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Being Safe With Sushi

Are there healthy, green-friendly mouthwashes?

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

January 20, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 6

BY MEKALA NEELAKANTAN

T

hrough March 31, the Milpitas Library will host a gallery display of pressed flower art by local artist Mr. Charles Xiao. Xiao, a former physician and Acupressure therapist, has created more than 100 pressed flower pieces

over the past ten years. In addition to a display at the Milpitas Phantom Gallery, his work has been showcased in several other galleries and libraries throughout the Bay Area. His knowledge, creativity, and techniques received outstanding reviews at the 2008 Worldwide Pressed Flower Guild Conference. Xiao’s work is known to be inventive and organic, incorporating different aspects of nature to preserve and celebrate their original beauty. Pressed flower art began in Europe and grew in popularity during the Victorian INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

age. Each pressed flower painting is created solely from natural elements such as flowers, branches, and leaves, except for the background painting on canvas. Besides any necessary trimming and shaping, the flowers and plants stay in their original state, transformed and arranged to create beautiful portraits, nature scenes, animals, and even human figures. Xiao’s introduction to pressed flower art came by accident when he visited a

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

continued on paage 9 Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Monday-Friday, Jan 17-Feb 29

Arabian Nights", "Twin Peaks Tunnel", "The Lucky Dog"

Saturday, Jan 21

Saturday, Jan 21

Saturday, Jan 21

Tide Pool Photo Outing

Danny Massing Concert $R

Paintings by Abdul S. Khusrawy

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411

2 p.m.

Musical celebration for 50th Anniversary

A Message from Congressman Pete Stark

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Display of paintings by Afghan artist

Fremont Cultural Arts Council 3375 Country Drive, Fremont

Saturday, Jan 21

Chinese New Year Celebration

Capture tide pools at the Fitzgerald Marine Preserve

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Friday, Jan 20

Music, dancing, crafts, treats

Saturday, Jan 21

Career and Community Resource Fair

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Ohlone Village Site Open House

8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Workshops and exhibits

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538

Vietnamese Tet Festival $

Saturday, Jan 21 - Sunday, Jan 22

11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Santa Clara County Fairgrounds

Friday, Jan 20

Welcoming Shabbat

7:30 p.m. Annual Jewish welcoming Sabbath service

Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley (510) 537-1787 Saturday, Jan 21

Saturday Night at the Movies Seventh Anniversary $

7:30 p.m.

Temple Beth Torah 4200 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 656-7141

344 Tully Road, San Jose (408) 295-9210 http://hoitetfairgrounds.org/

Yupo Workshop $R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Grace Rankin teaches watercolor techniques on Yupo paper

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

Town meeting to discuss Congress' top priorities

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600

10 a.m. - Noon and 1-3 p.m. Stroll through the marsh and tour the 2,400 year old Tuibun Ohlone village

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Jan 21

Water Birds $R

1 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan 21 - Sunday, Jan 22

9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Discover migratory and water birds along the shoreline trail. Adult only program

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

The Brotherhood of St. Anthony Annual Crab Cioppino Dinner January 28 at the Newark Pavillion 6430 Thornton Ave, Newark Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. Raffle, Cake Wheel, Auction We have the best crab cioppino cooks from Tracy, CA under the direction of Manuel Victoria Tickets: $40 per person For tickets please contact: Rose Ortiz @ (209) 818-1279 Sarah Gomes @ (209) 204-3380

"The Garden of Eden", The Palace of PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Sunday, January 22

Tuesday, Jan 24 Wednesday, Jan 25

Chinese New Year celebration

and

Noon – 3 p.m.

Auditions for The Adventures of Stuart Little $

Center Court

3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.newparkmall.com

Ages 8 - 18 years old read from a provided script

Keeping our Children Safe

SUBMITTED BY PAM MCDONALD Seniors have been invited to help Carlton Senior Living select “signature soups” at a contest to be held at its various senior living communities during the week of Sunday, January 22 to Saturday, January 28. Guests along with residents will have an opportunity to taste three soups and then vote for their favorite. The winning soup will be designated as the community’s Signature Soup and be rotated onto the community’s menu weekly throughout winter. The contest is being held to celebrate January as National Soup Month. Participants will be invited to take home a container of soup. Seniors interested in attending are asked to RSVP by Friday, January 20. For additional information, call 1-800-CARLTON (800-227-5866) or visit www.CarltonSeniorLiving.com.

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Tuesday, Jan 24

7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Conrad E. Anderson Auditorium Rooms A & B Washington Hospital (Washington West Bldg.) 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 624-4512 shfems@sbcglobal.net Sudoku Solutions

3 4 1 6 2 8 7 9 5

8 7 6 1 5 9 4 3 2

5 9 2 7 3 4 6 1 8

6 5 7 3 4 2 9 8 1

4 2 9 5 8 1 3 7 6

1 8 3 9 7 6 2 5 4

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C 0 B 5 1 2 D 8 9 4 7 6 3 F E A

7 4 6 2 B 0 A C 3 E D F 5 9 1 8

8 A D 3 E 9 F 7 2 1 C 5 4 6 0 B

5 C 2 6 D B 4 0 8 7 A 3 1 E F 9

4 3 0 E 7 8 9 2 1 B F C D A 6 5

F 7 A 9 6 C 1 3 D 5 E 2 8 B 4 0

D B 8 1 A 5 E F 6 9 0 4 7 2 C 3

A 5 1 C F 3 B E 4 0 9 7 6 8 D 2

2 E F 0 C 4 8 6 B A 3 D 9 7 5 1

6 8 4 B 9 1 7 D F 2 5 E A 0 3 C

January 20 2012

3 9 7 D 0 A 2 5 C 6 8 1 F 4 B E

0 D 5 8 4 E C 1 A F 6 9 B 3 2 7

B 6 C 7 2 F 5 9 E 3 1 8 0 D A 4

E F 9 4 3 7 0 A 5 D 2 B C 1 8 6

1 2 3 A 8 D 6 B 7 C 4 0 E 5 9 F

Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO

Senior soup tasting Thursday, January 26 11 a.m. Carlton Plaza San Leandro 1000 E. 14th St., San Leandro Saturday, January 28 2 p.m. Carlton Plaza Fremont 3800 Walnut Ave., Fremont

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info

SUBMITTED BY ISA POLT-JONES

B

eginning Wednesday, January 18, the East Bay Regional Park District’s nineteenth annual Trails Challenge is accepting registrations for 2012. The popular hiking program surpassed 10,000 participants in 2011. Residents of Alameda and Contra Costa County may register for free again this year, thanks to a partnership with Kaiser Permanente of Northern California and the Regional Parks Foundation. The Trails Challenge is a self-guided hiking program that gives participants an incentive to visit regional parks new to them, while promoting good health and conditioning through enjoyable outdoor exercise. Participants who register for the Trails Challenge will receive a free T-shirt and online access to the 2012 trail guidebook. The guidebook includes detailed trail descriptions as well as trails tips, driving directions, and maps for hikes in 20 different Regional Parks or Trails. Hikes range from easy to challengcontinued on page 29


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-area-news-groupmedianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website. www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999

We have over 963 signatures on change.org and over 1341 have signed a petition at our office and in the community. We need more signatures. You can come

to our office for a petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

Page 5


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 20, 2012

Washington Hospital Hosts Free Workshops for Women

A

19-year breast cancer survivor, Nesly Moquette knows firsthand that battling cancer can be rough. That’s why she is an American Cancer Society (ACS) volunteer, organizing group workshops for the “Look Good…Feel Better” program at the Washington Women’s Center and other East Bay locations. “After I went through cancer treatments, I wanted to provide positive support to others who were fighting the disease,” she recalls. “I worked with the American Cancer Society’s Reach for Recovery program for many years. Then when they launched the Look Good… Feel Better program several years ago, I decided to help with that, too. I lost some of my hair because of chemotherapy, so I know that changes in your appearance can be disheartening. I think people recover better when they look better, which is the objective of Look Good…Feel Better.” Look Good…Feel Better is a collaborative effort of the ACS, the Personal Care Products Council Foundation and the National Cosmetology Association (NCA). The program is a free, nonmedical service to help women with cancer improve their appearance and self-esteem, enabling them to manage their treatment and recovery with greater confidence. Small group workshops provide hands-on instruction on makeup, skin care and nail care, as well as ways to deal with hair loss by using wigs, turbans and scarves. The program also provides free makeup kits with products from well-known companies and high-quality wigs. Washington Hospital has been hosting Look Good…Feel Better “makeover” workshops led by Moquette and Shirley Fraga, a licensed esthetician whose husband is a cancer survivor, for small groups of women for many years.

“The workshops are open to all women with cancer who are undergoing radiation therapy, chemotherapy or other treatments,” says Washington Women’s Center Coordinator Kathy Hesser, RN. “The workshops are for

due to their treatments, having the right wig and sensitive cosmetics can help them maintain their dignity and confidentiality,” Hesser explains. “They don’t want to be seen and known just as a cancer patient. I’ve seen some patients

Breast cancer survivor Nesly Moquette is an American Cancer Society (ACS) volunteer, organizing group workshops for the “Look Good…Feel Better” program at the Washington Women’s Center.To register for a workshop call 1-800-227-2345.

women only. A female translator or caregiver may accompany the patient. Male companions are welcome to relax in one of the coffee shops or cafés located adjacent to the Women’s Center.” Hair loss and skin problems caused by radiation and chemotherapy not only may detract from cancer patients’ appearance, but also may expose them to unwanted scrutiny from other people, according to Hesser. “For women with cancer who are losing their hair or who have skin problems

with these wigs, and I didn’t even know they were wigs. They come in a variety of styles and color preferences, and the esthetician can help personalize the style of the wig. She also can teach participants how to draw in eyebrows, camouflage unusual skin pigmentation and tie on headscarves. It really is a very special program that helps women learn to care for themselves.” Look Good…Feel Better workshops currently take place in the Washington Women’s Center in the Washington

West Building at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. The free workshops for the coming year are scheduled for Monday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. on the following dates: • January 23 • March 19 • June 11 • August 13 • October 15 • November 26 Workshops are scheduled during the evenings so they won’t interfere with daytime work schedules or doctor appointments. Because the size of the workshops is limited, registration is required. Individual consultations with a volunteer cosmetologist also may be available for cancer patients who are unable to attend a group workshop. “Our goal is to provide a comfortable environment where women can feel safe asking questions and trying cosmetic products and wigs,” says Moquette. “I even bring in my prosthesis and the sleeve I wear to avoid lymphedema so the women can see what they look like. “We generally start with the makeup session first, and then try wigs on at the end,” she adds. “The one thing we love more than anything else is to meet a woman who comes in with no hair and help her find the perfect wig. And the reactions from the husbands are wonderful, too!” To register for a workshop or inquire about other Look Good…Feel Better services such as individual consultations or free wigs, call 1-800-227-2345. For more information about the Look Good…Feel Better program, visit the ACS Web site at www.cancer.org or www.lookgoodfeelbetter.org. A Look Good…Feel Better for Men brochure is available at www.lookgoodfeelbetterformen.org.


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Read our Ads for the answers

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Across 1 Free appetizer when you purchase a(n) _______ (6) 5 ____ offers a free home value estimation (4) 6 All-you-can-eat pizza every ___________ (9) 10 Warns against travel scams (2,6) 12 Where you can get a complimentary initial exam (11) 15 Jewelry By _______ appraises, sells, and repairs (6) 16 Helps you focus on the important things in life (5) 17 Church of _____ in Fremont (6) 19 Behind Dale Hardware (5) 20 Offers free x-ray and exam (8) 21 This club has an all-you-can-eat buffet (8) 24 Dream weddings don't just happen, they are ______ (7) 26 ________: The Modern Science of Mental Health (9) 27 Click here for Victorian elegance (8) 28 Friday Night ______ (5) 29 Ensure your bike with ______ (5)

Down 2 Mt. _____, since 1860 (4) 3 Offers free initial consultation (4) 4 Needs volunteer drivers (4,9) 7 Will advertise your vehicle (5,9) 8 Antique Treasures _____ Showcase (4) 9 Bistro brings flavors of ________ to you (7) 11 This center has been around since 1959 (9) 13 Everything that's California Cool (6) 14 Went to University of Illinois College of Law (3,4) 18 Free electric ________ for new patients (10) 20 Program at Mission Peak Fitness (7) 22 Find feather extensions here (7) 23 Mention ________ to AutoMotivated and get 10% off labor (6) 24 Minuteman Press designs, _____ and delivers (6) 25 Fremont Health ____ offers a variety of massages (3)

Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. There are two monthly prize puzzles (a Tuesday edition and a Friday edition). Enter both to increase your chances of winning! All entries will be eligible for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize! MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Or fax to: (510) 796-2462 Deadline for entry is the 5th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper.

Jan 20, 2012 Puzzle

Name:

Phone:

Email:


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 20, 2012 Tribune Media Services

The Palace of Arabian Knights (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M. Twin Peaks Tunnel (NR) The Lucky Dog (NR)

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Underworld: Awakening (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:00 Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 3:00, 6:40, 9:40 Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) The Girl With the Dragon Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35 Tattoo (R)Fri. - Thu. 3:05, 6:55, 10:20 Underworld: The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Awakening 3D (R) Fri. - Thu. Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 5:00, 10:10

2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG–13) Fri.

4:10, 7:10, 10:10

The Girl With the Dragon Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:15, Tattoo (R)Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 12:00, 12:30, 2:00, 3:10, 4:35, 5:45, 7:45, 4:00, 8:00 Sat. 4:00, 8:00

8:45, 10:25

Beauty and the Extremely Loud & Fri. - Thu. 12:25 Incredibly Close (PG–13) Fri. The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu. - Thu. 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7:05, 9:20 The Iron Lady (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55 Underworld: Awakening (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 5:25, 10:35 Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Haywire (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45 2:00, 3:25, 4:50, 6:15, 7:35, 9:05, 10:30 Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Beauty and the Beast (G) 12:40, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05 Fri. - Thu. 2:00 Enteng ng Ina mo (NR) Fri. The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu. Thu. 10:45, 1:10, 3:35, 6:00, 8:25, 10:50 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 10:00 Nanban (NR)Fri. - Thu. 1:30, 6:05, Underworld: Awakening (R) 10:00 Fri. - Thu. 2:45 The Flowers of War (R) Fri. Haywire(R)Fri. - Thu. 12:20, 2:50, - Thu. 12:00, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 5:20, 7:50, 10:20 The Adventures of Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Tintin 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 2:25, 7:35 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 2:50, 4:20, 6:40, Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35

Beast (G)

8:30, 9:00

Secret of the Rocket (NR)

Fri. 11:00, 12:00, 2:30 Sat. 12:30, 2:30 Sun. 12:30, 3:30 Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00

10:55, 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:40

Fri. - Thu. 1:45

7:30, 9:10, 9:50

Underworld: Awakening 3D (R) Fri. - Thu.

11:00, 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 6:00, 7:00,

Sat. 11:00, 1:45, 2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00, 10:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 2:00, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00

Contraband (R) Fri. & Sat.

Beauty and the Beast (G)

Fri. - Thu. 12:10, 4:50, 9:30

The Devil Inside (R) Fri. 11:00,

1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50, 12:01 Sat. 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50

Underworld: Awakening (R) Underworld: Awakening 3D (R) Fri. & Sat.

11:00, 12:25, 1:50, 4:40, 6:15, 7:30, 10:20

Sat. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40, 12:15

11:15, 12:30, 1:50, 3:05, 4:25, 5:40, 7:00, 8:15, 9:35, 10:50, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 12:30, 1:50, 3:05, 4:25, 5:40, 7:00, 8:15, 9:35

Sun. 4:15 P.M.

Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:10

& Sat. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45

Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 12:30, 2:50, 3:35, 5:10, Joyful Noise (PG–13) Fri. &

Cosmos 360(NR)Sat. 6:30, 8:30 Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M.

Extremely Loud & Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. Incredibly Close (PG–13) Fri. We Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 4:45, 7:35, 10:25 - Thu. 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10 Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG–13) Fri. 11:05, 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15 - Thu. 12:40, 4:00, 7:15, 10:20 Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 2:10, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05 War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 6:00 Haywire (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 2:40, Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu.

Alvin and the Chipmunks: 5:15, 7:40, 10:00 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 2:10, 4:25, 6:50, 9:05 Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Sherlock Holmes: A Game 11:00, 1:55, 4:45, 7:35, 10:25 of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Beauty and the Beast (G)

Thu. 11:15, 4:25

Fri. 1:00 P.M.

12:10, 2:45, 5:00, 7:20, 9:35 Thu. 12:10, 2:45, 5:00, 7:20

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG–13) Fri.

War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. The Adventures of 11:00, 2:15, 5:30 (PG) Fri. Wed. 11:15, Tintin 3D 4:25, 10:00 The Iron Lady (PG–13) Fri. &

Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00 A.M. To Be an Astronaut (NR)

The Metropolitan Opera: Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. The Enchanted Island 3:15, 9:05 12:15, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 Live (NR) Sat. 9:55 The Metropolitan Opera: Mission: Impossible -- Ghost The Enchanted Island Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:35, 3:45, 7:05, 10:10 Live (NR) Sat. 9:55 The Adventures of Tintin(PG)

11:00, 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:15, 11:30 Fri. - Thu. 2:55, 8:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:15

Haywire (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 1:50, 4:15, 7:20, 10:15

Fri. 1:00, 3:30 Sat. 1:00, 4:30 Sun. 1:30 P.M. Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

Underworld: Awakening 3D (R) Fri. - Thu.

Underworld: Awakening 3D (R) Fri. & Sat.

Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 4:40, 9:20

Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) 8:15, 10:30

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Wed.

The Adventures of Tintin(PG)

Fri. & Sat. 2:00, 7:10, 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 2:00, 7:10

We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 2:25, 5:20, 8:15, 11:10 Underworld: Awakening (R) Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:25, 5:20, 8:15

11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:35

War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 5:10 Astronaut (NR) Fri. 4:30 P.M. Sat. 11:30, 3:30 The Iron Lady (PG–13) Fri. & Sun. 11:30, 2:30

Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:05, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55 Sat. 4:35, 7:20, 9:55 Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 11:55, 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20

The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:10

Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

& Sat. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45, 11:25 Sun. - Thu. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G)Fri. - Thu. 11:25 Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 1:05,

Beauty and the Beast (G)

Fri. - Thu. 1:20

Fri. & Sat. 11:30, 1:45, 4:00, 6:15, 8:30, 10:45 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 1:45, 4:00, 6:15, 8:30

11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15, Haywire (R)Fri. & Sat. 12:00, 2:20, 12:30 4:40, 7:00, 9:20, 11:40 Fri. 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15, 11:30 Sun. - Thu. 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 Sat. 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 11:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, Red Tails (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 8:00, 10:15 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Enteng ng Ina mo (NR) Fri. Hugo (PG) Fri. - Thu. 4:50 11:30, 1:55, 4:20, 7:00, 9:25, 11:50 The Sitter (R)Fri. & Sat. 8:45, 10:55 Sat. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 Sun. - Thu. 8:45 Alvin and the Chipmunks: Business Man (NR) Fri. & Sat. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. & Sat. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30, 11:55 Sun. - Thu. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50 Sun. - Thu. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 The Flowers of War (R) Fri. Sherlock Holmes: A Game - Thu. 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10 of Shadows (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Hugo 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 7:45 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45 The Adventures of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:25, Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40 4:35, 9:45 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45 Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:20, 2:30, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:40, 11:50 Protocol (PG–13) Fri. & Sun. - 7:10, Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:20, 2:30, 3:40, Thu. 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 Sat. 10:15, 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 6:00, 7:10, 8:20

Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:25, The Girl With the Dragon 12:45, 2:00, 3:25, 4:35, 6:00, 7:25, Tattoo (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:10, 3:35, 8:45, 10:05 7:00, 10:25

The Metropolitan Opera: The Enchanted Island Live (NR) Sat. 9:55


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Pressed Flower Art Display, continued from page 1 woman’s home in Hayward. Noticing a pressed flower painting, he asked where he could buy such a painting. The woman did not have an answer, so Xiao decided to create the art on his own. With no formal training, Xiao began to make his pressed flower paintings. “I love nature so much, and pressed flower art is a wonderful way to keep nature from going away, because nothing can replace nature’s beauty and quality,” says Xiao. “If I can maintain nature’s original color and life and transform them into pictures, it could be a wonderful creation.” According to Xiao, one piece of pressed flower art may take weeks or even months to complete. The process begins by collecting and drying various flowers and plants; many are too withered or faded to be used. The most wellpreserved specimens are selected. Nature’s creations are the center of attention in Xiao paintings: a waterfall scene with rocks formed by pressed mushroom caps, a peacock made entirely of feathers and different parts of flowers and plants, and an under-the-sea scene in which each fish is created by using a single flower petal. When asked which creation is his favorite, Xiao points to a beautiful painting of a hawk devouring salmon, explaining how he created the piece, even using hibiscus flowers to create the hawk’s talons. “My dream is to publish a book about the lost art of pressed flowers, writing about the procedures, the history, and giving a step-by-step demonstration.” Xiao’s art will be on display in the Milpitas Library’s display cases and the south

wing until March 31. There is no entrance fee; the exhibit is open during gallery operating hours. Pressed Flower Art Display at Milpitas Library Through March 31 Monday-Thursday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday: Noon to 6 p.m. Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

January 20, 2012

Obituaries

Robert A. Souza William J. Stout RESIDENT OF UNION CITY March 3, 1925-December 30, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 26, 1921 - January 9, 2012

Sherri Anderson

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 10, 1937 - January 9, 2012

RESIDENT OF WALNUT CREEK April 3, 1953 - January 13, 2012

Diane Marie Navas RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 9, 1944 - January 15, 2012

Welton Duffey, Jr.

L

occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Alice Soong

Joseph L. Reichmuth

Obituary RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 30, 1915 - January 10, 2012

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that

RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 8, 1941 - January 8, 2012

RESIDENT OF NEWARK January 20, 1925 - January 16, 2012

Delfina Reyna RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 13, 1941 - January 18, 2012

Nick Nardo

Nauroz A, Sheikh RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON September 7, 1934 - January 10, 2012

Sr. Jean Marie Des Jardins RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 7, 1919 - January 12, 2012

Roy K. Akaba RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 20, 1934 - January 14, 2012

Dollie L. Faria RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 7, 1955 - January 15, 2012

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Janice Louise Searls RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 25, 1943 - January 17, 2012

Clarence N. Dutra RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 31, 1912 - January 17, 2012

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont


January 20, 2012

SUBMITTED BY STEVE SCHAEFER Alameda, California-based Red Paint is releasing their first CD, “American Tender.” The official CD release party takes place on Saturday, January 21 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at High Street Station in Alameda. At the event, the group will play through the new CD, in order, and in a second set debut some fresh, original material slated for the second CD, along with a few favorite covers. See the High Street Station website at http://www.highstreetstationcafe.com for event in-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

formation and directions. Contact the band directly at redpaint@mindspring.com to be added to the Evite invitation list. Space at High Street Station is limited, so if you want to go, sign up now. Red Paint was formed in October 2006. Members include Colin Close (lead vocal, rhythm guitar), Shaun Reid (lead guitar), Steve Schaefer (bass), and Tony Herrin (drums). The band plays about half original material and half carefully selected covers. The vast majority of the original songs are composed by Colin. Musical influences include Little Feat, the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, and the Who, among others. The band’s sound mixes rock with a little country, a little blues, and a surprise hint of punk, blended into a satisfying taste of Americana. See Red Paint’s Facebook Page (www.facebook.com/redpaintmusic) for information and some studio-recorded musical samples. Copies of the new 11-song CD will be available at the event at a special event-only price of just $5.

High Speed Rail Board re-affirms Antelope Valley route SUBMITTED BY RACHEL WALL After re-evaluating route options for the Central Valley-to-Los Angeles Basin segment of California’s

high speed rail system, the California High-Speed Rail Authority’s Board decided on January 12, continued on page 13

Page 11 11 Page


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 20, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 www.sshsa.org

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 pm October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net 510-656-2521 FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. A.M.A.C. The new Conservative AARP.Now over 200,000 members. ATTENTION-Lions, Rotary, TEA, VFW, American Legion, SIRS. Speakers available. Call to schd., Jan-April 510-938-1118 amacwest@aol.com Association of Mature American Citizens’ Go to our Website www.amac.us

Fremont Cribbage Club Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

New Fremont Chess Club www.newfremontchessclub.org

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-623-9935

Serious Mental Illness FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Sat., Jan 7, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email: joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Jazzinators East Bay Youth Jazz Band Tues 11/1 & 15 & 12/13 & 27 Bronco Billy’s, Irvington 7-8pm - No Cover chg. https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Mission Gold Jazz Band at Swiss Park 1st & 3rd Wed. 7-9pm

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org


January 20, 2012

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Starts on Thurs, Oct 27th Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 PM. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

High Speed Rail Board re-affirms Antelope Valley route

continued from page 11

2012, to continue moving forward with a proposed route through Palmdale. “After reviewing the study results and listening to comments from the communities, it’s very clear keeping the route in the Antelope Valley is the right decision,” said Board Chair Thomas J. Umberg. “The excitement we have seen out of Palmdale and their commitment to promote a strong system is exactly the kind of partnership we appreciate as we work to develop this critical statewide project.” The Authority recently re-examined the Central Valley-to-Los Angeles Basin segment, including a route along I-5 in Southern California that extends over the Grapevine. The Grapevine alignment was originally studied in the 2003-2005 Statewide Programmatic Environmental Review and did not advance because preliminary information suggested it could cost more than the Antelope Valley route. “Due to many changes which had occurred over time, we had to consider as many alternatives as possible to ensure the best statewide system possible,” said Roelof van Ark, CEO of the Authority. “We conducted a conceptual study to update the engineering data from 2005 to see if the Grapevine route would save us time, distance and money. This was a prudent time to re-evaluate both routes, which have changed since the initial studies. “This re-evaluation makes it clear that running the train through the Antelope Valley will connect people in one of the

county’s fastest-growing areas, have fewer environmental impacts and afford more flexibility in route selection,” van Ark said. Work on the two alignments in the Antelope Valley continued while the conceptual study was underway. Elected officials, including the mayors of Lancaster, Palmdale and Santa Clarita and Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael Antonovich, expressed support for the Antelope Valley route as the meeting approached. More than 300 people attended the January 12 meeting held at the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s

Page 13

board room; almost 100 spoke on this decision. “The results of this most recent study, along with feedback from residents of the area, have made it clear that this will be the most operationally successful alignment and serve to the great benefit of the region,” said Umberg. In a non-action item, the Board discussed its Strategic Energy Plan and sustainability framework. The Plan includes strategies for powering the highspeed train on 100 percent renewable energy in a cost-effective manner and the sustainability framework coordinates their implementation. It was developed by the Sustainability Partnership, collaboration between the Authority, the Federal Railroad Administration, Housing and Urban Development, Region 9, and other governmental bodies. About 120 small business owners, mostly from Los Angeles County, visited a separate conference room at the event to ask Authority representatives questions about its Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program and to receive contracting opportunity information. The program was developed to ensure small businesses in California are able to access contracts related to the construction of high-speed rail. The Authority has called for a 30 percent goal for small business involvement in the project. For more information, visit www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov


Page 14

Short sale vs foreclosure SUBMITTED BY ELAINE WONG-BIGEL The Rotary Club of Fremont, Union City and Newark is sponsoring a free community housing-awareness seminar, "Short Sale vs Foreclosure," on January 31, 2012, at 7 p.m. Homeowners may have the option of a short sale to avoid foreclosure. The property is sold for less than the outstanding mortgage. The lender will pay selling fees and it will not cost the borrower/seller anything. A short sale can save the homeowner's credit score. The lender may even pay moving expenses through the Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives, a federal program. Anyone, who is unable to maintain their mortgage commitment and has not entered the foreclosure process, should find out more about available options. Do not lose your home to foreclosure. Call 1-800-238-8388 ext 3 to register for the seminar. Space is limited to 30 attendees. Short sale vs Foreclosure Tuesday, January 31 7 - 8 p.m. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room B 2450 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont 1-(800) 238-8388 ext 3

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 20, 2012

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 12 Highest $: 675,000 Median $: 400,000 Lowest $: 142,500 Average $: 429,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

4825 Audrey Drive 17769 Camelot Lane 3979 Clara Lee Lane 2247 Lessley Avenue 3643 Northwood Drive 4993 Proctor Road 22024 Queen Street 4135 Veronica Avenue 4252 Veronica Avenue 2983 Wisteria Lane 25518 Conley Downs Drive 18543 Mountain Lane

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

675,000 625,000 448,500 241,000 400,000 535,000 142,500 339,000 335,000 370,000 487,000 550,000

3 5 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

3128 3529 906 1533 2450 1264 1353 1223 1802 1537 2376

1920 1988 1948 1953 2000 1947 1958 1952 1979 1998 1967

12-09-11 12-05-11 12-07-11 12-07-11 12-08-11 12-05-11 12-08-11 12-09-11 12-12-11 12-06-11 12-09-11 12-09-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 58 Highest $: 1,550,000 Median $: Lowest $: 154,000 Average $: ADDRESS

37890 3rd Street 4201 Canfield Drive 36417 Diego Drive 37170 Dondero Way 3188 Fairfax Court 38730 Huntington Circle 3404 Isherwood Place 3321 Kipling Place 4491 Maybeck Terrace 37308 Normandy Terrace 4177 Patricia Street 3312 Red Cedar Terrace 4314 Ribera Street 38590 Royal Ann Common 3546 Sequoia Common 3561 Shadowbrook Terrace 3582 Sutton Loop 38680 Tyson Lane 38780 Tyson Lane #105C 1008 Vardin Terrace 4161 Vincente Street 4141 Wakefield Loop 4403 Amador Road 5637 Antone Road 39139 Argonaut Way #110 39431 Blacow Road 4918 Boone Drive 5488 Crimson Circle 3639 Dickenson Common 3161 Estero Terrace 39219 Guardino Drive #167 3601 Howe Court 4463 Hyde Common #134 39113 Logan Drive 41626 Mahoney Street 39373 Monterey Way 3244 Rockett Drive 43638 Salem Way 5555 Starfire Circle 995 Bajada Court 370 Carmelita Place

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539

SOLD FOR BDS

350,000 655,000 405,000 199,000 430,000 235,000 540,000 585,000 565,000 460,000 465,000 154,000 390,000 221,500 450,000 450,000 510,000 785,000 160,000 540,000 373,000 465,000 365,000 428,000 191,000 390,000 360,000 590,000 440,000 622,000 185,000 345,000 333,500 435,000 635,000 346,000 264,500 389,000 507,000 940,000 826,000

5 3 3 2 3 2 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 1 3 4 3 4 4 1 3 4 4 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 3

460,000 506,457

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

594 1760 1339 747 1523 840 1714 1714 1917 1537 1344 840 1256 1180 1864 1864 1895 2386 870 1610 1387 1645 1946 1324 1221 1584 1321 1614 1448 844 1640 1244 1308 1366 1948 950 1314 1422 2304 1689

1962 1954 1952 1972 1989 1971 1971 2008 1997 1960 1986 1967 1971 2005 2005 1963 2001 1982 1995 1967 1964 1961 1963 1974 1963 1960 1994 1997 1987 1958 2009 1960 1956 1961 1954 1960 1994 1966 1967

12-15-11 12-09-11 12-08-11 12-14-11 12-08-11 12-15-11 12-06-11 12-06-11 12-13-11 12-08-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-14-11 12-06-11 12-06-11 12-08-11 12-09-11 12-07-11 12-15-11 12-14-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-07-11 12-05-11 12-06-11 12-12-11 12-08-11 12-08-11 12-08-11 12-15-11 12-13-11 12-06-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-08-11 12-08-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-12-11 12-14-11

715 Cochise Court 402 Craycroft Drive 711 Gable Drive 223 Mission Tierra Place 48998 Oat Grass Terrace 491 Pariso Terrace 43855 Paso Pino Common 264 Sequim Common 1998 Sioux Drive 32759 Clear Lake Street 3680 Cormorant Terrace 33155 Falcon Drive 3325 Hogarth Place 33197 Lake Superior Place 4467 MacBeth Circle 34187 O'Neil Terrace 5913 Tan Oak Drive

94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

724,500 935,000 726,000 1,550,000 715,000 688,000 642,500 260,000 945,000 492,000 490,000 730,000 554,000 355,000 500,000 678,000 410,000

4 4 5 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 2

1787 3123 1892 3363 2006 1472 897 2753 1871 1855 2762 1673 1444 1717 1857 1231

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 45 Highest $: 663,000 Median $: Lowest $: 90,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

22530 3rd Street #103 94541 647 Atherton Place #408 94541 3141 Atwal Court 94541 24162 Dawson Court 94541 20772 Grove Park Place #7 94541 19425 Hathaway Avenue 94541 2778 Hidden Lane 94541 654 Kingsford Way 94541 334 Lion Street 94541 22001 Rio Vista Street 94541 1870 Sally Creek Circle 94541 1755 Santa Cruz Way 94541 467 Shirley Avenue 94541 2785 Sulphur Drive 94541 121 West Blossom Way 94541 26971 Hayward Boulevard 94542 1632 Highland Boulevard 94542 1029 Major Avenue 94542 32283 Amelia Avenue 94544 16 Becker Place 94544 31285 Birkdale Way 94544 252 Cooper Avenue 94544 25444 Donald Avenue 94544 27239 Dunbar Place 94544 260 Ebony Way 94544 565 Evangeline Way 94544 1043 Folsom Avenue 94544 147 Goodwin Street 94544 27408 Hemlock Ranch Road 94544 31484 Meadowbrook Avenue 94544 24389 Thomas Avenue 94544 1157 Buchanan Way 94545 1888 Catalpa Way 94545 2019 Chiplay Court 94545 27654 Cliffwood Avenue 94545 25091 Copa Del Oro Drive #10394545 27653 Gainesville Avenue 94545 27591 La Porte Avenue 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

151,000 235,000 663,000 490,000 181,000 230,500 315,000 235,000 188,000 295,000 249,000 300,000 240,000 400,000 160,000 345,000 450,000 280,000 235,000 280,000 235,000 230,000 238,000 160,000 300,000 200,000 330,000 265,000 460,000 295,000 130,000 365,000 250,000 315,000 335,000 115,000 263,000 240,000

2 3 5 4 2 3 3 3 2 4 2 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 4 3 5 3 2 4 3 3 3 2 3 3

1978 2008 1973 2004 2008 2006 1985 1978 1976 1990 1979 1976 1969 1984 1990 2007

12-14-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-14-11 12-15-11 12-13-11 12-13-11 12-13-11 12-13-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-13-11 12-14-11 12-15-11 12-09-11

263,000 276,744

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1200 1224 4500 2363 1328 1519 1457 1381 951 2000 1561 1824 1634 2304 1182 1662 1551 1050 1164 1172 1252 1160 952 986 1506 1469 1736 1679 2360 1161 816 2404 1217 1128 1479 958 1497 1479

1994 1997 2008 2000 2005 1955 1952 2003 1950 1896 1979 1952 1951 1968 1952 2007 1948 1951 1955 1955 1955 1961 1950 1950 1980 1955 1991 1952 2000 1955 1924 1984 1963 1957 1955 1986 1955 1955

12-14-11 12-06-11 12-05-11 12-05-11 12-06-11 12-06-11 12-05-11 12-09-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-06-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-06-11 12-09-11 12-14-11 12-13-11 12-12-11 12-13-11 12-06-11 12-08-11 12-05-11 12-08-11 12-08-11 12-13-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-14-11 12-09-11 12-14-11 12-15-11 12-06-11


January 20, 2012 27872 Miami Avenue 24786 Mulberry Street 24787 Mulberry Street 2007 Rock Springs Drive 1234 Stanhope Lane #168 1875 Tulip Avenue 1860 Grove Way

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546

225,000 280,000 325,000 365,000 90,000 280,000 240,000

3 3 3 4 2 3 4

1000 1614 1215 2000 1007 1224 3118

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 916,000 Median $: Lowest $: 167,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

705 Coyote Street 943 Erie Circle 317 Junipero Drive #3 946 Kristin Ridge Way 1055 North Abbott Avenue 103 Serenity Place 1825 Yosemite Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

425,000 400,000 167,000 916,000 300,000 283,500 480,000

3 2 2 4 3 2 4

ZIP

6717 Baine Avenue 94560 6446 Buena Vista Drive #A 94560 39953 Cedar Boulevard #223 94560 36616 Darvon Street 94560 36211 Indian Wells Drive 94560 6282 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #B94560 6222 Mayhews Landing Road 94560 36837 Newark Boulevard #B 94560 36225 Ruschin Drive 94560 35344 Rutland Court 94560 6263 Thornton Avenue 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

250,000 190,000 178,000 350,000 429,000 160,000 310,000 224,000 315,000 580,000 365,000

3 2 2 3 4 2 3 3 3 4 2

ZIP

999 Arbor Drive 94577 992 Arthur Avenue 94577 1488 Bancroft Avenue 94577 261 Belleview Drive 94577 140 Breed Avenue 94577 1400 Carpentier Street #313 94577 14149 Doolittle Drive #16 94577 1110 Midway Avenue 94577 347 Parrott Street 94577 13970 Samoa Road 94577 1229 Sandelin Avenue 94577 1958 Sundberg Avenue 94577 1345 148th Avenue 94578 1596 166th Avenue 94578 2184 167th Avenue 94578 16006 East 14th Street #204 94578 15065 Hesperian Boulevard #2694578 2011 Placer Drive 94578 15281 Upton Avenue 94578 14662 Bethany Street 94579 1579 Boxwood Avenue 94579 15308 Churchill Street 94579 15303 Dewey Street 94579 15450 Farnsworth Street 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

499,000 190,000 465,000 305,000 306,500 182,000 130,000 225,000 170,000 320,000 400,000 270,000 310,000 225,000 175,000 114,000 125,000 240,000 279,500 230,500 260,000 268,000 165,000 324,500

4 4 6 3 3 2 2 2 2 4 3 3 4 4 2 2 2 3 4 3 3 2 3 3

15230 Hardin Street 2258 Mariner Way 1024 Marquette Way 1432 Sayre Street 773 Woodgate Court

BUILT

CLOSED

1964 1984 1971 1993 1979 2000 1967

12-21-11 12-21-11 12-22-11 12-20-11 12-23-11 12-23-11 12-22-11

ZIP

985 Hacienda Avenue 16527 Kent Avenue 2023 Via Amigos 15857 Via Arroyo 15925 Via Del Sol 17368 Via Julia 1399 Via Lucas

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1040 1031 1071 1190 1464 905 1238 1383 1136 1970 1132

1958 1985 1985 1954 1963 1982 1953 1987 1960 1970 1924

12-07-11 12-15-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-14-11 12-07-11 12-09-11 12-13-11 12-07-11 12-08-11

260,000 259,397

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

4018 1230 2738 1471 1296 1406 1047 845 1018 1466 2136 1092 2118 1304 884 901 822 746 1760 1081 1121 1233 1415 1190

1986 1942 1951 1940 1920 1983 1973 1942 1924 1961 1941 1953 1939 1926 1942 1985 1952 1952 1951 1954 1950 1950 1956

12-12-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-06-11 12-14-11 12-08-11 12-05-11 12-14-11 12-05-11 12-09-11 12-14-11 12-13-11 12-09-11 12-13-11 12-12-11 12-07-11 12-06-11 12-08-11 12-08-11 12-14-11 12-14-11 12-15-11 12-06-11

265,000 480,000 82,000 320,000 196,500

3 4 3 3 2

1241 2136 1386 1125 1167

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

245,000 195,000 310,000 175,000 285,000 267,000 350,000

3 4 3 3 3 3 3

33636 4th Street 32214 Allison Drive 34233 Arizona Street 32625 Brenda Way #2 32492 Deborah Drive 247 Galano Plaza 4501 MacKinaw Street 2974 Mallorca Way 122 Marge Court 30359 Meridien Circle 32781 Moccasin Street 5408 New Harbor Way 2639 Oregon Street 1145 Platinum Street 4135 Polaris Avenue 4362 Queensboro Way 31361 Santa Elena Way 3271 Santa Susana Way 523 Tamarack Drive #12 30681 Tidewater Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

245,000 440,000 429,000 150,000 420,000 168,000 525,000 655,000 222,000 649,000 308,000 735,000 390,000 627,000 220,000 430,000 260,000 360,000 130,000 620,000

3 4 3 2 5 2 5 4 3 4 4 6 3 5 3 4 2 4 2 4

1952 1999 1956 1957 1975

12-05-11 12-05-11 12-08-11 12-07-11 12-08-11

267,000 261,500

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1051 2185 1188 1062 1000 1207 1400

1947 1912 1956 1946 1944 1951 1951

12-15-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-08-11 12-09-11 12-07-11 12-06-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 20 Highest $: 735,000 Median $: Lowest $: 130,000 Average $: ADDRESS

310,000 304,636

94579 94579 94579 94579 94579

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 350,000 Median $: Lowest $: 175,500 Average $: ADDRESS

400,000 424, 500

1301 1459 882 2460 1143 1012 1737

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 29 Highest $: 499,000 Median $: Lowest $: 82,000 Average $: ADDRESS

12-06-11 12-13-11 12-15-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-14-11 12-05-11

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 580,000 Median $: Lowest $: 160,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1955 1959 1959 1996 1989 1965 1955

Page 15

390,000 399,150

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

966 2307 1667 903 2054 880 2296 2847 1260 2808 1646 2814 1396 3655 1214 1432 1195 1558 1072 2821

1955 1975 1980 1973 1973 1985 1997 1994 1960 1991 1958 1999 1972 2006 1974 1971 1969 1971 1976 2000

12-15-11 12-15-11 12-07-11 12-13-11 12-05-11 12-12-11 12-12-11 12-09-11 12-13-11 12-08-11 12-09-11 12-08-11 12-07-11 12-12-11 12-09-11 12-09-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-08-11 12-06-11

BY DANIELA PETROFF AP FASHION WRITER

MILAN (AP), Jan 14 - A grass green pullover, a similar style in tobacco brown and a series of collars embroidered with naif animal designs, were the only bright lights in the otherwise total black Jil Sander menswear collection for the winter of 2013.

Pale-faced models walked one-by-one through a stage door onto a dimly lit runway in black coats, black jackets, black trousers, black gloves and classic black laced shoes during Saturday's presentation of Belgian designer Raf Simons, latest collection for the label known for its minimalist style. This round, more than minimalist, the collection is monochromatic and at times monotonous. The predominant look is tailored, with leather the favorite material. Jackets tend to fit close to the body, while trousers are super wide and cuffed. As in other shows seen on opening day of the fourday preview showings for next year's chilly season, double-breasted styles make a come back in a season that promises to dwell on the safe past rather than the rocky present. Focal point of the revisited look is an extra long, black leather trench coat belted at the waist. Paired with the omnipresent black leather trousers, gloves and classic lace-ups, it lends a vaguely cloak-and-dagger feel to the entire collection. “Great, if you're into serial-killer fashion,” one fashionista was overheard commenting after the show.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY NISHA PATEL As red envelopes are passed around to close friends and family, the spirit of Chinese New Year is in full swing. On Saturday, January 21, the Fremont Main Library will be hosting a Chinese New Year celebration to bring the culture of China to the local community. This

event has become an annual attraction for families, and has been held for the last eight to ten years. Between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. in the children’s area of the library there will be art demonstrations that include calligraphy, paper cutting, and flower arrangements. Also, children will have the opportunity to participate in takehome crafts that include Chinese lanterns and fortune cookie pins. The main program, emceed by Lena Zee, will be between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. during which various performances will take place in the Fukaya Meeting Room. There will be a martial arts demonstration by Shaolin Temple, storytelling with Jessica Muh for The Year of the Dragon, and Chinese music. Moreover, there will be performances by various local groups that include a choir from Friends of Children with Special Needs (FCSN), California Youth Chinese Symphony, Virtuose International Flute Ensemble, along with a group dance made up of nine siblings from the Academy of Chinese Performing Arts. These groups all have a common purpose of bringing their performing arts and music to the local community. Leaders Amy Cho and Peggy Chiou have put in countless hours of effort to make this event possible for families to enjoy. They have received great help from local organizations and residents as

well. The main sponsors for the event are the South Bay Chinese Club, Citizens for a Better Community, and the Association of Chinese Schools of Northern California. During the event, eighteen students from Fremont’s Mission San Jose High School’s Chinese class will be leading the paper-cutting design activities, and the Citizens for a Better Community and South Bay Chinese Club will organize the performances, and other local artists have planned the arts and crafts. “The events’ success will definitely be thanks to the combined efforts from organizations, students, and other local people,” said Amy Cho. This event is a family program, and individuals of all ages are welcome to attend as there will be enjoyable activities for preschoolers, teenagers, and senior citizens. Although Chinese New Year will be on Monday, January 23, it is not too early to start participating in the festive celebrations for the holiday. Chinese New Year Celebration Saturday, January 21 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Free

January 20, 2012


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG The Chinese Lunar New Year, the Year of the Dragon, will be celebrated with traditional cultural activities, dances and arts and crafts at NewPark Mall on January 22, 2012. The shopping center invites the community to gather in Center Court for beautiful dance performances and free classes by Lorraine Yee with Jing Mo Athletic Association. The day will also feature a craft activity for families, who will be making red lanterns and dragons. The Jing Mo Athletic Association is a San Francisco-based martial arts group that has performed in the Bay Area for more than 30 years. The group began in the early 1900's with the unique teaching of all Chinese kung fu styles, all under one roof, and their story has been featured in movies including Bruce Lee's "Chinese Connection." Chinese New Year Celebrations Sunday, January 22

12:00 – 3:00 p.m. NewPark Mall Center Court 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.NewParkMall.com Activity Schedule 12:00-12:30 p.m. Jing Mo Performance 12:30-1:30 p.m. Photos with the Lion (bring a camera) 12:00-3:00 p.m. Prize Wheel - chance to win a gift card and prizes. 12:30-3:00 p.m. Craft activities 12:30-3:00 p.m. Facebook sign ups Enter to win an iPad2 1:30-2:00 p.m. Jing Mo Performance Learn the Lion Dance 2:30-3:00 p.m. Jing Mo Performance

Measure K waiver for seniors now available SUBMITTED BY SHARON COCO The Fremont Unified School District provides an opportunity for senior citizens to apply for a Senior Exemption Waiver to the Measure K Parcel Tax annually. Fremont residents, 65 years of age or older on June 30, 2012, who own and live in a single-family home may apply for this exemption. The exemption waiver application is available to the public at every school site, the Fremont Main Library, the Fremont Senior Center and is posted on the Fremont Unified School District web site. Chinese and Spanish translations of the waiver are also available. The application can be filled out online, printed and then submitted with the required supporting documentation at http://www.fremont.k12.ca.us/seniorwaiver. In order to provide access for any eligible senior citizen to obtain a form for the Waiver Exemption from the Measure K Parcel Tax, copies will be available at all locations listed above. Please call the following telephone number with any questions: (510) 979-7709. For further information, call the Office of the Superintendent at (510) 659-2542. Fremont Unified School District is comprised of 42 schools including 28 elementary, 5 junior high, 6 high schools, preschool, an adult school, and the Mission Valley ROP and serves over 32,000 students.

Page 17


Page 18 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD January 17: Officers responded to 4700 block of Wheeler Drive on a report of a hit and run vehicle collision that just occurred. The homeowner of the Wheeler address reported the driver lost of control of the vehicle and collided into the side of his house. The driver, a white male adult, fled from the vehicle and was last seen running toward Sundale Avenue. As a result of the collision, the home’s gas meter was sheered off and gas was actively leaking. Officers evacuated approximately six neighboring homes and a church while PG&E responded for the repair. Further investigation revealed the vehicle was stolen from Main Street on January 12th. Officers have developed several leads and are actively investigating the incident. Officers responded to Creekside Village regarding a report of ongoing drug sales. The suspect was driving a Dodge Charger and circling the property. Officers B. Johnson and Lawrence contacted and arrested a male for possession and transportation of marijuana. A residential burglary occurred on Wilmington Road. Point of entry was via an unlocked window. Loss included electronics, jewelry and cash. A potentially rabid raccoon was found in Gomes Park and dispatched by officers per policy. A residential burglary was reported at Camden Village Apartments. Point of entry was the kitchen window. Loss included electronics and jewelry. Officer Edwards responded to a vehicle collision on Terra Cotta Cir-

January 20, 2012

cle. A vehicle had plowed through the garage door of a residence and ended up underneath the resident’s vehicle parked inside the garage. Both cars struck the house itself causing major damage to the vehicles and the residence. The driver, a 19 year-old male, was arrested for DUI. January 18: Officer Newton and Field Training Officer (FTO) J. Lawrence arrested a 26-year-old male for possession of a controlled substance, being under the influence of a controlled substance, and a probation violation. Officer Allsup and FTO Bocage arrested a 49-year-old female for trespassing and transported her to SRJ. Officers responded to the Pennsylvania Apartments on a report of a 7 year-old boy who was out of control because he did not want to go to school. The juvenile threw a cement block at the mother’s vehicle and armed himself with a metal pole. When the officers arrived, they contacted the juvenile and placed him on a psychiatric hold. Officers responded to Maloney Elementary School on a report of an 11 year-old boy who was out of control (turns out to be the brother of the 7 year-old from above) The juvenile was fighting with his mother and the school staff. The juvenile was placed on a psychiatric hold. A residential burglary was reported at the Fremont Bell Apartments. Entry was through the living room window. Loss included electronics and jewelry. Officer Fuellenbach and FTO Luevano responded to Wells Fargo Bank (5 Corners) and arrested a male for burglary and passing a fictitious continued on page 35 check.

Three suspects arrested following burglary and fatal vehicle collision SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD The Newark Police Department responded to an in-progress residential home burglary mid-block of Mistflower Avenue Wednesday, January 18 at 9:54 a.m. A witness called police to say he saw three suspects enter a neighbor’s home after kicking down the front entry door. Descriptions of the suspects as well as the vehicle they were driving were reported. Responding officers saw the suspects leaving the area in the suspect vehicle (Charcoal Chevrolet Malibu) and attempted to stop it; the driver failed to stop. The vehicle traveled southbound on Cedar Boulevard at speeds estimated near 80 m.p.h. Due to the unsafe and reckless driving, officers discontinued their attempt at stopping the vehicle. The driver of the vehicle continued on at the high rate of speed and ultimately collided with another vehicle at the intersection of Cherry Street and Mowry Avenue. The driver and sole occupant of that uninvolved vehicle suffered life threatening injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of this vehicle’s identity will not be released pending notification of next of kin. One occupant of the suspect vehicle was trapped inside the car, while the other two suspects fled the vehicle on foot. The other suspect was arrested almost immediately near the collision scene, while the other was arrested at the Pick N’ Pull junk yard approximately one mile away on Mowry Avenue. All occupants of the suspect vehicle were accounted for and arrested for various felony crimes including residential burglary and vehicle evasion. All suspects have an extensive criminal history. Investigation is still ongoing. All suspects were transported to local trauma centers for their injuries sustained in the collision. Arrested Persons: • Rajwaun Watkins, age 20 Oakland and Hayward resident • Jabrie Watts, age 20 Oakland and Hayward resident • Deshon Collier, age 20 San Leandro, Union City and Hayward resident Any person with any information concerning/witnessing this incident can contact the Detective Sergeant Mike Carroll at 510-578-4247. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD January 16: Officers responded to the area of 6300 block of Joaquin Murieta Avenue at 5:48 p.m. for a report of purse-snatch, strong-arm robbery that had occurred approximately 15 minutes earlier. The two suspects were described as being in their late teens and on bikes. continued on page 35


January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Jake”

“Sylvester”

A107845

A108182

Jake is a male, tri-colored Chihuahua. He is about 8 years old. Jake is a fun little guy with big personality. He loves to play with other dogs and is a very curious boy. Jake is looking for someone to give him a second chance. If you think you could be that family for him, please come visit him today.

Sylvester is a neutered domestic long haired cat. He is about 5 years old with a long beautiful black and white coat. He is good about keeping his coat maintained, but since he has so much fur, he will require grooming upkeep. Sylvester is a bit reserved in his kennel, but when you take him out his affectionate personality comes out. If you are looking for a handsome, loving feline family member, he is the one for you! Total in Shelter: Dogs - 47 Cats - 30 Other - 8

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6640 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 pm Saturdays: 11 am - 4 pm Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

Page 19


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 20, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11610140 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Stephanie Danielle Mestaz for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Stephanie Danielle Mestaz to Danni Stephanie Daniel-Mestaz The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 10, 2012, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: December 29, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245034# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12611085 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Sukhvir Kaur Johal for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sukhvir Kaur Johal filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sukhvir Kaur Johal to Sukhvir Kaur Grewal The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3-2-2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Jan 5, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2241822# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11610247 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sang Eon Go, Hey Young Lee on behalf of Sung Yeol, Hyung Yeol for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sang Eon Go, Hey Young Lee filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sung Yeol Go to Steve SungYeol Go Hyung Yeol Go to Brian HyungYeol Go The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any

person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 10, 2012, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice Date: December 29, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236099#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460065 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bay Area Repid Cab Co., 33325 Mission Blvd., #C205, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Yunus Olomi, 33325 Mission Blvd., #C205, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yunus M. Olomi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 10, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245507# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460226 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: West Coast Catholic Books, 38572 Molina Ct., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Charles Vaughan, 38572 Molina Ct., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/12/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Charles Vaughan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245089# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460052 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: California Employment Services, 24301 Southland Dr. Ste. #100, Hayward, CA 94545, County of Alameda California Employment Services, California, 24301 Southland Dr. Ste. #100, Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Andrew S. Dashwood, Owner, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 10, 2012. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2245077# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 460189 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Wellness Chiropractic, 43108 Christy Street, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ha Thanh Truong, 318 Knottingham Circle, Livermore, CA 94551 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Dec 13, 2006 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ha Thanh Truong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 13, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, 2/10/12 CNS-2244644# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459022 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Galaxy Beauty Spa, 39383 Sutter Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Jackie Tran, 39383 Sutter Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jackie Tran, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 06, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2241821# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459617 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Epic Brokers, 3833 Peralta Blvd. #B, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Renu Bhardwal, 3833 Peralta Blvd. #B, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Renu Bhardwal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 28, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2240155# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459839 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Reflexions, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Moneisha Margaret Williams, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539 Anita Louise Williams, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by Co-partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 01/04/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Moneisha Williams, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 4, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2239878# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459449 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Miracle Landscaping, 31154 Brooklyn St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Miguel Vargas, 31154 Brooklyn St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on May 12, 2009 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Miguel Vargas This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 20, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236990# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459665 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Legacy Real Estate & Associates ERA Powered, 41111 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Legacy Real Estate & Associates, Inc., California, 41111 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12/6/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bill Abounrad, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236771# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459664 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Legacy Real Estate & Associates ERA Powered, 1686 Second Street, Livermore, CA 94550, County of Alameda III Create, Inc., 1686 Second Street, Livermore, CA 94550 This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12/6/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ -----, President


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PUBLIC NOTICES This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236767# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459666 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: US Realty Group, 38485 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Michel R. Harris, 37795 Logan Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12-29-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michel R. Harris This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236101# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459574-576 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Champion Learning Center, 2. Learning Champs, 3. Agile Training, 1900 Driscoll Road, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Innovations Group, LLC, CA, 40737 Vaca Drive, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Monika Kodnani, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 23, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

SUBMITTED BY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION On January 11, 2012, the Board of Equalization’s Legislative Committee recommended that the Board sponsor legislation creating a collaborative multi-agency partnership to combat the State’s underground economy, which deprives California of an estimated $8 billion in revenues annually. “Government has the resources and the authority to solve this problem. However, the bureaucratic agencies continue to fight for control and bragging rights, and covertly protect their pyramids at the expense of the public,” said Jerome E. Horton, Board of Equalization Chair. “As a result, we continue to do the same thing, expecting different results, and fail to develop a comprehensive proactive strategy to protect the public and recapture the billions of dollars lost to the black market.”

14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/30, 1/6, 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2233407#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 31, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at:

Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time:9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): B017 ROMANIK JR, CARL B020 WHITAKER, KEN C013 Moreno, Dawn C065 SCHROEDER, RANDALL C111 Rivera, Denise D066 Afukei, Elizabeth P040 Gregory, Robert Public Storage 08026 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2148 Secoquian, Corazon 2174 SAMFOHERUS, WENDY 7007 Simpson, Edward 8002 taylor, tyrone 9055 Coria, Antonio

Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461 (510) 659-6993 Time: 2:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): C409 Karr, Marla Kay C385 Romandia, Margaret C294 Karr, Marla Kay C184 Cardoza, Scott C162 Zamora, Antonio C086 IMERBTHAMA, JARROD C056 Rensel, Edgar B086 Magan, Karla A218 Brooks, Lamonica A159 Ramirez, Ricardo All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 13th day of January 2012 and 20th day of January 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2241242#

The Centralized Intelligence Partnership (CIP) is anticipated to increase California’s revenues by accelerating the investigations process, reducing prosecution costs and assisting in the capture of unreported taxes. In addition, the CIP is designed to streamline the complaint process by providing the public with a centralized one-call complaint hotline and make referrals to resources for victims of fraud and human trafficking. “All efforts aimed at combating the underground economy in a more aggressive manner would be positive to the citizens of the State of California and investing resources to combat this problem would pay huge dividends down the road,” said Jose Mejia, Director of the State Council of Laborers. “Multi-agency efforts make much sense in an effort to protect workers and employers while capturing lost revenue.”

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 31, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at:

Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s): B018 Angeles, Alvin C020 BERNARDO,CELEDONIO C097 Hawkins, Keith C138 Brown, Dennis D183 MacMullen, Ruth F009 White, Jermaine Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM

“The existence of the underground economy creates a devastating loss to California’s economy, depriving the State of good jobs, robust revenue and significant economic activity,” said Melissa Patack, Vice President of State Government Affairs for the Motion Picture Association of America, in support of the BOE’s initiative. It is anticipated that the proposed CIP will include representatives of the Attorney General’s Office, the Secretary of Labor, the Board of Equalization, the Franchise Tax Board, the Employment Development Department and the Departments of Insurance, Health, Motor Vehicles and Industrial Relations. For more information, visit www.boe.ca.gov and www.taxes.ca.gov Facts and Terms The five-member California State Board of Equalization is a publicly elected tax board.

Stored by the following person (s): A106 QUERIDA, MARILYN A109 MCDOWELL, CYNTHIA A137 Ho, Kevin C325 Mitchell, Wanda D733 Mitchell, Steve E505 PETTY, GERALD E579 Clark, Joseph E610 Scully, Richard E654 Hill, Aritha F428 Kerlegan, Francis G818 Hoos, Lisa Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123 (510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A008 Maly, Izy A041 CASE, PAMELA A085 ZAKRZEWSKI, JASON A094 Oneill, Sara A117 Dawson, Kristi A261 COLEMAN, RONNESHA A348 Thach, Theresa A350 Taylor, Lorrie C033 Wouters, Jim C061 PALMONES, JAMES D046 DeRush, Angela Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A084 DELVAL, RENGELL B056 ANDERSON, JAMES E043 Santoni, Rhonda E044 W.D. Campbell Construction, Inc. E065 Roesler-Barrett, Jamie All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 13th day of January 2012 and 20th day of January 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2241238#

The Board of Equalization collects more than $50 billion annually in taxes and fees supporting state and local government services. It hears business tax appeals, acts as the appellate body for franchise and personal income tax appeals, and serves a significant role in the assessment and administration of property taxes. The underground economy refers to those individuals and businesses that deal in cash and/or use other schemes to conceal their activities, identities and true tax liabilities from government licensing, regulatory and taxing agencies. Illegal activities of the underground economy range from the sale of stolen or counterfeit products to the exploitation of victims of human trafficking. Those who operate in the underground economy enjoy the same public services as tax and fee payers, such as hospitals, roads, and police and fire protection, without making the same contributions.


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January 20, 2012

Calif. revenue falls below governor's projections BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), - Just a week after Gov. Jerry Brown made his pitch for tax hikes and more spending cuts, the state controller on Tuesday reported that California is collecting less tax revenue than the governor projected and warned lawmakers that more cuts may be needed if the slide continues. Controller John Chiang released his cash report for December and said revenue came in $165 million below what Brown projected last week when he released his budget proposal for the 2012-13 fiscal year, which begins July 1. He said the state's ongoing structural deficit, in which annual spending commitments outpace tax revenue, is continuing despite recent budget cuts. “Coupled with higher spending tied to unrealized cost savings, these latest revenue figures create growing concern that legislative action may be needed in the near future to ensure that the state can meet its payment obligations,” Chiang said in statement. The Democratic governor estimated the state is facing a $9.2 billion shortfall on a $92.5 billion budget for the next fiscal year. He wants lawmakers to make cuts to welfare, health care for the poor and other so-

cial programs before asking voters to pass temporary taxes in November. Democratic lawmakers, who control the Legislature, have indicated they don't want to make those cuts. “None of this changes our overarching game plan or the fact that we need to generate more revenues to protect schools from devastating cuts,” said Robin Swanson, spokeswoman for Assembly Speaker John Perez. “We're keeping our eye on the ball here, and that means continuing to figure out substantive solutions to our state's long-term budget plans.” The controller's office wrote that late December and early January are an important period for estimating state revenue because many taxpayers send final estimated payments to maximize federal tax deductions for the year. The payments help predict revenue because they reflect what taxpayers think they owe on their annual tax returns. The state reported that while holiday shopping helped improve sales tax receipts, personal income taxes were $70 million below the governor's latest projection. Corporate taxes were about $20 million below the estimates in December. Brown's finance spokesman, H.D. Palmer, said the $165 million shortfall was out of $8.4 billion in total cash receipts.

“Put it in perspective,” he said. Palmer said the state should have enough money to get through the fiscal year, which ends June 30. In releasing his budget proposal last week, Brown made his first campaign pitch for his tax initiative, telling Californians they must choose between paying higher taxes or accepting cuts that would result in three fewer weeks of school, higher college tuition and fewer state park rangers, among other changes. Without the additional tax revenue, the governor said he will be forced to cut nearly $5 billion to public education along with additional cuts to courts, public universities and other services. Brown is trying to gather support for a November ballot initiative that would raise the income tax on those making $250,000 or more a year and boost the state sales tax by a half cent. The administration estimated the temporary tax increases would raise about $7 billion a year, but the Legislative Analyst's Office has pegged that figure at around $4.8 billion in additional revenues. The offices disagree over the amount of revenue to be generated by higher taxes on the wealthy. The analyst's office is expected to release its assessment of Brown's budget on Wednesday. The taxes would expire in 2017.


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Judge to end Calif. prison receiver BY DON THOMPSON ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP),- A federal judge on Tuesday ordered California officials to prepare for the end of a six-year, court-ordered oversight of the prison system that has cost taxpayers billions of dollars and helped force a shift of lower-level criminals from state prisons to county jails. U.S. District Court Judge Thelton Henderson cited improving conditions in the prison system in a three-page order that says “the end of the Receivership appears to be in sight.” The ruling marks an important milestone in a process that began nearly six years ago when the judge appointed a receiver to run California's prison medical system after finding that an average of one inmate a week was dying of neglect or malpractice. He cited inmate overcrowding as the leading cause, but said in Tuesday's order that conditions have improved. He praised the better conditions throughout the system, particularly noted during inspections of medical facilities by the prison system's independent inspector general. “Significant progress has been made,” Henderson wrote, citing the receiver's own report to the federal court last week. “While some critical work remains outstanding - most notably on construction issues - it is clear that many of the goals of the Receivership have been accomplished.” Gov. Jerry Brown's office issued a statement to The Associated Press, with the Democratic governor praising the decision. “We have been working very hard to clean up the mess in the prisons and I appreciate the judicial recognition of our efforts,” he said in the statement. Don Specter, director of the nonprofit Prison Law Office, said it is premature to end the receivership, although he said it is “reasonable to

start thinking about it.” Conditions have been improving but still “are nowhere near adequate” at many of the prison medical facilities, said Specter, whose group brought the lawsuit against the state. Moreover, the state has yet to finish building some of the facilities required by the receiver, and the judge has yet to decide what standards the prison system must meet to provide constitutionally adequate medical care, Specter said. “I understand the governor really wants to end the receivership,” he said. “Having a light at the end of the tunnel might even spur them to make more progress or faster progress, to act quicker or sooner.” J. Clark Kelso, who took over as receiver in January 2008, looks forward to participating in the talks with state officials but declined further comment, said his spokeswoman, Nancy Kincaid. Henderson ordered Kelso, state officials and attorneys representing inmates to report by April 30 on when the receivership should end and whether it should continue some oversight role. The Prison Law Office filed the lawsuit in 2001 and the state settled the case in 2002 by agreeing to improve inmate health care. But Henderson found in 2005 that conditions had not improved, leading to his appointment of a receiver. Attorneys for inmates asked federal judges in 2007 to rule that prison crowding was a leading cause of the continued poor care. The judges agreed, and required the state to ease prison crowding. That led to a shift that began last year that is sending lower-level inmates from state prisons to county jails. In a ruling last May, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the lower court's authority in ordering California to reduce inmate crowding as a way to improve medical conditions. The federal courts had ordered the

state's 33 adult prisons to reduce their total population by 33,000 inmates over a two-year period. The prison system had an all-time high of 162,268 inmates in 2006. The receiver's office also was given authority to greatly expand the prison system's medical staff and increase pay significantly. Henderson said he expects the receiver will continue in a general oversight role, even if the state takes back the authority to run the medical system. That will ensure that care is not diminished in the future. Federal and state judges or their appointed special masters also oversee most other activities of California's penal system, including dental care, care of the mentally ill and disabled, juvenile offenders, and criminals on parole. The judge asked parties for advice on when the receivership should end, how long an oversight period might last and when the underlying case on the quality of medical care should end. Jeffrey Callison, spokesman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said the department ``is ready and eager'' to begin planning for the end of federal oversight of prison medical care. Under the receivership, the state has built new medical facilities at several prisons, including San Quentin, where Death Row is located. It currently is building a medical complex in Stockton. The state doubled the amount of money it spent on inmate health care over five years, to more than $15,000 per inmate annually. Spending controlled by the receiver increased from $948 million before the receiver was appointed to nearly $2.3 billion by 2008, according to the state Department of Finance. Spending on medical care, pharmaceuticals and transporting and guarding inmates declined to $1.8 billion for the current fiscal year. mmm


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January 20, 2012

Colts subdue Eagles SUBMITTED BY JOHN SUZA PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW

The James Logan Colts Varsity basketball team beat the American High Eagles January 11 by a score of 55-49 in a defensive battle with great action under the basket. The Eagles came out attacking early but the Colts defense was equal to the task, holding the Eagles to just 11 points in the first quarter. Key Logan defensive players with four rebounds each were Clarence Kaye and Inderpreet Dhahan. Battle for control of the basket continued throughout the contest and Logan’s strong showing in the first two quarters held up as American was unable to overcome the eight point deficit of the first half.. Leading scorers for the Logan Colts were Jeremiah Agbayani with 12 points and Inderpreet Dhahan with 11 points.

Cougar basketball on a roll in MVAL SUBMITTED BY JOHN SUZA PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW The Newark Memorial Cougars showed why they are considered the best Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) varsity boys basketball team this year as they handled the Logan Colts 65-46 on January 18. They took control from the first play of the game, controlling the first rebound of the game and never looked back The Cougars were able to repeatedly use a fast break, demonstrating superior team speed; the game turned into a track meet. The Colts could not slow the Cougar attack. In addition to speed, the Cougars were able to take outside shots despite pressure from the Colts. In the third quarter, Logan tried using a full court press, also with no luck. Newark countered the press by passing the ball and opening a multi-front attack, remaining fully in control of the game… final score 65-46. The Newark Memorial Cougars are now in the driver’s seat of the MVAL. With this victory, they are the team to beat.


January 20, 2012

Newark Memorial Wrestling SUBMITTED BY TIM HESS Dream Wrestling Invitational @ San Rafael HS Monday, January, 16 108 Randy Tran 4-1 (2 pins, 1 tech fall) 3rd 122 Eric Tolbertson 2-1 (2 pins) 2nd 140 Jacob Pratt 5-0 (5 pins) 1st 147 Anthony Rubio 5-0 (1 pin, 1 tech fall, 2 majors) 1st 287 Elmer Hamidy 3-1 (2 pins) 3rd

Basketball Logan vs Washington SUBMITTED BY JAMES FORTENBERRY January 13 Logan 55, Washington 49 Logan (7 - 10, 4 - 0 MVAL) Agbayani 5, Schaper 3, Kaye 10, Loza 2, Mundeke 6, Torain 5, DePerio 11, Dhahan 6, Leno 7 Total: 55 Washington (4 - 13, 1 - 2 MVAL) Rozul 4, Romero 7, Isola 8, Songponnopachon 16, Lousi 14. Total: 49 Logan 19 15 813 - 55 Washington 18 7 14 10 - 49 3-pt goals: Agbayani 1, Mundeke 1, Torain 1, Romero 1, Songponnopachon 2 Foul Outs: NONE Technical Fouls: NONE

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January 20, 2012

Local student places second at U.S. Junior Open Squash Championships BY CHINMAI RAMAN The U.S. Junior Open Squash Championships is an annual tournament hosted at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. This year, a record field of over 750 competitors, ages 10 to 19 years old, from over 20 countries, entered the competition making it the largest individual junior squash tournament in the world. It is

student Cassandra Ong competed in this year’s U.S. Junior Open and placed second in her age division, GU11 (Girls under 11), beating out the top U.S. players; she lost in the finals to the top-seeded Egyptian girl. Squash is a racquet sport played by two or four players, comparable to racquetball. Players compete in a fourwalled court and use a hard,

Fighting it out on the squash court.

Cassandra Ong

also considered one of the most prestigious, together with the World Junior Open and the British Junior Open. Fremont

rubber ball to play the game. A squash racquet is similar to a tennis racket, only more oblique with less surface area.

Squash is like tennis in that it involves a service and hitting the ball back-and-forth between competitors, but the similarities end there. After the initial service, players can hit the ball on the side or back walls at any time, making for a very interesting game. With such intriguing game play, it is no surprise that there are over 49,908 squash courts in 188 countries around the world. Although squash is not as popular as many other sports in the U.S., it is one of the fastest growing. In recent years, the West Coast has seen a big growth in new players, probably due to the big influx of middle class immigrants from other countries in Asia, Europe and South America where squash is very popular,. In the

U.S., the East Coast is the "center" of squash. The Ivy League and many other universities have very strong collegiate teams -

Harvard and Princeton in particular. Living on the West Coast, Cassandra was undeterred.

Squash zone speed sensor.


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Championship winners and runners-up (Cassandra front, far right)

Cassandra started playing squash once a week about two years ago. Both she and her brother Clarence showed a natural aptitude for the game so in 2010, they both began training more intensively, about three to four times a week. Thanks to training with her brother and weekly coaching from squash coaches, Ariel Labra and Jonathan Perry, as well as support and encouragement of other squash players and friends, she

has won many tournaments in her age division (GU11: Girls Under 11) through the year, culminating with her second place finish in the U.S. Junior Open in December. She is on track to end the 2011-2012 tournament season in March 2012 as the topranked GU11 player in the U.S. “The U.S. Junior Open was the biggest tournament we have attended,” says Cassandra’s family. “It was exciting to see so many players from all

over the world compete on the court [and] quite eye opening to see the high level of squash.” Egypt was the most successful country team and won many of the top and second spots. For the U.S. players, it was a great experience and gave them a higher goal to reach for. They meet each other in various other national tournaments and know the level of each other's games, but they realize they have to

step up another level to compete on the world stage. International competition was a very enriching experience for Cassandra. Although they might compete fiercely on the court, the kids are very friendly off-court and enjoyed meeting each other and playing friendly games on the court. “Harvard set up the facilities very nicely,” says Cassandra. The Harvard Murr Athletic Center is a stateof-the-art facility with 14

squash courts. During the pretournament reception, they set up a court with a speed sensor, and the players enjoyed taking turns hitting the ball to see their top speed. “I think the highest number I saw was from a 17 year-old boy which was 188 miles per hour,” she says. There was even a Wii station set up for the kids to play an electronic version of the game although some preferred to just have fun playing the real thing!


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January 20, 2012

UN chief to focus on sustaining Arab Spring BY EDITH M. LEDERER ASSOCIATED PRESS UNITED NATIONS (AP), Dec 31 - Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, in his second term as chief of the United Nations, wants to help people who rose up in the Arab Spring attain and sustain freedom and democracy. As he embarks on a new five-year term starting New Year's Day, Ban said one of his top priorities is to help Arab countries sustain their moves toward democracy. He also said he intended to do more for young people and women, and address frustrations over the

growing gap between the rich and poor expressed by the Occupy movement. This is a moment of historic change “which we have to seize and help them,” Ban said. Ban's ability to influence what happens is limited because the U.N. secretary-general has no independent power over international affairs. It is up to the U.N.'s 193 member states to take action, and only the actions of the powerful 15-member Security Council are legally binding. But the position is a powerful megaphone, and following his unanimous reelection by the U.N. General Assembly in June

to a second and final five-year term, diplomats say Ban may feel less constrained on the need to satisfy all U.N. members, and may become more outspoken and perhaps more influential on global issues. Ban said that the uprisings that spread “like a wildfire” across the Middle East and North Africa and inspired demonstrations in the United States and other developed nations were propelled by the younger generation's rebellion against oppression and inequality - and their yearning for democratization. He won praise in the Middle East and elsewhere for speaking

out early and strongly in support of demonstrators in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen, urging the countries' leaders to listen to their demands. In Syria, the limitations of his position have been more clear. While Ban has been outspoken against the ongoing attacks on civilians in Syria, he has not been able to influence the deeply divided Security Council to pass a resolution condemning the violence which the U.N. says has killed more than 5,000 people. On Friday, Ban's spokesman Martin Nesirky expressed the U.N.'s support of an Arab League mission to Syria, saying it was critical that the government give full cooperation and unhindered access to the observers. During his first five years at the U.N.'s helm, Ban has won plaudits for helping to raise climate change close to the top of the global agenda, for creating a new agency, UN Women, to focus on the fight for gender equality, and for keeping a spotlight on nuclear disarmament and nuclear security. The secretary-general has traveled more than any of his predecessors on U.N. business, but is far from having a household name. In some polls people still think his immediate predecessor, Kofi Annan, is secretary-general. The workaholic Ban has also been criticized for his lack of charisma, his low-key style which observers say is typical of his South Korean roots, and his

failure to criticize human rights abuses in powerful countries, especially China and Russia. Russia's U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin recently expressed unhappiness with the secretary-general over his comment that NATO acted within its mandate in its bombing campaign in Libya. Russia has called for an independent U.N. investigation of civilian casualties, claiming NATO overstepped the U.N. mandate to protect civilians and used the bombing campaign to oust Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. Syria's President Bashar Assad is also a close Russian ally. Asked to look back at Ban's first term and ahead to his second, Churkin told AP that his overall performance has been “quite positive”under difficult and stressful circumstances. “For his second term, there is just one wish, if you will, and one expectation which I'm sure the secretary-general is going to be up to - the secretary-general must continue to serve the entire international community,” he said. The comments appeared to be an indirect criticism of Ban's pro-Western views on the NATO bombing as well as his criticism of the crackdown by Assad. Ban said it's important to look at what's happening in Syria and many countries around the world as part of a broader political and historical evolution that began with early yearnings for democracy in Eastern Europe in the 1950s, continued on page 34


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ing. There are trails open to hikers, bicyclists and equestrians, and many are wheelchair accessible. This year's theme is "Happy Trails.” In addition to trail information the guidebook includes sections on hiking with kids, hiking with dogs, trail safety and hiking in hot weather. To register, visit www.ebparks.org, click on “Trails Challenge” in the “Features” section on the right side of the home page, and proceed as directed. Registrants must have an e-mail address, as further instructions will be e-mailed. An e-mail confirmation will provide registration instructions, and details on how to download the guidebook and obtain the free Trails Challenge Tshirt. In a move towards “going green,” participants are encouraged to print out only portions of the booklet they need, though complete hard copies will be available

for $5 each. Besides the specific trail information, the booklet contains general park district information and tips for new trail users. A free mobile application for iPhone and Android smart phone users allows registered participants to bring the guidebook along with them wherever they go. To complete the actual challenge, participants are asked to hike five of the trails or 26.2 miles and send in their log after doing so. They will receive a commemorative pin mailed to them. As in past challenges, the honor system applies. Nobody is checking to make sure participants hiked the trails. The 2012 Trails Challeng includes the following parks and trails: • Big Break Regional Shoreline, Oakley • Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, Antioch • Briones Regional Park, Lafayette • California Riding & Hiking Trail, Martinez

• Carquinez Strait Regional Shoreline, Martinez • Diablo Foothills Regional Park, Walnut Creek • Dublin Hills Regional Park, Dublin • Garin / Dry Creek Pioneer Regional Park, Hayward • Hayward Regional Shoreline, Hayward • Huckleberry Botanic & Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserves, Oakland • Kennedy Grove Regional Recreation Area, El Sobrante • Las Trampas Regional Wilderness, San Ramon • Mission Peak Regional Preserve, Fremont • Martin Luther King, Jr. Regional Shoreline, Oakland • Morgan Territory Regional Preserve, near Tassajara/Eastern Contra Costa County • Pleasanton Ridge Regional Park, Pleasanton • Point Pinole Regional Shoreline, Richmond • Redwood Regional Park, Oakland • Sunol Regional Wilderness, Sunol • Wildcat Canyon Regional Park, Richmond More information is available at: www.ebparks.org or 1 (877) 327-2757

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January 20, 2012

Master Sudoku

Sudoku

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4 letter words Afar Alga Away Byte Flux Grin Ogre Scud

In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you crack the code.

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on page 4

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EARTHTALK®

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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E - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE

Dear EarthTalk: Are there healthy, green-friendly mouthwashes? I’ve heard that some contain formaldehyde and other nasty substances. -- Marina Sandberg, Albany, NY Many mainstream mouthhuman carcinogen” and research TheraBreath Oral Rinses, Hawashes contain ingredients that has shown an association bekeem Herbal Mouthwash, and you definitely don’t want to tween long term workplace expo- Miessence Freshening Mouthswallow, or even put down the sure and several specific cancers, wash. Besides these brands, the drain. According to the Environ- including leukemia. Few of us are Environmental Working Group’s mental Health Association of exposed to as much formaldeSkin Deep Cosmetic Database Nova Scotia’s (EHANS’s) also lists Tom’s of Maine “Guide to Less Toxic ProdNatural Baking Soda ucts”—a free online resource Mouthwash, Healing-Scents designed to help consumers Mouthwash, and Neal’s choose healthier, greener Yard Remedies Lavender everyday products—convenand Myrrh Mouthwash as tional mouthwash is often least harmful to people and alcohol-based, with an alcothe environment. hol content ranging from You can also make your 18-26 percent. “Products own all-natural mouthwash with alcohol can contribute at home. Eco-friendly conto cancers of the mouth, sumer advice columnist tongue and throat when used Annie Berthold Bond recregularly,” the guide reports, Credit: Lite Productions/Thinkstock ommends mixing warm adding that a 2009 review in Many mainstream mouthwashes contain ingredi- water, baking soda or sea ents that you wouldn't want to swallow or rinse the Dental Journal of Ausdown the drain. Fortunately, there are many natu- salt, and a drop of peppertralia confirmed the link be- ral alternatives available now, including recipes for mint and/or tea tree oil for a tween alcohol-based refreshing and bacteria-excismaking your own. mouthwashes and an ining rinse. Another recipe increased risk of oral cancers. hyde as, say, morticians, but does volves combining distilled or And you might want to avoid that mean its okay to swish it mineral water with a few dashes mouthwashes with fluoride (aka around in our mouths every day? of fresh mint and rosemary leaves sodium fluoride). While fluoride Other problematic ingrediand some anise seeds; mix well may help fight cavities, ingesting ents in many conventional and swish! A quick Internet too much of it has been linked to mouthwashes include sodium search will yield many other neurological problems and could lauryl sulfate, polysorbate, down-home natural mouthwash be a cancer trigger as well. Comcetylpyridinium chloride and formulas. mon mouthwash sweeteners have benzalkonium chloride, all CONTACTS: Guide to Less also been linked to health probwhich have been shown to be Toxic Products, www.lesstoxic.ca; lems: Saccharin is a suspected toxic to organisms in the Skin Deep Database, carcinogen while sucralose may aquatic environments where www.ewg.org/skindeep/; Annie trigger migraines. Synthetic colthese chemicals end up after we Berthold Bond, www.anniebors can also be troublesome. spit them out. bond.com. Some brands contain So what’s a concerned green EarthTalk® is written and formaldehyde (aka quanternium- consumer to do? EHANS recom- edited by Roddy Scheer and 15). According to the National mends the following mouthDoug Moss and is a registered Cancer Institute, overexposure to washes that do not contain trademark of E - The Environformaldehyde can cause a burnalcohol, fluoride, artificial colors mental Magazine ing sensation in the eyes, nose or sweeteners: Anarres Natural (www.emagazine.com). Send and throat as well as coughing, Candy Cane Mouthwash, Auquestions to: wheezing, nausea and skin irritaromere Ayurvedic Mouthwash, earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subtion. The U.S. Environmental Beauty with a Cause Mouthwash, scribe: www.emagazine.com/subProtection Agency considers Jason Natural Cosmetics Tea Tree scribe. Free Trial Issue: formaldehyde a “probable Oil Mouthwash, Dr. Katz www.emagazine.com/trial.

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


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This article was written by a group of sixth grade students and friends from Gomes, and Chadbourne Elementary Schools in Fremont. The team is participating in a robotics competition organized by First Lego League (FLL). For this year's theme of "Keep the Food Safe," participants are required to program a robot to solve Food Safety missions, while doing research on a real-world problem. Students must present the research as well as an innovative solution. The team competed and won in East Bay Qualifier round of this competition on November 20, and has advanced to regional competition January 22, from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. at Newark Memorial High School in Newark. For more information, visit http://www.firstlegoleague.org/challenge/2011foodfactor, or contact the team at rkodnani@yahoo.com

BY RITHVIK BARATAM, DAMANJIT HEER, DEVESH KODNANI, SHAURYE MAHAJAN, ANSH VIDYARTHI, AND ALEX YEM

H

ave you heard of First Lego League (FFL)? It is a competition in which kids build robots to solve themed missions and research a real world problem through team-

January 20, 2012

work. This year’s FLL theme, “Food Factor,” requires research of a food, its contamination risks and current solutions; then creating an innovative solution for the problem that could be even better! We are currently moving on to regional competition after doing well at the qualifier level. This competition has taught us a lot! You’ve probably tried or heard of the Japanese dish, Sushi, known for is health benefits and use of raw fish. Sushi is a great food with high levels of protein, vitamins, minerals, and omega-3, while maintaining a low level of fat… it’s tasty too! Those are some of the reasons we chose sushi as our “Food Factor” food. Sushi consists of cooked rice soaked in vinegar called Shari, seaweed called Nori, and other ingredients called Neta. The most common form of Neta is raw fish. Sushi is usually served with condiments such as soy sauce or wasabi. Sushi can be contaminated in the rice or fish. The fish in sushi can be contaminated with methylmercury, an organic form of mercury, toxaphene, an insecticide, PCBs, and other harmful substances such as bacteria. Most contamination is caused by ocean pollution and improper handling of raw fish. The rice in sushi can also be contaminated with bacteria such as Bacillus Cereus and other contaminants like pesticides. To learn more about contaminants in sushi, we interviewed Ms. Chithra Malani, a registered nutritionist and dietician from Santa Clara. We also visited a local sushi restaurant and inter-


January 20, 2012

viewed a sushi chef who told us about how he prepares food. We studied web pages, books, encyclopedias, charts, and other sources, narrowing our focus on contaminants to methylmercury, an organic form of mercury. Mercury is an elemental metal that is liquid at room temperature. During mining, volcanic eruptions, industrial processes or any other place where there may be mercury deposits or products, the mercury can heat up, converting into a gaseous form, and escape into the atmosphere. It precipitates with the rain, and into the ocean. This mercury is absorbed by tiny organisms, such as algae and becomes methylmercury. As those tiny organisms are consumed by larger creatures and, in turn, by larger fish, levels of methylmercury increase; the largest fish eat those with the highest levels

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of mercury. Fishermen collect and sell these fish. Why is mercury so bad? Mercury is a neurotoxin, meaning brain poison. It can damage brain functions and the nervous system. People should avoid fish with high mercury content, especially pregnant or nursing mothers and small children; because the minds of young children have not fully developed and can be affected. Mercury can also cause harm to adults including loss of hearing, vision, and memory. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t eat Sushi; Sushi is great! You should just avoid fish with high mercury content, like bluefin tuna, shark, mackerel, and eel. Some current solutions to avoid methylmercury poisoning is to eat farmed fish which avoids contaminants altogether, or, if you have already ingested the fish, gastric lavage. Gastric

lavage is a process where food from the stomach is pumped out. This process only works if the food is freshly ingested.

If the mercury has already reached the bloodstream, you need to remove it by means of chelation before it affects your body. Chelation is a process in which doctors intravenously insert a chemical, either DMSA or EDTA into the bloodstream. The EDTA and DMSA chemically bond with mercury and other toxic metals. Then the chemical exits the body through the urine. Two problems with this solution are that the chemical can also bond with vital metals, so you have to take supplements, and that this process happens in a hospital and has to be repeated several times to remove all the mercury. One part of our project was to come up with an innovative solution. Our solution is a pill that is half DMSA, half EDTA, and the center is iron and calcium. This pill is magnetically charged positive and bonds with metals, mostly mercury; because mercury is negatively charged. The ironcalcium core replenishes those

metals and harmful mercury is removed from the body through the urine. This solution is better than chelation because it can be taken as a pill. We shared our work and solution at restaurants, to our neighbors, to the community, at YMCA, on a website, at school, in this newspaper, and through brochures to people in our community. Please feel free to visit our website at www.sushisamurai.yolasite.com .Let us know if we missed anything or if you would like to share something about sushi by email at rkodnani@yahoo.com. Thank you Tri-City Voice for being kind enough to give us our own newspaper article and thanks to all who have contributed to or supported this team. Bon Appétit! Img source: http://store.indianfoodsco.com/recipe/sushi-reciperecipes-gifts-japanese-jp001000 Img source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mer cury_in_fish The Sushi Samurai


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January 20, 2012

UN chief to focus on sustaining Arab Spring

continued from page 28

saw democratic governments installed in South Korea and some Asian and African countries, and led to the collapse of communism, the end of the Cold War and the reunification of Germany in the late 1980s. “Then, another 20 years, or another generation later, we are seeing such yearnings” in the Arab world, he said. Ban said the Occupy Wall Street protest that spread from New York throughout the developed world also reflected frustration at the growing gap between the rich and poor people who feel ignored and marginalized. This is “a generational opportunity for the United Nations to address these issues,” he said at a news conference earlier this month. Exactly what the U.N. can do remains to be seen. The U.N. often provides electoral assistance and Ban said it is helping to provide technical and

logistical support for elections in Tunisia and Egypt - and will do so as well in Libya. He said the United Nations is discussing with world leaders how to provide social and economic support so that young people, women and marginalized groups in particular can find jobs and ``good opportunities.'' He said he is also discussing with his senior advisors other ways in which the U.N. can be relevant and helpful in trying ``to bridge the gap of inequity and provide equal opportunities to as many people as possible.'' U.N. agencies focusing on development, labor and employment, and women are likely to be asked to play a key role. Egypt's U.N. Ambassador Maged Abdelaziz, whose country heads the 120-member Nonaligned Movement of mainly developing countries, told AP the secretary-general “has been instrumental in garnering support for

developing countries in their efforts to avoid the negative effects” of the financial and economic crisis, the food crisis, the energy crisis and climate change. He said NAM is hoping that Ban will push for “tangible results” at the U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development, known as Rio+20, to be held in Brazil in June - a follow-up to the first international summit about the environment in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. At his year-end news conference, Ban said that at Rio+20 “we must connect the dots - between climate change, energy, food, water, health and education, and oceans.” Egypt's Abdelaziz said NAM is also looking for the U.N. to play an ``enhanced role'' in trying to achieve political settlements to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict; Somalia, which hasn't had a functioning government since 1991; and the Great Lakes region of central Africa, which is plagued by violence.

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January 20, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 18

continued from page 18

Fremont Police Log Officer Lambert developed information on a stolen vehicle in the area of Grimmer and Seneca Park. The vehicle was located by responding officers and a vehicle pursuit ensued, supervised by Sergeant Crandall. The driver, a well known parolee, crashed the vehicle and fled on foot. Patrol and SCU saturated the area and arrested him without incident. Two passengers were arrested as well. January 19: Officers responded to PK market on an Assault with a Deadly Weapon call. The reporting party said that her niece was intentionally run over by a female driving an older Buick. Officers tracked the suspect vehicle and located the driver who was positively identified and arrested by Officer Spear for ADW (Assault with a deadly weapon.) The victim sustained minor injury and refused medical aid. The investigation revealed that the victim and suspect knew each other and were involved in an ongoing dispute. A burglary was reported on Anza Street. Two homes under construction were victims of burglary for the second time in a week. Entry was made via the side garage door; loss unknown at this time. A burglary was reported on Stratford Ave. Entry via side garage door by means of pry tool. Loss included jewelry and electronics. An apartment was robbed at Stevenson Place Apartments. The door was found ajar with no sign of forced entry. Loss was cash only. A commercial burglary occurred at 190 Francisco Lane; approximately 240 ft. of copper wire was stolen. Officer Edwards arrested a male suspect for being under the influence of drugs. At the time of arrest Suspect had his pants halfway undone, which Edwards found curious. A strip search in the jail yielded 27.5 grams (one ounce) of methamphetamine hidden in his pants. At 4:54 a.m., an unknown caller reported one black male chasing another black male in the area of Blackstone and Darwin. The caller claimed the male doing the chasing had a gun and may have fired a shot. We only received one call on this and nothing was found in the area. The phone number came back to a known parolee. We visited him at his house to check on his welfare and a parole search. He and several other folks were located in his home in Glenmoor. All were cooperative. A female from the house claimed she lost her cell phone the day before. A large amount of Marijuana was found inside the home. Claims of a current medical Marijuana card were being investigated at the time of this writing.

Newark Police Log One was described as a black male with dreadlocks and a white t-shirt. The second suspect’s description was not available. No injuries were reported and the no weapons were seen. The adult female victim had her purse pulled from her by one of the suspects as they rode by on bikes. Officers handled a citizen’s arrest at Macy’s at 8 p.m. Officers a juvenile male was arrested and released to his mother for petty theft. January 17: At 6:45 a.m., officers responded to a report of a motorcyclist riding the wrong way with no lights on Sycamore Street. The motorcycle in question was found abandoned at the A&S gas station on Thornton Avenue. Officers then responded to the registered owner’s residence and located the injured rider. The rider was ultimately transported to a local hospital due to his minor injuries. The rider crashed the motorcycle and then went home. At 5:15 p.m., officers investigated a report of a utility trailer that had been stolen sometime over the holiday weekend from Oak Street. It was described as being a Big Tex trailer, approximately 5’ x 8’, tan over black, Ca. license plate 1BV8223. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

Another Newark neighborhood forming a Neighborhood Watch group! Neighbors on Cheviot Court are joining together to help make their community a safer place to live. This and all Neighborhood Watch meetings will be in coordination with the Newark Police Department. If you would like to attend this meeting or start a Neighborhood Watch in your area please contact:

Tim Jones Newark Police Dept. (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org It’s time to stand up to crime. Together we can make a difference!

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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187

January 20, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


January 20, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

Page 37

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

January 20, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


January 20, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

Page 39 31 Page

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2012-01-20  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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