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Curbing Graffiti: An EZ solution?

The Art of Bharatanatyam Page 23

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

February 10, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 12

SUBMITTED BY SHEREA WESTRA PHOTOS COURTESY OF DIRK LORENZ Strap on your pith helmets! Fremont Education Foundation’s (FEF’s) annual “Excellence in Education” Gala is “going on safari” to raise funds for innovative teacher grants and this year’s event is full of adventure and fun. The Gala, Friday, February 24, is the only fundraising event in Fremont that promotes and celebrates excellence in education at the K-12 level within public schools. Funds raised for the Foundation’s grants will allow FEF to continue to sponsor and expand support of exceptional projects in classrooms, improving educational achievement and broadening the horizons and experiences of students. Over the past 20 years, FEF has awarded over 175 grants to teachers, directly benefiting tens of thousands of students in district schools. Nina Moore, FEF Associate Board member and Co-Chair of the 2012 Gala states, “As always, our goal is to entertain and inspire in support of a good cause - to raise funds for innovative programs in FUSD schools that support academic achievement, leadership development, fitness, character education, and arts appreciation.” Community members will entertain the audience throughout the evening, culminating in the celebration of the two honorees – one from within the Fremont Unified School District and one from the greater community – selected for their outstanding continued on page 18 INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Tuesday, Thursday & Friday, Feb 10 - Feb 17

Interviews for Tri-City Senior Peer Counseling Training 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, Feb 10

Barry "Shabaka" Henley $ 8 p.m. Actor, Writer, Director, Historian

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Friday, Feb 10

American Red Cross Mobile Blood Drive 11:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Appointment recommended

Kaiser Union City 3555 Whipple Road, Union City (800) 733-2767 Friday, Feb 10 - Sunday, Feb 12

Valentine Boutique and Raffle 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Artisan boutique

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

Must be 50 years or older. Requires 9 week training course.

City of Fremont, Aging and Family Services 3300 Capitol Ave., Fremont (510) 574-2064 Saturday, Feb 11 & Feb 25

Purple Lotus School Open House 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Education grades 1 - 12

Purple Lotus School 33619 9th St., Union City (510) 516-1269 Saturday, Feb 11

Paul Posnak Classical & Jazz Piano $ 8 p.m. Classical and Jazz concert

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Saturday, Feb 11

Table Tennis Tournament $R 8 a.m.

Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5805

Saturday, Feb 11

Saturday, Feb 11

Welsh Sweethearts $R 12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

of Fremont 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-6844

Turn stalks of wheat into gifts. Ages 10 and up.

Saturday, Feb 11

Black Women in American Culture and History 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Health & Wellness Seminar, vendors, singers & dancers

Saturday, Feb 11

Newark Community Center 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 792-3973

Pancake Breakfast $ 8 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Saturday, Feb 11

Saturday, Feb 11

Fundraiser for Sulphur Creek Nature Center

F.U.N. Mothers' Club 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Knudsen's Restaurant and Ice Cream 3323 Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley (510) 881-6747

Preschool & Kindergarten Faire

Saturday, Feb 11

Saturday, Feb 11

Valentino for Valentine's Day $ 7:30 p.m. Romantic film

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Ohlone College Super Flea Market $ 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Saturday, Feb 11

How to Profitably Manage Rental Property $R 9 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Supporting Ohlone College programs

Prepare your property for the leasing market

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6191

Ohlone College Parking Lots E 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Dusty Paws Rescue 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Valentine’s Day Bake Sale

Pet Food Express Castro Valley 33853 Castro Valley Blvd, Castro Valley (510) 728-7788

World Friendship Day 12 noon - 3 p.m. Learn about international travel

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

Prince of Peace School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 789-8651 www.funmothersclub.org

Saturday, Feb 11

First United Methodist Church EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

Documentary on global power

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont (510) 797-0895

Ages 12 and up compete PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

"Thrive" 1:30 p.m.

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

continued on page18 Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012

California gets 5 percent of electricity from wind AP WIRE SERVICE BERKELEY, Calif. (AP), Feb 01 - Five percent of California's electricity is now generated by wind power. The Berkeley-based California Wind Energy Association says state wind projects last year generated 921 megawatts,

enough electricity to power more than 400,000 homes. The San Jose Mercury News (http://bit.ly/AABHPd ) says 2010 figures from the California Energy Commission said wind made up 4.7 percent of the state's electricity mix. Solar was 0.3 percent.

Forty-two percent of California's electricity comes from natural gas, followed by nuclear power and hydropower. The state wants to get 33 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2020. Information from: San Jose Mercury News, http://www.sjmercury.com

Sudoku Solutions

Contact: Andy Buchanan or Tracy Cressio 7 2 3 8 9 1 6 5 4

8 4 1 7 6 5 2 3 9

5 9 6 2 4 3 8 1 7

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0 F 1 6 E 7 B D A C 4 2 5 9 8 3

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D 0 6 1 4 E A F B 5 7 9 3 8 2 C

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F B 3 8 2 5 C 9 6 4 1 E 7 D A 0

Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO

42011 Boscell Road, Fremont www.thesaddlerack.com (510) 979-0477

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-area-news-groupmedianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website. www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999

We have over 1,040 signatures on change.org and over 2,300 have signed a petition at our office and in the community. We need more signatures. You can come

to our office for a petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Washington Hospital’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program Keeps Him Going Strong

of having another heart attack,” said Phyllis Fiscella, a registered nurse and manager of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at Washington Hospital. “The program offers lifestyle management with a focus on exercise and nutrition.” The goal of Cardiac Rehabilitation is to help people return to as active a lifestyle as possible after a cardiac event like a heart attack or surgery, according to Fiscella. Benefits include weight loss, education on lifestyle changes, management of risk factors, emotional support, and improvements in stamina and strength so participants can get back to regular activities like work, hobbies, and enjoying time with family and friends. Exercise and Eat Right The program provides a one-hour exercise session that includes 10 minutes of

D

oug Taylor’s heart attack changed his life. That was 1986 and he was a twopack-a-day smoker, but he quit cold turkey the moment he received his diagnosis. Two years later he was offered the opportunity to retire early from his pressure-filled job as a publications manager at Peterbilt Motors Company, so he took it for the sake of his health. And when he had another heart episode soon after that, he followed his physician’s advice and joined the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at Washington Hospital, where he has been going three days a week ever since. “I’ve only missed a few times in 23 years,” Taylor said. “It really keeps me going.” He credits the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program with helping him learn how to live a more heart healthy lifestyle after his heart attack through exercise and a healthier diet. Now he enjoys having a regular exercise routine as well as the companionship he receives through the friendships he’s developed with others in the program. “I started exercising and getting in better shape with the help of the program,” Taylor explained. “I lost some weight. I also learned how to eat better. I used to love having a cheeseburger every day for lunch, but that all changed after my heart attack.”

Doug Taylor (above) credits the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at Washington Hospital with helping him learn how to live a more heart healthy lifestyle after his heart attack through exercise and a healthier diet. Now he enjoys having a regular exercise routine as well as the companionship he receives through the friendships he’s developed with others in the program. To learn more about the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program and other Washington Hospital Heart Program services, visit www.whhs.com/heart.

Next week is National Cardiac Rehabilitation Week (February 12-18), designed to focus attention on the important benefits of rehabilitation for people with heart problems. This year’s theme is “Cardiac Rehabilitation: Experience a Change of Heart.” “Cardiac rehabilitation can help people live longer and reduce their chances

warm up; 30 minutes of aerobic conditioning; strength training; and balance, stretching, and relaxation exercises. The sessions are held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday in the Cardiac Rehabilitation gym, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in the Washington West building. “It’s a big, beautiful facility with plenty of room to exercise,” Taylor said.

February 10, 2012

“They have treadmills, stationary bikes, rowing machines, stair climbers, and machines for the upper body. Everything you need.” Participants exercise under close supervision by a registered nurse and exercise specialist. Each participant has an individual care plan and is assessed every session for progress. Blood pressure, heart rate/rhythm, and exercise intensity are carefully measured and the exercise prescription is progressed in a safe and systematic way. Progress is communicated to participants’ physicians on a monthly basis. The medical supervision is the major reason Taylor continues with the program instead of joining a gym, he said. A few years ago he collapsed while exercising. His heart was racing more than 200 beats a minute. He was taken directly to the Washington Hospital emergency room, where he was treated and released. “I didn’t worry because I knew I would get the care I needed,” he said. Registered dietitians from Washington Hospital provide counseling on how to incorporate more fruits and vegetables into participants’ diets and reduce the amount of salt and unhealthy fat they eat, which contributes to high blood pressure and high cholesterol, two risk factors for heart disease. “The nutrition education was really helpful,” Taylor said. “My weakness is ice cream, but I don’t eat that much anymore.” The program can also offer emotional support for people who are recovering from a heart attack or learning how to live with heart disease, Fiscella added. They get comfort from being with others who share their struggles and gain confidence as their physical health improves, she explained. “Cardiac Rehabilitation benefits your physical health as well as your outlook on life, which really means a better quality of life,” Fiscella said. For Taylor it has become a regular part of his life. To learn more about the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program and other Washington Hospital Heart Program services, visit www.whhs.com/heart.


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Railroad Rights of Way Services for the Dumbarton Rail Corridor Project 1333 Broadway, Suite 220, Oakland, CA 94612 (510) 208-7400 • www.alamedactc.org Requests for Proposal (RFP) for Implementation Strategy for the Acquisition of Railroad Rights of Way Services for the Dumbarton Rail Corridor Project (RFP No. A11-0063) The Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC) is seeking proposals from qualified firms to provide Implementation Strategy for the Acquisition of Railroad Rights of Way Services for the Dumbarton Rail Corridor Project for the Alameda CTC. Important Dates: -

-

RFP Issue date: February 1, 2012

Mandatory Pre-Proposal meeting: February 14, 2012 at 10 a.m. (PST) Proposal due date: February 24, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. (PST)

* See Table 1 of the RFP for more information on proposal selection and process dates. A detailed RFP, including a description of the services to be provided by respondents, is available for on the Alameda CTC website at www.alamedactc.org/news_items/edit/6901. Copies of the RFP may also be obtained at the Alameda CTC offices located at 1333 Broadway, Suite 220, Oakland, CA 94612, or by contacting Seung Cho, Contract Procurement Analyst, at (510) 208-7472. All questions regarding this RFP must be submitted in writing to Seung Cho at scho@alamedactc.org no later than February 12, 2012 at 3:00 p.m. (PST), as indicated in the RFP. Submittals must be made in accordance with the instructions set forth in the RFP. Any contract to be awarded must be in compliance with the local, state and/or federal requirements.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012 Tribune Media Services

Reaching for the Moon (NR)

Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (R) Fri. & Sat. 12:00, 12:40, 1:20, 2:25, 3:05, 3:45, 4:50, 5:30, 6:10, 7:15, 7:55, 8:35, 9:40, 10:20, 11:00, 12:05 Sun. - Wed. 12:00, 12:40, 1:20, 2:25, 3:05, 3:45, 4:50, 5:30, 6:10, 7:15, 7:55, 8:35, 9:40, 10:20

Toy Story 3 (G)Fri. - Wed. 11:15, Felix in Hollywood (NR) Felix the Cat a Tour of the 1:50, 4:25, 7:20 Tomas Ince Studio (NR) Eat Pray Love (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:50, 3:10, 6:55, 10:00

Going the Distance (R) Fri.

& Sat. 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:10, 11:40 Resident Evil: Afterlife (R) Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:10 Fri. - Wed. 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30

Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (R) Inception (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.

Fri. - Wed. 11:20, 12:10, 1:50, 2:40, 11:10, 2:25, 5:40, 8:55 4:20, 5:10, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:05

Machete (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:30,

12:10, 2:00, 3:15, 4:40, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:50, 11:05 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 12:10, 2:00, 3:15, Going the Distance (R)Fri. - 4:40, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:50 Wed. 11:40, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50

Wed. 12:55, 4:00, 7:05, 10:10

Lottery Ticket (PG–13) Fri. -

Salt (PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 12:05, 2:40,

Wed. 12:00, 2:30, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55

5:05, 8:05, 10:35

Machete (R) Fri. - Wed. 11:15, 12:20, 1:45, 2:50, 4:15, 5:20, 6:45, 7:50, 9:15, 10:20

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 11:25,

Takers (PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 11:25,

2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50

The American (R) Fri. - Wed.

11:50, 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:15

The Expendables (R) Fri. -

2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:10

Eat Pray Love (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 11:45, 2:50, 5:55, 9:00 Going the Distance (R)Fri. Thu. 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:35, 9:05 Machete (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 Takers (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50

3:05, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25

1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:45

Takers (PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 12:40, 2:00, 3:15, 6:00, 7:25, 9:00 The American (R) Fri. - Tue. 11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 10:00

Machete (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:15, 12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30, 11:45 Sun. - Wed. 11:15, 12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30

The Expendables (R) Fri. -

Nanny McPhee Returns (PG)

Wed. 12:05, 2:45, 5:20, 8:00, 10:30 Fri. - Wed. 11:00, 1:40, 4:20

3D(R) Fri. & Sat. 12:40, The Last Exorcism (PG–13) Piranha 2:55, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00, 12:20 Fri. - Wed. 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15 The Other Guys (PG–13) Fri.

- Wed. 11:45, 2:25, 5:00, 7:45, 10:25

Sun. - Wed. 12:40, 2:55, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00

Salt (PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 12:30, 3:00, 5:25, 7:55, 10:30

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 11:10,

The American (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35

1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10:00

The Expendables (R) Fri. -

Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:05

Takers (PG–13)Fri. & Sat. 11:55, 2:30, 3:25, 5:05, 6:00, 7:40, 9/11 Truth Film Festival (NR) 12:50, 8:35, 10:15, 11:10

Sat. 12:30 P.M.

Sun. - Wed. 11:55, 12:50, 2:30, 3:25, 5:05, 6:00, 7:40, 8:35, 10:15

The American (R) Fri. & Sat.

11:00, 12:15, 1:35, 2:50, 4:10, 5:25, 6:45, 8:00, 9:20, 10:35, 11:55 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:15, 1:35, 2:50, 4:10, 5:25, 6:45, 8:00, 9:20, 10:35

The Expendables (R) Fri. Dabangg (NR) Fri. - Wed. 11:15, Wed. 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30

2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15

The Last Exorcism (PG–13) Evil: Afterlife (R) Takers (PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 11:45, Resident Fri. - Wed. 12:50, 3:20, 5:50, 8:20 Resident Evil: Afterlife (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 1:00, 3:15, 4:25, 5:30,

2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05

Fri. & Sat. 11:10, 1:35, 4:00, 6:25, 8:50, 7:45, 9:10, 10:00, 12:15 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 1:00, 3:15, 4:25, Fri. - Wed. 12:00, 1:40, 2:30, 4:10, 5:05, Sun. - Wed. 11:10, 1:35, 4:00, 6:25, 8:50 5:30, 7:45, 9:10, 10:00 6:40, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:10 Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (R) The Other Guys (PG–13) Fri. Fri. & Sat. 11:45, 1:00, 2:15, 3:25, 4:40, - Wed. 11:45, 2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05 5:50, 7:05, 8:15, 9:30, 10:40, 11:55 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse(PG–13)Fri. - Wed. 11:15, Fri. & Sat. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, The Switch (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 10:05, 12:30 4:40, 10:05 1:45, 6:40, 11:35 Sun. - Wed. 11:45, 1:00, 2:15, 3:25, Sun. - Wed. 1:45, 6:40 4:40, 5:50, 7:05, 8:15, 9:30, 10:40 Toy Story 3 3D (G) Fri. - Wed. Sun. - Wed. 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 11:00, 1:35, 4:00 We Are Family (NR) Fri. & 10:05 Sat. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Avatar: Special Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 (PG–13) Fri. Vampires Suck Edition 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. & Sat. 7:10, 9:20, 11:30 6:45, 10:20 Alpha and Omega 3-D (PG) Sun. - Wed. 7:10, 9:20 Thu. 12:01 A.M. Going the Distance (R)Fri. Wed. 11:35, 2:15, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55 Despicable Me 3D (PG) Fri. Wed. 12:25, 2:45, 5:15, 7:35, 10:10 Devil (PG–13) Thu. 12:01Midnight Lottery Ticket (PG–13) Fri. Easy A(PG–13) Thu. 12:01 Midnight Wed. 11:55, 2:35, 5:00, 7:35, 10:00 Eat Pray Love (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 1:20, 4:30, 7:35, 10:45 Ladies & Gentlemen: The Machete (R) Fri. - Wed. 12:55, 3:35, 6:15, 8:55 Going the Distance (R) Fri. Rolling Stones Flashback to Fri. - Wed. 11:40, 2:20, 4:55, 7:40, 10:15 & Sat. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 1972 (NR) Thu. 7:30 P.M. 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45, 12:01 Nanny McPhee Returns (PG) Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, The Town (R)Thu. 12:01Midnight Fri. - Wed. 11:05, 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45

Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (R) 11:15

The American (R) Fri. - Wed. 12:20, 2:55, 5:35, 8:10, 10:45

Wed. 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:20

The Expendables (R) Fri. The Last Exorcism (PG–13) Wed. 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30

Fri. - Wed. 12:50, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00

Ladies & Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones Flashback to 1972 (NR) Thu. 7:30 P.M.

Resident Evil: Afterlife (R)

Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40

Sat. 7:30 P.M.

Eat Pray Love (PG–13) Fri. -

Piranha 3D(R)Fri. - Wed. 12:45, Inception (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.

The Last Exorcism (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:55, 2:10, 4:30, 6:45, 9:05, 11:20 Sun. - Wed. 11:55, 2:10, 4:30, 6:45, 9:05 The Other Guys (PG–13) Fri.

& Sat. 11:05, 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:25, 12:01 Sun. - Wed. 11:05, 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:25

Despicable Me (PG) Fri. -

Wed. 10:55, 1:15, 4:05, 7:00, 9:15

Vampires Suck (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:35, 1:45, 3:55, 6:15, 8:25, Piranha (R)Fri. - Wed. 9:55 P.M. 10:40 Resident Evil: Afterlife (R) Ladies & Gentlemen: The Fri. & Sat. 11:20, 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00, Rolling Stones Flashback to 11:25 Sun. - Wed. 11:20, 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 1972 (NR) Thu. 7:30 P.M.


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Planning Commissioner appointed to Newark City Council BY SIMON WONG Al Nagy’s election as Mayor of Newark on November 8, 2011 created a vacancy on Newark City Council for which a dozen applicants were interviewed at a Special Council meeting on January 30, 2012 by Mayor Nagy and Council members Ana Apodaca, Sucy Collazo and Luis Freitas. One of the original applicants, Richard Watters, withdrew his application on January 13, 2012 because he would be unable to attend in person and felt it inappropriate to conduct an interview by teleconference. The interviewees were: Bernie Nillo (Planning Commissioner, Project Manager, Sports Official); Ronald Brazil (Teacher); Robert Marshall (Planning Commissioner, Real Estate Appraiser); Donna Sisk (Office Manager and Inside Sales); Danny Radcliff (retired Cable TV Executive); Roberto Khamseh (Senior UC Engineer); Michelle Romero (Public Policy Non-Profit Program Manager);

Bob Marshall

Andrew Limtiaco (Video Editor, Reserve Hayward PD Officer); Jack Dane (Registered Tax Preparer); Mike Bucci (Journeyman Millwright); Christopher Wecks (Entrepreneur and Marketer); and Angelina Reyes (retired Hayward City Clerk). Each candidate had 15 minutes in which to answer eight questions. On completion of the interviews, each elected official

named his/her preferred candidate(s): Mayor Nagy, Robert Marshall; Ana Apodaca, Mike Bucci and Angelina Reyes; Luis Freitas, Robert Marshall; Sucy Collazo, Robert Marshall and Angelina Reyes. Apodaca (seconded by Collazo) moved to appoint Reyes but the motion was defeated by Nagy’s NO vote and Freitas’ Abstension. Collazo seconded Freitas’ motion to appoint Planning Commissioner Robert Marshall. The motion was carried by three YES votes and one NO vote (Apodaca). The selection process concluded with the adoption of a resolution to appoint Robert Marshall to Newark City Council for the term expiring November 2013. He took the Oath of Office on January 31, 2012. Councilman Marshall will take the Oath of Office again at the February 9, 2012 Council meeting for ceremonial purposes and receive a Certificate of Appointment.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

February 10, 2012

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Eugene Toy Welton Duffey, Jr. RESIDENT OF NEWARK January 20, 1925 - January 16, 2012

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 14, 1952 - January 31, 2012

Charles K. Cook

Joyce F. Hiram

RESIDENT OF SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO June 16,1955 - January 31, 2012

Alexander “Alex” M. Roberts

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 28, 1938 - February 2, 2012

Obituary RESIDENT OF UNION CITY June 24, 1945 - January 23, 2012 RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 11, 1992 - January 29, 2012

William Tomlin RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 12, 1925 - January 29, 2012

Mary Louise Tucker RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 19, 1919 - January 30, 2012

Wrex Sarah RESIDENT OF RED BLUFF April 8, 1949 - February 2, 2012

Carmela Bellomo RESIDENT OF UNION CITY September 23, 1921 - February 3, 2012

Gary E. Heightchew RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 14, 1966 - February 3, 2012

Jesse H. Robledo, Jr. RESIDENT OF HAYWARD July 3, 1955 - February 3, 2012

Bernice I. Francis RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 3, 1921 - Feburary 5, 2012

Joseph Gonzales

George Najarian RESIDENT OF ALAMO February 7, 1932 - February 2, 2012

Georgine Crabbe RESIDENT OF UNION CITY November 10, 1946 - February 3, 2012

Lilian C. Doyle RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 28, 1921 - February 4, 2012

Milton R. Hunter IV RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 23, 1922 - February 6, 2012

Earlene M. Walker RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 2, 1917 - February 6, 2012

Luis C. Santa Ana RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 21, 1913 - February 7, 2012

Alfred Rebello RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 23, 1922 - February 6, 2012

Josephine Landeros RESIDENT OF UNION CITY December 5, 1933 - February 7, 2012

Maria L. Sainez-Reynoso RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 21, 1954 - February 7, 2012

Fremont Chapel of the Roses FD1007 (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Fremont Memorial Chapel FD 1115 (510) 793-8900 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Obituary

Obituary

Alfred Rebello

Phyllis Merrifield Passed Away January 23, 2012 (age 92) Arriving in Fremont from New York in 1961, Phyllis was active in the Fremont community for more than 50 years. Described as a onewoman tour de force, her coalition of entrepreneurial music lovers provided the impetus to create the Fremont Symphony Orchestra (FSO). In recognition of her achievements, Phyllis was awarded the Rotary Club’s prestigious Paul Harris Award by Niles Rotary in 1990. The Symphony recognized Phyllis in 1998 for her generous support and 27 years of service on the board of directors. She sponsored the FSO Young Artist Competition from 1998-2002 and on November 28, 2011was honored at a ceremony at Mission Coffee Roasting Company for her role in founding the Fremont Symphony Guild 46 years ago. Always a tireless volunteer, Phyllis enjoyed organizing Sunday afternoon musical recitals in Fremont homes, which made high quality live music accessible to local audiences, showcased young artists and raised funds for the Symphony. She was so devoted to the concept that four years ago, she organized a recital from her room in a rehabilitation center while recovering from an injury. The League of Women Voters of Fremont had already formed when Phyllis and her family moved to Fremont and she became an active member almost the moment she arrived. Over the years, she served on the board of directors in many capacities, including president. Phyllis served on the Alameda County Arts Commission for seven years, and the Fremont Cultural Arts Council, where she judged young artist competitions. She also served on the Artsfund Grants Panel, and volunteered at the Smith Center to assist with musical performances. A 48-year member of the Music Teachers Association of California, Phyllis taught piano until her death, continuing to do so even after moving from her home on Beloit Street into Merrill Gardens. She influenced multiple generations and helped her students appreciate good music. Phyllis had a full and rich life, traveling the world; enjoying her many friends, relatives, and students; and always giving back to her community. She will be missed. A memorial service will be held for Phyllis Merrifield at Merrill Gardens, 2860 Country Drive, in Fremont, Sunday, March 18 at 3 pm.

Page 11 11 Page

July 23, 1922 – Feb 6, 2012 Fred passed away at the age of 89 after a short illness. He is survived by Mary his wife of 55 years, and their three children Mark, Elizabeth and Mitchell, and six grandchildren. Fred served in the US Coast Guard during WWII. Retired from the butchers union and took care of St. Joseph's grounds up until he got ill He was a lifelong resident of Niles/Mission San Jose in Fremont. He loved to garden and golf.He will be missed by many. Friends and family are invited to a memorial mass at 11 am, Feb 13, at St Joseph Church, 43148 Mission Blvd, Fremont Services under the direction of Berge-Papaps-Smith Chapel of the Angels 510-656-1226

SUBMITTED BY HELEN CHANG

S

tarStruck Theatre Youth Performing Arts invites young thespians to take part in their Summer Performance Camp and participate in two upcoming productions, “13” and “Dear Edwina Jr.” When his parents get divorced and he's forced to move from New York to a small town in Indiana, Evan Goldman just wants to make friends and survive the school year; easier said than done. With an unforgettable rock score from Tony Award-winning composer Jason Robert Brown, “13” is a hilarious, high-energy musical for all ages about discovering that cool is where you find it, and sometimes where you least expect it. This musical is rated PG. The camp for this production is for ages 12-14 (entering 7th - 9th grades in the fall 2012), and will be held June 18 – July 13, Monday through Fridays 12:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. (No rehearsal on Wednesday, July 4). Performances are Friday, July 13 through Sunday, July 15. At last a musical that features tons of parts for boys and girls! Follow the adventures of advicegiver extraordinaire, Edwina Spoonapple as she directs the kids in the neighborhood in production number after hilarious production number in her "Advice-A-Palooza" extravaganza. Written in the style of “Schoolhouse Rock Live!” and “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown,” “Dear Edwina Jr.” is the perfect musical for a new generation. The camp for this production is for ages 8-12 (entering 3rd – 6th grades in the fall 2012). It will be held July 16 – August 8, Monday through Fridays 12:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. Performances will be Tuesday, August 7 and Wednesday, August 8. The camps will be held at StarStruck Studio, 42307 Osgood Road Unit L in Fremont. The tuition fee for each camp is $650. Applications will be accepted from February 3 through February 25. Admittance is not based on a first come first served basis, but rather at the discretion of the director and the requirements of the show. Please do not send money at this time, only the show registration form. You will be notified by February 28 of your child’s enrollment status. If accepted, down payment will be due by March 15 and final payment will be due May 1. Auditions for roles will be held first few days of camp. Actors must supply shoes, make-up and possibly some costume items. Parent volunteer help may be required for set/costume building. Tickets to the performances are additional and will be on sale to family and friends. Performances will be held at Ohlone College’s Nummi Theatre. Actors will need to supply a daily snack and proper rehearsal attire. Please call (510) 659-1319 for more information or email info@ starstrucktheatre.org. Due to the short amount of rehearsal time, excessive conflicts will result in not being accepted into the program.


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 www.sshsa.org

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 pm October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net 510-656-2521 FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. A.M.A.C. The new Conservative AARP.Now over 200,000 members. ATTENTION-Lions, Rotary, TEA, VFW, American Legion, SIRS. Speakers available. Call to schd., Jan-April 510-938-1118 amacwest@aol.com Association of Mature American Citizens’ Go to our Website www.amac.us

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

New Fremont Chess Club www.newfremontchessclub.org

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-623-9935

Serious Mental Illness FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Sat., Jan 7, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email: joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Jazzinators East Bay Youth Jazz Band Tues 11/1 & 15 & 12/13 & 27 Bronco Billy’s, Irvington 7-8pm - No Cover chg. https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Mission Gold Jazz Band at Swiss Park 1st & 3rd Wed. 7-9pm

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS

GLEE

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Starts on Thurs, Oct 27th Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 PM. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

for Grown-Ups! Harmony Fusion Chorus Join us! Real Women. Real Harmony. Real Fun. Mondays, 7pm–10pm Hill & Valley Club 1809 “B” Street, Hayward Debbie 510-862-1073 www.harmonyfusion.org

Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

Newark Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

UnionCity Free Tax Preparation & E-Filing

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty St. Fremont CA 94538 1/25/12 - 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed 2/20/12 President's Day Mon & Wed (4 P.M. - 8 P.M.) Fri (10 A.M. - 1 P.M.) No Appointment Needed

Unnion City Football & Cheer League

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program

By Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program

At Newark Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark

At Union City Library 34007 Alavardo-Niles Road

Saturday Feb 11, 18, 25 & March 3 (10 A.M. - 2 P.M.) Call Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2020 No Appointment Needed

Saturday Feb 11, 18, 25 & March 3 (10 A.M. - 2 P.M.) Call Carolyn Robertson 510-574-2020 No Appointment Needed

Season 2012 For more information call Colt Hotline 510-441-8235 or Check our our website www.ucflcolts.org We are also looking for Cheer and Football Coaches

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

I

am happy to announce that over five new miles of the Bay Area Ridge Trail was recently opened to the public. This section is located in the hills above Alum Rock Park in the Sierra Vista Open Space Preserve. The Bay Area Ridge Trail Council and the Santa Clara County Open Space Authority, along with other partners, made this trail possible. This addition brings the total amount of completed trail to over 338 miles. The Bay Area Ridge Trail Council is dedicated to creating over 550 miles of continuous trails for hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrians along the ridges overlooking San Francisco Bay. On the trail, you can enjoy spectacular, expansive views of the Bay, Pacific coastline, mountain ranges, and city skylines, while crossing diverse landscapes of towering redwoods, open grasslands and dense California

Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

forests, wildflower-covered meadows, coastal bluffs and world-famous bridges. Trails are a critical aspect of any parks system. They provide access to nature and open space. And they provide linkages to encourage the public use of the multitude of parks in Santa Clara County. The Santa Clara County Parks System is a fantastic resource that was made possible by the champions of the Park Charter Fund in 1972. This voter approved initiative allocated a percentage of existing property tax revenues to the acquisition, development and maintenance of parks. When I was a kid, we had plenty of orchards to run and play in. Unfortunately as the valley has built out, those open spaces have disappeared. Therefore parks and green spaces have become even more important for public health. That is why, shortly after joining the

Board of Supervisors, I asked the Parks Department to update their 17 year old Parks Acquisition Plan. In the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, park acquisition was often used as a planning tool to limit urban sprawl. Land was cheap, so homes were being built right up into the hills. An urban greenbelt was seen as a way to acquire land and hold it in the hands of the public to prevent it from disappearing forever. In those decades, park acquisition by the county was sometimes rural – other times urban. Now that the urban cores have been compressed, we need to continue our focus on planning but also on public health. Oftentimes, the only place children have to play is in the street. This is obviously not a good idea. So children stay inside and play video games. While not the only reason, it is a significant contributor towards childhood obesity

and long term health impacts. All parks systems in the county must look to providing parks as places to relax, unwind, exercise and form a sense of community. I believe the County Parks Department should take a balanced approach to providing recreational opportunities for all county residents in urban, suburban and rural areas. This could take the form of rural open space, suburban regional parks, urban community parks, and trails that link all three. By continuing to build a balanced and comprehensive parks system with cities and other agencies, we can go a long way towards creating positive impacts on the mental and physical health of our families – and on our goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. What is your opinion? What types of parks are most important to you as a Santa Clara County resident? Should the

county continue to focus on the large rural parks like Ed Levin County Park or Grant Ranch? Or should we work with our partners to increase the amount of easily available urban parks and trails like Hellyer, Vasona and Lake Cunningham? Or should we do both? Please give me your thoughts and suggestions by calling 408-299-5030 or emailing me at dave.cortese@bos.sccgov.org. Feel free to contact me if you have any other issues or concerns as well.


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HOME SALES REPORT

Free income tax services

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 698,500 Median $: 359,000 Lowest $: 163,500 Average $: 358,136

SUBMITTED BY TONY ACOSTA Union City Leisure Services, in conjunction with the Fremont Family Resource Center VITA program, is offering free income tax preparation and filing services to families with incomes of $50,000 or lower this Saturday, February 11, at the Ruggieri Senior Center from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tax returns are prepared and filed by IRS-certified volunteer tax preparers, and despite the location, the program is not limited to seniors – all families meeting the income and complexity standards (e.g., no married filing separate returns are allowed) are eligible. Bring your tax documents and your spouse, if filing jointly! For more information about additional sites and dates, call (510) 574-2020.

Prison layoff notices AP WIRE SERVICE SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)California prison officials have sent layoff notices to 545 employees, including 140 guards, as the inmate population declines to comply with a federal court order. Corrections officials said Friday there are 14,000 fewer inmates than four months ago, when a new law began sending those convicted of lower-level offenses to county jails instead of state prisons. Federal judges, in an order backed by the U.S. Supreme Court, gave the state two years to reduce its prison population by 33,000 inmates to improve medical care. The population peaked at 162,000 in 2006. The layoffs will take effect Feb. 29, although some of those affected can transfer to other prisons that have vacancies. Another round of layoffs is planned this fall. Officials could not say how many notices will go out then.

February 10, 2012

ADDRESS

ZIP

19141 Almond Road 22072 Baywood Avenue 22091 Baywood Avenue 22068 Cameron Street 18864 Huber Drive 21311 Kahlert Street 2500 Miramar Avenue #208 17250 Robey Drive 25559 Brookshire Drive 7537 Denison Place 18541 Greenridge Court

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

380,000 345,000 359,000 185,000 220,000 369,000 163,500 194,500 465,000 698,500 560,000

3 3 3 2 3 3 2 4 4 -

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1360 1440 1476 984 1215 1301 1127 1176 1720 2728 2119

1950 1947 1947 1947 1955 1959 1982 1941 1998 1994 1976

01-04-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-09-12 01-10-12 01-05-12 01-10-12

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 28 Highest $: 1,450,000 Median $: Lowest $: 206,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

450 Barcelona Drive 94536 38160 Camden Street 94536 4924 Central Avenue 94536 4670 Devonshire Common 94536 38674 Dow Court 94536 4300 Gibraltar Drive 94536 36992 Meadowbrook Com #203 94536 35224 Noel Place 94536 4064 Norris Road 94536 38320 Oliver Way 94536 39331 Blacow Road 94538 42541 Charleston Way 94538 3656 Eugene Street 94538 4365 Millard Avenue 94538 4982 Seneca Park Loop 94538 4094 Stanley Avenue 94538 40443 Vogel Court 94538 39636 Whitecap Way 94538 46792 Crawford Street 94539 323 Lippert Avenue 94539 475 Pariso Terrace 94539 43757 Paso Nuez Common 94539 1921 Una Court 94539 1369 Valdez Way 94539 552 View Point Court 94539 49096 Woodgrove Common 94539 33261 Falcon Drive 94555 5003 Shalimar Circle 94555

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

585,000 460,000 289,000 212,000 675,000 482,500 206,000 850,000 605,000 298,000 415,000 300,000 255,000 277,000 625,000 500,000 285,000 325,000 490,000 795,000 675,000 560,000 988,000 820,000 1,450,000 580,000 730,000 270,000

2118 1601 1142 945 2393 1797 990 3332 2136 1070 1584 1000 950 1258 1809 1896 950 1067 1593 2098 1472 2537 1650 2934 1801 2762 892

1969 1964 1929 1987 1991 1965 1987 2004 1950 1952 1963 1958 1954 1955 1987 1957 1953 1962 1965 1992 2006 1977 1977 1990 2004 1979 1987

01-06-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-09-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-09-12 01-09-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-06-12 01-04-12 01-06-12

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 21 Highest $: 620,000 Median $: Lowest $: 103,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1737 Dahill Lane 22724 Happyland Avenue 3139 Madsen Street 19096 Meekland Avenue 19430 Royal Avenue 166 Sunset Boulevard 22141 Thelma Street 21070 Western Boulevard 26953 Hayward Blvd #308 64 Fernridge Court

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94544

490,000 535,804

SOLD FOR BDS

531,000 155,000 368,000 195,000 225,000 150,000 245,000 148,000 148,000 212,000

4 4 2 3 2 4 2 2 2

225,000 262,571

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

3084 1152 1198 1156 904 1352 768 1208 1520

1958 1930 1944 1951 1947 1950 1930 1983 1991

01-06-12 01-10-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-05-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-05-12

94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545

103,000 247,000 217,000 111,000 225,000 235,000 280,000 459,000 325,000 315,000 620,000

3 4 3 2 3 3 3 5 3 3 5

1125 1380 1476 894 1042 1233 1359 2687 1602 1119 3033

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 9 Highest $: 717,500 Median $: Lowest $: 187,000 Average $: ADDRESS

SOLD FOR BDS

3 3 2 2 4 4 2 5 3 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 5 3 4 2

631 Foster Court #6 26662 Joshua Street 26489 Mockingbird Lane 687 Royston Lane #128 26270 Underwood Avenue 26646 Underwood Avenue 25530 Barnard Street 2833 Dune Circle 25374 Kay Avenue 27536 La Porte Avenue 29145 Marshbrook Drive

ZIP

860 Canada Drive 511 Carnegie Drive 759 Claridad Loop 464 Dempsey Road #164 373 Junipero Drive #4 1496 Michael Court 1623 Rocky Mountain Avenue 800 Russell Lane 1140 Sunrise Way

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

717,500 400,500 620,000 187,000 197,000 715,000 575,000 530,000 540,000

3 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 4

ZIP

6285 Dairy Avenue 6652 George Avenue 6161 Honeysuckle Drive 6724 Jarvis Avenue 35192 Maidstone Court 6123 Marguerite Drive 36180 Toulouse Street 8051 Wells Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

250,000 225,000 525,000 223,000 515,000 388,000 367,500 220,000

3 2 3 3 4 3 4 1

ZIP

1137 Warden Avenue 2540 West Avenue 133rd 1315 136th Avenue 1570 165th Avenue #109 16659 Kildare Road 16194 Mateo Street 15936 Olivia Court 2014 Placer Drive 16056 Wellington Way 1377 Advent Avenue 15080 Fleming Street

94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

190,000 350,000 189,000 80,000 400,000 358,000 270,000 210,000 310,000 308,500 225,000

3 5 3 1 3 6 3 3 2 3 3

BUILT

CLOSED

1979 1966 2006 2007 1974 1984 1968 1971 1969

01-19-12 01-23-12 01-24-12 01-18-12 01-23-12 01-19-12 01-19-12 01-24-12 01-20-12

15588 Ronconi Drive 16150 Via Chiquita 15811 Via Hornitos 1996 Via Natal 16137 Via Pinale

ZIP

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

305,000 195,000 300,000 275,000 225,000

3 3 3 3 3

250,000 339,188

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

942 928 1776 1131 1761 1025 1763 702

1953 1947 1965 1982 1969 1964 1988 1922

01-09-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-05-12 01-04-12

270,000 262,773

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

972 2365 1222 681 1659 1800 1377 1200 990 1114 1029

1944 1929 1948 1987 1966 1964 2003 1963 1947 1951 1948

01-05-12 01-10-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-10-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-05-12 01-04-12 01-09-12

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 5 Highest $: 305,000 Median $: Lowest $: 195,000 Average $: ADDRESS

540,000 498,000

2217 1560 2045 842 1030 2285 2029 1921 1824

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 400,000 Median $: Lowest $: 80,000 Average $: ADDRESS

01-06-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-06-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-09-12 01-05-12 01-09-12 01-06-12 01-05-12

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 8 Highest $: 525,000 Median $: Lowest $: 220,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1981 1979 1952 1988 1952 1954 1959 2003 1958 1955 2003

275,000 260,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1388 1050 1760 1231 1000

2000 1951 1956 1956 1944

01-10-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-04-12


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 690,000 Median $: Lowest $: 125,000 Average $: ADDRESS

33746 4th Street 835 C Street 34760 Clover Street 2120 Dalton Way 32216 Dana Court 4274 Encinitas Way 31103 Fredi Street 31248 Lamprey Drive 4535 MacKinaw Street 30354 Meridien Circle 35980 Nickel Street 4493 Niland Street 519 Tamarack Drive #26

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

365,000 490,000 403,000 335,000 380,000 125,000 265,000 600,000 690,000 625,000 570,000 650,000 180,000

4 5 4 3 4 2 3 3 5 4 3 4 2

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Love and real estate

403,000 436,769

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2056 2966 1544 1349 1953 875 1035 2708 2730 2808 2250 2742 1072

1991 1998 1970 1967 1976 1974 1977 1993 1997 1992 2005 2007 1976

01-09-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-10-12 01-05-12 01-05-12 01-04-12 01-06-12 01-06-12 01-05-12 01-06-12 01-06-12

Citizen of the Year SUBMITTED BY LOU HORYZA The Milpitas Knights of Columbus invite members of the community to submit their nominations for the 2012 Milpitas Citizen of the Year. Nominees need not be a citizen of Milpitas to be eligible for consideration; the only requirement is that they have contributed to the betterment of the City. Nomination forms are available from Lou Horyza at (408) 2638779 or by email to loupegh@aol.com. The deadline for submittal of nominations is March 2, 2012. The Milpitas Citizen of the Year will be honored along with the 2012 Firefighter of the Year and 2012 Police Officer of the Year at an awards banquet hosted by the Milpitas Knights of Columbus on Saturday, April 14, 2012, at 7 p.m. at St. Johns Pavalkis Hall, 279 South Main Street, Milpitas. For more information, contact Lou Horyza at (408) 263-8779 or at loupegh@aol.com

SUBMITTED BY WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS Join the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter and divorce attorney Doris Mei for the WCR monthly luncheon at the Hilton Hotel, Newark, on February 15, 2012. REALTORS are in the business because they LOVE real estate but love and real estate do not always mix. Hear from divorce attorney Doris Mei about how love impacts real estate decision-making and what happens to the real estate when the two clash. This is not a post-Valentine’s Day counseling session but a practical refresher on the legal implications of divorce, separation, marriage and all those kinds of entanglements for property ownership, sale of property, short sales, credit, etc. Do not miss this meeting! This month’s featured raffle prize consists of two jugs of Alimony Ale. All, including members of the public, are welcome to attend the luncheon. $20 for members in advance; $28 for non-members in advance. This event is sponsored by Fremont Divorce & Document Services. For more information, visit www.FremontDivorce.com. For more information about the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter, visit www.WCRTriCities.com or call (510) 886-2662. To sponsor a luncheon, contact Greg Jones at (510) 881-1234 ext. 105 or email GregJones@GregJonesRealEstate.com Women’s Council of REALTORS Tri-Cities Chapter Luncheon Wednesday, February 15

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark (510) 886-2662 www.WCRTriCities.com Chapter Members: $20 / Guests: $28 WCR Tri-Cities Chapter Sponsors Platinum Tri-City Voice Newspaper www.TriCityVoice.com Gold Realty World Neighbors www.RealtyWorldNeighbors.com Sugar Bowl Bakery www.SugarBowlBakery.com Silver Bay East Association of REALTORS www.BayEast.org Bronze Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate – Mason-McDuffie www.BHGHome.com Law Office of Phong H. La www.PhongLa.com MLS Listings, Inc www.MLSListings.com Old Republic Home Warranty www.ORHP.com RE Realty Experts www.RealtyExperts.com WIN Tri-Cities Home Inspection www.WINI.com/TriCities

AP WIRE SERVICE

Past Milpitas Citizens of the Year. L-r, (seated): Bob McGuire, Lou Horyza and Althea Polanski; (standing): Ray Magdalang, Primo McHugh, Barbara Gomes, Lonnie Knight, Jose Esteves, Wanda Olinger, Deepka Llawani, Naranjan Gupta, Bob Burrill and Frank DeSmidt.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) Members of a Madison book club have quite a story to discuss. And, it doesn't have anything to do with a book. One of the book club members decided to take a pet python out of its terrarium during a recent meeting at a host's home. The 31-year-old woman says she had experience handling snakes and just wanted to hold it. The normally docile snake named Annie latched on to the woman's cheek and wouldn't let go. Police and paramedics were summoned. But, Annie wouldn't let go until her owner arrived home and detached her. The woman's bite was disinfected. Madison police spokesman Joel DeSpain says the book club members could write their own non-fiction piece involving a protagonist named Annie.


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BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE

B

eauty is in the eye of the beholder, or so the saying goes. Many beholders of graffiti, especially when found in inappropriate locations, do not see beauty; instead, they see just the opposite: vandalism, destruction of property, and urban decay. Opponents of graffiti do not see any value in this “art” and continually seek out the best methods for its removal. How can such markings be effectively discouraged? The first option is to just do nothing—let the graffiti stand. After a while, some people

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

don’t even notice graffiti; it simply fades into the background of life. This may be the least expensive route, but the “broken windows theory” developed in the 1980s suggests that this leads to higher crime and lower morale among residents. In 1982, social scientists James Wilson and George Kelling argued that maintenance of urban neighborhoods prevents an increase in crime and restrains criminals from creating more vandalism. “Consider a building with a few broken windows. If the windows are not repaired, the tendency is for vandals to break a few more windows.” This theory can be

applied to graffiti; if the graffiti is not removed, taggers feel empowered to continue their behavior. Graffiti removal is the next option. Regular, consistent efforts at removal can discourage taggers from further vandalism. Several removal methods are available, some more effective than others. Painting over graffiti is an easy way to restore damaged property to its former state. Residents who live in an area with frequent tagging may want to keep a can of matching paint on hand. Quick and consistent removal or covering the tags is a key to discouraging more tagging.

February 10, 2012


February 10, 2012

Sometimes painting over graffiti isn’t practical, such as on store windows. In this case, there are a few products available to help remove spray paint and markers. These tend to be powerful chemicals, so they must be stored safely and used with appropriate equipment including gloves and facemasks. Mötsenböcker’s is a line of stain removal products sold in hardware stores. Mötsenböcker’s Lift Off 3 removes ink and pen stains; Lift Off 4 works on spray paint, though it tends to work better on fresh spray paint. Another option is carburetor and choke cleaner which, although toxic and will cause clouding on plastic surfaces, is an effective cleaner.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

While wearing gloves, spray the removal chemical on the paint. Scrub with steel wool and clean up with disposable blue shop towels. For residents in commonly tagged areas, keeping a graffiti removal kit on hand might be a good option. It can be empowering to take part in beautifying a neighborhood. For those who do not feel comfortable doing the work, graffiti removal hotlines are available. Graffiti abatement groups stay very busy and are quite prompt in removing reported tags, especially if the tag is reported as gangrelated. Check your city’s Web site for a local graffiti removal hotline.

Page 17

A final option is prevention. The most common preventive measure is to plant climbing vines such as ivy in areas where graffiti occurs. There are some disadvantages to this approach since plants take time to grow and water and landscaping efforts are required to maintain the plants. Finally, certain vines are invasive, choking out other nearby plants and attracting rodents. One local entrepreneur has an alternative to live plants… faux ivy. Shannon Hendrick of EZ-Ivy, a small business selling faux ivy in Hayward, has noticed extensive graffiti in the area and feels this product is a good solution to the problem. He read with interest a Letter to the Editor in Tri-City Voice that spoke of a probable graffiti problem at the Central Park Terrace development in Fremont. Hendrick, who has been the Product Manager at EZ-Ivy for the last six months, believes that his products are a solution. Although discouraging graffiti was not what drew Hendrick to his business, he says that faux ivy is a quick, efficient, and cost-effective means of graffiti coverage and prevention. Faux ivy comes in a number of forms (rolls, fencing, tiles) and can be easily placed over walls, utility boxes, fences, or balconies to add beauty and prevent vandalism. M Clothing, a designer boutique with locations in Healdsburg and Corte Madera, uses the boxwood style tiles as wall décor in their shops. A close inspection reveals vine rolls clearly, but they do add visual appeal to apartment balconies and barren fences. The vines are hardy resisting the effects of bad weather and do not fade. Graffiti, when inappropriately placed on public and private property is visually damaging and brings down property values; it is classified as a criminal activity. As part of the solution, citizens can join a graffiti abatement group, plant or install vines or report vandalism through local hotlines. Let’s keep our neighborhoods beautiful! EZ-ivy product information can be found at: www.ezivy.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012

continued from page 3

continued from page 1

Saturday, Feb 11

Eddie & Friends in Concert 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Music by Eddie Saubolle

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 474-1004

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert Street, Newark (510) 505-1735

Tuesdays, June 5

Sunday, Feb 12

Integrates walking, flexibility, strength and balance

Bharatanatyam Arangetram of Nidhi Lakshmi Swamy $ 4 p.m.

Feb

14

-

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health -R 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 574-2053

Classic dance form of India

contributions to education within Fremont. This year, FEF is proud to recognize the contributions of Helen Paris, Washington High School teacher, as the 2012 “Excellence in Education” FUSD Honoree, and the Fremont Firefighters Association, as the 2012 “Excellence in Education” Community Honoree. Helen Paris has been a teacher and mentor to many students in FUSD for the past 23 years. She is a proud Washington High School “Husky” Alumna, and Student Activities Director. Her goal is to have students engaged in understanding the role of American History and love for our country. Students are challenged to focus on citizenship, community interaction and civic virtue. Fremont Firefighters Local 1689 was first established as Fremont Firefighters Association, Inc., May 18, 1963. The Association has sponsored Fremont Education Foundation events over many years, helping to ensure that students within the Fremont Unified School District have access to materials, equipment and programs that would otherwise be out of reach due to budget cuts. They have also contributed to many other charities and programs over the years, too numerous to mention, providing extensive support to families and children. Evening festivities will commence with a cocktail hour at 5:30 p.m., followed by a sit-down dinner. Entrée choices are: steak and potatoes, salmon and wild rice, or a vegetarian “vegetable napoleon.” Scrumptious desserts, passion fruit mousse cake or black forest cake, will tempt the palate. Gala attendees have an opportunity to win raffle prizes, including wine

baskets, tickets to local museums and many other items. In addition, eventgoers may bid on a wide array of silent auction items, such as an overnight stay in a luxury tent at Safari West or the opportunity to be “FUSD Superintendent for the Day.” This year, the Gala will include a fun twist to the classic “heads or tails” game where one lucky winner will win a special prize. Join us as we have fun while supporting this wonderful cause! Tickets are priced at $80 each/$55 for FUSD teachers or clerical staff. ($38 is tax-deductible.) Table sponsorships are available at $800 for a table of ten people. To register for this special evening, visit www.fremont-education.org. Reservations are required by February 15. Attire is casual, but dressing for an adventure, in safari khaki or animal prints, is encouraged! Excellence in Education Gala - “Safari Adventure” Friday, Feb 24 5:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Fremont Marriott Silicon Valley 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 659-2561 www.fremont-education.org kswestra@comcast.net Tickets: $80 per person/$55 FUSD teachers or clerical staff Register online at: www.fremont-education.org Reservations required by February 15 Proceeds benefit FEF’s Innovative Education Grants Program

Saturday, Feb 11

Bike Traffic Skills 101 R 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Bring a bike, helmet and bike lock

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 Saturday, Feb 11

Happy Birthday Mr. Lincoln $ 12 noon - 1 p.m. Celebrate President’s Day

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Jackson Theater, Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Sunday, Feb 12

Laurel & Hardy Talkie Matinee $ 4 p.m.

Live music by Hope in Disguise

Love @ First Slice Pizzeria 36601 Newark Blvd, Newark (510) 797-7300 Wednesday, Feb 15

"Sprucin' Up"

Health Insurance Options 10 a.m. – 12 Noon

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411 Sunday, Feb 12

Farwell to the Monarchs 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Goodbye to our butterfly friends

Charlotte Diamond $R 2 p.m.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont (510) 733-1189

Valentine's Day Singles Dance Party 8 p.m.

"Our Relations" &

Saturday, Feb 11

Family Concert

Tuesday, Feb 14

Monday, Feb 13

Bingo Luncheon $ 12 noon

Make Sure Your Kids are covered

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 791-3428 Wednesday, Feb 15 Feb 29

Web Page Creation and Design 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Students create multimedia pages

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

Sunday, Feb 12

Proceeds go to the Max

Religious Life Information 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Baer Heart Fund

Friday, Feb 24

Eagles Hall 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 785-8174

Excellence in Education Gala $R 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb 14

Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Pkwy., Fremont (510) 794-3428

Learn about the life of a Sister

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose 43326 Mission Blvd. Fremont (510) 933-6335 Sundays, Feb 12 & Feb 26

Celebrate African American History 10:45 a.m. Special programs during services

Valentine's Day Luncheon $R 11:45 a.m. - 3 p.m. Prizes and live music

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766

Proceeds benefit Fremont Education Foundation


February 10, 2012

“Chico” A108598 Chico is tan and white, adult male Pit Bull. He is very friendly and energetic, but polite and gentle with people. He loves to romp and play with other dogs. He has lots of love to give and is looking for a forever home.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Savannah” A108642 Savannah is a female, black and white domestic short haired cat. She is about 3 years old. Savannah is a shy girl, but she has a gentle spirit. She is looking for her forever home with a mellow family or even a single person. She is available for adoption now, so come see her today.

Total in Shelter: Cats - 25 Dogs - 44 Other - 7

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6640 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 pm Saturdays: 11 am - 4 pm Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

February 10, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12615772 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Zhixiong Xiao for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Yao Xiao to Alissa Yao Xiao The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3/16/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room, 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Feb. 03, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256514# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12612210 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Pratap Chillakanti, Chaya Yerrapragada for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Pratap Chillakanti, Chaya Yerrapragada filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Kartik Sri Chillakanti to Kartik Sri Sai Chillakanti The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3/16/2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Room 108, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice Date: January 12, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, 2/24/12 CNS-2254127# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11610140 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Stephanie Danielle Mestaz for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Stephanie Danielle Mestaz to Danni Stephanie Daniel-Mestaz The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court

days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 10, 2012, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: December 29, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245034#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460305 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ASR Logistics, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Puran Singh, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538. Amrinder Singh, 4445 Stevenson Blvd., #61, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by a General partnership. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Puran Singh, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2258084# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460223 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CC Medical Transport, 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Marcelino Galera Carig, Jr., 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538 Michele (NHN) Carig, 43396 Newport Drive, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by Husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Marcelino G. Carig, Jr., (co-Owner) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2257068# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 461174 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Contek Networks, 3909 Stevenson Blvd., #201, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Fremont Eddy Santoso, 3909 Stevenson Blvd., #201, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/2001 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Eddy Santoso This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on February 6, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2257060# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460311 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: New The Heart Cafe, 6038 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. 2970 Kentridge Dr., San Jose, CA 95133. Hien Anh Cao, 2970 Kenrtidge Dr., San Jose, CA 95133. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 01/17/12. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hien Anh Cao This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 17, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256512# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460496 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Magnafit, 968 Huntington Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Abbas S. Sadiq, 968 Huntington Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Abbas S. Sadiq This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 20, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2/12 CNS-2256110# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460868 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Inoochi, 41101 Ellen St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Vince Chen, 41101 Ellen St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on June 1, 2005. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Vince Chen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 27, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, 2/24/12 CNS-2252710# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460220-21 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1). JMK Investments and Consulting, 2). JMK, 31885 Alvarado Blvd., #200, Union City, Alameda, CA 94587, County of Alameda JMK Business Solutions, LLC, CA, 780 Folsom Ave., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Meinhart Mosqueda, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).

1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248521# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 446912 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Earnest Live-In-Home Care, 40824 Townsend Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538 The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in the County Clerk’s office on Jan. 19, 2011 in the County Alameda. Chi Hon Wong, 40824 Townsend Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538 This business was conducted by an individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Chi Hon Wong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 11, 2012. 1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248467# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460102 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Yacco’s Creative Services, 37341 Trellis Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Richard Yacco, 37341 Trellis Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on December 30, 2011. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Richard Yacco This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 11, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17/12 CNS-2248466# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460065 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bay Area Repid Cab Co., 33325 Mission Blvd., #C205, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Yunus Olomi, 33325 Mission Blvd., #C205, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yunus M. Olomi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 10, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under


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PUBLIC NOTICES Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245507# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460226 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: West Coast Catholic Books, 38572 Molina Ct., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Charles Vaughan, 38572 Molina Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/12/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Charles Vaughan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012

NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245089# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460052 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: California Employment Services, 24301 Southland Dr. Ste. #100, Hayward, CA 94545,

County of Alameda California Employment Services, California, 24301 Southland Dr. Ste. #100, Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Andrew S. Dashwood, Owner, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 10, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business

Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245077# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460189 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wellness Chiropractic, 43108 Christy Street, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ha Thanh Truong, 318 Knottingham Circle, Livermore, CA 94551 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Dec 13, 2006 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ha Thanh Truong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of

Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2244644#

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health! SUBMITTED BY SHAWN FONG “Walk this Way” is a free, 16-week program for seniors that integrates walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics. Seniors participating in the program will receive a free pedometer and walking logs; obtain training on various exercises; learn about health, nutrition, and safety; find out about local community resources; and, get support from others to stay motivated and achieve their individual fitness goals. Operated by the City of Fremont Human Services Department, the classes are taught by fitness instructors from Generations Community Wellness, a non-profit organization. The program is funded by a generous grant from the Alameda County Transportation Commission. Seniors who took part in the past programs commented on how much fun the classes were and how the program benefitted them. Through the exercises they learned in class, participants saw major improvements in the endurance, balance and flexibility. Many seniors mentioned how the program helped them avoid injuries, decrease their blood pressure, better manage their diabetes and improve their nutrition. The Walk This Way program is free and open to seniors of all fitness levels. Classes are starting soon at the following locations:

Newark Silliman Center 6800 Mowry Ave., Newark February 14 – June 5, (Tuesdays): 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Dr., Fremont February 16 – June 7, (Thursdays): 9:30 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Union City Kennedy Center 133 Decoto Rd., Union City February 15 – June 6, (Wednesdays): 9:30 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont February 17 – June 8, (Fridays): 9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Registration is required. For more information or to register for a Walk This Way session, please call Monica Gloria, City of Fremont Human Services Department, at (510) 574-2053. To learn more about ongoing classes and activities, visit www.fremont.gov.


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BY DONNA GORDON BLANKINSHIP ASSOCIATED PRESS SEATTLE (AP) Money donated by the nation's most chartable people is starting to catch up with pre-recession giving, thanks in part to some very large bequests from a few donors. The Chronicle of Philanthropy reports Monday in its annual report of the nation's most generous people that the top 50 donors made pledges in 2011 to give a total of $10.4 billion. The donors gave a total of $3.3 billion in 2010, the smallest total since The Chronicle began tracking the biggest donors in 2000. A decade ago, the top 50 givers gave $12.5 billion. Two people are conspicuously absent from the top 50 list this year: Bill Gates and Warren Buffett. That's because the Chronicle doesn't include payments on gifts promised in past years in its spreadsheet of top givers. Both Gates and Buffett made large payments on past pledges in 2011. It took gifts totaling at least $26 million to make the list this year. People on the list gave a median of $61 million in 2011, compared to $39.6 million in 2010. Twenty-nine of the top 50 gave $50 million or more. Nineteen made big gifts to colleges, including 10 multi-million dollar gifts to universities that were not the donors' alma maters. Ten of the top 50 made the list because of bequests after their death. The Chronicle notes that 379 of the Forbes 400 wealthiest Americans did not report making continued on page 35 any big charitable gifts.

After IPO, Facebook will face new profit pressures BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP BUSINESS WRITER SAN FRANCISCO (AP) For all the huge numbers in Facebook's IPO papers, a surprisingly small figure stands out: $4.39, the amount the site generated per user last year. It's one of the company's major challenges because the total is paltry compared with competing Internet companies. Google makes more than $30 a year from each registered user. Even struggling Yahoo and AOL make $7 and $10, respectively. Once Facebook goes public, Wall Street will surely demand more. That means the social network will almost certainly have to attract a lot more users or be more aggressive with its advertising, perhaps by mining personal data even more than it does now. But can Facebook do all that without spoiling the user experience? The company may have a tough time increasing the number of ads on a site that has become primarily a home for online conversations. “It's a communications tool. Can you imagine what a turn-off it would be if we were talking on the phone and AT&T tried to play an ad in the middle of our conversation?” said University of continued on page 35

February 10, 2012

Obama administration rejects Medi-Cal co-payments BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) Federal health officials on Monday said California cannot force Medi-Cal recipients to make a co-pay for doctor visits and prescription drugs, a decision that brings relief to low-income patients but complicates the state's effort to close a $9.2 billion budget deficit. A letter from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said agency officials were ``unable to identify the legal and policy support'' for the state's request. The decision is the latest in a string of legal and regulatory challenges that have made it difficult for the state to reduce spending and balance its budget. Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers were planning to save $511 million a year in the health insurance program by requiring low-income patients to pay a share of their medical costs. Under the state budget passed last year, MediCal would require recipients to pay $5 for doctor and dental visits, $3 for preferred prescription drugs, $50 for emergency room visits and a maximum of $200 for a hospital stay. The co-pays continued on page 35


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Great Prizes

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Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. There are two monthly prize puzzles (a Tuesday edition and a Friday edition). Enter both to increase your chances of winning! All entries will be eligible for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize!

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Across 1 Ippolito's Newark Jewelry Center offers ____, service and repairs (5) 6 Single _____ Replacement (5) 7 Hy Massage and _________ (11) 10 Don't ____ ____ this tax season (6,3) 12 CPA Firm (5) 13 Doctor at Chirosports (5) 16 Jewelry By Design has loose _________ (8) 19 Eat, drink and relax at this Bar and Grill (7,5) 21 Program offers free tax preparation (4) 24 See this pianist at Smith Center (6) 25 Fremont _______ encourages support of local businesses (7) 26 Watch the trains from this Cafe (5) 27_____ your designs with Minuteman Press (6) 28 Are you limited by your past ________? (10) Down 1 Healthy teeth, lasting _____ (6) 2 My one and only ____ Valentine dinner for two at Hilton (4) 3 Marriott Certified Wedding Planners coordinate weddings of all sizes, types, and _____ (6) 4 Fully Escorted "________" Vacation through

BJ Travel (8) 5 Call ______ if you owe more than your house MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN is worth (8) 8 Purple Lotus bridges school and _______ (8) A SEALED ENVELOPE TO: 9 Day at Fremont Christian School (8) TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 11 Settles injuries and business disputes (3,4) 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 14 Bill Stone, _________ insurance (10) 15 Our _____ Lutheran Preschool (6) Or fax to: (510) 796-2462 16 Autos Wholesale will handle _____ paperwork Deadline for entry is the 5th of the following month. Only paper (3) copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners 17 Chahall European _____ Center (4) will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper. 18 Buys diamonds and gold (6) 20 Relay for Life benefit concert at this venue (6,4) 22 These three are attorneys and counselors at law February 10th 2012 Puzzle (5) 23 Say "I care" with a ________ (7) 24 SACBC Bingo is played on _____, not maName: chines (5)

Phone:

January 2012 Winner will be announced February 14th

Email:


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February 10, 2012

Spin A Yarn on TV Friday, February 10 at 8 p.m. BY DENNY STEIN In October of 2011, a venerable Fremont restaurant, Saki’s Spin-A-Yarn, was overrun by media: Type A producers, meticulous directors, scurrying camera people, catering trucks, mysterious tents, and one giant television culinary celebrity. Saki’s was to be transformed by Chef Gordon Ramsey of Fox TV’s Kitchen Nightmares. Fremont on national television? Our own “super” bowl? How did it happen and how do I get in on it? These were the questions that leapt from household to office to neighborhood listserv as the news spread. Fortunately, as Dining Editor of the Tri-City Voice, I had an entrée into the production. I brought along three friends, Margo Hood of Legacy Real Estate, Judy Heyman of Niles, and Jas Atwal of Facebook, a “close” friend who had been standing in line with me the first night of filming. We signed confidentiality agreements, swearing not to reveal details of the experience, so I can only relate information approved by Fox spokespersons. Q: How is a restaurant chosen for Kitchen Nightmares? A: Nominations for restaurants are received from Yelp, local customers, and the owners themselves. If you’ve seen KN, you know that many of the featured establishments are in need of help. They turn to Chef Ramsey, and the KN staff, to transform their business. Q: How was Spin-A-Yarn chosen? A: The owners submitted a request to be on the show. After the usual scouting and vetting, the producers decided that Spin-A-Yarn was a perfect candidate; a long-standing restaurant in Fremont that needed Chef Ramsay’s help.

Q: How are the diners chosen? A: All diners are people from the community and follow strict rules: No Cell Phones! No Cameras! No Recorders!

Don’t wear stripes, patterns, loud clothing or all white! And No Autographs while Chef Ramsey is working! All diners pay for their meals… there are no freebies. Q: Are the food fiascos and nightmarish kitchen conditions for real? A: Yes Q: How long does it take to produce one show? A: A great deal of time goes into research of the restaurant – the show’s main focus is supporting the restaurant. Documenting it for the TV show is secondary. The crew spends about a week on-site. Q: How successful are the changes made by Kitchen Nightmares?

A: Chef Ramsay leaves each restaurant with the tools they need to create a successful business (e.g. new dishes and a simplified menu, chef and server training, updated décor, modern financial computer systems, and a heavy dose of family therapy); it’s up to them to commit to his suggestions.

So, Tri-City readers, there you have it, as much as can be revealed before the show airs tonight. Tune in or set your DVR to Fox TV at 8 p.m. on Friday, February10 to see how the new Spin-A-Yarn Steakhouse fared. You can also see Kitchen Nightmares on facebook and FOX.com


February 10, 2012

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SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER

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he Sun Gallery is proud to announce the 23rd Annual Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibition running from February 15 to April 7. The exhibition features 12 well known illustrators from across the United States and focuses on artwork closely linked to the text of the publications. Many of

Artist: Christy Hale, Book: “The East West HouseBats”

Bats: Artist: Jessica Lanan, Book: “Good Fortune”

the illustrators are also the authors of the books, and the books range from publications suitable for very young children, for example, Ashley Wolf’s “Baby

Artist: Lin Wang, Book: “Shining Star”

bear Sees Blue,” to books aimed at older children and teenagers such as the bilingual book “Side by Side/Lado a Lado” by Monica Brown and illustrated by Joe Cepeda describing the story of Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez as they fought for farmworkers rights in the 1960s. Illustrators and authors featured in the exhibition are: Joe Cepeda, “Lado y Lado” author Monica Brown, Tom Leonard “Here is the African Savannah” and “Here is Antartica,” author Madelaine Dunphy,

Christy Hale “The East West House,” Ashley Wolf “Baby Bear Sees Blue,” Felicia Hoshino “Sora and the Cloud,” Susan Guevera “Wild Women of the Wild West,” author Jonah Winter, Elisa Kleven “The Friendship Wish,” Julia Cairns “A Full Moon is Rising,” author Marilyn Singer, Andrea Burris “Tater and Tot,” Jessica Lanan “Good Fortune in a Wrapping Cloth,” author Joan Schoettle, Lin Wang “Shining Star: The Anna May Wong Story,” author Paula Yoo, Mike Dutton “Donovan’s Big Day,” and author Leslea Newman. The Sun Gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. A Reception and Book Signing Party with the artists will be held on March 17 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. For more information please contact the Sun Gallery at sungallery@comcast.net or call (510) 581-4050. This exhibition is free and open to the public. Sun Gallery is committed to interactive learning through its programs of School Tours, free Saturday Art Classes, Tuesday Art Classes for kids, and Summer Camps. For more information about these programs please contact Christine Bender at (510) 581-4050. Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit February 15 – April 7 Wednesday through Sunday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Reception and Book Signing Party Saturday, March 17 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. The Sun Gallery 1015 E. St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org

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rithyollasa Dance Academy, Fremont, presents the Bharatanatyam Arangetram of Nidhi Lakshmi Swamy on Sunday, February 12th at Jackson Theatre, Ohlone College. Indumathy Ganesh founded Nrithyollasa Dance Academy in Fremont in 1989 to provide rigorous and intense training in Bharatanatyam, one of the oldest dance forms in India. In the past two decades, hundreds of local children have been trained in this art form. The students of Nrithyollasa Dance academy have not only charmed the audience with their dancing skills, but have also performed to raise funds for worthy causes. Bharatanatyam, a classical dance of India, is one of the most beautiful, graceful, colorful and sophisticated style among the dance art forms. It is a combination of expression, music, rhythm and dance. Ancient Indian mythology includes the four Vedas or Knowledge of God, which are very difficult to master. Lord Brahma, Hindu God of Creation, created a fifth Veda, Natya Veda, based on the four existing ones. He took the words from Rig Veda, gesture from Yajur Veda, music from Sama Veda and emotion from Atharva Veda. Bharatanatyam has three main elements: Nritta is the rhythm, Nrithya is the combination of rhythm and expression and Natya is the dramatic element. In 200 BC, the principles of Bharatanatyam were compiled by Sage Bharata in his treatise

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February 10, 2012

“Natya Shastra”. Bharatanatyam originated in Thanjavur, South India and flourished in the temples among a community of devotees who expressed their love for the infinite spirit through the medium of dance. It is supposed to be the manifestation of the metaphysical element of fire in the human body. Nidhi Swamy, a senior at Mission San Jose High School this year, has been learning this art form for the past ten years from Guru Indumathy Ganesh in Fremont. Arangetram (Climbing the raised floor) or Rangapravesha (Entering the stagea) is the most significant event in the life of a dancer. As Indumathy always stresses, it is the beginning and not the end of a dancer’s career. In order to reach this level of dancing, a student must love the art, be committed to it and disciplined in approach. The students must be able to understand, memorize and perfect their dancing skills. Indumathy always points out the importance of practice. Nidhi says, “I have been able learn about the significance of different of cultures, the importance of dedication and the joy of learning art through this medium of dancing”. Nidhi will be accompanied by an orchestra. The accompanying artists play a very important part in the function. Nidhi’s arangetram consists of the following artists. Choreography and Nattuvangam or dance conducting by Artistic Director, Indumathy Ganesh, Vocal by Asha Ramesh, Mridangam by N. Narayanan, and Violin by Shanti Narayanan. They are renowned Bay area artists and often provide music for Nrithyollasa Dance Academy performances. The dancer will wear traditional costumes and jewelry along with heavy make up, especially around the eyes, such that, her expressions are highlighted. The dancer’s finger tips and toes are also painted in red color so that the hand gestures and footwork are clearly depicted. The bells or jingles on her feet will make rhythmic sound as the dancer keeps pace with the music. The entire performance will be approximately three hours in duration. The arangetram performance starts with a prayer and is divided into two main sections. The first consists of Pushpanjali, an invocation, where in the dancer offers prayers and flowers to the Hindu pantheon of gods and goddesses through the idiom of dance. Allaripu,


February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY MEKALA NEELAKANTAN

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the next dance stresses the importance to movements, the coordination of eyes, neck, arms and legs. Jathiswaram is an intricate item where the dancer demonstrates ‘Nritta’, abstract dance movements in rhythmic patterns, exemplifying the unique style of dancing. Shabda is a rhythmic dance with emphasis given to facial expression. Varnam is the most elaborate piece in a Bharatanatyam recital, where expressions alternate with jathis or rhythmic syllables. The second half consists of Padam, where the dancer’s facial expressions assumes importance. This is followed by a couple of Devaranama dances that are devotional in context. Tillana forms a grand finale of Bhanratanatyam concert. It is the

epitome of pure dance exploring the intricacies of footwork patterns. Each segment is fast paced and is punctuated with captivating and graceful poses. Mangalam is the ending of the performance where the dancer makes her final bow to God, her teacher, the accompanying artists and audience, thanking them for a successful performance. Those who would like to enjoy the divine Bharatanatyam experience may attend the Arangetram of local artist Nidhi Swamy, presented by Nrithyollasa Dance Academy, Fremont, on Sunday, February 12, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. at Jackson Theatre, Ohlone College, 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont, CA 94539. Interested people are invited to this free performance.

he Milpitas Phantom Art Gallery is currently featuring “Floral Explosion,” a watercolor exhibit by local artist Gloria Souza. Souza, originally from Iowa, has been producing watercolor pieces for over 25 years. In addition to the showcase at the Phantom Art Gallery, Souza has shown her paintings at Open Studio, bookstores, and restaurants such as Rivas (Santa Cruz). Currently, her paintings can be found at Caspian Village Restaurant (Evergreen) as well as through her website, www.watercolorsbygloriamejiasouza.com. Souza’s paintings are most known for their saturated colors and use of negative space, a technique she describes as “most rewarding and satisfying.” Souza’s introduction to art started at a young age, but she began painting with watercolors after taking an adult art class at Silver Creek High School. She went on to study art at West Valley College, and soon discovered that watercolor painting was her passion. Today, she paints primarily in negative space, a technique in which the artist finds the subject of the painting after the water and color pigments have been applied to the paper. Through this method of discovering images through the flowing color and water, Souza brings out the resulting shapes and designs. To Souza, the most important aspect of watercolor art is “the way the colors just seem to blend into each other, creating yet another feeling of movement with the pigments and water. The colors...complement each other and flow so beautifully together.” And, while many see watercolor painting as a very difficult art form, Souza finds this “unforgiving medium” most satisfying and challenging. “I think everyone should

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just pick up a brush and start to…watch the color flow,” she says. “It is so rewarding and brings me such pleasure.” The inspiration for Souza’s “Floral Explosion” exhibit stems from photographs of flowers and scenery taken during her many travels throughout the United States, Europe, and South America. Souza specifically chose flowers as the theme of her exhibit because “I felt the display of flowers was so dramatic; I simply felt an explosion of color, movement, and inspiration.” Souza’s exhibit at the Milpitas Phantom Art Gallery will run through March 16. The gallery is located at the Milpitas Community Center on 457 E. Calaveras Boulevard. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday. “Floral Explosion” Gallery Exhibit by Gloria Souza Through March 16 Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Milpitas Phantom Art Gallery 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 www.watercolorsbygloriamejiasouza.com


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February 10, 2012

SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER SIMONSEN

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or animal lovers, spring and summer in Silicon Valley are known as “kitten season.” It’s the time of year when shelters like Humane Society Silicon Valley (HSSV) are flooded with litters of unwanted, homeless kittens. HSSV saw an influx of more than 1,300 kittens in 2010 -- over 1,400 in 2011. People bring them in by the dozens, in shoe boxes, crates and laundry baskets. There are always too many kittens coming in and not enough adopters ready to provide safe, happy homes. HSSV and participating South Bay veterinarians are offering special discounts up to 40 percent on spay and neuter surgeries for dogs and cats during the month of February. HSSV, along with 33 private practice veterinarians across Santa Clara County and the City of Fremont, are offering the discounts to encourage the public to take advantage of these discounts to help pet owners prevent unwanted litters and to reduce pet overpopulation. Spaying and neutering can also help pets live longer, healthier lives and can greatly reduce the incidence of certain cancers. Additionally, it makes cats and dogs less likely to roam the neighborhood, spray, run away or get into fights. Last year, HSSV reported a 41 percent increase in pet spay/neuter surgeries during the month of February 2011 over the same time period in 2010. This is good news because in just seven years, one female cat and her offspring can produce more than 300,000 kittens! “We are making great strides in educating the public about our message: don’t delay, spay/neuter today. This is particularly critical for owners of female cats,” said Dr. Julia Lewis, HSSV’s chief veterinary officer. “Spayed female cats are more likely to live healthy lives and less likely to be surrendered by their owners. Our discounted prices will encourage people to act now.” Throughout February, HSSV is offering up to 40 percent discount on surgeries. Female cat spays are $65 while male cat neuters are just $40. Spay/neuter surgeries for dogs are priced by the animal’s weight and sex and range from $50 for a male dog under 26 pounds to $125 for a female dog weighing between 76 and 99 pounds. Prices include a brief pre-op exam, pre-anesthetic, anesthetic, nail trim, spay/neuter surgery, hospitalization on the day of surgery, as well as pain medication. There are additional charges for animals in-heat, pregnant, cryptorchid (missing testicles) or overweight. All animals must be current on their vaccinations. More information can be found at http://www.hssv.org/snmonth. Call (408) 262-2133, ext. 108 for appointments.

SUBMITTED BY KATHLEEN CHA AND CRAIG NOBLE The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) seeks the public’s assistance in developing Plan Bay Area, a 25-year transportation investment and land-use strategy for the nine-county region from 2015 through 2040. The agencies have created an online virtual workshop for anyone who wants to weigh in on options and trade-offs from the convenience of their computer. People can visit the online workshop at www.OneBayArea.org/workshops/virtual.htm. The virtual workshop closely mirrors the format of a series of nine public forums held in January 2012 in every Bay Area county, and includes numerous opportunities to comment. Web visitors can watch several informational videos and take a few short surveys on their priorities for the Bay Area’s future housing and land use development, transportation investments and policies and more. The virtual workshop will be available through February 15, 2012. “We want to hear from you, so make your opinion count,” said MTC Chair and San Mateo County Supervisor Adrienne Tissier. “The goal of Plan Bay Area is to make our region more livable for current and future generations and we need public input to ensure we’re hearing from as many residents as possible.” By creating the virtual workshop, MTC has increased its outreach effort for the Plan Bay Area process which is scheduled to conclude in Spring 2013. Plan Bay Area will be the region’s first transportation and land-use plan to incorporate the Sustainable Communities Strategy mandated by state Senate Bill 375 which was signed into law in 2008. More than 1,000 people attended Plan Bay Area workshops in all nine counties in January 2012. An additional 150 people attended 10 focus groups held with community-based organizations (CBOs) throughout the region. Survey results and comments from the virtual workshop will be tabulated and considered by MTC and ABAG decision makers, along with feedback gathered from workshops, CBO meetings, focus groups and a statistically valid telephone survey, at a meeting on March 9, 2012. MTC is the transportation planning and financing agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. ABAG is the official regional planning agency for the 101 cities and towns and nine counties of the Bay Area. Visit the online workshop at www.OneBayArea.org/workshops/virtual.htm


February 10, 2012

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Chamber of Commerce honors heroes SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT PHOTOS COURTESY OF KIM HUGGETT Hayward honored recipients of the Business Person, Educator, Firefighter and Police Officer of the Year Award at the 68th Annual Hayward Chamber of Commerce Awards Celebration Gala, on January 28, 2012, in the University Union at California State University, East Bay, 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward. Julie McKillop Business Person of the Year Julie McKillop, owner and executive chef of Neumanali

centric, Victorian-style restaurant Neumanali. Both her restaurant and accountancy business are located downtown, across from city hall. Her long record of public service includes serving on the boards of directors of Spectrum Community Services, the Hayward Historical Society, St. Rose Hospital and the Hayward Chamber of Commerce. She also served on the Hayward Planning Commission, the city’s Small Business Revolving Loan Committee and has worked with the Women’s Initiative for Self-Employment. Hector Garcia Educator of the Year Hector Garcia has been an educational leader for 16 years, most recently as principal of Harder Elementary School. At Harder, he has worked with universities, public health and safety agencies in Hayward and Alameda County to leverage support, tutoring and profes-

Julie McKillop

Restaurant and principal of McKillop Accountancy, received the Business Person of the Year Award, sponsored by Kaiser Permanente. A lifelong Hayward resident and graduate of Cal State East Bay, she and husband Tim began a major redevelopment project in 2000 that became the upscale wine-

Hector Garcia

sional development resources to transform Harder into a model school. He initiated an arts program in Hayward in 1998 for elementary and middle school students called Mariachi Juvenil de Hayward, which serves students and families throughout the East Bay. He served as director of curriculum and instruction at Alameda County Office of Education for five years, focusing on the needs of underachieving student populations and organized parent education forums throughout the county, utilizing parents as facilitators, leaders and advocates. This award is sponsored by Armas Consulting Group. Captain Joe Stilwell Firefighter of the Year Hayward Fire Capt. Joe Stilwell discovered his love for the fire service as a young man when he joined the volunteer fire department in Chico. He became a paramedic, then a firefighter and joined the Hayward Fire Department in 2005. Early in his career with HFD, he noticed that the department’s ventilation saws were stalling during operations due to tar build-up. On his own time, he fabricated a metal guard to protect the motor, a feature now used throughout the fire service. He also developed new hose rollers for HFD equipment, saving the city considerable cost in maintenance and equipment. Embracing the HFD commitment to community service, he has worked on the annual Toys for Kids Program and the charity golf tournament. He has re-

involved nine Bay Area municipalities and three countries. Largely as a result of her work, 15 suspects were taken into custody and three victims rescued from human trafficking. Officer Thomas put herself through a Drug Abuse Recognition Course and Narcotic Investigators School and has taught

Captain Joe Stilwell

sponsibility for the HFD’s popular 1923 Seagrave fire engine that is exhibited at community functions and which is representative of Hayward’s appreciation for its fire service and city history. Paramedics Plus is sponsor of the Firefighter of the Year award. Faye Thomas Police Officer of the Year Officer Faye Thomas began her law enforcement career at 16, when she began volunteering at the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office and, in 1999, was hired there as an administrative assistant. She later became a dispatcher and in 2009 became an officer with the Hayward Police Department. Over her two years in the HPD, she has consistently been a leader among her peers in arrests, citations and DUI suppression. In July 2010 she initiated a project that led to an investigation of human exploitation and trafficking that

Faye Thomas

coursework in drug trends and investigation to more than 100 HPD officers. She is also in demand as a speaker on child abduction issues and is a participant in Susan Komen Cancer Society fund-raisers. Her next goal is to obtain a law degree and earn a doctorate in international relations. This award is sponsored by St. Rose Hospital. For more information, call (510) 537-2424 or visit www.hayward.org


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February 10, 2012

Master Sudoku

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Sudoku Solutions on page 4

Word Search Places

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February 10, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY ANDREW REYNOLDS Come one, come all to Newark Memorial High School's student production of “The Butler Did It,” directed by Francis Vital, Tyler Lambert, and Jessica Cathcart. This spoof of English mysteries finds Miss Maple, a society dowager noted for her imaginative weekend parties, awaiting a group of detective writers invited to eerie Ravenswood Manor where they are to assume the personalities of their fictional characters. Then a real murder takes place and the guests realize they are all marked for death!

The Butler Did It February 10, 11, 17 and 18 7 p.m. Newark Memorial High School Black Box Theater 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 818-4386 www.nmhsdrama.com Tickets: $5

Democratic Party pre-endorsement SUBMITTED BY MARGARET HANLON-GRADIE Hayward Councilman Bill Quirk won a decisive victory on January 21, 2012, when 97 percent of local Democratic Party delegates voted to endorse him for the Assembly District 20 seat in the June 5, 2012 Primary. “This vote shows what local Democrat’s have known for a while: Bill Quirk is the best candidate to represent the Democratic Party’s values and platform,” said California State Treasurer and delegate Bill Lockyer. “I look forward to working with him in the Assembly.” “For decades, Bill’s supported Democrats by contributing financially to their campaigns, chairing election committees and phoning and canvassing voters. He’s worked to recruit and elect many Democrats up and down the ticket. Today, we got to support Bill Quirk,” said Alameda County Democratic Central

Committee Member Ginny DeMartini. The Democratic Party’s Pre-Endorsement Conference is the first official step in obtaining the Party’s endorsement. With California’s “top two” Primary, the Party’s endorsement is considered particularly important. The 20th Assembly District comprises Hayward, Union City, unincorporated Castro Valley, San Lorenzo, Ashland, Cherryland and Sunol, and the northern part of Fremont. Incumbent Mary Hayashi is termed-out and Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont), who endorses Quirk, is running in the “new” AD 25. “I am pleased and honored to receive the support of so many diverse Democrats from throughout the District. These are the Democrats I will turn to for counsel on my campaign and when I’m elected to the assembly,” said Quirk.

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Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD February 3: Officers responded to an attempted residential burglary and a completed residential burglary in the 35800 block of Mission Boulevard. The unknown suspect(s) entered one of the homes via an open window. One victim left her home for about 30 or 40 minutes, and returned to discover the burglary. Residential burglaries were reported at the 37000 Block of Panton Terrace, 35000 block of Mission Boulevard, and the 40000 block of Fremont Boulevard. No suspect information.

February 10, 2012

Five houses on Wabana Street were evacuated when water from a seven-foot diameter pipe flooded a portion of the street. The pipe runs along Interstate 680 and carries water from the Delta to Santa Clara County. Officers were on scene for three hours. Workers from the California Department of Water Resources cleaned up the debris. February 4: Residential Burglary - 35600 Block of Cabral - Loss to be determined. Several guests at Extended Stay America called to report a fight in a 3rd floor unit. One guest reported seeing three

males, one with a gun, flee towards the stairwell. Units surrounded the hotel and contact was made with the clerk. A check of the target room revealed the aftermath of a large, abandoned party. No victims were located, and no arrests were made. Investigation by Officer Holscher. A reporting party called in a vehicle bouncing off the center divider of the freeway and followed it to Milmont Business Park where the driver attempted to change a flat tire. Officer Settle responded and arrested an adult female for DUI. February 5: Fremont Fire requested assistance on a suspicious fire at the1300 block of Stevenson Boulevard. Several boxes and papers were smoldering on the patio of a residence when they

arrived. Fremont Fire personnel on scene could not determine the cause of the fire and suspected that it was intentionally set. Officer Francisco conducted the investigation. February 7: A residential burglary was reported at the Garden Village Apartments. Entry was made through a bedroom window. Loss is jewelry/electronics. The 44000 block of Topaz Court was the location of a residential burglary that occurred while victim was at work. Point of entry was an unlocked sliding rear door. Three rooms were ransacked, loss was jewelry. February 8: Officer Perry investigated an assault that left the victim with bleeding on his brain. The incident occurred on February 4 at Bully’s Bar. The victim, who

Shooting in Newark SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD February 7 A Federal agent was involved in a confrontation in the area of Mayhews Landing Road and Bettencourt Street at 5:53 a.m. during which gun shots were exchanged in front of his residence. One subject was seen fleeing on foot north on Mayhews Landing Road then getting into a vehicle that drove from the scene. Officers found the off-duty Federal Agent suffering from at least one gunshot wound. He was transported to the Trauma Center at the Eden Hospital. An investigation is ongoing with leads followed by detectives of the Newark Police Department with assistance of other local and federal agencies. No further information can be released as to motive or the victim’s medical status. The Newark Police Department can confirm the victim is a 61 year-old Newark resident employed with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Newark Police arrested Piedmont resident, Dennis D L Bagwell, age 61 in connection with the shooting. The suspect was tracked down and arrested and taken into custody without incident after a traffic stop in Union City. Even with the arrest, the investigation is ongoing with leads being followed up on by the Detectives of the Newark Police Department assisted by other local and federal agencies. No further information has been released as to motive, relation to the victim, or the victim’s medical status. Any person with any information concerning/witnessing this incident can contact the Detective Sergeant Mike Carroll at 510-578-4247. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

seemed to be minding his own business, was confronted and punched by a 44 year-old male. The victim was knocked out for three minutes. Officers continue to investigate. A reporting party on Parkmont Drive reported an exboyfriend kicking in the front door. While en route to the location officers were informed that the ex-boyfriend was inside the house, had the reporting party’s son and was suicidal. A contact team was formed and entry was made into the house. The exboyfriend was located in the front bedroom holding the 5 year-old child but had no weapons. The child was separated from the ex-boyfriend (also the father) who was taken into custody after a brief struggle.

Neighborhood Watch group formed Neighbors on Bridgeway Place are joining together to help make their community a safer place to live. This and all Neighborhood Watch meetings will be in coordination with the Newark Police Department. If you would like to attend this meeting or start a Neighborhood Watch in your area please contact: Tim Jones Special Assistant Community Engagement Division Newark Police Dept. (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org Its time to stand up to crime. Together we can make a difference!


February 10, 2012

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Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD February 3 At 12:14 p.m., officers responded to the area of Cherry and Auburn for a report of a male subject, who was seen entering an open garage door. Officers located and arrested Oscar Cortez, age 42 (Transient) for public intoxication. Officers accepted a citizen’s arrest of Giorgi Shampriani, age 23 (San Francisco) for petty theft from Macys. Shampriani was cited and released at the scene. Officers responded to a fight in progress in the parking lot of Home Town Buffet at 9:37 p.m. Jairo Saucedo, age 30 of San Jose and Erick Thomas, age 21 of Hayward were arrested. Both subjects were booked at Fremont Jail. Officers responded to a disturbance on Spruce Street at 3:40 a.m. While investigating the incident, Douglas Hawkins, age 19 of Newark was arrested for resisting/delaying officers in the performance of their duties and transported to Santa Rita jail. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500. February 5: A home burglary in the mid-block of Jonathan Drive was reported at 2:03 a.m. The homeowner called the police to report a suspect had just climbed into his residence through an open bathroom window. The suspect jumped back outside through the same window and fled on foot. Officer located the suspect running down the street about a block away from the scene. Kiniyate Carter, age 22, of Newark was arrested for burglary and booked at Fremont jail. At 12:03 p.m., Newark Police learned of a wanted subject inside the Mi Pueblo Supermarket on Newark Boulevard. Arrested without incident was Abel Ruiz, age 18 of East Palo Alto. East Palo Alto PD responded and took custody of Ruiz. Officers accepted a citizen’s arrest of Wai Tong of San Jose for Petty Theft from Macy’s at 3:11 p.m. He was cited and released at the scene. February 7: At 8:40 p.m., NPD Officers investigated a residential burglary at 37000 block of Spruce Street. Loss was jewelry and an IPod.

Stabbing in Union City SUBMITTED BY CMDR. KELLY MUSGROVE, UNION CITY PD On February 2, 2012, at 11:07 p.m., Union City police officers responded to the 32000 block of Crest Lane for a report of a stabbing. Officers located a 37 year-old male victim in the front yard of a residence who was suffering from a stab wound. The victim was transported to a local area hospital for non-life threatening injury. The victim and suspect were friends, speaking in the front yard prior to the stabbing. They became engaged in a verbal altercation and the suspect retrieved a knife from inside the home. The verbal argument escalated to a physical assault when the suspect stabbed the victim at least one time in the upper torso. The suspect fled from the area in the victim’s car. Other agencies within Alameda County were notified and the suspect was located in San Leandro. The San Leandro Police Department arrested the suspect and recovered the victim’s car. Kirk Robinson The suspect has been identified as Kirk Robinson, a 42 year-old Union City resident. Robinson was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon and vehicle theft. He is being held at the Fremont Jail. The victim is a resident of Union City. Anyone with information concerning this incident should contact Union City Police Department at 510- 17 471-1365. Anonymous tips regarding this incident can be made by calling 510-675-5207 or emailed to Tips@union-city.org.

Crime Alert - Senior Scams SUBMITTED BY TIM JONES, NEWARK PD The Newark Police Department wants to make you aware of a scam that targets senior citizens. This fraud is referred to as the “Western Union Grandmother/Grandfather” scam. This is a fraud in which a suspect telephones a victim, claiming to be a relative. The calls are intended to lower the victim’s guard using made up familiarity and frighten them into wiring money with the report of a tragedy. When a victim picks up the phone, she may hear something similar to, “Grandma! It’s me! I’m in jail.” The suspect addresses the victim in familiar terms—like “Grandma” or “Uncle”—to gain the victim’s confidence. The caller claims to be in some sort of peril at a distant location and in need of money immediately. For instance, the caller

claims to have been mugged or arrested while traveling on vacation. The suspect asks the victim to wire money by Western Union, Money Gram or similar means. The money is relayed electronically to a remote account, often out of the country. The caller will often express embarrassment and ask the victim to keep the information “just between us.” The Newark Police Department is advising people to be on guard for this scam. Anyone receiving a call that they suspect may be fraud can take the following steps to safeguard themselves: • Be wary of unsolicited calls requesting an urgent wire transfer of funds. • When receiving a suspicious call, don’t provide information and verify the caller. If the caller claims to be your son or granddaughter, ask, “Which one?” • Ask questions that you would

both know, but a stranger would not, like “What is the name of your dog?” or “Where did you go to elementary school?” • Call back the family member who claims to be in distress. Don’t ask the caller for the number; if you don’t have the number; call another family member for the number. • Scammers will often share information with each other about gullible victims. If you recognize the fraud, tell the caller you know it’s a scam, and then hang up. If you would like to start a Neighborhood Watch in your area to learn of crime trends and how to protect yourself and family from crime please contact: Tim Jones, Newark Police Department (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org It’s time to stand up to crime. Together we can make a difference!


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February 10, 2012

The Hayward Arts Council presents "Art: Believe/Achieve" a show by The National League of Pen Women, February 10 through March 30 at the John O'Lague Galleria. The National League of American Pen Women began in 1897 in Washington D.C. when three well-known professionals were denied access to the Press Club based on their gender. They formed an organization of women with achievements in letters, art, and music composition. Presently over 4,000 women meet for support and inspiration. A reception will be held at the John O'Lague Galleria on Friday, February 17 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. with music provided by Milt Bowerman. The public is welcome to attend. For information on this and other exhibits visit www.haywardarts.org or call the Hayward Arts Council at (510) 538-2787, Thursday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Art: Believe/Achieve February 10 through March 30 Monday – Friday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Reception: February 17 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. John O’Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall

777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

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The Chronicle's editor drew a connection between the list and the Occupy Wall Street movement in comments about the report, pondering whether the movement's spotlight on the nation's wealthiest individuals would encourage them to give more in 2012. “This year's survey indicates a healthy uptick in giving - the

highest level in three years. The increase is more likely a sign of economic improvements than a response to outside pressure to give more,” said Stacy Palmer, Chronicle editor. The top donor of 2011 was philanthropist Margaret A. Cargill of La Jolla, Calif., an agri-business heiress who died in 2006 but her estate put $6

billion into the two foundations she set up to support the arts, the environment, disaster relief and other causes, the Chronicle reported. Another bequest was responsible for the second largest donation in 2011. Pittsburgh steel executive William S. Dietrich II died last year and left $500 million to a foundation set up in

his name to support colleges and universities. No. 3 was Microsoft cofounder Paul G. Allen, who put $372.6 million into the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle's Experience Music Project and other charitable ventures. No. 4 was hedge fund financier George Soros, who donated $335 million to Open Society Foundations, which promote democracy around the world. New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is No. 5 on the list, for giving $311.3 million to a total of 1,185 nonprofits that

After IPO, Facebook will face new profit pressures

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Notre Dame finance professor Tim Loughran, who studies IPOs. Facebook stock probably won't begin trading until at least May, but analysts already believe the company will try to sell shares at a price that will give it a market value of at least $100 billion - more than Yahoo, AOL and Hewlett Packard Co. combined. To justify a valuation like that, Facebook will need to maximize its revenue to get closer to Google, one of its biggest rivals. Google's revenue of nearly $38 billion last year translated into about $35 per registered user. Facebook recorded $3.7 billion in revenue last year. The question is whether it can bring in more money without alienating the 845 million users who have become accustomed to hanging out with friends and family on the social network without an onslaught of ads. Part of that online environment has been by design. Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg wanted to get as many as people as possible to create profiles on the website before figuring out the best ways to profit from all the information about their interests and connections. In theory, those insights should enable Facebook to target ads to people most likely to be interested in certain products or services. That should appeal to marketers, giving the site enough leverage to charge more for its ads than other sites. If the ads work, Facebook should easily be able to increase

revenue per user to $10 to $12 annually, said Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter. Before Google went public, it also faced questions about its ability to make money from selling ads next to search results, in emails and within videos. Evidently most users don't mind because Google's annual revenue is now about 25 times higher than in 2003. Advertising isn't the only way Facebook can make money. It charges a commission for some of the sales of games and other services on its website. Although advertising accounted for 85 percent of Facebook's revenue last year, that was less than at Google, where ads accounted for 96 percent of revenue. Most of Facebook's non-advertising revenue comes from commissions paid by Zynga Inc., the maker of such popular Web games as CityVille and Words With Friends. In its IPO papers, Facebook says it may try to increase its revenue by introducing fees for other e-commerce features on its website. Facebook, which is based in Menlo Park, Calif., easily could offer sales of movies, music, even houses and cars. But believing it can expand into those markets requires a huge leap of faith, said Hudson Square Research analyst Daniel Ernst. “It's like saying because Chipotle has been good at selling burritos in certain urban markets in the U.S., it should be able to make more money selling Chinese food

in France,” he said. Facebook says roughly half its audience about 425 million people - now gets access to its service on smartphones, tablet computers and other mobile devices. But the site acknowledges it hasn't figured out the best way to make money from mobile users. The application-driven systems on mobile devices pose another threat because they could allow Zynga and other services to offer their own mobile apps to bypass Facebook and connect directly with users. The rise of mobile devices also opens up an opportunity for Google to expand the audience of Plus, its social networking alternative to Facebook. Although it hasn't done so yet, Google could make Plus part of the Android operating system that runs 250 million smartphones and tablets. Zuckerberg, Facebook's controlling shareholder as well as its leader, is promising to put users' interests ahead of the company's financial interests. “Simply put: We don't build services to make money; we make money to build better services,” Zuckerberg wrote in a letter included in Wednesday's IPO filing. “These days, I think more and more people want to use services from companies that believe in something beyond simply maximizing profits.” AP Technology Writer Barbara Ortutay in New York contributed to this report.

benefit the arts, human services, public affairs and other causes. The Chronicle creates it annual list by asking the nation's wealthiest people and America's biggest nonprofits to report on charitable giving. Not all donors disclose their giving publically, however, and the list does not include gifts from anonymous donors. The Chronicle reported 76 anonymous gifts of $1 million or more in 2011, which totaled $546 million.

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Medi-Cal co-payments were to start Oct. 1. State officials said they intend to appeal to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and others in President Barack Obama's administration. “We will be seeking a reversal of the ruling,” said Brown's finance spokesman, H.D. Palmer. “If this ruling were to stand, it's another instance where the state would be precluded from achieving savings the Legislature has approved.'' Advocates for the poor called it the right decision, saying the copays would have deterred people from seeking preventive treatments. “For a lot of folks, hearing $5 for a doctor visit or $3 for a prescription doesn't sound like a whole lot, but when you're talking about a person on Social Security who relies on five prescriptions and regular doctor visits or when you are talking about somebody living on $500 or $800 a month, that's a large percentage of their budget,'' said Vanessa Cajina, a legislative advocate for the Western Center on Law and Poverty.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187

February 10, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


February 10, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

Page 37

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

February 10, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


February 10, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2012-02-10  

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