he releases his revised budget in May. “We're trying to be as prudent as we can and that's why the Legislature has to man up, make the cuts,” Brown said. Sen. Noreen Evans, D-Santa Rosa, was among those who bristled at the phrasing. “‘Man up' doesn't quite apply here,” Evans said. “The reason it's a poor choice of words is the cuts would fall most heavily on the women and children in the state.” Not only would women bear the brunt of cuts to subsidized childcare and the welfare-to-work system, Evans said, but they also would suffer disproportionally from layoffs at public schools and homecare programs. “Maybe it's time for the women in the Legislature to take charge of this problem, given the fact that it's mostly the women that are being impacted,” she said. Assemblywoman Betsy Butler, a Democrat from Marina del Ray, needled Brown in a statement that was filled intentionally with clichés and referred to the governor's failed attempt last year to persuade Republicans to approve temporary tax hikes. “We need the Governor to shake off last year, dig down deep, show intestinal fortitude and not alligator arm his way across the middle to help us deliver those Republican votes,” she said. Brown's comment recalled one by former Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, when he mocked lawmakers as “girlie men” during a 2004 budget standoff. Schwarzenegger's remarks temporarily soured relations with some lawmakers and with gay and lesbian groups. Of the 120 members of the California Legislature, 33 are women, according to the California Legislative Women's Caucus. The governor's comment also drew a response from Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access California, who said in a statement there was “nothing manly about approving cuts to children's health care'' and other social services. John Vigna, a spokesman for Assembly Speaker John Perez, DLos Angeles, said most lawmakers were unlikely to be offended by Brown's antiquated language, given the governor's off-the-cuff speaking style. “He's certainly known for his colorful rhetoric throughout the years,” he said. Brown warned Friday that the state budget deficit will likely exceed the $9.2 billion shortfall his administration had predicted. Later in the radio interview, he defended the state's welfare-to-work program, saying it is designed to give women the education, skills and child care they need to get decent-paying job. Democrats reaffirmed their intention to delay the budget debate until they see the governor's revised budget. They are hoping the fiscal picture will look less dire after the state gathers income tax revenue in April. Later Friday, the state Department of Finance said revenue for the fiscal year is running nearly $900 million below earlier forecasts. “Our position hasn't changed,” said Alicia Trost, spokeswoman for Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento. “It is important to have a clear picture of exactly what we are facing.” To avoid further cuts, Brown is seeking a November ballot proposition asking voters to approve a higher sales tax and higher income taxes on those making $250,000 a year or more. Republicans have called the initiative a jobs killer. Brown said Friday there is little evidence that the rich flee hightax states, and took the opportunity to rib California's neighbors. He asked if business owners would really choose cities like Las Vegas or Tucson, Ariz., over Los Angeles or his hometown of Oakland. “Going to that desert with all those foreclosed homes, I don't know that tax break is worth it,'' he said.

Bank reports point to a healing housing market BY PALLAVI GOGOI AND CHRISTINA REXRODE AP BUSINESS WRITERS NEW YORK (AP), – Earnings reports from two major banks Friday painted a picture of a healing housing market, with more Americans taking out mortgages, paying them on time and taking advantage of low interest rates to refinance. At JPMorgan Chase, the biggest bank in the United States, income from new home loans set a record from January through March. The bank issued 6 percent more mortgages than a year ago and got 33 percent more applications. Wells Fargo, which issues the most home loans, booked the most mortgage fees since 2009. It issued 54 percent more mortgages than a year ago and took 84 percent more applications. A healthier housing market is welcome news. Housing has been the biggest drag on the economic recovery, while other segments, such as manufacturing and consumer spending, have held up or grown. Home prices are still falling, though more slowly than in the past several years, and more than half a million American homes were in the foreclosure process at the end of March, according to RealtyTrac. Still, stronger mortgage business helped JPMorgan and Wells Fargo beat Wall Street expectations for first-quarter earnings. JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon boasted that the bank had originated 200,000 mortgages in the quarter. Two key factors helped: – The average rate on the 30year fixed mortgage dropped to 3.87 percent in February, the lowest since long-term mortgages began in the 1950s. Rates have stayed low: This week, the average is 3.88 percent. Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf said the housing market is close to a “tipping point” at which it can take off. “When you have the dynamics of higher rental rates and lower home values at great financing rates, there's a point in time where the market's going to clear and you're going to see improvement,” Stumpf said. Some markets, he said, like Texas, Northern California and Washington, D.C., have already reached that point. – Job growth in January and February was some of the strongest since the Great Recession, and the unemployment rate has fallen to 8.2 percent, the lowest since January 2009. continued on page 26


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Where do the candidates for Hayward City Council stand? Tri-City Voice Newspaper has given the nine candidates, who are running for four seats on Hayward City Council in the June 5, 2012 Municipal Election, the opportunity to state their positions on four local issues. One question will be published per week with respondents’ answers to enable readers/voters to compare and contrast. This week we publish the third in the series. TCV: Should the “mini-loop,” which is part of the Route 238 Corridor Improvement Project, prove impractical, what alternatives are there to relieve congestion and improve traffic flow?

way flow on ‘A’ Street would improve local access. Some advocate other one-way streets in the Downtown and surrounding neighborhoods but these need careful evaluation. The project includes enhanced signal synchronization. Signal-metering might be an option to displace/discourage regional traffic from Hayward’s streets. A flexible, centralized system can respond to changes in traffic patterns. Re-thinking what we consider as "Downtown" is also important. Pedestrian and bicycle-friendliness are essential. A footbridge across Foothill Boulevard would improve access to a “Greater Downtown” district despite the mini-loop.

Peter Bufete: If the “mini-loop” proves impractical, I would like to see our City try to highlight other transportation routes that may relieve congestion in our Downtown area. I would like to see further analysis of this idea. By dispersing traffic evenly amongst surrounding traffic routes, we may find we may be able to reduce congestion in our busiest streets at peak hours. At the same time, we must make sure our new road system in the Downtown is more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly, in the name of public safety.

Al Mendall: I did not support the mini-loop as a Planning Commissioner because I felt it would increase traffic and damage the character of our Downtown but the loop was approved, so we must try to make it work. If does not, then we should return to bi-directional traffic flow; shrink the loop streets to add parking, wider sidewalks and give the Downtown a more walkable and welcoming feel. We can never widen our streets enough to accommodate all the commuter and cut-through traffic and we should stop trying to do so.

Ralph Farias: This Loop is a joke. It will kill business in Downtown and create more of a headache for commuters! Instead of making it difficult for drivers to get through the overly congested streets of Hayward, they should divert the traffic to our local businesses! Not make them get out of Hayward quicker! Our main goal is to somehow find out a way to capture these people’s money and put it in Hayward's budget!

Francisco Zermeño: I am still not impressed with folks driving through our City without stopping for some shopping, a meal, a visit or a movie. This is not our traffic and I would rather we spend our time, efforts and money on making the driving experience of our residents a better one. We are more into Destination driving, to and from their home to our Downtown or to our Retail Rectangle & Handle (A, Hesperian, Tennyson, Mission and Foothill). We would need to sit down with staff to look at any and all possibilities.

Barbara Halliday: The mini-loop is expected to significantly improve automobile travel times through the Mission-Foothill corridor, particularly at the "five corners" intersection. It will also bring new traffic into the Downtown that previously stayed on Foothill Boulevard. The worry is that cars will go too fast through the Downtown during non-peak hours, endangering pedestrians. Once the project is completed, we will have to evaluate its effects on Downtown pedestrian traffic and make adjustments, if necessary. In response to questions I have raised, local transportation officials have already indicated a willingness to consider funding for recommended changes needed to enhance pedestrian safety. Greg Jones: Moving traffic through Downtown while encouraging a more pedestrian-friendly shopping district requires balance. Restoration of two-

[Candidates Shahla Azimi, Olden Henson and Fahim A. Khan did not respond.] Candidates for Hayward City Council (four seats) Listed according to California Secretary of State’s Randomized Alphabet Drawing Shahla Azimi Francisco Zermeño Fahim A. Khan Greg Jones Barbara Halliday Olden Henson Al Mendall Peter Bufete Ralph Farias Jr. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/6ret3bg

Applications now being accepted for Citizen's Police Academy The Fremont Police Department is currently accepting applications for the next Citizen's Academy; class size will be limited to approximately 25 attendees. Have you ever wanted to get an inside look at the Fremont Police Department? Now is your opportunity. Beginning, Thursday, May 17, 2012, the Fremont Police Department will start it's next Citizen’s Academy Class. The free 12-session program will run for ten weeks generally meeting one night a week (Thursday) from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. One or two Saturday classes may be scheduled to accommodate specialized training. Participants learn about topics such as police selection and training, internal investigations, criminal law, patrol operations, communications, crime prevention, crime analysis, firearms training, critical incidents, narcotics, gangs, traffic enforcement and much more. To learn more about the academy and to sign up go to www.fremontpolice.org/citizensacademy. If you have any questions, please contact Lt. Kimberly Petersen at Kpetersen@fremont.gov or call 510-790-6869.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD April 11 Officer Eriksen investigated a stolen 1997 Nissan Altima (CA license 4XWG578) from 36566 Jennifer Street at 6:01 a.m. which occurred overnight. This vehicle was later located and the driver arrested see below. CSO Verandes located an unoccupied stolen vehicle at 6302 Potrero Drive at 7:31 a.m. Officer Kovach accepted Sears arrest of an employee at 7:21 p.m. for theft. Mursal Habibzadah of Hayward was arrested for embezzlement. At 2:18 a.m., Officer Allum saw a vehicle go through a stop sign on Spruce Street. He caught up to the vehicle and tried to conduct a traffic stop. The vehicle failed to yield. The DMV return showed it was stolen vehicle out of Newark on April 11, 2012. The vehicle sped off. Officer Allum discontinued any chase, but updated NPD on

the vehicle’s path, increasing speed, and disregard for safety by running several more stop signs. The vehicle collided with a curb at Mayhews Landing Road and Dijon then went southbound onNewark Boulevard in the northbound lanes and collided with a light pole. The suspect, Martin Harlon, (Transient –Livermore / Newark) was taken into custody without incident. Harlon was arrested for a variety of crimes. April 12 Officers investigated a theft of a vehicle from the 8100 block of Pebble Beach Avenue at 9:33 a.m. Officers investigated a theft of a vehicle from the 36400 block of Buckeye Street at 10:27 a.m. Officers investigated a theft of a vehicle from Amador Place at 7:21 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a vehicle from Beutke Drive at 7:41 p.m. Officers located an unoccupied stolen vehicle from Hayward on Crestmont Drive at 9:39 p.m. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 578-4965.


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Kidango has been a local presence for over 30 years. Fiftyfive childcare locations are spread throughout the Bay Area, with eight in Fremont, one in Newark, and six in Union City. More than just a daycare center, Kidango provides early childhood development services in the form of preschool for kids from birth to age five, before and after school care in San Jose for kids up to age 12, early intervention services, mental health care for young children, and nutritional information for children and their parents. “Inclusion classrooms” allow special needs kids and typically developing kids to work side-by-side. “We prepare children to excel academically by providing them with curriculum focused on social and emotional development. It’s the best practice to prepare them for later learning opportunities,” says Marc Baker, Kidango’s Development and Communications Director.

Kidango enhances the lives of children and their parents. For example, a young mother of a Kidango child began to volunteer at her local childcare center and due to Kidango’s scholarship program for low- to moderateincome families, she was able to go back to school and continue her education at Cal State East Bay. Enabling parents to continue to work or pursue educational goals benefits families and our local economy. Enjoy a culinary interlude and support a worthwhile organization Taster’s Showcase.

SUBMITTED BY SAMU TIUMALU

The Milpitas’ Got Talent show will be held on Friday, May 4 starting at 7 p.m. at the Milpitas Community Center. There will be a cash prize for the show winner. Tickets will be presold at the Teen Center starting April 23 for $5 or $7 at the door, all proceeds from the event will be donated to the Milpitas Teen Center. For more information or to schedule your audition contact the Youth & Teen Coordinator, Samu Tiumalu at (408) 586-3222 or by e-mail at stiumalu@ci.milpitas.ca.gov. The event is being brought to you by the City of Milpitas Youth Advisory Commission, Recreation Services, and Walgreens Milpitas.

You know you have talent and so do we! “Milpitas’ Got Talent” is back and ready to feature Milpitas’ biggest star – you! The Milpitas Youth Advisory Commission will be holding auditions on Saturday, April 21 starting at 1 p.m. at the Milpitas Teen Center. Requirements: • All performers must be Milpitas residents (unless you are in a band, at least half of the members must be Milpitas residents). •Auditions are open to teens and young adults, ages 12-21. • Acts are limited to five minutes in length. • Performers must bring their own musical instrumental backing track and/or instruments. • Profanity will not be permitted. • If you are selected to perform in the show, you will be required to perform what you auditioned.

17th Annual Taster’s Showcase Sunday, Apr 22 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Marriott Fremont 41600 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 897-6913 www.tastersshowcase.org Tickets: $35 in advance, $45 at the door

Milpitas’ Got Talent auditions Saturday, Apr 21 1 p.m. Milpitas Teen Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3222

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Seeing Common Musculoskeletal Issues from a Non-Surgical Viewpoint Washington Township Medical Foundation sports medicine specialist Sandeep Gupta, M.D., says that when people think of sports medicine, their first thought is often of young people. But in his practice, it’s a lot more than that. “I want people to know that sports medicine isn’t just about treating athletes but also helping adults who don’t require a surgical approach to address their musculoskeletal issues,” he explains. “A lot of orthopedic and sports medicine is about non-operative treatment, and people shouldn’t automatically think that they’re going to go under the knife when they seek medical advice.”

Dr. Gupta, who recently joined the WTMF roster of physicians, says he wants to serve the community where he grew up. “It was important to me being close to my mom and dad, and my first niece was born at Washington Hospital,” he says. “My sister and my niece were very well taken care of at the hospital, and I had occasion to visit Washington Hospital a few times when I was young. The care was excellent, and the physicians were people I looked up to as mentors. “Fremont is my home, and I wanted to establish my practice here. It’s great to be back in the community.”

Raised in Fremont, Dr. Gupta (above) says it’s great to be back in the community and work along side Dr. Russell Nord, who serves as medical director of Washington Hospital’s Sports Medicine Program. Dr. Gupta has worked with professional athletes as a team physician for the Philadelphia Phillies and several other universities. To learn more about Dr. Gupta and the Washington Township Medical Foundation, visit www.mywtmf.com

With a broad knowledgebase in general surgery, orthopedics, and sports medicine training, Dr. Sandeep Gupta, a Washington Township Medical Foundation sports medicine specialist has a unique background that allows him to help a variety of patients in the community. In treating student athletes in the community, Dr. Gupta says his experience as a board-certified family practice physician has proven very valuable in addressing not only musculoskeletal issues, but other medical conditions as well.

Dr. Gupta says he joined WTMF specifically because he wanted to partner with Dr. Russell Nord, who serves as medical director of Washington Hospital’s Sports Medicine Program. “One particular advantage of joining this medical group was the opportunity to work alongside Dr. Nord, who is very well trained, having performed fellowship training at Stanford University,” Dr. Gupta says. “He worked with the 49ers, and I’ve also worked with professional athletes as a team physician for the Phillies. Working together, I find we both learn from each other’s experience, and our team approach makes for a powerful combination.” In treating student athletes in the community, Dr. Gupta says his experience as a board-certified family practice physician has proven very valuable in addressing not only musculoskeletal issues, but other medical conditions as well. “Joining Dr. Nord has been a bonus because a lot of people think sports medicine is just about bones and muscles, but par-

ticularly in the student athlete population, kids might have other health issues—like a cardiac condition—that also needs to be addressed,” he says. “During my studies, I found I enjoyed focusing on the patient as a whole with a specialization in sports. With my medical background, even if I see patients for musculoskeletal issues, I have no issues arranging for other types of care that they might need.” Since he also specializes in back pain and arthritis, Dr. Gupta says he has the opportunity to work with patients of all ages, which he enjoys. “In my practice, I see kids all the way up to people in their 90s,” he says. “A major focus in my practice is on the older population, and for them one of the most common problems is arthritis, which is increasing. My focus is on non-operative treatments before they take the final step of joint replacement surgery. “For these patients, I want them to be aware that surgery is not always the answer and that there are non-operative treatments for arthritis. I’ve worked in general medicine and as a general surgeon, so I have knowledge of both the medical and surgical aspects of treatment, which helps me work with patients to establish a range of treatment options.” Ultimately, with a broad knowledgebase in general surgery, orthopedics, and sports medicine training, Dr. Gupta says it gives him a unique approach to care that can help a variety of patients in the community. He also is fluent in Hindi and Punjabi, which he says gives him an advantage in speaking to patients in a language they feel most comfortable expressing themselves. To learn more about sports medicine treatment for student athletes and adults, visit www.whhs.com/services/sports/ or call (510) 608-1320. Your health care, your way For more information about Washington Township Medical Foundation and its more than 60 board-certified physicians with expertise in a broad range of medical specialties—from neurosurgery to pediatrics—visit www.mywtmf.com.


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Local surgeon performs effective treatment for sweaty hands syndrome

D

o you suffer from sweaty hands syndrome? Are excessively sweaty feet, back or underarms a problem? What may seem like an inconvenience and an embarrassment to most of us, can actually make it nearly impossible for someone to live their life and relate to other people the way they would like. Called hyperhidrosis, this condition affects up to 3 percent of Americans, usually starting in young adulthood. Besides causing embarrassing clothing stains, sweaty palm syndrome can interfere with everyday activities most of us take for granted. For example, people with hyperhidrosis have difficulty using a computer because sweat from their hands gets all over the keyboard. Or, sweat can drip on the papers of their school exam. People with this condition tend to keep their fists in their pockets to avoid shaking hands with others or holding the hand of someone they care about. Unfortunately, many people believe sweaty hand syndrome is something you just have to live with, so they don’t seek medical help. Without treatment, people can suffer from hyperhidrosis for a very long time. “This condition is not totally understood but is believed to be related to an overstimulation of the body’s sympathetic nerve chain,” explained Mary S. Maish, M.D., a Fremont-based thoracic surgeon with Washington Township Medical Foundation. “We target our treatment to reduce this overstimulation and have had good results.” The sympathetic nerve chain originates in the mid and lower spinal cord. It is part of our autonomic nervous system, which mobilizes the body’s nervous system when a fight-or-flight response is needed. “There is a variety of treatments we can do, but none is as effective as surgery,” continued Dr. Maish.

Dr. Maish (above) recently joined Washington Township Medical Foundation as Chief of Thoracic and Foregut surgery. She is board certified in both general and thoracic surgery and emphasizes minimally invasive approaches in all aspects of her clinical practice. To learn more about Dr. Maish and the Washington Township Medical Foundation, go to www.mywtmf.com.

One possible treatment option is Drysol, a product that is applied directly to the skin to dry up excessive sweat. Dr. Maish reported that she has not found this option very effective, however insurance companies often require that it be tried before they will agree to cover the surgical treatment option. Another possible treatment is injections of Botox into the hand. Dr. Maish stated that she has found the results of this option to be mixed and not long lasting. In some cases, it does not work at all. Botox is a temporary muscle paralytic. Its effect usually lasts from four months to six months. “As an alternative, surgery works well,” she said. “To be a candidate, your condition must involve sweaty hands. We make a small incision under the armpit and, using a small 5 millimeter camera, we locate and clip the nerve causing the problem.” “This minimally invasive, outpatient procedure is very safe, and people begin having drier hands immediately,” concludes Dr. Maish.

Dr. Mary Maish, a Fremont-based thoracic surgeon with Washington Township Medical Foundation treats hyperhidrosis or sweaty hand syndrome by performing minimally invasive surgery. Maish says the outpatient procedure is very safe, and people begin having drier hands immediately.

Dr. Maish reported that this surgery is completely successful 80 percent of the time, while some patients continue to experience a sweaty back or sweaty feet afterwards. “Most people are happy to trade sweaty hands for sweaty feet,” she added. Dr. Maish recently joined Washington Township Medical Foundation as Chief of Thoracic and Foregut surgery. Foregut surgery refers to procedures done for problems located in the upper alimentary canal, which includes the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and upper part of the intestine. Dr. Maish completed her training in thoracic surgery at Baylor College of Medicine/MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and performed an esophageal/foregut fellowship at the Uni-

versity of Southern California, where she worked with one of the foremost practitioners of foregut surgery in the country. She is board certified in both general and thoracic surgery and emphasizes minimally invasive approaches in all aspects of her clinical practice.

Learn more To learn more about hyperhidrosis and its treatment options, visit www.webmd.com and search under “hyperhidrosis.” To learn more about Dr. Maish and the Washington Township Medical Foundation, go to www.mywtmf.com.


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amenities to provide an exquisite, “larger than life” visual and sound experience. Digital projectors with the highest quality bright bulbs allow flexibility for the theaters to host a variety of entertainment – film, live performance simulcasts, sports and much more. Sound is set to the optimum volume level for each film shown. The result is that viewers are seeing films “closer to what the directors wanted the film to look like.” Jeffries adds that theaters with the best bulbs and lighting systems receive the best prints of movies because “studios know their presentation will be worth it.” He says, “A consumer who experiences the difference between this system and other, lesser projections may not know how to describe it, but they will know it is better than what they have seen before.” As a Century Theater, a self-serve concession stand has been “expanded” to include a variety of options including a café-style eating area, featuring burgers and fries separate from the auditoriums. Called a “hot spot,” choice is a major theme of this theater. Fans of creating their own soft drink combinations will have free rein at the soda fountain to mix and match. Jeffries says that Century at Pacific Commons is designed as a destination for a variety of activities including a “party room” for birthday parties. Groups or companies that would like to rent a theater for their own event can do so, either screening a current film or, with assistance from Cinemark, a different film or presentation. Although innovation is a central theme of this new theatre, Century at Pacific Commons has not forgotten its roots. Along with new releases, a Classic Film series is scheduled beginning with “The Godfather, Part II” on Thursday, April 26 and Oscar-winning “Wings” on Thursday, May 3 (2 p.m. & 7 p.m.). The experience of seeing these films in large screen format with digital projection promises to be unique. In addition to requirements for disabled people (wheelchair access, etc.), each auditorium of the theater features the “CaptiView” system that allow deaf and those challenged by hearing impairments to view individual closed captioning at their seat. All auditoriums are equipped with these devices. Advance purchase will be available in the lobby or at www.cinemark.com. Tickets will be waiting through use of a kiosk without waiting on line at the box office. Reserved seating is also a future consideration. Real time ticketing allows sales to instantly match auditorium capacity to purchases avoiding overselling. Jeffries emphasizes that all auditoriums have superior projection, sound and seating. “It’s not as if we threw all our best equipment in one, large auditorium and abandoned the other screening rooms.” He continues, “We are proud of our facility and want to be a leader. We have challenged the rest of the industry to be like this.” According to Jeffries, much of the planning and effort for this theater was focused on quality with the result that those who visit any of the theater rooms - DX or not - will come away with the thought, “Wow. That was something!” Century at Pacific Commons 43917 Pacific Commons Blvd., Fremont (800) 326-3264 www.cinemark.com/theatre-1060 continued from page 1

Francisco Bay Area, is known for incorporating the romantic and whimsical into everyday life. More than 300 people are expected to attend the black tie event at Fremont’s Marriott Hotel, with festivities starting at 5:30 p.m. CBC will honor two guests— Bernie Dutra and Anna Wang— during the evening for their outstanding local contributions. Dutra, to be honored as CBC’s Citizen of the Year, launched a nonprofit organization, One Child, providing new clothes and school supplies annually to needy students from kindergarten through high school. Anna Wang, along with her husband Albert and nine other Chinese families, established Friends of Children with Special Needs to support families and children with developmental and other disabilities. Wang will be recognized as CBC Volunteer of the Year. While CBC honors Dutra and Wang, it was less than six months ago that CBC was honored as “Community Partner of the Year” by California State Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski. During his State of the Assembly address, Wieckowski issued a proclamation to then CBC President Tim Tran. Gerry Low-Sabado, recently named president of CBC and one of the runway models this year, was honored by the organization in 2009 for helping recover lost history of Monterey Bay Peninsula Chinese settlers who landed there in 1851. After being honored, Low-Sabado de-

cided to join the organization which annually co-sponsors a popular Chinese New Year’s celebration at the Alameda County Library Fremont Main branch along with South Bay Chinese Club, the Fremont Public Library, and other Chinese organizations and schools. CBC contributes to more than two dozen area organizations from Abode to Ohlone College to Washington Hospital Healthcare Foundation. Formed in 1992 by a small group of Chinese Americans, CBC shares Chinese culture and heritage and encourages citizen involvement. Richard Li is chairing the Spring Celebration along with event coordinator, Sharon Yap of Sharon Yap Design. Sponsorships and tickets are still available at $88 per person or $800 per table for 10 people. For tickets, call (510) 790-0740. Spring Celebration Saturday, Apr 21 5:30 p.m. Fremont’s Marriott Hotel 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-0740 www.cbcsfbay.org Tickets: $88

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1 Complimentary ________ Consultations (8) 8 High Quality, __________ Pet Care since 1986 (10) 9 Get Honey Walnut Prawns at this Restaurant? (5) 13 ________ we'll go far (8) 14 Auto, work and _____ injuries (5) 15 _________ White Fillings (9) 17 Free ___________ Exchange (11) 18 No hasty "_____ ____" for patients here. (6,4) 20 Antique ________ Specialists (8) 23 Who’s getting a haircut at Ardenwood? (5) 25 BJ Travel is ______! (6) 26 Special Discount for _____ customers (5) 27 ________ 4 Success at Best Institute (8) 28 2012 ________ Masquerade Ball (8)

2 Pain __________ treatment with Massage Therapy (10) 3 Test drive the latest _______ models (6) 4 Get a Frame & Lens discount here (5,3,4) 5________ as you like them! (8) 6 __________, Movie Making (10) 7 The Great Garage Sales _____ (5) 10 A one of a kind __________ community (10) 11 Hear McNevin & the Spokes at _______ ____ ____ (7,4,5) 12 At Fujita Graphics we offer _________. (9) 16 ________ to new Heights with Fitness and Fun (8) 19 We Care About You, your _______ and the (7) 21 Is Now The Right Time For ________ Living? (8) 22 Special ______ Sandwiches (6) 24 Citizen of the _____ Luncheon (5)

Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. There are two monthly prize puzzles (a Tuesday edition and a Friday edition). Enter both to increase your chances of winning! All entries will be eligible for an end-of-theyear Grand Prize! MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Or fax to: (510) 796-2462 Deadline for entry is the 5th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper. April 17th Puzzle Name:

Phone:

Email:

Cyber Bullying Seminar BY JULIE GRABOWSKI During World War II, approximately six million European Jews were persecuted and murdered in a statesanctioned extermination by Nazi Germany under the leadership of Adolf Hitler. Jews were deemed to be racially inferior to Germans and a threat to their community. Millions of other “inferiors” and those whose behavior was outside of social norms were also targeted and killed in one of the worst atrocities in human history. The Holocaust is an unimaginable horror to those of us living in the freedoms and comfort of modern American life. But we should never forget those who suffered and the vicious and devastating consequences of hate and prejudice. Sponsored for the 29th year by the Tri-City Interfaith Council, the Yom Hashoah Holocaust Memorial Interfaith Service held at Temple Beth Torah in Fremont remembers victims and unites the community. “The intent is to reach out to the entire faith community to commemorate this terrible tragedy,” says Rabbi Avi Schulman. The Tri-City Interfaith Council is comprised of members and leaders from various faiths in Fremont, Newark, and Union City who work together to promote respect, understanding, cooperation, and appreciation for the various religious groups throughout the community. Their Vision Statement reads: “We are a Group of People from various religious traditions who envision an inclusive society in which people of all traditions respect and appreciate one another. We are committed to a path which ennobles and teaches us to love and support one another more fully.” Leaders from other faiths will participate in and shape the Sunday service, with 10 to 15 faith communities represented. The evening will include prayers,

songs, the lighting of candles, readings related to the holocaust experience, and moments of silence, which Rabbi Schulman calls “highly significant for deepening the religious significance.” Instead of inviting a Holocaust survivor to speak as has been done in previous years, this year’s service welcomes Berkeley-based traveling storyteller Joel ben Izzy. Izzy has traveled the world collecting and telling stories which have been recorded on several awardwinning CDs, and shared his own personal tale of difficulty in his first book, “The Beggar King and the Secret of Happiness.” Izzy will deliver survivor’s tales and those from other cultures in “Treasuring the Stories We’ve Inherited,” a challenge to consider how we interpret stories and make them an impactful part of our own lives. There will also be a free-will offering for “Facing History and Ourselves,” an organization that helps communities and classrooms across the world connect the past to moral choices today. There are many who attend every year, and Rabbi Schulman says they are pleased to have those who choose to come for the first time and find themselves touched and moved by the experience. While an undeniably somber service, Rabbi Schulman says there is also a sense of gratitude for those who risked their own lives to preserve Jews, and the evening ends with a spirit of hope. “We recognize atrocities of the past and wish to strengthen our own ties together and prevent future acts of horror taking place.” Yom Hashoah Holocaust Memorial Interfaith Service Sunday, Apr 22 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7142 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

On Monday, April 23, Washington Hospital Healthcare System in partnership with the Fremont Police Department will be holding a seminar on Cyber Bullying. The seminar, entitled Digital Safety: Cyber Bullying, will be presented from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Rooms A, B & C, Washington West, 2500 Mowry Ave. Fremont. This seminar is free and open to the public.

March rains gave water supply outlook a boost RICHARD P. SANTOS SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT Do we have enough water? As a board member for the Santa Clara Valley Water District, I can tell you the answer is complicated. The bad news is that this year is shaping up to be San José’s driest ever with only 4.65 inches of rainfall measured to date, beating out the 1877 low which was just 4.82 inches. The good news is that thanks to last year’s heavy rains, our groundwater storage levels are normal. So, it is unlikely that the board will need to call for any mandatory water use reductions. Groundwater and local surface water are the region’s original sources of water supply. Groundwater is water found in aquifers, below the ground surface. Water seeps through the surface of the earth and, in much the same way that water saturates a sponge, fills the cracks and pores of sand and gravel layers beneath our feet. We use the same system of percolation ponds that were developed in the early 1900s. These mini-lakes are seen along creeks throughout the county and are vital to “recharging” the groundwater basin. Currently, groundwater accounts for about 40 percent of our water supply. To meet the needs of our region, we also rely heavily on imported water for 55 percent of our water supply. When the Sierra Nevada snow pack begins to melt, it travels through waterways into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and is then imported through an intricate network of pipelines and canals into Santa Clara County for storage in one of our 10 local reservoirs and treatment at one of our three water treatment plants. While we rely heavily on imported water, our supply is not guaranteed. Regulations to protect the ecosystem and fish species have resulted in restrictions on pumping water. Our imported supply is also affected by the weather. A low snowpack level can cause the Department

of Water Resources to place restrictions on the amount of imported water we receive, and this year’s snowpack is only 55 percent of normal. When those restrictions are combined with pumping restrictions on the Delta they can have a major effect on our imported water supply. That’s why we must all do our part to use water wisely. Today, we use 15 percent less water than we did in 1990, though our population has grown by 300,000 people. To help our customers save 20 gallons a day, we offer more than 20 programs and services to help residents and businesses use water more efficiently. We actively maintain and protect our groundwater basin, storing water underground during wet years for use during dry years. Last year alone, we were also able to “bank” 70,000 acre-feet of water outside of our county. That’s nearly as much as we have stored in all of our 10 reservoirs combined. In addition, we are teaming with the city of San José to construct a state-of-the-art advanced water purification facility to expand our use of locally sourced recycled water, which currently provides 5 percent of our local water supply. By using recycled water for industrial, landscaping and agricultural irrigation, we are able to save our drinking water supplies. I firmly believe that with extensive planning and preparation, along with the smart water use by the residents and businesses of Santa Clara County, we will be able to continue to meet the water supply demands of our ever-growing region. For more information on our conservation programs and services or for a detailed report on our water supply, please visit www.valleywater.org. As always, I am available for questions or comments as your District 3 representative for the northern areas of Sunnyvale and Santa Clara, Alviso, Milpitas; and the north San Jose and Berryessa communities. Feel free to contact me at (408) 234-7707.


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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Monday, Jun 18 - Friday, Aug 2

8 a.m.

Open House: Ohlone College Language and Culture Center for Deaf Studies

Continuing Events

Summer Enrichment Program. Registration begins April 1

1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Meet faculty, visit state-of-the art lab

Thru Apr 21

Ohlone College for Kids 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 742-2304 www.ohloneforkids.com

Ohlone College Bldg. 6 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6269

Ohlone for Kids $R

Sylvia $

8 p.m. (Sun: 1 p.m.) A dog threatens a long standing marriage

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Thru Apr 28

Textile Exhibit

Thursday, Apr 19 Wednesdays, Thru Dec 26

Alameda County Veterans Employment Committee 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Help veterans find career opportunities

Unitek College 4670 Auto Mall Parkway, Fremont (510) 552-8845 www.unitekcollege.edu

12 noon - 5 p.m. Innovative art work with textiles and fibers

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Mondays, Apr 9 thru May 7

Shinn House Tour $ Tuesdays, thru Apr 24

10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Meditation, Buddhism in Plain English

Tour the estate

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. American Buddhist monk teaches and answers questions

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352

Mission Hills Golf Course Restaurant 275 Industrial Parkway, Hayward ProfessorPhongLa@yahoo.com

Al-Anon Beginner Meeting

7:45 p.m. - 9 p.m. Support group for friends & family of problem drinkers

Kaiser Permanente 3555 Whipple Road, Union City

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 623-6920 Thru May 16

Photo Central Spring Show

Mon: 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Tues/Thurs: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sat: 12 noon - 3 p.m.

Tuesday, Apr 17

The Jazzinators

7 p.m. - 8 p.m. Youth musicians perform

Bronco Billys Pizza - Irvington 41200 Blacow Road, Fremont (510) 438-0121 www.eastbaytradjazz.org

Photographs from students and patrons

Hayward Area Recreation and Park District 1099 'E' Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747 www.photocentral.org Thursday, Apr 12 - Sunday, Apr 22

Electricidad $

8 p.m. Latino interpretation of Greek tragedy "Electra"

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 thru Apr 26

Computer Help in English & Spanish R

Town Hall Debate

6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Hayward City Council & Congressional District 15 Candidates

Thursday, Apr 19

City of Hayward's Restaurant Walk $

5 p.m. - 9 p.m. Enjoy a variety of food

Featuring Farshid Namei and Carol Ramos

Tuesday, Apr 17

Chinese Calligraphy

10 a.m. - 12 noon Shu-chen Chen presents five styles

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-4441 Tuesday, Apr 17

Community Meeting

6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Brainstorm ideas to generate revenue for school district

Fremont Unified School District, Board Room 4210 Technology Dr., Fremont (510) 659-2594 ivy826wu@yahoo.com

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 537-2424 Thursday, Apr 19

Effective Job Search Strategies R

6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Learn about the hidden job market

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 x 20 Thursday, Apr 19

East Bay Stompers Band

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Dixie, swing and standards music

Bronco Billys Pizza 41200 Blacow Road, Fremont (510) 438-0121 Friday, Apr 20

History Awards $R

5:30 p.m. Honoring historic preservation; dinner, silent auction & raffle.

Stonebrae Country Club 27900 Fairview Ave., Hayward (510) 581-0223 Saturday, Apr 21

6 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Tuesday, Apr 17

Comedy Short Subject Night $

Learn the basics & improve your skills

Electromagnetic Magic

7:30 p.m.

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 ext: 20

7 p.m.

"The Count", "The Boat", "Looking for Sally", & "We Faw Down"

Fridays, Apr 13 thru May 18

Zumba $R

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Latin inspired aerobic fitness

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 742-2303 www.ohlone.augusoft.net Wednesday, Apr 14 - Sunday, May 6

Oil and Watercolor Showcase

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Featuring Simone Archer & Christine Wilson

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Mon, Apr 17 - Sun, Jun 14

Images of Ladakh

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Thursday, Apr 19

Wednesdays, thru Dec 26

Mon-Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat-Sun: 6 a.m. - 9 p.m.

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

Mission Valley ROP 5019 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 795-2244 nmoore@fremontbusiness.com

Must be 18 or older and a resident of Hayward or the Fairview area

Artwork Display

Rev. Ken Daigle Senior Minister

Help students develop career skills

6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Thru Apr 30

Sunday 10:00 AM

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Thursday, Apr 19

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4948

Unity of Fremont

Building Career Pathway Partnerships - R

Buddhanusorn Buddhist Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont (650) 556-6428 www.watbuddha.org

Community Emergency Response Team Training

A positive path for spiritual living

Thursday, Apr 19

Mon-Thurs: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun: 12 noon-6 p.m. Exhibit by Bay Area photographer Tony Sehgal

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 586-3409

Presented by Math Science Nucleus for school-age children

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411 Saturday, Apr 21

Democratic Club Meeting

Healthy Kids Day Fun Run/Walk $

7 p.m.

8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Monthly general meeting

5K run/walk participants receive a tshirt. Games, activities & information booths

Wednesday, Apr 18

Chandni Restaurant 5748 Mowry School Rd., Newark (510) 875-5006 Wednesday, Apr 18

Resume & Interviewing

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Skill building workshop

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave. Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 Thursday, Apr 19

Good Government Now! $R

5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Hayward Chamber of Commerce political action committee fundraiser

Creekwood Apartments Community Center 22294 City Center Drive, Hayward (510) 581-5993 ggn.pac@gmail.com

Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-5200 www.fremontymca.org Saturday, Apr 21

Shrimp Feed Fiesta Fundraiser $

5 p.m. - 11 p.m. Dinner, music, no-host bar

Union City Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 675-5495 Saturday, Apr 21

Earth Day: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

9:30 a.m. - 12 noon & 1:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. Family fun games & puppet show

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

Saturday, Apr 21

Sunday, Apr 22

Family Bicycling Workshop - R

Wildflower Wanderings Walk

10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Bicycle safety class & neighborhood ride

Vallejo Mill Elementary 38569 Canyon Heights Dr., Fremont (510) 845-7433 www.ebbc.org/safety

10 a.m. - 12 noon Explore and examine flowers

Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 544-3220

Fremont Freewheelers 5006 Mowry Ave, Fremont (510) 693-8624 www.ffbc.org Sunday, Apr 22

Recycled Earth Day Cards

Sunday, Apr 22

12 noon - 1 p.m.

Feast of Edible and Useful Plants Hike

Decorate recycled paper with natural products

"Milpitas Got Talent" Auditions

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

1 p.m. Must be a Milpitas resident ages 12-21

Taste unique plants & learn about their use

Milpitas Teen Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3296

Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 544-3220

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturday, Apr 21

Sunday, Apr 22

Community Emergency Response Team Training

School-Age Storytime

Taster's Showcase $

6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

11 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Children grades kindergarten - 4th grade

Food, beverages, live & silent auction

Must be 18 or older and a resident of Hayward or the Fairview area

Saturday, Apr 21

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 897-6913

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 583-4948

Sunday, Apr 22

Saturday, Apr 28

Saturday, Apr 21 - Sunday, Apr 22

Welcome Back/Open House

Friends of the Union City Library Book Sale $

BBQ, family fun & music

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. (Sun: 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.) Shop for books, CD & DVD bargains

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464

Monday, Apr 23

12 noon - 6 p.m. Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont (510) 793-5683 www.Fremontelks.org

Become a US Citizen $R

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Citizenship educational workshop & application assistance

Fremont Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty Street, Fremont (510) 451-2846 x 301

Sunday, Apr 22

Primavera Century Bicycle Tour

6:30 a.m. Different routes in southern Alameda County

SUBMITTED BY JACK D'ANNIBALE U.S. Representative Mike Honda (D-Calif.) invites high school students to participate in the 2012 “An Artistic Discovery” Congressional Art Competition. Students may submit two-dimensional artworks, including: paintings, drawings, collages, prints, photographs, mixed media or computer-generated art by the deadline of Tuesday, April 24, 2012. The competition is open to all high school students living in the 15th Congressional District. The winning piece will represent the 15th Congressional District and be displayed as part of a year-long national exhibition in the Cannon Tunnel, a pedestrian walkway leading from the Cannon House Office Building to the United States Capitol. The winning artist and a guest will be flown to Washington, D.C., courtesy of Southwest Airlines, to attend the unveiling reception on June 20, 2012 at the Capitol Visitor Center. “Unfortunately, amidst budget cuts, arts-education and music are often the first classes to go,” said Honda. “However, opportunities like our art competition highlight the importance of supporting our young people to cultivate their artistic talents and creativity.”

Last year’s contest winner was Eunice Lee, of Monta Visa High School, whose piece was titled, “Embrace.” Eunice’s painting showed a young Libyan girl being embraced by a lively, yet warm Statue of Liberty to represent American support of the Libyan people during the uprisings. The second and third place winners were Younha Kim of Monta Vista High School and Yennie Shyu of Piedmont Hills High School. Honda also encourages local organizations and businesses to help young artists pursue their creativity by contributing gift certificates, art supplies and other incentives for the entrants. Last year’s generous contributors include Southwest Airlines, Pizza My Heart, University Art San Jose, Bontrager Framing Services, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, In N’ Out Burger, Panera, Amici’s Pizza, and the De Anza Euphrat Museum of Art. All pieces will be judged by a diverse panel of community leaders and a winning artist will be announced at a reception to be hosted on May 14, 2012. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/6n7l5az or contact Danielle Duong in Rep. Honda’s District Office at 1999 South Bascom Ave, Suite 815, Campbell, CA 95008 or by phone at (408) 558-8085.

SUBMITTED BY DOLORES M. FERENZ For many years the historic Mission San Jose, founded June 11, 1797, has offered docent-led tours to school classes and groups of over 25 people during the week. Starting last November, they offer guided tours on the second Sunday of each month at 1 p.m. To reserve space on these new tours, call the Mission Gift Shop at 510-67-1797 extension 100. The tour includes the nine-room Museum, which originally served as the padres’ living quarters, and the 1809 church, which was accurately reconstructed in 1985 at a cost of $5 million. The fee for these Sunday tours is $5 per adult and $2 per student. Children under 16 must be accompanied by at least one adult. You are asked to reserve space on the tour to assure there will be sufficient docents available to make your visit pleasurable and educational. Normal hours of operation for the Church and the Museum are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. They are closed on New Years Day, Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. The Old Mission is located at 43300 Mission Boulevard in Fremont. For more information about this jewel of Fremont’s history, visit MissionSanJose.org.


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL Five English graduate students will read from their fiction at a program presented by the Cal State East Bay English Department April 23. Organized by graduate student Christopher Morgan, the 7

CSUEB English graduate student and San Leandro resident Justin Melville.

p.m. program will be in the Biella Room of the University Library. Readers will be Janet Burns, TJ Lyons, Justin Melville, Christopher Morgan, and Johann Schiffer. Burns’ reading will focus on a young man attempting to turn his hobby of writing fan-letters into a lucrative career. Lyons bases his story on a young boy who sleeps every night with the dogs. Melville sends a high school English teacher into a

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memory search in his piece. Morgan’s characters will look for falcons on the Warren Hall roof, and Schiffer places his character in the worst play known to mankind. Alumnus Zac Walsh created a similar program in 2010; Morgan resurrected it to celebrate the creativity, dedication, and determination of these grad students to write despite the dueling demands of their studies, families, and jobs. Stephen Gutierrez, English professor and faculty liaison for this project, said, “These are five terrifically talented writers eager to get out there and strut their stuff. They’re all so different, unique, in style and sensibility it’ll be a wonderful literary treat for the literati at Cal State East Bay. I can’t wait to hear them, as they’ll be reading new works, and they’ve earned my deep respect and affection. A great way to showcase what’s happening here in the halls of the English Department!” Each presentation will be a recently written, currently unpublished piece of fiction running about 1520 minutes in length - sufficient to develop a story line. For information, contact Steve Gutierrez, steve.gutierrez@csueastbay.edu or (510) 885-3400. CSUEB welcomes persons with disabilities. Please notify event sponsor in advance at (510) 8853118 if accommodation is needed. CSUEB English students read 7 p.m. Cal State East Bay Biella Room, University Library 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3400 Free admission Parking $2 per hour

Awards ceremony honors local historic achievements SUBMITTED BY ALISON WENZ Each year since 2000, the Hayward Area Historical Society (HAHS) has honored community members who have made an outstanding contribution to the preservation of the community’s history and historic architecture. The 13th Annual History Awards will be held at the Stonebrae Country Club on Friday, April 20, 2012. Six winners were nominated by local community members and selected by the HAHS Board of Directors for their exemplary contributions to the preservation of local history. Randy Wittorp will receive the Historic Preservation Award for the restoration and preservation of his 1930s-era Tudor style house in the Prospect Hill area. Pete’s Ace Hardware in Castro Valley, founded in 1926, will be honored with the Historic Business Award. The Historic Organization Award will go to the Hayward Mu-

nicipal Band for entertaining the community at their summer concerts and other events since 1957. Hayward High School teacher Peggy Hearne will receive the Educator of the Year Award in appreciation of her outstanding ability to connect students with history. The Community Service Award will go to Robert and Erica Campisi for their long-time commitment to the betterment of the Cherryland community and Meek Park. Alameda County Supervisor Nate Miley will receive the John Sandoval Award in appreciation of his leadership and commitment to preserve the San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery. The soiree begins at 5:30 p.m. at Stonebrae Country Club with a cocktail hour and sweeping sunset views of the bay. In addition to the awards presentation, the evening will feature the live music of Christine Ferrari’s Swing Society, a buffet dinner prepared by Stonebrae’s Executive Chef Ryan Dawson and an opportunity to bid on silent auc-

tion prizes. Raffle tickets may also be purchased for the chance to win a tour and wine tasting for up to 30 people courtesy of Byington Winery and Vineyard. Proceeds from the event support the HAHS Center of History and Culture Campaign. All who wish to support the 2012 award winners, HAHS, or the preservation of local history are welcome to attend. To purchase tickets or request an invitation, call Development Director Alison Wenz at (510) 581-0223 or send an email to alison@haywardareahistory.org. For more information about HAHS and the award winners, please visit www.HaywardAreaHistory.org. Hayward Area Historical Society History Awards Friday, Apr 20 5:30 p.m. Stonebrae Country Club 27900 Fairview Avenue Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.HaywardAreaHistory.org

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, April 17 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25– 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25– 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, April 18 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apartments, 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apartments, 1300 Kentwood Lane, San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, April 19 2:00 – 2:25 p.m. Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 2:45 – 3:40 p.m. Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., San Lorenzo 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Falcon Dr. & Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Creekside Village Apartments, 3999 Sequoia Terrace, Fremont Friday, April 20 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. Kidango Grant, 879 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., San Lorenzo

Monday, April 23 1:45 – 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, April 24 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, April 25 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, April 18 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

Ohlone ladies softball on pace for playoffs, Chabot season winding down BY BIFF JONES PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Thursday, April 12, Ohlone College Renegades and Chabot College Gladiators faced off in the second meeting of the year between the two Coast Conference North (CCN) rivals. Ohlone won the first meeting, 10-0, at Chabot. After winning nine straight

baseman Joline Long, laded down a sacrifice bunt attempt. When Ohlone tried to get the lead runner Ferrer at second base, Ferrer was safe on a fielder's choice putting two on with no outs. Next Chabot hitter, catcher Meghan Magallanes, loaded the bases on an Ohlone error. Bihl then got the next two hitters on a pop up and a fielder's choice force out at home. However, Gladiator shortstop, Vanessa Felex, then drove in

the fifth, Ohlone scored 3 runs on singles by center fielder Ashley Vignola and Marden, a three base Chabot error which put Ermitano on third with still only one out, and a sacrifice fly by Fowler for a 5-2 Renegade lead. Bihl shut down Chabot in the sixth giving up one walk and Brittany Wright came on to pitch a perfect seventh while striking out two. Bihl allowed 2 runs and 3 hits with 2 walks while striking

Play at third base: Chabot third baseman, Vanessa Medina ready to apply tag on Ohlone Sophomore pinch hitter, Brittany Lema-Kesis, American High School, Fremont attempting to take third on a passed ball. Chabot Shortstop,Vanessa Felix backing up the play.

CCN titles, Ohlone, under Head Coach Donna Runyon, will probably have to settle for second place this year which still qualifies the Renegades for one of two CCN automatic bids to the California Community College (CCC) post season tournament. This year's Ohlone squad is heavily dominated by sophomores while Chabot, under first year Head Coach, Megan Grace, is laden with mostly freshman. Southpaw Katy Bihl with a record of 10-7 started the game for Ohlone while Alani Ferrer, coming in at 3-11, started on the rubber for the visitors. Top of the first inning saw Chabot lead off hitter, Ferrer, reach on a base-on-balls. Second hitter for the Gladiators, first

the first runs of the game with a two run, two out single to put the visitors up 2-0. Renegades answered in their half of the first inning when after two outs, third baseman Kaley Marden and first baseman Lauren Ermitano drew back-to-back walks. This was followed by second baseman, Sarah Ragusa, Ohlone's hottest hitter of late as she had added 100 points to her batting average over the past three weeks, delivering an RBI single to cut the lead to 2-1. Score would remain the same until the bottom of the fourth when the hosts Bihl and catcher Shelby Fowler led off with back-toback doubles to tie the score at 2-2. After an out in the bottom of

out 5 in her six innings of work. Ferrer gave up 5 runs with 8 hits and 3 walks in her six innings. Ohlone is now 12-3 in CCN and 24-11 overall and need one win or a loss by CCN third place De Anza College of Cupertion to secure CCN second place and the automatic post season bid. Renegades played Mission College of Santa Clara on Monday, April 16 with results unknown at press time. They play at De Anza on the 19th and finish the regular season at first place College of San Mateo (14-1, 33-3) on Tuesday, 24th. Chabot is now 3-12, 7-19 and play Foothill College of Los Altos Hills in their final game of the year April 24th at 3 p.m. on the Chabot Campus.

BY HELEN TRACEY-NOREN With views of the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco, visibility wasn’t predictable at TPC Stonebrae Championship golf tournament in the Hayward hills. Due to severe fog, Pro-Am tee times were pushed back by nearly two hours on Wednesday and play was shortened from 18 holes to nine. Jerry Rice, former San Francisco 49er, was due to tee off at 8:50 a.m. but did not see the first tee until just after 10:30 a.m. Tournament officials said they planned for all players to finish by 5 p.m. Several remarks were made about cold temperatures and course difficulty. Monday and Tuesday were dedicated to the Nationwide Tour qualifying rounds held at the Diablo Creek and Boundary Oak golf courses. Livermore local Todd Fischer shot the lowest score on the par 72 course scoring a 65 followed by Ken Sisler III from La Quinta, CA, who shot a 67. John Chin from Temecula, CA and Wes Roach from Knoxville, TN had the lowest two scores from par 72 Diablo Creek course shooting a 64 and 65, respectively. Because the Pro-Am course was shortened to nine holes rather than 18, par was set at 35. Of the morning group, the lowest team score was 27 led by professional Ryan Armour who started at the front nine, however he was passed by B.J. Staten in the afternoon group who shot a 25. This was an incredible ten under par. Rice and Steve Elkington, renowned Australian golfer, did not submit their teams' score cards after completing their games. Boxing legend Sugar Ray Leonard was due to appear at Stonebrae, but cancelled late Tuesday night. The Championship Tournament officially started Thursday with yet another two hour delay due to weather conditions. The course was divided into two sections to prevent congestion and maintain simultaneous play throughout the day. Brian Smock from Coronado, CA held the lead for the morning group for most of the tournament on Thursday averaging three under par for the first seven holes. Smock looked as if he would be the player to beat after being the leader on the front nine holes, second only to Michael Putnam (Tacoma, WA) who held the lowest score for the back nine holes. However, by the end of the tournament, Smock would end up in 16th place. Alex Aragon (San Diego, CA) was the leader of the TPC Stonebrae Nationwide Tournament with an astounding 10 below par, taking home the $108,000 purse. This was Aragon's first career Nationwide Tour win after only sparse appearances in the past two years – two PGA Tour events last year and another Nationwide Tour in 2010. Aragon was only a one stroke victor to Matt Harmon – who only went pro in 2007 – Duffy Waldorf and Paul Haley II who all shot nine under par.

Pioneer Athletic Hall of Fame SUBMITTED BY MARTY VALDEZ The Cal State East Bay Athletics is set to induct six new members into the Pioneer Athletic Hall of Fame. Women’s volleyball player Marion Champion, women’s basketball player Antoinette Goode, football player and assistant football and track coach Don Sawyer, men’s tennis player Jeff Southwick, track and field assistant coach Dr. Charles Harmon “Doc” Brown and men’s tennis head coach John Nelson have all been selected as members of the 2012 induction class.

The six Cal State East Bay Athletic Hall of Fame inductees will be honored at a reception and dinner to be held in the University Union on the Hayward campus on May 5, 2012. Online registration for the dinner is available on the Cal State East Bay Athletic Department website. For more information on the 2012 Hall of Fame induction, please contact Associate Athletic Director Marissa Parry at marissa.parry@csueastbay.edu or (510) 885-2810.


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

ICC Table Tennis Fundraiser Table Tennis program, and our annual Table Tennis Fundraiser is instrumental to our providing the best training atmosphere possible.” The ICC’s facility was opened in 2005 and meets all international standards. This facility is also home to 23 nationally ranked table tennis players as well as the three 2012 Olympic hopefuls. There are more than 100 kids who participate in their Junior Training Program and numerous others who come to play. In addition to their table tennis program, the ICC also has roughly 350 seniors who are members as well as free medical, tax, and legal clinics for members. Individual ticket prices for the Table Tennis Fundraiser are $100 (regular) and $250 (VIP). Prices for tables of 10 people are $1,000 (regular) and $2,500 (VIP).To purchase tickets, please contact Kavita Ramani at (408) 934-1130 x 236.

SUBMITTED BY NEHA KOTHARI The India Community Center’s (ICC) Fourth Annual Table Tennis Fundraiser will be held on May 20 from 5-8 p.m.in Milpitas. The event will include a social hour with coaches and celebrity players and a chance to test your table tennis skills against ICC trainees. Proceeds from the fundraiser benefit ICC’s Table Tennis Junior Training Program – which has provided training to 2012 Olympic hopefuls Ariel Hsing, Timothy Wang, and Lily Zhang over the past six years. “The ICC’s Table Tennis program is being taken to a whole new level this year; with former Olympians training 2012 Olympic hopefuls,” said Rajul Sheth, Director of Sports and Recreation at ICC. “We are so excited about the continued growth of our

Men’s Baseball Pioneers doomed by Coyotes’ big inning

SUBMITTED BY MARTY VALDEZ The Pioneers held a 1-0 advantage after five innings in the first of a four-game series with Cal State San Bernardino. The Coyotes scored five runs in the bottom of the sixth en route to a 6-2 victory over the Pioneers on April 14. The defeat snapped a three-game winning streak and leaves the Pioneers with an 8-17 CCAA record. East Bay is 14-21 for the season. The Coyotes win their fourth straight game and improves to 15-10 in the CCAA and 18-12 overall. Charlie Sharrer was 2-for-4 at the plate including a home run for the Pioneers. Brett Hall had a double and scored a run. Pioneer starting hurler Bryce Miller (1-7) had a strong outing as he allowed only one earned run on

Letter to the Editor

Are there Native American burial sites in Hayward? This is a communication from myself as a private citizen and should not be construed as representing the views of the Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association. Remains of what were said to be a Native American teenage girl and an adult male were retrieved from Maple Court on March 22, 1959 by City of Hayward Street Department staff. University of California archaeologist, James Davis, apparently opined that the bones of the Costonoan tribal group, could date anywhere from 1500 BC to 1000 AD. Where exactly on Maple Court were these remains found? In front of the proposed 44-unit condominium project on the west side of Maple Court (between McKeever Avenue and A Street) that was approved by the Hayward Planning Commission on March 8, 2012? Perhaps Public Works has records? Perhaps the Water Department has records? Please consider this a request for information on this issue. I would submit the strong possibility of Native American burial sites in the vicinity requires further conditions be considered to ensure proper respect be given. I am also asking City Council members to call up this matter so that we, the Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association, or any of our members, do not have to pay the fee to appeal the item. I request any Council member so inclined to communicate with Greg Jones who is the current President of the Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association. Should this matter come before a public body with appropriate notice to the adjacent neighborhood, I would expect this article would be considered a reason NOT to allow a mitigated negative declaration on this project. I would certainly encourage Council to press for a full environmental review on all the issues. Those interested in my theory that we built Hayward on an ancient Native American Cemetery are invited to my history walk (sponsored by the Hayward Area Historical Society) designed to explore the hypothesis at 10 a.m. on August 25, 2012. Frank Goulart, Hayward

Letter to the Editor

seven hits and recorded five strikeouts. Xavier De La Cruz tossed a scoreless eighth inning. Brandon Day and Matt Hanley each drove in a pair of runs for the Coyotes. Casey McCarthy (3-3) hurled a complete game, and held the Pioneers to one earned run on five hits and four strikeouts. McCarthy threw only 76 pitches in nine innings of work. The Pioneers opened the scoring with a run in the top of the fourth inning. Hall opened the fourth with a double and later scored on a Coyote error. The Coyotes took advantage of three Pioneers errors to score five runs in the bottom of the sixth. Haney drove in two runs with a single. In the top of the seventh, Sharrer hit a solo home run, his fourth roundtripper of the season. Cal State San Bernardino answered with a run in the bottom of the seventh. The series continued on April 15, 2012 with a doubleheader at Fiscalini Field.

Just for Us

SUBMITTED BY LEE STAUB Tri-City Health Center’s Just for Us tobacco prevention program is taking aim at the high smoking rates among young adults through the reduction of tobacco industry marketing and sponsorship within Alameda County-based bars and night clubs. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States and is responsible for one in five deaths. So, how is it that an industry that makes, distributes and markets a product that essentially kills off their customer base stay in business? The answer is youth. “Young adult smokers are the only source of replacement smokers.” (Source: RJR Tobacco Company, Bates No. 503170243) For the past twenty five years, tobacco companies such as Philip Morris and RJ Reynolds have created tobacco bar night promotions to attract young adults to start smoking. Tobacco companies provided bars with free promotional items including branded coasters, bar mats napkins, furniture; doled out cash incentives to bar owners; and created elaborate marketing campaigns and nightclub events that featured popular music bands such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers and a number of other attractions designed to appeal to young adults. “Philip Mor-

Road Rage SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD In recent years, aggressive driving and road rage has increased on City streets. When provoked, angry drivers have been known to commit acts of violence. It is important to recognize the warning signs of aggressive driving in order to avoid becoming involved in a potentially hazardous situation. Examples of aggressive driving include: tailgating, cutting off other vehicles, careless lane changes, speeding, and running red lights. Extremely aggressive driving can lead to road rage. Signs to be aware of include: obscene gestures, verbal assaults, intentionally crashing

ris used gifts, luxury car sweepstakes, and interactive video racing games…” (Glantz, Ling, Sepe, 2002). During these promotional events, Tobacco Company representatives (usually attractive young men and women) would socialize with the crowd, provide free giveaways to patrons in exchange for names and contact information that would later be added to mailing list and customer profile databases. “These 1993 promotions generated approximately 1.3 million new names for the Philip Morris database.” (Sepe et.al., 2002, p.6) For a chance to win a luxury car or for free “swag” these young adults become the “replacement smokers” that continue to sustain the entire industry. Just for Us staff are working closely with local bar owners to reverse this trend through the adoption of a voluntary pledge to keep BIG tobacco out of our bars. If you own or manage a bar that doesn’t have tobacco industry marketing materials Just for Us would like to recognize your commitment to public health in a local news publication. Call Lee Staub, Just for Us Project Coordinator at 510-456-3540 for more information. References: Glantz, S., Ling, P., Sepe, E. (2002). Smooth Moves: Bar and Nightclub Tobacco Promotions that Target Young Adults. American Journal of Public Health, 92 (3), 414-419.

into other vehicles, and threatening to use weapons. As our roads become more congested, some drivers' anger and rage also build up. While you're on the road, keep these suggestions in mind to have a safe and enjoyable trip. 1. Plan ahead and allow enough time for your trip. 2. Avoid following other vehicles too closely. 3. Use your horn only when necessary. 4. Drive in the passing lane only if you are passing. 5. Use your turn signal when changing lanes. 6. Avoid gestures that may offend others. 7. Ignore agitated drivers. 8. Use low beam headlights when other vehicles are near. 9. Be aware of speeding cars and let them pass. 10. Remember the vehicle golden rule: Drive the way you would like others to drive.

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Phone: Archaeologist James Davis (center) taking a picture of Native American remains, with Water Department Foreman Bill Williford and Jane Barnes of Public Works, The Daily Review, March 23,1959. (Original on file at the Hayward Area Historical Society).

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Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES NOTICE OF BULK SALE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given to the Creditors of: FADILAH BOUKHELKHAL, Seller(s), whose business address(es) is: 32106 ALVARADO BLVD., City of UNION CITY, County of ALAMEDA, State of California, 94587, that a bulk transfer is about to be made to: NAVEED JALAL, Buyer(s), whose business(es) address is: 32106 ALVARADO BLVD., City of UNION CITY, County of ALAMEDA, State of California, 94587. The property to be transferred is located at: 32106 ALVARADO BLVD., City of UNION CITY, County of ALAMEDA, State of California, 94587. Said property is described in general as: All stock in trade, fixtures, equipment, goodwill and other property of that RESTAURANT business known as RAYYAN PIZZA & PASTA, and located at: 32106 ALVARADO BLVD., City of UNION CITY, County of ALAMEDA, State of California, 94587. The bulk transfer will be consummated on or after the 3rd day of May, 2012. This bulk transfer is subject to Section 6106.2 of the California Commercial Code. If Section 6106.2 applies, claims may be filed at FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, Escrow Division, Escrow No: 8121744 -LC, 601 California Street, Suite 1501, San Francisco, County of San Francisco, State of California, 94108. Phone: 415.421.5566 • Fax: 415.520.6508 ESCROW NO: 8121744 -LC XX This bulk transfer does NOT include a liquor license transfer. All claims must be received at this address by the 2nd day of May, 2012. So far as known to the Buyer(s), all business names and addresses used by the Seller(s) for the three years last past, if different from the above, are: None Dated: APRIL 5, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY AS ESCROW AGENT FOR THE HEREIN SELLER AND BUYER BY: TIFFANY CRIGER 4/17/12 CNS-2296680#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463740 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Baybabes, 40442 Grimmer Blvd., Unit 2, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Mussart Khan, 40442 Grimmer Blvd., Unit 2, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mussart Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 9, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself autho-

rize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/17, 4/24, 5/1, 5/8/12 CNS-2296533# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 436160 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: RADICAL IMPAC INC 33626 DEPOT RD UNION CITY CA 94587, County of ALAMEDA RADICAL IMPAC INC 33626 DEPOT RD UNION CITY CA 94587 This business is conducted by A CORPORATION The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N.A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ ARLINGTON WEAVER JR This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MARCH 23,2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/10, 4/17, 4/24, 5/1/12 CNS-2293527# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463620 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: G & R Financial Services, 43979 S. Moray St., Fremont, CA 94359, County of Alameda P.O. Box 3122 Fremont, CA 94539 Ghanshyam C. Gajjar, 43979 S. Moray St., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 2/21/1996 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ghanshyam C. Gajjar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 4, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/10, 4/17, 4/24, 5/1/12 CNS-2293431# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 463619 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

continued from page 12

Bank reports point to a healing housing market At Wells Fargo, 15 percent of mortgage applications came from the government's Home Affordable Refinance Program, which helps Americans who owe more than their property is worth get more affordable loans. “It is great to see people who have made their payments every month even though they are underwater, or hugely underwater,” Stumpf said. “And now to be able to help them put a few hundred dollars extra in their pocket every month, that is terrific.” Foreclosures are still holding the housing market back. A $25 billion settlement reached in February between the nation's biggest mortgage lenders and state officials has paved the way for banks to take action on unpaid mortgages, many of which have been in a procedural limbo for months or years. Those homes could be foreclosed on and end up back on the market. Foreclosures typically sell at a discount to other homes and can drag down the value of neighboring properties. The banks agreed to overhaul their mortgage practices. Because of that commitment and more disciplined internal rules, banks don't make as much money as they once did on mortgage loans. At a time when low interest rates have already reduced income for banks, banks must also assign one banker to each homeowner undergoing a loan modification and make sure every loan has double-checked documentation. At JPMorgan, expenses related to mortgage production increased 35 percent for the quarter to $573 million. At Wells Fargo, total noninterest expenses rose slightly over the year before, mostly from commissions and bonuses for bankers in the mortgage unit and elsewhere. Both Wells Fargo and JPMorgan also put aside more money to pay investors who allege they were misled about mortgage-backed securities that the bank sold them before the financial crisis in the fall of 2008. Dimon said JPMorgan expects high costs from the bursting of the real estate bubble last decade “for a while longer.” The bank set aside $2.5 billion to fight legal battles, including over foreclosures. Its chief financial officer said the bank has enough reserves for mortgage-related litigation. Wells Fargo added $314 million to its legal reserves. Despite the increased costs, any growth is welcome at a time when other loans are growing at an even slower pace, says Christopher Mutascio, an analyst for the brokerage Stifel Nicolaus. In a conference call with Wells Fargo executives, bank analyst Nancy Bush asked whether mortgage loan modifications – slashing rates, forgiving principal – would give borrowers an excuse not to meet their mortgage payments. Stumpf said the “vast majority” of Americans want to pay their bills “if they have the income to do it.” Loans today, Stumpf said, are more like those made a decade ago, with full documentation and substantial down payments. JPMorgan Chase, the largest U.S. bank by assets, turned a $5.4 billion profit for the quarter, down 3 percent from last year but ahead of Wall Street estimates. Wells Fargo made $4 billion, up from $3.6 billion a year ago. Large banks serve as a barometer of the economy. Citigroup, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley report their results for the first quarter next week.

VCIP Funds, 43979 S. Moray St., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. P.O. Box 3122, Fremont, CA 94539. Ghanshyam C. Gajjar, 43979 S. Moray St., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 8/2/2002. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ghanshyam C. Gajjar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on April 4, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/10, 4/17, 4/24, 5/1/12 CNS-2293418# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462517-18 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Associated Network Systems Representatives, (2) ANSR, 7777 Pardee Lane, Oakland, CA 94621, County of Alameda. P.O. Box 2265, Oakland, CA 94621. Associated Lighting Representatives, Inc., CA, 7777 Pardee Lane, Oakland, CA 94621. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Sept. 1, 2003. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Darrell C. Packard, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 6, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/12 CNS-2284723# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 461871 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Beauty Worx Newpark Mall, 1097 Newpark Mall, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Nichole Edwards, 6529 Ranchhand Way, Citrus Heights, CA 95621. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Jan. 1, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as

true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Nichole Edwards, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 22, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/12 CNS-2284722# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462481 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Miki Bistro, 39156 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. 34133 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94555. Kun Zhang, 39748 Costa Way, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kun Zhang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 6, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/12 CNS-2284603# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 462358 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PICC Placement Services, 35373 Terra Cotta Circle, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Raquel Madamba Hoag, 35373 Terra Cotta Circle, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raquel Madamba Hoag This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 02, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/12 CNS-2284507#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY Department of Public Works City Project No. 08-16B Notice to Contractor Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: UNION CITY POLICE EVIDENCE STORAGE BUILDING, will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012, 2:00PM PST, at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. Project is funded by the CAPITAL FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT FUND. The Contractor shall possess a Class B California contractor’s license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans specifications and proposals forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $15.00 PER IMPROVEMENT PLANS ON A CD & PRINTED SPECIFICATIONS WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $25.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, consists of demolition of existing pavement, site work (includes grading, water, sewer, and gas improvements), construct steel frame building, interior finishing, concrete foundation, sidewalk improvements, curb & gutter, install mechanical systems, install electrical systems, plumbing and other such items indicated and required by the plans, and these technical specifications. Call Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request bid packages to be mailed. All questions should be emailed or fax to Travis Huang of City of Union City, email: travish@unioncity.org or fax to (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication.) CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: April 10, 2012 4/13, 4/17/12 CNS-2295997#

Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) Board meeting report ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH

bat the anticipated $30.6 million deficit so far. Suggested options were to charge outside groups more for use of school facilities, additional furlough days by management, class size reduction, etc. Further input will be gathered and an updated list will be presented to the Board with recommendations at the April 25 meeting. Final decisions need to be made by May 23. Trustee Ivy Wu scheduled a “call to action” meeting for April 17 at the District office. Agenda Item – Transportation Department:

The following are highlights from the Fremont Unified School District (FUSD) Board meeting held March 28, 2012. Oral Communications/Public Comment Non-Agenda Items: Changes are being proposed for the district’s Opportunity Program for “at risk” 7th and 8th graders, who have not had success in the traditional school environment. Brannin Dorsey, President of the Fremont Unified District Teachers’ Association, stated that the teachers had not been informed in advance. Several teachers and a school psychologist spoke on the necessity of continuing the program as it is a place for students who feel they can’t fit elsewhere. These students do well in a smaller, safer and calmer learning environment, with attention from dedicated teachers. Jim Nation, who has taught in the Opportunity Program for 22 years, addressed the Board saying, “Not every child can thrive in the traditional setting.” Agenda Item – Revised Board Policy on Student Bullying: Director of Pupil Services, “A trio of young, school bus riders show their concern over possible school bus cuts.” Rickey Jones, stated that staff has re-written and updated the FUSD is still one of the few remaining districts offerdefinitions on student bullying and cyber-bullying and ing home to school bus service but is considering eliminatrevised a bullying complaint form. ing all regular education bus service. Nevertheless, the Trustee Larry Sweeney commented on considering District is still required by law to continue providing the needs of the victim [in this revised policy] to make transportation for its Special Education students. them feel whole, besides the disciplinary action toward Scott Cantacessi, President of SEIU 1021 (Service the bullies. Motion to accept this first reading of the Employees International Union) stated, “Polling data new Board Policy was unanimously passed. suggests that the tax initiative will pass. Don’t make Agenda Item – New Board Policy on the decision [to cut transportation services] this year. Search & Seizure: Make it next spring!” Following the trend of other school districts, such Preliminary recommendations will be discussed at as Newark and Pleasanton, who have recently apthe April 25 Board meeting. proved the use of police dogs on campus to deter drug Agenda Item - Child Nutrition Services: use, FUSD is also pursuing this tactic. A discussion of Cooks/Bakers housed in one central Police Sgt. Jim Koepf attended the School Board location is an option being considered. meeting. The proposed plan recommends two unanFacilities Needs Assessment: nounced searches per school year, by the police dogs. Based on the assessment of the District’s school faThe motion to accept the first reading of the Search cilities, conducted by WLC Architects/MGT America, and Seizure Regulation was passed unanimously. $568 million would be necessary to repair or update Agenda Item –Revenue Enhancements & all of the various school sites. The proposed Facilities Budget Reductions: Bond, would not cover the entire amount needed; the Assistant Superintendent of Business, Micaela next step is to rank, prioritize and seek public input. Ochoa, discussed some preliminary ideas to help com-


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

Tax Season plenty. The buck actually starts and stops with each voter. Income tax bounced from a temporary collection measure to support the Civil War effort, then shifted to liquor taxes in 1872, dying and reviving in subsequent years until the 16th Amendment to the Constitution made it permanent in 1913.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

D

on’t let April sunshine fool you; clouds of gloom and doom are about to descend on every voter and taxpayer in the voting booth this year. As we pass the calendar anniversary of the granddaddy of them all, Income Tax, its cousins – sales, use, utility, etc. - continue to penetrate our pocketbooks. The season of need in the guise of new taxes is approaching following the speculation and greed that fueled the Great Recession of the 2000s (i.e. Depression). April 15 is painfully and indelibly printed on every US citizen’s mind but it isn’t all bad. It is a reminder that all of us are obligated to pay toward the common good of our country whether we believe in and support every use of our funds or not. This year we get a break since this infamous day falls on a Sunday and the following Monday is a District of Columbia holiday – Emancipation Day. Go figure… in our world, emancipation comes and goes in just a few hours. Some analyst has calculated that on the same day as our income taxes are due, the “average” worker has finally begun to collect a salary that really goes to themselves and family. In theory, incomes taxes for the year have been paid and it only took three and a half months to do it. This year, we are about to be inundated with requests from public agencies for more taxes, many for excellent reasons and for worthy causes. Unfortunately, just as water runs downhill, so does the almighty buck which, contrary to President Truman’s desk sign “The Buck Stops Here,” misses the mark by

Along with a host of other taxes, many hidden and unrecognizable, the impulse by the public sector to take just a little more from everyone is a political itch never fully satisfied. When spending is unsupported by a healthy economy, the bad news filters from the top down and finally ends up at the taxpayer doorstep. Taxes of every color and stripe are proposed and each carries an emotional plea that is difficult, if not impossible to ignore. Our children need to be educated and compete in a world economy, streets must be passable and energy created to run our world. All of this requires an intricate system supported by our collective efforts… i.e. taxes. Gasoline, utilities, sales, use and a plethora of taxes support a mass of public functions and employees. This is a fact and cannot be ignored or simply shut down without disastrous consequences to ourselves and future generations. However, when tax advocates come calling, there are a few simple questions to ask just as you would do when considering personal finances. Are these permanent taxes or do they have a “sunset” provision? Does a return to voters in some future year actually give power to stop the taxes or simply approve of how they are used? A new transportation tax proposed for Alameda County, for instance, touts voter approval every 20 years following an initial 30 year period, but does continuation of the tax actually depend on voters or is this simply an approval of how to use the money. What happens when the economy improves and other entities that are supposed to support local transportation efforts find they are relieved of this responsibility since local folks are paying an additional tax? Where does that money go?

Are taxes dispersed equitably? After listening to a presentation of a proposed Transportation Expenditure Plan by the Alameda County Transportation Commission, the tax carrot to local cities is money sent directly to the city but what of other funds that are promised to be distributed equitably (eventually!) throughout the area. Does such a formula use population, area, street mileage, needs or something else that will bring tax dollars to the Southern Alameda County? Fremont is bribed with an Irvington BART station, Newark is told of wondrous things in the Dumbarton Rail Corridor and Union City salivates over its Intermodal Station. Are these trinkets that buy votes without a more substantial evaluation? Our schools are in desperate need and yet, what happens to State coffers once they begin to fill again? Does the legislature now follow the same patterns as before but with additional funding? How can we pressure our representatives to learn from their mistakes and pay attention to local needs rather than using a time-honored tradition of simply stealing from the next few layers of government – county and local? Local taxes and resources that cannot be raided by State and Federal shenanigans is useful, but our politicians need to heel to voters, not the other way around. If we are to expand local funding, the time has come to demand a balanced budget at the State level. If our present legislators cannot do this, it is time to hire those who can. Strict budget control does not mean malicious intent toward areas of our State that need extra help, simply better fiscal control of how this is done. Tax Season is a good time to pay your fair share but question where it all goes.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Jessica Noël Flohr Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Helen Tracey-Noren Angie Wang WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published twice weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Union City City Council

Newark City Council

Fremont City Council Fremont City Council April 10, 2012

Newark City Council April 12, 2012

Consent: Appropriate Community Service Block Grant funds for the Fremont Family Resource Center (FRC) - $80,000 and $$43,500. Accept $60,000 from Toyota USA Foundation for City FRC Support Services Fund Provide Senior Service Coordinator Services at Cottonwood Senior Housing Rescind resolutions and policies no longer relevant Submit a housing-related parks program grant application to State Department of Housing and Community Development Adopt an updated “Art in Public Places” policy

Presentations and Proclamations: Commending Commander Robert Douglas of the Newark Police Department for 28 years service with the City of Newark Farmers and Farmerettes Square Dance Club presented checks totaling $2,250: $750 for Meals on Wheels; $750 for K-9 operations; and $750 for graffiti abatement. Presentation by Alameda County Transportation Commission regarding the proposed 2012 Transportation Expenditure Plan. This proposal will involve an additional county-wide sales tax measure on the November 2012 ballot. If passed, funds will be apportioned directly to cities and through a needs assessment. City support for this measure is sought and will be on the agenda at the next meeting of the Newark City Council.

Scheduled Items: Introduce an ordinance pertaining to renewable energy systems that will include both solar power and wind power systems. Solar panels are becoming more common; wind turbines are also possible sources of alternative energy although much of Fremont is considered a substandard location for sustained wind energy. Private turbines are allowed but restricted in number, height and diameter which may lessen the efficacy of these devices.

Public Hearings: Consider a conditional use permit and planned unit development at 39650 Cedar Blvd. to include physical activity uses (i.e. dance studio, marital arts, health club, etc.) Consider property owner objections to 2012 Weed Abatement Program (no speakers)

Mayor Gus Morrison Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan William Harrison Suzanne Lee Chan Dominic Dutra

Aye Aye Aye Aye Absent

AC Transit buys new coaches from Gillig In line with its strict “Buy American Goods” policy, the AC Transit Board of Directors recently agreed to purchase as many as 40, low-floor coaches from the Gillig Corporation, a local bus manufacturer in Hayward. In total, the 40-foot long, diesel-fueled buses will cost $16.4M - with $8.2M in agency funds being matched by $8.2M from the State Local Partnership Program. Board President Elsa Ortiz, who authored the agency’s “Buy American Goods” policy in 2009, is especially gratified because the bus purchase is expected to stimulate the local economy by providing jobs for scores of local residents. “I’m happy that we’re not only buying America but buses made in this District,” Ortiz said. “We don’t need to go overseas to buy buses when we have people, who need work and produce a high-quality product at a competitive price, in our own backyard.” A prototype of the new bus is expected to be delivered to the agency by the end of 2012 and several of the buses are expected to be in service in early 2013. Noting that the nation was experiencing one of its worst recessions since the 1930s, the Board’s 2009 “Buy American Goods” policy directs the agency to “…employ its best efforts to procure goods manufactured in America and when possible give first priority to goods manufactured in California… ” “I’m delighted an American manufacturer competed successfully for this contract with the agency and am especially pleased it is in my District” said Board member Mark Williams who represents the Hayward area. The Gillig Corporation is an American bus manufacturer employing more than 500 East Bay workers. With a financial stimulus package from the Obama Administration, it has been able to retain its workforce during tough economic times and has even added to its work force. “This is great news for our workers,’’ said David Bloch, political coordinator for the Teamsters Union which represents the Gillig workforce. “Gillig is the foremost transit bus supplier in the United States and has been, and continues to be, the dominant supplier in North America, supplying more US transit districts, such as Santa Clara, San Mateo, Contra Costa, Livermore, Tri-Delta, etc., than any other bus manufacturer,” stated Gillig CEO Denny Howard. “The AC Transit order represents about 13 days of production; our employees are extremely satisfied with this order because their families can once again ride on a Gillig bus locally.” Howard also notes that unemployment and debt are the two biggest problems in the United States, today. At some point, people will have to seriously consider purchasing Americanmade products to boost domestic consumption and keep tax dollars in the US, tax dollars in California and jobs in the United States. AC Transit’s contract and “Buy American Goods” policy are signs of recognition. “The City of Hayward has been very supportive of Gillig’s presence in Hayward. Mayor Michael Sweeney, former City Manager Greg Jones and Economic Development Manager Sean Brooks have all visited Gillig,” added Howard. Howard finds it remarkable that businesses continue to leave the US and few try to stop them. When NUMMI left, there was some discussion but ultimately such an exodus equates to a loss of jobs. “We have more than 250 customers and seek a long-term relationship with them all. We’ve done business with some for 3540 years. Given the terms associated with federal funding of transportation, Gillig must bid on all contracts with transit agencies. We’re pleased to have won the AC Transit contract,” concluded Howard. For more information, visit www.ACTransit.org and www.Gillig.com.

Consent Calendar: Authorize public right-of-way encroachment permit for S.E.S. Holy Ghost Festival July 21-22. Delete Redevelopment Agency from council agenda and replace with Successor Agency Authorize park furniture replacement through Outdoor Creations, Inc. in the amount of $13,104.38. Adopt Successor Agency to Newark Redevelopment Agency Approve $10,000 sponsorship of Newark Chamber of Commerce SummerFest to promote recycling. Non-consent: Review draft of 2012-13 and 2013-14 Capital Improvement Plan. As part of the City’s biennial budget, expenditures in excess of $5,000 are listed except equipment and vehicles replaced through the Equipment Replacement Fund. With no operating surplus since 2004, requirements for inclusion are strict and must satisfy a regulatory or mandatory need, reduce a liability or preserve an existing asset. Among projects considered, 96 remain unfunded. FY 2012-13 includes 30 projects totaling $9,015,000 primarily associated with repair of Silliman Activity Center ceiling with funds from a legal settlement and environmental and design of a Central Ave. overpass funded with Measure B funds (Alameda County Transportation Commission). Sidewalk, street tree maintenance, pavement repair and transportation-related expenditures are included in the budget. Funds for maintenance of City Administration Building, audio/visual upgrades for council chambers. Grant funds are anticipated for Police Department upgrades and community nonprofit organizations. FY 2013-14 project recommendations include 22 projects totaling $2,245,000 for maintenance of sidewalks, handicap ramps, roadway maintenance. Purchase and installation of building permit tracking software will be ultimately repaid through building inspection fees. Draft document completion is expected by April 16 and a presentation to the Planning Commission on May 8 will precede presentation at a City Council Budget Work Session May 24. Adoption of the Biennial Budget and CIP by City Council is planned June 28, 2012. Amend Solid Waste Collection and Recycling Services Contract with Waste Management of Alameda County, Inc. – 24% increase. Due to a significant rate increase, a one-year interim contract has been accepted with an initial rate increase of 24% effective June 1, 2012. There is an option to continue this contract for another year with a rate increase of an additional 4%. A residential 35-gallon container will increase from $21.72 per month to $26.93 per month. Staff is preparing a competitive Request for Proposal process. Council Matters: Adopt summer recess of council during the month of August 2012 Appoint a replacement on Planning Commission for Councilmember Robert Marshall. Theresa Ballard Dias was selected by Mayor Nagy. Mayor Alan Nagy Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Luis Freitas Maria “Sucy” Collazo Robert Marshall

Aye Absent Aye Aye Aye

State of the City Address SUBMITTED BY LAURIE GEBHARD

The Newark Chamber of Commerce and the City of Newark present the 2012 State of the City Address by Mayor Alan Nagy. This year’s State of the City Address will be held on Thursday, April 19 at the Newark Hilton, 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark. 11:15 am to 12:00 pm Registration and Networking 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm Welcome and Lunch 12:20 pm to 12:30 pm Gallery Seating Open 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm State of the City Address Cost to attend is $35 for Chamber of Commerce Members, $45 for Non-Chamber Members, and Gallery seating is at no charge. Doors will open for Gallery seating at 12:20 pm and will close at 12:30 pm. Reservations are required by April 16 to the Newark Chamber of Commerce at (510) 744-1003.

Union City City Council April 10, 2012 Consent: Adopt a resolution to adopt a Master Fee Schedule to incorporate new fees and business license payment options for stand-alone food trucks and events Accept Dyer Street Pavement Rehabilitation Project from MCK Services, Inc. for the final contract amount of $894,449.61 Award the Smith Street Crosswalk Improvements Project to Wattis Construction Co., Inc of San Jose, CA in the amount of $190,000 City Manager Reports: Endorse Measure H – a parcel tax to support New Haven Unified Schools on the June 5, 2012 ballot. Tax will be for four years with voter renewal required to continue. Ratios will go 30-1 for entire district with cuts. Focus is on preservation of school resources. Approve an Exclusive Right to Negotiate with Windflower Properties for six months to develop a market evaluation for continued development of the Station District. Redevelopment Successor Agency Meetings held April 4 and April 9. Elected Chair Mayor Mark Green and reviewed Recognized Obligation Payment Schedules. As of July 1, 2016, all local oversight boards will be combined into one county oversight board. Mayor Mark Green Vice Mayor Pat Gacoscos Emily Duncan Lorrin Ellis rival Jim Navarro

Aye Aye Aye Late ArAye

Spinal cord injury research bill approved SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA

Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski’s (D-Fremont) bill to provide funding for a spinal cord injury research program named after a former Chabot College football player, who was paralyzed during a game, passed the state Assembly’s Public Safety Committee 4-2 on March 27, 2012. AB 1657 would restore funding to the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research program created in 2000. The program is administered by the University of California out of the Reeve-Irvine Research Center, partially named after the late actor Christopher Reeve. It provides research grants to scientists at universities around the state working to improve the quality of life for the 650,000 Californians living with paralysis. “In the past week, I have received about 300 emails in support of this bill from people all over the world” Wieckowski said. “I’ve heard from people who are dealing with spinal cord injuries or know a loved one who is living with the condition. This bill gives them hope that through this research there will be medical advances that improve the mobility and functionality of people with SCI.” To date, California has invested about $15M since the program’s beginning and leveraged that amount with an additional $64M from federal research grants from the National Institute of Health and other sources. However, state funding has run out. AB 1657 would restore the funding by adding a $1 penalty on all moving traffic violations and directing them to the spinal cord injury research fund. Roman Reed, now a Fremont Planning Commissioner, attended the hearing and spoke eloquently of his support for the bill and his experience of living with paralysis. Since suffering his injury in the 1990s, he has become a wellknown advocate for SCI research. The University of California and the California Healthcare Institute, a statewide organization representing the state’s biomedical community, also support the bill. AB 1657 will now go to the Assembly Health Committee for consideration.


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Maqsood Khan

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 3, 1937 - April 12, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 11, 1923 – April 13, 2010

Alexander R. Lewis Berge • Pappas • Smith

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 5, 1932 - April 13, 2012

Chapel of the Angels

Hung Tieu Lu-Huynh

(510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 24, 1916 - April 13, 2012

James C. Nicholas RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 1, 1943 - April 13, 2012

L

Maria F. Salinas RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 12, 1927 - April 13, 2012

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Special Life Events

Ruth & Dwain Scott - 75th Anniversary Celebration

Dwain and Ruth Scott celebrated their anniversary on March 28th with family and friends for dinner at Dino’s Restaurant in Castro Valley. The couple was married 75 years ago to the day, and had been high school sweethearts in Wakefield High School in Nebraska. Dwain was the captain of the football team and naturally, Ruth was a cheerleader. Today, the Scotts are living with a grandson, Jack in Hayward. They are members of the First United Methodist Church in Hayward. After retirement, they traveled and visited 49 of the 50 states, including Alaska. Their birthdays were both in November of last year. Ruth turned 93 and Dwain is 95. “We both like to do the same things.” Ruth said, “We have a lot in common.”

A somber joyful day As mourners filed into Bay Area Baptist Church in Newark, floral displays and a handout with a picture of a smiling fellow parishioner, Katleen Ping on its cover, dispelled some of the gloom. Psalm 27:1 accompanied the photo proclaiming, “…the LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” Through sermon, hymn and prayer, the legacy of Katleen Brans Ping who perished in the Oikos University tragedy was sad, but upbeat. Throughout the service, presented as the Ping family desired, Pastor Jeremey Stalnecker emphasized that although painful and “a tragedy beyond explanation,” such occurrences are a time to hold tightly to your faith. He told those gathered, “God has a purpose, God has a plan.”

Katleen’s brother, Kaine Ping, spoke briefly and expressed sorrow but conviction that his sister is now at peace in heaven. An ironic twist to the life and death of Katleen is that she was an embodiment of the American

Dream, working hard to achieve economic success, spiritual enlightenment and become a US citizen. Living with her father, mother, brother and sisters, Katleen was scheduled for a naturalization interview on April 19 and looked forward to becoming a citizen, able to sponsor the immigration of her husband still living in the Philippines. She and her young son would soon be reunited with him. While continuing her education toward a career in nursing, Katleen worked at the front desk of Oikos University. On Monday, April 2, 2012, Katleen, described as “a delightful, joyful person with a faithful life and a lovable spirit,” was at work when One L. Goh entered and allegedly began a murderous rampage. She did not survive.

Obituary

Vesta Louise Croes Wilson 1929 - 2012 Vesta Louise Croes Wilson, born in 1929, in Williams, California, daughter of Ida Cleo Waldrop Croes and Everett Croes, died in Alameda, California on January 24, 2012, of cardiopulmonary disease. Vesta Wilson is survived by

one of her four brothers, Jack Croes. Her beloved brothers, who left earth before her, are Henry, Everett, and Ken. She is survived by her three children, William James, Cynthia Ann and John Robert. She is survived by her ex husband, Finis Wilson. She is also survived by her one granddaughter, Katherine Rose. She is survived by her two adopted children, Beth Coy and Michael Wilson. Vesta is also survived by her adopted niece, Carol Van Airsdale. Vesta Wilson graduated from Roosevelt High School in Fresno, California in 1947.Vesta met her future husband at Fresno State College in the Socialist Club, and they were married in 1950. Vesta returned to college in 1961to earn her teaching credential and she taught at Pioneer Elementary School in Bakersfield, California for 7 years, until Vesta’s family moved to the Bay Area in 1967, and Vesta finished her 29 years of teaching and counseling in the Fremont Unified School District at Robertson Jr. High and then at Horner Middle School. Vesta Wilson, a lifelong Democrat, has lived as a progressive feminist and she has been devoted to humanitarian causes for many years. She was a lifelong

member of the ACLU, and she has generously supported Greenpeace, PFLAG, Planned Parenthood, The Nature Company, Sierra Club, The Audubon Society, SEVA and other progressive causes. She demonstrated for Civil Rights and she marched against the war in Viet Nam. She was a pacifist. For the last phase of her life she was an active member of the League of Women Voters in Fremont, helming the Education Committee, and she won a national award for the flyer she produced for seven years. Vesta Wilson was a founding member of Cathexis Institute, a visionary Transactiaonl Analysis Treatment Center, in Oakland, California. Vesta Wilson was a devoted musician all of her life. She was the choir teacher in Bakersfield. She played the fiddle, the piano, the clarinet and the harp. She could sing alto, tenor and bass. She has instilled a love of music in her children and in fact, in all who knew her well. Vesta was an accomplished photographer, a water colorist , a stained glass artist and a fine writer. Vesta Louise Croes Wilson lived her life the way she wanted to, undaunted and unbound. She was a world traveler, devoted to the wild places on earth. Her favorite continent was Africa, which she visited three times. Vesta was/is extraordinarily beloved by her friends and family because of her wicked and irrepressible sense of humor, and because she accepted people for exactly who they were, on their own terms. She had a huge capacity for love, which explains why she was “Mom” to many people. She was forever kind and inclusive. She had a heart the size of a house and we all loved living in that home and all who knew her, loved her, and grieve her loss deeply. There is a Celebration of Vesta Wilson’s Life coming up in May. Please donate, in lieu of flowers, to Trees for a Change.com, in her name, a company that reforests the National Forests, places ` where Vesta Wilson visited all of her long and rich life.


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Spring Photo Walk Submitted by Ric Ricard

“Sunol Ridge” by Cooksey-Talbott

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS Award-winning photographers Cooksey-Talbott and Jacline Deridder will lead a free photo walk through Sunol Regional Park to “Little Yosemite” on Saturday, April 21, to capture afternoon light on the hills and flowers. It is a several mile walk on dirt trails with several hills. All levels are welcome. Meet at The Fremont Art Centre at 11 a.m. and car-pool on a 20-minute ride to the park. There will be a small admission fee or use EBPRD pass. Maps will be provided at the meeting or you can view it on www.faadpg.ning.com. Wear appropriate clothes as it may be chilly. Wear your walking or hiking shoes and bring a hat,

coat, water, snacks, camera, batteries, memory, lens hood, tripod, remote shutter release, and lens kit. Participants must sign a Release of Liability. For questions, call Cooksey at (510) 742-0548. For details, visit faadpg.ning.com. For more information on the S3 program and photography classes, please go to: faadpg.ning.com/events. Spring Photo Walk Saturday, Apr 21 11 a.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre 37697 Niles Blvd., Niles-Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.faadpgning.com

The Southern Alameda County Alliance of African American Educators (SACAAAE), with Chabot College, is hosting the 8th Annual Awards ceremony for African American students. The event’s purpose is to recognize and encourage student achievement, and to acknowledge parents/family and community support in the lives of young people. This year, SACAAAE will be honoring well over 400 students in grades 5/6, 8, and 12, throughout 10 southern Alameda County local school districts. Students will be honored in six categories: Leadership/Civic Involvement; Talent/Fine Arts; Resilience/Spiritual Consciousness; African-American History Awareness; Academic Excellence; and Academic Potential and Success. Over 1,300 parents and family, friends, educators, and community members are expected to attend. Thus far, SACAAAE has honored almost 1,700 youth. Approximately 532 students from 65 schools were recognized at last year’s event, with over 1,300 in attendance! The Southern Alameda County Alliance of African American Educators (SACAAAE) is dedicated to “promoting excellence in education by providing services and support to enhance the success and performance of all students, with a specific emphasis on students of African descent.” This mission is vital to the educational success of African American children, and in their ability to become productive citizens of our nation. SACAAAE’s efforts are helping make a difference, with the support of parents/families, educators, businesses, and institutions. Once again, the University of California Office of the President is the key sponsor of this year’s Award ceremony. Cultural Pursuits Student Achievement Awards Sunday, Apr 22 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Performing Arts Center at Chabot Community College 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 329-5043 aricricard@comcast.net Open to the community and free of charge

Fremont Bank customers can deliver a “win-win” through the B-CharitableSM checking account… nonprofit organizations win by receiving additional funding and customers win by supporting their favorite charity. To be part of the charitable buzz come to a local Fremont Bank office, call (800) 359-2265 or visit www.fremontbank.com/bcharitable. See how easy it is to B-CharitableSM If you think one person can make a difference Imagine what an entire community can do


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle

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Tri-City Stargazer APRIL 18 – APRIL 24, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Our most remote planet, Pluto, changed directions on Apr 10th, moving into “retrograde,” or backward, motion. This is actually an apparent shift, not literal, and it represents an alteration of viewpoint or shift in perspective on issues that we may have thought were nearly decided. Pluto will remain retrograde until early August, and during this period, we are given time to reassess values and facts before making final conclusions. From the celestial point of view, it is a brief moment of hesitation before a final plunge. Pluto’s motion is related to vast power and social/political judgments that affect the masses. It is well for all of us that a period of hesitation precedes these decisions. The political machinery of the world is like a mighty locomotive: once set in motion, it is hard to change directions. Aries (March 21-April 20): Mercury has entered your sign and brings with him a bright new idea or opportunity. After a three month siege of getting nowhere, this will feel like the breath of spring. You are looking for something that will give you greater freedom, and this may be it. Taurus (April 21-May 20): The sun returns “home” to your sign this week. You will likely find it to be energizing. Now is the time to focus on new plans for this next year of your life. Take a fresh look at where you want to direct your energy. It is appropriate that your attention is directed toward yourself right now. Gemini (May 21-June 20): You are wide open to receive new experiences through friends or new group associations. Whatever your circumstances, you are in a position to be helpful to others and that will please you. You are witty and fun to be around this week. Cancer (June 21-July 21): You are in a reasonably good place with yourself at this time. Your heart and

mind are flowing together. You have no conflict between your feelings and your thoughts about those feelings. This is a time for reflection on important subjects. You can make good decisions now.

catch-up and to dig more deeply into your philosophy. Reflect on your ethics. Teaching, education, travel, and legal projects should be smooth.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Your general attention is shifting for the next month into the arena of your career and overall life direction. Whatever you have created thus far will be noticed and perhaps applauded. As a talented leader, you may attract an invitation to manage an upcoming project.

Scorpio (October 23-November 21): You have a sense of physical strength at this time that will be especially beneficial if you are exercising or are in any type of competition. For the first time in weeks, circumstances concerning relationships are looking more positive. Now is a good time to look toward a meeting of minds.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): An issue of shared resources—time, money, or energy—is on your plate as the week begins. You may feel you have no good solution; however, discuss this with your family and brainstorm for solutions as the week progresses. You likely will find a way through quickly.

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): Your mind and heart are clearly in sync at this time. You are likely at peace with yourself. There is a solid and practical solution at hand, and you do not have to quarrel with yourself over it. Activities involving your children and/or other creative products of your being are favored. Love life flows smoothly.

Libra (September 23-October 22): This is not likely to be an eventful week, because you have no new aspects. It is a good time, however, for

Capricorn (December 22-January 19): This is a steady week for Goats. You have a few balls in the air that are beginning to line up very well

and will be bringing rewards over the next two to three weeks. So, keep up the good work and move forward with your plans. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): This is a great week for a getaway. Do something novel, even if you do not leave home. Your mind is open to whatever seems fresh and unique. A surprise—related to a roommate, neighbor, or sibling— may occur.

ment to your daily life. Aspects favor adding a roommate or visiting with siblings. Short trips could be revitalizing. It seems you need greater exposure to the natural world.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): New media or a renewed form of communication will bring refresh-

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


April 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

Page 33

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 17, 2012

Page 34

Reduced gasoline consumption as prices soar SUBMITTED BY BOE California gasoline prices rose by 23 percent in 2011 to an average of $3.86 per gallon as consumer consumption dropped 1.8 percent, according to a report released on March 30, 2012 by Betty T. Yee, First District Member of the California State Board of Equalization (BOE). “Many Californians are struggling with the increasing cost of gasoline and seek ways to reduce their consumption such as driving more economical vehicles or using alternative modes of transportation,” said Yee. Diesel fuel prices in California increased by 25 percent in the fourth quarter of 2011 to $4.13 per gallon as consumption grew by 2.3 percent. According to the BOE Economic Perspective, commercial trucks account for the bulk of diesel fuel purchases in California. The diesel market is affected by the economy, imports and exports through California ports, and supply and demand conditions in residential and nonresidential construction and agriculture. Gasoline consumption began to decline in 2005 and has continued as consumers, struggling with high prices, take steps to reduce their gasoline purchases, including driving fuel-efficient and hybrid vehicles and taking alternative forms of transportation such as buses, light rail and trains. California is a leader in promoting these methods to support conservation and reduce dependence on foreign oil. Additionally, consumers may be using less gasoline because of the national fuel economy standards that have increased the miles-per-gallon required for new cars. The recession and high unemployment rates have reduced the number of drivers on the highways and the number of long commutes and contributed to lower gasoline consumption in California. The fourth quarter of 2011 saw the national average price of a gallon of gasoline rise by 17 percent to $3.43, while diesel prices increased 23 percent to $3.87. According to the Energy Information Administration, the cost of crude oil, which is set on the world market, determines about 72 percent of the price of gasoline. Some energy experts agree that the way to reduce gasoline price spikes is to decrease the dependence on oil, regardless of where the oil is sourced. According to energy economist Severin Borenstein, with U.C. Berkeley's Haas School of Business, oil prices drive gasoline prices and current oil prices are high. Global factors, such as high demand in India, China and elsewhere in the developing world, largely determine the price of oil. Consequently, Californians’ reduced consumption has only a minor impact on worldwide demand. Similarly, U.S. oil production has only a small impact on the world supply; output increased by 13 percent between 2008 and 2011 but still accounts for less than 10 percent of global production. California gasoline and diesel fuel figures are net consumption, including audit assessments, refunds, amended and late tax returns and the State Controller’s Office refunds. BOE is able to monitor gallons through tax receipts paid by fuel distributors in California. BOE updates the fuel reports at the end of each month. For more information, visit www.boe.ca.gov

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TCV 2012-04-17  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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