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“Denny” Weisgerber

Mixed Media Collage Demonstration

Ohlone Softball

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

D

r. Seuss would approve and applaud the efforts of Evergreen Oil in Newark. From an unappetizing beginning, and without the persuasion and persistence of Sam-I-Am of Green Eggs and Ham fame, what appears to be destined for an ignoble future is revived and celebrated as wor-

February 17, 2012

thy of praise and acceptance. One of very few facilities of its kind in the United States and the only one in California, used motor oil is brought to this unassuming distillation and conversion plant on Smith Avenue in Newark to undergo an amazing transformation. From sludge no longer fit for use in engines, a metamorphosis at

Vol. 11 No. 14

Evergreen creates a variety of products including asphalt and clear, clean oil ready to be modified as a lubricant for engines. “Our technology is very unique available through our ‘sister’ company, Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP), which licenses this technology,” says Bob Gwaltney, Vice President of Refinery Operations. According to CEP, this acid-free commercial method of re-refining uses about half the energy with a much smaller carbon footprint, producing lube oil of equal or better quality than that refined from crude oil. The process is straightforward but exacting; heat and chemicals are involved during distillation to create a series of products that convert dirty and unusable motor oil into a renewable resource. Gwaltney explains, “Our feed stock is used motor oil with about five percontinued from page 15

INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS

A

ward winning local artist Denise Oyama Miller is presenting a “Mixed Media Collage Demonstration” at Olive Hyde Art Center on Wednesday, February 22 from 10 a.m. to noon. With a degree in mathematics from U.C. Berkeley, Miller worked 30 years for Kaiser Permanente in the Information Technology area. Retirement has given her the opportunity to work on her art full time. As a multi-media artist, her work is now in many private and public collections. Currently, she has exhibits at Gallery Concord and Valley Art in Walnut Creek. She is a member of the California Watercolor Association, Studio Art Quilt Associates, Fremont Art Association, Livermore Art Association, Pleasanton Art League, and Artists 7, a women's art group that travels together and shows their work throughout Northern California. Inspired by the natural world, Miller’s work often focuses on intimate landscape scenes. “I

February 17, 2012

love the challenge of taking an idea from one of my inspirations and interpreting it in fabric or watercolor. The challenge of taking an idea

Portrait of a Tree –OHAG: “Portrait of a Tree”

California Gold –OHAG: “California Gold”

from inspiration to completed artwork is thrilling.” Focusing primarily on water media and art quilts, the demonstration at Olive Hyde will show a new, exciting technique for combining these two mediums. Utilizing fabric, paper, and paint Miller will show examples of her mixed media collages and demonstrate techniques for creating a small landscape. Sponsored by the Olive Hyde Art Guild, there will be no charge to participants, but attendance is limited. Contact the Program Chair at (510) 651-4441 for reservations and a supply list. Refreshments will be provided. Mixed media collage demonstration Wednesday, Feb 22 10 a.m. to noon Olive Hyde Art Center 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-4441


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411

1 p.m - 4 p.m

Sunday, Feb 19

Discover the 2,000 year old Tuibun Ohlone Village

Fundraiser for Fremont Senior Center

Saturday, Feb 18

Merrill Gardens 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6602

Battle of the Bands $ 7 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Zarganar - The Art of Freedom $ 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Friday, Feb 17

Senior Center Crab Feed $R 6 p.m.

Friday, Feb 17 - Sunday, Mar 17

Hidden Treasures 12 noon - 5 p.m. Local Artwork

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Friday, Feb 17

Open Mic Night 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Music, storytelling and comedy

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 Friday, Feb 17 - Saturday, Feb 18

The Butler Did It 7 p.m.

Saturday, Feb 18

Magic-Juggling-Storytelling 2 p.m. Tickets available at the Children's Information Desk

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Saturday, Feb 18

Jailbreak: High Voltage Tribute to AC/DC 9 p.m. Music by Chick Jagger and the Falling Rocks

Love @ First Slice Pizzeria 36601 Newark Blvd, Newark (510) 797-7300

Production by Black Box Theater

Saturday, Feb 18

Newark Memorial High School Theatre 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 818-4386

Comedy Short Night $ 7:30 p.m. Films by Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Laurel & Hardy

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Music Competition

Chabot Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6976

Sunday, Feb 19

Chabot Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6976

Our African Dream 7:30 p.m.

Monday, Feb 20

Saturday, Feb 18

Singers, musicians, and dancers

Learn Chinese 3:45 p.m.

New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 739-0430

Stories, songs & games for ages 3 - 6.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Saturday, Feb 18

iPhones & iPads: Tame Your Tech 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Learn to use your device

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 Sunday, Feb 19

Ohlone Village Site Open House 10 a.m - 12 noon &

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Burmese Film Festival, Comedy Show & Ethnic Food Faire

Dirty Cello 8 p.m. Professional Blues Cellist

Sunday, Feb 19

Love at First Slice Pizzeria 36601 Newark Blvd, Newark (510) 797-7300

Folk Jam $R 4:30 - 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb 21

Bring your instruments to play & sing along

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 Sunday, Feb 19

Rockin' the Rack Against Cancer $ 5:30 p.m.

Munchkin Mardi Gras Mania $R 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Celebrate with art, music, and a parade. Ages 5 - 9

Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Dr., Fremont (510) 494-4322

Benefits the American Cancer Society Relay for Life

Saddle Rack 42011 Boscell Rd., Fremont (510) 979-0477

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

continued on page 11 Suzanne Ortt Chinmai Raman Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

Crab Feed

SUBMITTED BY MIKE MARTIN

American Legion Post 649, VFW Post 9601 and Castro Valley Moose Lodge will host a crab and spaghetti feed on Saturday, February 18 at the Castro Valley Moose Lodge. Music by “Silver Lining” and a 50/50 raffle will accompany the meal. Pre-sale tickets only.

Crab and Spaghetti Feed Saturday, February 18 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Moose Lodge 20835 Rutledge Rd., Castro Valley (925) 323-1093 $37.50 per person

Sudoku Solutions

Contact: Andy Buchanan or Tracy Cressio 7 6 9 5 2 1 3 4 8

5 2 3 6 4 8 9 7 1

1 8 4 3 7 9 6 2 5

4 5 7 9 1 3 8 6 2

6 9 2 7 8 4 1 5 3

8 3 1 2 5 6 7 9 4

2 7 8 1 6 5 4 3 9

9 1 5 4 3 7 2 8 6

3 4 6 8 9 2 5 1 7

1 6 C 2 3 9 0 D E F 4 A 7 5 8 B

4 7 E 8 2 5 F C 3 1 9 B A 6 D 0

D A 3 0 6 4 1 B C 5 7 8 F 2 E 9

5 F B 9 E A 7 8 2 0 D 6 C 1 3 4

7 C 4 5 0 D 9 3 8 E 6 1 B A 2 F

2 8 1 B 5 7 6 F A D 3 0 E 4 9 C

6 9 F 3 A E B 2 7 C 5 4 8 D 0 1

A E 0 D 8 1 C 4 B 2 F 9 5 7 6 3

8 3 9 C 7 F D 1 4 6 B 2 0 E A 5

E 1 2 A B 6 3 5 F 7 0 C 9 8 4 D

F 4 5 6 9 8 2 0 D 3 A E 1 B C 7

0 B D 7 4 C E A 9 8 1 5 6 3 F 2

B 0 A E D 3 5 6 1 9 2 F 4 C 7 8

3 2 6 4 1 B 8 9 0 A C 7 D F 5 E

C D 7 1 F 0 A E 5 4 8 3 2 9 B 6

9 5 8 F C 2 4 7 6 B E D 3 0 1 A

Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO

42011 Boscell Road, Fremont www.thesaddlerack.com (510) 979-0477

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-area-news-groupmedianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website. www.tricityvoice.com We have over 1,040 signatures on change.org and over 2,400 have signed a petition at our office and in the community. We need more signatures. You can come

to our office for a petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

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What’s cooking at Washington Hospital during February’s observance of American Heart Month? As part of their efforts to encourage heart-healthy eating habits, the Food & Nutrition Services staff is promoting a “Dine In – Dine Out Healthy Eating” campaign that follows the dietary guidelines for heart health from the National Cholesterol Education Program of the National Institutes of Health. Along with their regular menu of healthy meals for hospital patients and people who dine in the hospital Café, they are offering “Sweetheart Specials” every Tuesday, featuring additional new menu items that meet heart-healthy criteria. Plus, for the second year in a row, the hospital’s dietitians teamed up with a local Italian eatery located near the hospital, Strizzi’s Restaurant, to create heart-healthy meals for their clientele. They also are providing information and recipes so people can learn to prepare heart-healthy meals at home. “It’s no secret that it’s much harder to eat a healthy meal when you’re dining out,” says Kimberlee Alvari, R.D., Director of Food & Nutrition Services at Washington Hospital. “Restaurant meals often include foods loaded with calories, fats and sodium. We want to get the message out that you can have heart-healthy restaurant meals that taste good.” As they did last February, Strizzi’s will offer two main courses – wood-grilled salmon and grilled chicken breast with a roasted mango salsa -- on a special menu that specifies the dishes are “approved by Washington Hospital Registered Dietitians for meeting heart-healthy criteria.” “Both entrees are lower in saturated fat than red meat,” Alvari says. “The fish is an especially good choice because the American Heart Association recommends eating fish twice a week for the benefits derived from the Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish, and most people don’t get enough Omega-3s in their diet.” In addition to creating the maincourse specials, the dietitians also worked

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

Washington Hospital registered dietitians from left to right: Macaria Meyer, Anna Mazzei, Amy Kelly, Danielle Soule, Lorie Roffelsen and Nachal Bhangal provide nutrition counseling for a full range of needs including cardiovascular disorders, gastrointestinal problems and weight management.

with the restaurant staff on portion sizes and on replacing high-calorie, high-fat side dishes with healthier options. “For their heart-healthy side dishes, Strizzi’s is offering pasta with meatless tomato-based marinara sauce and steamed fresh vegetables,” Alvari explains. “Strizzi’s indicated that their heart-healthy menu choices were best sellers last year.” The Sweetheart Specials being offered in the hospital Café during February include: • Chicken and asparagus tossed with penne pasta • Baked salmon with Southeast marinade and couscous • Wild rice and turkey casserole • Antipasto-style penne pasta “We had a very positive response to our Sweetheart Specials last year,” Alvari says. “In addition to the specials, we recently introduced a ‘Wake Up to Wellness’ breakfast menu on Wednesdays that offers heart-healthy options such as whole-grain pancakes with fruit topping, a grilled egg white and turkey-bacon

sandwich on pannini, a whole-grain muffin sandwich with egg whites and low-fat cheese, and a breakfast bowl with egg whites, roasted potatoes and turkey sausage.” The Café also now offers a new “Sinless” line of low-fat breakfast breads and muffins, including such taste-tempting delights as: • Lemon Tuscan muffins made with olive oil • Double-chocolate muffins (with lowfat chocolate) • Almond-blueberry coffee cake • Whole-grain flaxseed banana bread “People who eat in the Café during February can pick up a ‘Heart-Smart’ card that accumulates credits for purchases of any Sweetheart Special, Wake Up to Wellness or Sinless bread item,” she adds. “When they have earned enough card credits, people can enter them into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate from Strizzi’s.” Alvari emphasizes that heart disease is still the number one cause of death in the United States.

“About once every 25 seconds, an American will have a coronary event, and about once every minute, someone will die from a coronary event,” she explains. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that a healthy diet and lifestyle are the best weapons you have to fight heart disease. We are hoping that other restaurants in the Tri-City Voice area will join Strizzi’s and Washington Hospital in this effort to prevent heart disease.”

Learn More About Healthy Eating Local restaurant owners who are interested in working with Washington Hospital dietitians to develop heart-healthy menus for next year’s American Heart Month observance can call the Food & Nutrition Services department at (510) 745-6540 or visit www.whhs.com/nutrition for more information.


February 17, 2012

BY PAT KITE When the Fremont Animal Control Center in Newark moved to their new location at Central Park in Fremont, the old building was boarded up and left unused. The old animal shelter, on Hickory in Newark, remained dismal and shuttered. However, at the same time, Fremont residents Pat Lane and Connie Nelson were taking over 1000 wildlife birds/animals a year into their homes, trying to save as many as they could. “We were soon overwhelmed,” Connie recalls, “and started looking for a site.” The Ohlone Humane Society [OHS] offered to take them in as part of their organization. After much searching, Pat and Connie located the vacant Hickory Street shelter property. The rest should have been easy. It wasn’t. The land is owned by San Francisco Water District. “We approached them for permission to use the building,” Connie states. “We were immediately told ‘no.’” Connie and Pat then went to the East Bay Park District [EBRPD] asking if they had a potential site for a wildlife rescue center. They asked what happened with the San Francisco Water District. As luck would have it, EBRPD has a good working relationship with the Water District and was able to get a reasonably- priced lease on OHS behalf. “So we now had a building,” Connie says, “unfortunately it was a building with no water.” Long story short, to get water into the hopeful shelter, OHS would have to construct a pipeline for almost a mile. Not possible. Onward… a growing contingent of Volunteers and Worldpac, Inc., a kind neighboring company who allowed them to tap into their water line, came to the rescue. One nearby trench completed, “and we were in business.” Of course the grimy dank abandoned shelter was just that. So, then came ren-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ovation and repairs. “Rose, the manager of Sulphur Creek Nature Center, and her husband came down to help. We tore down concrete pillars and had to build aviaries and set up caging,” Connie says. “By some miracle, and with the help of many volunteers, our building came together.” It opened in April 1999.

“At one time I used to work at a local pet store,” he says, “But I don’t like the pet trade. Some animals are not meant to be pets. When you get these things, you contribute to the exotic pet market and deplete the environment.” Doing what he could, David says he would buy injured reptiles from the pet

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some are too injured or sick when they arrive. But we have saved 55 percent of those taken in, which is a wonderful thing in this sometimes-difficult world. Many thanks to all who continue to help from the kindness of their hearts. For more information, or to volunteer [baby bird season is coming up in the spring; they may have to be fed hourly, or every ? hour]… contact. Ohlone Humane Society Wildlife Rehabilitation Center 37175 Hickory Street Newark, CA 94560 Angela Hartman, fantastic volunteer coordinator (510) 797-9449 ohswildlife@yahoo.com

Pat Lane and Connie Nelson managed the OHS Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for several years, but it was obvious the Center need a full-time paid center Manager. They looked toward David Anderson, Registered Veterinary Technician [RVT] at All About Pets in Union City. “It was obvious that David had a huge heart for wildlife,” Connie says. In 2004 he started part-time and in 2006 full time. Born in Eugene, Oregon, David’s family came to the Bay Area when he was age 2. His brother, sisters and mother often went to Garin and Dry Creek Regional Parks. David states that he has always loved animals. “I’d take home any sick or injured animal,” and try to make it better. After graduating from Western Career College, he worked as a Veterinary Technician for 12 years.

store, and take them home. “I used to have wall-to-wall pets, including birds and a lot of reptiles.” Following the pet store employment, he went to work for Dr. Freeman at All About Pets in Union City, which handles emergency OHS care. Then the OHS Wildlife Rehabilitation Center position opened. In 2011 alone, the Center took in 678 birds and other animals. “I’m always here,” David says. “I’m here more than full time.” “The best thing I ever did,” Connie recalls, was pass the baton to David. He has the medical background and is so much better than I was at working with the volunteers and managing all aspects of the Center. The Center has improved and is thriving under his watchful eye.” OHS Wildlife Rehabilitation Center is entirely funded by donations and bequests. We cannot save all wild animals;

PAT KITE

L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012 Tribune Media Services

Comedy Short Subject Night (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M.

Safe House (R)Fri. & Sat. 10:45, 12:10, 1:25, 3:00, 4:25, 5:55, 7:15, 8:45, 10:05, 11:30 Sun. - Thu. 10:45, 12:10, 1:25, 3:00, 4:25, 5:55, 7:15, 8:45, 10:05 The Vow (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:55, 12:05, 1:30, 2:45, 4:05, 5:20, 6:50, 8:05, 9:20, 10:35

This Means War (PG–13)

Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 11:00, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30

12:10, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50, 12:15 Journey 2: The Mysterious Chronicle (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Island (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 4:55, 11:10, 12:05, 1:20, 2:20, 3:30, 4:35, Sun. - Thu. 12:10, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50 10:10 5:40, 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:15 This Means War (PG–13) Star Wars: Episode I -- The The Woman in Black(PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:35, 12:25, 1:10, 2:00, Phantom Menace (PG) Fri. - Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 1:45, 4:40, 7:10, 10:10 2:50, 3:35, 4:25, 5:15, 6:00, 6:50, 7:40, The Grey (R)Fri. - Thu. 7:35, 10:25 8:25, 9:15, 10:05, 10:50, 11:40, 12:30 Star Wars: Episode I -- The Thu. 4:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:35, 12:25, 1:10, 2:00, Journey 2: The Mysterious Journey 2: The Mysterious 2:50, 3:35, 4:25, 5:15, 6:00, 6:50, 7:40, (PG) Fri. Phantom Menace Thu. 11:15 Island 3D(PG)Fri. - Thu. 2:20, 7:30 Island 3D(PG)Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:20 8:25, 9:15, 10:05 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Star Wars: Episode I -- The Star Wars: Episode I -- The Vengeance (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Hugo (PG)Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 4:50, 10:40

The Secret World of Fri. - Thu. 12:50, 7:10, 10:20 Arrietty (G)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 11:25, 4:30, 9:30 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 This Means War (PG–13) Journey 2: The Mysterious Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 12:50, 2:05, 3:20, 4:35, Island (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 4:30, 5:50, 7:05, 8:20, 9:40, 10:45 Hugo (PG) Fri. - Thu. 10:50, 4:40, 9:30 Safe House (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 10:30 Mission: Impossible -- Ghost 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30 Astronaut (NR) Fri. 2:30 P.M. Protocol (PG–13) Fri. & Sun. The Vow (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00

Thu. 11:10, 4:20, 10:00 Sat. 10:00

Star Wars: Episode I -- The Underworld: Awakening (R) Phantom Menace (PG) Fri. - Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 3:30, 8:00 Thu. 2:15 Chronicle (PG–13) Fri. & Sun. Ghost Rider: Spirit of Thu. 10:50, 1:00, 2:10, 3:25, 6:00, 7:30, Vengeance (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 2:30 8:25, 10:40 Sat. 10:50, 1:00, 3:25, 6:00, 7:30, 8:25, This Means War (PG–13)

Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40 10:40 The Woman in Black(PG–13) Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Fri. - Thu. 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 8:00, 10:25 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 The Grey (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, Man on a Ledge (PG–13) 2:25, 5:10, 8:05, 10:50 Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 4:50, 10:30 Hugo 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 1:45, 7:35 Chronicle (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Underworld: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30 The Woman in Black(PG–13) Awakening 3D (R) Fri. - Thu. Fri. - Thu. 11:40, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:00 1:15, 5:45, 10:15 The Grey (R)Fri. - Thu. 2:00, 7:40 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, Journey 2: The Mysterious 1:40, 2:55, 4:10, 6:45, 7:45, 9:15 Island 3D(PG)Fri. - Thu. 2:00, 7:00

Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 5:20, 7:05, 8:30, Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 4:50 10:15

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG–13) Fri. -

Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:25, 5:45, 7:05, 8:10, 9:30, 10:35

Sat. & Sun. 11:30, 4:15 Wed. & Thu. 2:00 P.M.

Thu. 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50, 10:20 Fri. & Sat. 1:05, 2:00, 3:40, 6:10, 7:00, 8:40, 11:10 Chronicle (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Sun. - Thu. 1:05, 2:00, 3:40, 6:10, 7:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:35, 9:50 8:40 Safe House (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:45, 7:45, 10:25 The Secret World of Arrietty (G)Fri. - Thu. 11:55, 2:15, The Vow (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 11:05, 1:45, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15

Journey 2: The Mysterious Ghost Rider: Spirit of Island (PG)Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 5:20, Vengeance (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:10, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05

Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 6:30

Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 5:00, 10:35 Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 5:00 Fri. - Thu. 1:45, 8:45

Dawn of the Space Age (NR)

Fri. 4:30 P.M. Big Miracle (PG) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 4:20, 9:20 Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Queen of the Sun: What Are Fri. 1:00, 3:30, 5:15 (NR) the Bees Telling Us? Chronicle (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Sat. & Sun. 1:00, 3:30 Fri. 7:00 P.M. Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00 Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00 Secret of the Rocket (NR)

Sat. & Sun. 12:30, 2:30 Wed. 11:00, 12:00 Thu. 12:00 P.M.

11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50,

Procedure 769 (NR) Sat. 2:00, 7:00 12:01

Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50

The Woman in Black(PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:55, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:55, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 The Grey (R)Fri. - Thu. 2:15, 7:50 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG–13) Fri. & Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu (NR)

Sat. 1:00, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15, 10:40 Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40 Fri. & Sat. 11:20, 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00, Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45 11:25 Sun. - Thu. 1:00, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15 Ek Deewana Tha (PG) Fri. Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 Thu. 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45

11:30, 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 10:00

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG–13) Fri. -

Underworld: Awakening (R)

Man on a Ledge (PG–13)

Star Wars: Episode I -- The Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) The Secret World of Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Fri. & Sat. 1:10, 2:20, 4:15, 5:30, 7:20, Arrietty (G)Fri. - Thu. 11:40, 2:00, The Secret World of Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 12:40, 3:50, 5:25, 7:00, 8:35, 10:25, 11:40 Arrietty (G)Fri. & Sat. 12:05, 2:25, 4:30, 7:15, 10:05 8:35, 10:10 Sun. - Thu. 1:10, 2:20, 4:15, 5:30, 7:20, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25, 11:45 Journey 2: The Mysterious 8:35, 10:25 Sun. - Thu. 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Island (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 4:35, Vengeance 3D (PG–13) Fri. - LA Phil Live: Dudamel Journey 2: The Mysterious 10:00 Thu. 12:00, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 Conducts Mahler (NR)Sat. 2:00 (PG) Fri. & Sat. 12:10, 2:35, Island Safe House(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50, 12:15 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12:01 12:20, 1:55, 3:00, 4:45, 5:40, 7:30, Sun. - Thu. 12:10, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50 Tyler Perry's Good 9:00, 10:20 Safe House(R)Fri. & Sat. 11:00, Deeds (PG–13) Thu. 12:05 The Vow (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 12:40, 1:40, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20,

10:10

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

5:10, 6:00, 7:00, 7:50, 8:40, 9:40, Star Wars: Episode I -- The 10:30, 11:20, 12:20 Phantom Menace (PG) Fri. - Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 11:50, 12:40, 1:40, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:10, 6:00, 7:00, 7:50, Thu. 11:05, 2:15 8:40, 9:40, 10:30

Hugo 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 1:55, 7:45 Underworld: Awakening 3D (R) Fri. & Sat.

4:15, 11:15 Sun. - Thu. 4:15

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Fri. 11:00, 1:25,

1:55, 3:50, 6:15, 6:55, 8:40, 11:05, 11:55 Sat. 11:00, 1:55, 6:15, 6:55, 8:40, 11:05, 11:55 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:25, 1:55, 3:50, 6:15, 6:55, 8:40

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vow (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Star Wars: Episode I -- The Vengeance (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. The 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, Phantom Menace 3D (PG) 12:45, 3:15

7:00, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45, 12:01 Fri. & Sat. 11:10, 1:10, 2:15, 4:15, 5:20, Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 7:20, 8:25, 10:25, 11:30 Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 12:15, 1:25, 2:45, 3:55, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:10, 1:10, 2:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:20, 7:40, 9:10, 10:20 Star Wars: Episode I -- The 5:20, 7:20, 8:25, 10:25

This Means War (PG–13)

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Phantom Menace (PG) Fri. & Sat. 12:10, 3:15, 6:20, 9:25, 12:30 LA Phil Live: Dudamel Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00 Sun. - Thu. 12:10, 3:15, 6:20, 9:25 Conducts Mahler (NR)Sat. 2:00


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Emergency Room Expansion to Cause Civic Center Drive Road Closure On Monday, February 20, the Fremont Police Department will intermittently close westbound and eastbound turn lanes from Mowry Avenue onto Civic Center Drive between 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please be advised that Washington Hospital’s Emergency Room will continue to operate as normal during the road closure. Patients and visitors will need to use the main entrance of the Hospital to access the ER and its waiting area. Traffic light boards and temporary signage will be placed at Washington Hospital vehicle

entrance points and security staff members will be onsite to provide directional support to vehicles at the Center for Joint Replacement entrance (Civic Center Drive) and Washington West entrance (2500 Mowry Avenue). Additionally, the sidewalk along Civic Center Drive and the Emergency Room entrance will be blocked to pedestrians at periodic times throughout the day. The intermittent road closure is being conducted to allow construction vehicles to work on Washington Hospital’s Emergency Room expansion project.

Intermittent road closures will occur on Monday, February 20, to allow construction vehicles to work on Washington Hospital’s Emergency Room expansion project.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

February 17, 2012

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Alfred Rebello RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 23, 1922 - February 6, 2012

Obituary Mildred L. Geib RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 13, 1916-February 8, 2012

Adam M. Didia RESIDENT OF HAYWARD November 3, 1967-February 11, 2012

Patricia L. Smith RESIDENT OF HAYWARD January 21, 1927-February 12, 2012

James “Jim” Owen RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 10, 1961-February 13, 2012

Eli Nava RESIDENT OF UNION CITY October 6, 1944-February 15, 2012

Earlene M. Walker RESIDENT OF FEWMONT November 2, 1917 - February 6, 2012

Luis C. Santa Ana RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 21, 1913 - February 7, 2012

Huong N. Ly RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 17, 1941 - February 9, 2012

Warren Sommers RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 22, 1935 - February 9, 2012

Don Yonko RESIDENT OF SUNNYVALE March 24, 1948 - February 13, 2012

Ivy Chen RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 25, 1952 - February 14, 2012

Rebecca A. Roller-Barton RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 23, 1950 - February 14, 2012

Sidney “Fred” Hebison RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 21, 1913 - February 7, 2012

Joumana Elhayek RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 16, 1955 - Febraury 15, 2012

Fremont Chapel of the Roses FD1007 (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel FD 1115 (510) 793-8900 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont


February 17, 2012 continued from page 3 Tuesday, Feb 21

World Travel 101 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Independent Travel on a Budget

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305 Wednesday, Feb 22

Alzheimer's Support Group 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. For family members or caretakers

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 791-3428

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Friday, Feb 24 - Saturday, Feb 25

The BE-Attitudes - Our Life GPS 6 p.m. Fri 7 p.m. Sat Young adult retreat. RSVP by Feb 20

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 933-6335 Friday, Feb 24

Excellence in Education Gala $R 5:30 p.m.

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 794-3428 Saturday, Feb 25

Fremont Symphony Orchestra $ 8 p.m. Lafayette String Quartet

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.fremontsymphony.org

Proceeds benefit Fremont Education Foundation

Page 11 11 Page Saturday, Feb 25

Sunday, Feb 26

Purple Lotus School Open House 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Celebrate African American History 10:45 a.m.

Education grades 1 - 12

Special programs during services

Purple Lotus School 33619 9th St., Union City (510) 516-1269

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert Street, Newark (510) 505-1735

Saturday, Feb 25

Sunday, Mar 11

MSJHS Booster Club Crab Feed $ 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Benefits Athletics & Arts

Newark Pavilion 6430 Thornton Ave., Newark (510) 673-7467 Linda Curtis

Union City 5k/10k Fun Run & Walk $R 8 a.m. Must register by February 24, 2012

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5808

Family troubles open DMT season SUBMITTED BY MARSHA HOWARD In “Dividing the Estate,” Horton Foote shows us a darkly comic portrait of a family divided. In 1987 in Harrison, Texas, the Gordon family has fallen on hard times, what with the ’80s oil bust. Mama’s dead set against splitting up the 100-year old estate, but her children have other plans as they gather round the dining table to squabble about their righteous share of the pie. Will this life of ease and entitlement soon be coming to an end?

The show opens at the Douglas Morrisson Theatre with a preview performance on Thursday, February 23 at 8 p.m. and continues through March 18. Tickets are $10 for the preview, with Saturday matinees $20 for adults, $15 for seniors 60 and over, and $12 for students, juniors and TBA members with ID. Evening performances and Sunday matinees are $28 for adults, $25 for seniors, and $20 for students, juniors and TBA members. Purchase tickets online at www.dmtonline.org or call the Box Office at (510) 881-6777.

Dividing the Estate Feb 23 – Mar 18 Fridays and Saturdays: 8 p.m. Sundays: 2 p.m. Thursday, Mar 15: 8 p.m. Saturday, Mar 10: 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 http://www.dmtonline.org/ Tickets: $10 (preview), $20 - $28


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 www.sshsa.org

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 pm October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net 510-656-2521 FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. A.M.A.C. The new Conservative AARP.Now over 200,000 members. ATTENTION-Lions, Rotary, TEA, VFW, American Legion, SIRS. Speakers available. Call to schd., Jan-April 510-938-1118 amacwest@aol.com Association of Mature American Citizens’ Go to our Website www.amac.us

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

New Fremont Chess Club www.newfremontchessclub.org

Fremont Symphony Guild Learn more about this dedicated group of music lovers who help bring “Great Music Close to Home” www.fremontsymphony.org We welcome new members! For more information call 510-656-8763 or 510-371-4859

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-623-9935

Serious Mental Illness FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Sat., Jan 7, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email: joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Jazzinators East Bay Youth Jazz Band Tues 11/1 & 15 & 12/13 & 27 Bronco Billy’s, Irvington 7-8pm - No Cover chg. https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Mission Gold Jazz Band at Swiss Park 1st & 3rd Wed. 7-9pm

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS

GLEE

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Starts on Thurs, Oct 27th Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 PM. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

for Grown-Ups! Harmony Fusion Chorus Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mondays, 7pm–10pm Hill & Valley Club 1809 “B” Street, Hayward Debbie 510-862-1073 www.harmonyfusion.org

Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

Newark Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

UnionCity Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty St. Fremont CA 94538 1/25/12 - 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed 2/20/12 President's Day Mon & Wed (4 P.M. - 8 P.M.) Fri (10 A.M. - 1 P.M.) No Appointment Needed

Unnion City Football & Cheer League

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program Drop off Site

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program

Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline 510-441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer and Football Coaches

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM KELLER PHOTO BY MARY LYNN PELICAN The American Association of University Women (AAUW) Fremont Branch is proudly sponsoring their twenty-sixth Mother/Daughter Math &

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

At Newark Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark

Saturdays Feb 11, 18, 25 & March 3 (10 A.M. - 2 P.M.) Call Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2020 No Appointment Needed

Science Discovery Day on Saturday, February 25 at Hopkins Junior High. This session is geared for third and fourth girls. Plan for a morning of fun, hands-on math and science adventure! Participants have the opportunity to select

At Union City Library 34007 Alavardo-Niles Road

Saturdays Feb 11, 18, 25, March 3 & Sunday March 11 (12 P.M - 4.00 P.M.) Call Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2020 No Appointment Needed

from five of the nine activities being offered, one of which is a show in the Hopkins Planetarium. Activity choices: Planetarium Show Making a Solar Photo Print Build a Better Bridge Tangrams & Chinese Puzzles Germs! It’s the Little Things That Get You. Make Your Own Slime Levers & Pulleys: Can you lift your mom with one hand? Skyscraper Challenge Lego Robotics Mania Deadline for registration is February 20 Classes will be assigned in order of when registration is received. Cost is $22 per mother/daughter pair ($12 for an additional third or fourth grade daughter). Prioritize your choices and send it in with your check as soon as possible. Mail check, payable to Fre-

mont Branch AAUW, to: Cora Assali, 437 Pomo Court, Fremont 94539. Participants are asked to dress warmly and comfortably. AAUW will provide beverages, snacks, and a folder with fun stuff to take home. AAUW advances equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. AAUW Mother/Daughter Math & Science Discovery Day (For 3rd and 4th grade girls) Saturday Feb 25 8:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Hopkins Jr. High 600 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 490-6293 cassali@comcast.net Reservations required by Feb 20 $22 per mother/daughter pair Mail check, payable to Fremont Branch AAUW, to: Cora Assali 437 Pomo Court, Fremont 94539


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

HOME SALES REPORT

Russian buys crates, gets Kalashnikov content free AP WIRE SERVICE IZHEVSK, Russia (AP), Jan 13 - Reports say a Russian villager ended up with his own private arsenal after buying wooden containers for firewood. The ITAR-Tass news agency reported Friday that a truck driver had decided to make extra money by selling crates he was transporting from an arms plant in the Ural Mountains to a nearby landfill.

Little did he know, the crates contained 79 Kalashnikov rifles, spare parts and more than 250 cases of ammunition. The report said the villager turned over the arsenal to local police, who say they are now checking the grounds of the Izhmash factory - which makes Kalashnikovs and other weapons - for compliance with safety standards. ITAR-Tass reported that a preliminary investigation had found the rifles were sent from the Defense Ministry to Izhmash for recycling or disposal.

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 820,000 Median $: 475,000 Lowest $: 170,000 Average $: 486,500 ADDRESS

ZIP

18217 Carmel Drive 18438 Fleetwood Avenue 4176 Omega Avenue 19764 Stanton Avenue #3 4168 High Ridge Place 21700 Pheasant Woods Drive 5039 Stone Canyon Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

520,000 392,000 438,500 170,000 475,000 590,000 820,000

3 3 4 2 3 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1814 1025 2425 1000 1956 2566 3526

1962 1950 1981 1970 1968 1989 1999

01-12-12 01-13-12 01-17-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-12-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 29 Highest $: 818,000 Median $: Lowest $: 185,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

562 Boulder Terrace 94536 3788 Colet Terrace 94536 313 D Street 94536 38893 Le Count Way 94536 38083 Miller Place 94536 3509 Pepperwood Terrace #20194536 4488 Peralta Boulevard 94536 36003 Perkins Street 94536 4933 Sterling Drive 94536 627 Wasatch Drive 94536 4532 Capewood Terrace 94538 40766 Creston Street 94538 42714 Fontainebleau Park Lane94538 3130 Hancock Place 94538 43325 Isle Royal Street 94538 42625 Jefferson Street 94538 3532 Langdon Common 94538 39904 Lindsay McDermott Lane94538 4016 Ralston Common 94538 4057 San Francisco Terrace 94538 4772 Stratford Avenue 94538 1003 Olive Avenue 94539 48355 Purpleleaf Street 94539 968 Seville Place 94539 48615 Spokane Court 94539 350 Stacey Common 94539 3859 Milton Terrace 94555 4510 Santee Road 94555 34723 Woodhue Terrace 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

380,000 200,000 510,000 445,000 385,000 210,000 584,000 520,000 770,000 399,000 190,000 380,000 420,000 500,000 380,000 315,000 485,000 185,000 225,000 355,000 440,000 780,000 535,000 818,000 760,000 295,000 204,000 405,000 365,000

3 2 3 3 2 2 3 4 5 3 2 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 4 2 2 4 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1314 1024 1760 1202 1116 1083 2036 2497 2302 1120 1027 1577 1581 2223 1296 1000 1637 1127 1067 1582 1452 2318 1631 1914 1866 926 985 1728 1110

2007 1974 1954 1959 1973 1985 2008 1965 1953 1955 1971 1960 1964 1977 1962 1959 1998 1981 1980 1978 1962 1964 1962 1967 1977 1987 1986 1975 1988

01-11-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-11-12 01-13-12 01-17-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-11-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-11-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-12-12 01-12-12 01-11-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-17-12 01-12-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-13-12

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 30 Highest $: 550,000 Median $: Lowest $: 121,000 Average $: ADDRESS

376 Elmwood Lane 1110 Holmes Way 176 Mero Street 652 Mesa Circle 22522 Nevada Road 755 Paradise Boulevard 353 Redbud Lane 22650 Town Drive #2 21784 Westfield Avenue 25914 Bel Aire Drive #D 2498 Carisbrook Court 2712 Markham Court 483 Blue Bonnet Place

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94544

SOLD FOR BDS

165,000 240,000 197,000 225,000 255,000 170,000 170,000 249,000 207,000 190,000 494,000 265,000 255,000

3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 4 3 3

399,000 428,966

230,000 271,667

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1288 1797 1093 1381 1296 808 1032 1361 1230 858 2101 1760 1581

1950 1979 1955 2003 1985 1942 1950 2002 1941 1951 1977 1986 1952

01-13-12 01-12-12 01-11-12 01-13-12 01-11-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-11-12 01-17-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-12-12

30059 Bridgeview Way 680 Dartmore Lane #358 762 Folsom Avenue 29090 Huntwood Avenue 29284 Lone Tree Place 24932 Lucien Way 157 Newton Street 30531 Oakmont Way 27719 Persimmon Drive 522 Spalding Street 27410 Sunview Place 24613 Thomas Avenue 829 Voyager Way 25001 Willimet Way 27835 Coronado Way 29241 Eden Shores Court 1925 Rock Springs Drive

94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545

550,000 121,000 225,000 310,000 215,000 160,000 230,000 300,000 205,000 455,000 346,000 230,000 166,000 210,000 265,000 550,000 530,000

5 2 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 5 4 3 2 3 3 4 4

2708 894 2126 1782 1386 1054 1070 1134 1457 2321 1744 1092 1312 1153 1119 2291 2000

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 715,000 Median $: Lowest $: 359,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

4510 Felter Road 723 Jennifer Way 435 Moretti Lane 1389 North Hillview Drive 923 North Hillview Drive 1027 Nova Court

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

500,000 359,000 475,000 510,000 620,000 715,000

2 2 3 4 4 4

ZIP

5774 Bellflower Drive 5256 Bristol Place 6215 Castillon Drive 6321 Market Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

398,000 485,000 340,000 305,000

4 4 3 3

ZIP

472 Alvarado Street 815 Estudillo Avenue 471 Juana Avenue 763 Midway Avenue 398 Parrott Street #208 16108 Berkshire Road 16882 Clinton Avenue 1293 Dorothy Avenue 15401 Lark Street 16264 Lyle Street 16371 Saratoga Street #206E 1486 Dayton Avenue 1647 Lanier Avenue 1087 Tulane Avenue

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

485,000 381,000 940,000 225,000 135,000 225,000 200,000 238,000 170,000 479,000 140,000 310,000 340,000 252,500

5 3 9 2 2 2 3 2 1 4 2 3 3 3

BUILT

CLOSED

1962 1984 1986 1969 1979 1998

01-25-12 01-27-12 01-25-12 01-30-12 01-30-12 01-25-12

15965 Via Descanso 1105 Via Esperanza 16055 Via Harriet

ZIP

94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

252,000 259,000 135,000

3 3 3

340,000 382,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1468 1707 1100 1054

1986 1967 1959 1953

01-13-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-13-12

238,000 322,893

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2412 1584 4447 912 990 969 984 1058 1081 2367 962 1436 1420 1081

2002 1922 1975 1942 1976 1948 1945 1947 1957 1953 1981 1951 1957 1951

01-13-12 01-11-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-17-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-17-12 01-17-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-11-12 01-12-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 259,000 Median $: Lowest $: 135,000 Average $: ADDRESS

500,000 529,833

2423 1350 1550 2000 2099 2316

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 940,000 Median $: Lowest $: 135,000 Average $: ADDRESS

01-11-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-12-12 01-11-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-17-12

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 4 Highest $: 485,000 Median $: Lowest $: 305,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1999 1988 1940 1991 1989 1950 1952 1955 1979 2000 2007 1990 1988 1958 1955 2005 1996

252,000 215,333

SQFT

BUILT

986 1043 1092

1944 01-11-12 1950 01-17-12 1956 01-13-12

CLOSED


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 09 Highest $: 668,000 Median $: Lowest $: 150,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2455 Andover Drive 4155 Aquarius Circle 32673 Colorburst Court 4521 Ojai Loop 427 Riviera Drive 2624 Royal Ann Drive 3239 Santa Rosa Way 32531 Seaside Drive 33553 University Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

425,000 150,000 565,000 518,000 350,000 465,000 325,000 668,000 320,000

3 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 3

425,000 420,667

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1565 1137 1851 1962 2016 1550 1449 2828 1786

1968 1970 1998 1984 1966 1975 1971 1991 1960

01-13-12 01-12-12 01-13-12 01-12-12 01-12-12 01-17-12 01-13-12 01-11-12 01-13-12

Page 15

The raw product delivered to Evergreen come from oil change and other contracted facilities throughout the State of California and must meet certain specifications, says Gwaltney. Every batch of oil received at the plant is tested in the Quality Control Laboratory to make sure unacceptable contaminants are not present.

Used oil disposal fees are not received by Evergreen. “The market has changed; years ago many of our suppliers paid us to pick up used motor oil. Now, it has become valuable fuel – the biggest market besides what we do is use as a fuel oil. We are now competing with those who use it as fuel and are now paying to collect

Safety is a huge concern at Evergreen Oil. “We follow the same safeguards of a crude oil refinery,” says Gwaltney. Temperatures are minimized by performing distillation under a vacuum – lower pressure means lower boiling points. Personnel are trained in emergency procedures and control personnel continuously monitor all phases of the manufacturing process. Gwaltney notes that the process of revitalizing oil can be done repeatedly with the result equal to or better than the original lubricant; “It is a closed loop process.” With the current emphasis on “green” industries, a major obstacle for building more refineries of this nature is the permit process. Gwaltney remarks that it takes many years to receive a permit, especially in California due to air quality standards. But, he remarks, “This is a growing industry

Throughout the process, close inspection assures quality control through laboratory analysis and system monitoring.

the oil.” Capacity at Evergreen was doubled about a year ago due to demand for re-refined “green” oil.

and Evergreen has plans to take part in that expansion.” It turns out that our cars actually like these green eggs and ham!

continued from page 1

cent water which is removed using heat.” After several stages of distillation, the initial result is gas/oil, a fuel product. As distillation continues, the remaining components subsequently separate from the oil depending on their boiling point; the heaviest is asphalt for roofing shingles, road tar, etc. What remains is called “lube distillate.” Gwaltney says this is the final product of physical

separation; chemical reactions result in further purification. A chemical reaction between lube distillate and hydrogen is done in series to create a finished product called “base oil.” This, in turn, is sent to other companies which blend and compound it with other additives. About 75 percent of the feed product that reaches Evergreen Oil is recycled directly back to motor oil.


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SUBMITTED BY BARRY ZEPEL, CSUEB In an effort to increase the number of African Americans attending college, Cal State East Bay and the California State University system are partnering with 22 Bay Area African American churches for the seventh annual CSU Super Sunday on Sunday, February 19. Throughout the day, new Cal State East Bay President Leroy Morishita and other CSU presidents, trustees, professors, staff members and Chancellor Charles B. Reed will address congregations about the importance of a college education. Chancellor Reed will address the congregation of Family Bible Fellowship Church, 37620 Filbert, in Newark at 10:30 a.m., while President Morishita will address both the 8 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. congregations of Glad Tidings Church of God of Christ, 27689 Tyrell Ave., in Hayward. As the university’s outreach has grown through the years, CSU staff and church education liaisons have continued meeting to further develop ways to communicate with the African American community, particularly young men. New programs launched include financial aid workshops, expanded distribution of college materials to sixth through 12th grade students and their parents, and the development of a how-to guide for church educational advisers who work directly with families within these communities. Following each of the selected church services on Super Sunday, CSU outreach directors and

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

church education advisors will provide information on the application and admission process, including virtual tours through CSU Mentor, the Web site that helps students apply for college. CSU officials and staff members will discuss the role of parent involvement and early student preparation in getting to college. One of the informational pieces to be distributed during Super Sunday is the “How to Get to College” poster, providing middle and high school students and their parents with step-bystep information on the path to college. Members of each congregation also will hear about the CSU’s Early Assessment Program, an academic preparation testing program enabling 11th graders to gauge their college readiness in English language arts and mathematics long before applying to the CSU. Additional information about the Super Sunday, including the names and addresses of participating churches, can be found on the Cal State East Bay Web site; while details about others in Northern California are available on the CSU site. Any member of the university community can volunteer to be a greeter or ambassador at the CSUEB information tables set up at the churches on Super Sunday, according to Stan Hebert, associate vice president for student affairs. http://www20.csueastbay.edu/events/supersunday/index.html has more information on volunteer duties and a link to sign-up.

February 17, 2012

SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL AND LAUREL ANDERSON Responding to a growing epidemic of Ecstasy drug use among teens and young adults in Santa Clara County, a county-wide initiative is being launched to educate youth, parents and the community about the dangers of taking 3,4methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The initiative includes the release of a youth-inspired “Ecstasy: Lives Out of Balance” documentary and music video that highlight the myths and dangers of using MDMA. “Ecstasy is a health issue that reaches into communities. Many teens think it’s just a feel-good drug that removes their inhibitions. They don’t understand Ecstasy is dangerous,” said Supervisor Liz Kniss, Chair of the Board’s Health and Hospital Committee. “The Ecstasy initiative is a call to action to ‘spread the word’ to all youth, parents, schools and community members that Ecstasy use is dangerous and deadly.” In the past, Ecstasy was used most frequently in a club setting but in recent years, there has been a shift to home use. The “Ecstasy: Lives Out of Balance” documentary showcases stories from teens, who have taken Ecstasy at raves or just at home, and how it has impacted their lives. It also shows the devastating impact on the families, the teenage brothers and sisters, of those who have died from taking the drug. The video is available at www.LivesOutOfBalance.org.


February 17, 2012

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“Denny” Weisgerber SUBMITTED BY JACK D'ANNIBALE PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OFFICE OF CONGRESSMAN MIKE HONDA FRANK DE SMIDT William “Denny” Weisgerber, a Marine Corps veteran from Milpitas, former President of Milpitas Rotary Club, past District Governor of Rotary District 5170 and former Mayor of Milpitas, received an Honorary Promotion from

Staff Sergeant to Gunnery Sergeant on January, 28, 2012 at a promotion ceremony at the Marine Corps Reserve Center/Navy Operational Support Center, 901 E. Mission Street, San Jose. He served on active duty in the United States Marine Corps from February 1949 to May 1953. While serving his country in the Korean War, Weisgerber was severely wounded. He refused medical treatment and courageously moved forward to

Gunnery Sgt. William “Denny” Weisgerber with Miss Silicon Valley Alexis Grimes

aid a wounded comrade where he fearlessly exposed himself to intense hostile fire. His wounds later resulted in the loss of his leg. In recognition of his bravery and valor, he was awarded the Navy Cross and Purple Heart. Weisgerber was to be promoted from Staff Sergeant but was medically discharged because of the wounds he received in Korea, making him ineligible for promotion. Denny is a living legend among Marines; he is only the second to receive an Honorary Promotion since the authority was changed under Title 10 in 2000. His promotion is longoverdue recognition of his outstanding efforts. He was promoted alongside family, friends, hundreds of Marines and Congressman Mike Honda. The only other Marine to receive an Honorary Promotion is renowned actor R. Lee Ermey. Since April 2011, Honda has worked closely with the Marine Corps to promote Staff Sgt. Weisgerber to Gunnery Sergeant. Honda’s request for honorary promotion was exam-

Congressman Mike Honda with Gunnery Sgt. William “Denny” Weisgerber (r)

ined and approved by a special review board consisting of the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. James F. Amos, and the Secretary of the Navy, The Honorable Ray Mabus. “Today, Gunnery Sergeant Weisgerber, at 81 years old, remains committed to the Marine Corps. He volunteers to help young Marines in the Bay Area

find jobs, adjust to civilian life and receive military benefits once they leave the service. He continues to counsel generations of amputee veterans and other returning veterans at the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital and the Menlo Park PTSD Center. It was my honor to request his Honorary Promotion,” said Congressman Mike Honda.

“Denny” Weisgerber with Marianne


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

D

oesn’t it always seem that the most friendly "up-close to your face and personal" pets are those with the worst breath! Does your pet have breath that could stop a freight train? We often hear from our friends, “My dog was just at the vet and had ten teeth pulled” or “My pet had a kidney infection because of his teeth.” Unfortunately, many pet owners are realizing too late the importance of good oral health for their pets. Sometimes, despite their best intentions, they are sabotaging their pet’s oral health. Dogs are diagnosed with dental infection more than any other infection. Studies indicate that 85% of all dogs over one year of age have some degree of periodontal disease, but very few are treated (less than 3%). Veterinarians all across the country are frustrated and confused by this predicament. There is a huge need for proper dental care for pets across the country but very few pet owners seem to get it. Perhaps the veterinary profession is partly to blame. For years, our forefathers didn’t get it either. Due to our profession’s agrarian roots, it would be absurd to “clean a pet’s

teeth.” However, our profession has progressed at a tremendous rate from the dark ages of medicine. We know have seen the light and we realize that bad teeth lead to bad organs. Our goal is not necessarily to clean your pet’s teeth for cosmetic reason, but as a means to cure periodontal disease. Majority of these pets are getting “deep cleanings” and periodontal therapy as our human dentist counterparts would call it. Your veterinarian is highly trained to handle periodontal disease and your pet’s dental health care. What causes periodontal disease? Periodontal disease starts by accumulation of plaque – which is composed of bacteria, salivary proteins and food debris. Plaque builds up in the space between teeth and gums, causing irritation, redness, swelling, and pain. Eventually, pockets form and deepen and there is loss of attachment of the bone with the teeth result-

ing in loose and abscessed teeth. As any dentist will tell you, the mouth has a large blood supply. Once an entry way is created, bacteria and toxins can enter into the bloodstream and cause serious problems to the vital organs. The most susceptible organs are the ones with the highest blood flow: lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, and even the brain. Due to their stoic natures, dogs and cats don’t show pain when their teeth hurt. They just tough it out and deal with it. It is only when it is really bad, they show any symptoms. Perhaps the most painful of all things are dental and gum pain. A simple sore in your mouth or a cavity seem to hurt more than many other injuries or pains. Pulling teeth vs. saving teeth Many people just don’t want to hear about their pet’s teeth. A few get a blank stare when we mention the teeth as if it is insignificant. Others acknowledge that their pet’s teeth are bad but

don’t want to do anything about them. Some are afraid of anesthesia and are afraid to put their pet under sedation for a proper professional cleaning. These fears often cause the inevitable – loss of teeth, pain, and infection in the organs. It is a frequent dilemma in senior pets that have a “sewer mouth” causing kidney infections or heart infections. At this point it is very difficult to sedate a patient that has major underlying problems and extract any abscessed teeth that may be present. What can you do at home? There are various means of home care. The most important are active means such as tooth brushing. More passive means are by using oral rinses, dental chews, dental diets and other dental treats. To gain maximum benefit, the teeth should be brushed a minimum of two times a week for 50% reduction in plaque. “I have his teeth cleaned at the groomer,” is what we often hear. Having your pet’s teeth brushed once a month at the groomer is not doing much. In-fact, it may be causing you a false sense of hope that you are actually doing something. It may not be possible for everyone to brush their pet’s teeth so it is always best to start when they are little puppies and kittens. Professional dental care To correct the gingivitis that is present it is important to gently clean under the gum line. This can only be accomplished thoroughly and gently if your pet is under sedation. Sedation will make it impossible for your pet to experience any anxiety from

having instruments placed in its mouth, or discomfort when the tartar is actually removed. It is impossible and unethical to properly clean the pet’s teeth and gingival without sedation. Many of these so called “anesthesia-free teeth cleanings” are doing a disservice to pet owners as they do not really clean the gum line, which is where the battle is. They are only cosmetic in nature and mainly clean the surface of the tooth. Please consult your veterinarian and have them show you the condition and stage of your pet’s teeth on every visit and become proactive in regular dental care. Regular care over time is better than excessive or infrequent care and will result in a longer, happier life for your loved companion.

Dr Raj Salwan is a second generation Veterinarian and has been around veterinary medicine for over 23 years. His interests include Internal Medicine, Surgery, Emergency/Acute care, &general small animal practice. He currently works at American Animal Care in Fremont and can be reached via email at drsalwan@aol.com or www.americananimalcare.com.


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Page 19

Stark named ‘Champion for Children’

"Steve" A105797 Steve is a neutered male adult rabbit. He has a silky black coat and quite the charming personality to go with it. Steve is adventurous and active, always seeking attention. He is a fun boy that has been at the shelter since September and is ready to go to his forever home. Come see him today.

"Spartacus"

has a wonderful personality and would mesh well in any home. today.

A108861 Spartacus is a neutered, domestic long haired cat. He is about 7 years old. Spartacus is the nicest, mellow cat you will meet. He just wants to follow you around and sit on your lay making biscuits. He has a long coat that will need to be maintained, but when it is he is just so handsome! he

Total in Shelter: Dogs - 38 Cats - 22 Other - 6

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6640 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 pm Saturdays: 11 am - 4 pm Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

SUBMITTED BY SARAH BALDAUF Rep. Pete Stark (D-CA) was named a 2011 Champion for Children by the First Focus Campaign for Children (FFCC), a national bipartisan children's advocacy campaign based in Washington, D.C. Stark is one of 50 Members of Congress selected as a "Champion" by FFCC who introduced, cosponsored, and voted for legislation to better the lives of children. Stark commented, "I am humbled to be named a 2011 Champion for Children by the First Focus Campaign for Children. The Campaign provides important leadership on children's issues and I'm honored to have been able to collaborate with them over the years. I share their belief that society's investments in its children are investments in America's future. While some in Congress look to balance the budget on the backs of families and children, I'll continue working to protect and strengthen the programs and laws that safeguard our youngest citizens." In 2011, Stark worked to pass the bipartisan Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act (P.L. 11234), which was signed into law by President Obama last fall. This legislation included important reforms to the child welfare system to improve the lives of foster children. The bill included a provision championed by Stark to ensure that foster youth are not victims of identity theft. Stark also introduced the following legislation to protect children and support families: Foster Children Opportunities Act Recovering Missing Children Act Every Child Deserves a Family Act Investing in Our Future Act


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12616074 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Danny Hsu and Janice Fong for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Danny Hsu and Janice Fong filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Devan Lew Hsu to Devan Lew Fong Jamie Priscilla Hsu to Jamie Priscilla Fong The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 04/13/12, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri-City Voice Date: February 07, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 2/17, 2/24, 3/2, 3/9/12 CNS-2262657# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12615772 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Zhixiong Xiao for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Yao Xiao to Alissa Yao Xiao The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3/16/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room, 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Feb. 03, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256514# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12612210 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Pratap Chillakanti, Chaya Yerrapragada for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Pratap Chillakanti, Chaya Yerrapragada filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Kartik Sri Chillakanti to Kartik Sri Sai Chillakanti The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes

the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3/16/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice Date: January 12, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, 2/24/12 CNS-2254127#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460568 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Elite Auto Tech, 43263 Osgood Rd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Hasaan Hurte, 1600 Stokes St., San Jose, CA 95126 Peter Olsen, 994 Westlynn Way, #4, Cupertino, CA 95014 This business is conducted by Co-Partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hasaan Hurte, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 23, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/17, 2/24, 3/2, 3/9/12 CNS-2262645# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460570 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Omg Sound, 43263 Osgood Rd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Hasaan Hurte, 1600 Stokes St., San Jose, CA 95126 Julie Willey, 1559 Easington Way, San Jose, CA 95126 This business is conducted by co-partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hasaan Hurte, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 23, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/17, 2/24, 3/2, 3/9/12 CNS-2262639# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460024 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Pogostick Studio, 673 Woodchuck Pl., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Deborah Harrison, 673 Woodchuck Pl., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Deborah Harrison This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 09, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/17, 2/24, 3/2, 3/9/12 CNS-2262635# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460305 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ASR Logistics, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Puran Singh, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538. Amrinder Singh, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Puran Singh, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2258084# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460223 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CC Medical Transport, 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Marcelino Galera Carig, Jr., 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538

Michele (NHN) Carig, 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by Husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Marcelino G. Carig, Jr., (co-Owner) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2257068# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 461174 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Contek Networks, 3909 Stevenson Blvd., #201, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Fremont Eddy Santoso, 3909 Stevenson Blvd., #201, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/2001 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Eddy Santoso This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 6, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2257060# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460311 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: New The Heart Cafe, 6038 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. 2970 Kentridge Dr., San Jose, CA 95133. Hien Anh Cao, 2970 Kenrtidge Dr., San Jose, CA 95133. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 01/17/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hien Anh Cao This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration.

The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256512# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460496 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magnafit, 968 Huntington Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Abbas S. Sadiq, 968 Huntington Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Abbas S. Sadiq This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 20, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256110# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460868 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Inoochi, 41101 Ellen St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Vince Chen, 41101 Ellen St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on June 1, 2005. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Vince Chen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, 2/24/12 CNS-2252710# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460220-21 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1). JMK Investments and Consulting, 2). JMK, 31885 Alvarado Blvd., #200, Union City, Alameda, CA 94587, County of Alameda JMK Business Solutions, LLC, CA, 780 Folsom Ave., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as


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PUBLIC NOTICES true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Meinhart Mosqueda, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248521# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 446912 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Earnest Live-In-Home Care, 40824 Townsend Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on Jan. 19, 2011 in the County Alameda. Chi Hon Wong, 40824 Townsend Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538 This business was conducted by an individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Chi Hon Wong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 11, 2012. 1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248467# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460102 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Yacco’s Creative Services, 37341 Trellis Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard Yacco, 37341 Trellis Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual.

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on December 30, 2011. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard Yacco This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248466#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 SITE WALK NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900936 for Fleet Fuel Management System – Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 10:00 a.m. – General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA SITE WALK NETWORKING/ SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900936 for Fleet Fuel Management System – Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 2:00 p.m – Public Works Agency, 4825 Gleason Drive, Conference Room, Dublin, CA Response Due by 2:00 p.m. on April 4, 2012 County Contact: Jeannise Gonzalez (510) 208-9612 or via email: jeannise .gonzalez@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org.

2/17/12 CNS-2262383# CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS CITY PROJECT NO. 12-02 NOTICE TO CONTRACTOR Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: CITY OF UNION CITY 2012 SLURRY SEAL PROGRAM, will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012, 2:00PM PST, at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. Project is funded by the Gas Tax. The Contractor shall possess a Class A or C-12 California contractor’s license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans specifications and proposals forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 AlvaradoNiles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call (510) 675-5308 for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $40.00 PER SET WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $ 50.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, consists of grinding/milling of existing asphalt concrete pavement, asphalt concrete spot repairs on various roadways, hot mix asphalt paving, provide associated traffic control measures, lane & crosswalk striping, and other such items indicated and required by the plans, Standard Specifications, and these technical specifications. Call Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request bid packages to be mailed. All questions should be emailed or fax to Murray Chang of City of Union City, email: murrayc@unioncity.org or fax to (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond, and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher

Journey Home Breakfast Fundraiser SUBMITTED BY ALISSA STALLINGS Abode Services invites the TriCity community to its 7th Annual Journey Home Breakfast Fundraiser Thursday, March 15. The event is a one-hour fundraiser featuring inspiring speakers and program updates about Abode Services. We invite you to learn about the causes of homelessness, the impact on our community, and how you can make a difference. Established in 1989, Abode Services’ mission is to end homelessness by assisting low-income, un-housed people, including those with special needs, to secure stable, supportive housing,

and to be advocates for the removal of the causes of homelessness. Abode Services offers twenty-two programs that combine housing and services to assist homeless families and individuals in establishing stability and independence. These programs include emergency services, permanent housing, and support services (such as case management, vocational counseling, life skills training, veteran’s services, and children’s programs). Sponsors for the Breakfast Fundraiser include Fremont Bank Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, Washington Hospital Healthcare System, Symantec, Digital Nirvana, Gonsalves & Kozachenko,

and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Please RSVP by February 24 to Carol Arata, Development Director, at (510) 657-7409 x203 or carata@abodeservices.org. If you cannot attend the fundraiser and would like to make a donation online, please visit: www.abodeservices.org. Journey Home Breakfast Fundraiser Thursday, Mar 15 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 657-7409 x203 www.abodeservices.org RSVP by February 24

wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: February 17, 2012 2/17/12 CNS-2260751# CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS CITY PROJECT NO. 11-12 NOTICE TO CONTRACTOR Sealed proposals for the work shown on the plans entitled: 2011-12 Sidewalk Repair Project; City Project No. 11-12will be received at the office of the City Clerk of the City of Union City, City Government Building, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, until THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 2012, 2:00 P.M. at which time they will be publicly opened and read in the Council Chambers of said building. The Contractor shall possess a Class A or C8 license at the time this contract is awarded. Bids are required for the entire work described herein. This contract is subject to the State contract nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code Section 12990. Plans, specifications and proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can only be obtained at the Department of Public Works, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, or by calling (510) 675-5308. In addition, you may call (510) 675-5308 for a copy of the Plan Holder’s List. Plans and specifications fees are as follows: NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $55.00 PER SET WHEN PICKED UP AT THE PUBLIC WORKS’ COUNTER OR $65.00 IF REQUESTED TO BE MAILED Bid packages will be mailed upon request and receipt of the additional $10 non-refundable mailing charge (via US Postal Service) or bidder’s FedEx account number. General Work Description: The work to be done, in general, consists of removing and reinstalling sidewalks, walkways, driveway, root barriers, wheelchair ramps with detectable warning surface, and other such items indicated and required by the plans, Standard Specifications, and these special provisions. All questions should be faxed to Farooq Azim, City of Union City, at (510) 489-9468. The successful bidder shall furnish a Payment Bond, a Performance Bond,

and a Maintenance Bond. Minimum wage rates for this project as predetermined by the Secretary of Labor are set forth in the special provisions. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and prevailing wage rates determined by the Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the contractor and his subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rates. Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing rate of wages in the county in which the work is to be done has been determined by the Director of the wage rates appear in the Department of Transportation publication entitled General Prevailing Wage Rates, (current semi-annual which have been predetermined and are on file with the Department of Industrial Relations are referenced but not printed in said publication. CITY OF UNION CITY DATED: February 17, 2012 2/17, 2/21/12 CNS-2260724# CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE is hereby given that on February 28, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, the City Council of the City of Union City will hold a Public Hearing at the City Council Chambers located at 34009 Alvarado Niles Road, Union City, CAfor the purpose of considering the adoption of an urgency ordinance extending an existing moratorium on the establishment and operation of medical marijuana dispensaries in the City of Union City. The proposed moratorium would last for a period of up to ten months and fifteen days, unless otherwise extended as permitted by law. Following the Public Hearing, the City Council may take such action on the ordinance as it deems appropriate. Interested persons are invited to submit written comments prior to, and may testify at, the Public Hearing. All comments will be considered by the City Council. If you challenge the action of the City Council on this matter in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the Public Hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk at, or prior to the Public Hearing. Dated: February 9, 2012 Renee Elliott, City Clerk 2/17/12 CNS-2260699#

Ind. man rescues $50K lottery ticket he'd trashed AP WIRE SERVICE CLINTON, Ind. (AP), Lottery officials say a western Indiana man who threw out a $50,000 lottery ticket he thought was worthless is lucky he hadn't taken out his trash. Hoosier Lottery spokesman Al Larsen says Ernest Scott III realized Feb. 3 that the Lucky 5 ticket he'd thrown away the day before had in fact matched the numbers chosen in the Feb. 2 drawing. Scott and his family scrambled to the kitchen trash can in their Clinton home and scoured it for the tossed ticket. They found the ticket soggy and stained beneath coffee grounds but dried it out. Scott and his wife Kathy turned in their ticket Tuesday at Hoosier Lottery headquarters in Indianapolis. The couple may use their winnings to build a garage and take their four kids to Florida.


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$25B settlement reached over foreclosure abuses BY DEREK KRAVITZ AP REAL ESTATE WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Feb 09 - A landmark $25 billion settlement with the nation's top mortgage lenders was hailed by government officials Thursday as long-overdue relief for victims of foreclosure abuses. But consumer advocates countered that far too few people will benefit. The deal will reduce loans for only a fraction of those Americans who owe more than their homes are worth. It will also send checks to others who were improperly foreclosed upon. But the amounts are modest. It's unclear how much the deal will help struggling homeowners keep their homes or benefit those who have already lost theirs. About 11 million households are underwater, meaning they owe more than their homes are worth. The settlement would help 1 million of them.

``The total number of dollars is still small compared to the value of the mortgages that are underwater,'' said Richard Green, director of the University of Southern California's Lusk Center for Real Estate. Federal and state officials announced that 49 states joined the settlement with five of the nation's biggest lenders. Oklahoma struck a separate deal with the five banks. Government officials are still negotiating with 14 other lenders to join. The bulk of the money will go to California and Florida, two of the states hardest hit by the housing crisis and the ones with the most underwater homeowners. The two states stand to receive roughly 75 percent of the settlement funds. Of the five major lenders, Bank of America will pay the most to borrowers: nearly $8.6 billion. Wells Fargo will pay about $4.3 billion, JPMorgan Chase roughly $4.2 billion, Citigroup about $1.8 billion

and Ally Financial $200 million. The banks will also pay state and federal governments about $5.5 billion. The settlement ends a painful chapter of the financial crisis, when home values sank and millions edged toward foreclosure. Many companies processed foreclosures without verifying documents. Some employees signed papers they hadn't read or used fake signatures to speed foreclosures - an action known as robo-signing. President Barack Obama praised the settlement, saying it will ``speed relief to the hardest-hit homeowners, end some of the most abusive practices of the mortgage industry and begin to turn the page on an era of recklessness that has left so much damage in its wake.'' The deal requires the banks to reduce loans for about 1 million households that are at risk of foreclosure. The lenders will also send $2,000 each to about 750,000 Americans who were

improperly foreclosed upon from 2008 through 2011. The banks will have three years to fulfill terms of the deal. The states have agreed not to pursue civil charges over the abuses covered by the settlement. Homeowners can still sue lenders on their own, and federal and state authorities can still pursue criminal charges. The deal, reached after 16 months of contentious negotiations, is subject to approval by a federal judge. It's the biggest settlement involving a single industry since the $206 billion multistate tobacco deal in 1998. But for the many people who lost their homes to foreclosure in the past two years, some of them improperly, a check for $2,000 is small consolation. ``Two thousand dollars won't cover my moving costs,'' said Brian Duncan, who was evicted from his Tempe, Ariz., home last April. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, who led the 50-state

talks, said the $2,000 checks represent the homeowners' best hope of being reimbursed for any amount. They would have had trouble winning settlements in court because of the time-consuming complexity of litigation, Miller said. Mike Heid, president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, said the agreement ``represents a very important step toward restoring confidence in mortgage servicing and stability in the housing market.'' Mark Vitner, a senior economist at Wells Fargo Securities, said the settlement may help the housing market in the long run. That's because it lets banks proceed with millions of foreclosures that have been stalled. Many lenders had refrained from foreclosing on homes as they awaited the settlement. ``We've got a lot of issues to work our way through in the housing market,'' Vitner said. continued on page 23


February 17, 2012 continued from page 22

``What this settlement does is allow that process to get started.'' For the banks, the settlement comes mainly as a relief. If each state had sued the lenders and won, the total settlements could have run into the hundreds of billions. And all the lenders have set aside adequate reserves. ``It's really a wash,'' said Paul Miller, bank analyst at FBR Capital Markets. ``A billion dollars is nothing for these large trillion-dollar banks.''

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$25B settlement reached over foreclosure abuses The bulk of the settlement will go toward reducing underwater mortgages and refinancing some of them. But the banks had realized they weren't going to collect the loans and had already written down their value, Miller noted. The deal requires banks to make foreclosure their last resort. And they can't foreclose on a homeowner who is being considered for a loan modification. Still, the federal government has a dubious track record of enforcing such rules. The Obama

administration's signature foreclosure-prevention program has failed to help more than half of those who have applied to have their mortgage payments lowered permanently. Many have complained that the program is a bureaucratic nightmare. Critics also note that the settlement will apply only to privately held mortgages and not to those owned by mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Banks own about half of all U.S. mortgages, or roughly 30 million loans. Fannie and

Freddie own the other half. The deal is ``another sad example of Wall Street not being held accountable for fraud, perjury and crimes that created the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression,'' said Dennis Kelleher, CEO of Better Markets, a group that advocates stricter financial regulation. ``The math does not add up in a massive `robo-signing' scandal that is nothing more than systemic criminal conduct.'' The settlement also ends a separate investigation into Bank

of America and Countrywide for inflating appraisals of loans from 2003 through most of 2009. Bank of America acquired Countrywide in 2008. Associated Press Writers Michael Virtanen in Albany, N.Y., Pallavi Gogoi in New York and Ben Feller, Christopher S. Rugaber and Marcy Gordon in Washington contributed to this report.

The Bookworm The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

T

he writing on the package could not be more succinct: One Size Fits All. As you pull the garment from the packaging, you wonder: are the manufacturers serious? The garment you hold with two fingers is miniscule. It is fashion-doll size. It is crumpled and woefully too tiny for your grown-up body. It is One Size Fits All, but only if the “all” is five months old. Does anything ever “fit all” in this world any more? No, says Seth Godin. He explains why in his new audiobook, “We Are All Weird.” For a very long time, businesses have reached for the masses. Create a musthave, the old paradigm said. Make something that everybody wants, sell it to the world, and rake in the money. Be everything to everyone. Godin asserts that, today, this is wrong. Business can no longer be all things to the masses because there are no masses anymore, no top-of-the-bellcurve. Our culture’s most influential people are now outliers.

Weird is what sells, says Godin. Weird is normal. Weird can’t be faked. Furthermore, “on close inspection, everybody is weird.” And we just get weirder. Weird is unique and individual, and it is made of choices. That is good, says Godin, because choice makes people feel rich. Choice “means more,” which is not to say that you should rush out to make more or different products for your clients. No, we are wired to do the new, but not to follow something that gives off the merest whiff of mass. People want businesses that offer choices that are particular, not general. Since, as Godin claims, this book is not about marketing to niches, how can you attract customers who will sing your praises? First of all, understand that “us” and “not us” does not work anymore. Secondly, do not insist upon conformity to the detriment of talent in your workplace. Most importantly, says Godin, find and assemble your “tribe”: the people who are passionate about you and

your product. Speak to them alone and your business will prosper. True to its title, “We Are All Weird” is an odd little audiobook. Expounding upon a previous book, author Seth Godin takes his “tribe” theories further here, explaining in two hours

what I thought could have been said in ten minutes; to wit: people no longer want what everybody else wants, and they are more willing to be fervent about products, causes, and ideals than ever before. Find them, connect with them, sell to them, and they will be loyal. I appreciated that someone is finally pointing out this “revolution” made real by politics and protests, but “We Are All Weird” is repetitious, scattershot, and worth listening to, but only for the last few tracks. You would be better-served, I think, by looking for something by Malcolm Gladwell, who tackled this subject more suitably. If you are a big fan and follower of Seth Godin, you might appreciate this audiobook. For most people, though, “We Are All Weird” is not a good fit. “We Are All Weird” by Seth Godin, performed by the author c.2011, Brilliance Audio 2 CDs: 2h 16m $14.99 / $16.99 Canada


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Ohlone Softball BY BIFF JONES Thursday, February 9: Ohlone traveled to Modesto College for a nonconference encounter and came away with another mercy rule shortened affair winning 9-0 in 6 innings. Freshman Brittany Wright (California High

BY HELEN TRACEY-NOREN PHOTOS BY HELEN TRACEY-NOREN Jerry Losson, coach of the American High School varsity girls soccer team and physical education department chair, sets the bar high for his team. “Kids don’t rise to low expectations,” Losson said. “If you set the bar high, they will rise to meet it.” In addition to maintaining high grades, Losson insists that the ShEagles soccer team be good citizens in order to play for him. “Over the last couple of years, we try to get the kids to realize that they are part of a community, and that they need to be good citizens,” Losson said. “Your career as an athlete only lasts so long. You’ve got to learn to be a good citizen.” Losson has been coaching the American High School ShEagles for the past eight seasons and each year

the team has qualified for the California North Coast Sectional playoffs. They’ve also received recognition by the California Interscholastic Federation for maintaining a 3.0 grade point average as a team. Every soccer season, the ShEagles and Losson volunteer to better their community and themselves as citizens. In past years, they have volunteered with the American Cancer Society but this year, the girls decided to give their time to another cause close to their heart. Kim Johnson, assistant coach to Losson and a teacher at John M. Blacow Elementary School, volunteers her time to help train the ShEagles. After years of coaching with the Ohlone College Renegades, Johnson called Losson – whom she met during college at CSU East Bay – to see if she could assist his coaching efforts. Losson

Sophomore second baseman Sarah Ragusa/Granada High-Livermore; looking on sophomore shortstop Kaley Marden/Washington High

School, San Ramon) pitched all 6 innings giving up 4 hits, 1 walk and striking out 8. Sophomore third baseman, Renelle Traylor (San Lorenzo High School) went 3 for 4 with two doubles. Saturday, February 11: Ohlone hosted San Joaquin Delta College of Stockton and Fresno City College. Game 1 saw Ermitano start for Ohlone and take continued on page 25

The American High ShEagles

accepted and they have been working together for the past two seasons. Losson wanted to return the favor. “How can I give back to this woman who has given so much of her time to us as a team?” Losson said. And that’s when the ShEagles decided to volunteer their time at Blacow Elementary. The team split into four groups: help teachers in their classrooms, set up Blacow’s new science lab, redecorate the multipurpose room, and teach the kids soccer skills during physical education. “If you look good, you feel good,” said Kala Clark, a senior at American High School and co-captain of the ShEagles this past season. “We’re making the school look good, so that [kids] will feel good. Losson also told us to tell them that school is important and sports are important.” continued on page 25


February 17, 2012

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 24

continued from page 24

Ohlone Softball the loss as Delta won a 6-inning shortened game 9-0. Sophomore southpaw Katy Bihl (Newark Memorial High School) pitched the sixth, giving up 3 runs on 3 hits. After Delta defeated Fresno in Game 2, it was Wright who got Blacow is one of the last elementary schools to receive a new science laboratory. The ShEagles helped unwrap stools and put together the much needed lab which, according to Blacow Principal Angela Morariu and alum of American High School, will officially

their interest to do more community service, or see all these kids and want to become an elementary school teacher.” The ShEagles provided a much needed community service according to P.E. Instructor Justin Charbonneau. “It’s great to have the girls here,” Char-

which they always seemed to lose – the message of bettering the community was not lost. “Soccer helps develop leadership and confidence in these kids. It helps develop teamwork skills and communication,” said Alexandria Johnson, a senior on the ShEagles. “And it keeps you

Ermitano the start for Ohlone in Game 3 against Fresno. Both teams went scoreless over the first 3 innings, then each scored 3 runs over the next 3 innings. After a scoreless seventh, Ohlone won the extra inning encounter 4-3 in the eighth on a two-out double by freshman, designated hitter, Jaime Costa (West High School, Tracy). Ohlone is now 3-1 and next home games are Coast Conference North league games against Foothill College of Los Altos Hills, Tuesday, February 21 and Mission College of Santa Clara, Tuesday, February 28. Both games start at 3 p.m.

Olympians train at India Community Center SUBMITTED BY RAJUL SHETH Among the eight players selected for US Olympic Table Tennis team, four are training hard at the India Community Center (ICC) in Milpitas: Ariel Ssing, Lily Zhang, Timothy Wang and Barney Reed. ICC will host the California State Open tournament in March and has opened registration for summer Table Tennis camp and a summer Chess camp as well. Visit www.indiacc.org for more information.

Alexandria Johnson, senior at American High open Thursday, February 23. The elementary school is also one of three immersion schools in the Fremont Unified district, teaching in both Spanish and English. Since eight members of the soccer team speak Spanish fluently, they were able to help in these classrooms. Not only were the ShEagles glad to be giving back to their community, but Blacow staff was more than happy to welcome the ShEagles to their school. “It’s so great to have [the ShEagles] here,” Morariu said. “And maybe it will spark

bonneau said. “We don’t get too many volunteers. I work four days at another elementary school in the district, and we don’t get many volunteers there either.” Volunteering not only was a benefit for the elementary school students, but also helped the ShEagles form a stronger bond. “I think that this will bring all the girls together,” Clark said. “It will give us something to look back on.” Through playground shouts of calling for the ball and the high school volunteers playing a friendly game of keep-away –

out of trouble, that’s for sure,” chimed in Melissa Urena, teammate and junior at American High School. Though the elementary school students may not realize it yet, these volunteers raised the bar for them to become better “big kids.” And by raising that bar, the ShEagles challenged themselves to become better citizens too. If you would like to volunteer at John M. Blacow Elementary School, please call (510) 656-5121 for more information.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD February 10 Officer Snyder was dispatched to a theft with a person in custody at Fry’s Electronics. She learned that he was providing a false name and located his true identity. Officer Snyder took custody of the male and booked him for burglary. Two suspects, one armed with a small revolver, robbed the Comfort Inn on Kato Road. Both suspects covered their faces and were wearing dark colored jackets or hoodies and blue jeans but video evidence indicates that both suspects were Black males. Investigated by Officer Chahouati. February 11 A bar fight within the Saddlerack became an assault with a deadly weapon when an uninvolved victim was struck in the head with a bottle. The victim was transported to the ER, treated and released. An adult male was arrested at the scene. Officer Chahouati investigated. Two other adult males were arrested for public intoxication. A resident of Stone Pine Terrace was away from home for five hours returned to find electronics stolen.

February 17, 2012

A burglary occurred at the Hub Valero Service Station. The suspect used a rock to break the front door glass of the store. February 12 Officer Perry attempted to stop a vehicle for a vehicle code violation. The vehicle failed to yield and Officer Perry followed the vehicle which pulled into a garage; the female driver attempted to close the garage door behind her. Officer Perry contacted and detained the woman who was uncooperative and ultimately arrested for evading / resisting arrest. The female stated that she did not stop because she did not do anything wrong. A single vehicle rollover occurred at Paseo Padre and Dumbarton Circle after an intoxicated driver hit a light pole. Case investigated by Officer M. Marcelino. February 14 An adult female was arrested for child neglect after leaving her 15 month-old daughter unattended in her van for at least 30 minutes at WalMart (Osgood). The father responded and took custody of his daughter. A shopper noticed the baby in the van, called 911, and remained on scene until police arrived. The baby was not injured.

Hayward CERT Program

The Hayward Fire Department is providing a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) Training Program which will consist of four evening indoor classes and one outdoor “hands on” skills class. Participants learn skills that will enable them to provide emergency assistance to their families and immediate neighbors as well as organize a neighborhood team response. Training will begin in the month of April 2012. The dates and times are as follows: Class #1, Monday, April 9th, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall Class #2, Monday, April 16th, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall Class #3, Monday, April 23rd, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall Class #4, Monday, April 30th, 6-9:30pm @ Hayward City Hall Skills #5, Monday, May 7th, 6-9:30pm (Fire Station #6 W. Winton) You must attend all classes in order to receive certification. CERT training is for all City of Hayward and Fairview residents. Residential verification will be required during the final application process. You must be 18 years or older to sign up and a resident of the City of Hayward or the Fairview area. Residents who are interested in this free training can sign-up via the city’s Disaster Preparedness website by clicking on the red “Disaster Preparedness” button at http://www.hayward-ca.gov/departments/fire/DP/disasterprep.shtm, then clicking on the green “CERT” button. Residents will then need to enter only their name, phone number and address in the email. You will receive notification back by email acknowledging your enrollment into the program and further directions. If without internet access or more information is needed, contact: Thor Poulsen, Public Education Officer at (510) 583-4948.

Tip-A-Cop® fundraiser CAPTAIN CLARISE LEW, FREMONT PD The Fremont Police Department, along with the international law enforcement community, has a longstanding relationship with the Special Olympics including The Law Enforcement Torch Run®, a

year-round fundraising campaign, which culminates with the carrying of the Flame of HopeTM to Special Olympics competitions. Funds are raised through a variety of activities, including several Tip-A-Cop® events at local restaurants. Police officers and other representatives of the Fremont Police

Department will be volunteering their time to assist restaurant staff and help raise money for Special Olympics Northern California at a Tip-A-Cop® fundraiser on Thursday, February 23 at Chili’s, located at the Fremont Hub shopping center. Please join us and help support Special Olympics. For

more information, or to make a donation to the Special Olympics, contact Captain Clarise Lew at (510) 790-6989 or clew@fremont.gov. Tip-A-Cop® fundraiser Thursday, Feb 23 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Chili’s Restaurant

39131 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

(510) 790-6989 clew@fremont.gov For details contact Captain Clarise Lew at (510) 790-6989 or clew@fremont.gov


February 17, 2012

SUBMITTED BY CHRIS COCHRAN, CALIFORNIA OFFICE OF TRAFFIC SAFETY

Winter is coming late to California, but it’s hitting this week with a vengeance. Record cold temperatures, rain, wind and snow are all on the docket. The California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) reminds you that winter brings its own special road safety and travel preparation lists. Safety First and Always • Buckle Up. Every Trip. Every Time. • Always plan ahead, use a Designated Sober Driver. • Don’t text or talk on your cell phone while driving – even hands-free. If you need to make a call, check road or weather conditions or respond to a text, wait until you stop in safe place, such as a rest stop or parking lot. • Carry an emergency kit. You can build your own with tips found at http://www.ots.ca.gov/roadsideemergencykit.asp. • Share the driving with other passengers to avoid fatigue. • Schedule trips to allow for frequent breaks. Take time to pull over at rest stops to stretch your legs and focus your head. • Don’t fall into the trap of driving while angry – aggressive driving kills. Driving in Rain • Before it starts to rain, replace old or brittle wiper blades. • Stay toward the middle lanes – water tends to pool in outside lanes. • Maintain proper following distance (3 second rule). This needs to be increased in wet weather. • Be more alert watching for brake

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

lights in front of you. Avoid using your brakes; if possible, take your foot off the accelerator to slow down. • Turn your headlights on in a light rain and in gloomy, foggy, or overcast conditions to help you see the road and help other drivers see you. • Never drive beyond the limits of visibility. The glare of oncoming lights, amplified by the rain on the windshield, can cause temporary loss of visibility while substantially increasing driver fatigue. • Never drive through moving water if you can’t see the ground through it; your vehicle could be swept off the road. • Avoid driving through deep water, because it can cause serious damage to a modern vehicle’s electrical system. • When you need to stop or slow, do not brake hard or lock the wheels and risk a skid. Maintain mild pressure on the brake pedal. • Watch out for places where floodwater collects, particularly low-lying roads adjacent to streams, and dips under rail or highway bridges. • Never use cruise control on wet roads or icy road conditions. Cruise control can cause skidding and loss of tire traction on wet or icy roads. • Don’t drive with your windows frosted or fogged up. Wait until they clear before leaving home. A quick way to de-fog your windows is to open a window to let cool air in. • “Hydroplaning” happens when heavy rain and fast speeds lead to your vehicle riding on top of a thin layer of water, a dangerous situation that can lead to uncontrolled skidding or drifting out of the lane. If you find yourself hydroplaning or skidding: • Do not brake or turn suddenly. Ease

your foot off the gas until the vehicle slows and you can feel traction on the road again. • Turn your steering wheel in the direction of the skid. As you recover control, gently straighten the wheels. • If you need to brake, do it gently with light pumping action. Your vehicle has anti-lock brakes, then brake normally. Because the vehicle’s computer will mimic a pumping action. Before Heading for Snow Country: • Make sure your brakes, windshield wipers, defroster, heater and exhaust system are in top condition. Check your tires. Make sure they are properly inflated and the tread is in good condition. • Check your antifreeze and be ready for colder temperatures. • You may need to add concentrated windshield washer fluid to the windshield washer fluid reservoir to prevent an icy windshield. • Always carry chains. Make sure they are the proper size for your tires, are in working order, and you have learned how to install them. • It is also a good idea to take along water, food, warm blankets and extra clothing. A lengthy delay will make you glad you have them. • Load the Caltrans Road Conditions phone number in your cell phone for convenient, updated road conditions – (800) 427-7623. Driving in Snow Country: • Allow enough time. Trips can take longer during winter that other times of the year, especially if you encounter storm conditions or icy roads. Get an early start and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.

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• Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. Travel in the day, don’t travel alone, and keep others informed of your schedule. • Stay on main roads; avoid back road shortcuts. • Keep your gas tank full. It may be necessary to change routes or turn back during a bad storm or you may be caught in a traffic delay. • Keep windshield and windows clear. You may want to stop at a safe turnout to use a snow brush or scraper. Use the car defroster and a clean cloth to keep the windows free of fog. • Slow down. A highway speed of 65 miles per hour may be safe in dry weather, but an invitation for trouble on snow and ice. Snow and ice make stopping distances much longer, so keep your seat belt buckled and leave more distance between your vehicle and the vehicle ahead. Bridge decks and shady spots can be icy when other areas are not. • Remember to avoid sudden stops and quick direction changes. • When stalled, stay with your vehicle and try to conserve fuel while maintaining warmth. Be alert to any possible exhaust or monoxide problems. A little advance planning and preparation can keep you, your family and our roads safe during the winter months. This effort is part of the ongoing California Strategic Highway Safety Plan, where hundreds of state and local agencies, advocacy groups and private industries help develop tactics to significantly reduce deaths and injuries. For more traffic safety information visit www.ots.ca.gov , like us at www.Facebook.com/CaliforniaOTS., or follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/OTS_CA


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

California Superintendents call for Transitional Kindergarten SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER KERN The Small School District Association recently joined the superintendents of large school districts across California in voicing their opposition to Gov. Brown’s budget proposal to eliminate transitional kindergarten, which would bar 125,000 children from public school classrooms. Representing superintendents from over 500 small and mid-sized districts, the Small School District Association expressed its strong support for the full implementation of transitional kindergarten and opposition to the budget proposal to deny 125,000 of California’s youngest students access to public education.

“We call on the Governor and the California legislature to swiftly reject this proposal and restore the clarity that our more than 500 district members need to move forward with full implementation of transitional kindergarten and best serve our students,” said David Walrath, the Small School District Association’s legislative advocate. A growing chorus of school superintendents across California is vigorously advocating for full implementation of transitional kindergarten this fall. “We’ve been delighted with the results of our transitional kindergarten pilot program over the past five years and have seen firsthand the tremendous benefits of giving our youngest students a smart start. Our students are

making dramatic progress, especially in language and literacy, and graduates are entering kindergarten with the confidence and love of learning that will follow them throughout their academic careers,” said Christopher J. Steinhauser, Superintendent of the Long Beach Unified School District, which is moving forward with fully implementing transitional kindergarten. “Anyone who cares about public education should urge the California legislature to support full implementation of transitional kindergarten.” Jonathan P. Raymond, Superintendent of Sacramento City Unified School District, also reinforced his district’s steadfast support for transitional kindergarten. “Governor Brown’s pro-

posed elimination of transitional kindergarten – a move that will effectively kick 125,000 children out of California schools – is a wrongheaded approach to fiscal management. Transitional kindergarten is an investment in the future of California. We cannot build a strong future workforce without well-educated high school graduates who are ready for college and careers, and that effort must start with our youngest learners,” noted Raymond. In San Jose, Dr. John R. Porter Jr., Superintendent of the Franklin-McKinley School District, emphasized his district’s strong support of full implementation of transitional kindergarten in a recent rallying speech to the California Kindergarten Association. “Transitional kindergarten is one of the best pieces of policy that the state of California has put into law over the last several years. It is desperately needed to fill the gap that many of our children have in early vocabulary development, literacy, and readiness skills that are so crucial for a successful school experience,” explained Porter. Also leading the charge to fully implement transitional kindergarten is the Sacramento County Office of Education. “The kindergarten reform legislation passed two years ago changed the kindergarten entry date and promised parents the option of having their children in a classroom setting that would meet their educational needs. The governor’s

proposal reneges on that promise and would be profoundly damaging to children, families and schools,” warned David W. Gordon, Superintendent of the Sacramento County Office of Education. Fully implementing transitional kindergarten is in accordance with The Kindergarten Readiness Act – the California law that mandates changing the kindergarten entry date so that children enter school at age 5 and establishing transitional kindergarten, a developmentally-appropriate grade to serve those younger students with birthdays between September and December. The Kindergarten Readiness Act remains the law. The governor’s budget proposal would impact 1 out of 4 kindergarten-aged students, representing the largest number of students removed from public education in U.S. history. The Save Kindergarten coalition of school districts, superintendents, educators, parents, business and civic leaders is launching a series of visibility events in support of the full implementation of transitional kindergarten, including a rally of parents and teachers in Southern California in early February. For more information on the Save Kindergarten Campaign visit www.preschoolcalifornia.org/savekindergarten. Preschool California is a nonprofit advocacy organization working to increase access to high-quality early learning for all of California’s children, starting with those who need it most.


February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ideas for a Mini Bathroom Makeover Is your bathroom in need of an update? There is a design solution for every budget. Before you begin, evaluate your needs and wants. Who will use this bathroom? What is the feeling you want to evoke? Do you want a luxurious spa bath or a whimsical, kid-friendly bath? Here are some ideas to get you started: 1. Start with a new piece of art. Purchase a new art print, or “borrow” one from another room in your house. Think creatively about artwork— frame calendar photos, or your kids’ paintings, or even greeting cards. Paint the walls, using a color from the artwork, and purchase new towels and accessories. 2. Paint the ceiling. If you want to try some vibrant color but are hesitant to paint all of the walls, paint the ceiling. Consider colors like lavender, red, or apple green. Be sure and bring in art and accessories that contain your ceiling color. It will look amazing. 3. As an alternative to paint, consider using wallpaper. Talk about dramatic! Cover one wall, or just the ceiling, or go ahead and cover all the walls. Choose a bold and dramatic pattern like a paisley or damask. 4. For a luxurious spa bath feeling, stick with neutrals—select creams, whites, grays and tans for wall colors and accessories. Outfit the bath with aromatic lotions, soaps and candles, and of course fluffy white towels. 5. Replace the light fixtures. Is there a ceiling light? For a romantic look, replace it with a small chandelier. Replace the outdated bar light with something more modern. The choices are endless. 6. Change your light switch to a dimmer switch. Imagine relaxing in the tub with the lights dimmed and candles lit. 7. Change the cabinet hardware. You can select whimsical knobs shaped like soccer balls or frogs, or glass knobs for a vintage look, cut crystal for an elegant look, and iron knobs for a rustic look. 8. Keep knickknacks to a minimum. Because of their size, bathrooms will just look cluttered and crowded with too many accessories. Less is more—display one large, beautiful vase on the counter. Or borrow a model home trick and fill a

Anna Jacoby of Anna Jacob Interiors is a local interior designer. Send your design questions to her at info@annajacobyinteriors.com Call or fax her at 510-490-0379 or visit www.annajacobyinteriors.com

large glass container with bars of soap. 9. Update the towel bars and tissue holder. Again, there are so many choices, from traditional, to rustic, to modern. If you have chrome bath fixtures, nickel, Lucite, or chrome accessories will work well. If you have bronze fixtures, choose bronze towel bars. 10. Is there room in your budget for a new tile floor? There is an incredible variety many of materials and finishes available today. I recently finished a bathroom project where we used tile that looks just like hardwood for the flooring. It looks fabulous. In another bath, we used glass tile mosaic as a perimeter border, surrounding 12” x 12” tiles. 11. Add display space by mounting wall ledges or glass shelves on the wall above the toilet or towel bar. Prop or hang a piece of art, and add a bud vase of flowers and a candle. Your new bath may become your favorite room in the house.

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February 17, 2012

Master Sudoku

Sudoku Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

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February 17, 2012

BY MICHELLE LOCKE FOR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NAPA, California (AP), Napa Valley wine producers will go a long way to protect their good name, all the way to Thailand if necessary. That's the latest country which has awarded Geographic Indication status to Napa wine, which means they've agreed not to allow sales of wine labeled “Napa” if the grapes inside aren't from that California region. The agreement, reached late last year, is part of a campaign for truth-in-wine-labeling laws supported by a loose-knit cohort of wine regions around the world _ a movement that has gotten a boost from the general trend of consumers seeking ingredient integrity. “What has been on our side is consumer awareness of, and appreciation for, the place where the product they're consuming comes from and paying more attention to labels, paying more attention to how things are produced,” says Linda Reiff, executive director of the 420-member Napa Valley Vintners association. For Napa Valley producers, the name campaign began during the late `90s on a defensive footing when producers lobbied for a 2000 state law requiring that any wine with “Napa” in its name consist of at least 75 percent Napa grapes. That law was intended to stop Bronco Wine Co. from selling non-Napa wine in bottles labeled “Napa Creek” and “Napa Ridge,” existing brand names that had been purchased by Bronco. Bronco sued, but the law was upheld. The case ended in 2006 after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear Bronco's final appeal. (Meanwhile, Bronco would go on to introduce the hugely successful “super value” wine known as Two Buck Chuck.) The trade association continues to stay on the defensive, monitoring labels filed with the name “Napa” on them and taking steps where possible. A current concern is the new “Nava Valley” wine region in China. But they've also moved into the proactive side, winning Geographical Indication status

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

from the European Union and India and joining forces with a number of other global wine regions who have signed a declaration to protect regional wine names. “We all realized that we were on the same page,” says Sam Heitner, spokesman for the U.S. Champagne Bureau. “There is a common bond for quality wine-producing regions around the world. It is not a country-vs.-country issue; it is quality wine regions finding commonality.” Trade groups representing 15 appellations have signed up so far, including the Rioja region in Spain, producers in Portugal and the Wine Industry Association of Western Australia. But agreement on the name campaign isn't unanimous. A major issue has been the use of the terms sherry, Champagne and port on U.S. brands. Those terms originated as styles of wine produced in Jerez, Spain; Champagne, France; and Porto in Portugal. In 2006, U.S. officials signed an agreement preventing new producers outside those regions from using the three designations, but existing brands were grandfathered in. That is something that continues to irk European producers. But the San Francisco-based Wine Institute, a trade association, denies that using terms such as “American Champagne” is misleading since producers are required to put on the label the geographic location of where the wine was produced. They also note that bottles labeled “California Champagne,'' have been legally produced and sold in the United States since 1857. But Heitner points out that several U.S. producers, including the highly regarded Schramsberg winery in the Napa Valley, switched to putting the region-neutral “sparkling wine” on their labels without losing customers. He sees the issue as underscoring the importance of “being upfront and proud of where one's wine comes from.” The point of protecting naming rights, says Reiff, is to give consumers confidence that “wherever they are in the world, when they purchase a bottle of wine that has Napa on the label, that it's truly Napa wine in the bottle.”

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www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 17, 2012

Kodak to stop making cameras, digital frames AP WIRE SERVICE ROCHESTER, New York (AP), Picture it: Except for a few disposable point-and-shoots, Kodak is exiting the camera business. Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday that it will stop making digital cameras, pocket video cameras and digital picture frames in a move that marks the end of an era for the beleaguered 132year-old company. Founded by George Eastman in 1880, Kodak was known all over the world for iconic cameras such as the Brownie and the Instamatic. For the last few decades, however, the Rochester, New York-based company has struggled. It was battered by Japanese competition in the 1980s, and failed to keep pace with the shift from film to digital technology. The company sought bankruptcy protection from creditors last month in a case that covers $6.7 billion in debt. It has a year to devise a restructuring plan. Citigroup Inc. was approved to lend the company $650 million to continue operating. Exiting the digital camera business is especially poignant for Kodak. In 1975, using an electronic sensor invented six years earlier at Bell Labs, a Kodak engineer named Steven Sasson created the world's first digital camera. It was an eight-pound (3.6 kilogram), toaster-size device that captured low-resolution black-and-white images. Reached at home Thursday, Sasson told The Associated Press that seeing Kodak exit the business is “a bit sad” but part of a transition facing all companies that use evolving technology. “The average person probably owns more digital cameras than they realize,” he said. “It's just the reality that digital imaging is a part of our lives and you can capture images in a lot of different ways. There's a lot of choices people have, cellphones being one of them.” Through the 1990s, Kodak spent some $4 billion developing the photo technology inside most of today's cellphones and digital devices. But fearing that it might cannibalize its celluloid film business, Kodak waited until 2001 to bring its own digital cameras to the consumer market. By then, it faced strong competitors like Sony Corp. and Canon. These days, digital camera sales are suffering as consumers increasingly take photos on smartphones such as the iPhone. Certain smartphone makers such as LG, Nokia, Motorola and Sam-

sung have agreed to pay Kodak to license its digital camera technology, while companies like Apple are fighting its patent claims. Before Thursday's announcement, Kodak had already been trying to shrink its product line and sell in fewer retail venues, but as sales declines worsened, the company saw no way to make the business profitable. “We made the logical conclusion that there was no clear path to profitability and we have to focus on generating profits at this point,” said Kodak spokesman Chris Veronda. Kodak said getting out the digital camera business by June should help cut losses by about $100 million a year as it struggles to emerge from bankruptcy. The company's digital camera line was part of a rapidly shrinking division that accounted for about a quarter of Kodak's revenue in the threemonth period through September. For the nine months through September, total company sales plunged 18 percent to $4.3 billion and it lost $647 million. Kodak sees home photo printers, high-speed commercial inkjet presses, workflow software and packaging as the core of its future business. Since 2005, the company has poured hundreds of millions of dollars into new lines of inkjet printers. Once the digital camera business is phased out, Kodak said its consumer business will focus on printing. It will seek a company to license its EasyShare digital camera brand. Kodak said it's working with retailers to ensure an orderly transition. The company will continue to honor product warranties and provide technical support for the discontinued products. The company didn't say how many jobs would be eliminated as a result of the decision, but did say that it expects to take a charge of $30 million related to separation costs. Kodak owns patents that cover a number of basic functions in many smartphone cameras, and the bankruptcy judge has given the company until June 30 to come up with a procedure to sell them. The company picked up $27 million in patent-licensing fees in the first half of 2011. It made about $1.9 billion from those fees in the previous three years combined. But no buyers have emerged since Kodak started shopping them around in July. AP Business Writer Ryan Nakashima in Los Angeles contributed to this report.


February 17, 2012

BY DANIEL WAGNER AP BUSINESS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Underperforming money managers are losing their most reliable scapegoat. Since the 2008 financial crisis, the nation's professional stock-pickers - who manage billions for pension funds, endowments and wealthy families - have said stocks were too stuck-together to build smart, market-beating portfolios. When stocks are rising and falling in unison based on the same big-picture economic news, with little regard for the companies behind them, it's tough to beat the market. That's no longer a problem for the 2,000 relatively small companies in the Russell 2000 index. Correlation among Russell 2000 stocks, as measured by data analysts at Credit Suisse, plunged to 20 percent in late January, from 74 percent in September. Meanwhile, the Russell has been on a historic upswing, gaining more than 36 percent in the past four months, compared with 22 percent for the much-bigger companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index. Last month, the mighty Russell rose 7 percent - 60 percent better than the S&P 500, and its strongest January since 2006. The median market value of a Russell 2000 company is $563 million about one-twentieth the median size of S&P 500 companies. It should be a small-stock-picker's paradise. Yet only 42 percent of the small-cap funds tracked by Credit Suisse are beating the market so far this year, compared with half of S&P 500 funds. “This should have been a period when stock-pickers should have done well, and unfortunately, it just didn't happen,” says Lori Calvasina, the lead author of the Credit Suisse report. “It does feel like this was an opportunity that got missed.”

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

So how did so many fund managers end up holding the wrong stocks? They were too cautious, Calvasina says. Late last year, many were afraid that Europe's debt crisis would boil over, threatening the U.S.'s slow economic recovery. They set about buying ``high-quality'' stocks - bigger companies, often in industries that do well when the economy is weak. Traders also bid up stocks of companies that do most of their business here in the U.S., Calvasina says. Those aren't the stocks driving the Russell index's gains. As the economic outlook has improved this winter and traders have grown less worried about Europe, stocks have gained the most in sectors that are sensitive to the economy, such as homebuilders, boatmakers and furniture manufacturers. “Plain and simple, (fund managers are) just not positioned for this,” Calvasina says. “The portfolios that most small-cap fund managers have built are positioned to outperform in pullbacks, not to dominate in rallies.” One investment adviser who gave in to last fall's economic worries is Don Olmstead, managing director of Novare Capital in Charlotte, N.C. Olmstead sold his clients' small-cap stocks in September because the market was volatile and it looked like a financial shock from Europe might push the U.S. into a double-dip recession. “If we were going into a slowergrowth type of an economy, small-cap was not a place to be in our clients' portfolios,” says Olmstead, whose company invests about $500 million on behalf of families, trusts, foundations and corporations. Olmstead's was the correct call for many investors. Small-company stocks are inherently risky, and they fall faster when the economy hits a snag. Even when his company is confident enough to endorse small-cap stocks, Olmstead

says, portfolio managers still assess whether they're a smart choice for a given client's account. Investors seeking a little more risk in their financial lives still have time to join the small-cap rally, says Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist at S&P's Capital IQ, a data and research company. One reason: Russell 2000 stocks fell further during last year's selloff, so they have further to climb. The Russell 2000 skidded 30 percent between its April 29 high and its Oct. 3 low last year, compared with 19 percent for the S&P 500 and 17 percent for the Dow Jones industrial average. After last year's losses, investors should ask what investments typically do well in the first year of a new bull market, Stovall says. ``The answer is, stocks over bonds, small-caps over large-caps,'' he says. Stovall said last year's sell-off amounted to a “mini-bear market” because the major indexes declined less than the 20 percent typically that defines a bear market. The market has experienced eight such baby-bear corrections since World War II. Each time, stocks were sharply higher three, six and 12 months later. “For four months of pain, you get an average of 12 months of pleasure, and right now, we're four months into the 12,” Stovall says. But this year's small-cap gains aren't merely a normal rebound from last year's overselling, says Doug Roberts, chief investment strategist with Channel Capital Research. He says they're also a result of the Federal Reserve's policy of keeping short-term interest rates near zero. Smaller companies generally have more trouble borrowing than their bigger counterparts, Roberts explains. But when the Fed is using all of its tools to spur growth, as it has during this recov-

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ery, they can borrow more cheaply. That increases their chances of success, Roberts says. “It's the cheap money, or the liquidity, that drives up stock prices,” he says. To beat broader indexes, analysts say, it's worth focusing on companies' fundamental strengths - especially as correlations break down and companies' financial results retake center stage. Stovall says investors should focus on sectors that do well during periods of growth and select companies with strong analyst ratings and high price targets. Calvasina says small-cap pickers should chase “low-quality” bets - tiny companies with low return on equity, negative earnings and low expectations among Wall Street analysts. That's a lot easier for fund managers, who typically have access to much better company information than individual investors. Companies that suffered from economic fears, such as homebuilders and shippers, have been outperforming and surprising investors. Their stock prices are jumping. Take The Ryland Group Inc., a homebuilder in Westlake Village, Calif., with a market value of about $902 million. The stock has more than doubled since October's low, despite its having lost money in each of the seven previous quarters. Ryland eked out a profit of 2 cents per share profit in the quarter ended Dec. 31, it said last week. John Fox, director of research at Fenimore Asset Management in New York state, says traders should look for companies that aren't already picked-over by Wall Street analysts. “In small-cap world, you have many more stocks to pick from, and you can find companies that may have one analyst looking at them, or no analyst coverage at all,” he says. “That's what's different.”


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BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Feb 14 President Barack Obama proposed tax increases on wealthy individuals and some corporations Monday, setting the stage for an ideological battle that won't be resolved until after the November election - if then. Obama's proposed tax hikes put him at odds with the Republican presidential hopefuls. They have all called for tax packages that would lower taxes but possibly add to the federal deficit. Obama's 2013 budget proposal mixes tax cuts designed to improve the economy with long-term tax increases aimed at reducing the federal budget deficit. The plan calls for a tax reform package that would increase revenue by $1.5 trillion over the next decade. Obama did not offer a detailed plan for tax reform.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Instead, he proposed a series of changes to the current tax system and several principles for what comprehensive tax reform would look like. Administration officials said Monday that Obama would release a framework for corporate tax reform by the end of the month. The top corporate income tax rate of 35 percent is among the highest in the industrialized world. But the system is filled with so many deductions, credits and exemptions that many corporations pay taxes at a much lower rate. Obama says he wants to simplify the tax code, lowering marginal tax rates while eliminating or reducing tax breaks enjoyed by wealthy individuals and U.S.-based multinational corporations. Obama's plan would allow Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy to expire at the end of the year, and would impose a new rule that people making more than $1 million a year pay at least 30 percent

of their income in taxes. The ``Buffett'' rule, named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett, would replace the alternative minimum tax, which was originally designed to ensure that wealthy families pay at least some tax. Obama did not detail how the Buffett rule would work. He said it should be a guiding principle for comprehensive tax reform. ``I believe that in our country, everyone must shoulder their fair share - especially those who have benefited the most from our economy,'' Obama said in his budget message. ``In the United States of America, a teacher, a nurse, or a construction worker who earns $50,000 a year should not pay taxes at a higher rate than somebody making $50 million. That is wrong.'' Obama's tax proposals have no chance of passing a divided Congress in which most Republicans oppose all tax increases. Obama has included many of them in previous budget proposals, only to have them ignored by Congress. Instead, Congress appears headed for another year-end showdown over whether to extend tax cuts first enacted under former President George W. Bush. ``The president offered a partisan, election-year budget that ratchets up spending while ignoring the biggest drivers of our debt and calls for massive

February 17, 2012

tax increases on hardworking families and small businesses,'' said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va. The tax cuts, which expire at the end of the year, affect taxpayers at every income level. Obama wants to extend them for individuals making less than $200,000 a year and married couples making less than $250,000. He wants to let the tax cuts expire for those who make more. Obama's plan would increase the taxes on qualified dividends for the wealthiest investors. The top tax rate on qualified dividends is currently 15 percent. For the wealthiest investors, Obama would tax them at the same rate as ordinary income, with a top rate of 39.6 percent. Obama's rivals, including former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, have proposed tax plans that independent experts say would result in lower taxes for corporations and the wealthy. Romney's tax plan would make permanent all of the Bush-era tax cuts, including those for the wealthy. Romney's plan, however, would reduce revenue by $180 billion in 2015, adding to the federal budget deficit, according to an analysis by the Tax Policy Center, a Washington think tank. Romney's campaign disputes the estimate, saying tax cuts in the plan would

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February 17, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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help improve the economy, leading to more revenue. Among Obama's tax proposals: - Make permanent the American Opportunity Tax Credit, which provides students with up to $2,500 a year for college expenses, saving taxpayers $137 billion over the next decade. - Enhance and make permanent the research and experimentation tax credit, saving businesses $109 billion over the next decade. - Extend through 2012 a provision that allows businesses to more quickly write off the cost of new equipment such as computers, saving them $31 billion over the next decade. - Provide a tax credit for employers that increase their payrolls in 2012. Employers could get a tax credit equal to 10 percent of the increase in wages subject to Social Security taxes. The tax credit would save businesses $18 billion. - Raise $143 billion over the next decade by increasing estate and gift taxes, and changing the

way some trusts are taxed. - Increase taxes on U.S.based multinational corporations by $148 billion over the next decade, in part by changing the way foreign tax credits are calculated and restricting the ability to defer taxes on foreign profits by limiting deductions for interest expenses. - Raise $61 billion over the next decade by imposing a fee on financial institutions with more than $50 billion in assets. The fee, which is designed to recover the costs of the Wall Street bailout, would be based on the covered liabilities of a financial firm. - Raise $30 billion over the next decade by eliminating tax breaks for oil, gas and coal companies. - Raise $87 billion over the next decade by requiring businesses to change the way they value their inventory for tax purposes. Online: Treasury Department: www.treasury.gov

BY LOUISE NORDSTROM ASSOCIATED PRESS STOCKHOLM (AP), Champis the bunny doesn't only hop - he also knows how to herd his masters' flock of sheep, possibly having picked up the skill after watching trained dogs do the job. The 5-year-old pet rabbit from the small village of Kal in northern Sweden shot to online fame last week, having garnered more than 700,000 YouTube hits so far, after a clip of his sheep herding skills surfaced on a blog. The June video shows a persistent Champis running back and forth on the farm, trying to keep Nils-Erik and Greta Vigren's sheep together. Greta Vigren said she first noted his talent last spring when they let out the sheep to graze for the first time after the long Swedish winter. ``He just started to behave like a sheepdog,'' she recalled, adding that while he likes to round up the sheep, he is consistent about leaving the farm's hens alone, treating them more gently. “He's like a king for the whole group. He thinks he rules over both the sheep and the hens. He has a very big ego.”

Dan Westman, a sheepdog breeder who shot and posted the video of his friends' bunny, said he was in awe when he first witnessed the phenomenon, noting Champis does the job even better than most dogs would. “It's really incredible, it's a herding rabbit,” he said. “He rounds them up, and if they get close to escaping through the gate he sometimes stops them,'' he said. “I mean I work with sheepdogs and know how hard this is. There are very few dogs that could do what this rabbit does.'' Westman, who's known both Champis and its owners for years, said the beige little mixbreed bunny had never been trained for the job but seemed to have learned the ropes all on his own. “He's probably picked some of it up from watching the dogs,” he said. Despite his tiny size, Westman said the sheep seem to pay their minder a world of respect, letting him herd them around when he feels they need some moving. --Online: http://bit.ly/Aixo8I


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677

February 17, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


February 17, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

February 17, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


February 17, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

Page 39 31 Page

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2012-02-17  

Tri-City Voice newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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