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Toastmaster Youth Leadership soars!

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

January 13, 2012

www.tricityvoice.com

“To the attentive eye each moment of the year has its own beauty and in the same field it beholds every hour a picture which was never seen before and which shall never be seen again.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

From Cicero (106-43 B.C.) to Shakespeare, writings and proverbs of many cultures have linked human eyes to the soul and spirit of man. It is said that through these “windows,” true

Vol. 11 No. 4

feelings and the essence of personal thoughts are communicated to others. “One Eye Shut,” a photographic exhibit showing at Olive Hyde Art Gallery through February 4, 2012 serves as a window for visitors to sample the insight of those who use a camera lens as a their connection to the world around us. Through a variety of medium, styles and subjects, a group of photographers have been selected to display their sight and interpretations of a myriad of feelings and moods. Among the 11 artists represented in One Eye Shut, Richard Leon says his scenic photos of the California coastline and Napa Valley allow him to “see the world one moment at a time, one experience at a time.” He adds that the moments observed and captured “filter through my mind, consciousness and heart.” Another photographic artist contributing to the exhibit, Michael Puff is a former theater set designer and scenic artist whose alter ego is a computer programmer. Exploring a variety of art forms since age five, he states that he prefers surreal continued on page 7

INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Saturday, Jan 14

Friday, Jan 13

Saturday, Jan 14

Saturday, Jan 14

Monday, Jan 16

Community Rummage Sale

Ballroom Dance Classes $ Beginners 7-8 pm, Intermediate & Advanced 8:15- 9:15 pm

Comedy Short Subject Night $

Community Rummage Sale

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

8:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

7:30 p.m.

Great bargains

9:30 a.m.

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

Five week dance class for couples ages 16 and older. Learn to Tango, Waltz, Samba and

"One AM", "The Caretaker's Daughter", "One Week", "Love 'em and Weep"

Celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Merengue. Bolero for intermediate and advance class.

Thursday, Jan 12

Fremont Adult School Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd , Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 (408) 586-2744

Gently used and clean items

High School Re-Entry Information Day

8:30 am - 9 pm Drop-in day for people re-entering school to earn their diploma

Saturday, Jan 14

Canine Capers - Dog Walk Friday, Jan 13

9 - 11 a.m.

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538

Spanish Story Time

Enjoy a nature walk with your four legged friends. Ages 8 and older, meet at Garin Barn Visitor

Friday, Jan 13

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

The Grapes of Wrath $

7 p.m. Depression-era drama

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd , Fremont, CA (510) 494-1411

4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Free program featuring stories, songs and rhymes for children who speak Spanish

Saturday, Jan 14

PROM EXPO

Rabbit Adoption Event

3 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.

12 noon - 3 p.m.

Information and advice about Prom Night

Irvington High School Valhalla Theatre 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 590-7510 (510) 656-5711

For tickets please contact: Rose Ortiz @ (209) 818-1279 Sarah Gomes @ (209) 204-3380

Tri-City Shelter bunnies need new homes. Free admission, adoption fees apply.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Center. Garin Regional Park 1320 Garin Ave., Hayward (510) 582-2206

The Brotherhood of St. Anthony Annual Crab Cioppino Dinner January 28 at the Newark Pavillion 6430 Thornton Ave, Newark Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. Raffle, Cake Wheel, Auction We have the best crab cioppino cooks from Tracy, CA under the direction of Manuel Victoria Tickets: $40 per person

Pet Food Express 39010 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 713-9999

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 (510) 270-8399

Saturday, Jan 14

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fremont City Council Seeks to Fill Vacancy in the Office of the Mayor SUBMITTED BY NADINE NADER The Fremont City Council announced on January 10, 2012, its plan to appoint a person to fill the vacancy in the Office of the Mayor, for approximately ten months, until the results of the November 6, 2012, General Municipal Election are certified. Those interested in being considered for the appointment to serve as the Mayor on the Fremont City Council are invited to submit a resume and letter of interest along with a Vacancy Application for the Office of the Mayor. The application can be obtained online at

January 13, 2012

www.Fremont.gov/CouncilVacancy or at Fremont City Hall, located at 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A. Applications may be submitted electronically to cclerk@fremont.gov or in person, at Fremont City Hall (address noted above). Completed applications must be returned to the Office of the City Clerk no later than Tuesday, January 17, 2012, at 5:00 p.m. Once the application period has closed, resumes and letters of interest will be distributed to the City Council for review. Based on the response, the City Council will decide at a Special Council Meeting on Monday, January 23, 2012, at 5:00 p.m. which process to use for the selection, including: 1. Decide to rank the top candidates and conduct interviews; or 2. Decide to interview all candidates and then make its decision. Interviews are tentatively scheduled to take place at another Special Council Meeting on Monday, January 30, 2012, at 5:00 p.m. Interest in serving on the City Council of the City of Fremont is greatly appreciated. All applicants must be a Fremont resident. For more information contact the Office of the City Clerk at (510) 284-4060.

Sudoku Solutions

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Enjoy Friday Night BINGO at SACBC BINGO

SUBMITTED BY JOY TSOU A one hour free program features stories, songs and rhymes for children who speak Spanish. Come to improve Spanish and have some fun in the same time. Presented in Spanish.

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info

Spanish Story Time Fridays, January 13 (and following Fridays) 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-area-news-groupmedianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website. www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999 We have over 925 signatures on change.org and over 800 have signed a petition at our office and in the community.We need more signatures.You can come to our office for a

petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012

January is here and it’s time to get moving. No matter what your goals are for the new year, exercise can help you reach them. “If your New Year’s resolution is to lose weight or improve your health, exercise can help you get there. It can also help to reduce stress and increase your ability to concentrate,” said Kathy Hesser, RN, Washington Women’s Center coordinator. “Now that the holidays are over, we can focus on our health.” Hesser will help women get started on their exercise plans when she presents “Exercise for Your Health,” on Wednesday, January 18, from 7 to 8 p.m. The free class will be held in the Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. You can register online at www.whhs.com or call (510) To help you get started on an exercise plan that's right for you, the Washington Women's Center is hosting a free class, “Exercise for Your Health,” on Wednesday, 608-1301 for more information. January 18, from 7 to 8 p.m. The class will be held in the Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont.You can register online at www.whhs.com or call (510) 608-1301 for more information. “Exercise offers so many health benefits,” Hesser said. sidetracked during the holidays and JanEach participant will have the opportuyou,” Hesser said. “Ladies Choice is an “And if your goal is to lose a few uary is a good time to get back on track nity to develop an individualized exercise individualized program that will provide pounds, it’s nearly impossible to do it and start exercising.” plan or routine that incorporates some of you with a great workout.” without exercising.” The class is designed to be motivathe exercises demonstrated in the class. Workout sessions include aerobic enIn addition to weight loss and other tional and interactive. Hesser will begin “Everyone can leave with an exercise durance training on a number of mabenefits, exercise can actually help to rewith exercises you can do in short increroutine that works for them and a plan chines, including the treadmill, duce your risk for a number of chronic ments for either a quick routine or a of action,” Hesser said. “It will make it stationary bicycle, rowing machine, and diseases, including diabetes and heart warm-up for a walk or run. much easier to get started.” elliptical; strength training using a disease, according to Hesser. Studies “It will include some stretching and Keep it Up weight bench and hand weights; stretchshow that physical activity strengthens exercises that help to wake up the musOnce you get started with your exercise ing; sit ups and other mat exercises. the heart muscle, increases good cholescles and joints,” she said. plan, it’s important to keep it up. The “Exercise is so important for overall terol, and lowers blood pressure, bad Next she will move to cardio exercises Washington Women’s Center offers a health and wellness,” Hesser said. “Now cholesterol, and blood sugar. Aerobic ex- that can be done indoors. These exercises number of programs that can help you stay is the time to get started or get back at ercise and strength training can also help help to increase the heart rate and provide motivated, including the Ladies Choice it. You will receive a lot of support and to prevent osteoporosis by slowing the an indoor alternative to running or power Fitness Program. Workout sessions are held encouragement at the Women’s Center.” loss of bone density. walking, she said. This will be followed on a walk-in basis from 2 to 6:30 p.m. on To learn more about Ladies Choice, Motivational and Interactive by strengthening exercises that can be done Tuesdays and Thursdays. go to www.whhs.com/ladieschoice. For “Even if you had a good routine bewithout equipment other than hand “The gym is clean and wellinformation about other services offered fore, it can be hard to get started,” weights. Hesser will end with some gentle equipped, and you get the benefit of a at the Washington Women’s Center, Hesser said. “Many times women are cool-down exercises. certified personal trainer who will assist visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Tuesday, Jan 17

Student Art Exhibition

5 p.m. -7 p.m. Annual Bachelor of Fine Art Student Exhibition reception

California State University, East Bay 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward (510) 885-3441 Wednesday, Jan 18

ARTSFund Grants workshop

3 - 4:30 p.m. Assist organizations to prepare grant applications

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 (510) 208-9646 Wednesday, Jan 18

Democratic Club Meeting

7 p.m. Monthly general meeting

Chandni Restaurant 5748 Mowry School Rd., Newark (510) 875-5006 Wednesday, Jan 18

Homeowner Energy workshop

6:30 p.m. Strategies to save money

City of Fremont Development Services Center, Niles Room 39550 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 494-4535 http://tricityenergyupgradeeorg Wednesday, Jan 18

Women's Council of REALTORS Luncheon$

11:30 - 1:30 p.m. Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 886-2662 Thursday, Jan 19

Transportation Forum

6:30 p.m. Open house and presentations re Alameda County Transportation

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 (510) 208-7400

expression. "Like theater, it is innovative, thought-provoking, and plays with reality and illusion." Some of his work is shown using a unique platinum/palladium printing process. Three dimensional objects are converted to a print or copy with “a limited degree of accuracy and an inevitable degree of distortion and deterioration” in presentations by Rene Bien. She says it mimics “the process of remembering and of the passing of time.” Another artist, Barbara Kyne, tries to connect emotional content and continued from page 1 convey “how it feels to be connected to something aesthetically and emotionally.” In a series of blurred images, “bodies and artworks are stripped of narrative and yet rich in color, shape, light and energy.” These artists represent just a sample of the visual experience available now at One Eye Shut through February 4, 2012 at Olive Hyde Art Gallery in Fremont. Peek through the lens of 11 artists – Rene Bien, Margaret Ann Cockrell, Annie Frantzeskos, Barbara Kyne, Ace Lehner, Richard Leon, Matthias Leue, Bill McClaren, Michael Puff, John Ricca and Mary K. Shisler - and explore the soul of photography.

One Eye Shut Through February 4 Thursday – Sunday 12 noon – 5 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov Works displayed in this exhibit are available for purchase.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012 Tribune Media Services

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Beauty and the Beast (G) Fri. - Thu. 1:50 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 2:10, 4:25, 6:50, 9:05 The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: A Game Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 4:20, 9:50 of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) The Grapes of Wrath (NR) 10:50, 1:45, 4:45, 7:40, 10:40 Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35 Fri. & Sat. 7:00 P.M. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) Fri. - Thu. 10:45, 1:40, 4:35, 7:30, 10:35 One A.M. (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M. The Caretaker's Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Daughter (NR) Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. One Week (NR) 12:20, 1:55, 3:20, 5:35, 6:30, 8:40, 9:30 Love 'Em and Weep (NR) The Girl With the Dragon Astronaut (NR) Fri. 4:30 P.M. Tattoo (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 2:40, Sat. 11:30, 3:30 6:55, 10:20

Sun. 11:30, 2:30

The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat.

Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 5:05, 10:15

Alvin and the Chipmunks: We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Thu. Thu. 12:45, 4:00, 7:10, 10:05 11:25, 1:55, 4:25, 7:00, 9:30 The Darkest Hour (PG–13) Sherlock Holmes: A Game Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 4:20, 9:50 of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 11:40, 3:15, 6:45, 10:00

Mission: Impossible -- Ghost The Iron Lady (PG–13) Fri. Protocol(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 1:30, Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55 4:30, 7:30, 10:30

6:30, 8:30

Contraband(R)Fri. - Tue. 11:25, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) 12:45, 2:00, 3:25, 4:40, 6:00, 7:30, Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 8:45, 10:15 10:50 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45 Beauty and the Beast (G) Fri. - Tue. 1:20, 6:00 Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Tue. 11:00, 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 11:00, 12:05, 1:15, 2:20, 3:30, 4:35, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:30 5:45, 6:50, 8:00, 9:05, 10:30 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30 Thu. 11:00, 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, The Adventures of Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Tue. 11:15, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 4:25, 10:00

The Girl With the Dragon The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) Tattoo (R)Fri. Sat. & Thu. 12:30, Fri. - Tue. 11:05, 3:35, 8:00

Beauty and the Beast 3D (G)

Fri. - Tue. 11:00, 3:40, 8:15

Secret of the Rocket (NR)

The Adventures of

Fri. - Thu. 2:00, 7:20

Sun. - Thu. 10:55, 12:05, 1:40, 2:55, Tintin(PG) 4:30, 5:40, 7:30, 8:50, 10:20

Beauty and the Beast (G) We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. - Fri. - Thu. 11:55, 4:55, 9:35 Thu. 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu. The Darkest Hour (PG–13) 12:00, 1:15, 2:20, 3:35, 4:40, 6:05,

Fri. - Thu. 1:15, 5:45, 10:15

Fri. 11:00, 12:00, 2:30 Sat. & Sun. 12:30, 2:30 Wed. 12:00 P.M. Thu. 11:00, 12:00

We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45

Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Fri. 1:00, 3:30 Sat. 1:30, 4:30 Sun. 1:30 P.M. Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

The Darkest Hour (PG–13)

Fri. - Thu. 1:45, 9:00

Sun. 4:15 P.M.

12:35, 3:10, 5:45, 8:20, 10:55 Fri. & Sat. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35, Joyful Noise (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 12:20, 1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 12:20 Sun. - Wed. 12:35, 3:10, 5:45, 8:20 5:50, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00, 11:20 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:20, 1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 5:50, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00

7:05, 8:15, 9:20, 10:50 2:35, 6:10, 9:45

Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:10, The Adventures of 12:35, 2:00, 3:25, 4:50, 6:15, 7:40, Tintin 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 2:25, 7:40 9:05, 10:30 Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Beauty and the Beast (G) Fri. - Thu. 10:50, 1:10, 2:30, 3:30, 5:50,

Fri. - Thu. 2:00

7:15, 8:10, 10:30

War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30

The Iron Lady (PG–13) Fri. & Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00 Sat. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40, 12:15 To Be an Astronaut (NR) Contraband(R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40 Fri. 1:00 P.M.

Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Nanban (NR) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20

The Twilight Saga: Beauty and the Beast (G) Alvin and the Chipmunks: Breaking Dawn Part 1(PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:10, 4:50, 9:30 Fri. Thu. 11:00, 6:15 Chipwrecked (G) Fri. - Tue. 11:00, 1:15, 3:35, 5:55, 8:10, 10:20 Hugo (PG) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:05, The Devil Inside (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 12:05, 1:10, 2:15, 3:20, Sherlock Holmes: A Game 4:55, 10:45 4:25, 5:30, 6:35, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50, of Shadows (PG–13)Fri. - Tue. Sun. - Wed. 11:05, 4:55 10:55, 12:01

12:30, 3:35, 7:05, 10:05

The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu.

The Adventures of Tintin(PG)

Fri. & Sat. 2:00, 7:10, 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 2:00, 7:10

Joyful Noise (PG–13) Fri. & The Girl With the Dragon Sat. Two Small Pieces of 10:55, 12:05, 1:40, 2:55, 4:30, 5:40, Glass (NR) Fri. & Sat. 7:30 P.M. Tattoo (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 3:30, 7:30, 8:50, 10:20, 11:35 7:00, 10:30

3:55, 7:20, 10:45 Sun. - Wed. 12:30, 3:55, 7:20

Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:05, 1:10, 2:15, Mission: Impossible -- Ghost The Sitter (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50, 3:20, 4:25, 5:30, 6:35, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50 Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. The Adventures of 12:01 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10, 10:30 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, Players (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 12:00, Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 3:35, 7:10, 10:45 4:35, 10:00 The Girl With the Dragon 7:40, 9:50 Sun. - Wed. 12:00, 3:35, 7:10 Alvin and the Chipmunks: (R)Fri. Tue. 12:00, 3:30, Tattoo The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) (PG–13) Fri. New Year's Eve 7:00, 10:20 (G) Fri. Thu. Chipwrecked Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 3:30, 8:00 Thu. 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Hugo 3D (PG) Fri. - Thu. 2:00, 7:50 12:15, 2:45, 5:00, 7:25, 9:55 The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Fri. - Tue. 1:50, 7:10 Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Adventures of Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35 Tintin 3D (PG)Fri. - Thu. 11:25, Protocol (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. We Bought a Zoo (PG) Fri. - Chipwrecked (G) Fri. Sat. & 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 10:00

12:30, 3:50, 7:10, 10:20

Tue. 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:25 Thu. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30, 11:55 4:35, 9:45

Joyful Noise (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. The Darkest Hour (PG–13) Sun. - Wed. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 The Darkest Hour 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. 1:20, 5:50, 10:15 11:10, 1:55, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Sherlock Holmes: A Game Fri. Sat. & Thu. 4:00, 11:15 Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:20, War Horse (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. of Shadows (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Sun. - Wed. 4:00 Contraband(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 2:10, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 12:20, 3:45, 7:15, 10:25 11:00, 12:30, 1:55, 3:25, 4:50, 6:20, 2:00, 4:35, 7:45, 10:25 Beauty and the Beast 3D (G) Fri. & Sat. 12:30, 3:10, 5:45, 8:45, 11:20 The Devil Inside (R)Fri. - Thu. Joyful Noise(PG–13)Fri. - Tue. 7:45, 9:15, 10:40, 12:10 11:00, 12:25, 1:50, 3:15, 4:40, 6:00, Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:30, 1:55, 3:25, Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 1:20, 2:30, 3:40, Sun. - Thu. 12:30, 3:10, 5:45, 8:45

12:20, 2:40, 4:50, 7:05, 9:30

7:30, 8:50, 10:20

4:50, 6:20, 7:45, 9:15

6:00, 7:10, 8:20, 10:40, 11:50

Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:20, 2:30, 3:40, New Year's Eve (PG–13) Fri. - The Adventures of Tintin(PG) Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, Thu. 11:00, 12:30, 1:55, 3:25, 4:50, 6:00, 7:10, 8:20 Thu. 1:35, 7:00 Fri. - Thu. 1:40, 7:15 10:00 6:20, 7:45, 9:15, 10:40


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY IRENE JORDAHL "Hidden Treasures/Local Talent" presents the work of local artists working in various mediums from traditional and contemporary visual arts to contemporary craft. Innovation is encouraged, all works must be original (no production work) and may include submissions of painting, drawing, printmaking, fiber arts, photography, sculpture, craft and mixed media. All work must be made from 2008 to current and be ready to hang upon delivery. Works not deemed "ready to hang" may not be accepted at delivery. No duplicate entries from prior Olive Hyde Exhibitions. A reception, hosted by the Olive Hyde Art Guild, will be held Friday, February 17, 7-9 pm.

SUBMITTED BY GREG WILSON For many people, ringing in the New Year brings hope and joyful anticipation. But for those who struggle with stuttering, the old fears of speaking

Submission of works must include: Short (one paragraph) bios and artist statement no more than 8000 characters (roughly 1000 words). Must include mailing address. Up to 10 images in support of your proposal. Images in JPEG format (images used for postcard will be requested at 300 dpi). Please list image title, dimensions, year, in email submission. Upon acceptance, an entry fee of $15. Hidden Treasures/Local Talent Feb 17 to Mar 17, 2012 Submittal Deadline: Feb 1, 2012 Acceptance Announcement by: Feb 3, 2012 Delivery of work: Feb 5, 2012 Submit proposals to Exhibitions Assistant Curator, Gloria Kim, via email at: kimglo@gmail.com

and being teased are the same. “I was picked on so much about my stuttering,” recalls 16-year-old Peter, “that I wouldn’t even go to lunch because I didn’t want to sit at a table by myself.”

“I don’t raise my hand in class because I’m worried about what others might think,” says 14-year-old Juan. A typical school day can be fraught with painfully embarcontinued on page 27

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

January 13, 2012

Obituaries

Marie C. Rose Joan I. O’Neil RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 30, 1933 - December 15, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 5, 1916 - January 4, 2012

Betty Allen

Ralph B. Huerta

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 10, 1926 - January 4, 2012

William J. Stout

RESIDENT OF ARIZONA July 14, 1923 - January 5, 2012

RESIDENT Obituary OF MOUNTAIN VIEW October 17, 1955 - December 26, 2011 RESIDENT OF UNION CITY March 3, 1925-December 30, 2011

Charles G. Cullen RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 21, 1930 - January 5, 2012

Doris H. Agins RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 25, 1918 - January 6, 2012

Frank L. Smith, Sr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 16, 1923 - January 8, 2012

Joseph L. Reichmuth RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 30, 1915 - January 10, 2012

Laverne J. Rose RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 3, 1928 - January 10, 2012

Carol J. Rose RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 29, 1948 - January 11, 2012

Fremont Chapel of the Roses FD1007 (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Stella Ayers

Robert A. Souza RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 8, 1941 - January 8, 2012

Alice Soong RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 26, 1921 - January 9, 2012

Nick Nardo RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 10, 1937 - January 9, 2012

Nauroz A, Sheikh RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON September 7, 1934 - January 10, 2012 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.


January 13, 2012

Obituary

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Miss Barbara” Sprott Nov 22, 1930 – Dec 25, 2011

“Miss Barbara” contributed a gentle smile and calm demeanor as she helped shape thousands of lives of young children attending the First Presbyterian Church of Newark Preschool. During 34 years of service at the school as director and teacher, several generations of students – and their parents were influenced by Miss Barbara who prepared them

for kindergarten and life in general from 1968 until her retirement. The secret to her success was a love for people and an understanding that a smile and composed attitude was necessary to “keep cool”

when young charges were not quite perfect. She is quoted as saying, “You have to understand they haven’t been on Earth a long time.” A child tugging at her for attention was a common occurrence during those years; all, in turn, received the love and care they needed. Years later, the respect, affection and honesty of Miss Barbara was cherished and remembered by former students and returned when the opportunity arose. At retirement, she remembered a full life of active participation in many lives and noted that her career had been “awesome” and she felt “blessed.” Barbara Sprott passed away peacefully at home early Christmas morning 2011 at 81 years of age. Born in Berkeley November 22, 1930, Barbara attended Berkeley High and the University of California-Berkeley where she met her husband Vernon Sprott; they married in 1947. Vernon passed away in 1976. She is survived by daughter Donna Sprott of Fremont; Daughter Judy and Son-in-law Ken Plunkett, grandchildren Michael and Ann Marie and Great-Grandson Noah of El Cajon, CA. Friends and past students are invited to a memorial service and potluck on Saturday, January 21 at 2 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Newark, 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark. The potluck is a fond remembrance of a tradition held at the end of every school year at the preschool. Miss Barbara would host a graduation potluck for the children going on to kindergarten. In keeping with that tradition, we are going to have a pot luck gathering at the church after the service.

Page 11 11 Page


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Branch 59 Retired men who enjoy leisure time with new friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Call 1-877-747-9066 Visit www.sirinc.org

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 www.sshsa.org

Country Club of Washington Township Women’s Club First Tuesday of each month at 1:00 pm October through June St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace (off Thornton Ave., Fremont) maryingold06@sbcglobal.net 510-656-2521 FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. A.M.A.C. The new Conservative AARP.Now over 200,000 members. ATTENTION-Lions, Rotary, TEA, VFW, American Legion, SIRS. Speakers available. Call to schd., Jan-April 510-938-1118 amacwest@aol.com Association of Mature American Citizens’ Go to our Website www.amac.us

Fremont Cribbage Club Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

New Fremont Chess Club www.newfremontchessclub.org

• Unrated, Bi-Monthly Cash Blitz Tournaments • Expert Lectures • Summer Camps • Casual Games & Blitz All Ages - Fridays - 8-11pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-623-9935

Serious Mental Illness FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Sat., Jan 7, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email: joerose707@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2f.blogspot.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Jazzinators East Bay Youth Jazz Band Tues 11/1 & 15 & 12/13 & 27 Bronco Billy’s, Irvington 7-8pm - No Cover chg. https://eastbaytradjazz.org 657-0243 John Soulis, Dir. Mission Gold Jazz Band at Swiss Park 1st & 3rd Wed. 7-9pm

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Is Food a Problem for You? Overeaters Anonymous NO dues - NO fees - NO diets Monday 7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m. St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Ter, Fremont Saturday 10:30 a.m. - Noon 1st Presbyterian Church 35450 Newark Blvd, Newark southernalamedacountyoa.org


January 13, 2012

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

BOOK CLUB NIGHTS Fremont Dahn Yoga Center 42130 Blacow Rd. Fremont Starts on Thurs, Oct 27th Tues from 7:20 to 8:30 PM. Non Members welcome! Call of Sedona by Ilchi Lee Free classes w/book purchase 510-979-1130 for more info

BART Silicon Valley Berryessa Extension Project anticipates federal grant SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) learned on January 9, 2012, that its $900M-grant request for the BART Silicon Valley Berryessa Extension Project has received all of the administrative approvals from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). VTA can expect the award of funds through a full funding grant agreement (FFGA) 60 days from the date of notification. The execution of an FFGA with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is the final step before active construction can commence on the project, planned for Spring 2012. The FFGA is the multi-year contractual agreement between the FTA and VTA that formally defines the project scope, cost and schedule and establishes the terms of the $900M in federal financial assistance. “The BART Silicon Valley Project has had years of design and planning and I’m proud to see this important, job-creation project become a reality,” said U.S. Congressman Mike Honda. “As a current Member of the House Appropriations Committee and a former Member of the House Transportation Committee, I promised my constituents I’d fight to ensure the BART Silicon Valley Project receives the federal funds it deserves. Today’s news is one step closer to making good on that promise.”

VTA submitted a grant application to the FTA in June 2011. In mid-December 2011, following review of VTA’s grant request, the FTA presented an FFGA packet to the Federal Office of Management and Budget and to the Office of the Secretary of Transportation. Both offices approved the

Page 13

grant packet before submittal, complete with project scope, schedule and cost summary, to Congress on January 9, 2012, with a recommendation for the grant award and to begin the mandatory 60-day congressional notification period. During this period, House and Senate committees may seek additional project information prior to execution of the grant award. The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Silicon Valley Project is a 16-mile extension of the existing BART system to San Jose, Milpitas and Santa Clara, which will be delivered through a phased approach. The first phase, the Berryessa Extension, is a 10-mile, two-station extension, beginning in Fremont south of the future BART Warm Springs Station and proceeding in the former Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way through Milpitas, the location of the first station, and then to the Berryessa area of north San Jose, at the second station. VTA continues project development activities for the second 6-mile phase of the project that includes a 5.1 mile-long subway tunnel through downtown San Jose, and ends at grade in Santa Clara near the Caltrain Station. Construction on the second phase of the project will commence as additional funding is secured. For more information about BART Silicon Valley, contact VTA Community Outreach at (408) 934-2662, (TTY only) (408) 321-2330, or visit www.vta.org/bart.


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012

HOME SALES REPORT

Company announces low-cost DNA decoding machine BY MALCOLM RITTER AP SCIENCE WRITER NEW YORK (AP), Jan 10 A biotechnology company announced it has developed a machine to decode a person's DNA in a day for $1,000, a long-sought price goal for making a person's genome useful for medical care. Life Technologies Corp. said Tuesday it was taking orders for the technology, which it expects to deliver in about a year. The Carlsbad, Calif., company said three major research institutions had already signed up for the $149,000 machine: the Baylor College of Medicine, the Yale School of Medicine and the Broad Institute of Cambridge, Mass. A second company, Illumina of San Diego, also introduced a new technology Tuesday that it said will decode an entire genome in about 24 hours. Its statement did not estimate the cost per genome. The machines, called sequencers, allow scientists to identify the arrangement of the 3 billion chemical building blocks that make up a person's DNA. continued on page 15

CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 16 Highest $: 700,000 Median $: 394,000 Lowest $: 192,000 Average $: 427,875 ADDRESS

ZIP

21106 Aspen Avenue 3152 Barlow Drive 3134 Brent Court 21293 Kahlert Street 22266 Lantana Court 2946 Massachusetts Street 21465 Orange Avenue 18852 Parsons Avenue 17040 Rolando Avenue 4031 Seven Hills Road 4520 Seven Hills Road 5179 Chesney Glen Drive 25767 Cloverfield Court 25793 Durrwood Court 21354 Justco Lane 5673 Shadow Ridge Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

337,000 340,000 419,000 368,000 317,000 440,000 385,000 394,000 192,000 375,000 530,000 465,000 700,000 676,000 435,000 473,000

3 3 5 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 4 5 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1660 1284 2248 1318 1466 1630 1509 1240 852 1094 1642 1537 2280 2698 1511 1723

1954 1951 1969 1959 1956 1937 1938 1956 1942 1948 1956 1998 1998 1998 1990 1972

11-28-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 37 Highest $: 1,165,000 Median $: Lowest $: 112,000 Average $: ADDRESS

35131 Arbordale Court 37719 Arlene Court 38332 Ballard Drive 38873 Bass Common 37917 Bright Common 38457 Canyon Heights Drive 37900 Essanay Place 3283 Foxtail Terrace 45 Gazania Terrace 35619 Goldsmith Drive 38599 Granville Drive 165 Joan Terrace 37433 Parish Circle #1D 3395 Pinewood Terrace #101 107 Ray Court 3248 Red Cedar Terrace 36858 San Pedro Drive 123 Santos Court 38529 Vancouver Common 3562 Fitzsimmons Common 40438 Gibson Street 4181 Hawkins Street 4214 Margery Drive 39122 Sundale Drive 39375 Sutter Drive 3968 Wildflower Common 39364 Wilford Street 3300 Wolcott Common #216 40569 Ambar Place 42943 Corte Galicia 41336 Denise Street 43557 Excelso Drive 34192 Aberdeen Terrace 5252 Fairbanks Common 34586 Shenandoah Place 3828 Springfield Common

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555

5965 Tan Oak Drive

402,000 426,432

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

475,000 410,000 550,000 375,000 365,000 330,000 335,000 116,000 290,000 645,000 431,000 440,000 195,000 228,000 910,000 149,000 232,000 745,000 184,000 410,500 275,000 240,500 348,000 572,000 405,000 309,000 380,000 112,000 935,000 402,000 735,000 1,165,000 215,000 415,000 455,000 574,000

1302 792 1238 1178 1717 1120 1408 593 1378 2236 1588 1664 942 1125 3346 750 960 2410 976 1638 925 925 1107 3368 1358 1433 1180 712 2116 968 1508 2560 1166 1250 1305 1760

1993 1951 1959 1994 1977 1955 1981 1986 1991 1979 1963 1989 1989 1987 1989 1986 1982 1980 1978 1997 1954 1955 1959 1964 1959 1987 1962 1983 1969 1971 1955 1984 1970 1989 1972 1998

11-28-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-28-11 11-29-11 11-28-11 11-28-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 12-01-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-01-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 11-30-11

3 2 3 2 3 3 4 1 3 4 3 3 2 2 5 2 2 4 2 3 3 3 3 8 3 3 1 4 2 3 3 3 2 3 3

94555

425,000

3

1387

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 37 Highest $: 490,000 Median $: Lowest $: 91,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1315 A Street #311 94541 607 Arcadia Drive 94541 3251 Bridle Drive 94541 1791 East Avenue 94541 24717 Echo Springs Drive 94541 152 El Dorado Avenue 94541 22114 Hesperian Boulevard 94541 3307 Jamie Way 94541 23163 Klamath Road 94541 22648 Mossy Rock Drive 94541 18865 Standish Avenue 94541 929 Sueirro Street 94541 3013 Woodroe Court 94541 27947 Farm Hill Drive 94542 1042 Major Avenue 94542 25859 Spring Drive 94542 25901 Spring Drive 94542 3949 Star Ridge Road 94542 31059 Brae Burn Avenue 94544 30713 Carroll Avenue 94544 841 Douglas Street 94544 159 Goodrich Street 94544 1355 Henderson Lane 94544 31601 Medinah Street 94544 31833 Medinah Street 94544 1057 Nancy Court 94544 28250 Pacific Street 94544 28678 Ruus Road 94544 414 St. Andrews Street 94544 26019 Stanwood Avenue 94544 26501 Underwood Avenue 94544 29067 Caravan Lane 94545 2651 Darwin Street 94545 27755 Miami Avenue 94545 819 Poinciana Street 94545 27402 Sleepy Hollow Avenue #S94545 1256 Stanhope Lane #152 94545

SOLD FOR BDS

91,000 210,000 390,000 310,000 252,000 150,000 280,000 300,000 272,500 300,000 316,000 262,000 348,000 450,000 282,500 206,500 320,000 490,000 250,000 235,000 190,000 282,000 299,000 330,000 232,500 162,000 294,000 283,500 348,000 221,000 200,000 320,000 313,000 220,000 297,000 250,000 104,000

1 2 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2

ZIP

163 Butler Street 1500 Canton Drive 416 Dempsey Road #118 1121 Kovanda Way 1364 Lowland Court 479 Maple Avenue 1371 Mt. Shasta Avenue 310 San Petra Court #1 496 Sark Court 700 South Abel Street #419 1348 Yosemite Drive

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

575,000 400,000 184,000 685,000 225,000 400,000 405,000 190,000 610,000 325,000 553,000

4 3 2 4 2 3 4 3 3 2 4

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 460,000 Median $:

282,000 271,932

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

944 1179 2034 1784 1607 600 1162 1280 1471 1280 1664 1352 2049 2650 1082 1264 1591 4120 1134 1161 1012 1390 1666 1368 1233 1219 1500 1135 1419 1059 1046 1604 1128 1264 1601 1215 1007

1984 2005 1957 1958 1981 1922 1952 1979 1951 1978 1989 1950 1985 1972 1951 1951 1951 1980 1955 1955 1960 1952 1954 1956 1956 1987 1952 1955 1955 1952 1952 2010 1956 1955 1959 1956 1989

11-30-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 12-01-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-30-11

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 685,000 Median $: Lowest $: 184,000 Average $: ADDRESS

2007 12-01-11

400,000 413,818

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2215 1141 842 2412 1005 1036 1567 1050 1757 1259 1921

1956 1958 2007 1978 1973 1960 1981 1971 1979 2007 1963

12-16-11 12-13-11 12-19-11 12-14-11 12-16-11 12-16-11 12-13-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-15-11 12-16-11

352,000


January 13, 2012 Lowest $: ADDRESS

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE 178,000 ZIP

5034 Abbotford Court 39887 Cedar Boulevard #247 6084 Fair Avenue 35235 Farnham Drive 6651 George Avenue 5520 Jonathan Drive

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

Average $: SOLD FOR BDS

460,000 178,000 354,000 437,500 256,000 352,000

3 2 3 3 3

ZIP

833 Bancroft Avenue 1203 Gardner Boulevard 2153 Hillside Circle 552 Juana Avenue 1078 Melcher Street 1302 Oakes Boulevard 2048 Wallace Avenue 1528 141st Avenue 1666 163rd Avenue 756 Barri Drive 1650 Brockton Way 14835 East 14th Street #20 15260 Hesperian Boulevard 1336 Margery Avenue 16060 Mateo Street 15655 Maubert Avenue 14749 Saturn Drive 14811 Towers Street 14618 Corvallis Street 15644 Cranbrook Street 15490 Dowicher Court 2256 Regatta Court

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

442,500 325,000 607,500 273,500 246,000 421,000 205,000 240,000 221,000 321,500 105,000 157,500 140,000 278,000 163,500 205,000 295,000 280,000 232,000 330,000 369,000 416,000

3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 6 3 2 2 3 3 2 2 4 3 3 3 4 4

BUILT

CLOSED

2144 1071 1080 1500 1012 1671

1971 1986 1955 1970 1947 1959

12-02-11 11-30-11 12-01-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 12-02-11

ZIP

15787 Via Arroyo 17240 Via San Ardo 1689 Via Ventana

94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

185,500 210,000 350,000

3 3 3

BUILT

CLOSED

2250 2108 2578 1168 1024 1734 1028 1028 2688 1480 815 958 1400 1317 1092 849 2022 1277 1081 1414 1544 2013

1941 1942 1975 1902 1943 1974 1944 1942 1915 1955 1997 1980 1947 1900 1953 1961 1948 1951 1958 1999 1998

11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-28-11 12-02-11 12-02-11 11-29-11

33737 10th Street 33433 4th Street 33355 8th Street 2567 Bing Court 4925 Caspar Street 4223 Chapalla Way 2707 Cherry Blossom Way 33044 Corning Court 705 East Street 3018 Flint Street #64 34896 Herringbone Way 1330 I Street 1057 Pearl Terrace 395 Riviera Drive 31395 Santa Ana Way 33798 Trailside Way 2578 Village Drive #28

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

183,500 240,000 108,500 380,000 375,000 195,000 390,000 379,000 325,000 186,000 410,000 252,500 350,000 385,000 335,000 675,000 271,000

2 3 2 4 3 2 4 3 4 2 4 2 2 3 3 5 3

Since the first sequencing of the basic human genome was announced at the White House in 2000, the costs of sequencing DNA have steadily tumbled. The $1,000 target has long been cited as a key step toward making the technique practical for doctors to use to help their patients, such as for revealing vulnerabilities to certain diseases or tailoring medical treatment. Sequencing whole genomes is now done primarily for research. It's different from the service some companies offer to consumers that cover just part of the genome or particular spots in it, such as for information on ancestry or disease susceptibility. The $1,000 cost for a whole genome is about the same as many of today's lab tests, said Chad Nussbaum, co-director of

continued from page 14

the Genome Sequencing and Analysis Program at the Broad Institute. Tuesday's announcement is “bringing the DNA sequence closer” to being affordable and fast enough for doctors to use, Nussbaum said. If the machine works as expected, a doctor might send a patient's DNA to a lab and get useful information back in about a week, he said. Whether genomes from the new machine will actually cost exactly $1,000 will depend on how one calculates that figure, Nussbaum said. But even if it's just in the neighborhood, the technology could become widely adopted by doctors, he said. Richard Gibbs, who directs the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor, said, “We will see if the machines really perform as well as described” in terms of cost and accuracy.

“We're optimistic.” Nussbaum emphasized that uncovering a deluge of DNA data about a patient is one thing, and being able to analyze it for useful information is quite another. “You've got to glean the news out of the genome and you've got to give it to the doctor in a usable way,” he said. The ability to do that analysis is still “a developing story,” he said. In the shorter term, the relatively low cost of the machine itself is important because it will let more research laboratories get into DNA sequencing, Nussbaum said. Shares of Life Technologies closed Tuesday at $46.17, up 8.3 percent. Online: Life Technologies: www.lifetechnologies.com

210,000 248,500

SQFT

BUILT

1062 1431 1687

1946 11-29-11 1950 12-02-11 1954 11-30-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 675,000 Median $: Lowest $: 108,500 Average $: ADDRESS

273,500 285,182

SQFT

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 350,000 Median $: Lowest $: 185,500 Average $: ADDRESS

DNA

SQFT

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 22 Highest $: 607,500 Median $: Lowest $: 105,000 Average $: ADDRESS

339,583

Page 15

CLOSED

335,000 320,029

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

826 1204 560 1909 1268 1054 1544 1657 1987 908 1859 540 1203 1932 1449 2521 1524

1955 1963 1930 1970 1984 1972 1973 1980 1987 1987 1997 1948 2007 1965 1970 1999 1985

11-28-11 11-28-11 11-28-11 11-30-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 11-30-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 11-29-11 12-02-11 11-29-11 11-28-11 11-30-11 12-02-11

BY TERENCE CHEA ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jan 10 - California community college leaders have signed off on major policy changes aimed at boosting graduation and transfer rates in the 112-campus system, despite concerns the measures could hurt disadvantaged students. The 22 recommendations will go to the state Legislature for review after the California Community Colleges' governing board on Monday endorsed the measures recommended by the state-appointed Student Success Task Force. Backers believe the proposals, if implemented, will help more students complete degree and certificate programs and transfer to University of California and California State University campuses. That would help reduce the number of dropouts and create a more educated workforce.

“We're really doing all that we can to ensure student success,” Chancellor Jack Scott said Tuesday. “We want to have as few casualties as possible.” Measures endorsed by the board would: - Give priority registration to first-time students and students making progress toward their academic goals. - Take priority registration or fee waivers from students who fail to make adequate progress. - Require all incoming students to develop education plans shortly after matriculating. - Have campuses give priority to courses needed for degree and certificate programs over enrichment courses catering to older adults. - Require campuses to keep scorecards to track completion and transfer rates of students of different backgrounds. continued on page 21


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012

SUBMITTED BY DANA HERNANDEZ

SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER, MVROP The Mission Valley Regional Occupational Program (MVROP) Automotive Technology Program, located on the Washington High campus, created and submitted a video to the Universal Technical Institute (UTI) Foundation’s “Drive to Succeed” contest. The contest requires interested Automotive Technology programs to submit a three minute video demonstrating their need for the potential donation towards an automotive shop makeover of up to $25,000 for first place, $10,000 for second place, and $5,000 for third place. Out of the 70 videos that were submitted for consideration of this prize money, our video has made it to the top eight video finalists. The next step in the contest is where the community has a chance to help decide the winner of the prize money. So now is the time to “Rev up the Votes” and help our students win the contest! The UTI Foundation has posted the final top eight videos on their Facebook page to allow the public to vote for their favorite video. To vote, by the January 18, noon MST deadline, please refer to the instructions listed below. Go to the UTI Foundation Facebook page, click on the “Auto Shop Video” link on the left side of the page. Look for the video titled “Washington High School” and click the “Vote” button. To help get the word out to as many people as possible, please share the link and “Like” our video. (The direct link for the video gallery is https://apps.facebook.com/drivetosucceed/index2.php. Established in 1969, Mission Valley ROP (MVROP) is the regional occupational program for the Tri-City area and has been instrumental in preparing students for successful business, medical, and technical careers. For more information, visit www.mvrop.org.

pair will connect virtually and work through an original project that the finalist will present at the final event in October. Follow these three easy steps to enter: SUBMITTED BY NIMA THANANJEYAN The 2012 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge is now officially open for entries! Students in grades 5 - 8 can enter for a chance to win $25,000, a trip to 3M’s global headquarters to work alongside leading scientists, and the coveted title of America’s Top Young Scientist. Ten finalists will have an exclusive opportunity to work directly with a 3M scientist during a summer mentorship program. Each

1. Parents submit an online consent form at www.youngscientistchallenge.com 2. Parents fill out a registration form and choose a username/password. 3. Students login to upload a quick 1-2 minute science video about a possible solution to an everyday problem. Deadline for submissions is April 19. For video topic guidelines, tips from previous winners and more, visit www.youngscientistchallenge.com. For questions, email YSC@discovery.com.

Each year, the Union City Chamber of Commerce hosts the "Community Spirit Awards," which recognizes four people who have made huge contributions to the residents and businesses in Union City. This year, we will honor an employee from the City of Union City, the New Haven Unified School District, a Volunteer of the Year and a Chamber Business. The Union City Chamber is proud to announce that once again, we will also be awarding a Union City business with the "Best Green Business" Award. Please join us in an afternoon of networking, lunch and giving support to our community leaders that are so deserving of this prestigious award. Learn more about the leaders in our community and what drives them. Be inspired! And the winners are..... Best Green Business: Emerald Packaging Incorporated Business: Jody Stowers, General Manager, Walmart Education: Nancy George, Director, Adult Education & Intervention Services Government: Gregory Stewart, Past Chief of Police, Union City Police Department Volunteer of the Year: Cindy O'Brien, President, New Haven Schools Foundation Community Spirit Awards Luncheon Thursday, Jan 19 11:30 a.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel 32083 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 952-9637 dana@unioncitychamber.com $35 per person

Red Light Camera Protest Group SUBMITTED BY ROGER JONES The first organizing meeting of the Red Light Camera Protest Group will be held at Mountain Mike's Pizza in the Brookvale Shopping Center next to Lucky's on Monday Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. 35760 Fremont Blvd. in Fremont. Initial focus will be on Fremont, Newark, and Hayward but is not limited to these cities. The goal will be to raise public consciousness as to just how ineffective the massive ticketing programs in these cities have been. Ways to show how extending the yellow light times as well as ways to curtail cities relying on revenue from rolling right turns will be discussed. Fremont, Newark, and Hayward, combined, issue approximately 31,000 camera tickets annually with no evidence as to safety benefits. RSVP appreciated but not required. Email: rlouisj@aol.com


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 17

City of Fremont Board/Commission Vacancies

SUBMITTED BY JESSIE MANGALIMAN Kaiser Permanente is now soliciting and accepting applications for its 2012 Community Benefit Grants Program in southern Alameda County. The deadline for online application is Monday, Jan. 16 at 4 p.m. Non-profit community groups and government agencies are encouraged to apply for these health grants. For nearly 60 years, Kaiser Permanente’s social mission has been the foundation of its community service programs. “These grants speak to the core work of Kaiser Permanente: improving the health of our members and the communities we serve,” said Sylvia Jimenez, Community Benefit Manager for Kaiser Permanente in southern Alameda County. “These grants address health care disparities and we’re inviting community groups to apply.” Last year, Kaiser Permanente distributed more than $800,000 to 40 community organizations whose work ranged from preventing cyberbullying in schools in San Leandro; preventing youth violence through a tattoo removal program in Hayward and Fremont; to online classes on managing diabetes for Hindi and Punjabi speaking residents in the county. Funding priorities this year include: reduce obesity in adults and children; reduce teen pregnancy rates; improve access to prevention and primary care services; improve prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease; and increasing violence prevention and education. The funding range for community grants this year is in two categories: new and innovative community grants range from $5,000 to $15,000; collaborative grants range from $15,000 to $30,000, in which two or more groups partner in a project. The project time line will run from April 1, 2012 to Dec. 31, 2012. Applicants will be notified of the status of their application by March 23. To apply online, visit: http://info.kp.org/communitybenefit/html/our_communities/northerncalifornia/alamedaco/. Scroll down to “Application Process and Timeline.” For questions, contact Arleen Carino, Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit Specialist, at 510-618-5807 or email at arleen.r.carino@kp.org.

Economic Development Advisory Commission – One vacancy (Commercial/Industrial) Term to expire 12/31/2014 George W. Patterson House Advisory Board – One vacancy (Citizen At Large) Term to expire 12/31/2013 Historical Architectural Review Board – Two vacancies Terms to expire 12/31/2015 Human Relations Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014

Library Advisory Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014 Planning Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2015 Advisory Body Applications can be obtained at: http://www.fremont.gov/index.aspx?NID=76 or you may obtain an application from the City Clerk’s Office, 3300 Capitol Ave, Bldg A, 510284-4060


Page 18 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD January 10: Officers were dispatched to a report of possible in-progress residential burglary at 4300 block of Hardwood Street. The victim reported two juvenile males knocked on her front door and when she did not answer they entered her backyard. While in the backyard, the males attempted to open a window. Responding officers set up a perimeter and attempted to contact the subjects; however, as the officers arrived, the males jumped the fence and were last seen heading toward Fairwood. Officers were able to track at least one of the subjects to an address on Fairwood (home of a probationer). After a short yard-to-yard search, officers conducted a probation search of the Fairwood address and located the two 16-year-old suspects. The suspects were positively identified and arrested for attempted burglary. A special thanks to CHP for providing air support and to Officer Lambert for responding with his dog. Investigated by Officer Allsup and Field Training Officer Rodriguez. January 11: Officers responded to the Carrington Apartments, 38900 Blacow Road, on a report of an in-progress residential burglary. The victim reported an unknown person knocked on her front door. The victim did not answer the door and within a few minutes a Hispanic male in his 20s attempted to climb through her bathroom window. When the victim confronted the suspect, he fled toward Blacow Road. A perimeter was set and the area was

January 13, 2012

searched; however, the suspect was not located The incident was investigated by Officer Allsup. A 17 year-old Kennedy student was walking home and approached by a male offering her a ride and making inappropriate comments near Sundale/Boone. The suspect is described as a dark skinned male, 27-30 years old, 5’07”-5’08”, with dark hair. Suspect vehicle is a black 90’s model Toyota or Honda 4-door. This description matches similar cases in the area. Investigated by Officer Butcher. A residential burglary was reported in the 34800 block of Armour Way. Entry was via a forced rear door. Loss is jewelry/electronic. Investigated by Officer Spear. Victim's teenage daughter arrives home in the 4000 block of Stanley Avenue and finds the home was recently been burglarized. Responding officers cleared the residence. Entry was via the back door. Loss is electronics/jewelry. Investigated by Officer Allsup A residential burglary occurred at the Ramblewood Apartments. Entry was via front window. Loss was laptop and jewelry. January 12: Officer Stone responded to Kennedy HS in regard to a suspicious circumstance. A 14 year-old female was walking home from school and noticed a dark green 4-door sedan following her. The vehicle was driven by an Indian male, black mustache; 3040’s wearing no shirt. The victim stated as she was walking, the vehicle kept pace with her and would not pass her. The vehicle eventually left the area when she attempted to notify people at Walter’s Jr. High. continued on page 28

Newark Police Log

SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD

January 6: Officers responded to Home Depot at 1:48 p.m. and investigated a robbery that had occurred approximately 45 minutes earlier. Investigation revealed the suspect, later identified as Jeffrey Caton, age 38 of Fremont, brandished a knife and threatened loss prevention personnel when they attempted to apprehend him for stealing landscape irrigation equipment. There were no injuries sustained during the incident. The suspect was identified by officers as they recognized the suspect who had been captured on surveillance footage from previous contacts. Later in the day about 3 p.m., officers responded to Work World at Newpark Mall and investigated a theft in which the suspect had stolen employees’ credit cards, debit cards as well as an iPod from a back room. The suspect’s description was consistent with that of Canton. At 4:04 p.m., as officers were conducting their investigation and searching for Canton, the victim from the Work World theft learned that her stolen credit card had been used to complete an unauthorized transaction at a nearby retail tobacco supply store, Twilight Zone Gift and Smoke Shop (5970 Mowry Avenue). That store is approximately one quarter-quarter mile away from the Work World store. The victim went to that location and encountered Caton near the Twilight Zone store. continued on page 21

SUBMITTED BY RENEE SNYDER On Thursday, January 12, 2012, Hayward Fire Department presented a check for $7,500 to St. Rose Hospital Foundation for the Women’s Imaging Center. These honorable Hayward firemen held a fundraiser to support breast cancer awareness and to ensure women in our community have access to high quality, early detection mammogram screenings. They were determined to raise funds – at any length! How the funds were raised was creative, eye-catching and certainly did the trick! During October 2011, Hayward firefighters were spotted wearing vibrant pink teeshirts that boldly stated “Firefighters Care Enough to Wear Pink”. Each firefighter purchased the shirt they wore and sold shirts to their families and friends. They were so well-received by their loved ones that they took to the streets and even spent one day bagging groceries at Safeway while selling these shirts to customers. Thanks to the Hayward Fire Department for their generous donation and their unwavering support of the women in our community! For more information about St. Rose Hospital and the St. Rose Hospital Foundation, visit www.srhca.org


January 13, 2012

“Ruby” Ruby is a red and white, female, Pit Bull. She is roughly a year old. Ruby is a gentle soul that is just looking for a family to share her love with. She loves people and always wants to be near someone. Ruby is very playful with other dogs and does not seem to mind her feline counterparts. Ruby deserves a second chance, and if you think you could be the forever family for her, come visit her today.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Mater” Mater is a small, reddish brown male rabbit. He is quite the personality. Mater is very curious and adventurous. He has been at the shelter since the middle of

December. Come visit this lively bunny today to see if he could be the next member of your family.

Total in Kennel: Dogs – 48 Cats – 36 Other – 8

Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd. Fremont (510) 790-6640 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 pm Saturdays: 11 am - 4 pm Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 13, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG12611085 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. Petition of: Sukhvir Kaur Johal for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sukhvir Kaur Johal filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sukhvir Kaur Johal to Sukhvir Kaur Grewal The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 3-2-2012, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: Jan 5, 2012 WINIFRED Y. SMITH Judge of the Superior Court 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2241822# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11610247 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Sang Eon Go, Hey Young Lee on behalf of Sung Yeol, Hyung Yeol for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Sang Eon Go, Hey Young Lee filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Sung Yeol Go to Steve SungYeol Go Hyung Yeol Go to Brian HyungYeol Go The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 10, 2012, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice Date: December 29, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236099#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459022 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Galaxy Beauty Spa, 39383 Sutter Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Jackie Tran, 39383 Sutter Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jackie Tran, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 06, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2241821# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459617 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Epic Brokers, 3833 Peralta Blvd. #B, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Renu Bhardwal, 3833 Peralta Blvd. #B, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Renu Bhardwal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 28, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2240155# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459839 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Reflexions, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Moneisha Margaret Williams, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539 Anita Louise Williams, 40087 Mission Blvd. #224, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by Co-partners The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 01/04/2012 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Moneisha Williams, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 4, 2012 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3/12 CNS-2239878# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459449 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Miracle Landscaping, 31154 Brooklyn St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Miguel Vargas, 31154 Brooklyn St., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on May 12, 2009 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Miguel Vargas This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 20, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236990# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459665 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Legacy Real Estate & Associates ERA Powered, 41111 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Legacy Real Estate & Associates, Inc., California, 41111 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12/6/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Bill Abounrad, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236771# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459664 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Legacy Real Estate & Associates ERA Powered, 1686 Second Street, Livermore, CA 94550, County of Alameda III Create, Inc., 1686 Second Street, Livermore, CA 94550 This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12/6/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ -----, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236767# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459666 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: US Realty Group, 38485 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Michel R. Harris, 37795 Logan Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12-29-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michel R. Harris This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 29, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27/12 CNS-2236101# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459574-576 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Champion Learning Center, 2. Learning Champs, 3. Agile Training, 1900 Driscoll Road, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Innovations Group, LLC, CA, 40737 Vaca Drive, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by a Limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Monika Kodnani, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 23, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/30, 1/6, 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2233407# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458557 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DSPTEL, 3204 Hancock Place, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Yuan Cheng Zheng, 3204 Hancock Place, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on November 28, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yuan Cheng Zheng This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13/12 CNS-2229930# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459379 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: KINDER ESTATES, 1879 NELSON STREET, SAN LEANDRO, CA 94579, County of ALAMEDA SUSAN ANN KINDER, 1879 NELSON STREET, SAN LEANDRO, CA 94579 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ SUSAN ANN KINDER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on DECEMBER 19, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/23, 12/30, 1/6, 1/13/12 CNS-2229681#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project applications: Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan Update


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PUBLIC NOTICES The City of Union City is updating the Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan. The plan provides for a citywide system of pedestrian and bicycle facilities and a variety of programs to allow for safe, efficient, and convenient walking and bicycling within the City. The City is updating the plan to reflect current background information, pedestrian and bicycle facilities that have been constructed since 2006. In addition, the update reflects the incorporation of previous analysis, which was completed since adoption of the plan in 2006, including additional Safe Routes to School projects. The update also reflects changes in response to the public comments and other feedback that has been received to date. NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that the City had adopted a Negative Declaration for the adoption of the original Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan in 2006. The Negative Declaration determined the project would not have a significant effect on the environment. The proposed update to the plan does not include any significant changes that would impact this determination. City Council Meeting Tuesday, January 24, 2012 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. For further information, contact Carmela Campbell, Planning Manager, at (510) 675-5316. Written comments regarding this project should be received by the Planning Division prior to Tuesday January 24, 2012. The plan is available for review at City Hall and the Union City Library located at 34007 Alvarado Niles Road. The plan is also avail-

able for review on-line at www.unioncity.org The Planning Commission reviewed this project at its January 5, 2012 public hearing and recommended approval to the City Council on a 5-0 vote with some minor modifications to the plan. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. JOAN MALLOY Economic & Director 1/13/12

Community

Development

CNS-2241848#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 31, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461

(510) 659-6993 Time: 2:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): C409 Karr, Marla Kay C385 Romandia, Margaret C294 Karr, Marla Kay C184 Cardoza, Scott C162 Zamora, Antonio C086 IMERBTHAMA, JARROD C056 Rensel, Edgar B086 Magan, Karla A218 Brooks, Lamonica A159 Ramirez, Ricardo All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 13th day of January 2012 and 20th day of January 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2241242# NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on January 31, 2012 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time:9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): B017 ROMANIK JR, CARL B020 WHITAKER, KEN C013 Moreno, Dawn C065 SCHROEDER, RANDALL C111 Rivera, Denise

D066 Afukei, Elizabeth P040 Gregory, Robert Public Storage 08026 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2148 Secoquian, Corazon 2174 SAMFOHERUS, WENDY 7007 Simpson, Edward 8002 taylor, tyrone 9055 Coria, Antonio Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s): B018 Angeles, Alvin C020 BERNARDO,CELEDONIO C097 Hawkins, Keith C138 Brown, Dennis D183 MacMullen, Ruth F009 White, Jermaine Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A106 QUERIDA, MARILYN A109 MCDOWELL, CYNTHIA A137 Ho, Kevin C325 Mitchell, Wanda D733 Mitchell, Steve E505 PETTY, GERALD E579 Clark, Joseph E610 Scully, Richard E654 Hill, Aritha F428 Kerlegan, Francis

G818 Hoos, Lisa Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123 (510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A008 Maly, Izy A041 CASE, PAMELA A085 ZAKRZEWSKI, JASON A094 Oneill, Sara A117 Dawson, Kristi A261 COLEMAN, RONNESHA A348 Thach, Theresa A350 Taylor, Lorrie C033 Wouters, Jim C061 PALMONES, JAMES D046 DeRush, Angela Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A084 DELVAL, RENGELL B056 ANDERSON, JAMES E043 Santoni, Rhonda E044 W.D. Campbell Construction, Inc. E065 Roesler-Barrett, Jamie All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 13th day of January 2012 and 20th day of January 2012, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 1/13, 1/20/12 CNS-2241238#

continued from page 15

Some of the measures will require approval by the state Legislature or the community college system's Board of Governors. Some can be carried out by school administrators, while oth-

ers just call on campuses to adopt best practices. Critics say the reform plan will move California's community college system, the nation's largest with 2.6 million students,

away from its tradition of offering nearly universal access to higher education. Some say without additional funding for student counseling and services, the proposed changes could hurt low-income students who need extra help to reach their academic goals.

“There's a very big concern that the plan will impact both access and equity,” said Jonathan Lightman, executive director of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges Officials say the changes are needed because the cashstrapped state has cut funding to community colleges by 14 percent during the past three years,

which has forced campuses to raise tuition and turn away tens of thousands of students. “Now that the money has become scarce, we have got to prioritize,” Scott said. “The state has already forced us to ration courses. If we're going to ration education, how should we do it intelligently?”

continued to brandish the knife toward the victim. Officers responded and located the suspect in a backyard in the 6200 block of Quartz Place. The suspect, Jeffrey Canton, was found in the yard complaining of pain to his ankle from his flight. He was taken into custody without further incident. Caton was provided medical assistance and taken to a local hospital. Canton was arrested for

the Home Depot robbery and the Work World theft with additional charges pending. Caton was booked at Santa Rita jail for robbery, weapons brandishing, and using a stolen credit card. January 7: Officers handled a shop lift call at Macy’s at 7:02 p.m. Angelica Cayabyab, age 19 (Fremont) was arrested for embezzlement & petty theft. January 8: Officers were detailed to the La Cabana Restaurant at 6

p.m. for a 911 Hang up. Responding units located Ramon Arreola, age 37 (Transient) around the corner from the restaurant. A records check revealed he is restrained from being near the business by court order. Arreola also had three warrants which he was subsequently arrested along with possession of methamphetamine. Officers followed up at the restaurant and learned that Arreola had broken into the restaurant and

stolen some beer. Arreola was booked at SRJ for his three warrants, burglary, possession of methamphetamine, and violation of a restraining order. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510-5784237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-5784000, extension 500.

continued from page 18

Newark Police Log Caton fled and ran westbound across Cedar Boulevard with the victim in pursuit. The suspect brandished a knife at the pursuing victim and scaled a concrete wall; the victim followed. Caton injured his right foot and was unable to stand but attempted to crawl away. Caton


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BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP ECONOMICS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP),The job market is looking a little brighter at the start of the new year. Weekly unemployment benefit applications have fallen to levels last seen more than three years ago. Holiday sales were solid. Service companies grew a little faster in December. And many small businesses say they plan to add jobs over the next three months. The mix of private and government data released Thursday sketched a picture of an economy that is slowly strengthening, stoking optimism one day ahead of the government's important read on December job growth. “Businesses have increased hiring to meet the underlying

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

pick-up in (consumer) demand,” said Neil Dutta, an economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. The encouraging reports on the U.S. economy gave Wall Street a late-day lift, offsetting renewed concerns over Europe's debt crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average, which had fallen by as much as 134 points at one point in the day, closed down just 3 points. Broader indexes posted modest gains. Weekly applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a seasonally adjusted 372,000 last week, the Labor Department said Thursday. That's 11 percent lower than the same time last year. Almost the entire descent occurred this fall. Applications had fluctuated sharply over the first nine months of 2011, falling as

low as 375,000 and rising as high as 478,000. By early September, they were at 432,000 - only 5,000 below where they began the year. Since then, applications have declined steadily. That has pushed the four-week average, which smooths fluctuations, to 373,250 the lowest level since June 2008. When applications drop below 375,000 - consistently they generally signal that hiring is strong enough to reduce the unemployment rate. U.S. service firms, which employ roughly 90 percent of the work force, grew a little faster in December, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The trade group of purchasing managers said its index of non-manufacturing activity rose to 52.6. That's slightly above November's reading of 52 - the lowest in nearly two years - but well below last year's high of 59.7 recorded in February. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion. An increase in new orders and stronger imports drove last month's modest expansion. But a gauge of hiring showed many service firms

January 13, 2012

were hesitant to add workers. Retailers, meanwhile, reported solid but not spectacular sales gains last month. And much of the increase stemmed from heavy discounting that will likely cut into profits. Sales rose 3.5 percent in December for a group of 25 retail chains tracked by the International Council of Shopping Centers. Holiday sales, which cover the last two months of the year, rose 3.3 percent, a decent rise but less than last year's gain. Small businesses remain encouraged about their plans to hire over the next three months. The National Federation of Independent Business says the proportion of those firms that expect to add workers is slightly off from the three-year high hit last month. Economists are predicting that overall hiring increased in December and will strengthen this year. John Ryding, an economist at RDQ Economics, forecasts that employers added 180,000 jobs last month, a big jump from November's 120,000 net jobs. Economists surveyed by the Associated Press project that the econ-

omy will generate an average of 175,000 jobs per month this year. That would be a step up from average monthly gains of 130,000 last year and 78,000 in 2010. In November, the unemployment rate fell to 8.6 percent from 9 percent. Still, about half that decline occurred because many of the unemployed gave up looking for work. When people stop looking for a job, they're no longer counted as unemployed. The pickup in hiring reflects some modest improvement in the economy. Growth will likely top 3 percent at an annual rate in the final three months of this year, economists expect. That would be a sharp improvement over the 1.8 percent growth in the JulySeptember quarter. Even so, many economists forecast that growth could slow to roughly 2 percent this year. Europe is almost certain to fall into recession because of its financial troubles. And without more jobs and higher incomes, consumers may have to cut back on spending. That could drag on growth in 2012. AP Economics Writer Martin Crutsinger contributed to this report.


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Calif. lawmakers return to face budget challenges BY DON THOMPSON ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Jan 03 - California lawmakers will reconvene to face a $13 billion budget deficit and other familiar issues, but they also will be dealing with an entirely new political landscape. Legislators who want to continue their political careers are trying to figure out a new primary system and independently drawn legislative boundaries. The election-year dynamics are likely to influence much of the legislative debate, including how to resolve California's continual budget shortfalls. Lawmakers returning Wednesday in Sacramento are awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown's plan to deal with the deficit over the next 18 months. He has until Jan. 10 to present his proposed budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Brown plans to ask voters in November to raise income taxes on high-income earners and boost the state sales tax by half a cent, both temporary measures. His budget is expected to include automatic cuts to public schools and social services if voters reject that initiative. Increasing the sales tax and boosting income taxes on those earning more than $250,000 a year is expected to raise about $7 billion a year for five years. It will be ``a dynamic year,'' said Robin Swanson, spokeswoman for Assembly Speaker John Perez, D-Los Angeles. She said Perez will work to persuade voters that the tax increases are vital to ``protect public schools and other vital services from devastating cuts.'' The recession has taken a deep bite out of California's tax revenue. The state's general fund budget for

the current fiscal year is nearly $17 billion lower than it was during the 2007-08 fiscal year, when the recession began. Lawmakers exhausted all the easy budget cuts years ago and face Republican resistance to raising revenue, which requires a twothirds vote in the Legislature. Democrats control both chambers of the Legislature and say they are unwilling to again spend fruitless days negotiating with Republicans. Instead, they said they will prepare to pass a budget this spring by simple majority vote and rely on voters to approve Brown's tax proposal later in the year. Dealing with California's budget deficit and persuading voters to raise revenue with temporary tax increases will be the governor's primary goals this year, Brown spokeswoman Elizabeth Ashford said Tuesday. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, said lawmakers also will focus on nonbudget issues such as changes to the mortgage industry, reducing the cost of college textbooks and implementing federal health care reforms. They also will consider if the state should sell voter-approved bonds to pay for high-speed rail and to rebuild the state's water distribution system. A panel on Tuesday recommended that lawmakers not sell the first series of bonds for the initial phase of the high-speed rail project, saying the current plan is not feasible. Two significant voter-approved changes will add uncertainty to lawmakers' political and legislative strategies this election year. All 80 Assembly members and half the 40 state senators are up for election this year. They will run in

new districts drawn by an independent redistricting commission that was tasked with avoiding partisan considerations. They also run in June under a top-two open primary system, in which the two candidates with the most votes go on to the November election, even if they are from the same political party. Proponents hope that change will favor moderate lawmakers who are more willing to compromise. Previously, the winner from each party advanced to the general election. The Legislature reconvenes just as $1 billion in midyear reductions to schools, higher education and social services kick in because tax revenue did not meet the projections Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic lawmakers set last summer. The session also begins less than a week after the state Supreme Court ruled that lawmakers have the authority to eliminate more than 400 community redevelopment agencies. Those developments will create more budget pressure on local government officials, who are letting their state representatives know of their displeasure. The high court's ruling will free up about $1.7 billion for the state's general fund this fiscal year, but many lawmakers want a compromise to keep the agencies operating in some capacity. Brown and majority Democrats will be negotiating with a new Senate Republican leader after Sen. Bob Dutton, R-Rancho Cucamonga, announced he would give up the post this month. A caucus vote is expected after Wednesday's Senate session to replace Dutton, who is termed out of office after this year. continued on page 27

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


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January 13, 2012

Boys Soccer Boys Basketball Logan vs American SUBMITTED BY COACH CHRISTOPHER AFORTENBERRY PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW January 11 Logan 55, American 49 Logan (6 - 10, 3 - 0 MVAL) Agbayani 12, Schaper 3, Kaye 16, Mundeke 6, Torain 3, DePerio 4, Dhahan 11. Total: 55

Logan vs Newark Memorial SUBMITTED BY JAMES WILLIAMS January 11 James Logan 1, Newark Memorial 1 Played at Logan

American (3 - 13, 0 - 3 MVAL) Tse 9, Ramee 2, Young 12, Chukwu David 8 Ponco 4, Anand 12, Perez 2. Total: 49

1st Half Scoring: JL: Rodolfo Esquivias (Juan Carlos Romero-Pacheco) 18:00

Logan 16 15 11 13 -55 American 11 12 12 14 -49

2nd Half Scoring: NWK: Joel Sandoval

3-pt goals: Mundeke 2, Kaye 1, Tse 1, Young 1, Anand 4. Foul Outs: DePerio, Ponco Technical Fouls: 1 Coach Fortenberry, 1 Coach Kline JV: American 47, Logan 46

JL Goalie: Kyle Doser, 80 Min, 4 Saves, 1 GA NWK Goalie: Logan Lombana, 80 Min, 4 Saves, 1 GA JL Record: 8 - 3 - 4 (4 - 0 - 1)

Frosh: American 40, Logan 39


January 13, 2012

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH As part of the Union City Toastmasters’ “Youth Leadership Program,” fourteen high school students in grades 9 to 11, met for eight weekly/ 2-

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mational Toastmasters “Open House” at the Union City Library, Rovetta was approached by a parent, Venkat Rayapaneni. He inquired if Toastmasters, typically for adults ages 18 and over, would offer a group for teenagers. “I wanted them

something required for the homeschoolers to something I really enjoyed. I looked forward to it on Sunday nights and it was a really nice experience.” To cover the cost of books and supplies for the twomonth session, only a minimal

individually in front of the audience, to be given the topic for the speech. After taking a few moments to collect their thoughts, they spoke aloud extemporaneously on the assigned subject, for the 1 – 2 minute time limit. During that time,

2nd Place – Tejaswini Cherukuri 3rd Place – Justin Swartz International Speech Contest: 1st Place - Bonnie Pong 2nd Place – Sriya Bhupathiraju 3rd Place – Faith Rovetta Medals were also given to each

Student participants celebrate after receiving their certificates of completion. Joining them are coordinators Jean Luong (far left, front row) and Midji Rovetta (far left, back row)

hour sessions, to hone their communication and public speaking skills. The culmination of their efforts was exhibited during a final competition and “graduation” held on the evening of December 18. The adult coordinators who volunteered their time to work with the teens, were Jean Luong and Midji Rovetta members of Union City’s Toastmasters International, an organization created to encourage the improvement of speaking and leadership skills of its members. Rovetta, the immediate Past President of the club, explained how the teenagers became involved with their organization. A while back, during an infor-

to teach my daughter oratory skills, to help her overcome shyness,” said Rayapaneni. Through the combined efforts of Toastmaster members and several interested parents, the word spread to reach those teens who were interested in becoming involved and thus the Youth Leadership Program began. Comprising the group of fourteen teens were eight students from American High School in Fremont, one student from Alsion Montessori Middle/High School and five home- schooled students. Justin Swartz, one of the homeschooled students, expressed his thoughts on the program, “It went from being

contribution of $20 was asked of each participant. For the final evening of the program, a competitive speech competition was held, divided into two components: the Table Topic Contest and the International Speech Contest. Prior to commencing, Toastmasters’ member Heidi Green, who served as Chief Judge of the event, read the Code of Ethics. Rules and timing guidelines were outlined for each contest. Other judges were asked to mark their tally sheets, confidentially, throughout the competition. During the Table Topic Contest, students were sequestered and then called up

the other student competitors, who were to be given the same topic, remained in another room until their turn. The International Speech Contest portion was substantially an original, prepared speech competition. Prior to the evening, students had been asked to select a topic of their own choosing to present and were required to talk on their subject for a period of 4 – 5 minutes in length. Trophies were awarded to the top three student finishers in each of the evening’s two speech competitions: Table Topic Contest: 1st Place Deekshita Chigullapally

student in appreciation of their participation and for completion of the program: Katie Buhnerkempe Ganesh Chendica Pavani Chendica Sriranganayaki (Sriya) Bhupathiraju Phani Rayapaneni Basole Samanvitha Justin J. Swartz Cheyenne M Serafino-Lee Tejaswini Cherukuri Brittanie Eddlemon Bonnie Pong Faith Rovetta Meghna Satish Deekshita Chigullapally For more information, please visit http://unioncity.freetoasthost.com or www.toastmasters.org.


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BY MAURICIO SEGURA

T

he week began with Michael's flight to Memphis being delayed for hours due to a bomb threat. Not a surprise considering the way his life had been going the last few years, but definitely an inconvenience. Regardless, his work ethic and dedication helped him overcome obvious fatigue to deliver a moving speech to over 15,000 people at the Mason Temple downtown. The following day, April 4, was one of those ideal cold and rainy days, perfect for staying in bed and getting lost in a good book. And after the last couple of days, Michael welcomed the opportunity to spend it relaxing in his motel room. With a dinner and speech scheduled that evening, he prepared as he had done so many times before for one of these functions. Running a little late with some of his friends already waiting by the car, Michael emerged from room 306 into the chilly, overcast southern air. Without warning, time suddenly froze in dark terror. Michael, who for the last decade had traveled 6 million miles, given 2,500 speeches, and authored five popular books, lay dead at the age of 39. The victim of a sniper’s bullet. Though it was his physical life which ended, his legacy has endured. And to understand the legacy, you must understand the life. Like the famous Dusty Springfield song, “Son of a Preacher Man,” Michael was the middle child of reverend Michael Sr. and his wife Alberta. Growing up in Atlanta, he heard and witnessed first hand the injustice against people of color. Mentally gifted, Michael skipped both the 9th and 12th grades at Booker T. Washington High School before entering Morehouse College at just 15 years of age. He earned a degree in sociology and theology, followed by a PH.D. a few years later from Boston College. By the time he was 25, Michael was a husband, a father, and pastor of his own church in Montgomery, Alabama. Race tensions were at an all-time high in the south. Colored people were segregated like cattle in a slaugh-

ter house. There were “black only” restaurants, rest rooms, drinking fountains, and swimming pools. About the only things blacks and whites were allowed to share was oxygen and buses, though they had to ride the latter in the back. This all culminated with the unjust arrest of a 15-year-old girl named Rosa Parks who refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a full bus. Michael's involvement and support of Parks and the fight for equality between blacks and whites brought him notoriety in the early days of the civil rights movement. What ensued became known as the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Lasting 381 days, the boycott left the public transportation system in a crippling financial deficit. With no black people riding the buses, and the black taxi drivers helping by charging only a dime (the equivalent of a bus ride), the U.S. Supreme Court was forced to step in and eventually rule that bus segregation was an unconstitutional act. This was a major win in the civil rights movement, but only the beginning for the cause. Soon after, a trip through India introduced Michael to Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy and peaceful nonviolent approach to acquire change. Taking this to heart, Michael returned to the U.S. refreshed with a dream and determined to make that dream a reality. The last decade of his life was spent fully dedicated to improve the rights of blacks in a white culture dominated society. He organized protests and marches, spoke to audiences thousands deep, and negotiated with top political figures, celebrities, and common folk alike, to make sure his dream survived beyond his own physical mortality. He was loved by millions, but those who hated him did so with a passion like no other. A sniper’s bullet may have taken his life that spring evening years ago, but his legacy lives on and continues to inspire even beyond the cause he fought his entire life for. Michael was a pioneer who laid down his life as a modern day martyr. In case you haven't figured it out by now, you should be very familiar with Michael. You had to have

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studied about him in school. And if you can't recall him from there, you definitely hear about him each year as his legacy is honored nationwide. Michael, as his name appears on his official birth certificate, might not necessarily be the name you know him by. When “little Mikey” (as he was known to family and friends then) was five years old, his father changed both of their names. From that point on, the boy who grew up to into the man with a dream to change the world became known to all as Martin… Martin Luther King Jr. January 16 is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, in celebration of his birthday on the 15th. Throughout the country parades, peace marches, memorials, and service activities are held in his honor. King is the only individual in the United States to have a holiday all his own. Even the presidents we honor yearly have shared holidays. It's a true testament to the impact he had on the nation. For those wanting to celebrate the day with a local activity, James Logan High School in Union City will be hosting the MLK Speech and Debate Tournament Friday, January 13 through Sunday, January 15. The event is open to the public and free of charge. For more information, visit jlhsforensics.org. For something more hands on, assist park staff at Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline in Oakland in habitat restoration and invasive plant removal. Advanced registration is encouraged. Call 1-888-3272757 or visit http://www.ebparks.org/node/1605 for more information and to register. Join the celebration at Hayward’s City Hall Plaza, which includes local youth choirs, a rally and peace march, music, and the words of Dr. King. Carry your organizational banner and wear national dress. Beginning at 6 p.m. Chabot College in Hayward will be having a birthday celebration, co-sponsored by Hayward South Alameda County NAACP, Chabot Community College, and the City of Hayward. Admission is free. James Logan High School MLK Speech and Debate Tournament Friday, January 13, (late afternoon and evening) Saturday, January 14 (all day) Sunday, January 15 (all day) James Logan High School 1800 H Street, Union City (510) 471-2520 jlhsforensics.org Free continued on page 27


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Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service Monday, January 16 8:30 a.m. - noon Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline Doolittle Dr. and Swan Way, Oakland 1-888-327-2757 http://www.ebparks.org/node/1605

Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Monday, January 16 9:30 a.m. Hayward City Hall Plaza 777 B St., Hayward (510) 270-8399

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration Monday, January 16 Pre-show video – 6 p.m. Event starts – 6:30 p.m. Chabot College Reed L. Buffington Performing Arts Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 Free

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rassing situations for school-age children who stutter. Parents who notice their child beginning to stutter should seek help right away. “In the past, experts incorrectly believed that giving attention to a child’s stuttering

would exacerbate the situation,” said speech-language pathologist Lisa Scott, Ph.D., of The Florida State University. “We now know that children who stutter will have significantly less disfluent speech and a higher recovery rate if they are

treated when they are young.” To help parents gain a better understanding of stuttering, the Foundation offers a free streaming video in English and Spanish of “Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents” at www.StutteringHelp.org. The

Calif. lawmakers return to face budget challenges

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Candidates to lead the 15 Republicans in the 40-member chamber include Joel Anderson of La Mesa and Bob Huff of Diamond Bar. Anderson is the top Republican on the Senate Public Safety Committee, while Huff has been the Republicans' budget negotiator. Spokesmen for the Legislature's leaders said they expect little ceremony as lawmakers reconvene. Committees will begin meeting, but the bulk of bills will be considered later this spring. The new year's session also will give lawmakers the opportunity to weigh in on national issues, including campaign finance. Two Assembly Democrats,

Michael Allen of Santa Rosa and Bob Wieckowski of Fremont, plan to introduce a resolution Wednesday urging Congress to pass a constitutional amendment overturning the U.S. Supreme Court's Citizens United campaign finance ruling in 2010. The ruling overturned prohibitions against corporations contributing money to political campaigns, leading to a surge of such donations during the 2010 election cycle. Public Citizen, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit advocacy group supporting the resolution, said Hawaii passed a similar measure last year and that other states are

considering joining in. Some of the focus Wednesday will be on Assemblywoman Mary Hayashi, who faces a felony shoplifting charge alleging that she stole leather pants and two other items worth about $2,500 from a Neiman Marcus store in San Francisco in October. Hayashi, D-Castro Valley, has pleaded not guilty. She said she was distracted by a cellphone conversation and inadvertently walked outside with the merchandise. Prosecutors said she took the items into a dressing room and concealed them in an empty shopping bag before leaving.

Foundation also offers: “7 Tips for Parents.” “Any time parents are concerned about a child’s fluency,” notes Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation, “they should educate themselves about the disorder and the many ways they can work to prevent stuttering from becoming a chronic problem. Early treatment for children who stutter is key!” For a free copy of the newlyupdated brochure, If You Think

Your Child Is Stuttering, parents, teachers and others can call the Foundation’s toll-free helpline at 800-992-9392 or visit www.StutteringHelp.org. The site also offers a worldwide referral list of specialists in stuttering. About the Foundation: Malcolm Fraser, a successful businessman and stutterer, went on to establish and endow the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation in 1947. For more information please visit www.StutteringHelp.org.

Bill assisting distressed homeowners clears committee SUBMITTED BY ANDREW LAMAR Legislation by Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-San Leandro) to extend assistance to homeowners caught in the nation’s mortgage crisis passed the Senate Banking and Financial Institutions Committee on January 9, 2012. Senate Bill 708 requires lenders to contact property owners to attempt to avoid foreclosure, provides tenants additional time to move from a foreclosed property and mandates that properties that have been foreclosed be maintained to help limit any negative impact on the value of neighboring homes. “Unfortunately, we still have a housing crisis that affects thousands of Californians, who are either struggling to make their payments or are hurt when homes enter foreclosure,” Corbett said. “This legislation continues important protections for homeowners and renters that have proved tremendously helpful in this trying time.” The provisions of SB 708 were first enacted in 2008 with Senate Bill 1137 but that legislation is set to expire at the end of 2012. SB 708 extends the same protections through 2017. California saw a 55 percent increase in foreclosure notices from July to August 2011, with one out of every 226 homes in the state filing for foreclosure, according to RealtyTrac. Nationally, more than 10 million Americans are expected to default on home loans in 2012. The bill goes next to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett


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Newark Police arrest carjack and sexual assault suspect SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD On Monday January 9, 2012, approximately 10:00 p.m., a suspect (later identified and arrested) approached a 22-year-old female victim (Newark resident) as she sat behind the wheel of her parked car on Darvon St. The suspect pointed a handgun at her and forced his way into the vehicle and drove off with the victim inside. The suspect stopped at a local park and attempted to sexually assault the victim. The suspect was not able to complete the act and drove the victim out of the park, and then forced her out of her vehicle nearby in Newark. The suspect drove off in the car. The victim went to a residence and asked that the police be called. The victim was seen at a local hospital and later released. Through investigative means, members of the Newark Police Department were able track down and locate the suspect on Scarbough Drive. The suspect was arrested and the victim’s vehicle was recovered. The investigation is still ongoing and evidence is being collected. The arrestee is David Petelo AKA: Tevita, age 26, transient (parolee at large for carjacking) and booked for auto theft (carjacking), kidnapping, false imprisonment, at-

tempted rape, sexual battery, assault with the attempt to rape and parole violations. Newark Police Department investigators are looking into the possibility that Petelo was involved in an April 2010 attempted kidnapping where a suspect approached a 15 year-old female as she was walking in the area of Parkshore Drive and Edgewater Drive in Newark. The suspect in this case grabbed the juvenile from behind, knocking her to the ground. The victim fought back by kicking and screaming, and drew the attention of a passing adult bicyclist. The victim was able to break free from the suspect and he walked away from the area. The bicyclist pointed out the suspect to a passing motorist and asked him to follow the suspect and call 911. The motorist followed the suspect onto Parkshore Drive until the suspect turned and fired three shots from a handgun in the direction of the motorist. The suspect was last seen fleeing the area on northbound Parkshore Drive. None of the involved parties were injured during this incident. Any person with information concerning this incident should contact Detective Sergeant Michael Carroll at (510) 578-4247. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

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Internet Child Pornography Arrests SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD Four Alameda County men were arrested Wednesday, January 11, following a sweep of suspected child pornography users and distributors. 35 detectives from seven agencies collaborated with the Silicon Valley Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force to launch the sweep. Local detectives included teams from Fremont, Newark & San Jose Police Departments, the Alameda County Sheriff's Department and the Santa Clara County Sheriffs Department. A cluster of suspected child pornography users detected in Alameda County led the SVICAC Task Force to launch the sweep, which began early Wednesday morning. Officers armed with warrants searched four homes in Fremont and Newark. Computers with pornographic images and other evidence linking the men to the distribution and or possession of child pornography were seized. Those arrested include Fremont residents, Alvin Lee Rodriguez, 38, & Brian Trusz, 39. Also arrested were Chen Yu Huang, 21 & Miguel Angel Mendoza, 30 of Newark. The 8-year-old Silicon Valley task force is one of 61 around the nation targeting peer-to-peer file sharing online, evolving from previous investigative techniques when suspects often were identified through chatroom decoy operations. Investigators search for hard-core images involving children, see who is downloading the images to individual IP (Internet protocol) addresses, use search warrants to figure out who owns the individual IP address and carry out search warrants for those people's homes. A key feature of the task force arsenal is a mobile forensics lab that allows investigators in a technology-stocked van to drive up to a suspect's home, seize hard drives and immediately begin searching for evidence that would normally take months to obtain from a state Department of Justice lab. The SVICAC Task Force arrested four men for possession of child pornography last week in San Jose. The task force has conducted a number of child porn sweeps in the Bay Area over the last few months, including multiple arrests in Sonoma County, Monterey County and Oakland.

Fremont Police Log continued from page 18

Armed Robbery occurred at the Quik Stop Market on Farwell Dr. A black male adult, 5’3 - 5’5”, thin build wearing gray sweat pants, gray hoodie, black ski mask and carrying a black revolver entered the store. The suspect pointed the revolver at the clerk and took approximately $400 in cash from the register. He was last seen running N/B on Farwell Dr. Case investigated by Officer Zargham.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

id you know that Pantone selected Tan- tangerine colored dishes and green placemats and gerine Tango—a vibrant, deep orange napkins. How cheerful and inviting! color—as the color for 2012? AccordTo create a complementary color scheme, pair ing to Pantone, Tangerine Tango gives orange with blue. Imagine a navy blue sofa with us “the energy boost we need to recharge and move copper-topped tables and a patterned area rug in forward.” If you haven’t already noticed splashes of shades of rust, blue, tan and cream. An accent wall orange in home furnishings as well as in fashion and in a deep rusty red tone would add a very warm consumer products, you definitely will be seeing touch. Use browns to ground an oritems like toasters, purses and accent furniture in ange room—for example—add a the very near future. Orange is an optimistic brown leather chair or ottoman to and energetic color and can very this scenario, and use an espresso successfully be incorpofinish dining table in the kitchen rated into your décor. scenario above. Adding orange will bring If you work from home, try new life, vitality, and vigor to painting your home office (at your space. least one wall) in orange; its enWhile painting an entire ergy will help you get your room in Tangerine Tango might work done! seem too bold for most people’s palettes, a smattering of orange in accessories might just do the trick. Try an arrangement of ceramic vases on a mantel or dining table, or some punchy new throw pillows, or a new set of dishes. Reupholster your dining chairs or that bench in your entryway in a printed fabric with lots of orange. Or paint the ceiling in your powder room—what a statement! Orange comes in a wide variety of tints, tones and shades so don’t think bright orange is your only option. Members of the orange family include: Apricot, Salmon, Rust, Brick, Persimmon, Pumpkin, Cantaloupe, Peach and many others. For a harmonious color scheme, look to the color wheel. Combine yellow-orange (like a Mandarin orange) with yellow and yellow-green Anna Jacoby of Anna Jacoby (like pear or celery). This is a Interiors is a local interior great color scheme for a kitchen designer. Send your design and adjacent family room. questions to her at Imagine buttery yellow walls, info@annajacobyinteriors.com with green, yellow and orange Call or fax her at printed dining chairs and win510-490-0379 or visit dow valances; a pear green sofa, www.annajacobyinteriors.com

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Sudoku Solutions on page 4

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Alan Baer SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE RELUCIO Eden Housing welcomed Alan Baer as its new Chief Financial Officer (CFO) on January 9, 2012. Baer brings more than 28 years of finance, asset management, customer service and human resource

expertise from the real estate and hospitality industries. He spent eight years as Senior Vice President Corporate Controller and Technology and Senior

Vice President People and Technology for Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. Kimpton, a collection of boutique hotels and restaurants in the US, is consistently ranked above others in the upscale hotel segment for customer satisfaction. He oversaw accounting, finance, treasury, partnership development and risk management functions for more than 100 hotels and restaurants nationwide and secured the FORTUNE 100 “Best Places to Work” designation and “Best Places to Work” designation in 24 cities for the company. Additionally, Baer worked for almost 20 years as CFO for Waterford Hotel group and as Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration for Outrigger Lodging Services. As CFO, he will be responsible for corporate and real estate development accounting, finance and asset management and information technology operations of Eden Housing, its affiliates and ownership entities. He will report to Jan Peters, Eden Housing's Chief Operating Officer. Baer enjoys community service activities including mentoring kids at Larkin Street Youth Services, improving housing issues through the Marin Organizing Committee in his community and volunteering at his children's high school. Baer can be reached at (510) 582-1460 or abaer@edenhousing.org. For more information, visit www.EdenHousing.org

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Website connects Californians in fight against human-trafficking SUBMITTED BY THE OFFICE ATTORNEY GENERAL

OF THE

January 2012 is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. On January 6, 2012, Attorney General Kamala D. Harris announced the launch of the Human Trafficking in California website, a hub for information and resources designed to connect Californians in the fight against human trafficking. "This month, we’re called upon to acknowledge the appalling existence of modern-day slavery and to join together in the effort to eradicate slavery once and for all. This effort requires our collaboration to protect victims and hold traffickers accountable, as well as our vigilance to protect

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these abuses from occurring in the first place,” said Harris. “I have long been committed to fighting human trafficking. As District Attorney of San Francisco, I co-sponsored the California Human Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2005, which made human-trafficking a felony in this state. Now, as Attorney General, I am making the fight against human-trafficking a priority for the California Department of Justice. “I’m proud to have many partners in this work and to participate in the National Association of Attorneys General's Pillars of Hope initiative to combat human trafficking. “The Human Trafficking in California website includes highlights of the important work being done across the state, as well as comprehensive resources to identify and report human trafficking. I encourage every Californian to visit the website, and to join in the fight against human trafficking,” Harris concluded. For more information, visit http://oag.ca.gov/human-trafficking

High-Speed Train partially revised draft EIR SUBMITTED BY CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY The California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority) is circulating the Bay Area to Central Valley High-Speed Train (HST) Partially Revised Draft Program Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to address the November 2011 Town of Atherton court rulings regarding the 2010 Bay Area to Central Valley High-Speed Train Revised Final Program Environmental Impact Report. The Authority will accept public comment on this document for a period of 45 days, commencing on January 6, 2012, and concluding at close of business on February 21, 2012. The Bay Area to Central Valley HST Partially Revised Draft Program EIR can be obtained on the Authority’s website at http://tinyurl.com/7mzh6lt, or by calling the Authority at (916) 324-1541 and requesting a Compact Disk (CD) copy of the document. The Partially Revised Draft Program EIR contains only the additional information and analyses needed to address court rulings. Context for this document is contained in the 2008 Final Bay Area to Central Valley HST Program EIR/EIS and the 2010 Revised Final Program EIR, also located on the Authority’s website at http://tinyurl.com/7mzh6lt. Pursuant to CEQA

Guidelines section 15088.5, subdivision (f)(2), the Authority requests that reviewers limit the scope of their comments to the revised materials contained in this document. The Authority is obligated only to respond to those comments received during the comment period that relate to the content of this Partially Revised Draft Program EIR. Comments can be mailed to John Mason, California High-Speed Rail Authority, 770 L Street, Suite 800, Sacramento, CA 95814, sent via email to BayArea-CentralValley@hsr.ca.gov with the subject line “Bay Area to Central Valley HST Partially Revised Draft Program EIR Comments” or submitted online using the contact form on the Authority's website at http://tinyurl.com/7bup492. A public meeting will also be held on February 9, 2012, at 4 p.m. at San Jose City Hall to receive comment. For more information, visit www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov Bay Area to Central Valley High-Speed Train Friday, Feb 9 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. San Jose City Hall, City Council Chambers 200 East Santa Clara St., San Jose (916) 324-1541 www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov


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LA court seeks more info in Honda hybrid suit BY LINDA DEUTSCH AP SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT LOS ANGELES (AP), Jan 10 - A Honda hybrid car owner who took the auto giant to small-claims court for failing to deliver promised mileage is heading back to court for another round after a judge ordered a continuation of her trial Tuesday. Los Angeles County Superior Court Commissioner Douglas Carnahan did not address the substance of the unusual lawsuit by Heather Peters, the owner of a hybrid Honda Civic. But he sought more information on technicalities of its filing, such as the possibility of a statute-of-limitations problem. “Of particular interest to the court is whether, considering the date of purchase of the vehicle, the plaintiff is within operative statutes of limitations relating to claims of relief,” Carnahan said. He asked for additional legal arguments and scheduled another session of the trial for Jan. 25 in Torrance, the U.S. headquarters for Honda. After testimony and arguments on Jan. 3, he took the matter under submission and said he would have a ruling soon. But he removed it from submission Tuesday in order to get clarification. A class-action lawsuit involving the hybrid Civic has already been filed, with Honda proposing a settlement that would give each owner $100 to $200 and a $1,000 credit on the purchase of a new Honda. Peters has acknowledged that the statute of limitations for individual fraud suits like hers can be from one to four years in California. She said, however, that the filing of the class-action lawsuit “stops the ticking of the clock” under a legal theory known as “equitable tolling.” Experts on class-action law agreed with her interpretation. “The clock stopped ticking when the class action was filed,” said attorney Clifford Pearson. Attorney Aaron Jacoby noted that the statute would start tolling again on the day she opted out of the class-action lawsuit, which was Dec. 8, 2011. He said the statute is four years. Peters bought her car in April 2006 and the first class-action lawsuit over the mileage issue was filed in March. Peters claimed the car never came close to the 50 miles per gallon (21.26 kilometers per liter) promised and that it got no more than 30 miles per gallon (12.75 kilometers per liter) when the battery began deteriorating. She still owns the car and wants to be compensated for money lost on gas, as well as punitive damages, amounting to $10,000. Peters, a former lawyer, took the unique action of opting out of the class-action lawsuit involving thousands of hybrid Honda owners. She has said that if all owners of the problem cars won in small-claims court, it could cost Honda $2 billion. In addition to seeking more information on the statute-of-limitations issue, Carnahan also requested arguments on the effect of a “presuit notice requirement.” “I am confident that I will prevail on the questions raised in the Court's order,” Peters said. She said she was encouraged by the fact that the commissioner was giving the case close consideration. Carnahan ruled in favor of Peters on one issue when he refused to consider a brief filed by Honda's chief counsel. He rejected it because litigants are not allowed to have lawyers in small-claims court. Peters has urged other owners of the cars to reject Honda's proposed class-action settlement and has launched a website called DontsettlewithHonda.com. Chris Martin, spokesman for Honda, said the company would “be reviewing the communication from the court and we will participate in the Jan. 25 hearing.”

Resolve to Not Be an Easy Victim The Milpitas Police Department encourages you to add one more New Year’s resolution. Resolve to not be a victim of opportunity and actively help keep your neighborhood safe. Recently, MPD received a report from a resident that had accidentally left his garage door open overnight and an opportunistic thief stole his snowboard. A woman’s purse was stolen from her car when she left it on the front passenger seat. Elsewhere, a child’s bicycle was left outside then stolen. Obviously, no one asks to be a victim; however, each of these cases may have been avoided if the owners had been more cautious. Many thefts are crimes of opportunity. The easier you make it to steal your property, the more likely you are to become a victim. In contrast, cautious safeguarding and early reporting of suspicious activity can keep you, your things, and your neighborhood safe. It should be your goal to deter and delay a would-be thief’s efforts to steal from you so that the risk of making you the target outweighs the potential gain. More simply, if a thief doesn’t see any temptations in plain view or thinks he might get caught, he’s likely to leave you and your property alone. MPD encourages you to follow these simple tips to reduce your chances of becoming a victim at home:

toys, etc.) unattended in your front yard or on your porch. _ Record the serial numbers of and engrave your driver’s license number into electronic devices for easy identification and recovery in case your property is stolen. _ Keep side gates closed and padlocked. _ Install a home burglar alarm and use it consistently. _ Keep trees and bushes trimmed to prevent privacy for burglars or prowlers. _ Use motion sensor lights to properly light the front door, driveway, and other pathways around your home. _ Never leave valuables unattended in parked cars, especially in plain view. _ Familiarize yourself with your neighbors and their vehicles in order to recognize strangers to your neighborhood. _ Immediately report any suspicious activity around your home or neighborhood to the police. Call 9-1-1 if necessary. _ Immediately call 9-1-1 to report the activation of a burglar alarm in your neighborhood. Your call may give the police the head start necessary to catch a fleeing thief. _ If a crime occurs, report it. Report major or recent crimes to the police immediately. Minor or prior cases may also be reported by phone or online for your convenience. _ If your neighborhood does not have an active Neighborhood Watch Program, please consider calling MPD to start one.

_ Close and lock your doors and windows at night and while away. _ Install secondary locks, rods, or dowels to prevent opening of closed windows by force. _ Be sure automatic garage doors close completely and stay closed before leaving the area. (Pets and small debris may trigger the safety mechanism and reopen the door.) _ Do not leave valuables (bicycles, tools,

In summary, be vigilant in protecting yourself, your property, and neighborhood. The Milpitas Police Department wishes you a safe and crime free New Year and are always here to serve you. The Milpitas Police Department may be contacted at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/citydept/police

SUBMITTED BY OFFICER MARK DOYLE, MILPITAS PD


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T

wo days after Thanksgiving, I wrote my first letter home after deploying to the Middle East. I was sitting at an airfield in Kandahar, Afghanistan, awaiting a flight to the north. Thanksgiving 2011 was celebrated over dinner with my Kandahar Team at the "American-style” dining facility named Niagara. Five years previously, to the day, I had spent Thanksgiving in Iraq though it seems as if it was only last year. Spending Thanksgiving on deployment makes me thankful for what I have. I am thankful to be married to Maria for more than 25 years and for my family. We said our last good bye and took my last photos with Maria and the family in mid-October 2011 just before heading to Fort Benning, Georgia. Saying “good bye” does not get easier. Fort Benning stirred many memories - I attended Airborne School at Fort Benning in 1986 and Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced Courses in the late 1980s and early 1990s. My father trained there in the 1940s before serving in Korea. More

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

than 60 years later, it feels strange to find myself training at Fort Benning again prior to my deployment. Just before leaving the US, we transitioned to "lock down" and awaited our final transportation overseas. During this time, our commanding general visited our team and bade us farewell. We stopped at Hahn, Germany en route from Atlanta to Kuwait. I also stopped there on my way to Iraq in 2006. Nothing had changed. In fact, the air base still has the same vinyl sign hanging by the entrance to the passenger-waiting area. Arrival in Kuwait in October 2011 was much more comfortable than my previous visit in July 2006. It was not 140 degrees on the airfield at 2 a.m. The mild fall afternoon was pleasant. We travelled from Kuwait International Airport to Ali Al Saleem Air Base where our headquarters company commander and first sergeant met and took us to Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. On arrival, we checked into billeting and, during the first week, received additional in-

January 13, 2012

Col. Garrett Yee and Maria Yee

theater training before beginning our "right seat ride" with those whom we were replacing. The pace has been non-stop. After spending time with my team in

Kuwait, I found myself on a small C-12 airplane with three of my colleagues en route to Qatar to discuss communications projects for the Southwest Asia region. I am replacing Col. Rick Meador. The timing of this trip was fortuitous; it allowed me to meet many of the region’s key leaders with whom I shall work over the next 12 months. The day after returning to Kuwait from Qatar, I took a C-130 airplane to Sather Air Base in Iraq to spend time with my Iraq team. Yes, Iraq. In the midst of the Iraq draw down, one couldn’t escape the historical significance of this event. I shall remember my time in Iraq during this momentous event for a long time. From Sather, I visited the Al Faw Palace at Camp Victory where I had served in 2006. At the height of the Iraq war, the Al Faw Palace had vitality. Strange as it might sound, I have many fond memories of Camp Victory. The Al Faw Palace now looks deserted. Yes, we are leaving Iraq. We took our last photo in Iraq displaying the American flag with my Iraq team; another memory that will remain with us for years to come.


January 13, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Camp Arifjan, Kuwait

We flew via helicopter from Sather to Forward Operating Base (FOB) Union III where we support the Office of Security and Cooperation for Iraq (OSC-I) with communications. We also travelled to FOB Hammer in Besmaya and to Erbil where the Department of State now has the lead. At FOB Hammer, I updated the three-star general responsible for OSC-I.

Travel in Iraq has its challenges and security concerns. The nation remains a dangerous place and we must take extra security precautions. Air travel is safest. We have been aboard various aircraft, including Black Hawk, Chinook, Department of State helicopters and a Dash 8 fixed-wing aircraft to Erbil which is unlike the rest of Iraq. Those in Erbil refer to their part of the world as Kurdistan.

After about a week in Iraq, we returned to Ali Al Saleem Air Base in a C-130 airplane and were collected by our Kuwait team which took us back to Camp Arifjan. Two days later, I returned to Ali Al Saleem Air Base to fly to Afghanistan. As luck would have it, I caught a 1 a.m. flight to Kandahar Air Base in southern Afghanistan. Kandahar is overly dusty and the fine grit finds its way everywhere. The terrain reminds me of the southwest region of the United States. In Kandahar, my team and I enjoyed our Thanksgiving dinner together. Earlier in the day, we had visited our storage area where we posed atop a shipping container for a group photo with the American flag. Garrett Yee Afghanistan December 19, 2011

Thanksgiving 2011, Kandahar

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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly 130 Piedmont Rd., Milpitas 408-946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187

January 13, 2012

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.therbchurch.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas, CA 95035 (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 1244 B St., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


January 13, 2012 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

January 13, 2012

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Cathedral of Faith–Milpitas Service held at: Curtner Elementary School 275 Redwood Ave., Milpitas www.cathedraloffaith.org Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org

Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org


January 13, 2012

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com



TCV 2012-01-13