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Mission: SOS

Lady Cougar Classic recap

2012 Ford Focus: Finally—We Get the European Model

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The newspaper for the new millennium

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ayor Bob Wasserman, one of the most active and strong connections to Fremont’s institutional memory, died December 29, 2011 following a lengthy respiratory illness. Mayor Wasserman served the people of Fremont since 1976 when appointed Chief of Police, serving in that capacity for 15 years. After retirement from a 40-year career in law enforcement including appointments in Southern California and a term as president of the California Peace Officers’ Association, Bob was elected to the Fremont City Council in 1992 and has served as mayor since 2004. He had previously been commended for outstanding public service by a resolution of the California Senate and received the Law Enforcement Executive of the Year Award. Wasserman’s long service with the City was an asset when controversies arose; he was often able to assist City staff and other councilmembers by putting issues into an historical context. No stranger to personal and political challenges, Wasserman even faced a deadly threat in 1998 when his residence was the tar-

www.tricityvoice.com

January 3, 2012

Vol. 11 No. 1

get of an abortive firebomb attempt. Through contentious debates that encompassed such disparate issues including a bid for an Oakland A’s ballpark, BART extension, demise of NUMMI and subsequent Tesla factory placement, Auto Mall development, Warm Springs plans and historic district development, the mayor was able to maintain a steady sense of purpose and civic commitment. Recently appointed as Vice Mayor, Councilmember Anu Natarajan will serve as Fremont’s interim mayor until the unexpired term of mayor is filled. As a general law city, California Government Code controls the method and timing of replacing the mayor. According to a press release from city officials, “The City Council will consider filling the vacancy within 60 days from the commencement of the vacancy.” Mayor Wasserman is survived by his wife of 53 years, Linda, and their two children, Dan and Jill. He was 77 years-old. Funeral services will be held 4 p.m. Friday, January 6, 2012 at the Harbor Lights Church, 4760 Thornton Avenue in Fremont. A reception will immediately follow.

From the governor: Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued the following statement regarding today's (December 29, 2011) ruling by the California Supreme Court: “Today’s ruling by the California Supreme Court validates a key component of the state budget and guarantees more than a billion dollars of ongoing funding for schools and public safety.”

County of Santa Clara:

BY NISHA PATEL PHOTOS BY SANJEEV MANUCHA Six Bay Area schools will join with Irvington’s IndoPak club to present the third annual cultural charity show, “Dil Se,” at Irvington High School. The event primary purpose is to provide a night of cultural entertainment and raise funds for a South Asian charity. In addition to Irvington students, the show will feature performers from Amador Valley High School, Cupertino High School, Evergreen Valley High School, Kennedy High School, and Monta Vista High School. The show includes energetic Bollywood dances, traditional Bhangra and Raas performances along with classical music and fusion teams. In addition dances, Dil Se’s opening act will feature the national anthems of both India and Pakistan, sung by all singers in the show. This performance will emphasize the goal of the IndoPak Club, peaceful collaboration of both parties.

The California Supreme Court unanimously upheld the Legislature’s power to abolish redevelopment agencies (“RDAs”) statewide. This decision adopted arguments made by the County of Santa Clara (“County”), a party to the case. The result is that scarce public dollars will return to schools, counties, fire districts and other local agencies to perform vital public services. The County joined as a respondent in the case, California Redevelopment Association et al. v. Matosantos et al. (California Supreme Court Case No. S194861), shortly after it was filed. The controversy centered on the validity of two legislative bills that were passed as part of the state’s FY 2012 budget. The first, ABX1 26, abolished all redevelopment agencies in the state through an orderly wind-down process. The second, ABX1 27, created a new voluntary redevelopment program. The Court unanimously upheld ABX1 26; and, by a 6-1 vote, it struck down ABX1 27 as a violation of Proposition 22. The end result is that redevelopment agencies throughout the state will be required to wind-down operations and public dollars will be returned to local governments as redevelopment debts are fulfilled. “Redevelopment has had a huge negative effect on local governments’ ability to provide basic public services,” said Miguel Márquez, Santa Clara County Counsel. “Prior to yesterday’s ruling, redevelopment agencies received 12 percent of all property tax revenue in the continued on page 19

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INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 29

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Hospital Staff’s Donations Support Local Children’s Organization

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ernadine Dutra’s nonprofit organization OneChild, which celebrated its 10th anniversary this year, provides new school clothes and supplies to hundreds of local children every year. Yet, Bernadine, the wife of former Assemblyman John Dutra of Fremont, admits her efforts sometimes don’t feel like enough. And she says on occasion she has to remind herself of how OneChild got its name. “You do sometimes have that feeling of being overwhelmed—there are so many requests—and I think, ‘I can’t do it all,’” she says. “Then I remember, if you just start with one child—my daughter Cindy helps a lot by saying, ‘We started with the goal of helping one child.’ You build from there. “We’ve been blessed to serve over 3,500 since we started, and that’s wonderful, truly wonderful.” OneChild, whose headquarters operates on the Washington Hospital campus, partners with other community organizations to identify children in need and provide free, private “shopping trips” for them and their siblings. According to Bernadine, the experience of seeing children get the clothing and supplies they need for the new school year is a reward in and of itself. “My daughter and I got to the shop early on a Saturday to volunteer, and there were two children with their mother, just leaving, and they said thank you. The mother didn’t speak much English. Then, in a few minutes the girls ran back through the doors saying, ‘Thank you, thank you, thank you!’ and the mother was crying. “Helping children like this, it just fills your heart.”

Community support Nevertheless, the work that OneChild does requires the faith and support of many different organizations and individuals, she says. One of those organizations is Washington Hospital. “Community support is very, very important,” according to Bernadine. “Wash-

“Each year the hospital’s management staff members picks a name of a child, and they are given information such as the age, type of clothing the children want, sizes, and a list of what the children want. Then they go out and shop for a specific child. And it’s so rewarding for them. This year there were 12 bikes, and the whole corner

Nancy Farber, Washington Hospital Healthcare System CEO, and Bernie Dutra, founder of OneChild, celebrate the great collection of donated gifts along with Kathleen Hearty and Cheryl Renaud.

ington Hospital’s CEO Nancy Farber and the hospital have just been wonderful. One of the biggest costs of a nonprofit is what you pay for rent, and Nancy offered to bring OneChild onto the hospital grounds. I told her that we couldn’t afford that. She said I wouldn’t have to pay anything. I asked her why she would do that, and she said that they are always looking for something that is good for the community. She brought it to the board, and it was approved.

of the room was filled. It’s just incredible. It’s a wonderful experience for both the children and the adults.” Inspired to help children Bernadine herself was inspired to help children in need based on her own experiences growing up, experiences she said left her self esteem broken for many years. As the children of an alcoholic mother, she and her brothers were teased, shunned— and even spit on—for coming to school dirty and without new clothes. And de-

spite receiving good grades in school, Bernadine says a feeling of shame followed her well into adulthood. It wasn’t until she was 37 and began achieving personal success as a real estate agent in a company that her husband and she started, that she finally felt self-esteem. Today, when she sees a child smiling and able to pick out new supplies and clothing, she says it reminds her of how much difference just one person can make in the lives of children. Make a difference “As a child, because of my circumstances, I didn’t know about volunteering, but now I know that if people would just go volunteer, they could get so much out of it,” Bernadine says. “This season I want people to think of what they can do for these children—or by working for another nonprofit organization in the community. “Recently, I gave my daughter a crossword puzzle, and on the other side were letters to Santa. One letter was written by a child asking Santa to help her mother and sister. She asked for clothing for her baby sister and shoes for her mother, but nothing for herself. There were so many letters like this from people. We have so much to be thankful for, and I think we lose sight of that sometimes.” Find out more To learn more about OneChild and the difference one person can make in the lives of local children and their families, visit www.onechildca.org. To find out about volunteer opportunities at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/giving.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

1/3/12

1/4/12

1/5/12

1/6/12

1/7/12

1/8/12

1/9/12

Cancer Caregivers: Complementary Therapy

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Think Pink 2011

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

Think Pink 2011

Washington Women's Center: Circulation 101 for Women - Part 1: Varicose Veins

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Treatment Options for Knee Problems (NEW)

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Oh My Aching Lower Back! Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer

Women's Health Conference: Skin Health From Infancy to Maturity

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes and the Kidneys

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You?

Influenza and Other Learn About Nutrition for Contagious Respiratory a Healthy Life Conditions

Voices InHealth:The Greatest Gift of All

Cancer Caregivers: Panel Discussion

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Disaster Preparedness Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The PreSchool Years

Men's Health Expo 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Diabetes and Your Hormones Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment

Brain Health for Seniors Heart Irregularities

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Living with Heart Failure

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children

Kidney Disease

Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care

World Kidney Day (Late Start) Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure How to Prevent a Heart and Slow Your Heart Rate Attack

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

Learn About Foods That Help Your Digestive System Crohn's & Colitis, Stomach Cancer and Irritable Bowel Disorders Diabetes Matters:Vacation or Travel Plans? Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Late Start) Learn How to Access Community Services Quickly and Easily

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Do You Have Sinus Problems? Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team

Inside Washington Hospital: Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease Pediatric Care George Mark Children's House - A New Way Voices InHealth: The Home Inside Washington Hospital: Legacy Strength Training Keys to Healthy Eyes Rapid Detection of MRSA System


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

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Seminar Focuses on Cancer Risk Based on Family History of the Disease

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f you have a history of cancer in your family—or you have a close relative that has been diagnosed—chances are you have a lot of questions. How does this impact your risk of developing cancer? What about your children? Are there tests to determine risk? Are there ways to change your risk profile? What about screenings? Next Tuesday, Jan. 10, from noon to 1 p.m., Vandana B. Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., an oncologist on the Washington Hospital Medical Staff and director of the hospital’s Cancer Genetics Program, and Nicki Chun, M.S., CGC, a genetic counselor with the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic, will present a free Lunch and Learn lecture at the Washington Women’s Center to discuss why and how genetic counseling can help individuals with a strong family history of cancer. Learn more and reduce your risk “By getting information early on and understanding their risk, people can positively impact their outcomes when it comes to cancer,” according to Dr. Sharma. “Unfortunately, many people out there may not even realize that their risk for developing cancer is something they can alter, but it’s true.” Referred to as a cancer syndrome, this type of genetic predisposition increases a person’s lifetime risk of developing cancer. “An individual diagnosed with cancer who has some family history, or women with a mother or sister diagnosed with breast cancer, or anyone diagnosed with multiple cancers, such as breast and ovarian—these individuals are our target audience when talking about heritability and cancer,” Dr. Sharma says. For these individuals in particular, knowledge can make all the difference in early detection—and even avoidance of developing cancer, according to Dr. Sharma. In the past, she says patients have told her they thought they were destined to develop cancer—even die of it—because they had a family history of the disease. Dr. Sharma is adamant that this is not the case. And genetic testing has become a valuable tool in evaluating individuals’ risk of certain types of cancer, as well as in taking steps to change that risk. Strategies to diagnose cancer early “When we do genetic testing, we’re able to implement strategies to diagnose the

cancer earlier and sometimes even prevent it,” Dr. Sharma says. “If we do test the individuals and family members, and an individual doesn’t have the gene mutation—not gene—then they know that don’t have an increased risk, and therefore they don’t have to do the more frequent screening.”

ple with a first-degree relative who has been diagnosed begin the screening 10 years younger than the age their relative was diagnosed. We wouldn’t wait until the age the cancer was found in the family member.” Getting answers Stanford genetic counselor Nicki Chun recommends seeking information

In addition to altering screening frequency, Chun says, treatment options for individuals with cancer are frequently adjusted based on knowledge about family history and genetic risk. Moreover, treatment modalities and technology also evolve quickly in the realm of cancer care, which is why it’s important to seek the latest information, according to Chun. For more information about classes at the Washington Women’s Center, call (866) 608-1301 or (510) 608-1301. To register for this class, call (800) 963-7070 or go online at www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Cancer in the Family … Am I at Risk?

Vandana Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of the Washington Hospital Cancer Genetics program (pictured above) and Nicki Chun, M.S., C.G.C., a genetic counselor with the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic, will present a free Lunch and Learn lecture at the Washington Women’s Center to discuss why and how genetic counseling can help individuals with a strong family history of cancer. The lecture will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 10 from noon to 1 p.m. at the Washington Women’s Center, located at 2500 Mowry Ave. (Washington West) in Fremont. To register for this class, call (800) 963-7070 or visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Bring your lunch, and come learn more from Dr. Sharma and Ms. Chun about genetic counseling and cancer risk based on family history. “Cancer in the Family … Am I at Risk?” will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 10, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Washington Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150, in the Washington West building. Who should attend?

Dr. Sharma adds that one of the reasons she wants people to be aware of a family history of cancer is because this knowledge might change how screening is approached. Similarly, individuals diagnosed with more than two cancers are more prone to a genetic predisposition that could be shared amongst family members—people whose screening schedules for cancer may change drastically based on this information. “Take, for example, the general screening schedule for colon cancer, which typically begins at age 50,” she says. “If everything is normal, a person is screened five to 10 years later. However, with a strong family history, the schedule increases in frequency to one to three years. We always recommend that peo-

It was a picture-perfect Wednesday afternoon on Dec. 21 when the Wyotech motorcycle mechanics came rumbling in on their bikes, toys in tow, to visit Washington Hospital. Fremont Wyotech instructors and students parked their motorcycles in front of Washington West and delivered hundreds of new stuffed animals, coloring books and toys that had been collected during their holiday toy drive. Nurses and hospital employees gathered to welcome the motorcyclists. “We are truly grateful to Wyotech for choosing to stop by and provide us with this very generous donation,” said Angus Cochran, Executive Director of the Washington Hospital Foundation. “It is always nice to be able to provide a little something special to a child or family in our pediatrics unit or emergency room during the holidays.” This was the third annual collection effort according to Carl Blevins, administrator of the WyoTech Motorcycle Technology program, who added, “We hope to do it even bigger next year.” Washington Hospital sincerely appreciates the community’s support during this special time of year.

Washington Hospital employees meet with Wyotech instructors and students at Washington West to accept toys for pediatric patients at Washington Hospital. Hospital employees pictured include:Tina Sloan R.N., Carmen Williams R.N., Christina Fowlks R.N., Margo Dextraze-Cordova R.N., Barbara Crabtree, Beth Copeland

rather than feeling anxious and uncertain about what the future may hold. “Many people have relatives with cancer,” Chun says. “We’ll discuss who might benefit from genetic testing, the basics of inherited cancer risk, what genetic tests are currently available, and what might become available in the future.” She says people have a lot of unanswered questions when it comes to cancer risk, and genetic counseling is a good way of getting answers. “Two of the most common questions people have when they come to genetic counseling are: ‘What caused my cancer?’ and ‘What does it mean for my kids and relatives?’ The other outstanding question is: ‘How will this affect my treatment?’”

• Individuals that have been diagnosed with cancer and have a family history • Women with mother or sister diagnosed with breast cancer • Individuals diagnosed with multiple cancers (such as breast and ovarian cancers) • Individuals with colon or uterine cancer • Anyone with multiple family members affected by cancer • Members of the community interested in learning more about genetics


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY MARSHA HOWARD

T

he Douglas Morrisson Theatre (DMT) is excited to introduce the first show in the 2012 "Bare Bones" staged reading series: “The Drunken City” by Adam Bock. “What would it be like if all the characters in a play were drunk?” That’s the question the playwright Adam Bock asked himself, and answers with quirkily charming results in “The Drunken City.” Bride- to-be Marnie and her two bridesmaids, Melissa and Linda, hit the streets of Manhattan for a final, and fateful, bachelorettes night out on the town. These 20-something women stagger into Frank and his buddy Eddie outside a club, and before you know it, Marnie and Frank have paired off. What ensues is a hysterical night plus of soulsearching as we discover the lonely hearts hidden beneath the tipsy exteriors. Bock’s playful comedy “The Drunken City” inaugurates DMT’s Bare Bones series – staged readings of edgier pieces by contemporary writers. “The Drunken City” was commissioned by and originally premiered in 2005 at New York’s Kitchen Theatre Company, revised at TheatreWorks in Palo Alto, and received its off Broadway premiere in 2008, produced by Playwrights Horizons. “A lot of fun! Adam Bock’s scapel-sharp insight has made him a potent force on today’s theatre scene… Tart, smart, and intoxicating.” -The New York Sun Bay Area audiences will recognize Canadian playwright Bock through his long history with Shotgun Players. Bock's plays have been produced in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, London, Toronto, and Edinburgh. They include “Swimming in the Shallows” (Shotgun Players, Off-Broadway), “The Shaker Chair” (Shotgun Players, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Humana Festival), “The Thugs,” “Five Flights” (Off-Broadway), “The Typographer's Dream” (Shotgun Players, 2003 Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and the Menier Theatre, London), “The

January 3, 2012

Receptionist” (Manhattan Theatre Club), and “A Small Fire” (Off-Broadway's Playwrights Horizons). Director Dale Albright most recently directed “Sister Cities” (Dragon Productions), “Abigail Dreary” (Ianiro Productions), and “Tuna Christmas” (BusBarn). He has also directed for Dragon Productions and productions at theatre Q, as well as the San Francisco Fringe Festival. As an actor, Albright will soon be seen in “Bach at Leipzig” at The Pear Avenue Theatre (April 2012) and most recently appeared in “Compleat Female Stage Beauty” at City Lights Theatre Company of San Jose. Previous performances include playing Tennessee Williams (“Tennessee in the Summer” at New Conservatory Theatre Center, Bay Area Critics Circle nomination) as well as “Lips Together, Teeth Apart” (theatre Q), “Snakebit” (theatre Q), “Cloud 9” (coproduced by Dragon Productions/ theatre Q), “Terminating” (co-produced by Theatre Rhino/Eastenders), “Rough Crossing” (Town Hall Theatre) and Dragon Productions' “Chekhov in Yalta” and “Heidi Chronicles.” The Bare Bones series will continue with “Looking for Normal” by Jane Anderson and directed by Marilyn Langbehn on April 3, “Broke-ology” by Nathan Louis Jackson on August 7, and a reading to be announced for October 9. The Douglas Morrisson Theatre is located at 22311 N. Third St. in Hayward, next to the Senior Center and the Japanese Gardens. The Box Office is open Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and can be reached at (510) 881-6777. Information is also available at www.dmtonline.org. The Drunken City Tuesday, Jan 10 8 p.m. Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Tickets: $10 open seating


January 3, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Mission: SOS ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY ANGIE WANG The leadership board of Mission San Jose High School’s (MSJHS) student-run organization Stressed Out Students (SOS), presented an enlightening presentation, December 13, on how intense, high stakes competition affects healthy teen development. Seniors Stephanie Hom and Charlotte Miller, Junior Tanya Raja and Sophomore Anjali Kanthilal were in charge of the event. The presentation opened with MSJHS’s Assistant Principal Zack Larsen who spoke about the typical MSJ student’s definition of success. The answer: a high GPA, high SAT scores, and ultimately, ac-

Assistant Principal Zack Larsen speaks at SOS presentation.

ceptance letters from top-tier colleges of their choice. Yet the parents in attendance were hardly surprised; most are aware of the high school’s reputation for rigorous courses and high test scores. The topic for discussion was whether or not these expectations get in the way of “real” success, instead defined by a feeling of accomplishment and excelling in what the student loves and chooses to do. Senior Kevin Zhai’s video about course rigor and school stress also offered similar ideas from the students and staff at MSJH. SOS Outreach Coordinator and parent of MSJHS alumni, Martha Kreeger says that “SOS is not about eliminating stress. SOS is dedicated to helping students manage their stress.” Her role is to research Fremont Unified School District policy changes and encourage parents, students, staff, and faculty to communicate and exchange ideas. Kreeger spreads awareness for issues that the school board has on the table for discussion so that students and staff alike can contribute to the discussion. Later, Zack Larsen and MSJHS Counselor Merri Blum joined Tanya Raja and Charlotte Miller to open up a panel discussion for the parents and students in attendance, encouraging them to text in their answers for poll questions regarding their definitions of success, good grades, and the like. Poll results were immediately projected onto the screen while audience members discussed and explained their decisions and answer choices. SOS’s goal for the future is to make students feel like they are in control. Says Kreeger, “We see a lot of distressed students who don’t think that they can make a change. If we put power in the hands of students, then we’re able to prove that their say does matter. The best thing you can do for a student is to show them that they have control over their own lives.” That’s the beauty of an organization like SOS. With students in charge, they are motivated to change their future and mold it into something they are proud of. By allowing students to make their own mistakes and live life for themselves, SOS empowers students who will go on to change their own future and that of others for the better. For more information, visit http://www.missionsos.net/home.

PG&E rates will increase in 2012 Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) has said that with the start of the new year, residential customers will see flat to moderate increases in gas and electric rates, which cover the utility’s costs of buying energy, investing in new plants and equipment, and paying for state mandates such as special programs to help income-qualified customers. PG&E’s average rates for residential gas customers will dip 0.3 percent compared to January 2011 and increase 1.8 percent over December 2011. Average residential electric rates will increase 2.9 percent over January 1, 2011, or 2.4 percent over December 2011. “These revenues help us serve customers by reducing the frequency of electrical outages, improving the responsiveness of our call centers, providing more convenient services and, above all, continuing to upgrade the safety of our system,” said Tom Bottorff, Senior Vice President of Regulatory Relations for PG&E. The rate increases are lower than the trend for all U.S. consumer prices, which increased 3.4 percent over the most recently measured 12-month period (November 2010 to November 2011), according to the U.S. Department of Labor. “Although electric and gas rates fluctuate from year to year, we have managed to keep them below the rate of inflation over the past five years,” Bottorff added. The January electric rate change will provide increased revenues to repair and replace aging infrastructure and invest in clean energy supplies, among other needs. Electric and gas rates have not been affected by PG&E’s costs stemming from the San Bruno tragedy, which have been borne by the utility’s shareholders. For more information, visit http://www.pge.com.

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SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER Start your New Year’s fitness program with offerings from Ohlone College Community Education. Chen Style Tai Chi: Learn the original

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

form of Tai Chi with the 2010 Tai Chi Master of the Year, May Chen. Only $95 for eight classes! Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep: Learn basic stretching using Qigong and Tai Chi forms to provide a well-rounded fitness

workout that readies the mind, body and spirit. Only $95 for eight classes! Both classes are held in Newark at the Ohlone College Newark Center, Room 1407. Register now! Sign up online at http://ohlone.augusoft.net or by calling (510) 742-2303. Chen Style Tai Chi Saturdays, Jan 7 - Mar 3 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep Saturdays, Jan 7 - Mar 3 10 a.m. - 11:15 a.m. Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry Street, Newark Room 1407 (510) 742-2303 http://ohlone.augusoft.net Cost: $95 each

January 3, 2012


January 3, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Auto Review

BY STEVE SCHAEFER The Ford Focus was a nice step forward when it debuted in 2000 here in the U.S. It was based on a European design, and although it was built in North America, it was taut and fun to drive. But despite some restyling, it was never the real European model, and as time went on, the folks across

Americans want. The one in the Focus is a six-speed with a low first gear for quickness off the line and overdrive fifth and sixth gears for better fuel economy. Under the hood is an all-new 2.0-liter DOHC four-cylinder engine that combines high-pressure gasoline direct injection and twin independent variable camshaft timing for enhanced performance and fuel effi-

the pond got a better car while we settled for a restyled version of the old one. Well, that's over. As part of the company’s One Ford strategy, we receive just about the same car they enjoy, but it’s built for us in a plant in Wayne, Michigan, the heartland of America. The Focus is very popular worldwide, with more than ten million sold since its European debut in 1998. Foci (is that the plural?) come in four trim lines stateside: S, SE, SEL and Titanium. All except the base S model are available in both five-door hatchback and four-door sedan configurations; the S is a sedan only. My Ingot Silver Metallic test car was an SE, with, - oh boy - a five-speed manual transmission. That helped to make the driving experience even sportier, with firm, direct shifts. The new Focus turned out to be surprisingly roomy and had more lines and curves on it and in it than anything I've seen since the

ciency. Its 160 horsepower is 20 more than the previous Focus 2.0-liter engine yet it also brings a more than 10 percent fuel economy improvement. My tester was rated at 26 City, 36 Highway, averaging at an even 30 mpg. I averaged 28.1 mpg. The EPA Green Vehicle Guide gives the car a superior 9 for Air Pollution and a respectable 7 on Greenhouse Gas, placing it squarely in the SmartWay category. It actually gets a PZEV (partial zero emission vehicle) rating for its clean ways. You can get the Euro-style five-door hatchback, but many Americans will likely opt for the sedan. It fits in as the second step in a foursedan Ford lineup, anchored by the Fiesta. Above it are the midsize Fusion and the now full-size Taurus, so it’s a strong team today. Prices start at $17,225 for the S sedan and move up in steps to the Titanium at $23,425. Both prices include shipping. My SE Sedan tester, with the Convenience Package (cruise control, alarm, and MyFord

smaller Fiesta I drove a while ago. The taillights, especially on the hatchback, are fanciful and like nothing else I’ve ever seen. This is one car that really looks unlike its predecessor—and that’s probably a good thing. The car came with an impressive set of black alloy wheels – 17-inchers that gave the silver car a look with attitude. I am personally less thrilled by black wheels—they remind me of silver wheels covered in brake dust—but the look is modern and youthful, so I made the best of it and smiled. The quality of the new Focus’ interior is way above the old one. I’m not sure why, but everything from materials to fit and finish is simply superior to the past iteration. Europeans expect even their most inexpensive cars to be well turned out, and with this car, they are giving Americans more than they expect at the lower end of the automotive marketplace. The fresh interior is remarkable for its busy interplay of surfaces and textures. The top of the dash is remarkable in its varied terrain. There’s plenty of silvery trim on the steering wheel, door handles, and the brake thumb button. The light blue needles of the gauges are an unusual and tasteful accent. Ford’s SYNC® with MyFord Touch™ replaces many of the traditional buttons, knobs and gauges with LCD screens and buttons. I have always found the system annoying, with normally easy actions buried in menus and interruptions by a female automated voice. I have to relearn each time how to get my iPod connected. Living with the system for a while would probably solve this problem. Of course, most cars sold in the U.S. will be automatics, because that’s what most

audio system) and SE Sport Package (includes leather wheel and gear knob and rear spoiler) came to $20,580 with a discount. Finally, the Focus has become the world car it was meant to be, and you can go get yours anytime you want.

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

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Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD December 30: CSO Anders investigated a commercial burglary that occurred at Universal Tires (40648 Fremont Blvd). Surveillance video showed a male suspect, driving an early 70’s pick-up truck, jump the fence to the business, and remove 16 tires. Detectives and the Street Crimes Unit obtained information that wanted felon (Erica Rojo) was in an apartment in the City of Hayward. This information was confirmed and attempts to have Rojo exit were initially unsuccessful. Several “on duty” SWAT officers and a patrol unit responded to support the investigators. Hayward SWAT eventually responded and Rojo surrendered without incident after a window was breached by

Newark Police Log

Hayward SWAT. Rojo was arrested and transported back to FPD for questioning. Officer Edwards made a traffic stop on a subject. After a search of the vehicle, stolen property from a residential burglary was recovered. The subject provided a full confession and was arrested for the burglary, DUI, and a probation violation. A passenger in the car was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. December 31: CSO Aguirre responded to a commercial burglary at a PG&E substation (42105 Boyce Road) after an unknown suspect(s) entered the yard and used a bobcattype of vehicle to remove an eight foot spool of insulated copper wire Officers responded to the East West Bank (6036 Stevenson

Boulevard) on a report of a robbery that just occurred. The suspect, a black male adult, 6’02”, wearing a grey shirt and jeans, entered the bank, jumped the counter, and demanded cash from the teller. The suspect was last seen running toward Stevenson January 1: Officers were dispatched to a residence on Gage Court because a neighbor reported people inside a vacant home. As officers responded, the two trespassers fled via the backyard onto the railroad tracks. This is the second incident at this residence. Officer N. Johnson contacted the owner and requested she use a board-up company to secure the door to the garage. Officer Chahouati investigated a residential burglary on Emerson Street. The resident returned after four days to find the home burglarized.

SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD

December 28 A commercial burglary occurred overnight at the Sinodino Restaurant were copper pipes were stolen. Later in the shift Officers contacted Ellis Vietor, a transient, near the recycling center on Redekker Place. Vietor was in possession of the stolen pipes. He was arrested for burglary of the restaurant and booked at Santa Rita Jail. A family in the 37400 block of Ash Street left their home for the evening. An item was left behind and the family returned to retrieve the article (less than ten minutes after they left). The family found two subjects inside the home ransacking and placing property in pillow cases. No property was stolen. Police officers responded at 6:30 p.m., set up a perimeter around the neighborhood and arrested a 15 year-old male Newark resident for the burglary. The other suspect was not captured. It was learned that there were two lookouts outside the residence while two others entered the home via an unlocked rear window. The three outstanding suspects were described as Hispanic Males age 15-18 wearing dark clothing. Investigation is ongoing to learn the identity of the other suspects. NOTE: it is believed the suspects watched the home and saw the family leave prior to breaking in. Please be vigilant around your neighborhood and call the Newark Police Department to report any suspicious activity. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at (510) 578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 5784000, extension 500.

Documents in slain nursing student case released AP WIRE SERVICE OAKLAND, Calif. (AP), Dec 31 - The suspect in the slaying of a San Francisco Bay area nursing student was obsessed and increasingly angry with her ex-boyfriend's relationship with the victim and was convinced the two were having an affair, according to grand jury transcripts. The transcripts - released on Friday - include threatening text messages that Giselle Esteban, 27, allegedly sent to her ex-boyfriend about the victim, Michelle Le, in the months before Le's disappearance from a Hayward hospital parking lot in May, according to the Hayward Daily Review (http://bit.ly/uLCg4e). Her remains were found in a remote area four months later. In one message, Esteban said her ex-boyfriend, Scott Marasigan, and Le would ``pay'' for lying to her, according to the 470-page transcript. In another text message sent on March 2, Esteban allegedly accused Le of digging her own grave and being a ``home wrecker'' and said she wouldn't be an ``issue'' much longer. She was even more explicit in a March 18 phone call to Marasigan, according to the transcript, telling him that she would take his life and Le's if he was not honest with her regarding Le. ``This is your last and final warning,'' Esteban allegedly said. Marasigan apparently recorded the conversation. ``No matter how many times Marasigan denied an affair, Esteban refused to believe him,'' Alameda County prosecutor Butch Ford told the grand jury. ``And she became fixated.'' Marasigan testified that he dated Le for two or three weeks several years ago, but they never had a sexual relationship. Esteban was charged with murder in Le's death in September. She was indicted by the grand jury on the same charge earlier this month, as prosecutors sought to avoid a preliminary hearing and speed the case up. She has yet to enter a plea and is scheduled to return to court for arraignment on Jan. 20. According to the grand jury transcripts, Esteban's DNA was a match to a stain on the steering wheel and turn signal of Le's car, and Le's DNA was a match to a stain on Esteban's shoe.

Burglary prevention tips SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Burglaries in Newark neighborhoods cost residents the loss of property and the sense of security. Most burglaries in your neighborhood are being committed by criminals that are not skilled professionals, but people that will take advantage of an easy target. Don't make it easy for them! Ten Quick Security Tips: Keep all doors and windows closed and securely fastened. An open window or door is an open invitation for burglars. Thieves are also quick to spot weak locks that may be easily forced open. Doors should have deadbolt locks with a one inch throw and reinforced strike plate with three inch screws. All windows should have window locks. Secure sliding glass doors. Place a metal rod or piece of plywood in the track and install vertical bolts. These will help prevent burglars from forcing the door open or lifting it off the track. Always lock the door to an attached garage. Don't rely on your automatic garage door opener for security. Create the illusion that you are home by using timers on lights, radios and TV's. Making your residence appear occupied, even when no one is home, will deter criminals. continued on page 9


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-areanews-group-medianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business

The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help.

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999 We have over 880 signatures on change.org and over 446 have signed a petition at our office. We need more signatures.You can come to our office for a petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers. continued from page 8

Burglary prevention tips

Keep the perimeter of your home well lighted. Installing low voltage outdoor lighting is a cost-effective way to discourage intruders, as well as highlight a house. Never leave clues that you are away on a trip. Have a trusted neighbor collect mail and newspapers while you are away so delivered items do not accumulate. You can also ask a neighbor to park in your driveway or parking place to make it appear that you are present. Keep some shades and blinds up and curtains open to maintain a normal, everyday appearance in your residence. Never leave a message on your telephone answering machine telling people that you are away from home. A message that you will return at a certain time leaves your home vulnerable in the interim. Never advertise your absence by the use of social media.

Keep shrubbery trimmed away from entrances and walkways. While large, ornate hedges may be beautiful, they also provide a hiding place for burglars who need only a minute to break in through a window or door. And most importantly, organize a community watch program to protect your neighborhood. An alert community is a safe community. If you would like to attend this meeting or start a Neighborhood Watch in your area please contact: Tim Jones Special Assistant Community Engagement Division Newark Police Dept. (510) 578-4209 tim.jones@newark.org

SUBMITTED BY KATHERINE HIGUERA-MCCOY Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision, the world's largest K-12 science and technology competition celebrating its 20th Anniversary, is now accepting entries for 2012. Students research scientific principles and current technologies as the basis for designing inventions that could exist in 20 years. As the program has evolved over the past two decades, it continues to encourage excellence and motivate students in STEM disciplines. Applications for this year's competition are available online at www.exploravision.org and are due by February 1, 2012. The ExploraVision program, sponsored by Toshiba and administered by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), was created to help motivate young students to excel in science and technology. It challenges teams of 2-4 students to research scientific principles and current technologies as the basis for designing innovative technologies that could exist in 20 years. By instilling a sense of empowerment and the great potential of science, ExploraVision motivates students to excel and helps contribute to building the next generation of scientists, entrepreneurs and innovators. Students on the four first-place ExploraVision winning teams will each receive a $10,000 U.S. Series EE Savings Bond valued at maturity. Students on second-place teams will each receive a $5,000 bond valued at maturity. (Canadian winners receive Canada bonds purchased for the equivalent issue price in Canadian dollars.) The eight teams will also receive an expenses-paid trip with their families, mentor and coach to Washington, DC for a gala awards weekend in June 2012. Activities will include a visit to Capitol Hill to meet with members of Congress and a Science Showcase during which the students will display and demonstrate their winning ideas and enjoy sightseeing. The highlight of ExploraVision weekend will be a gala awards banquet and ceremony where students will be formally recognized for their creativity and accomplishments. Each of the 24 regional winning teams receives a Toshiba laptop for the school and each member of the regional winning teams will receive a Toshiba HD Camcorder. Applications for this year’s competition are available online at exploravision.org and due by February 1, 2012.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

History

January 3, 2012

Downtown

W

e hear some discussion these days about “downtown,” but not everyone agrees on what that means or where it is. The dictionary says that “downtown” is toward or in the lower part of a town or city, the section of a city located downtown in the main business section. The question is what does that mean in Fremont today? Perhaps

trict on Main Street or First Street. People in Old Town, the original town, sometimes spoke of going uptown, over to town or just to town. Warm Springs created a different problem because the business houses were located around a “Y” created by the junction of Mission Boulevard and Warm Springs Boulevard. People sometimes said they were going to a

erty Street.” The district would have been served by the State Route 238 freeway that was abandoned in 1978. The City passed a moratorium on development on Mount Vernon Avenue in 2001 so plans could be completed to convert the area to “a thriving downtown.” Vernon Avenue was to be a high density area in the Central Business District.

Mission San Jose, 1900

Through the years, several attempts were made to publicize the Central Business District. Community workshops and meetings were held to promote the downtown area. Tours were held by a group of civic minded citizens called PLACE (People for Livable Accessible Community Environment). In 2003, the city was reported to be moving closer to helping develop

Centerville, 1910

a historical look really makes the question more meaningful or maybe will just add more confusion to the issue. Mission San Jose was the first of the towns or villages that joined to become Fremont. Many early visitors commented on the plaza in front of the church without mentioning the street. Others commented about the narrow or

Irvington, 1900

Niles, 1910

dusty street without naming it and, others just referred to “the road” with no mention of a street. A lady visitor was horrified to see an animal butchered “on the public street.” Eventually the road became known as Main Street and Vallejo Street. Nearby residents began saying they were “going uptown” or to town or maybe even downtown if they lived above Vallejo Street. Charles Shinn wrote that nearby Centerville was the “crossroads town of the valley.” It really was a place where crossroads met, but where was downtown? There was not much change in elevation, but residents sometime said “they were going uptown or downtown,” which usually meant they were going to the main business section on Main Street. Washington Corners, now Irvington, had a different kind of “downtown.” Part of it was on the road to Mission San Jose, part on the road to San Jose and part on the road to Centerville. Going “downtown” could have several meanings depending on where you started from, but there was no doubt where the center of town was. That was where the roads met at “the corners,” now marked by a small park and the historic “Irvington Monument.” People who lived on the west side of Niles sometimes spoke of going uptown to the business dis-

specific business to identify their destination. These five towns were incorporated into the City of Fremont in 1956, and a master plan was devised to meet the needs of the five towns and “provide a central business district and civic-cultural-recreation center.” Planners were wise in choosing the area near the present Mowry Avenue and Fremont Boulevard for commercial development because it was undeveloped and had few streets and buildings. Chapter four (4) of the book The First Thirty Years is entitled “Looking for a Center, 1958 – 1969.” Not everyone agreed on where the center should be or what should be built there. The community center and the City Government were built on the edge of Central Park. The General Plan showed a central park near the business district that would be the center for government and cultural activities. In 1962, THE “Hub” was opened and described as the “central business district. Some said “Fremont has found its center.” Architect John Vogley presented a concept for an exciting downtown in Fremont’s Central Business District in 1966. The district was described in 1969 as “11.6 acres behind Payless Drugs, bounded by Beacon Street, State Street, Capital Avenue and Lib-

13 acres of land, “once known as the central business district.” The district was then bounded by Fremont Boulevard, Paseo Padre Parkway, Mowry Avenue and Walnut Avenue. Articles in 2009 noted that “Fremont was once again seeking a downtown.” Articles in 2010 noted that the city was planning a “Midtown District” that would include mixed-use buildings with plazas organized around a main on Capitol Avenue. By 2011 citizens were asking “Where is the real Downtown” when they heard about the Block development in Pacific Commons. Now do we know where “Downtown” is? How about the “Central Business District”? One of our more eloquent citizens replied, “Thanks for your help. It’s now clear as mud! I could have figured out all of this without your help.” Most people no longer ask, “Where is Fremont?” but they still might wonder where downtown is.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Fremont man wins SBA award SUBMITTED BY ROBERT BORDEN Somesh Kumar, a software developer from Fremont, Calif., won first prize and $5,000 in a nationwide competition sponsored by the U.S. Small Business Administration for developing a new electronic application that quickly and efficiently finds loans, grants, and other useful small business resources for entrepreneurs. The competition and resulting seven apps are meant to put new and useful web tools at the fingertips of growing entrepreneurs. Kumar competed in the SBA’s “Apps for Entrepreneurs Challenge,” a competition for tech-savvy developers to build new and useful web tools for small businesses and entrepreneurs. As a result, entrepreneurs can reach for their smartphone or tablet and search federal, state and local databases for vital information by using one of seven award-winning apps. “It was a great learning experience to participate in SBA’s Apps for Entrepreneurs Challenge and to create SBA Gems,” said Kumar, whose winning app can be downloaded at “SBA Gems” at entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5458. The SBA competition produced seven winners - one First Place winner ($5,000), three Second Place winners ($3,000 each), and three Third Place winners ($2,000 each) for a total of $20,000 in prize money - as follows (all seven apps can be downloaded from SBA’s web site, with URLs listed below): First Place SBA Gems – Find loans, grants permits etc. Developer - Somesh Kumar, Freemont, California entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5458 Second Place CapitaList – Find federal databases for licenses, awards, proposals and websites. Developer – Muneeb Akhter, Springfield, Virginia entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5464 Small Business Toolbox – Find small business programs, SBA offices etc. Developer -- Joseph Blough, Dexter, Michigan entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submis-

sions/5450 SBA Loan Search App -- Find loans, venture capital, tax incentives etc. Developer – Richard Murphy, Silver Spring, Maryland entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5462 Third Place Energy SBA – Find property rights, oil and gas leases, solar etc. Developer – Robert Grogan, Eden Prairie, Minnesota entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5470 SB Alert – Find contracting opportunities and get push notification. Developers – Ben McGinnis and Team, Fairfax, Virginia entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5445 Every Thing For The Entrepreneur – Find SBIR solicitations and more. Developer – Edwardo Martinez, San Francisco, California entrepreneurs.challenge.gov/submissions/5469 These new mobile apps complement SBA’s mobile application created for iPhone in partnership with Palo Alto Software. Users can employ the SBA app to find local Small Business Administration-affiliated advisers and get free, personal, one-on-one help with starting and growing their businesses. The SBA mobile app also features a builtin startup cost calculator to help estimate the costs associated with getting a business off the ground, plus an SBA partner locator to help users find SBA offices, Small Business Development Centers, Women’s Business Centers and SCORE. Users will also have mobile access to SBA video content and social media alerts to provide them with tips on the go. This will include live updates from the SBA’s YouTube channel and from SBA’s Twitter feeds. The free mobile app can be downloaded from the SBA’s website at sba.gov/content/sba-mobile-app.

County releases health assessment SUBMITTED BY STEVE BLOMQUIST Release of the results of Santa Clara County’s first ever Vietnamese Health Assessment provide a fuller understanding of the specific health issues and needs of the County’s Vietnamese community whose members account for one of the largest groups within the County’s Asian/Pacific Islander population. “Although Santa Clara County has one of the largest Vietnamese communities outside Vietnam, it is underserved,” said Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors President Dave Cortese. “We need to understand the precise needs of specific populations so that we can better allocate scarce public health funds. This Health Assessment does just that.” Initiated by Cortese in January 2011 as part of the State of the County Address, this six-month study is the first in a series of ethnic health assessments designed to more efficiently address the public health needs of Santa Clara County’s diverse population. “The Public Health Department’s comprehensive assessment gives us a clearer picture of the major areas of concern affecting the health of the Vietnamese community and shows us where we must focus our efforts,” said Public Health Director Dan Peddycord. “The data collected and analyzed will be extremely helpful in moving forward to improve the health of our county’s Vietnamese residents.” Information for the assessment was gathered through a telephone survey, community event and online surveys, interviews with key community leaders and a community forum. The results indicate the Vietnamese community faces significant socio-economic challenges that can limit their access to resources for good health and wellbeing. In addition to concerns about finances and jobs/unemployment, the Vietnamese community is significantly affected by lack of access to health insurance, cancer, angina/coronary heart disease, diabetes and mental health issues and had high rates of tuberculosis relative to individuals from other countries of birth. Smoking rates were high among Vietnamese men. The full report from the Vietnamese Health Assessment, “Status of Vietnamese Health: Santa Clara County, California, 2011” is available online at the Public Health Department’s website at www.sccphd.org. For more information, contact Steven Blomquist at (408) 299-5030.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Pros see stocks up in 2012, but big risks, too BY BERNARD CONDON AP BUSINESS WRITER NEW YORK (AP) The good news is that Wall Street experts think stock prices will rise more than 10 percent next year. The bad news is that they expected big gains in 2011 and got nearly zero instead. It's forecasting time on Wall Street, and once again the pros are trying to predict the unpredictable. History suggests their target price for stocks by the end of 2012 will prove too high or too low. They might even get the direction wrong - predicting a gain when there's a loss. As famed baseball player Yogi Berra said, “It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” In typical times, guessing where stocks will end up in a year is difficult. There are many assumptions about economic growth, inflation and consumer spending that go into the calculation. Now, forecasting has become nearly impossible. Big unknowns hang over the market as rarely before. Will the euro break up? Will China slow too sharply? Will squabbling in Washington scuttle the economic recovery? “Normally, you wonder, How will sales do? How are managements doing?” says Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at Standard & Poor's, which puts out its own forecasts. “Now there are so many high-level issues that affect the market.” Silverblatt's firm says the S&P 500 index should rise to 1,400 by the end of 2012, up more than 10 percent from Friday's close of 1,265. That figure is an average of expectations from investment strategists, economists and other big thinkers. More bullish yet are stock analysts focused on individual companies. Add up their price targets for each stock in the index, and they see it rising to 1,457, up 15 percent. There's plenty of reason to think stocks will rise fast in the coming year. U.S. companies are generating record profits. Americans are spending more than expected and factories are producing more. The job market finally appears to be healing, too. The odds of the U.S. slipping into another recession have fallen since the summer, when the economy had slowed. Stocks seem attractively priced, too. The S&P 500 is trading at 12 times its expected earnings per share for 2012. It typically trades at 15 times, meaning stocks appear cheaper now. Binky Chadha, chief strategist at Deutsche Bank, says the S&P 500 could hit 1,500 by the end of 2012, a gain of more than 18 percent. Still, there is worry amid the bullishness. Michael Hartnett, chief global equity strategist at Bank of America-Merrill Lynch, expects the S&P to close next year at 1,350, up 6.7 percent from Friday's close. He thinks the U.S. will avoid recession and U.S. companies will generate decent profits. What could wreck that prediction is a worse situation in Europe than he is expecting. If European leaders move too slowly to solve their government debt crisis, the region could fall into a deep recession and throw the U.S. into one, too. If Europe tanks, profits will drop sharply and push the S&P down to 1,000, he says. That would be a sharp drop of 21 percent from Friday's close. The frightening part is that Hartnett gives this “bear” case four-in-10 odds. Similarly, Barry Knapp, strategist at Barclays Capital, predicts the S&P will rise to 1,330 next year. But he expects Europe's struggles with its debt and Washington gridlock could lead investors to sell before they buy. He says the S&P could fall to 1,150 by the middle of the year before rising to his target. It could drop sooner. In the first three months next year, Italy needs to sell national bonds to raise money to pay continued on page 28

Election reforms, tax initiatives will shape 2012 BY JULIET WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) While California is likely to remain out of the presidential spotlight in 2012, the state will undergo dramatic political changes that will alter elections and potentially transform the Legislature. At the same time, voters likely will be asked to consider tax increases even as the state's economy remains stalled by slow growth and high unemployment. A host of new election rules, many approved by voters, will affect how campaigns are run and how incumbents fare in a state that is tilting increasingly Democratic and independent. Several groups, as well as Gov. Jerry Brown, hope to capitalize on the public outrage exemplified by the Occupy movement by asking voters to approve new taxes on high income earners and even themselves to help California close its perennial budget gap. One of the biggest changes could be in the makeup of the state Legislature and perhaps in California's congressional delegation, the result of an independent citizens commission that took over the authority for drawing districts from state lawmakers. Republicans championed the commission when it was proposed to voters but now are seeking a ballot initiative to overturn the state Senate boundaries because they are not happy with the resulting maps. The new political districts also are throwing incumbent state lawmakers into a tailspin as they figure out where they must live to run for office, what other offices to seek or, in a handful of cases, decide whether to run against an opponent from the same political party. Congressional candidates do not have to live in the district in which they are running. As Republicans focus on overturning some of the new districts, Democrats hope to make a play in inland areas of the state long dominated by Republicans, including a challenge to Rep. Mary Bono Mack by Democrat Raul Ruiz, an emergency room doctor. California voters also will face the first widespread use of the state's new primary system, which allows the top two vote-getters in June primaries to advance to the November general election, even if they are from the same party. This replaces a system in which the top vote-getter from each party advanced. The new primary system and independent redistricting were intended to promote more centrist candidates to state legislative seats. The idea is that candidates would have to appeal to a wider spectrum of voters, rather than just zealots continued on page 28


January 3, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

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Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

January 3, 2012

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

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Across 1 Having a preconcieved opinion (10) 7 Computer woe (5) 9 Happening by chance (12) 12 Place of take-of and landing of planes (8) 13 Difficult (6) 14 Causes malaria (8) 16 Very vast, great (7) 18 Mathematical operation (14) 19 Process of computation with figures (10) 20 Put money in with hope of making returns (6) 22 Any Time (5) 24 Baby grand, e.g. (5) 25 People acting for others, usually an elected body (15) 28 Charades, basically (8) 29 Savanna (10) 32 Bonsai are ____ plants and trees (9) 33 Improvements (12) 34 Prohibiting by law (7) 35 Telephone part (6)

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Tri-City Stargazer JANUARY 4 – JANUARY 10, 2012 BY VIVIAN CAROL

Taurus (April 21-May 20): You will have over five more months of Jupiter in your sign. This placement represents expansion of your life through philosophy,

travel or education. It oftentimes promotes the “flow” in your life so that things are easier than they have been in the past. This Jupiter transit began in June of 2011 and occurs for one full year out of every twelve. It represents a time of new beginnings that will continue well after Jupiter has left your sign. Mid-January, mid-March and late November will be particularly auspicious times for you. Venus, your ruling planet, turns retrograde in midMay through June. It is quite probable that you will be reviewing financial conditions during that time. Income may drop during those months or expenses may become greater than norm. You may withdraw from social activities and people during this period. This is probably not your best year for romance. I see challenges in relationships in February, April, June, August, September, and early November. Someone new enters your life in early December and may become a teacher or point you in the next “right” direction. During the last quarter, your overall attitude about partnership becomes clearly more serious. You will want to be in a relationship that is moving forward or you are prepared to let it go. Gemini (May 21-June 20): Whatever illusions you might have about your usual work in the world are beginning to crack. You seek a mission that will reenchant your everyday life and give you a sense of meaning. Jan-

uary and February open the year with your attention on shared resources. “Resources” include time, things of material value, energy and sexuality. The territory is wide, ranging from the mundane study of budget and finances all the way to important discussions with partners over the need for greater intimacy. You may be organizing business issues related to an inheritance or your own legacy. Think very carefully in April about any relationship decisions, including contracts. The probability is strong you will feel the need to back out of commitments during May, June, to mid-July. During this period you will prefer to spend time in solitude. Fair warning to those in committed relationships: you will be prone to regress into old patterns that you know are not productive. Avoid this if you can or you will have apologies to make later. On June 11, the planet Jupiter moves into your sign and will remain there for a full year. Jupiter in your sign will lighten any load, renew your sense of optimism and reinforce your self esteem. Help and cooperation of others will be more available to you, especially if you make your requests in person. The spiritual dimension of your life will improve, and travel or education becomes more prominent. Cancer (June 21-July 21): Let’s look at the big picture since 2009. Pluto opposes your sign, challenging you to recognize your worth in some way and stand up

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for yourself. This press will continue for a decade. Uranus moved into your territory of career and social contributions. It is pressuring you to find ways to express your unique identity in the outer world, preferably while promoting social justice. This continues for seven years. The Saturn voice is sending you words of caution and asking you to maintain your safety, security and the status quo. Sometimes the cosmos seems to have a sense of humor. How can you manage all of these projects at once? No doubt you are, even though there might be a foul-up now and then. In January, it might all seem to be too much, but you will climb out of your shell in February to greet the world anew. Health issues may need attending during March. The eclipse season between mid-May and mid-June draws attention to your health once again. You will probably be choosing to begin healthful regimens anew. During June, August through September, and November through December, there will be episodes related to the above projects. You are getting stronger all the time.

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Aries (March 21-April 20): Mars, your ruling planet, is preparing to go through a retrograde cycle as the year begins. On this visit, the review is in your house of work and health. You may find it a challenge to move forward with your goals in either of these areas until the end of April. Do not give up or you will lose ground. During March when Mercury turns retrograde in your sign you will likely change your mind and back out of a previously made plan. Overall, important commitments to new activities are unlikely until the end of April. Use these months to think seriously about your next direction. You are probably already aware that you are becoming more and more charged with the zeitgeist of our times, independence versus oppression. It is probable that you will be embroiled in this battle in a major way by June, continuing on through October. Stay on the side of social justice and you will be doing the right thing. Aspects suggest a thoroughly challenging August. Personal relationship issues could explode. Resources are subject to tighten in the fall. Overall, this will be a challenging year, but when it is over you will know you are doing the right things for yourself and perhaps for others as well.

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Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): Maintaining your health has become a priority in the last three years. Exercise and diet are a major part of your daily activities now. You realize more than most that health is the bottom line and nothing else in your life works without these basics. Special emphasis on this factor is present in January, March through April, late June, late September, and December. Travel and expansion of your life territory is significant through June. Aspects for this are favorably emphasized during late January, late February and May. Make note of the weeks surrounding the March 21st equinox, as this is a propitious time for you to begin new things, especially if they involve travel or communications. You may overdo during late June, early July. Ease up on the energy output and take breaks to rest. Give special attention to investments and other shared resources. There are signs of loss there, slow and gradual, as though leaking. For the past two years, you have had concerns about aging family members or property. The time is continued on page 25

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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January 3, 2012

Clipper reaches millionth card SUBMITTED BY MTC The Bay Area’s Clipper transit fare-collection program now has a million active cards in circulation. Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) staff credit the surge to transit operators’ campaigns to move more riders, especially youth and seniors, from paper tickets and passes to the reloadable Clipper card before the end of 2011. As of December 16, 2011, there were 1,000,606 active Clipper cards in use, an increase of approximately 2,000 from the previous week. The million-plus active cards represent a 30 percent increase from the 778,197 active cards in circulation six months ago and a 142 percent increase from the 413,616 active cards in circulation a year ago. “We’re delighted with the numbers. Word is spreading that it’s time to switch from paper to plastic,” said Clipper Program Senior Coordinator Jacob Avidon. “With the holidays upon us, we remind Bay Area residents the Clipper card makes a great environmentally friendly gift; you can put as much as $300 on the card to encourage friends and family to take transit in 2012.” BART is in the midst of a campaign to alert riders about the need to switch to Clipper cards to access discounted fares, viz. youth, senior, disabled and high-value tickets. The paper ver-

BART construction notification Activities related to the BART Warm Springs Extension Project are set to expand south of Central Park all the way to the Warm Springs Station site near South Grimmer Boulevard. Fremont businesses and residents will soon notice the preliminary work in this expanded area. Impacts to the public are expected to be minimal. The work will include, but is not limited to: Utility potholing - drilling test holes to determine the location of underground utilities. Utilities that are in the path of future construction work will be relocated; Limited building demolition and reconstruction adjacent to the railroad right-of-way west of Warm Springs Court; Removal of old Western Pacific track from Washington Blvd. to South Grimmer Boulevard; Tree trimming and removal along the alignment from Fremont Station to the planned Warm Springs Station. We appreciate your continued patience during construction. If you have questions regarding these activities, please contact our project information line at (510) 476-3900 or e-mail bartwarmspringsextension@bart.gov. You can also visit our Community Relations Field Office located in Fremont Central Park at 1320 Stevenson Boulevard Monday – Friday 8 am to 5 pm.

sions of these BART tickets are now available at only a few retail locations; Clipper is the easiest way for riders to keep their discounts. BART has spread the word via events, in-station advertising and other avenues. SamTrans has also organized outreach events to sign-up riders for a Clipper card before the Peninsula bus system’s paper monthly passes are phased out at the end of 2011. Riders seem to be taking heed, with a week-overweek increase of 14 percent in the number of SamTrans passengers paying their fares via Clipper, as of December 9, 2011. For overall Bay Area transit ridership, MTC recorded an average of 584,000 weekday transit boardings using the Clipper card, a year-over-year increase of almost 80 percent, for the week ending December 9, 2011. San Francisco Muni leads with 328,000 average weekday boardings over the week ending December 9, about half of its ridership. BART follows with 169,000 weekday Clipper boardings, representing 45 percent of its weekday traffic, then AC Transit with 50,000 weekday boardings, about 25 percent of its weekday ridership. All of these daily boarding figures include trips made with Clipper’s predecessor, the TransLink card, which is still being used by early converts to electronic fare payment. There

are 65,000 TransLink cards still in circulation in addition to the million-plus Clipper cards. Seven major transit operators accept the Clipper card plus Caltrain, SamTrans, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and the Golden Gate Bus and Ferry system. Clipper can also be used on the express bus service across the Dumbarton Bridge. Clipper allows riders to transfer seamlessly among the region’s transit operators without having to carry cash or purchase multiple passes. Introduced by MTC in June 2010 with five major transit systems (plus the Dumbarton Express), the Clipper program has been growing exponentially as more transit agencies have joined and as participating systems have been phasing out paper fare media and transitioning to the Clipper card. Adult Clipper cards are available at many Walgreens stores, at other participating retail locations and online at www.ClipperCard.com or by calling 877-878-8883. Youth and senior riders must apply in person at transit agency ticket offices or at the two Clipper walk-up service centers in San Francisco or at signup events (go to www.ClipperCard.com and click on the “Get” tab for locations). While the cards are free during Clipper’s extended introductory period, riders must load cash value, tickets or passes before using the card.

SUBMITTED BY ISA POLT-JONES Each winter, monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) from the western U.S. and Canada migrate hundreds of miles to coastal California and Baja California, Mexico. They seek protection from freezing temperatures and winter storms, which they find in temperate forest groves along the Pacific coast. In the East Bay, monarchs migrate to and spend the winter at four primary locations: Point Pinole Regional Shoreline (Richmond), Coyote Hills Regional Park (Fremont), Ardenwood Historic Farm (Fremont), and the Monarch Bay Golf Course in San Leandro. Monarch populations fluctuate greatly; as many as 25,000 were counted at Ardenwood in 1997, with more modest numbers in recent years varying from two hundred to two thousand. This year the numbers look promising for Bay Area monarchs. The butterflies will remain clustered in sheltered groves until longer days and warmer temperatures signal the time to begin mating. After mating, the male monarchs will expire and the fertilized females will disperse in search of milkweed onto which they will deposit their eggs. According to Park District Resource Analyst Jessica Sheppard, the best time to view clustering monarchs is in the morning, before the ambient temperature reaches 55 degrees (Fahrenheit), or late in the afternoon. In the warmth of the midday sun, many of the butterflies leave the trees seeking flowers and water. Guided monarch walks and programs for all ages are offered at Ardenwood Historic Farm on weekends through February 5th. Richmond area visitors may seek out a clustering group of several hundred monarchs at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline. Their resting spot - high in the trees south of Biazi Trail - is marked with flagging tape on nearby trees. For program information visit the East Bay Regional Park District’s web site at www.ebparks.org or call 1 (888) 327-2757.

Clinical Medical Assistant Training Program SUBMITTED BY BOSTON REED COLLEGE Boston Reed College presents the Clinical Medical Assistant Training Program from January 9 through March 7. As a Clinical Medical Assistant you will help the physician carry out procedures, care for patients, perform simple lab tests and administer medications. The Clinical Medical Assistant works in a doctor's office or clinic. This course combines 134 hours of classroom instruction (21 of these hours online), including electrocardiography (EKG), with a 160-hour externship to provide you with a complete learning experience. Starting pay is $15 - $22 per hour based on a national average. Students are encouraged to do their own research as to what the prevailing wage is for employers in the region. Employment is projected to grow much faster than average, ranking medical assistants among the fastest growing occupations over the

2006-16 decade. Employment of medical assistants is expected to grow 35 percent from 2006 to 2016, much faster than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be excellent, particularly for those with formal training or experience, and certification. See the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook for Medical Assisting. For more information contact Boston Reed College at 800-201-1141, contact@bostonreed.com or visit online at http://www.bostonreedcollege.com/. Clinical Medical Assistant Training Program January 9 – March 7 Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - noon New Haven Adult School 600 G St., Union City 800-201-1141 http://www.bostonreedcollege.com/enrollnow/index.cfm Cost/registration: $2,795.00


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“Dil Se,” translates as “from the heart” and incorporates the many facets of South Asian culture in a night of true entertainment. Irvington junior Praveena Motupalli will be performing traditional Karnatic vocals accompanied by Irvington sophomore Mariam Syeda-Quadri on the tabla, South Asian style “drums.” Solo singing acts will be performed by Arjun Lakshmipathy, Naeha Lakshmanan, Surina Gulati, Sukhmani Kaur, Mary Weeber, Puukaninoeaualoha Tiwanak, Ashwathi Sreekumar, Navneet Kaur, and Gina Wang. The show will include school dance teams from each school including Irvington:

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Sitaare; Irvington: Lachak; Irvington: Bhangra Crew; Amador: Bhangra; Cupertino: Andaaz; Cupertino: Dhamaka; Evergreen: Junoon; Kennedy: Dhoom; Monta Vista: Raas and Monta Vista: Bhangra. “I think Dil Se honors the culture of Irvington students and families and presents a showcase that blends the American youth and the Indian, Pakistani, Nepali, etc. cultures of the families to which students were born and raised with,” said IndoPak’s Club Advisor Rebecca Devakumar. “Not only does Dil Se appeal to community members, but the act of finding a charity and a cause to support really connects the outside world and those less fortunate with the Fremont community.” In addition to a showcase of talent, Dil Se includes a fashion show that includes 50 Irvington students. Students will walk across the stage displaying beautiful “desi” clothing styles from different regions of India and Pakistan. This year, funds from ticket sales and sponsorships will be donated to a charity known as “Project Rishi.” The charity’s main purpose is to “bring education and healthcare where it is needed most.” Moreover, they provide financial and volunteer support to sites in rural

Maharashtra, India, including remote villages and a leprosy colony. The sites provide basic necessities such as education, health care, nutrition, and clean water. Dil Se will be held on Saturday, January 7 at Irvington High School’s Valhalla Theatre from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are $10 presale, $12 at the door and also available online at http://indopak.ticketleap.com/dilse/. Snacks and drinks will be for sale at intermission. It’s going to be the cultural show of the year, and an event you are not going to want to miss; six local high schools in an amazing performance for one profound cause. Dil Se Saturday, Jan 7 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Irvington High School Valhalla Theatre 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont http://indopak.ticketleap.com/dilse/ Tickets: $10 presale, $12 at the door


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he Douglas Morrisson Theatre (DMT) proudly announces a new year of award-winning plays on the theme of Family Portraits. The season will begin in February with the Northern California premiere of Horton Foote’s trenchant comedy “Dividing the Estate,” directed by DMT’s new Artistic Director Susan E. Evans. Next, in June, will be a revival of the poignant Southern classic, “The Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers. In September, DMT will present the quirky Broadway musical “Grey Gardens,” winner of three Tony Awards in 2007, and closing out the season in November will be an American masterpiece, Arthur Miller’s powerful morality play “All My Sons.” “This coming year will mark DMT’s 33rd year,” Evans said. “I am thrilled to be coming aboard at this point in its history, and to create a new season filled with amazing plays about American families, warts and all. These are plays that will truly enlighten, enrich, and challenge our audiences.” “The theatre made a tough decision for the new season. We decided to keep our subscription prices exactly the same as last year,” Evans said. “We believe that live theatre should be accessible and affordable to everyone, especially nowadays, so we’re hoping this will help a lot of people continue to attend our performances. We will also be offering discounted Thursday evening previews of all four shows.” A darkly comic portrait of a rapacious Texan clan, “Dividing the Estate,” by prolific playwright Horton Foote, premiered in 1989, and 18 years later opened in New York to critical acclaim. In his article, “Political Theater with Iced Tea and a Drawl,” Charles Isherwood of the NY Times wrote of the 2007 production, “And yet, by golly, Mr. Foote’s pungent comedy ‘Dividing the Estate’ is in my view among the most acute — not to mention hilarious — analyses of flaws in the American psyche in the 21st century that the theater has come up with to date.” It’s 1987 in Harrison, Texas, and the Gordons have fallen on hard times, what with the ‘80s oil bust. Mama’s dead set against splitting up the 100-year old estate, but her children have other plans as they gather round the dining table to squabble about their righteous share of the pie. “The Member of the Wedding” is Carson McCuller’s poignant coming-of-age story adapted from her own novel. The play opened on Broadway in 1950, winning the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for best play. An eloquent character sketch of adolescent dreams, growing up, and letting go, the play is frequently revived. Twelve-year-old tomboy Frankie is restless and lonely. Playing three-handed bridge with her six-year-old cousin and the family cook, she

dreams of escaping the Georgia heat with her big brother and his fiancée, and becoming “the we of me.” Of the 2007 production at the Young Vic in London The Independent asserted: “Imagine a great Chekhov story crossed with a Tennessee Williams play and you'll have some notion of the warm brilliance of ‘The Member of the Wedding’ by Carson McCullers.” Winner of three Tony Awards in 2007, “Grey Gardens” is the serio-comic musical version of the 1975 documentary about Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale and her daughter, Edith Bouvier Beale, the aunt and cousin of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, and their weirdly fascinating and haunting relationship. “Grey Gardens” follows the lives of “Big Edie” and “Little Edie,” from their 1941 glory days in New York high society to 1973, after decades of a reclusive, eccentric existence together at Grey Gardens, the dilapidated squalid family mansion overrun with cats and raccoons. "To listen to ‘Grey Gardens’ is to bring to mind two phrases seldom linked nowadays: 'Broadway musical' and 'artistic integrity,” wrote Stephen Holden in The New York Times. “The score is a meticulously fashioned piece of musical theater that gains in depth the more you listen to it." ''I'm his father and he's my son, and if there's something bigger than that I'll put a bullet in my head!'' shouts Joe Keller in “All My Sons,” an electrifying drama about capitalism, greed, and moral

January 3, 2012

responsibility. Keller’s factory sent faulty airplane parts overseas during the war and his business partner is in prison for the crime. The Keller’s younger son never returned from a flight mission years earlier, but Mrs. Keller refuses to believe he’s gone. Now the older son is starting to romance his brother’s fiancée. In just one climactic night a heartrending family secret, or two, is revealed. Miller won Best Author in 1947 for “All My Sons”: its themes are enduring and timeless. In his review of the 2010 revival, Michael Billington of the Guardian observed, “Miller's play is a portrait of a society as well as of a flawed individual … the power of the production lies in the stripping away of protective illusion.” In addition to the main season, each of the four shows will have one special Saturday matinee performance where the audience will have the opportunity to chat with the actors and directors. The theatre will also introduce “Bare Bones Tuesdays,” a series of four staged readings of contemporary plays which complement the theatre season. The Douglas Morrisson Theatre is located at 22311 N. Third St. in Hayward, next to the Senior Center and the Japanese Gardens. The Box Office is open Tuesday through Friday, 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and can be reached at (510) 881-6777. Information is also available at www.dmtonline.org.

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Read the advertisements to solve the crossword puzzle. Submit the completed puzzle, with your name, address and contact details, for a chance to win valuable prizes each month. There are two monthly prize puzzles (a Tuesday edition and a Friday edition). Enter both to increase your chances of winning! All entries will be eligible for an end-of-the-year Grand Prize! MAIL OR DELIVER COMPLETED PUZZLES IN A SEALED ENVELOPE TO:

TCV Crossword Puzzle Contest, 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Or fax to: (510) 796-2462 Deadline for entry is the 5th of the following month. Only paper copies will be accepted. One entry per puzzle per household.Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice Newspaper. Jan 3, 2012 Puzzle Name:

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state. The Court affirmed that the Legislature may abolish redevelopment agencies to better serve the needs of all Californians during these difficult economic times.” In Santa Clara County alone, this decision will eventually mean a return of $90 million annually that can be used for critical health and safety services and vital infrastructure provided by the County and over $150 million annually for schools within the County. “This decision does not mean an end to economic development or redevelopment activities, just an end to the diversion of money to redevelopment agencies,” said Jeffrey V. Smith, Santa Clara County Executive. “In fact, the County – which does not have its own redevelopment agency – already plays a large role in job creation, public safety and economic development. The Court’s decision will help the County address the enormous needs in public safety, health care, and transportation infrastructure such as roads and expressways.” “We look forward to implementing the careful wind down of redevelopment that the Legis-

lature directed,” said Vinod Sharma, Santa Clara County Director of Finance. “We are pleased that the County’s participation in this case has led to the correct outcome, which will benefit schools and local governments for years to come.”

Cities, lawmakers seek redevelopment compromise BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Dec 29 - The California Supreme Court on Thursday gave Gov. Jerry Brown and state lawmakers the right to eliminate community redevelopment agencies in a crucial decision that impacts the state budget. But the fate of the more than 400 redevelopment agencies remains unclear as cities - and even

many lawmakers - vowed to seek a legislative compromise next year that would ensure the agencies' survival. The court affirmed the state's authority to dissolve the agencies, calling it “a proper exercise of the legislative power vested in the Legislature by the state constitution.” Doing so means more of the property taxes generated within redevelopment zones will go toward schools, law enforcement and other local services, freeing up as much as $1.7 billion in the state general fund during the current fiscal year. The money now is returned to the agencies to spend on future redevelopment projects. Lawmakers and the mayors of several large cities said Thursday they were inclined to work out a compromise after the justices issued their split decision. While they affirmed the Legislature's authority to dissolve redevelopment agencies, the justices in a unanimous decision invalidated companion legislation passed last summer that was intended to keep the agencies operating by forcing them to direct a certain amount of property tax revenue to schools and other services. The majority said that law ran afoul of voter-approved Proposition 22, which prohibits the state from raiding local tax money. “I intend to work closely with leaders in Sacramento and across California to develop a responsible path forward that invests in our schools, our safety and puts the 14 million unemployed Californians back to work,” Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said in a statement. “This includes new legislation to provide economic tools to communities most in need.” Redevelopment agencies were authorized by the Legislature

shortly after World War II as a way to restore blighted neighborhoods and are largely controlled by cities and counties to promote construction projects. They have been credited with revitalizing blighted districts such as the Gaslamp Quarter in San Diego, downtown San Jose and Yerba Buena Gardens in San Francisco. Critics, including Brown, say some have become little more than slush funds for private developers. They want property taxes generated by new developments to be diverted from the agencies to local services that now must be funded by the state. Redevelopment money in the past has been used to finance big box retailers, sports complexes and other projects that critics say run counter to the agencies' original mission. “Today's ruling by the California Supreme Court validates a key component of the state budget and guarantees more than a billion dollars of ongoing funding for schools and public safety,” the governor said in a statement. The ruling was highly anticipated because it was a key component of balancing this year's state budget. The state is heading into the new year with a $13 billion deficit over the next 18 months, and a ruling against the state would have widened the shortfall. The governor proposed dissolving redevelopment agencies in January, then transferring their property tax revenue of about $5 billion a year to the cities and counties that controlled the agencies. They would then use the money to repay redevelopment debt and distribute money to cities, counties, special districts and schools, saving the state about $1.7 billion this year. State lawmakers inserted a compromise in last summer's budget that allowed the agencies to keep operating if they made additional payments of about

$400 million annually to schools and other local services starting next year. The court invalidated that piece of legislation, calling it “flawed.” The court opinion was written by Justice Kathryn Mickle Werdegar and signed by five other justices. The seventh, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, agreed but wrote a separate opinion saying she would have upheld the compromise law that would have permitted agencies to continue if they shared revenue. The decision means schools can expect more than $1 billion each year in additional property tax revenues, but a firm figure won't be released until Brown presents his spending plan next month, said Brown's finance department spokesman, H.D. Palmer. Local government officials say it does not make sense for the state to eliminate redevelopment agencies, which contribute $2 billion a year in economic activity. They say because the Legislature did not intent to eliminate local economic development efforts, agencies should be reshaped. “We do know that the governor will be a tough nut on this, but at the end of the day, his primary challenge is to help balance the state budget,” said Jim Kennedy, interim executive director of the California Redevelopment Association, which filed the lawsuit along with the League of California Cities. San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders called it a “sad day” while San Jose City Attorney Richard Doyle called the ruling a disappointment but not a total surprise, given the judges' reactions during arguments in November.

--Associated Press writer Juliet Williams contributed to this report.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Please join us for our Signature Soup Contest on January 28, 2012 at 2pm! Sample our delicious soups and vote for your favorite. This is a free event and space is limited so please RSVP before January 25th.

January 3, 2012

SUBMITTED BY AMY ROCHA

T

he Art Institute of California — San Francisco and Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, announced that entries for the 2012 Poster Design Competition will be accepted through February

3, 2012. This year’s competition challenges high school seniors and high school graduates from the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico to design a poster that best expresses the competition’s theme “You Can Create Tomorrow.” Contestants will compete in two different categories: (1.) high school senior or (2.) high school graduate/adult. This year marks the first time the competition is open to high school graduates, as well as high school seniors. In the high school senior category, the local winner will earn a $3000 scholarship and the local second place winner will earn a $1000 scholarship to The Art Institute of California — San Francisco. In the high school graduate category, the local first place winner will earn a $1000 scholarship to The Art Institute of California — San Francisco. The local first place winners in each category will go on to compete in the National Poster Design Competition. The national grand prize winner in the high school senior category will earn a full-tuition scholarship to an Art Institutes school. The national grand prize winner in the high school graduate category will earn a $10,000 tuition scholarship to an Art Institutes school. “We are inspired by the creativity that students exhibit in the artwork they create for this competition and believe that this scholarship competition helps some of our most talented students achieve their goals,” said Byron Chung, president of The Art Institute of California — San Francisco. To see the full entry requirements and learn more about The Art Institutes and Americans for the Arts Poster Design Competition, visit www.artinstitutes.edu/postercompetition. The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 45 educational institutions located throughout North America. Americans for the Arts is the leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education in America. (www.AmericansForTheArts.org).


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesday, Jan 4

Mission Gold Jazz Band

7 - 9 p.m. Danceable Dixieland music. Food, bar, music, dance floor. No cover

Swiss Park 5911 Mowry Ave., Newark (510)793-6279 Friday, Jan 6 - Sunday, Jan 22

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer $

7:30 p.m. (2:30 p.m. Sundays) Musical based on the novel by Mark Twain

Jackson Theater, Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Friday, Jan 6

Senior Ball $R

6 - 9 p.m. Enjoy dancing, light refreshments and drinks

Ralph & Mary Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495 Saturday , Jan 7

Bird Walk

8 - 10 a.m. Discover behavior, migration and habitat - vehicle enterance fee

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Kennedy Community Center 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City (510) 675-5329 Golden Basic Belly Dance Fusion is a class designed for the older adult. Beginners are welcome as the class is aimed to promote exercise, enjoyment of dance, health and longevity! Code 47585 47586 47567 47588

Day Mon Mon Mon Mon

Dates Time Classes 1/9/-2/13 7-8:15pm 6 2/20-3/26 7-8:15pm 6 4/9-5/7 7-8:15pm 5 5/14-6/11 7-8:15 pm 5

Fee( res/non) $45/50 $45/50 $40/45 $40/45

Code Day Dates Time Classes 47589 *Tues 1/10-2/14 10-11AM 6 47590 *Tues 2/21-3/27 10-11AM 6 47591 *Tues 4/10-5/8 10-11AM 5 47592 *Tues 5/15-6/12 10-11AM 5 *Tuesday class designed for the older adult

Fee/(res/non) $40/45 $40/45 $35/40 $35/40

Beatriz Ross is a professionally trained dancer from New York City that has taught and performed dance for over 30 years. She is also certified by the American Senior Fitness Association and Generations Wellness in Successful Aging Training Program.

For more information: (510) 623-0882 or rossbeatrice47@yahoo.com

Saturdays, Jan 7 - Mar 3

Learn Tai Chi $R

11:30 - 12:45 pm Class teaches the original form of Tai Chi

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6191 Saturday, Jan 7

Community Defensible Space Training Workshop

10 a.m. - Noon Improve safety around the Ward Creek and Fairview area

City of Hayward Fire Department 777 B Street 2494 Oaks Drive, Hayward (510) 583-4948 Saturday, Jan 7 - Mar 3

Qigong and Tai Chi Fitness Prep $ Learn basic stretching to provide fitness for the mind, body, and spirit

FREE Tax Preparation Services for Eligible Households making $50,000 or Less

Fremont Family Resource Center - VITA Program 39155 Liberty Street Fremont, CA 94538 1/25/12 to 4/16/12 M-W-F Closed President's Day 2/20/12 Mon. & Wed. 4 to 8 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointment needed Go to

www.fremont.gov/frc for more info

A positive path for spiritual living

Welcome New Spiritual Leader KEN DAIGLE

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry St., Newark (510) 659-6191 Wednesday, Jan 11

Wednesday, Jan 11

Saturday, Jan 7

Dance Class $

Dil Se $

7 - 8 p.m.

Intermediate/Advanced Dance $

6:30 - 9:30 p.m.

Tango, Waltz, Samba/Merengue - 5 week class

8:15 - 9:15 a.m. Bolero $

Ralph & Mary Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495 (510) 675-5329

Ralph & Mary Ruggieri Senior Center

Cultural show of India and Pakistan

Irvington High School Valhalla Theatre 41800 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 590-7510 www.indopak.ticketleap.com/dilse/

33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495 (510) 793-6465


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Gamblers will be using funny money, but for a serious cause, when the New Haven Schools Foundation hosts “An Evening in Monte Carlo” to raise funds to continue to help students in the New Haven Unified School District.

Black Jack, Texas Hold ‘em, craps and roulette – with guests competing for prizes – will be just part of the fun Saturday, February 4, when the Union City Sports Center will be transformed into a luxurious casino and resort. Guests will be “stacking the deck for education,” as they take on Lady Luck with $1,000 in casino chips and a chance to compete for prizes. The evening also will include a gourmet buffet dinner, catered by Federicos of Union City. The menu features a variety of appetizers, spinach salad, a choice of entrée (pasta primavera, chicken put-

January 3, 2012

tanesca or grilled New York steak medallions) and a chocolate heart filled with raspberry sorbet for dessert. There also will be an espresso cart, hosted by Too Much Fun Club, Inc. Premium beer from Gordon Biersch and champagne from J Vineyards will be served. The wine selection will include Aquinas chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir, Decoy cabernet, and Acacia chardonnay. A selection of specialty cocktails will also be available. Tickets are priced at $100, half of which is tax-deductible. Attire will be semi-formal and guests must be 21 or older to attend. Auction and giveaway items include two round-trip tickets to Hawaii, a threeday/two night stay at a Tahoe/Truckee cabin, other local destination getaways, a 42-inch flat-screen television, a luxury box for 20 people at an Oakland A’s game, and bottles of fine wine. A preview of auction and raffle items will be available at www.nhsfoundation.com after January 2, 2012. Tickets to the event will make for a great holiday gift. To receive an invitation, call (510) 471-3850 or email info@nhsfoundation.com. An evening in Monte Carlo Saturday, Feb 4 6 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Boulevard, Union City (510) 471-3850 info@nhsfoundation.com $100/ ticket (21 years of age or older to attend)

Fathers embrace shift in responsibilities AP WIRE SERVICE BY BRENDA SHOWALTER THE REPUBLIC

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

COLUMBUS, Ind. (AP), Dec 29 - Couples are sharing more responsibilities today raising children, even switching traditional parenting roles. Census figures, released recently, show that the U.S. has 176,000 stay-at-home dads - up from 93,000 in 2000 - but some fathers groups claim the numbers are much higher. Daddyshome.org, a nationwide online network for at-home dads, says the census undercounted the actual number because it did not account for stay-at-home dads who were looking for work or who work part time. The parenting change occurred in part as more women entered the workforce. In addition, the weak economy forced some families to adjust their child care arrangements. But some couples simply have found that having dad at home with the children works for other reasons. David and Amanda Dornfeld of Columbus decided before they were married that when they had children, David would stay at home when Amanda went back to work as a family practice physician. “We are fortunate that we can do this,”Amanda said. David has been the primary caregiver for the couple's three children since the birth of their oldest, 6-year-old Luke. His days also include caring for Noah, 3, and Violet, 15 months. “I love it a lot, but it's exhausting,” said David, a certified public accountant. He squeezes in some work hours during the busy tax season. David, 36, takes care of most of the typical household tasks, including grocery shopping, menu planning and cooking. Amanda does the laundry. Amanda, 34, said she admires her husband's parenting skills, from coordinating daily schedules and playing with the kids to remaining calm when sibling squabbles erupt. “I always say his job is harder than mine. And he's really, really good at it,” said Amanda, who works at Sandcrest Family Medicine. Joan Poulsen, assistant professor of psychology at IUPUC, said fathers who are not primary breadwinners are still sometimes stigmatized, but attitudes are changing. “Things have definitely changed since the 1950s and '60s with what husbands and wives are expected to do in the household,” Poulsen said. Studies show that today's couples are more likely to share cooking, cleaning and child care.

“Both parents can equally nurture a child even though we traditionally think of women as doing this,” Poulsen said. She added that one of the advantages for children of stay-at-home dads is the strong bonds they develop with their fathers. Drew Vaughan, 32, of Hope has been the primary caregiver for his sons Nick, 11, and Nate, 7, for about a year and a half. “I like being in my kids' lives all the time,” said Vaughan, who received a medical discharge from the Army. His wife, Staci, 40, works in administration in the Division of Science at IUPUC. “I get the kids up and get them ready for school, clean the house, pay bills, run errands,” Vaughan said of his typical day. Vaughan said he misses going to work sometimes, but he's glad he had this time with the boys. Jeff Jones, 53, of Columbus has been a stay-athome dad since 1997. His wife, Terry, a manager at a local business, first suggested he stay home with their boys, Dylan, now 17, and Nicholas, 11. “I was having back problems at the time and it seemed like the right fit,” Jones said. “I've been able to bond with my sons in a way that not all dads get too.” Jones believes the economy has forced more men into the role of stay-at-home dad, but he doesn't think it's for all men. “What works for our family situation might not work for every family. Not every guy is cut out for this,” Jones said. Ethan Crough, 38, of Columbus said staying at home with his two young children has been a good experience. “I've liked the bonding aspect of it and all the memories I've had,'' Crough said. “You're the ones watching them grow up.” Crough works a part-time evening job at the Bartholomew Public Library. He and his wife, Emily Westhafer, who works for the Columbus Regional Hospital Foundation, trade off the kids after dinner. Jones said in all the years he's been a stay-athome dad only one time did he receive negative feedback, which came from a man he knew. “It's been a blessing. It's the toughest job I'll ever love,” Jones said. The U.S. Census Bureau reported recently that 32 percent of fathers with working wives were a regular source of care for their children under age 15, up from 26 percent in 2002. Information from: The Republic, http://www.therepublic.com/


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

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SUBMITTED BY RENEE LORENTZEN The Milpitas Community Concert Band (MCCB) is actively inviting musicians from all over the Bay Area to join us! MCCB performs three family-friendly concerts throughout the year (fall, spring, and summer) and is a musical presence at the City of Milpitas’ Tree Lighting and Veterans Day Ceremonies. The Milpitas Community Concert Band meets Wednesday evenings, 7:30 p.m. – 9 p.m., at the Milpitas Community Center (457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas). Annual registration is only $30. Musicians with at least two years’ experience in woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments are invited to join. We welcome students, adults, and senior citizens to come make music. Even if you haven't touched that old clarinet in the garage for decades, dust it off and join us! We are a low pressure, pleasant group of people who enjoy making music. Our concerts provide both musicians and audience with the largest variety of repertoire of any community band in the area. In addition to band “standards” we perform a variety of marches, musical/Broadway selections, classical pieces, transcriptions, and forgotten gems (some of which haven't been performed in the Bay Area in decades). Come join this unique band! We welcome the following instruments: flute, any sized clarinet, bassoon, any saxophone, French horn, trumpet, trombone, baritone horn, tuba, and percussion. For more information, please contact band director Jeff Yaeger at mccband@gmail.com, or Parks and Recreation Services at (408) 586-3210. Rehearsals start Wednesday January 4. See you there!

BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE Horace Mann, a 19th century American education reformer said, “Education, then, beyond all other devices of human origin, is the great equalizer of the conditions of men, — the balance-wheel of the social machinery.” Americans have long known that an educated population is a key to the future success of our country. Education reduces crime and poverty and increases citizens’ ability to contribute to their communities. It is in this vein that Superintendent Kari McVeigh has introduced the Union City Kids’ Zone initiative in the New Haven Unified School District (NHUSD). Kari McVeigh joined the NHUSD in 2008 as the Superintendent of Schools. Shortly after her arrival at New Haven, McVeigh implemented the Equity Task Force to address educational gaps in underperforming student groups. Her desire was to make education more equitable by raising the educational performance of all groups, addressing cultural diversity in the school environment, and creating more holistic learning goals for graduating students joining the workforce. With this focus, as well as inspiration from programs such as Harlem Children’s Zone and Promise Neighborhoods, McVeigh began to build a community-wide plan to address the needs of vulnerable students in the district. The purpose of the Union City Kids’ Zone project is to create a cradle-to-career “safety net woven so tightly that no child can slip through,” says McVeigh. This program would provide vital services to at-risk families to ensure the children’s academic success long term. Individuals and organizations

SUBMITTED BY GLADYS KIEFER As part of a state-wide effort by California Adult Schools to reach adults without a high school diploma, Fremont Adult and Continuing Education in Fremont will participate in the 26th annual Drop-in Day for Dropouts, on Thursday, January 12, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Throughout that day private, individualized high school diploma counseling will be provided on a walk-in, no appointment basis. Drop-in Day participants will receive specific recommendations as to how they can best proceed to earn a diploma. Many persons without a diploma are not aware that job experience, previous high school work and certain other activities can count for diploma credit. “The best solution to the dropout problem is to keep our children in school. However, the many excellent programs, with that as their goal, don’t take into account the tens of thousands of adults who never graduated and for whom there is no staying in school or even returning to their old high school,” said Mr. Giudici, Principal at Fremont Adult and Continuing Education. “Drop-in Day is an outreach to these people. We want them to know about the literacy instruction, diploma program and GED Preparation and testing services that we have here at Fremont Adult and Continuing Education. They are

working in cooperation with the project would provide these services. The idea is to have a “pipeline of support” within the community to give these kids whatever they need to stay in school and eventually transition to college. The Kids’ Zone project is still in the formative stage, waiting for funding from the state and federal level in the form of grants. Once funding is in place, implementation will follow. The Union City neighborhood between Decoto Road, Alvarado Niles, Sherman Drive, and Mission Boulevard is the initial target for the Kids’ Zone project. Families in this area have fewer community resources available, greater levels of poverty, and a low rate of high school graduation (less than 60 percent). The inspiration for this initiative comes from the Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ), a New York program that began in the 1990s with a single city block. HCZ has grown to provide much needed services to over 8,000 children in Harlem today. The Children’s Zone works to break the cycle of generational poverty by offering parenting classes to expectant mothers, nutritional counseling, crisis intervention, financial services, charter schools, and career counseling. President Obama, impressed with the success of HCZ, created the federal Promise Neighborhoods program in 2010. Twenty organizations or institutions will be granted funding for implementation or planning each year. This year, Cal State East Bay received an implementation grant to begin a Hayward Promise Neighborhood. Poverty is a shackle on humanity, and its grips are reaching farther today with the state of the economy and the continued budget cuts in education. Programs like the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods, and Union City Kids’ Zone bring the community together to lift up its most vulnerable members. Reducing poverty and increasing educational success are crucial to our nation’s future. Communities should work together to do whatever it takes to procure the best future for their children. These programs are just the beginning. To learn more about the Union City Kids’ Zone, please contact Kari McVeigh at kmcveigh@nhusd.k12.ca.us.

low cost, scheduling is flexible and students proceed at their own pace; there is no competitive pressure,” concluded Mr. Giudici. High school diploma and GED Test Preparation classes are designed for working adults and the following teaching methods are available to all students: teacher directed classes, high school learning center and independent study. While a major goal at Fremont Adult and Continuing Education is providing second opportunities for adults who were unable to complete the traditional kindergarten through 12th grade schooling, that’s just part of the story. The school also offers educational programs for handicapped adults, senior citizens, parents, and adults newly arrived from foreign lands. Career and Technical Education and job training is another important element of the curriculum at Fremont Adult and Continuing Education. The school also offers a variety of community education courses at nominal fees. Drop-in Day Thursday, Jan 12 8:30 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Fremont Adult School and Continuing Education 4700 Calaveras Avenue, Fremont (510) 793-6465

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, Jan 3 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Jan 4 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, Jan 5 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Ln., Fremont 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 So. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Fremont

Monday, Jan 9 1:00 – 2:10 p.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., Hayward 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, Jan 10 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25 – 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 – 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, Jan 11 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apt., 1300 Kentwood Ln., San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Schedule unavailable at this time


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Lady Cougar Classic recap PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Newark Memorial’s Lady Cougars faced tough competition in the non-league Lady Cougar Classic held December 28-30, 2011. In their first game, December 28, they were handed a lopsided loss by the visiting Evergreen Valley Cougars (San Jose) 53-32. Ni’vesha Brown and Taylor Norman shared top scoring honors for Newark at 13 points while Sydney Hills, Tarryn Clark and Laurisa Hernandez all scored a basket. The second game of the tournament for the Lady Cougars, December 29, held an even worse

result for the Lady Cougars as they faced the Menlo-Atherton Bears and fell 51-18 in the nonleague contest. Again Ni’vesha Brown (8 pts) and Taylor Norman (9 pts) led the meager scoring while Danielle Stuart added a single point. Finally, in their last contest of the Lady Cougar Classic on Friday, December 30, the Newark Memorial women got it together, scoring 46 points while limiting the North Salinas Vikings to 34.

Fremont National Youth Baseball Signups All Pee Wee, Micro, and Minor games are played at Brier Elementary while our Major and Senior divisions play around the corner at Walters Jr. High. FNYB has a “must play” rule, so no player is ever left out. Modified Little League rules apply to all divisions. Division Breakdown and 2012 fees: • PEE WEE (5-6): $80 Coach pitch division (not T-ball), 5 pitches to hit ball, no score kept • MICRO (7-8): $100 Coach pitch division, score and standings are kept, 6 innings • MINOR (9-10): $125 Player pitch division, 6 innings, 60-ft. baseline • MAJOR (11-12): $150 70-ft.

Again Ni’vesha Brown was a scoring leader at 24 points and Taylor Norman came through in a supporting role with 13 points. Laurisa Hernandez added 4 points, Sydney Hills and Danielle Stuart 2 points each and Tarryn Clark, 1 point in the win. Newark Memorial finished in seventh place. The championship game of the tournament saw Castro Valley overwhelm St. Joseph-Notre Dame 55-33. In the third place contest, Irvington barely

baseline, 7 innings • SENIOR (13-14): TBD Travel team, 90-ft baseline, 7 innings, metal spikes allowed (Player age is determined by age as of April 30th of that year) SIGNUP DATES (10AM-2PM AT BRIER ELEMENTARY): JANUARY 7 JANUARY 14 JANUARY21 JANUARY 22 JANUARY 28 JANUARY 29 *Early bird signups receive $20 off registration fees •Discounts are available for families with more than one player •A copy of your child’s birth certificate is required at registration WWW.FNYB.NET

SUBMITTED BY TRACY YOTT During the early summer of 2011, American Cribbage Congress (ACC) Grass Roots Club #43 (GR 43) established a beginners club on Tuesday evenings to welcome those players that haven’t played in a long time or would like to learn how to play cribbage. With no entry fee or membership required, players were introduced to tournament style cribbage, improving their play by learning new strategies and most importantly, making new friends. By August, the new program was a smashing success and it was decided to continue the experiment through the remainder of 2011. Thanks to the new program, GR 43 signed up seven new members during the first half of the 2011-2012 official season. No longer considered an experiment, the program will continue every Tuesday in 2012 starting January 3. With members of all ages and from all walks of life, GR 43 has thrived since its charter in 1987. Playing in various establishments in Newark and Fremont over the years, the club currently has 34 members from as far as South San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose. With an average of 18 players each week on Wednesday nights this season, the club holds a nine game tournament where each player faces nine random opponents. The Grass Roots points system allows for rating players locally, regionally and nationally during the official season which consists of 36 tournaments between Sept. 1 and May 31.

outscored Evergreen Valley 4846; the consolation game featured Santa Rosa and Menlo-Atherton in which Santa Rosa triumphed 45-39. All-Tournament players included: Elena Ala-MVP (Castro Valley), Michelle Miyamoto (CV), Jazel Talauta (CV), Taylor Norman (Newark Memorial), Darjhian Tennant (North Salinas), Hannah Sourek (Santa Rosa), Tennyson Jellins (MenloAtherton), Joelle Cariaga (Evergreen Valley), Nicole Ho (Irvington), Desi Harris (St. Joseph), and Jessica De Mesa (St.Joseph) Closing the tournament with a winning effort was a good sign for the Lady Cougars as they are faced with league play against the Kennedy Titans January 3. Newark is attempting to move toward a winning season as they now hold a 7-7 season record.

Roy Kaufmann of San Leandro started the season with a bang by winning all nine games of the first official tournament (also known as a Grand Slam). With 15 official tournaments played before the holiday break, Charlie Dunn of South San Francisco leads the club with 114 points, closely followed by Bill Wakeman (San Lorenzo) with 112 points and Terry Higgins (Hayward) with 103 points. Reginald Lennie (Newark) held the only 28 hand of the season so far (odds are 1 in 15,028). ACC Grass Roots Club #43 welcomes all players of any skill level to join us. Tuesdays evenings are open to everyone while Wednesdays are for intermediate to advanced players who are capable of playing a game in 15 – 20 minutes. For more information go to www.cribbage.org, email cribbagegr43@yahoo.com or call Tracy Yott at 510-793-6472. Or simply show up any Tuesday or Wednesday between 6:00 & 6:15 p.m. at Round Table Pizza (Centerville), 37480 Fremont Blvd., Fremont. Grassroots Cribbage Club All players including beginners: Tuesday 6 p.m. Intermediate/Advanced: Wednesday 6 p.m. Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-6472 www.cribbage.org Cribbagegr43@yahoo.com


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approaching for a change in both areas, and it will be apparent in late October through the end of the year. You may shift your attention almost entirely to one or both of these matters as this year ends and the next begins. Virgo the Virgin (August 23-September 22): The first four months of this year could feel like you are trudging through molasses. Even your physical body may feel sluggish. At this time, your primary focus is internal healing. Anger that has been buried in the past may be surfacing now, and you need to work toward letting it go. Resentment is bad for your health. If you have had illusions about your primary relationship(s), these are beginning to fade. You will find a far more realistic perspective. It may be painful, but you can then have a more solid basis on which to make good decisions about your relationship life. You will find the garlic you need to repel vampire types. Issues concerning financial resources will demand attention, particularly in the time frame of March and April. In July and August, your inner critic may be hard at work. Most of what it says is a lie, so don’t accept its chattering as truth. This may also be a time in which you are once again healing your past. During mid-September, global affairs will particularly draw your attention, along with another round of evaluating your resources. In November, you may feel compelled to rearrange your home or to buy or sell property. Mercury is retrograde at that time, and it would be best to make no permanent decisions until mid-December. From June 2012 through the following year, your career is in a bright spot. During the last quarter you will be moving toward work that requires learning and practicing sharpened communication skills. Libra (September 23-October 22): Saturn has been in your sign since November of 2009. Since that time, you have felt the need to mature and to solidify your identity, probably in a new or additional field of work. Saturn will continue to be in your sign until November of 2012. You have a few more months to bring a sense of completion to these tasks. No doubt you have matured significantly over these years and through multiple circumstances have come to know yourself from a deeper, more conscious core. Starting last spring, changes have come into your life through relationships with others. This will continue for another six years. Many of these relationships will be with those who have minds of their own, and they will teach

you to set boundaries, claim your independence in a relationship and learn more about taking care of yourself. Other relationships may come and go suddenly. Times of potential upheaval occur in February, August, September, and early November. Times of restoration are January, October, and late November through December. During the months of May and June, you may back off from relationships altogether for some R&R. Beginning in November, you will have fewer discretionary resources. This may be due to a decision to decrease debt, or increase savings and investments. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): The flow of 2012 will begin in slow motion for the first four months. It may feel as though you are repeatedly treading old ground. You are looking for somewhere to connect and put down roots. In May, you might encounter a physical or emotional blockage that demands healing before you move forward. In June through September, you will be heavily involved in the drama of our time: justice versus oppression. This will certainly develop in your personal life, and you may also become involved in the collective struggle. Note your frame of mind in July and take responsibility for it. If you do not recognize your feelings, a situation may drop in from the sky that will remind you of past circumstances. You will be prone to overreact. Drive and handle tools very carefully at that time. In the big picture, you are nearly at the end of a 28-year cycle concerning your work in the world. As the fall begins, you are likely to leave behind an old and worn out way of life. You may be choosing to be alone for a while rather than continue in a dead situation. Even those of you in committed relationships may choose to withdraw while you concentrate on reinventing yourself during the next few years. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): Beginning last summer, your opportunities related to work have begun to open. You are able to make more income than before. In addition, your health, both physical and emotional, has improved. This good fortune continues through the month of March, 2012. The window does not close, but after March it will be your responsibility to maintain the opportunities you’ve been given. In mid-June, your ruling planet, Jupiter, moves into the sign of Gemini for the following year. This brings improvements in partnerships of

Planning meetings scheduled for New Haven School District SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE New Haven School District’s Chief Academic Officer, Wendy Gudalewicz, has announced a series of planning meetings to gather input from parents and community members concerning the essential elements of the District’s strategy for teaching and learning. The “Seven Essentials for Continuous Growth and Improvement” are designed to ensure that the District: Provides district-wide instructional foci; Uses data to inform instructional and professional development decisions; Implements a targeted professional development plan to grow and strengthen instruction; Learns and uses research-based best instructional practices; Creates and maintains effective and safe learning environments; Aligns resources (human, time, money) toward instructional focus and student learning; Involves parents and community in student learning, assessments and learning supports.

Ms. Gudalewicz will review prior and current actions, present data and ask participants to identify questions or concerns based on the data and the Seven Essentials. She also will ask participants to help identify and prioritize potential action steps. Parents and community members can attend the meeting at their neighborhood school or select another meeting that fits their schedule. The meeting schedule:

any kind. In particular, note the time frame during the second half of July to bring positive changes in this area. Perhaps you will find someone new or will be adding new spirit to an ongoing relationship. Throughout the year, you will feel restless concerning your sense of home and security base. You may be searching for the truth of your history. At any time during the next few years, you may discover that some facts about your past were never true at all. Previously unknown factors may alter the picture entirely. Many of you will be yearning to seek a dream that takes you to distant places. The theme of water is prominent, suggesting that you need to create a home literally nearby a body of water or maybe add soothing water sounds to your environment. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): This is the second year of five which will bring major transitions and change to your life. For 2012, the summer and fall are particularly notable. On a mundane level, you will likely see significant changes among those in your family. As this happens, your own attitudes about how families “should be” will open to the unusual, even eccentric. You will personally struggle with the subject of control versus freedom. You may become bored, tired of being in charge and ready to pass on the baton. One part of you is looking for escape from the crucible of your own rules. If this does not come from the inside, you will be challenged from the outside to crack a firm belief and allow the rush of a great gulp of fresh air to open your mind. The freedom will be exhilarating, once you let go of the struggle. Since last summer, you have been given fresh inspiration through a creative work, birth of a child, or another new love in your life. This energy is prominent through April. Between May and August, an issue requiring healing of the body or spirit will come to the surface and require attention. It is possible that you may not need help, and, instead, someone near to you will require your assistance. During the last quarter of the year, you will feel a need to take responsibility for your niche in life and clarify the role you want to play in the world. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): As Neptune departs your sign in February, it may carry away the last vestiges of an illusion you have had about yourself or your direction in life. It has been with you for 14 years, so the change may be startling. Perhaps a long held spiritual belief is dis-

solving or becoming much less a priority. It was good for many years, but, if we are to grow, we must allow some things to be left behind, lest they turn to concrete. A new vision for your life will take its place as the year moves forward, but be patient. During the summer you could be attending to the health of yourself or of someone who depends on you. Your career or work in the world is moving toward an important turning point. You can predict this now by understanding yourself and your attitude toward your occupation. If you are participating in work that fulfills you, then in late 2012 and through 2013 you will be given a boost, along with more recognition and responsibility. If instead, you are bored and ready to depart, the transition away from this situation will be within sight by the end of this year. It is time to find purpose in the world that makes sense for you. If purpose is not already there, then it will be time to seek out another adventure. Pisces (February 19-March 20): During 2011, you began to wake up to your mission in life. Your entire history has prepared you for what is beginning to happen now. The Piscean, who often feels like a bystander in the world, is coming into a true calling. For quite a long time, you have been prepared to bring your voice of inspiration and healing to the world. Warning: do not allow your ego to take control of this mission or it will go dark. You are not the only one, but your natural gifts are called forth by the collective now. It is important that you recognize that you are becoming a messenger; you are not the message. You must take care of your body. Whatever might be amiss in your physical system will show its symptoms now. Addictions of whatever type are already taking their toll. Carefully consider your lifestyle and recognize that not all addictions are chemical. Between July of last summer and the end of April 2012, a perfect path has opened up that will show your first few steps on this journey. Teaching, short distance travels, or communication of your ideas will be prominent and must happen now. During late February and March, it will be time to back up and review in order to ensure that you are a spiritually clear vehicle for the message. Overcome your natural tendency to shyness and speak up while you have the opportunity. Other possibilities for reaching people develop in the fall. Do not give in to fear. The world is ready for you at last.

When the holiday season winds down, it’s time to figure out what to do with the packing material left over from holiday shipping. Handle With Care Packaging Store at 3217 Whipple Road, Union City are helping solve this problem by collecting and recycling packaging materials. Members of the community are encouraged to bring foam peanuts and bubble wrap to Handle With Care for recycling. “It is important never to simply throw away old packing material because most of it is not biodegradable, and it just takes up space in landfills,” say Sam & Mary Rathin, owners of Handle With Care in Union City. Left-over packing material is not the only holiday item that can be recycled. Holiday lights contain glass, aluminum, and copper, which are all recyclable, and old Christmas trees can be turned into mulch or planted. For those who received new cell phones, the old phones can be turned back into the service provider to recycle. Old clothing can be donated to charitable organizations like Goodwill or the Salvation Army, making room for new clothing received during the holidays.

Thursday, January 12: Conley-Caraballo High, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 18: Searles Elementary, 8 a.m.; Pioneer Elementary, 6 p.m. Thursday, January 26: Alvarado Middle, 3 p.m.; James Logan High, 6 p.m. Friday, January 27: Eastin Elementary, 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, February 1: Alvarado Elementary, 6 p.m. Thursday, February 9: Emanuele Elementary, 6 p.m. (This also is the designated meeting for Cesar Chavez Middle School). Wednesday, February 15: Hillview Crest Elementary, 4 p.m.; Kitayama Elementary, 5:30 p.m.

VTA Introducing New Service SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS Starting January 9, 2012, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) will introduce twenty new diesel-electric hybrid commuter buses designed specifically for VTA’s Express Bus Service. These new buses are outfitted to better accommodate longer commutes and feature amenities such as high-back seats, free on-board Wi-Fi, luggage racks, footrests and reading lights. The new coaches will operate on VTA Express Lines 102, 103, 120, 121, 122, 182 and 183. Express Line 183 is new to VTA and will travel from Aborn & White Road to Fremont BART serving Evergreen and East San Jose area residents. Express Bus Line 120 will also offer extended routing from Fremont BART to the Shoreline area in Mountain View. Many changes are being implemented to the existing express routes in terms of routing, number of trips, scheduled times, and stops observed as part of the Express Bus Business Plan that was approved by the VTA Board of Directors in March 2011. VTA acquired twenty new hybrid buses with an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant, combined with California Proposition 1B funding. These buses will be phased into service during January and February as they are delivered from the manufacturer; Gillig Corp. of Hayward, CA. VTA’s long range plan is to replace all express buses with new vehicles as funding becomes available. For more details on VTA Express Bus Routes, please visit http://www.vta.org/xbus/


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Cultivation of Marijuana SUBMITTED BY SGT. RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD The Milpitas Police Department received information about

SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD

Sean Minh Lieu

James Dinh Hoy Tran

a home on Fox Hollow Court possibly being used to cultivate marijuana. Milpitas Police detectives conducted an investigation and subsequently obtained a search warrant for the residence. The search warrant was executed on December 2, 2011, which resulted in the police department seizing several pounds of cultivated marijuana, hundreds of marijuana plants, and materials used to cultivate marijuana. As a result of this investigation and the seized items, Truong Huang Pham was arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Jail for Cultivation of Marijuana, Possession of Marijuana for Sales, Transportation of Marijuana, and the Theft of Utilities. Sean Minh Lieu was arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Jail for Possession of a Controlled Substance and Theft of Utilities. James Dinh Hoy Tran was arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Jail for Theft of Utilities. The Milpitas Police Department would like to provide the following tips to landlords regarding homes rented and possibly being used for the cultivation of marijuana:

1) Tenant paying in cash only 2) Tenants changing locks and not providing access to your property 3) Tenant is never home 4) Alteration to utility equipment 5) Additional ventilation added, and 6) Odor of marijuana Anyone with any information regarding this investigation, other marijuana cultivation locations, or any other criminal activity occurring in this jurisdiction is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/cri me_tip.asp

County to offer SCCGov 101 residents academy program Truong Hoang Pham

City Council seeks applicants to fill vacancy SUBMITTED BY NEWARK CITY CLERK SHEILA HARRINGTON The Newark City Council is seeking qualified applicants to fill a vacancy caused by the election of Council Member Nagy to the position of Mayor. The appointee will fill the unexpired City Council Member term which will end in November 2013. Official application forms are available on the City's website at www.newark.org or by contacting the City Clerk's office at 37101 Newark Boulevard, 5th floor, (510) 578-4266, sheila.harrington@newark.org. Obtaining the application from the city website is highly encouraged since City Hall offices will be closed from December 23, 2011 through January 2, 2012. Applicants must provide a typewritten statement of no more than 200 words per numbered category addressing the following: (1) why you want to be appointed to the Newark City Council; (2) your familiarity with City of Newark's organization and projects; (3) prior governmental, political, occupational, community service, or volunteer experience; (4) applicable education; and (5) your view of the City's budgetary priorities. Applicants must be a Newark resident and a registered voter at the time the application is filed. Original applications must be signed by the applicant and received in the City Clerk's Office before 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 5, 2012.

City of Fremont Board/Commission Vacancies Economic Development Advisory Commission One vacancy (Commercial/Industrial) Term to expire 12/31/2014

Library Advisory Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014

George W. Patterson House Advisory Board – One vacancy (Citizen At Large) Term to expire 12/31/2013

Planning Commission One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2015

Historical Architectural Review Board – Two vacancies Terms to expire 12/31/2015

Advisory Body Applications can be obtained at: http://www.fremont.gov/index.as px?NID=76 or you may obtain an application from the City Clerk’s Office, 3300 Capitol Ave, Bldg A, 510-284-4060

Human Relations Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014

No? Unfortunately, you may be doing just that by regularly using your debit card. Debit cards may look identical to credit cards, but there's one key difference. With credit cards, users who spot fraudulent charges on their bill can simply decline the charges and not pay the bill. On the other hand, debit cards draw money directly from your checking account, rather than from an intermediary such as a credit card company. While debit card fraud is always a possibility, being careful where you use it can help keep your checking account balance out of the hands of criminals. Protect Your PIN. You’ve heard it before, but as a friendly reminder, never carry your PIN on you. That includes storing your PIN in your mobile phone or writing it on a piece of scratch paper and storing it in your wallet. Similarly, protect your pin while you’re at the ATM. Cover the keypad with your hand as you enter your pin. Outdoor ATMs present a perfect opportunity for thieves to skim users' debit cards. Skimming is the practice of capturing a bank customer's card information by running it through a machine that reads the card's magnetic strip. Those machines are often placed over the real card slots at ATMs and other card terminals. You are better off using an ATM inside a retail outlet or other high-trafficked, well-lit place.

Gas stations are another danger zone for debit card use. Gas station payment terminals have many of the characteristics card fraudsters love. Thieves often use small cameras to capture footage of debit card users entering their PINs so they can have free access to your money. With the high potential for fraud in pay-at-the-pump debit transactions, it might make sense to use an alternative such as cash or credit cards the next time you fill up. Debit cards are a convenient way to buy products online, especially for those who don't like to use credit cards. Unfortunately, the Web is one of the most dangerous places to make purchases. Online is the No. 1 place where consumers should not use their debit cards. Aside from the potential for hacking at many different points in a transaction, the fundamental problem with using debit cards online is it's impossible to know who is handling your information. Any place where the card is out of hand can increase the chances of fraud. Restaurant servers use the standard practice of taking customers' debit cards out of sight giving the person the opportunity to copy your card information. Many restaurants rarely take the steps necessary to safeguard payment information. Overall, regardless of whether you use your debit card at a small restaurant or a big-box store, the possibility of fraud is always there. If you are a victim of ATM fraud, immediately report the fraud to all of your banks and credit card companies.

10-week class to start in late-January 2012 SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL AND LINGXIA MENG The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors has approved the creation of a new informational program based on the model of Citizens Academies across the country. The program’s goal is to raise public awareness of County government roles and services, promote civic engagement and residents’ participation in County governance and to provide answers, which residents need to know, to basic questions. County of Santa Clara Government 101 is a 10-week course with a range of topics, including “Know Your County” which describes how the County is organized, its mission and key mandates; “All About Taxes” where revenue comes from and where it goes; “Keeping the Community Safe” which will include a tour of a correctional facility; “Justice at Work” covers the District Attorney and Public Defender roles and offers a tour of the state of the art Crime Lab; “Supporting Community” which focuses on the County’s roles in caring for children, seniors and families in need; “Protecting Environment and Consumers; 24/7 Community Service” such as Fire, roads, and 911 center; “Healthy Communities” features award-winning medical and health-care programs; “Get Involved” will cover opportunities to volunteer or serve in advisory roles; and, finally, “The End of the Road” and “Graduation.” “SCCGov 101 is a superb opportunity for residents who want to know more about what we do at the County,” said Supervisor Liz Kniss, District 5, who championed the program. “I suspect there will be more demand than seats available.” The 10-week program will take place on Tuesday evenings, for 2.5 hours. One half-day session will be held on a Saturday. The Board has also conceptually approved a nominal fee to cover the cost of materials, with a waiver for hardship, and asked staff to explore telecasts of the sessions, so that more people can participate. For details of the application process, visit www.sccgov.org.

A look at stock market highs and lows in 2011 BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK (AP), Dec 30 - A look at the best and worst performers in the Dow Jones industrial average, which tracks 30 key U.S. companies; the biggest industry gainers and decliners in the broader S&P 500 index, which ended nearly flat for the year; and some companies that rattled investors in 2011. BEST OF THE DOW - McDonald's Corp., up 31 percent. The burger chain has remodeled stores and added healthier items to menus in the U.S. while expanding abroad. - IBM Corp., up 25 percent. The 100-year-old tech company sells high-margin software and technology services that can help corporations and governments cut costs. - Pfizer Inc., up 24 percent. The world's largest drugmaker has been advancing new drugs to offset generic competition for Lipitor, the biggest-selling drug in history. WORST OF THE DOW - Bank of America Corp., down 58 percent. One of the country's largest financial institutions is still dealing with fallout from the housing meltdown. - Alcoa Inc., down 44 percent. The aluminum producer is a barometer for the health of the global economy. Investors worried about a slowdown in China and a prolonged debt crisis in Europe.

- Hewlett-Packard Co., down 39 percent. The PC and printer maker struggled with executive dysfunction and indecisiveness on whether to sell its low-margin PC business. OTHER BIG MOVERS - First Solar Inc., down 74 percent and worst in the S&P 500. Chinese companies are producing cheaper solar products while governments cut subsidies for alternative energy. - Cabot Oil & Gas, up 101 percent and best in the S&P 500. The oil and gas company ramped up production, and lucrative natural gas reserves in the energy-rich Marcellus Shale bode well for its future. - Netflix Inc., down 61 percent. The video company alienated subscribers with changes to prices and an ill-fated attempt to separate its streaming and DVD-by-mail businesses. - Apple Inc., up 26 percent. The company's newest iPads and iPhones sold briskly while investors looked to new CEO Tim Cook to fill the shoes of Steve Jobs, who died in October. THE TOP S&P INDUSTRY SECTORS - Utilities, up 15 percent - Consumer staples, up 10.5 percent - Healthcare, up 10 percent THE WORST S&P INDUSTRY SECTORS - Financials, down 18 percent - Materials, down 12 percent - Industrials, down 3 percent


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

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PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

The Mayan factor

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

Arguments rage on either side of this debate but there is no doubt that while some agencies were prudent with tax increment dollars, others were wasteful and disgraceful. State hunger for money has trumped cities, even helped by the cities themselves when they asked voters to outlaw any attempt by the state to raid city funds. This proved the downfall of redevelopment since the alternative to dissolution of these agencies was a payment to the state. No dice said the court!

WILLIAM MARSHAK

I

am not a fan of doomsday prophecies. Having listened predictions of an impending apocalypse or variations of it throughout my life with little empirical evidence to substantiate the argument, I’ll pass on the next immediate universal alarm that sounds. However, the Mayans may have had an inkling of how complex life would become by the year 2012 and decided a new calendar would probably be in order. I have no argument there! In the last few weeks, there has been ample evidence of impending and significant change for our area – good or bad, marvelous or malevolent. A much anticipated ruling by the Supreme Court of California has dealt a severe, possibly and probably fatal, blow to the industry of Redevelopment Agencies. Projects such as the Irvington BART station, financed almost solely by redevelopment funds are in disarray while schools may become long term beneficiaries.

What happens now will be a legislative dance at all levels of government – city, county, state - to assess the fallout and create alternatives. Are our legislators capable of this? Only time will tell, but the prognosis at the state level is not hopeful, especially in light of district boundary changes representing a variety of priorities and challenges for 2012. An election year makes legislation difficult especially when trying to balance current district electorate concerns with much different perspectives of a different political geography. Our current state representative, Bob Wieckowski, represents the Tri-City area this year but will campaign for reelection to a much different constituency, split between pro and con to salvage redevelopment. What to do? Our cities face significant change as well. Newark has seated a new councilmember and seeks to fill another vacancy while Union City’s council has undergone its own extreme makeover, soon electing a new Mayor. Changes, major and minor, are in the wind for the entire Southeast Bay Area. The unfortu-

nate change to Fremont’s City Council with the death of Mayor Wasserman is a personal and political tragedy for the area. Coupled with present economic challenges, comes the advent of an election year when at least two members of the council have planned to run for the mayoral seat. The political reality is that anyone who assumes the role of mayor for a significant portion of a year may reap an advantage for “reelection” and, at the same time create another vacancy. A special election is costly and an appointment process, especially when facing the dynamics of mayoral candidates potentially choosing their opponent, is difficult at best.

Did the Mayans have it right when they foretold a significant change in 2012? So far, it looks that way!

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Karin Diamond Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire

William Marshak PUBLISHER

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

Air District offers grants to reduce port truck pollution SUBMITTED BY AARON RICHARDSON The Board of Directors of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the regional agency responsible for protecting air quality in the nine-county Bay Area, approved $1.04M in funding to replace older, higher-emitting trucks to reduce diesel particulate emissions at the Port of Oakland on December 7, 2011. Grants will be available through the Air District’s Transportation Fund for Clean Air Regional Fund, which is financed by a Department of Motor Vehicles surcharge on vehicles registered in the Bay Area. The Board of Directors selected Cascade Sierra Solutions to assist the Air District in implementing this program. “Our port truck grant programs create a ‘win-win’ solution for West Oakland and the port trucking community,” said Damian Breen, the Air District’s director of strategic incentives. “Truckers get help in modernizing their equipment before state deadlines and the local neighborhood will see reductions in toxic diesel pollution.” This latest round of funding should provide for upgrades of 104 port trucks with model year 2004 engines registered in the Bay Area. The grant funding will provide $10,000 to these eligible Bay Area truck owners toward the purchase of a truck with a cleaner 2007 model year engine. Under the program, owners would also be able to trade their old 2004 trucks in for their current worth. Visit www.baaqmd.gov/goods for details on how to apply.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2012® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11609736 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Chang Choi, Hyosook Jung for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Chang Ju Choi, and Hyosook Jung filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Seung Yun Choi to Mark Seungyun Choi Eun Soo Choi to Rachel Eunsoo Choi The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: February 10, 2012, Time: 8:45 AM, Dept.: 504 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: December 23, 2011 Jon R. Rolefson Judge of the Superior Court 1/3, 1/10, 1/17, 1/24/12 CNS-2234559# SUMMONS (CITATION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (Numero del Caso) FCS038346 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (Aviso a Acusado): RUSSELL L. BISHOP, BANG DUONG and DOES 1 through 10 inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (A Ud. le esta demandando): JAGDISH GOSWAMI and TAHEREH ALAVI You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons is served on you to file a typewritten response at this court. A letter or phone call will not protect you; your typewritten response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book). Despues de que le entreguen esta citacion judicial usted tiene un plazo de 30 DIAS CALENDARIOS para presentar una respuesta escrita a maquina en esta corte. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no le ofrecerá protección; su respuesta escrita o a maquina tiene que cumplir con las formalidades legales apropiadas si usted quiere que la corte escuche su caso. Si usted no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso, y le pueden quitar su salario, su dinero y otras cosas de su propiedad sin aviso adicional por parte de la corte. Existen otros requisitos legales. Puede que usted quiera llamar un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce un abogado, puede llamar un servicio de referencia de abogados o una oficina de ayuda legal (vea el directorio telefonico). The name and address of the court is: (El Nombre y direccion de la corte es) Solano County Superior Court, 600 Union Ave., Fairfield, CA 94533 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de tele-

fono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es) Michael W. Jansen 1301 College Street, Woodland, CA 95695 DATE (Fecha): August 11, 2011, By: G. Robins, Deputy (Delegado) (SEAL) 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10/12 CNS-2227507#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459441 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bay Fashionwear, 5012 Spring Crest Ter., Fremont, CA 94536,County of Alameda Badru Z. Khan, 5012 Spring Crest Ter., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/21/2006 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Badru Z. Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 20, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17/12 CNS-2232506# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 454260 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Indian Tiffias and Pizza, 4137 Bay Street, Fremont, CA 94538, 3021 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 The fictitious business name statement for the Partnership was filed on 7/21/2011 in the County of Alameda. Mohan Foods Inc., California, 3021 Peralta Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536 This business was conducted by Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Raizer Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 20, 2011. 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17/12 CNS-2232491# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459109 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Phoenix Dental Laboratory, 3995 Smith St. Ste. #1, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Jessie Potenciano, 1772 Egret Ct., Hayward, CA 94545 This business is conducted by an Individual.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458638 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Uncrossable Productions, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda, 37 E. Lewelling Blvd., San Lorenzo, CA 94580, Alameda Sonearra Cross, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555 Nejiua Gordon, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a general partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on October, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sonearra Cross, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 22, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10/12 CNS-2226384# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458552 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Simon Cyber Tech, 4169 Rainbow Ter, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Simon M. Ho, 4169 Rainbow Ter, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/21/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Simon M. Ho This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five

years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222917# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459027 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Nails 54, 1554 Washington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Kim Xuyen Thi Huynh, 6620 Eskrigde Way, Elk , CA 95758 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kim Xuyen Thi Huynh, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 06, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222899# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458712 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bombay Pizza House, 31871 Alvarado Blvd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 Gursewak Singh Gill, 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11-23-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gursewak Singh Gill This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 23, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222882#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459036 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: J. Winsco, 34111 Cartwright Place, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Liguan Zhang, 34111 Cartwright Place, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Liguan Zhang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 7, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222873#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 17th DAY OFJanuary 2012at or after 11:00ampursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Thornton U-Haul, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Maxima Tronsal B105 11/1/2011 Will Buckner B118 11/10/2011 Dorothy Dantes B136 10/8/2011 Norma Williams B242 11/12/2011 Jeff Biggs C129 11/4/2011 Sibyl Cupit C165 11/2/2011 Sonia Young C223 10/3/2011 Lamar Thomas C245-46 11/2/2011 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2231189# NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 17th D AY OF January 2012 at or after11:15 am pursuant to the California SelfStorage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Grimmer U-Haul, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Paul Bukenburger 175 9/19/2011 Melissa Costello 257U 9/10/2011 Ted Sakadales 274U 10/30/2011 Troy Williams 316 10/1/2011 Barbara Erickson 324 11/11/2011 Melissa Costello 335 9/10/2011 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2231180#

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Pros see stocks up in 2012, but big risks, too holders of $172 billion worth of old ones coming due. The risk is that investors will demand high interest rates to buy the new bonds, and that will spread fears of a possible default. After Italy was forced to pay unexpectedly high rates in a bond auction earlier this month, stocks fell hard around the world. “The crisis could become systemic,” says Athanasios Vamvakidis, head European currency strategist at Bank of AmericaMerrill Lynch. “That would threaten not only Europe, but the whole global recovery.” One solution is to invest in companies selling goods that people need in both good times and bad, such as drugs and food. If the economy falls into recession, profits of these companies are less likely to collapse. In 2011, these so-called defensive companies bucked the flat market. Stocks of utility companies have risen almost 15 percent through Friday. Healthcare and consumer staples were each up 10. Standouts include insurer UnitedHealth Group Inc., which has risen 42 percent, and Kraft Foods, up almost 20 percent. Then again, you might do better investing in the opposite kind of companies, like makers of toys and other consumer discretionary goods. Their profits tend to zoom up and down with the economy. A report from S&P Capital IQ notes that stocks of cyclical companies such as these tend to gain the most after market drops like the one in October, when stocks fell nearly 20 percent. In the five times that the S&P 500 has fallen between 15 percent and 25 percent since 1978, consumer discretionary stocks have risen an average 30 percent in the next six months, according

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jessie Potenciano, Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 8, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17/12 CNS-2230940#

to S&P. Those stocks are up 16 percent since their Oct. 3 lows. One reason it's difficult to guess future stock prices is that figuring out where the economy is heading isn't so easy either. In December 2007, economists expected the economy to grow an average 2.4 percent in 2008, according to a survey of three dozen of them by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. It shrank 0.3 percent instead. For 2009, they forecast the economy would shrink 0.8 percent. It shrank 3.5 percent. Economists were more accurate the next two years, though not by much. Now they say the economy will grow 2.2 percent next year. A few mutual fund managers say people aren't skeptical enough about forecasts. In a recent letter to their investors, the folks who run Castle Focus, a $43 million fund, say hopes of big profits may be dashed given all the economic uncertainty. The fund had 28 percent of its assets in cash in September, its latest report. Most funds are doing the opposite and investing cash. The average stock mutual fund had just 3.5 percent of its assets in cash in October, according to a report from the Investment Company Institute. That is the nearly the lowest level since the firm started keeping records 25 years ago. Maybe fund managers have been listening too much to bullish stock analysts. For the record, the same analysts surveyed by S&P who expect a 16 percent stock jump next year were optimistic about 2011, too. A year ago, they called for the S&P to rise 9 percent. It still may, but the odds are long and time is running out. As of Friday, the index was up 0.6 percent for the year.

Election reforms, tax initiatives will shape 2012 within a particular party, and thus take more moderate stances. Brown and his predecessor, former Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, complained that lawmakers of both parties are far too partisan, making compromise nearly impossible. After a year that saw mounting public frustration over income inequity, Gov. Jerry Brown is hoping to capitalize on discontent over California's deep spending cuts, especially to public schools and higher education. He said he wants to force Californians to choose between the education and social programs they say they support and their desire for lower taxes. “Here's the dilemma: People don't want cuts in education and health care and policing, but they don't want to pay taxes, either,” Brown said in a recent interview with The Associated Press. “And there's a type of cognitive dissonance where people want incompatible objectives. So the challenge for today's politics is to clarify the choices.” Brown's plan calls for a sliding scale of higher income tax rates, starting at $250,000 a year, and an extra half-cent sales tax, which would raise about $7 billion a year for five years. First, he must deal with other groups that are seeking similar ballot-box solutions. If numerous tax proposals make the November ballot, the resulting confusion could doom them all. Brown is trying to persuade other Democratically aligned groups to drop their proposals to boost taxes on the wealthy, such as a separate initiative supported by the California Federation of Teachers and the Courage Campaign to add a 3 percent surtax on incomes greater than $1 million and 5 percent on incomes greater than $2 million. About 60 percent of the estimated $6 billion a year that measure would raise would go toward education, with the rest going to counties for their in-

creased burden in paying more for aid to seniors and the disabled, law enforcement and child care programs. Supporters of the so-called “millionaire's tax” dislike Brown's approach because it increases the sales tax, which affects people at all income levels. “This tax places responsibility for restoring funding on those who have been benefiting the most and does not put it on the backs of working-class and middle-class families who have been suffering, particularly during this economic downturn,” said Joshua Pechthalt, president of the teachers federation. The group's pollster, Ben Tulchin, said the timing is right for the millionaire's tax, although it's hard to say whether the current anti-Wall Street sentiment will hold all the way until November. He said about two-thirds of likely voters he polled supported a plan to raise taxes exclusively on millionaires. After years of budget cuts, California voters may even be softening toward taxing themselves, said Molly Munger, co-director of the Advancement Project for preschool age children and daughter of Charles Munger, a longtime financial partner of Warren Buffett. She is sponsoring her own ballot initiative to raise taxes primarily on the wealthy. That plan would impose a sliding scale income tax, from four-tenths of a percentage point on low-income earners to 2.2 percent for couples who make more than $5 million a year about $428 a year for a household income of $75,000 a year, or $27,266 for one that makes more than $1.5 million, according to proponents. It is projected to generate about $10 billion a year for California schools. The group's internal polls show that the first time in decades, California voters indicate that they are willing to tax themselves to make up for lost money in public schools. Californians have been telling pollsters

for years that they want the state to invest more for public schools and universities, but often have been unwilling to pay more for them when asked at the ballot box. Munger said her group has talked with the governor's office and others seeking to place reforms or tax initiatives on the ballot in 2012, but none was targeting education as narrowly as she hoped. “We didn't see anybody else working on getting money directly to the local level, either, as opposed to sending it to Sacramento,” she said. “Our approach avoids the politics of Sacramento and sends money by formula to every child in every school in the state in a very transformative way, and we didn't see anybody else doing that.” Republicans are countering with their own challenges to the status quo, even as they fight further decline within the state. In January, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments on the GOP lawsuit seeking to overturn the Senate maps drawn by the independent commission, which voters approved in response to years of gerrymandering by lawmakers. The new maps give Democrats an opportunity to take a supermajority of the state Senate, which would effectively silence Republican power in the upper house. Republican-leaning interest groups also have qualified a ballot initiative that would deny public employee unions the right to automatically deduct dues from workers' paychecks, their chief source of political cash. It is funded in part by Munger's brother, GOP donor and Stanford University physicist Charles Munger Jr., and is supported by former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. Proponents say they want to end payto-play politics in California. Unions thwarted a similar effort in 2005 and are gearing up for an expensive campaign battle in the coming year.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

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For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

Obituaries

Joan I. O’Neil RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 30, 1933 - December 15, 2011

Amparo B. Armaz RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 26, 1924 - December 25, 2011

James A. Irwin Jr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 24, 1985 - December 27, 2011

Sharon Chandler-Tindall

Giovanna Bucchi

RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

RESIDENT OF TRACY June 30, 1939 - December 23, 2011

Aurora Cunha Furtado RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 6, 1909 - December 14, 2011

Enrique “Fool” Duran RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 25, 1982 - December 25, 2011

Xianzhao Yu RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE May 30, 1933 - December 29, 2011

Celia Ramirez RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Sanjiv Handa RESIDENT OF CASTRO VALLEY October 29, 1947 - December 28, 2011

Saokram Bouth RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

Manherbhai R. Patel RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE December 29, 1931 - December 28, 2011

Ruperto Vasquez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Amelia A. Vargas RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 7, 1913 - December 30, 2011

Lupe Arriola RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

Colleen Pysell RESIDENT OF PLYMOUTH January 12, 1938 - December 30, 2011

Bob Wasserman RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 12, 1934 - December 29, 2011

Jane Bell

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark

RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON February 10, 1937 - December 30, 2011

Berge • Pappas • Smith

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ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published biweekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

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Obituary

Herman Ficklin

H

University of California, Berkeley, San Francisco State University, and then eventually earned his MBA from Cal State University, Hayward (now Cal State East Bay). Herman married his wife Jean in 1963, and they moved with her four children to Newark, California. The family was originally supposed to move to Hayward. Due to discriminatory practices in a real estate office, the family instead ended up in Newark and became one of the first black families to ever live in the city. He was a professional employment representative at Lockheed Missiles and Space (now Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co.) in Sunnyvale, retiring after 33 years. Herman was ambitious, astute and determined in his work. It was at Lockheed where he mentored many employees. As a retiree, he enjoyed lunch gatherings with his colleagues. During the 1960s and 1970s, Herman was actively involved with Indoor and Good Sports Club, where he served as treasurer, and Western Disabled Al-

erman Ficklin passed away on Wednesday, December 28, 2011, after enduring four years of health problems. All of his family had spent the day by his side at Kaiser Hospital Fremont, and his wife was nearby until his final moment. Herman was born on November 17, 1929, in Leake County, Mississippi, to Asberry Ficklin, Sr., and Lona Black Ficklin. He was the oldest of four brothers. Attempting to make a better life for their family, Herman’s parents moved with him and his brothers out of the segregated South to Richmond, California. Herman dreamed of joining the U.S. Marine Corps. While attending Berkeley High, he suffered a spinal-cord injury in a sandlot football game that brought his dream to a halt. Herman then had to face intense physical therapy, completing high school and beyond in a wheelchair. After getting an associate’s degree from Contra Costa Junior College, he forged ahead at the

liance. Western Disabled Alliance’s primary goal was to eliminate architectural barriers in public places. In later years, he supported the Afro-American Cultural and Historical Society, Cal State East Bay’s School of Business and the UC Berkeley Library Fund. It was a joy for him to assist students financially so that they could excel and pursue a career. He was also proud to have fulfilled his mother’s dream of succeeding in life despite growing up in segregation, even though she didn’t live to celebrate that dream with him. In Newark, where he lived for 48 years, Herman worshipped at First Presbyterian Church of Newark, and he supported the Newark Arts Council and Afro-American Cultural and Historical Society. Herman was preceded in death by his devoted parents; one brother, Lanier Ficklin; a grandson, Kevin Green; and a daughter, Aurelia Jeannette Ricard.


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Professor Emeritus publishes haiku and photography collection SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER Ohlone College Professor Emeritus Cynthia Lee Katona may have retired from thirty-six years of teaching at Ohlone College, but she is still hitting the books. Writing and publishing books, that is. This November she published, not one, but four books, which are comprised of both original photography complimented by original haiku poems. “Imagine My Surprise,” “I Hate When That Happens,” “Maybe…and That’s Final,” and “Was It Good For You?” are a collection of Katona’s fondest photography projects and mark her debut as a haiku writer. Her books depict the world through her lens, from photographs of everyday moments, to travel experiences. Katona is a retired professor of English and Gender and Women’s Studies Literature at Ohlone College. She has been a nationally published photographer for the last forty years, and has already published two books, “Book Savvy” (2005) and “Modern Ivory Netsuke” (2008). Fifteen-page previews of her four newest books, “Imagine My Surprise,” “I Hate When That Happens,” “Maybe…and That’s Final,” and “Was It Good For You?” are available on blurb.com, where the e-book versions can be purchased for $3.99.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

January 3, 2012

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

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Overeaters Anonymous offers a program of recovery from compulsive eating using the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of OA. There are no dues or fees. For more information about meeting times, or other questions about OA, you may contact Bev at 510-783-2680 or visit the OA website at: www.oa.org.

clothes shoes vacations franchies and much more How you can save hundreds of dollars by simply ordering at 70-80% below department store prices direct over the internet

Log on to www.wholesalecostless.com 510-472-1844 email: apparelwholesale@hotmail.com

Great Rates! Great Results

Southland Senior Club

Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

The club is open to all Seniors 50+ Various Activities at the Club include: Line Dancing Lessons, Card Playing, Tap dancing. Chance to work on Jigsaw puzzles or read books. A good supply of both are free for borrowing. Various Crafts including Knitting, Sewing Trips and events Free cookies, coffee or tea

510-264-0850 Mon -Thur from 10am-3pm Fri 10am-1 pm. Closed Sat & Sun Southland Shopping Center. The Club is located in the Food Court.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Engineering

Computer System Analyst in Newark, may travel to unanticipated work sites Send résumé to: Service Oriented Solutions, 37600 Central Court, Suite 212 Newark, CA 94560

Lumenergi Inc has openings in Newark, CA for Principal Engineer. Responsible for in house specification, design, integration & development of Lumenergi lighting control products. Email resume to: jobs@lumenergi.com indicating job ref# PE. EOE.

WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz


January 3, 2012

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 32

Yupo: Abstract to Representational SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS

P

lease join award-winning multi-media artist, Grace Rankin, as she demonstrates watercolor painting on the” impossible” surface called Yupo (synthetic glossy paper used in printing) on Wednesday, January 4, from 7

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

Yupo study by Grace Rankin

SMOG INSPECTION

p.m. – 9 p.m. at The Fremont Art Association Centre. This event is free and the public is welcome. There will be audience participation, if time permits. Rankin is primarily a self-taught multi-media artist with a current focus in watercolor and mixed media/collage. She is a signature member of Society of Western Artists and Alliance of California Artists and is a long time member of FAA and the gallery. Rankin has studied Yupo technique with experts George James and Mark Mehaffy. Her art works have been exhibited in many prominent public facilities in the region. Collectors of her art include Mr. and Mrs. Clint Eastwood. The artist has 25 years teaching experience in watercolor, both on location and in the studio. The event will be followed by a two-day workshop January, 21 and 22, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. (both days), at the FAA Centre. More details will be provided later. For more information, please call the centre at (510) 792-0905 or visit www.FremontArtAssociation.org. Guest Artist Demo Wednesday, Jan 4 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Free

$25.95

$8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Most cars, van's & truck's extra With this coupon only.

Exp. 1/30/12

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

$24.95+ FREON Easy Service we will check for leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only.

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 1/30/12

Exp. 1/30/12

TIMING BELT SPECIAL TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER 95 95 95 + parts + disposal fee

$19.

$79.

$89.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp.1/30/12

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 1/30/12

RADIATOR FLUSH

$29.

95

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 1/30/12

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 1/30/12

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.

95

6-CYL.

$49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp. 1/30/12


TCV 2012-01-03  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper "Accurate, Fair & Honest"

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