Issuu on Google+

Police give kids the gift of giving

San Leandro Resident Elected Board President

Page 19

Page 6

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

December 20, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 101

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI AP PHOTO

A

s Christmas Day marches steadily closer, the Filipino community celebrates its coming with Simbang Gabi, a spiritual preparation for the most joyous of days, the birth of Jesus Christ. One of the longest and most popular traditions in the Philippines, Simbang Gabi is a series of nine pre-dawn masses, ending with a midnight mass on Christmas Eve. Aptly meaning “mass at dawn,” Simbang Gabi is also known by the Spanish name Misa de Gallo, or “mass of the continued on page 23

BY MAURICIO SEGURA AP PHOTO With all the lodgings in Bethlehem at capacity, Joseph and his very pregnant wife Mary had to settle for a stable. It was there that their child, Jesus, the promised messiah was born, bringing hope and life for all who believed, changing the world forever. Three Magi, or Wise Men, visited the baby and brought gifts to celebrate his birth. They had known for some time that this future savior would be born, and traveled hundreds of miles to see him. But this was two thousand years before Google and GPS - how were they able to find his precise location? The Bible says that they followed a star each night which settled over the place where the child lay. And therein lies a mystery.

Is there a reasonable explanation for the star that appeared over Bethlehem announcing the birth of this baby and marking where he was? If you're a Christian and believe Jesus was the son of God, there isn't much debate in this matter, as God is capable of anything and this was simply a supernatural event. However, scholars, astronomers, and non-Christians have debated for years if there truly was a celestial event visible over the Middle East all those years ago, or if it was simply a fabrication to make a good story sound even more majestic. Of the most plausible possibilities, there are many to choose from: typical new star, a planet, meteor, comet, a nova, or any miscellaneous documented celestial event. Great astronomers like Brahe, Galileo, and Kepler among others spent continued on page 23

SUBMITTED BY SENIOR AIRMAN JESSICA GREEN

C

hief Master Sgt. Jason E. Red, a California National Guardsman assigned to the 129th Rescue Wing, was presented the Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross November 5 at a ceremony at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA. Red, a Fremont native and an HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter aerial gunner, distinguished himself while participating in an aerial mission in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan on Aug. 9, 2009. On that date, then-Senior Master Sgt. Red flew onboard Pedro 15, a Pave Hawk that was part of an eight-aircraft joint force tasked to enter an extremely hostile area to recover five critically wounded soldiers in the midst of an ongoing firefight. continued on page 4

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 29

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 29 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Program Focuses on Whole Foods and Realistic Approach to Losing Weight

A

chieving and maintaining a healthy weight is easier said than done, isn’t it? For those serious about reaching a healthy weight—and staying there—it’s time for a new approach grounded in reality. Fortunately, that’s exactly what the Right Weigh program at the Washington Women’s Center offers. No gimmicks here “I think that our program is a little more broad and based more on reality eating than it is about figuring out points or counting calories, and the latest research is pointing to going in that direction—away from counting,” according to Kathy Hesser, R.N., clinical coordinator at the Women’s Center. But if you’re not counting calories, then what exactly are you doing to lose weight? According to Hesser, the Right Weigh program focuses more on what you’re eating—to help you feel satisfied, to meet your nutritional requirements and feel better overall. “There’s more of a focus on whole foods—which means foods that are not man-made,” she explains. “If you’re eating a lot of fruits, vegetables, portion-sized protein—not all from animal sources— then you’re probably going to lose weight without thinking about the calories, because you’re eating foods that are less calorie dense, higher in fiber and higher in vitamins and minerals. “The more whole foods we eat, the better it is for us. The Right Weigh program

In 2012, lose weight the "Right Weigh" at the Washington Women’s Center, which offers a realistic program to get to a healthy weight and stay there. No tricks, no fads and no shortcuts. To register for the program, which begins next month, call Kathy Hesser at (510) 608-1356. Group classes meet once a week for the first four weeks. Then sessions meet every two weeks for the next two months.

is based on that concept.” It also helps that the program looks at each person as an individual, not an equation, according to Anna Mazzei, R.D., C.D.E., the Washington Hospital registered dietitian who instructs the program. “The program offers a comprehensive look at weight management, but partici-

pants also get an individualized hour to discuss their main problem areas that contribute to their weight issues,” Mazzei explains. “Everyone comes from a different place, and they’re going to need different skills to achieve their weight loss goals.” Identifying bad habits Mazzei says women typically have one or two specific problem habits—such as ingesting too many empty calories through beverages like flavored coffees and soda or trouble determining the right portion size. Fortunately, because it’s not one-size-fitsall, the Right Weigh program easily accommodates a variety of ages and lifestyles, including women who have struggled to take off the weight or have given up on quick-fix diets. “We get a broad spectrum of ladies in the program,” according to Hesser. “Some are in their mid-40s and are done having children. They might still have that 15 pounds of baby fat. Others are just saying, ‘I’m getting older and I should start looking at things I can do to be healthier.’ The truth is that as you get older it becomes harder to lose weight because your metabolism slows down.” Many of the women in the program also are dealing with chronic diseases and health conditions that require extra supervision. “I like that the program is supervised by a registered dietitian,” Hesser says. “Anna’s expertise offers more of a safety net for people because she has the tools to consider the whole person, whether

that individual has diabetes or kidney problems. “We don’t want people going on crash diets. In fact, Anna doesn’t even like the word diet.” Mazzei has been a registered dietitian at Washington Hospital for more than 20 years and holds a certificate in Adult Weight Management from the American Diabetes Association. She counsels participants in the Right Weigh program to achieve a healthy weight loss of one to two pounds a week. Physical and emotional benefits During the 12-week program, Hesser says participants often see other benefits to their health and emotional wellbeing. “When I see ladies from Right Weigh in other classes like the Arthritis Foundation exercise class, they just beam and I can see their confidence is better,” she says. “Our Right Weigh participants just seem so radiant when I see them, and that’s neat for me.” Geared exclusively for women, the program includes eight, small-group sessions over a 12-week period. Classes include individual weight checks followed by group education sessions on pertinent topics that help the individual stay focused on her weight management goals. Each group session starts off with an interactive lecture and participants are encouraged to ask questions and provide their own perspectives. continued on page 4

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

12/20/11

12/21/11

12/22/11

12/23/11

12/24/11

12/25/11

12/26/11

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Women's Health Conference: Beyond Sadness - Depression

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes and the Kidneys

Think Pink 2011

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Voices InHealth: Bras for Body & Soul

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Superbugs: Are We Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention Winning the Germ War?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Men's Health Expo 2011

Think Pink 2011

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels (Late Start)

Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults Diabetes Matters: Ins and Outs of Glucose Monitoring

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children

Think Pink 2011

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Cyberbullying - The New Schoolyard Bully

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure Minimally Invasive Surgery Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart for Lower Back Disorders

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011 Neurological Disorders: How Brain Tumors are Treated

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Raising Awareness About Stroke Community Based Senior Supportive Services Women's Health Conference: Weight Management

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression?

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

What is Cholesterol and How to Lower It

Reach Your Goal: Quit Smoking (Late Start)

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options Diabetes Matters:Vacation or Travel Plans?

Take the Steps: What You Should Know About Foot Care

Heart Irregularities Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Cooking Demonstration: Learn About Healthy Eating

Washington Women's Center: Heart Healthy Foods

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

How to Prevent a Heart Attack

World Kidney Day (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run!

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System (Late Start)

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting December 14, 2011

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions (Late Start)

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage?

Kidney Disease Prostate Enlargements and Cancer

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea Women's Health Conference: Chronic Pain Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Partnering with Your Management Learn How Exercise Can Doctor to Improve DiaHelp Diabetes betes Control (Late Start) Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It (Late Start)

Weight Management for Seniors

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Percutaneous (Under the Learn About Foods That Skin) Treatment Help Your Digestive System Learn How to Eat Better! Learn Exercises to Help Fitting Physical Activity Lower Your Blood Pressure Into Your Day and Slow Your Heart Rate


December 20, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

Hospital’s Six-Month Catalog Provides Schedule of Upcoming Classes, Events

D

o you have your New Year’s resolutions set for 2012? Is one of them to make the coming year your healthiest yet—or maybe to try something new? If so, then Washington Hospital can help. From support groups and seminars to health screenings and wellness massage, the hospital’s January to June 2012 Health & Wellness Catalog provides you with a roadmap to better health. (Unless otherwise noted, classes and seminars are held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, located on the first floor of 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.) Preventing stroke According to the American Stroke Association (ASA), up to 80 percent of all strokes can be prevented. And on Tuesday, Jan. 3, you can get the tools you need to help prevent stroke during the latest Stroke Education Series seminar: “Stroke Prevention and Other Disease Processes/Healthy Lifestyle – Be Smart and Avoid Stroke.” Get the facts about diabetes On Thursday, Jan. 5, get the truth about dietary supplements and diabetes. During a free Diabetes Matters education class, a Washington Hospital registered dietitian and certified diabetes

educator (CDE) will discuss supplements and how they should fit into your care plan. “Dietary Supplements: What You Should Know” will be held from 7 to 8 p.m., and make sure to stay for the Diabetes Support Group from 8 to 9 p.m. Learn about your cancer risk Certain types of cancers can run in families, putting some individuals at greater risk. But this doesn’t mean you have to feel helpless. Be proactive and arm yourself with the facts by finding out more about these heritable cancers. The “Cancer in the Family … Am I at Risk?” class will be held from noon to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 10, at the Washington Women’s Center, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150, in Fremont. Brain health—what’s normal and what’s not If you can’t remember where you parked the car, keep forgetting the neighbor-across-thestreet’s name and you want to learn about normal changes in brain functioning as we get older—as well as symptoms to be concerned about—then mark Tuesday, Jan. 17, on the calendar. From 1 to 3 p.m., a specialist will present a free seminar entitled

“How Does Aging Affect Your Brain?” Get the skinny on healthy exercise for women Chances are you know that exercise is good for you, but where do you start? And what are the specific benefits of different types of exercise—like strength training, cardio, and stretching— for women? Find out on Wednesday, Jan. 18, during “Exercise for Your Health,” which will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Washington Women’s Center, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150, in Fremont. Try something new For women looking to add a

gentle, meditative exercise class to their routine, it’s time to check out the Washington Women’s Center’s new “Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi Program.” The program incorporates gentle Sun-style tai chi routines that are appropriate for all levels of fitness. This ancient practice is proven to reduce pain while improving physical and mental wellness. The fee is $48 for a six-class series or $80 for a 12-class series. The Tuesday series meets once a week from 10 to 11 a.m. The Thursday series meets once a week from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. The Tuesday and Thursday series meets twice a week at the previ-

ously listed times. All classes take place in the Washington Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150, in Fremont. For details, call the Washington Women’s Center Wellness Line at (510) 608-1301. Your ticket to better health The January to June 2012 catalog will be available in early January. To receive your free copy of the latest Health & Wellness Catalog, call (800) 963-7070, visit www.whhs.com to download a digital copy, or pick one up at various locations throughout Washington Hospital’s campus.

Washington Women’s Center Offers Holiday Packages This holiday season consider putting a relaxing massage on your holiday gift list. Massages make great presents and offer a nice respite after a busy day of shopping. The Washington Women’s Center is featuring a number of specials on massage packages that can make the holidays brighter for the women in your life, including yourself. “You can treat your sister, mother, or girlfriend to a wonderful experience,” said Kathy Hesser, RN, Women’s Center coordinator. “A massage is the perfect way to take a break from busy holiday schedules.” The Women’s Center is a comfortable place for women to enjoy a personalized massage, she added. It features a spa-like setting where women are pampered. They are provided with a fresh robe to slip into and they have their own private dressing area with individual lockers for personal items. “Women are invited to linger afterward and bask in that calm and relaxed feeling that comes from having a massage,” Hesser said. “They can sit in their robes and enjoy a nice cup of tea or

coffee. We can even provide a warm blanket to curl up in.” The Women’s Center features licensed massage therapists who each have more than 12 years experience, according to Hesser. Therapists tailor their massages to meet the individual needs of each woman. “A lot of women feel more comfortable getting a massage at a hospital,” she said. “There is a trust factor because the focus here is on health. Some of the women who come for regular massages have arthritis or other health issues, and they feel confident knowing that their individual needs will be met.” Holiday Specials Special pricing on a number of holiday packages is available through December 23. Packages start at $100 for the De-Stress package, which includes six 15minute chair massages. The Balance Package includes six 30-minute massage sessions of your choice (Swedish, therapeutic, or foot reflexology) for $180. The Rejuvenation Package includes six 50-minute sessions of your choice (Swedish, therapeutic, deep tissue, or sports) for $270.

“If you purchase three gift certificates, you get a half hour massage for yourself,” Hesser said. “That’s an added bonus.” She suggested that mothers and daughters, sisters, or girlfriends could create a special holiday outing around a massage. Get a massage together and combine it with a special lunch out or some shopping before or after, she said. Massages are offered by appointment at the Washington Women’s Center on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. During the week, massages are available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. To learn more about the holiday packages or to schedule a massage, call (510) 608-1301. It Feels Great “A massage simply feels great,” Hesser said. “It also offers a number of health benefits depending on the type of massage. We offer the whole gamut, from Swedish to hot rocks.” The Swedish massage uses long, fluid strokes and deep, circular motions to reduce tension, improve circulation, and relieve muscle tension.

The Washington Women’s Center is offering special massage packages and gift certificates through December 23. Give the gift of massage for that someone special in your life. Call (510) 608-1301 to schedule an appointment or visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter for more information.

The sports massage is similar to the Swedish massage but is more for women who work out frequently or are involved in sports. It helps improve flexibility, and prevent or treat injuries. Deep tissue massage works deep into the muscle to help ease and release muscular tension. It uses slower, more forceful strokes to target the deeper layers of the muscles and connective tissue. The pregnancy massage is for expectant mothers. It helps alleviate back pain and aids circulation, providing some relief from the discomfort of pregnancy. Therapeutic massage integrates neuromuscular therapy and

reflexology with Swedish strokes to help relax and restore balance to the body. The hot rock massage helps the muscles relax. Hot rocks are strategically placed in certain areas like the neck and spine. The foot reflexology is a gentle massage of the foot that helps to relieve tension. Chair massage is also available, and usually focuses on the head, neck, shoulders, back, arms, and hands. “You can give the gift of relaxation by giving a massage this holiday season,” Hesser said. “With work and family pressures, most women would say that is priceless.”


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

continued from page 2

Those enrolled in the program will also meet one-on-one with the dietitian for an hour-long session to evaluate and discuss individual goals and specific needs. Mazzei says the first step—even before enrolling in the Right Weigh program—is preparing mentally to make permanent changes. Once women do that, she says, Right Weigh offers them a comprehensive toolset for building a healthier lifestyle. “I always tell people, ‘You are never going to stop doing this. You can’t go back to what you did before,’” she explains. “At the same time, I don’t think about weight management and diet in terms of restrictions. Let’s not make food a bad thing. When we say ‘diet,’ there are so many great foods to eat and it’s about discovering new products, new ways to prepare things and trying brand new foods. No, you can’t eat the entire package of Oreo cookies, but there are lots of other things you can enjoy.” Lose weight for better health To register for the Right Weigh nutrition program beginning Tuesday, Jan. 31, call Kathy Hesser at (510) 608-1356. Group classes meet once a week for the first four weeks. Then sessions meet every two weeks for the next two months. The fee for the entire program is $185. Group classes and meetings will take place inside the Washington Women’s Center, Suite 150, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. continued from page 1

Undaunted by the threat of hostile action, Pedro 15 approached the zone while Red directed his aircraft safely to the ground through a near zero-visibility landing. Red limited the amount of time his aircraft remained vulnerable in the zone by assisting with the loading of the wounded soldiers. After departing the zone with four of the five wounded, Lt. Col. Rhys Hunt, a Pave Hawk pilot assigned to the 129th Rescue Squadron and Pedro flight lead, directed Pedro 16 into the zone to retrieve the remaining ca-

sualty. Seconds after takeoff, the Pedro flight was ambushed. Facing a barrage of small arms fire and rocket propelled grenades, Red directed Pedro 15 through multiple re-attacks of enemy positions, repeatedly placing his aircraft in between Pedro 16 and an advancing enemy threat. Red continued to direct the fight, firing on the enemy positions and eliminating a group of insurgents 50 meters from Pedro 16. His superior airmanship and unfaltering dedication helped save the lives of 16 people that day. “The Distinguished Flying

Cross is one of the highest decorations reserved for those who demonstrate extraordinary courage and airmanship under fire,” said Col. Steven Butow, 129th Rescue Wing commander. “These 10 individuals heroically saved the lives of Americans and allies under the most challenging of combat conditions.” The Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to service members who distinguish themselves in support of operations by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight. The 129th RQW has 10 outstanding airmen receiving this prestigious medal. They were presented by Brigadier General Matthew P. Beevers, assistant adjutant general of the California Military Department. For more information, please go to www.129rqw.ang.af.mil.

Hospice basics in seven languages SUBMITTED BY JUDY CONNER The holidays are a time when families gather and celebrate. Yet for some families, it may be a time when they are facing the decline and foreseeable death of a loved one to disease and/or old age. These families may be considering hospice care for their loved one. Hospice can be difficult to discuss, and it can be even more difficult when there is a language barrier. End-of-life care and customs vary as much as the languages in the multi-ethnic San Francisco Bay Area. Pathways Home Health, Hospice & Private Duty offers basic hospice information in seven different languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, Farsi, Tagalog, Russian and Vietnamese on their website. Individuals and families with general ques-

tions about hospice, how hospice care works, and what services are provided under hospice care will find answers in this basic brochure. The basic hospice brochure is downloadable in all seven languages and easy to understand. It provides patients and their families with information that will help them begin to discuss hospice as a care option. They will also be able to better understand the services provided under hospice care. These services include pain management, symptom control, emotional support and spiritual care to patients and their families as they come to grip with a life-limiting illness. Link to brochure resource page http://www.pathwayshealth.org/resources/translated-materials.html


December 20, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 5


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Adopt an Animal SUBMITTED BY WENDY WINSTED Give a gift that says, "I care!" Consider a gift that supports your local California native wildlife educa-

tion and rehabilitation center - Sulphur Creek Nature Center. For $65, you can adopt one of Sulphur Creek’s resident critters, and receive a certificate, photo, and nature notes about your selected animal. Donations help provide habitat improvements, aid in the cost of feeding and caring for these animals, and allow us to obtain materials for the animals’ enrich-

San Leandro Resident Elected Board President SUBMITTED BY LAURA WEAVER Mrs. Isobel Dvorsky, a long-time member of the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District, was elected president of the Board at its latest meeting held at the district office. A veteran board member and higher education advocate, Mrs. Dvorsky takes over as president from Livermore resident

Barbara F. Mertes, Ph.D. Elected to the board in 1985 to represent San Leandro, this is Mrs. Dvorsky’s sixth turn as president. In addition to her service as a board member for the college district, Mrs. Dvorsky served as the trustee representative on the board of directors of the American Association of Community Colleges, national president of the Association of Community College Trustees, and as the president of the California Community College Trustees Association and founding member of the Community College League of California. Her local affiliations include serving as board member and past president of the Davis Street Family Resource Center, board member and past president of the San Leandro Scholarship Foundation, advisory board member of the San Leandro Education Foundation, and founding member and past president of the Political Action Committee for Excellence all located in San Leandro. A former speech therapist, Mrs. Dvorsky’s roots are in education. She has been recognized numerous times for her dedication to community colleges and is the recipient of the prestigious M. Dale Ensign Trustee Award given by the Association of Community College Trustees.

December 20, 2011

ment and enjoyment. Call or stop by to obtain an adoption form. Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D Street, Hayward (510) 881-6747


December 20, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Auto Review

BY STEVE SCHAEFER

A

t a quick glance, you'd say that the new Scion iQ is Toyota's version of the smart car. It's a tiny little thing, with very little in front of its windshield and a vertical hatch in back. But it’s smarter than a smart. Before reviewing the numbers, all I can say is that when you're driving the iQ (nice take

on "smart" name, right), it doesn't feel small inside. That's because it's not little where it counts. The seating is high, legroom is plentiful, the windshield stretches far forward, and

truly, when you're driving a larger car you don't see the hood or trunk anyway. The iQ’s hood can be very short, thanks to a compact front-mounted differential, high-mount steering rack with electronic power-steering, and a compact air-conditioning unit. The iQ may be small - 10 feet long - but it is 14 inches longer than a smart, on a fiveinch longer wheelbase. It also is almost five inches wider and weighs about 300 pounds more. It's powered by a 1.3-liter four-cylinder engine under its diminutive hood that puts out 94 horsepower through a continuously variable automatic transmission. The smart makes do with a 1.0-liter threecylinder engine in the rear that produces 70 horsepower through an odd "automated manual" transmission. The iQ actually offers rear seating, something you won't see on a smart. Because the dash is scooped out on the passenger side, you can push the front passenger seat up and fit an average-sized adult in back behind it… really! Behind the driver, there is zero legroom, unless the driver is very short of stature and moves the seat way forward. Normally, I left the rear seats folded down for a handy cargo-carrying space. How it compare to the dinky MINI Cooper? Well, the iQ is 26 inches shorter, although its nearly identical width explains part of why the iQ doesn’t feel cramped. However, the MINI's wheelbase is 18 inches longer which is why that legendary box can carry so much. The MINI is about 400 pounds heavier too. So you can see that the iQ is pretty small. But, it doesn't feel that way. The iQ is very nicely finished, even in the pre-production model I had the privilege of testing for a week. Handsomely detailed surfaces and thoughtful touches make it seem like much more than an econobox. An elegant, silvery console runs up from the floor to bloom like a flower atop the center of the dash. It contains a full-service touch screen. The delicately configured door armrests continue the herbological flow of the dash with surprisingly exquisite detailing. A single eyeball-socket light sits in the ceiling, serving as courtesy and reading light for driver or passenger.

A robust-sounding Pioneer system filled the car with sound—another illusion. You can control it from the dash or with tiny, but functional steering wheel buttons. Staying with the audio description, the iQ’s horn emits a comically baby beep. That reminds me of a song (Beep Beep— actually written about Nash Metropolitans). Fuel economy: The iQ is rated at 36 City, 37 Highway. The smart gets 33/41. The MINI is 29/37. One day, I noticed that the fuel gauge needle was approaching “Empty,” so I stopped to fill the tank. It took only 5.1 gallons. Turns out the tank is small, only 10 gallons. That’s something you’ll want to remember. Toyota says the iQ is safe despite its tiny proportions. There are no fewer than 11 standard airbags, including the world’s first rear

window airbag. All iQs come standard with the Star Safety System, which includes antilock brakes, Electronic Brake-force Distribution, Brake Assist, Traction Control, Vehicle Stability Control (VSC) and Smart Stop Technology brakeoverride. A tire-pressure monitoring system is also standard equipment. Pricing: While the smart claims to have a $12,000 car to sell you, the iQ starts at about $16,000. The MINI is more like $20,000 plus. The iQ was just delightful, with its surprising road presence, and, as previously stated, perceived roominess. The only problem is that it's too short to carry an upright bass, which is the only possible reason I have for not ordering one immediately. I dubbed the iQ the Nash Metropolitan for today. It takes care of the front passengers while supplying modest rear accommodations if absolutely necessary (no belts in the 1950s Nash!) It has reasonable power and performance for its time with an engine up front. It’s cute—one of the smallest cars on the road. Figuring for 50 years of inflation, it probably costs about the same amount of money too. The iQ will arrive imminently on the West Coast, and elsewhere over the following several months. Go see it for yourself—and listen to that nice solid door slam.

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

Page 7


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD December 16: CSO Aguirre investigated a commercial burglary at Vallejo Mills Elementary School (38569 Canyon Heights Drive) after an unknown suspect(s) entered a classroom sometime during the night and stole a teacher’s wallet from a desk. Officers were dispatched to a forgery in progress at the Wells Fargo Bank (Paseo Padre Pkwy/Capitol Ave). It was reported that a suspect attempted to cash a $2300 fraudulent check. Officers arrived and detained a female suspect. Investigation revealed that the check had been stolen yesterday in San Jose. The suspect was ultimately arrested for burglary and possession of stolen property. A doctor at a local hospital called to report a case of domestic battery. The doctor suspected that a female patient had been battered by her husband. The woman had a serious injury to her ear. The woman stated that her husband was responsible for the injury. The husband was arrested for felony domestic battery. Officers responded to 36500 block of Bosworth Court on a report of a vehicle that had collided with the house. The vehicle struck the side of the house, and the driver drove off. Officers found the suspect and the suspect’s vehicle in a condominium parking lot a few blocks away. A 43 year-old female was arrested for DUI (drugs) and hit and run (property damage only). Officer Burns requested assistance at Robertson High School after a teacher saw a gun on the ground but failed to retrieve it before it disappeared. The school was locked down and a search of

the school and students located the (toy) Air soft gun at the bottom of a garbage can. Officer Edwards attempted to conduct a pedestrian stop on a suspicious person in the area of Mission View/Leslie. The suspect fled but was quickly apprehended. Suspect was in possession of several knives and a machete; he was arrested for possession of dangerous weapons. Officer Manrique was asked to stand by while Washington High School staff suspended a problem student. After the suspension, the student became disruptive and refused to leave campus. While attempting to escort the student off of the campus, the student assaulted the officer and “code 3” cover officers responded. Officer Manrique struggled with the student and was only able to gain control after pointing (not firing) his TASER at the suspect. Officer Manrique suffered minor injuries as a result of the incident. Approximately 10-12 persons and two or three tents “occupied” Veteran’s Park (north of the Courthouse). The demonstrators held up signs at the intersection of Paseo Padre Parkway/Walnut Avenue for several hours. There was no impact on police services. December 17: The Occupy Fremont demonstration remained extremely small (four individuals and one tent) and did not create any issues or calls for service. Officer Zargham responded to Walmart (40580 Albrae) on a report of an in-progress forgery. Walmart employees reported a 59-year-old male attempted to purchase a computer on-line with a stolen credit card. The male went to store to pick up the computer. Walmart was notified of the fraudulent card and called police. Officer Zargham con-

Man sentenced in shooting of Fremont cop AP WIRE SERVICE OAKLAND, Calif. (AP), Dec 17 - An alleged gang member has been sentenced to two life terms in the shooting of a Fremont police officer. An Alameda County judge issued the sentenced against 21-year-old Andrew Barrientos on Friday. Barrientos was convicted last month of attempted murder of a police officer, assault on an officer and weapons charges in the August 2010 shooting of Officer Todd Young. Authorities say the 41-year-old Young was shot when he and another officer tried to serve an arrest warrant on Barrientos. Barrientos was also convicted of carjacking a vehicle at gunpoint as he fled the scene. Young survived the shooting, but was hospitalized for seven weeks and underwent several surgeries. He said on Friday that he plans to return to full duty next summer on the same task force he was on when he was shot.

tacted the suspect as he waited in line for his purchase. California Highway Patrol (CHP) requested that Fremont PD investigate a shooting that occurred between two vehicles on N/B 680 near Mission (north). Essentially, two Hispanic males associated with the Sureno street gang were on their way to Livermore from San Jose when an unknown vehicle pulled up next to them and fired several rounds into their vehicle, striking the passenger in the back. The victims continued to Valley Care Hospital in Pleasanton; CHP was called. The victim was transported to Eden for treatment. Officer Soper and Field Training Officer Carpenter were on their way to Eden when the victim was released and refused to cooperate. CSI Smith met with driver and vehicle in Pleasanton and the vehicle was towed to FPD for processing. No suspect description. Investigation forwarded to Major Crimes for followup. December 18 An adult female had a little too much to drink causing her to remove her clothing and go marching about naked in sub-fifty degree temperatures. Officer Shadle arrested her for public intoxication. Officer Manrique attempted to stop a Honda Accord for running a stop sign as it pulled into the Victoria Gardens apartment complex. It turns out the Honda Accord was reported stolen out of Stockton. The driver and two occupants immediately ran from the vehicle. Officer Manrique, in foot pursuit, caught the driver, a 23 year-old male. A perimeter was set and a search was conducted for the remaining two passengers. A female passenger was stopped just outside the perimeter and arrested. The third occupant of the vehicle was not located.

Commercial Burglary SUBMITTED BY OFFICER TRISH YOUNG, MILPITAS PD On December 10, 2011 at 4:02 am, Milpitas officers responded to a burglary alarm at Milpitas Smile Design. Upon arrival, officers found a broken glass door, entered the business and found Anthony Daniels inside. Milpitas police officers arrested Daniels without incident. Anthony Daniels was booked into the Santa Clara County Jail for commercial burglary and vandalism. The Milpitas Police Department encourages the public to immediately call 911 to report in progress crimes or suspicious activities. Anyone with any information regarding this incident or other burglaries is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/citydept/police

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD December 15: At 3:05 p.m. a report was received of people drinking alcohol and causing a disturbance at Bridgepointe Park. Officers made contact with two occupants of a car parked by the park and arrested Phillip Greene, a 23 year-old male transient who was in possession of more than a half pound of marijuana. Greene was arrested for possession of marijuana for sale, possession of more than an ounce of marijuana and possession of prescription drugs without a prescription. SRO Slater arrested a juvenile at Newark Memorial High School for possession of an illegal knife on school grounds, possession of marijuana on school grounds, and possession of tobacco products. Officer Slater also arrested two other juveniles for possession of marijuana on the high school campus. A candlelight vigil for Justice Afoa was held at Cedar Blvd and Birch St at 1800 hours. Street Crimes Detectives attended the peaceful memorial service. At 10:35 p.m., an NPD Officer located Michael Olacio, a 54 year-old Newark resident, drunk and yelling in the parking lot of Newark Square. A failed attempt to kick a Newark Officer resulted in Olacio falling on the ground; the officer held Olacio on the ground until other officers arrived. Olacio was transported for medical clearance prior to being booked for public intoxication. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at (510) 578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at (510) 578-4000, extension 500.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Tri-City Voice Newspaper Needs Your Help We need you to vote for us Sign our petition on change.org http://www.change.org/petitions/tri-city-voice-newspaper-needs-help-bay-areanews-group-medianews-is-trying-to-put-us-out-of-business

The courts do not believe that people care about local independent community newspapers. We need to go back to court with enough names to show community support. The Bay Area News Group, MediaNews (which includes Oakland Tribune, Hayward Review, The Argus, Milpitas Post, Fremont Bulletin, San Jose Mercury and many other Bay Area newspapers) is trying to put Tri-City Voice Newspaper out of business. This is about corporate greed and maintaining a monopoly. What they do not own and control they want to crush.

We need your help.

We also need more subscribers We have a petition here at our office that you can sign. 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont If you need help going to Change.org to sign, send me an email and I will give you the link.

We have a link to our petition on our website www.tricityvoice.com sharon@tricityvoice.com Call for information. 510-494-1999 We have over 790 signatures on change.org and over 326 have signed a petition at our office. We need more signatures.You can come to our office for a petition and help us get more names. We need letters of support from clubs and organizations and more subscribers.

Ohlone Humane Society

BY NANCY LYON

B

ooks are wonderful friends, it really doesn’t matter if they are the traditional companion you can hold and mull over while turning the pages beside the fire, or not so warm and fuzzy quick moments snatched from the convenient electronic form during a busy day. Books enrich our lives in so many ways and giving one as a gift is a special act of sharing. One of my favorite authors is Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, in his professional world a rather controversial psychoanalyst and academic, but a person whose deep love and respect for animals shows unquestionably in his writing. If you share his feelings or are simply interested in exploring the world of animals through an animal lover’s eyes, it’s an adventure that can be life changing. Masson authored the highly acclaimed and stirring ‘When Elephants Weep’ a decade ago and has since written many books on his passion… the world of animal feelings and their reality. Each one would make a fantastic present and I strongly recommend his following works: Dogs Never Lie About Love: Reflections on the Emotional World of Dogs – Masson explores the inner world of dogs and investigates the scientific studies, myths and observations on the complex inner life of Man’s Best Friend. If you’ve ever had any doubts that dogs have a rich and diverse perception of reality, read this book and you’ll never look at a dog again as anything but the embodiment of unfailing Love. It is fun, insightful and serious, a great read for anyone and especially those of us that know our canine friends and companions are very special beings. The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals – It’s not often that as people consider the lives and feelings of farmed animals; in fact, we find it uncomfortable to consider them sentient beings who share many of our qualities. Masson documents examples they have in common with humans like tenderness, humor and trust - leaving us with little doubt that they have complex emotions, intelligence and very possibly are as self-aware as we are. It also gives rise to serious consideration of the way we treat animals like pigs, cows, chickens, goats and other animals that are designated as “food” and the conditions we force millions of them to live and die in. It’s a very timely book that is touching, thought provoking, and ground-breaking. Two fictional tales by Masson that would make great holiday offerings – A Cat That Came In From The Cold: A Fable – For cat lovers… the story of Billi, a somewhat senior undomesticated exotic cat gifted with great wisdom

who sets out on a worldwide journey to try and understand the “two-foots.” It’s an engaging tale of his encounters with the animals who share their experiences of humans, stories that are often not positive, not all of the animals have been treated well, and some have met violence and others terrible prejudice at the hands of humans for simply being who they are. Little that he hears makes him want to become part of the human world until arriving back home he meets a young girl from the past who is a kindred spirit and he decides to become the first domesticated cat. The book is in hardcopy and may be difficult to find but there’s a masterfully done audio version available. His next book is brimming with holiday spirit - The Dog Who Couldn’t Stop Loving. It’s undeniable, we have always had a special connection with dogs, they have loved us without reservation no matter our status or fortune in life and that link is a unique and wonderful gift. Masson, as a card carrying animal lover, explores this sharing with all its compassion, empathy and joy that is an integral part of the relationship. From his scholarly background, he sets out to show the development of the rapport between man and dog over thousands of years of evolution. He introduces his beloved dog Benjy, who failed as a guide dog for the blind but who is filled with a wealth of enthusiastic love of everything and everyone in the world. It’s a wonderful book that is both scholarly and joyous. I guarantee you won’t regret reading it. In this season of giving, books are a great offering but the presenting of animals to others as a gift is a bad idea. Animals are best chosen by the person who will be their family and caregiver at a quieter time. The unsolicited and unexpected gift of an animal often ends up unhappily for both. Also consider that it is not the ideal time during holiday celebrations to bring a “pet” into your home; the excitement can be upsetting for them during the initial period of adjustment and the opportunity to get into trouble with foods dangerous to their health and well-being, wrappings and other indigestible but tempting things is too big a risk. Happy Holidays!

510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont Ca. 94538-1304

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the TriCity Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organizations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

History

Calvin Valpey had no success prospecting. Captain Richard Benson found the work was too hard for his body. Captain Ebenezer Haley had moderate success and Captain Frederick used up all his cash. They all helped develop the Washington Township Area.

T

he early Californians did not come here in search of gold. They came more as adventurers or men in search of new lands and new lives. Mission Indians had made minor finds of gold, but it did not mean much to them. The mission padres told them not to advertise their find as that might encourage a rush of “money-mad foreigners.” Minor discoveries were made in Southern California, but

the deposits proved to be quite small and caused only temporary rushes to the area. All this changed when James Marshal and his workers found gold in the waters of Sutter’s mill on the American River in January 1848. It was not long before the secret was out and the rush was on. When Sam Brannon shouted “Gold” on the streets of San Francisco the rush became a stampede. Men deserted their homes, their ships and their jobs and headed for the Sierras in a mad dash to get rich. The gold strike soon became known to the people living at Mission San Jose. John and Elizabeth Horner responded to the call of gold, left their struggling farming operation and went to the gold fields. They picked up dysentery and fever and returned to their mission home exhausted. Horner resumed farming and became California’s most famous farmer. Historian William Halley wrote that “at first nearly all rushed off to the diggings, but

most of the farmers soon returned.” Henry Smith returned from a short trip to the mines and opened a store at the Mission in 1848. “He made so much

money in a short time that it took a wagon to remove it.” This probably was an exaggerated statement, but he did make money. Elias Beard toured the mining region for a month and saw nothing promising so he came back to Mission San Jose and opened a store in competition to Henry Smith. Men rushing through Mission San Jose on their way to the gold fields provided a stream of customers for both Henry Smith and Elias Beard. Jacob and George Harlan were included among the Americans temporarily living at Mission San Jose. They joined the rush to the gold fields and tried the mines near Sutter’s Fort. They failed to find much gold and returned to farmland rented from J. J. Vallejo. William and Martin Mendenhall hunted in the Placerville mines but returned after failing to find riches. William Tyson and William Morrison mined successfully in Hangtown for a few months before they joined Perry Morrison to farm here. Howard Overacker tried mining before he also

moved here to farm. James Hawley made a “sizable stake” in the Trinity River mines before he came to Mission San Jose to follow his trade as a carpenter. His first contract was with J. J. Vallejo to rebuild the Vallejo grist mill. William Mack was not successful mining so he worked on the steamers plying between Sacramento and San Francisco. Later he kept a general store at Mowry’s Landing. Timothy Rix mined in the placers for awhile and then settled at Washington Corners (Now Irvington) and became its first postmaster. Henry Curtner tried mining but left and arrived at Mission San Jose “shabby and barefooted.” He began farming and was very successful. Several sea captains tried hunting for gold before they settled here and established more permanent occupations. Captain

John T. Stevenson tried mining in the southern placer mines then came to Centerville where his family became an important part of our history. August Church failed to make a fortune in the mines and came here to serve as our first elected county clerk. John Riser tried his luck in the mines and then farmed and practiced law here. Edward Niehaus had his claim washed out but returned later and found a pocket of gold worth $2,000. He later went into partnership in the S. Salz & Co. General Store in Centerville, a firm that prospered for many years. Henry Gregory lost most of his capital in a mining venture and returned to Centerville to operate a store and his hotel called the Gregory House. George Patterson and his companions mined for awhile and then returned to the Bay Area “broken in pocketbook, spirit and health.” George worked on the Horner-Beard ranch, saved his money, bought land and established the Patterson Ranch. Henry Dusterberry came late for the gold rush, but he met Edward Niehaus in the placers and followed him to Centerville. He became a farmer and served as the local supervisor for eight years. Earl Marshal and his wife, Letita, came to the Bay Area on the Ship Brooklyn. Writers of the History of Washington Township preserved a story of the Marshalls” experience with the gold rush: They were operating a small dairy when Earl decided to go to the mines. Letita moved the cows to Mission San Jose and conducted the first dairy in the area. She sold butter “at marvelous prices and milk at 25 cents a quart and cleared in the year her husband was absent, over $2,500.” This is one of the few stories we have about local women in the gold rush. Other gold miners included Edward Mack, Robert Blacow and Philip Hellwig. There were certainly others who have not been named here.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


December 20, 2011

BY SIMON WONG PHOTOS BY SIMON WONG Moreau Catholic High School, Hayward, celebrated the blessing and consecration of The Grotto of Our Lady on December 8, 2011, the day of the Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Grotto is situated in what is known as the Festival Area, akin to a quadrangle bounded by the playing field and school buildings, where students often gather informally and through

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

and Frosh Cecilia Saenz cut the ribbon before Moreau Chaplain Fr. Tito Bonoan blessed the Grotto. “Meditation gardens can take many different forms but their primary purpose is always to provide mental, emotional, physical and spiritual benefits. It’s a place that offers refuge from a stressful schedule and hectic lifestyle and is a sanctuary where we can rejuvenate our soul, a spot that is conducive to prayer and meditation,” explained Bonoan who sprinkled Holy Water, accompanied by with social

Grotto of Our Lady, Moreau Catholic High School, 27170 Mission Boulevard, Hayward

which they pass as they move around campus. Formerly the site of the Moreau Festival, which ceased in the early 1990s, the Festival Area has always had a statue of the Blessed Mother but years of exposure to the elements took their toll. The area was earmarked for a facelift that became a grander vision. The Grotto of Our Lady is part of a $20,000 project to create a spiritual retreat for prayer and reflection and will include new landscaping, lighting and enough bench seating to accommodate a class of students. “The idea of creating a space in honor of Mary arose approximately two years ago,” stated Principal Lauren Lek. “Every year, students raise funds through the Student Fundraiser to enhance the academic, social and spiritual life of Moreau. The fruits of their labor in August/September 2011 have contributed to the creation of a retreat garden with the new statue of Mary and will help 11 other projects including interactive white boards, a mobile learning lab of more than 30 iPads, a student art gallery and more. Additionally, the support of generous donors, parents and friends has made the Grotto possible.” Moreau’s Grotto of Our Lady is full of symbolism. The sacred space echoes Our Lady of Lourdes in France and the Grotto of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana. It was designed and constructed by Bay Area artisan Arturo Hernandez, Hernandez Landscaping, and his team with input from staff. The on-site work was supported by Tom Alcottt, Moreau’s Director of Site Services and the maintenance and custodial staff. Every element in the design, construction and materials has significance. The Grotto takes the form of a crescent moon which is a sign of fertility, related to life and death. Biblical references use the symbol to highlight cosmic events and divine epiphanies and it is often associated with Mary; it is used in representations of her miraculous conception and birth and appears in depictions of the Assumption of Mary into heaven after her death. Natural materials, such as rocks, stones, plants and water, were used to construct the Grotto. The rocks and cave-like appearance are redolent of the setting (grotto of Massabieille, near Lourdes) and landscape in which Bernadette Soubirous, a 14-year old peasant girl, first saw Mary in 1858. A waterfall to Mary’s right represents the River Gave which flows nearby. On each side of the statue, there are seven steps and six candle holders are fixed to the wall. The steps represent the 14 Stations of the Cross endured by Jesus during his final hours. The candle holders represent the 12 Apostles. The Holy Cross, which is set into the ground before Mary, symbolizes her faith and that of those who pass through Moreau Catholic High School which is dedicated to the legacy of the Congregation of the Holy Cross whose motto is Ave Cruz, Spes Unica (Hail the Cross, Our only Hope). Mrs. Bernie Puccini (cafeteria/volunteer)

studies/theology teacher Fr. Cecil Bruce. Bruce led the student body and guests, who included trustees, parent representatives, staff, volunteers, alumni and friends of Moreau, in the Prayer to Our Lady. “My heart-felt thanks to all of you… those who led it, built it, prayed for it and supported it, for bringing this to our campus. May God bless us all and may our intentions today invoke the Virgin Mary and bring us closer to our faith and to the meaning of the Christmas season,” stated Terry Lee, President, Moreau Catholic High School. Following the consecration and blessing of the Grotto of Our Lady, the entire school processed to the Main Gym for the Feast of the Immaculate Conception Mass. For more information, call (510) 8814300 or visit www.MoreauCatholic.org

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

US charges ex-Fannie, Freddie CEOs with fraud BY DEREK KRAVITZ AP BUSINESS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Dec 17 - Two former CEOs at mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac on Friday became the highest-profile individuals to be charged in connection with the 2008 financial crisis. In a lawsuit filed in New York, the Securities and Exchange Commission brought civil fraud charges against six former executives at the two firms, including former Fannie CEO Daniel Mudd and former Freddie CEO Richard Syron. The executives were accused of understating the level of high-risk subprime mortgages that Fannie and Freddie held just before the housing bubble burst. “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac executives told the world that their subprime exposure was substantially smaller than it really was,” said Robert Khuzami, SEC's enforcement director. Khuzami noted that huge losses on their subprime loans eventually pushed the two companies to the brink of failure and forced the government to take them over. The charges brought Friday follow widespread criticism of federal authorities for not holding top executives accountable for the recklessness that triggered the 2008 crisis. continued on page 32

Senate OKs 2-month extension of payroll tax cut and jobless benefits, finishes spending bill AP WIRE SERVICE WASHINGTON (AP), Dec 17 - The Senate voted Saturday to temporarily avert a Jan. 1 payroll tax increase and benefit cutoff for the long-time unemployed, but forcing a reluctant President Barack Obama to make an election-year choice between unions and environmentalists over whether to build an oil pipeline through the heart of the country. With the still-reeling economy serving as a backdrop, the Senate's 89-10 vote belied a tortuous battle between Democrats and Republicans that produced the compromise twomonth extension of the expiring tax breaks and jobless benefits and forestalled cuts in doctors' Medicare reimbursements. It also capped a year of divided government marked by raucous partisan fights that tumbled to the brink of a first-ever U.S. default and three federal shutdowns, only to see eleventhhour deals emerge. It also put the two sides on track to revisit the payroll tax cut early next year as the fights for control of the White House and Congress heat up. However, House GOP leaders held a conference call Saturday with rank-and-file lawmakers in which participants said strong anger was expressed at the Senate for approving a bill that lasted just two months. No specific date was set for bringing the House back to town or for a vote, they said, injecting uncertainty into the next step. “You can't have an economic recovery with this,” said Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., of the uncertainty he said the temporary bill would create. “If the Senate is incapable of doing that, we don't have to accept it.”

Additional $100 million cut from CSU budget SUBMITTED BY CLAUDIA KEITH State funding support for the California State University will be cut by an additional $100 million for this year, on top of a $650 million reduction already in place, as a result of lower-thanprojected state revenues. The additional cut reduces CSU funding to $2 billion and represents a 27 percent year-to-year reduction in state support. “It is disheartening to say the least when your budget is cut by an initial $650 million, but to face an additional $100 million reduction mid-year makes things extremely challenging,” said CSU Chancellor Charles B. Reed. “We were aware that this was a possibility, and our campuses have been planning accordingly. However, the uncertainty of the overall fiscal outlook for the state is not encouraging, and the CSU has run out of good options.” The $2 billion in state funding allocated to the CSU for the 2011-2012 budget is the lowest level of state support the system has received since 1997-1998, but the university currently serves an additional 90,000 compared to that year. The CSU had previously announced that it will not raise tuition mid-year, even with the additional $100 million cut. To get through the remaining months of this fiscal year, campuses will need to take short-term measures such as drawing on one-time reserves, delaying equipment purchases and facility maintenance work. However, starting with the next fiscal year, extremely difficult longer-term tradeoffs will have to be considered, including the possibility of additional cuts to academic programs or further increases in tuition. For the past three years, CSU has instituted a number of cost savings measures including decreased enrollment, employee layoffs and furloughs, deferred maintenance, travel restrictions, better use of information technology and other efforts. In two of the last four fiscal years, state funding to the CSU has been dramatically reduced, forcing the board to approve sizable tuition fee increases. However, increases in revenue from tuition hikes – after setting aside onethird for financial aid – have not kept pace with state funding cuts. For the current fiscal year 2011-2012, tuition increases raised approximately $300 million, but CSU’s budget has now been cut by $750 million. California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Alliance stops Caltrans Niles Canyon Project SUBMITTED BY JEFF MILLER

T

he California Department of Transportation signed a settlement agreement December 12, 2011 with the Alameda Creek Alliance that forces the agency to terminate the approval and permits for the first phase of a controversial $80 million highway widening project in Niles Canyon along Alameda Creek. CalTrans will rescind its 2006 approval and flawed environmental review for the Route 84 Safety Improvement Project, notify regulatory agencies it is withdrawing the project, terminate the project construction contract, and comply with mitigation requirements for work already done, such as tree cutting along Alameda Creek. “This is a victory both for protecting Alameda Creek and forcing transparency in public agency decisions,” said Jeff Miller, director of the Alameda Creek Alliance. “CalTrans must mitigate for damaged trees along Alameda Creek and cannot pursue a highway project in lower Niles Canyon without adequate environmental review and full public participation. If CalTrans comes back with a revised project, we strongly suggest it not involve significant highway widening or unnecessary damage to trout habitat.” “Unfortunately, CalTrans is still pursuing another larger and even more ecologically damaging highway widening project in the middle of Niles Canyon, so streamside trees and wildlife habitat along Alameda Creek in the canyon are not safe yet,” said Miller. “We are monitoring any project approval for phase two, since the environmental review for that project was also severely flawed.” CalTrans cut nearly 100 trees in the canyon this spring and intended to resume the environmentally damaging project in June. The Alameda Creek Alliance filed suit challenging the inadequate environmental review for the project, winning a court order halting plans to remove tree stumps and vegetation, grade and fill the creek channel and floodplain, and build huge creekside retaining walls. Alameda Superior Court judge Frank Roesch issued a preliminary injunction in June barring CalTrans from continuing construction and excoriated the agency’s clandestine project approval and obstruction of the public process. Judge Roesch is expected to sign the settlement agreement and retain jurisdiction to enforce the settlement. San Francisco attorneys Brian Gaffney, Kelly Franger and Erin Ganahl represented the Alameda Creek Alliance. “CalTrans’ Niles Canyon projects would waste $80 million in taxpayer funds and undermine a decade-long effort by dozens of land and water management agencies to restore Alameda Creek,” said Miller. “CalTrans’ one-size-fits-all approach disregards the scenic beauty and wildlife habitat in the canyon and devalues the communities of Niles and Sunol. We all want a safer roadway, but CalTrans must consider continued on page 32

Page 13

Preferred route and stations for high-speed rail SUBMITTED BY RACHEL WALL In response to extensive public comments and feedback from Central Valley residents, agricultural groups, and businesses, the California High-Speed Rail Authority Board agreed with the staff recommendation of the “hybrid alternative” route as the preferred alignment for the project’s Merced to Fresno section at its monthly meeting in Merced on December 13, 2011. “This is a milestone for the state’s high-speed rail project,” said Thomas J. Umberg, Chairman of the Board. “I’m grateful for the tremendous public feedback and community participation. This is an important step closer to building an intrastate highspeed rail system, connecting the Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area to the Los Angeles and Anaheim region. That trip, which will take less than three hours, is a real investment in our state’s future.” Since the release of the draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Merced to Fresno section in August 2011, Central Valley residents have submitted more than 2,500 public comments. More than 350 people attended the December 13 board meeting and more than 150 people addressed the Board. “The decision to move forward with the recommended route brings us closer to the start of construction on the nation’s first, true high-speed rail system,” said Umberg. “Construction will create thousands of jobs at a time and in a place where they are needed most. There is no better time than now to start California’s high-speed rail project.” “I’ve asked your staff to be supportive of agriculture, so I’m extremely pleased to see them recommend the hybrid approach. Thank you for taking our comments into consideration,” said Merced County Supervisor John Pedrozo. “The construction industry has been one of the hardest hit sectors of the economy in this recession. The state’s high-speed rail project will create tens of thousands of badly needed jobs in the next year in the Central Valley. As construction begins over the next two decades, this project will generate many thousands of jobs up and down the state,” stated Mark Kyle, Operating Engineers Local Union No. 3. The route was one of three alternatives under consideration. The hybrid alternative generally parallels the Union Pacific Railroad and State Route 99 between Merced and Fresno. To avoid impacts to downtown Madera, this route travels east to be adjacent to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) corridor. The preferred station locations along this

route include downtown Merced between Martin Luther King Jr. Way and G Street and downtown Fresno at Mariposa Street. The Authority studied potential routes for the Merced to Fresno Section, a corridor of approximately 65 miles, from 2001 to 2005. Based on this analysis, five alternative north-south alignment routes were identified in 2010. In August 2011, that list was narrowed to three routes, which were included in the Authority’s draft EIR/EIS. Based on community feedback and further analysis, the Authority identified the hybrid alternative route, which combines elements of the other two routes identified in the draft EIR/EIS. It is estimated that the Union Pacific Railroad / State Route 99 would have cost $1 billion more than the Hybrid Alternative and the BNSF route would have cost $500M more. Staff is preparing the Final Environmental Impact Report/Statement for the Merced to Fresno section, which will include today’s hybrid route, to be heard by the Board in February 2012. The Board also approved the staff’s recommendation to add the Hanford West Bypass route, with an accompanying station alternative, to the routes under consideration in Kings County within the Fresno to Bakersfield section. The decision to re-introduce the West Hanford Bypass was announced in October 2011 in response to feedback from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as well as comments from the community on potential improvements to the East Hanford route. There are two options for the location of the optional Kings/Tulare regional station, one on the Hanford East Bypass north of Hwy 198 and east of Hwy 43, the other also in Hanford, but on the Hanford West Bypass east of 13th Avenue and north of Hwy 198. Additionally, about 50 small business owners, mostly from Merced and Madera Counties, crowded into a separate conference room at the event to ask Authority representatives questions about its Small and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program and to receive contracting opportunity information. The program was developed to ensure small businesses in California can access contracts related to the construction of high-speed rail. The Authority has called for a 30 percent goal for small business involvement in the project. For more information, visit www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

December 20, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 15

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

1

2

3

4

5

6

B 142

Crossword Puzzle 6

7

10 12

13

14 15

16

17 18

19

20

21

22

25

1

P

8

A

L

2

L

28 29 30 32

14

R

A

2 6 3 6 8

4

9

17

B

34

15

I

Across 2 Emotionally sick (9) 6 Stopped for a short time (6) 9 Big lie (5) 10 Defeat kingdoms (7) 11 Separating in parts (9) 14 Unpleasant and shocking (8) 15 Professions (11) 16 Times flights leave (9) 17 David, "the sweet psalmist of ___" (6) 19 Nonagenarian is ___ + years (6) 20 Not sure (9) 25 Otalgia (7) 26 Listed (6) 27 Like some talk (5) 28 Features (15) 29 Get a wife (5) 30 Downing Street distance (5) 31 Promoting business by publishing/airing (14) 34 Favorite food (9) 35 High Landmass (9) 36 Young unmarried woman (6) 37 Penmanship (11)

Down 1 Beyond's partner (5) 2 Choose (6) 3 One person (8) 4 Cooking over an open fire (8) 5 Upset for something that was as anticipated (14) 7 Introduce an idea for consideration (7) 8 Breaking up of soil with a spade (7) 12 Insects before become butterflies (12) 13 Pressed (6) 14 Chinese winged animal (6) 16 Prehistoric animal (8) 18 Person who lead the orchestra (9) 21 Land of Vikings (6) 22 Rate of conversion between currencies (8) 23 Charter of a country (12) 24 Place with swings and slides (10) 25 Feeling of being thrilled (8) 27 Feeling someone's loss (8) 30 Contraction for must not (6) 32 Our "mother" (5) 33 Set, as a price (5)

N 21

E

23

R

F

U

C

U B

I

I 32

E

S

S

R

R

H

D

E

4

S

R

E

10

O

N

R

U

13

R E

A

A

S

S M

R

18

A

A

C

E

O

M

M L

E

T

P

R

I

33

N G

N

C

T

H

R

M

A

E

Puzzle Solutions

1 9 5 4 2 8 7 3 6

E P

T

T

E R

E

T

S

A

T

E

D

N

C

L

I

T

26

N

29

A

T

T R

M

L

Y

M

Y

O

35

N

D

L

E A

T

I

I

T

Y

4 6 2 5 8 3 1 7 9

E

E

S

N U

E

9 8 1 6 4 7 3 2 5

P

A

K

2 4 9 7 6 5 8 1 3

N G S

38

D

7 5 3 2 1 9 6 8 4

P

S

S

N G

I

E W R

N

L

T M

R

R

A

S

E

N

G

E

O

E 34

I

L

R

L

N

S

R O

E

8 2 4 3 7 6 5 9 1

O

D

A

C O

3 7 6 9 5 1 2 4 8

P

S

22

28

A P

O

31

S

7

R

25

S E

V

E

M

P

L O

I

D

20

I

24

N

V

D

E A

6

16

R

H

R

N E

U E

U

R

S

C N

E

19

N

S E

T

S

B 141

5

S

11

N G

N A

B

I

S

F

D

U

36 37

A

E T

N

A

E

U O

E

27

T

B A

U

U

A

F L

B

A S

9

M

U

R

3

12

E M

U

R O

R

E M

E

30

T

T

T 37

L

T

T

35

G

U

A

33

Y

C D

U

36

3

26

27

31

9

23

2 24

1

2 9 7 4 5 4 3 7 5 7 6 4 1

8

9

11

8

5 3 8 1 9 2 4 6 7

E

S

6 1 7 8 3 4 9 5 2

Tri-City Stargazer DECEMBER 21 – DECEMBER 27, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The winter solstice this year is timed at 12:30 a.m. on the 22nd. This is the point of deepest darkness in the northern hemisphere. Ancients celebrated the "return" of the Sun within a few days following the solstice, when it became apparent that it would, indeed, return. On both Hanukkah and Christmas, we celebrate the inner light that never quite goes out, no matter how dark it may seem in the world. We rejoice in the ongoing rebirth of hope for new life within our psyches and on the planet. May each of you experience fresh inspiration and expectation of joy in the year to come! Aries (March 21-April 20): Your frame of mind is more than a little bit maverick at this time. You may be compelled to declare your freedom in every direction. It won’t make a lot of friends on the playground, but this feels truly mandatory now. If your energy is directed toward social justice, there will be many on your side. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Aspects are favored related to education, the law, publishing, the Internet, or your religious organization. Someone is in the background as your “secret” supporter and promoter. You are thinking on your feet right now. All in all, it is a very fine week for the Bulls. Gemini (May 21-June 20): It is of paramount importance that you control your mouth this week. Although you have an opinion about whatever is happening, let it go and say nothing unless asked for it. Being "right" is not as important as maintaining human relations. Later you can take action to correct what you perceive is wrong, but for now you will be challenged to a fight. Cancer (June 21-July 21): Give special attention to unusual mes-

sages or to new people who enter your life during this time. A “teacher” crosses your path in the form of a person, a book, or the right message that will steer you in the next favorable direction. As an aside, it may feel important to organize your closets or files at this time. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You have your eye on the big picture and it looks grand indeed. A word of caution: your optimistic attitude and belief that you are right could cause you to become arrogant. If you want others to join your ride, give them a special place on the wagon. Share the glory. Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): You have a troubling relationship that needs some kind of a finale. You may have a skirmish now that causes you to decide you are done. It is just a bit soon, however, to make an ultimate decision, and something inside you is aware of that. Give it about one more month. Libra (September 23-October 22): Your overall creativity is high at this time. Romance and your social life are given a lift. Avoid

any action that could be construed as an “attack,” whether verbal or physical. It would cost more than the satisfaction is worth. Do not take the initiative in any skirmish. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): There is tension between you and a friend or family member. You are coming closer to a decision on a situation that has been on hold for a few weeks. Somehow, the right solution will evolve if you concentrate upon the reality of who you truly are. Watch your tone of voice; it could easily turn icy. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): You will be issuing opinions many times this week. Your ability to see the big picture is important to those around you. Use absolute discretion when speaking of other persons, lest your statements return to bite you. Aspects are currently positive in the financial department. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): The “rules” and the world’s expectations have you tied up like a pretzel. The harder you struggle, the tighter those binds seem to become. It’s like a Chinese puzzle: sometimes if you relax on

the control issues, the solution comes through. Present the issue to your higher Self and give it some space. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Venus has entered your sign this week and will be traveling "with you" through January 13th. Her presence gives you an air of poise, and people will simply like how you look. She is a people-attractor. Often when Venus is prominent, we become more interested in art forms and things of beauty.

Pisces (February 19-March 20): Aspects favor writing, communing with friends and associates, and even expressing yourself to a greater world than normal. Your ideas are fully grounded and they make sense to a great many people. You have a grasp of the big picture and could use this energy to promote your projects and gain support. Let people know what you think.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

BY SIMON WONG PHOTOS BY SIMON WONG

U

nion City’s Police Explorers deliver gifts and festive cheer to more than 100 Union City families each year. They distribute some presents at the annual Tri-Cities Winter Charity Event at the Purple Lotus School on Ninth Street and deliver the majority to homes throughout Union City. How do they come by these toys? The public can leave donations, marked for the attention of 'Police Explorers,' year-round at Union City Police Department, William M. Cann Memorial Civic Center, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. What is not so apparent is the support of Hayward businessman Gilbert D. Robledo, who owns Gilbert’s Body

Gilbert Robledo (Gilbert’s Body & Paint, Hayward) and Santa (Jeff Orozco, Fremont Chapel of the Roses).

Members of the Bay Bombs Car Club, which awards educational scholarships, proudly displayed their vehicles in support of the toy drive organized by Gilbert’s Body & Paint, Hayward, on December 10, 2011.

nity in which I grew up. I graduated from James Logan High School and have very strong ties to Union City.” More than 500 toys were collected last year; most went to Union City and some to San Jose. Robledo also introduced auctions in 2010 and raised $650. “We linked in with a teen program administered by a church in Hayward and invited seven kids to our staff Christmas party. The kids didn’t know why they were at the shop. We topped off the auction proceeds and my wife and daughter presented each with a $100 gift card at the end of lunch. It was really touching. None of them would have had anything for Christmas,” added Robledo. “This year’s auction proceeds might go to teens or a family. We’ll decide once we have the final count.” This year’s toy drive party lasted from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. with Union City Police Explorers sporting “Toys for Tots” banners and megaphones at the intersection of Industrial Boulevard and Arf Avenue, supervised by Officer Ryan Seto. Santa, aka Jeff Orozco who has worked for Fremont Chapel of the Roses for 22 years, arrived in the funeral home’s famed white, hot-rod hearse with $100 of toys and candy canes from his employer to lend support for the toy drive. This is the first year that Fremont Chapel of the Roses has participated. “The Police Explorers is a program for kids, aged 14-21, interested in law enforcement. They attend two-hour, weekly meetings at the Police Department and community events such as Toys for Tots; they do fingerprinting, ride-along with officers each month and attend two annual comUnion City Police Department Explorers loading wrapped gifts at the petitions in which they’re assessed in scenarios, end of the Toys for Tots toy drive at Gilbert’s Body & Paint, Hayward, such as traffic stops, searches and hostage negotiaon December 10, 2011 tions, which are part of real police work,” said fundraising auctions throughout the day and collec- Seto, advisor to the Union City Police Explorers. “We tion boxes on tables. It is an event at which Bay have a close relationship with Gilbert Robledo; the Bombs Car Club members show off their beautiful families we serve are identified through Centro De vehicles and an opportunity for friends to catch up Servicios and have between one and five children. The with each other. Most hail from Decoto and grew Community Policing & Problem-Solving Unit, the up together. Explorers and Union City command staff will deliver J.J. Amaya (KOHL 89.3 FM), supported by the toys.” Chucky Salinas, provided the playlist and doubled Passing motorists responded. One gentleman doas auctioneer. Robledo, who earned his living as a nated $50. Others went home and returned with drummer across the Bay Area before joining the toys. Andrea Rodrick, who was moving home and military and starting his own busishuttling between Hayward and San Mateo, reness, played a live set with friends. trieved unused toys from her belongings and gener“I started the toy drive on behalf ously donated them. The Police Explorers wrapped of the Marines when I opened my 210 toys and took away another 54 in boxes. business 10 years ago. It was someAdditional donations can be left at Gilbert’s thing I had wanted to do for a long Body & Paint at 2964 Arf Avenue, Hayward, for time. The first year, they delivered a final collection by the Union City Police Explorers collection drum which was still here on December 24. on Christmas Eve and couldn’t be For more information: collected until January because the Marines had been deployed to Iraq. Union City Police Explorers The toys had to go out in time for (510) 471-1365 Christmas so, for the first seven www.UnionCity.org/police/explorers.htm years, I took them to Hayward Fire Department. For the past three Centro De Servicios years, I’ve enjoyed the support of (510) 489-4100 Bay Bombs Car Club of which I’m www.UnionCity.org/community/centro.htm a member. The son of one of my wife’s co-workers is a Union City Bay Bombs Car Club Police Explorer. We collect new toys eastbay@baybombs.com and the Explorers, gently used toys, www.BayBombs.com so we connected with each other,” explained Robledo, a former MaGilbert’s Body & Paint rine. “This arrangement works well (510) 783-0500 because the toys go to the commuwww.GilbertsBodyAndPaint.com & Paint at 2964 Arf Avenue, Hayward, and of the Bay Bombs Car Club. Every December, Union City-born-and bred Robledo closes his business for one day to host a toy drive party though he collects toys from Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve. He and his wife, Dolores, graciously organize food, BBQ, a DJ and live music to entertain guests and supporters. There are


December 20, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

C

elebrated Bay Area attorney and well known former Las Vegas entertainer Richard King sings once again this Christmas season in a free-to-the public cabaret performance. The event will be held at the Oakland Inter-Stake Center adjacent to the Oakland Morman Temple on Wednesday evening, December 21 at 8 p.m. Mr. King’s musical director and accompanist is Steve Pietkiewicz, co-president of the Fremont Symphony Orchestra. Mr. King has performed the leading roles in many Equity-West Coast productions of Broadway musicals including “The Music Man, “Oklahoma!,” “Carousel,” “Guys & Dolls,” “South Pacific,” “No Strings,” “Paint Your Wagon,” “Brigadoon,” “No, No Nanette” and many others. He has performed extensively in cabaret engagements and has performed this Christmas concert for many years. The songs include Christmas music as well as Broadway show tunes. Mr. King has traveled the world many times over as the world President of Rotary International. He serves on a number of boards and has practiced law for 49 years. He is married to the beautiful Cherie Kay King and they have two grown sons.

A Christmas Cabaret Wednesday, December 21 8 p.m. Oakland Inter-Stake Center 4780 Lincoln Ave., Oakland (510) 394-4721 Free

Ohlone College appoints new trustee SUBMITTED BY GOSIA ASHER PHOTO COURTESY OF OHLONE COLLEGE The Ohlone College Board of Trustees appointed a new member to fill an empty spot vacated by the retirement of former trustee Nick Nardolillo on October 30. The new trustee is Ann Crosbie, a resident of Fremont since 1996, who is very involved with education and volunteer organizations in the community. She has served as a board member for the Fremont Education Foundation, Music for Minors II, and StarStruck Theatre, and as the Education Committee Chair for the League of Women Voters, Fremont, Newark and Union City.

Please join us for our Signature Soup Contest on January 28, 2012 at 2pm! Sample our delicious soups and vote for your favorite. This is a free event and space is limited so please RSVP before January 25th. Ann Crosbie

Crosbie describes herself as the daughter of educators and an education advocate, locally and at the state level, having donated her time on several local education committees in Fremont. She is the parent of four school age children, including one who has just completed a semester at Ohlone. Crosbie is currently working on her teaching credential in secondary education and her master’s degree in teaching. She works part time as a substitute teacher in the Fremont schools. The Board advertised for applicants to the position and received 14 applications. Three of the applicants dropped out, so eleven candidates were interviewed at the meeting. After three rounds of balloting, Crosbie emerged as the choice for the new interim trustee. She will hold this position until the elections in November 2012 where the position will be opened to the voters to decide. Crosbie joins the seven-member Board of Trustees of the Ohlone Community College District. The Board meets on the second Wednesday of the month with additional workshops as needed. The yearly calendar, agendas, and archived minutes of the meetings are available on the Board’s web page at www.ohlone.edu/board.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Local heroes honored SUBMITTED BY JEFF BARBOSA Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) honored outstanding community heroes and organizations from throughout the 20th Assembly District during an Address and Awards Ceremony Thursday, December 15, at James Logan High School’s Center for the Performing Arts, 1800 H Street in Union City. Wieckowski also reviewed his legislative accomplishments for his first year in the state Legislature, and highlighted priorities for the 2012 session. “In my first year I was able to pass some critical bills for cleaning up hazardous sites to protect our environment,” Wieckowski said. “I also worked to eliminate barriers to job creation with my Made in California package and partnered with local chambers of commerce to provide forums on how to put more Californians back to work. There is a lot of work to be done to maintain California’s stature as a global leader in innovation. I am looking forward to working on a number of issues to stimulate our economy, preserve our environment and better serve those who are struggling in these difficult times.” Wieckowski honored key leaders in the 20th Assembly District who have dedicated themselves to

improving the quality of life for local residents. “Each of these honorees has put in countless hours of their own time to help their neighbors,” Wieckowski said. “They have stepped up to assist others and to make our community a better place to live and work.” The honorees include: Traci Cross – Castro Valley Local Hero Obray Van Buren – Hayward Local Hero Makhan Singh Bains – Union City Local Hero Shirley Sisk – Newark Local Hero Rennu Dhillon – Fremont Local Hero Joyce and Robert M. Shapiro – Pleasanton Local Heroes Thelma Boac – San Jose Local Hero Milpitas Firefighters IAFF Local 1699 – Milpitas Local Heroes Avanzando (Newark) – Outstanding Organization Award Citizens for Better Community – Community Partner of the Year Jeevan Zutshi – Unity Award One Child – Non-Profit of the Year Steve Waterhouse – Distinguished Service Award

groups, and while one half shopped with officers and Target employees, the other half made crafts, played games, got their faces painted, sat on a police motorcycle and met a police K-9. Decorated foam picture frames were created to display pictures of the kids with their officer. Santa Claus and the

officers to give back other than law enforcement.” Sergeant Bobbitt says there’s more to being a cop than providing safety, and this event gives them an opportunity to interact with young kids in a positive way. Matthiesen agrees. She says you don’t know what these kids and their family’s experience has been with the police, and the event not only gives kids the gift of giving, but also affords a positive interaction with police enforce-

Half Price Books mascot BW Bookworm were also a part of the festivities. “It gets more elaborate every year,” says Police Department Community Engagement Specialist and event organizer Martha Matthiesen. New games and shampoo, toothbrushes, and toothpaste for the families were this year’s new additions. “Shop with a Cop” is supported entirely by grants and donations. Matthiesen says she starts applying for grants in the summer and planning for the event begins in September. $50 is allocated for

ment, reinforcing that they are there to help. “I love this program,” says Sergeant Bobbitt, whose son was in high school when “Shop with a Cop” started and now is helping as a cop himself. There is never any shortage of officers wanting to participate; it is an established favorite of the department and people have to be turned away. When asked about future hopes for the program, Sergeant Bobbitt and Matthiesen say they would love to be able to provide holiday meal vouchers or groceries for the families. “This is a great start to their holiday season,” says Sergeant Bobbitt, and it would be wonderful if they could not only provide presents, but the holiday meal to go with them. Once the shopping has been completed, carts are taken to a wrapping station where kids and volunteers wrap their family’s presents. The gifts are bagged up and later taken to the Family Resource Center to be picked up by the families. After enjoying a lunch donated by Outback Restaurant, it’s back to the books for the kids, but the snowmen and Christmas trees will glitter on their cheeks for a little while longer, and the day will certainly be one they’ll never forget. For the police department the motivation and payoff is simple: “We have touched the lives of nearly 100 families over the first seven years of this event, and we hope to continue this tradition of giving back to more Fremont families in the future. The Fremont Police Department is honored to have the opportunity to brighten the holiday experience for 20 families in our community.”

Police give kids the gift of giving STORY AND PHOTOS BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Each Christmas the Fremont Police Department provides local children with the best gift of the season - the gift of giving. In partnership with Target Stores, Mission San Jose Rotary, Fremont Police Association, and Fremont Bank, the eighth annual “Shop with a Cop” was held Wednesday, December 7. The event gives 20 kids a pass from school to go Christmas shopping for their family at the Target in the Hub Shopping Center in Fremont. Participants are selected by the Human Services Department of the Family Resource Center, whose counselors work with families needing services in areas such as education, legal, medical, and employment. Participation level and the needs of the family are taken into account when determining nominations for “Shop with a Cop.” Goals are created for the family and they must be active in helping to help themselves. Those nominated must be six to eight years of age, attend school in Fremont, and be a current client of the Resource Center or Youth and Family Services. Once kids are chosen, they and their family members put together a wish list for the shopping day, and the police department notifies the schools of the event and kids involved. When the happy day arrived, kids were picked up from school in patrol cars sporting antlers and Rudolph noses and chauffeured to a large white tent in the Target parking lot where Christmas music, Starbucks hot chocolate, and breakfast welcomed them. A picture of each kid and their officer was snapped by a Christmas tree decorated with envelopes bearing their names and containing gift cards for their shopping trip. But the day’s gifts weren’t only for others - a nearby table was piled with bright red Target bags filled with presents purchased in advance from the kids’ own wish lists. Half Price Books also donated a book for each child. After a welcome and rundown of the day’s workings from Sergeant Fred Bobbitt, the shopping began. Kids were split into

each child and $35 to $50 for each family member. Generous contributions and participation in the event were given by Target Stores, Mission San Jose Rotary, Fremont Police Officer Association, Fremont Bank, Outback Restaurant, Starbucks, Half Price Books, Irvington Business Association, and employees of the Fremont Police Department. In addition to cordoning off a section of their parking lot for the event, Target donated wrapping supplies and provided helpers to aid the kids in purchasing their gifts. “They support us big time,” says Matthiesen. “We love Target and they love us.” Sergeant Fred Bobbitt has been involved with “Shop with a Cop” from the beginning. “It’s great for the kids but it’s also great for the

Page 19


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Connect with us on Facebook Fremont Economic Development

December 20, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesday, Dec 21

Mission Gold Jazz Band

7 - 9 p.m.

A great place to see holiday lights in Newark on the corner of Gum and Peachtree. Set your radio to 87.9 and the lights dance to the music.

An evening of danceable Dixieland jazz. Food, bar, music, dance floor. No cover (pass the hat)

Swiss Park 5911 Mowry Ave., Newark (510)793-6279 (510) 657-0243 Thursday, Dec 22

Tri-City Voice Contest!

Thursday Afternoon Dance

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

2 - 4 p.m. Music by the Dick Green Band featuring country, 50's & 60's

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 Saturday, Dec 24

"The Man from Beyond" $

7:30 p.m. Film, with "Broncho Billy's Christmas Dinner" (1911), "Hearts and Diamonds" (1914)

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411 www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

Starting in January, look for the Crossword Puzzle Contest! Solve the puzzles by looking through the advertisements and you could win valuable prizes. There will be a contest crossword in one Tuesday edition and one Friday edition every month. Winners will be drawn at random from each month’s correctly completed entries— turning in both of the month’s crosswords will increase your odds of winning! Winners will be announced in the Tri-City Voice.

Saturday, Dec 24

Trekking for Tracks

1 p.m. Discover and identify tracks of our nocturnal friends; Park Admission fee.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Dec 24

Family Service with Pageant and Communion

4 p.m. Children of all ages participate in a pageant with carols

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492 Saturday, Dec 24

Carols and Festive Service

10:30 p.m. Singing carols followed by traditional service

St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont (510) 797-1492

Subscribe

A positive path for spiritual living

Welcome New Spiritual Leader KEN DAIGLE

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

continued from page 1

rooster.” The tradition’s roots reach back to Mexico in the late 1500s, when the Pope granted permission for mass to be held out-of-doors at Christmas time because church buildings could not contain all of the people attending the evening mass. It is also said to have been arranged to accommodate the farmers who had to be out in their fields by dawn; the workers appeared noticeably tired at the evening masses after their long day. From December 16 through 24, Catholic churches welcome devoted early risers to prayers, songs, and Scripture readings. It is common to see a reenactment of the “panuluyan,” the journey of Mary and Joseph to find a birthplace for Jesus. A nativity scene, or “belen,” is an important focus of the celebration, complete with shepherds, farm animals, wise men, and the guiding

star of Bethlehem. After the mass, food stalls outside the church offer traditional treats such as bibingka (rice cakes topped with carabao cheese and grated coconut), hot pandesal (breakfast roll), and puto bungbong (purple glutinous rice cakes steamed in bamboo cylinders sprinkled with grated coconut and brown sugar) along with cups of coffee or salabat (ginger tea). When the final mass of the season has come to a close, families return home to celebrate Noche Buena with foods such as lechon (roasted pig), lumpia, pancit, kare-kare (oxtail stew in peanut butter sauce), rellenong manok (baked stuffed chicken), barbecue, rice, adobo, and Western and native rice cakes. Christmas in the Philippines is celebrated with colorful lights and parols (lanterns) illuminating

buildings inside and out, and Christmas songs maintain the festive spirit. Colored streamers, wreaths, and candles are common decorations, but the parol is the symbol of the Philippine Christmas, which represents the star of Bethlehem, as well as the warmth and hospitality of the season. While an anticipation and celebration of Christ’s birth, Simbang Gabi is also seen as a time for people to request blessings. Many believe that if one attends every morning mass, then what they have asked for will be granted. It is also a special time that strengthens family ties and faith in God. But whatever the mass attendance or wishes made, the gift of Jesus and blessings of the season are available to all, and are joyful reminders of the true riches found in Him. Maligayang Pasko (Merry Christmas)! Simbang Gabi December, 16 - 24 5 a.m. Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-1660 December, 16 - 24 5 a.m. St. Edward Church 5788 Thornton Ave. (near Cedar Blvd.), Newark (510) 797-0241

Happy Holidays performance

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

SUBMITTED BY MS. TIFFANY HARMAN Scribbles Montessori School and Montessori School of Centerville in Fremont share holiday performances with the community at the Winter Concert with the Santa, singing, dancing, and leadership every year. Happy Holidays & Happy New Year!

New Bridges Presbyterian Church Announcements If you need help, come to our Outreach Center at 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward and talk to the Director of South Hayward Parish. Every Tuesday, Thursday and Friday food is distributed from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m. At the Worship Center, 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward Saturday, December 24: 7 p.m., Candlelight service of Lessons and Carols Sunday, December 25 10 a.m., Christmas Day, worship; favorite Christmas toys will be blessed


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

continued from page 1

hours using complex mathematics to figure out what the sky looked like on any particular night. The only drawback was that their calculations could only pinpoint a single day in time, at a time. Today however, simple computer programs and even smart phone apps take these same calculations and, in seconds, map out the sky in any place on Earth, thousands of years in the past or future. With these extraordinary tools, only one key thing is missing… the date(s) to search. Upon hearing of Jesus' birth, King Herod ordered that all male children under three years of age be killed throughout the land. King Herod himself died shortly after Jesus’ birth. Taking that into consideration, scholars studying manuscripts held by the British Library in London have determined Herod's death at 1 B.C. With that as a starting point, it is feasible to determine that Jesus was born between 5 and 2 B.C. Were any other physical phenomenon applicable during that time? Star? A star is a ball of fiery gas. Our own sun is a star. A new star can appear at any given point in the night sky. The star the Magi followed rose and set in the east each evening, keeping in line with the rest of the celestial bodies. But the problem is this: Had a star bright enough and situated over Bethlehem suddenly appeared, it would still be there, and there isn’t one. Planet? Even an untrained astronomical eye can see and tell the difference between a star and a planet. Planets move and change positions night after night behind the relatively stable stars. Had the Magi (professional astronomers themselves who would never make such a mistake) been following a planet, they would have ended up zig-zagging through the desert, never reaching their destination. Meteor? Commonly called a shooting star, a meteor is particles or rocks that burn up through our atmosphere. They race across the sky and although a sight to see, usually only last a few seconds before disappearing. It's safe to say the Bethlehem Star was not a meteor. Comet? Comets are among the most impressive astronomical objects to see. Like planets in our solar system, comets orbit the sun and for the most part are very predictable. For example, the famous Halley's Comet has been faithfully putting on a show for Earth viewers every 75.5 years. For the Magi, the return of a predictable comet would not be important enough to fol-

low. A new comet might peak interest, but according to searches in computer programs, there were no comets viewable from Earth between 5 and 2 B.C. Furthermore, the Chinese, who still hold ancient writings and astronomical records, also mention that no visible comets sailed by the Earth during those years. Nova? A nova is a very rare event that could have definitely been attributed as the Bethlehem Star. A nova is a star that explodes. At the end of their lives, stars begin to lose their nuclear energy and simply explode. In some instances and depending on the proximity to Earth, the brightness could be a celestial show like any other. The last major nova explosion on record happened in 1054. This nova, leaving behind what can now be seen through a telescope as the Crab Nebulae, was bright enough to be seen during the day for 23 days and remained the brightest object in the night sky (aside from the moon) for the next two years. No novas were visible from Earth between 5 and 2 B.C. So where does that leave this entire debate? Planets by themselves zig-zag from night to night and should be ruled out. Regular stars are nothing out of the ordinary. But what about a combination of both? A conjunction in space is when two or more objects align between each other, making the star or object in the front appear brighter than normal. Could this be the answer? It's highly likely. As it turns out, Jupiter (a very bright planet on its own) took the time to waltz though the night sky with a very bright star called Regulus. For months, the planet and the star carried on this dance that would have definitely caught the Magis’ eyes. Jupiter eventually reached full retrograde, giving it the appearance of stopping right in front of Regulus; a celestial phenomenon that viewed by a Magi in Jerusalem would have appeared as a bright object resting in the sky right above the little town of Bethlehem. The date… December 25, 2 B.C. Believing the legitimacy of the Christmas story is up to the individual. But there is no denying the fact that you can't fake what happened in the night sky. The proof is there for anyone to see with their own eyes on a computer or iPad screen. Whatever explanation might be ascribed to that light, that wondrous star has stayed with us through the ages, serving as a symbol of guidance, hope, and great joy. Merry Christmas!

Summer Camp in the middle of winter A two-night, three day camp program is the perfect solution to your child care needs over the New Year. Now you can celebrate and so can your kids. Camp includes meals, activities, supervision by our amazing YMCA summer camp staff and CILTs, and accommodations in modern, heated cabins with attached restroom facilities.

Help make dreams come true

Dec 30, 2011-Jan. 1, 2012 The YMCA at Camp Arroyo 5535 Arroyo Rd., Livermore (925) 455-7975 Kids ages 7-14 $179 for Y members, $199 for non-members

SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE RELUCIO

At Eden Housing, we make a positive difference in the daily lives of our residents by providing the extra help they need to achieve self-sufficiency, economic stability and a better quality of life. The Nguyen family moved to Eden Palms 15 years ago. With four boys, the family is grateful for Eden Housing's youth programs including Digital Connectors technology and leadership training. With the help of Eden Housing scholarships, Quoc-Sy completed his undergraduate degree at U.C. Berkeley and is studying to be a doctor at Drexel University College of Medicine. At age 16, Bill has just received a full scholarship to Columbia University. "Thank you Eden Housing for providing me with the resources to fulfill my dreams," says Bill. Your contribution, at any level, will make a difference for families like the Nguyens: $25 provides a backpack and school supplies for one child; $50 buys one month of Internet access at a resident computer center; $100 buys a tool kit for a digital connector to provide technology assistance for the community; $500 provides one week of educational, enrichment, and recreational opportunities for youth; and $1,000 provides a scholarship for educational or career advancement. Donations may be made online at www.EdenHousing.org (click on the “Contribute” link) or by mailing a check made payable to Eden Housing to Eden Housing, Attention: Fund Development, 22645 Grand Street, Hayward, CA 94541. Thank you for your consideration during this holiday season. For more information or questions, contact Catherine Relucio at (510) 582-1460 or crelucio@edenhousing.org. Nguyen family, Eden Palms.

Page 23


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

MVU 00 Girls win NorCal Premier Soccer State Cup SUBMITTED BY MONICA CONTI Fremont’s competitive soccer team, Mission Valley United 00

came back with a game tying goal from Rachel Lin. With 10 minutes left in the game, Rachel Lin was fouled in the box and sent the penalty kick firmly into the lower

The next weekend, on a foggy field, MVU faced the Briceno Soccer Club 00/01 Girls for the Championship. The game started with a flourish; a cross and nice

MVU-00-GIRLS-BLACK - Back Row (LtoR):Team Managers Irene Rodriguez and Cassie van de Graaf; Payton Porter, Kimiya Ganjooi, Tara Conti, Jolie Poulet, Lorin Moyer, Natalie Rodgers and Coach Ricky Clarke. Front Row (LtoR): Darya Rasoli, Kylie McNamara, Samantha van de Graaf, Gabriella Funk, Mary Gaffey. Not pictured: Rachel Lin.

Fremont National Youth Baseball Signups All Pee Wee, Micro, and Minor games are played at Brier Elementary while our Major and Senior divisions play around the corner at Walters Jr. High. FNYB has a “must play” rule, so no player is ever left out. Modified Little League rules apply to all divisions. Division Breakdown and 2012 fees: • PEE WEE (5-6): $80 Coach pitch division (not T-ball), 5 pitches to hit ball, no score kept • MICRO (7-8): $100 Coach pitch division, score and standings are kept, 6 innings • MINOR (9-10): $125 Player pitch division, 6 innings, 60-ft. baseline • MAJOR (11-12): $150 70-ft.

baseline, 7 innings • SENIOR (13-14): TBD Travel team, 90-ft baseline, 7 innings, metal spikes allowed (Player age is determined by age as of April 30th of that year) SIGNUP DATES (10AM-2PM AT BRIER ELEMENTARY): DECEMBER 10* JANUARY 7 JANUARY 14 JANUARY21 JANUARY 22 JANUARY 28 JANUARY 29 *Early bird signups receive $20 off registration fees •Discounts are available for families with more than one player •A copy of your child’s birth certificate is required at registration WWW.FNYB.NET

Girls Black won the U11 NorCal State Cup. The team coached by Ricky Clarke blasted their way through the Preliminary and State Seeding rounds by earning 59 out of a possible 60 points and not allowing a single goal. This gave them the first place seed in the Girls White – Silver grouping. The final rounds of the tournament were held at the Woodward Park Field in Manteca over the first three weekends in December. For their quarterfinal match, the MVU girls faced the Willow SC Estrellitas in an early morning match on frozen turf. MVU took a 1-0 lead when Kimiya Ganjooi got one under the goalie’s hands and into the net. The Willow SC Estrellitas came back with a game tying goal with the half ending 11. After the Estrellitas took a 2-1 lead, MVU played strong and

Logan HS Boys Basketball Report SUBMITTED BY COACH CHRISTOPHER FORTENBERRY December 14 Non- League Game: Logan 68, Skyline 79 Logan (3 - 5, 0 - 0 MVAL) Bell 1 0-0 2, Agbayani 2 0-0 4, Kaye 8 5-7 21, Mundeke 7 0-1 19, Torain 3 0-0 9, Wilson 2 0-0 5, Dhahan 2 0-0 4, Leno 2 0-0 4. Totals: 27 5-8 68 Skyline (5 - 3, 0 - 0 OAL) Payne 2 0-2 4, Barker 6 0-0 12, Jones 3 1-2 7, Golson 7 6-8 21, P. Davis 7 9-12 24, Adams 1 1-2 3, A. Davis 1 0-0 2, Maxie 3 0-1 6. Totals: 30 17-29 79 Logan 19 Skyline 21

16 -19 --

23 68 14 79

10 25

3-pt goals: Mundeke 5, Torain 3, Wilson 1, Golson 1, Davis 1 Foul Outs: 1 Agbayani Techinical Fouls: 1 Coach Fortenberry

corner of the net, giving MVU a 3-2 lead. The girls held on for the rest of the game for the win. The following morning, in the semifinal match, MVU battled the Piedmont SC Highlanders. Halfway through the first half, MVU took a 1-0 lead with a goal from Kimiya Ganjooi assisted by Rachel Lin to finish the half 1-0. About 12 minutes into the second half, Kimiya Ganjooi centered the ball to Gabriella Funk, who launched a shot through the defense and past the goalie for a 2-0 lead. Just two minutes later, Rachel Lin worked the ball down the sideline and centered the ball to Jolie Poulet, who scored and put MVU up 3-0. The game continued with unrelenting defensive plays from Kylie McNamara, Payton Porter, Samantha van de Graaf and goalie Lorin Moyer, resulting in another shutout win, 3-0.

header attempt from Darya Rasoli. MVU continued to pound away with many shots at goal, but without any finding the back of the net. Late in the first half, Garbriella Funk, Tara Conti and Kimiya Ganjooi worked together to keep possession of the ball and Kimiya Ganjooi sent a powerful shot right over the goalie’s outstretched hands, putting MVU up 1-0. During the second half, MVU were not foiled by Briceno as they tried some tricks they had up their sleeve. MVU had many near misses at goal, including ones from Mary Gaffey and Natalie Rodgers. But in the end, the defense of Kylie McNamara, Patyon Porter, Samantha van de Graaf and goalie Lorin Moyer held Briceno scoreless. MVU won the Championship game 1-0 and ended their State Cup run undefeated, with eight shutouts.

ICC excels at national championships SUBMITTED BY RAJUL SHETH Congratulations to all ICC members for their excellent showing at the 2011 US National Championship at Virginia Beach, December 13-17. The 2011 Men's Singles champion is Peter Li and Women's Singles champion is Fremont native, Ariel Hsing. For more information, visit http://indiacc.org/tabletennis

Newark Memorial VS Washington (Fremont) December 14, 2011 Match Summary: 120 Marlin Hess (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 126 Eric Tolbertson (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 132 Christopher Arce (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Gabriel Champion (Washington) 138 Jacob Pratt (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Zackory Morton (Washington) 145 Trevor Hubby (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Waleed Salemi (Washington) 152 Anthony Rubio (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Joseph Dereis (Washington) 160 Anthony Pietrobono (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Billal Nawabi (Washington) 170 Victor Pereira (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 182 Patrick Craig (Newark Memorial) won by pin over Elijah Johnson (Washington) 195 Andrew Zeigler (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 220 Beny Nevarez (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 285 Elmer Hamidy (Newark Memorial) won by decision over Jorge Garcia (Washington) 106 Anthony Thepsaikone (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit 113 Randy Tran (Newark Memorial) won by forfeit


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 25

James Logan vs Mission San Jose SUBMITTED BY JAMES WILLIAMS December 14 James Logan 3, Mission San Jose 0 1st Half Scoring: Rodolfo Esquivias (Anthony Gonzalez) 10:00 2nd Half Scoring: Juan Carlos Romero-Pacheco 68:00, Carlos Nunez (Juan Carlos Romero-Pacheco) 76:00

Cougar wrestlers look good SUBMITTED BY TIM HESS Congratulations to the Newark Memorial High School Cougar Wrestling Team for placing third out of 25 teams at the Marty Manges Wrestling Invitational at Casa Roble HS in Orangevale, CA on December 17. The Cougars were only four points away from the team title! Ponderosa finished first and Del Oro was second. Newark had four individual champions: 126 lbs Anthony Arce; 138 lbs Jacob Pratt; 145 lbs Trevor Hubby and 170 lbs Victor Pereira. Elmer Hamidy 285 lbs placed second while 106 lbs Randy Tran and 152 lbs Anthony Rubio were awarded third place. At 195 lbs, Andrew Zeigler finished in 7th place.

Goalies: JL: Kyle Doser, 80 Min, 3 Saves, 0 Goals Against MSJ: Eamon Jahani, 80 Min, 4 Saves, 3 goals Against JL Record: 4-3-3

Two VTA buses stuffed with 5,300 Toys

SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS

O

n Saturday, December 10, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) partnered with the United States Marine Corps for the annual Toys for Tots Drive. This year's “Stuff the VTA Bus” event featured an awe-inspiring turnout from the community, resulting in a total of 5,300 toys and $600 in cash donations! The VTA hybrid bus staged near Christmas in the

Park in downtown San Jose was filled to capacity by 1 p.m., just five short hours after the event began. To top that, a second VTA bus was provided and by the event's end at 5 p.m. the bus was filled three-quarters of the way full. “Thanks to the local support from our amazing community, thousands of toys are just waiting to meet their new owners come Christmas Day,” said Sergeant Daniel P. Best. “It doesn’t surprise me one bit,” said VTA General Manager Michael Burns. “Our community always shows

overwhelming generosity through toy and cash donations, customarily outdoing themselves from previous years.” VTA and the U.S. Marine Corps thank each and every person who came out this weekend to donate bikes, dolls, toys, books and cash donations. Because of you, children who may not expect to receive a gift this year will have one to open this Christmas holiday!

Support for HIV/AIDS testing SUBMITTED BY JESSIE MANGALIMAN A Tri-City non-profit that provides mobile HIV testing in nightclubs and motels has received a $75,000 grant from Kaiser Permanente to expand its outreach to African-American Latino youth, a population group disproportionately affected by the AIDS epidemic. Tri-City Health Center, which serves Fremont, Hayward and also Oakland and Livermore, will use the grant to expand HIV testing to AfricanAmerican and Latino young gay men, day laborers, and transgender youth. Last year, Tri-City tested and counseled nearly 1,400 youth in Alameda County. “These funds are instrumental in helping Tri-City Health complete the work that we do on HIV/AIDS prevention and education in the community,” said Juliana Schirmer, development director of Tri-City Health Center. “State funding for HIV/AIDS education and testing have been radically cut in recent years and we’re now looking to our community partners to provide the necessary funds that allow us to continue providing these much needed services.”

Andrew Navarro, of Tri-City Health Center, demonstrates a rapid HIV test that uses fluid from the mouth for testing.The test produces results in 20 minutes. Credit: Dolores Radding, Kaiser Permanente


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Newark City Council

Fremont City Council

Union City City Council

Fremont City Council December 13, 2011

Newark City Council December 15, 2011

Union City City Council December 13, 2011

Consent: Approve new city park standard details and landscape standard details Approve Development Fee Impact Report for FY 2010/11 License ingress and egress for driveway aisle at 39155 State Street Authorize Patterson House design and engineering rehabilitation in the amount of $99,676 to Garavalia Architecture, Inc. Approve grant application to San Francisco Foundation for Senior Support activities

Special meeting was held to consider the method to fill the council vacancy due to the election of Alan Nagy as Mayor. It was decided due to cost and time considerations to follow a pattern – appointment process - used in 2007 to fill a council vacancy. Request for applications and particulars can be found in this issue of Tri-City Voice. Mayor Nagy asked for approval of councilmember appointments to boards and commissions. Re-Appointments made to Planning Commission (Glen Kramer, William Fitts) Appointment of William Spinola to Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District Appoint Ana Apodaca to Alameda County Housing Commission

Proclamations and Presentations: Recognize Finelite, Inc. for 2011 Stopwaste Partnership Leadership Award Honor Police Chief Gregory Stewart upon his retirement December 30, 2011 Appointment of Pat Gacoscos as Vice Mayor

Scheduled Items: General Plan update and certification. With some reservations and a provision to allow submission of a plan to develop Kimber Park open space by March for review, the General Plan was approved. It was noted that the General Plan is open to revision throughout its 20-year span. (4-1, Dutra oppose)* Allow parking reductions within Zoning Text Amendments for targeted needs groups 4-0-1 (Chan recuse)* Clean Technology Business Tax exemption through December 31, 2016. Consider adding language to include biotech businesses. Continue reduction of Development Impact Fees: Payment will be 50% of schedule in Midtown, 75% in Central Business District and 90% elsewhere in the City. Consider a special study to allow relaxation of City guidelines for large family day care facilities. 4-1 (Dutra oppose)* Reports: Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan and Councilmember Bill Harrison reported that they were able to visit with several members of congress during a City-sponsored trip to Washington, D.C. Mayor Bob Wasserman Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Bill Harrison Suzanne Lee Chan Dominic Dutra

Aye Aye Aye Aye* Aye*

Mayor Al Nagy Vice Mayor Ana Apodaca Luis Freitas Sucy Collazo

Yes Yes Yes Yes

City Council seeks applicants to fill vacancy SUBMITTED BY NEWARK CITY CLERK SHEILA HARRINGTON The Newark City Council is seeking qualified applicants to fill a vacancy caused by the election of Council Member Nagy to the position of Mayor. The appointee will fill the unexpired City Council Member term which will end in November 2013. Official application forms are available on the City's website at www.newark.org or by contacting the City Clerk's office at 37101 Newark Boulevard, 5th floor, (510) 578-4266, sheila.harrington@newark.org. Obtaining the application from the city website is highly encouraged since City Hall offices will be closed from December 23, 2011 through January 2, 2012. Applicants must provide a typewritten statement of no more than 200 words per numbered category addressing the following: (1) why you want to be appointed to the Newark City Council; (2) your familiarity with City of Newark's organization and projects; (3) prior governmental, political, occupational, community service, or volunteer experience; (4) applicable education; and (5) your view of the City's budgetary priorities. Applicants must be a Newark resident and a registered voter at the time the application is filed. Original applications must be signed by the applicant and received in the City Clerk's Office before 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 5, 2012.

Consent Calendar: Accept and appropriate the 2010 Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) funds from the Federal Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance for Radio Equipment and Professional Services Authorize a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) to establish the Bay Area Regional Interoperable Communications System (BayRICS) Replace the Animal Control Vehicle Accept the Audited Financial Statements and other required reports of the Agency for FY 09-10 City Manager reports: Authorize a Right-of-Entry and Due Diligence Agreement with Windflower Properties LLC and Direct the Developer and Staff to present a Report to the City Council in March 2012 Adopt a Resolution to approve the 2010 Association of Bay Area Governments report "Taming Natural Disasters" as the City of Union City's Local Hazard Mitigation Plan (LHMP) and adapt it to prepare for rather than react to disasters Authorize an amendment to the FY 201112 Adopted Budget and Fiscal Year 2011-12 1st Quarter (QTR) Report on Budget to Actual Results for the Period of July 1 through September 30, 2011

Mayor Mark Green Vice Mayor Pat Gacoscos Jim Navarro Emily Duncan Lorrin Ellis

Ohlone College Trustees select redistricting plan Ohlone College Trustees voted at their December 14 meeting to change the way voters will elect trustees to positions on the Board. The changes will begin to take effect as early as the next Board election in November 2012. Under the current election plan, seven trustees represent two areas. Five trustees come from the City of Fremont and a small portion of Union City (comprised of nine voter precincts in the southern end of Union City.) Two trustees are elected from the City of Newark. However, based on new data from the 2010 Census, redistricting is required to give more equal representation to voters based on current population. In the plan selected at last night’s Board meeting, the District will be divided into two areas, which are divided East/West by 880. Residents of Area 1, which includes all of the City of Newark and the western portion of Fremont and Union City, can elect two candidates to the Board of Trustees. Residents of Area 2, which includes the remainder of Fremont and Union City that lie east of 880, can elect five trustees. Candidates must reside in the area from which they run, however, voters from both areas may vote for all candidates running, regardless of the area in which they live.

City of Fremont Board/Commission Vacancies Economic Development Advisory Commission – One vacancy (Commercial/Industrial) Term to expire 12/31/2014 George W. Patterson House Advisory Board – One vacancy (Citizen At Large) Term to expire 12/31/2013 Historical Architectural Review Board – Two vacancies Terms to expire 12/31/2015 Human Relations Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014 Library Advisory Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2014 Planning Commission – One vacancy Term to expire 12/31/2015 Advisory Body Applications can be obtained at: http://www.fremont.gov/index.aspx?NID=76 or you may obtain an application from the City Clerk’s Office, 3300 Capitol Ave, Bldg A, 510-284-4060

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 27

The end of the world

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

WILLIAM MARSHAK

D

ecember 21 marks a point in time – winter solstice - when daylight hours, once again, slowly begin to lengthen. Even as winter’s grasp is still firmly in control, daylight minutes expand in an inexorable march toward spring and summer. As I look forward to the change, others mark the time as a beginning of the end. Dire predictions based on the Mayan Calendar, alignment of planets and solar flares are simply part of the annual landscape of life. The political scene is among the interesting times approaching this year as local elections loom and the economy struggles to snap out of its nadir. In the midst of the darkness of winter, lights glisten from holiday celebrations and remind us all that hope pervades even the gloomiest corners. The end of times is the beginning of times!

In the 1989 film, Parenthood, a combination of wackiness, sadness, hope, failure, and frustration culminate in grandma’s conclusion "that a ride could make me so frightened, so scared, so sick, so excited and so thrilled all together... some didn't like it... they went on the merry-go-round... that just goes around... nothing... I like the rollercoaster... you get more out of it." So, tighten up your seat belts because 2012 promises to be quite a ride on the local scene and beyond. While there is plenty to criticize in our neck of the woods, citizen involvement appears to be on the rise and that is always a good thing. As an example, activism displayed by the Kimber Park neighborhood demonstrates a strong fabric that forms the bedrock of our communities. As each area struggles with issues that are of greatest concern, the lesson is clear to all that a vibrant and sturdy society is built on vigilance and strong conviction. Each election cycle allows citizens to express their collective thoughts and make critical decisions. The choice will be growing along with the length of the days; it is time to begin noting what your leaders say and do, making sure they are accountable for their actions.

rather than fear and loneliness. It is with this wish of optimism and anticipation that we enjoy whatever holiday is celebrated in our household and take pleasure in the ride of our lives. Parenthood again strikes the proper note when the patriarch who has much to learn about the consequences of his choices in life, notes, "There's no goal line in parenting, no end zone where you spike the ball and that's it . . ." The football touchdown dance and spiking the ball are illusions which, while pleasurable, simply lead to additional challenges. So, as we move toward a New Year and spike the ball in the 2011 end zone, the world is not ending; the roller coaster is just getting ready for another lap around the track!

A new report, “All Over the Map,” was recently released by Change the Equation (CTEq), a network of more than 100 CEOs dedicated to creating widespread literacy in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), at the National Governor Association’s STEM Summit in Durham, N.C. For the first time, researchers put state definitions of “proficiency” in eighth-grade science against a common measuring stick – the 2009 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) eighth-grade science test. NAEP is a project of the U.S. Department of Education that measures student knowledge and achievement nationally. The results are startling. What one state may deem to be “proficient” may be classified as “basic” or well below grade level in another. Fifteen states have set the bar for “proficiency” below NAEP’s threshold for “basic” knowledge. Only four states have set the bar near or above NAEP’s bar for proficiency. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi have more rigorous performance standards for students

FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

William Marshak PUBLISHER

The holiday season sends light into the darkness of long nights which become a symbol of hope and merriment

than states like Connecticut, New York and Maryland that are generally thought to have high-quality, competitive schools. “Nationally, we do not have a common understanding or agreement of what it means to be proficient in eighth-grade science,” said Linda Rosen, Ph.D., CEO of Change the Equation. “We’re sounding the alarm to say that without meaningful definitions of proficiency, parents and teachers are not getting an accurate picture of student progress. Students can be falling behind and may not know it until it is too late.” Virginia has the lowest definition of “proficient,” followed by Tennessee, Michigan, North Carolina, Iowa, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Georgia, Maryland, Texas, Oregon, South Carolina, California and Arizona. All have set their definitions for achievement below NAEP’s standard for “basic” science learning. Just four states— Louisiana, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire—are at or above NAEP’s standard for proficiency. While parents, teachers and administrators believe that young people are learning, students may actually be in danger of falling

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina

U.S. student science achievement varies by state SUBMITTED BY STACEY MINK

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

behind in science. Two-thirds of the states studied in “All Over the Map” determined that most of their students are proficient in eighth-grade science. But ACT, which administers standardized tests to measure high school achievement and college entrance, found that only 13 percent of eighth-graders nationally were prepared for college science. And U.S. students are falling behind internationally. They rank significantly behind 12 other developed nations and ahead of only nine on an international test of 15 year-olds’ achievement in science. Working with the respected American Institutes for Research (AIR), CTEq compared the passing scores that states set on their 2009 eighth-grade science tests required by federal law with the scale that NAEP established for its own test. “All Over the Map” examines 37 states for which data was available. For full results and more information about the methodology, visit www.changetheequation.org/scienceproficiency. For more information about the work of Change the Equation, visit www.changetheequation.org.

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Catherine Kirch Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL SUMMONS (CITATION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (Numero del Caso) FCS038346 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (Aviso a Acusado): RUSSELL L. BISHOP, BANG DUONG and DOES 1 through 10 inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (A Ud. le esta demandando): JAGDISH GOSWAMI and TAHEREH ALAVI You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons is served on you to file a typewritten response at this court. A letter or phone call will not protect you; your typewritten response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book). Despues de que le entreguen esta citacion judicial usted tiene un plazo de 30 DIAS CALENDARIOS para presentar una respuesta escrita a maquina en esta corte. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no le ofrecerá protección; su respuesta escrita o a maquina tiene que cumplir con las formalidades legales apropiadas si usted quiere que la corte escuche su caso. Si usted no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso, y le pueden quitar su salario, su dinero y otras cosas de su propiedad sin aviso adicional por parte de la corte. Existen otros requisitos legales. Puede que usted quiera llamar un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce un abogado, puede llamar un servicio de referencia de abogados o una oficina de ayuda legal (vea el directorio telefonico). The name and address of the court is: (El Nombre y direccion de la corte es) Solano County Superior Court, 600 Union Ave., Fairfield, CA 94533 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es) Michael W. Jansen 1301 College Street, Woodland, CA 95695 DATE (Fecha): August 11, 2011, By: G. Robins, Deputy (Delegado) (SEAL) 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10/12 CNS-2227507#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458638 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Uncrossable Productions, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda, 37 E. Lewelling Blvd., San Lorenzo, CA 94580, Alameda Sonearra Cross, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555 Nejiua Gordon, 3856 Jacana Lake Court, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a general partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on October, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sonearra Cross, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 22, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10/12 CNS-2226384# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458552

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Simon Cyber Tech, 4169 Rainbow Ter, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Simon M. Ho, 4169 Rainbow Ter, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/21/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Simon M. Ho This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222917# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459027 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Nails 54, 1554 Washington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Kim Xuyen Thi Huynh, 6620 Eskrigde Way, Elk , CA 95758 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Kim Xuyen Thi Huynh, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 06, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222899# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458712 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bombay Pizza House, 31871 Alvarado Blvd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 Gursewak Singh Gill, 30730 Canterbury Ct., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11-23-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gursewak Singh Gill This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 23, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222882# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 459036 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

J. Winsco, 34111 Cartwright Place, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Liguan Zhang, 34111 Cartwright Place, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Liguan Zhang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 7, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 1/3/12 CNS-2222873# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458074 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Hope Knows Vintage, 40679 Witherspoon Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Mandi Preftokis, 40679 Witherspoon Terrace, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 2/10/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mandi Preftokis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/11 CNS-2219354# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458568 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fancy Goldfish World, 37323 Niles Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Rising Aro Investment Limited, 37751 Glenmoor Drive, Fremont, CA 94536; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11-21-11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jonathan Liu, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/29, 12/6, 12/13, 12/20/11 CNS-2215131# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458567 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Niles Tutoring Club, 37323 Niles Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Rising Aro Investment Limited, 37751 Glenmoor

Third year of record high CSU undergrad applications SUBMITTED BY ERIK FALLS For the third year in a row, California State University received a record number of undergraduate applications. This year’s record confirms the continued high demand for a CSU education. Through CSU Mentor, potential first-time freshmen and transfer students submitted 665,860 applications – easily eclipsing last year’s total. The submissions came from 258,834 distinct applicants versus 241,166 last year. Potential students typically apply to multiple CSU campuses. CSU has also continued a trend of attracting a group of students that reflects the diversity of California. Based on self-reported statistical data, no ethnic or racial group forms a majority among CSU undergraduate applicants. This year also saw a first with Latino applicants outnumbering White applicants by 33.3 percent to 31.2 percent. “The CSU has gone into communities throughout California with the message that a university education is achievable,” said Nathan Evans, director of CSU Enrollment Management Services. “California’s high school and community college students identify the CSU as the university that offers them a clear path to a successful and prosperous future.” The application totals are for October 1 through November 30, the priority period for all 23 CSU campuses. As of today, seven campuses continue to accept new undergraduate applications: Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Dominguez Hills, East Bay, Stanislaus, Humboldt and the California Maritime Academy. Applications may close at any time and be limited to specific programs. Due to severe cuts in state funding, the CSU has been unable to keep up with record demand – denying as many as 20,000 qualified potential

students. In November, trustees urged the state to restore $333 million to the CSU in order to increase student access and better serve those already attending. Campuses still accepting applications for graduate programs. All CSU campuses continue to take graduate applications, however individual campus deadlines differ and it is best to review campus postings. For a full list of campuses still accepting applications please visit the CSU Mentor Application Filing Status Report. Prospective CSU graduate students are also applying to Doctor of Nursing Practice programs for the first time in the system’s history. The three CSU DNP programs continue to welcome applications. Two of the programs are offered jointly by multiple CSU campuses, including Fresno and San José in the north and Fullerton, Long Beach and Los Angeles in the south. San Diego offers a stand-alone program. “Nurse practitioners have an incredible amount of knowledge to contribute to the care of the ‘whole patient,’ in addition to treating diseases,” said Terea Giannetta, a Fresno State and Sacramento State alumna, Fresno State faculty member and nurse practitioner on CSU Voices and Views. “Nursing and medicine need to be partners in helping change healthcare to make it more accessible to everyone.” California State University is the largest system of senior higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, approximately 412,000 students and 43,000 faculty and staff. The CSU awards about 90,000 degrees annually and since its creation in 1961 has conferred nearly 2.6 million. Learn more about CSU at www.calstate.edu

Dr., Fremont, CA 94536; California This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jonathan Liu, President & CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 21, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/29, 12/6, 12/13, 12/20/11 CNS-2215128# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458254 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ardenwood Tax Service, 2140 Peralta Blvd. Ste 111, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Dale B. Miller, 33757 Shylock Drive, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 12/19/91. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Dale B. Miller, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 10, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/29, 12/6, 12/13, 12/20/11 CNS-2215125#

GOVERNMENT NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on January 10, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: PASEO PADRE PARKWAY ELECTROLIER REPLACEMENT PROJECT – PHASE D City Project No. 8392D (PWC) Federal Project No. HSIPL-5322(036) Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at ww.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 12/20, 12/27/11 CNS-2228405# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on January 11, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: 2012 Citywide Storm Drain Repair Project No. 7926-M (PWC)

Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at ww.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 12/20, 12/27/11 CNS-2227755# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on January 26, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: HVAC Units Replacement at Fremont Main Library City Project No. PWC 8754 APN 525-167-100 MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled for 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2012, at the project site, 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, California. Meet at the loading dock at the south side of the building. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 1654 Centre Pointe Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 or through Planwell at ww.e-arc.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 12/20, 12/27/11 CNS-2227721# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Alameda County Social Services Agency Contracts Office, 2000 San Pablo Avenue, 4th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #SSA-FYMP 2012 Foster Youth Mentoring, January 9, 2012, 1:00 PM – Alameda County Social Services Agency, 2000 San Pablo Ave., 3rd Floor, Berkeley Room (#331B), Oakland, CA NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #SSAFYMP 2012 Foster Youth Mentoring, January 11, 2012, 1:00 PM – Alameda County Social Services Agency, 24100 Amador Street, 2nd Floor, California Poppy (#225/226), Hayward, CA Response Due by 2:00 pm on February 1, 2012 County Contact: Ramil Rivera at (510) 271-9165 or via email: RCRivera@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 12/20/11 CNS-2227579# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on January 12, 2012, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: TINY TOTS EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT PWC 8732, MEASURE WW PRE-BID CONFERENCE: A pre-bid conference is scheduled for 11:00 am, Thursday, December 29, 2011, at Irvington Tiny Tots, located within Irvington Community Center at 41885 Blacow Road, Fremont, California. Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 44846 Osgood Road, Fremont, CA 94539 or 599 Fairchild Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043, or through Planwell at ww.e-arc.com or www.peninsuladigital.com, Phone (408) 262-3000. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 12/13, 12/20/11 CNS-2223982#

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, Dec 20 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Dec 21 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, Dec 22 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Ln., Fremont 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 So. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Fremont Monday, Dec 26: No service

Tuesday, Dec 27 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25 – 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 – 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, Dec 28 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apt., 1300 Kentwood Ln., San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Dec 28 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 29

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

Obituaries Ricky W. Lewis Eugene H. Arthur RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 25, 1923 - December 7, 2011

Anhan Liu RESIDENT OF MILPITAS July 14, 1934 - December 13, 2011

Aurora Cunha Furtado RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 6, 1909 - December 14, 2011

Leonora V. Fajardo RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 6, 1947 - December 15, 2011

Joan I. O’Neil RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 30, 1933 - December 15, 2011

Carmelita T. Facunla

RESIDENT OF HAYWARD November 9, 1961 - December 4, 2011

Marie L. Betschart RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 22, 1918 - December 4, 2011 RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 26, 1924 - December 5, 2011

Marjorie S. Miles RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 20, 1940 - December 7, 2011

Boris Kirillov RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 29, 1937 - December 7, 2011

Jose Martins Rodrigues

RESIDENT OF NEWARK August 8, 1948- December 13, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 15, 1930 - December 17, 2011

Maolin Zhao RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 7, 1941 - December 17, 2011

Lance “Chan” Hunter, Jr. RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA June 6, 1955 - December 18, 2011

Celia Ramirez RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Kelly B. Raiche RESIDENT OF LIVERMORE July 28, 1962 - December 6, 2011

Dr. Edward L. Buchanan, III

John A. Lanto

RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

Peter Pleskach

RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 27, 1946 - December 16, 2011 RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 2, 1926 - December 16, 2011

Sharon Chandler-Tindall

Roberto D. Devera RESIDENT OF UNION CITY May 26, 1931 - December 14, 2011

Saokram Bouth RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

Ruperto Vasquez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Lupe Arriola RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark

Hortensia E. Gomez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 18, 1927 - December 15, 2011

Kulsoom Bawani RESIDENT OF SAN RAMON June 20, 1940 - December 16, 2011

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published biweekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Roses FD1007 (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

LANA’S Estate Sales-Clean Outs-Appraisals Whether you’re closing a loved ones Estate, downsizing or need an appraisal for current market value; it’s an overwhelming task. Lana’s provides efficient solutions for quick completion, allowing you to move through the process with ease. Take a Deep Breath, Don’t Throw anything away, call for a FREE preview.

Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

510-657-1908 www.lanasestatesales.com

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

Girl Scouts' Project Hope Bags SUBMITTED BY RESHMA PARMAR Local Girl Scout troops (Kindergarten thru 5th grade) from the Coyote Hills Service Unit gathered Sunday, December 11, on a mission to give back to our local community. Project Hope Bags for the Children’s Program at Abode Services, sponsored by Troops 31998, 31114, 32018, 32004, 30705, and their parents, donated a variety of non-perishable items such as tuna cans, raisins, granola bars, crackers, and bottled water. The Girl Scout troops made over 200 Hope Bags for distribution to the homeless community and gained a sense of sharing with those less fortunate. Abode Services, formerly TriCity Homeless Coalition, is a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to over 2,000 homeless and low income people in Alameda

County to gain access to shelter and assistance for those who are at risk of becoming homeless. Located in Fremont, Abode also offers primary and mental health care, social services, and substance recovery

services to the homeless, free of charge. The Girl Scouts’ Project Hope Bags is one of the many positive experiences in girl scouting that allows young girls to understand

the value of kindness and giving with the camaraderie of their sister scouts. "We really appreciate the Girl Scouts' thoughtfulness in putting these bags together. The adults

and children who will receive them will be very grateful for these items. It's a great project from a great organization." Carol Arata, Director of Development, Abode Services


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Santa Paws Parade BY SIMON WONG PHOTOS BY SIMON WONG Downtown businesses, the City of Hayward, Hayward Area Parks and Recreation Dis-

Standard poodle, with a toupee of dreadlocks and won the Best Owner/Pet Look-alike category. Owner and pet also sported a length of tinsel. Howard travelled from Pitts-

County with prizes for categories such as Cutest Pet and Best Pet/Owner Look-Alike. The Hayward Pet Parade was a community event that families anticipated with excitement

Winners of the 2011 Santa Paws Parade, Hayward

trict and Hayward Animal Shelter Volunteers sponsored a very successful Santa Paws Parade on December 3, 2011, along B, Watkins and C Streets from

burg. While thoroughly enjoying the occasion, he was keen to socialize Sampson with other dogs. Members of the Super

every year. The Santa Paws Parade is now part of the popular Light Up the Season tree lighting ceremony in the historic Downtown Hayward.

The Varela Family: daughters Bianca (l) and Briana (r) with “Chico,” who was adopted in June 2011, participating in the 2011 Santa Paws Parade, Hayward

Foothill Boulevard past City Hall to the park around Hayward Public Library. Strong winds did not deter more than 100 pets and their families from participating, led by Grand Marshal Mayor Mike Sweeney and his wife, Maria Ochoa. Councilwoman Barbara Halliday, City Clerk Miriam Lens and Councilman Francisco Zermeno formed the judging panel with Hayward Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Kim Huggett as master of ceremonies. Animals of all breeds, shapes and sizes competed in Best Float, Best Group Entry, Just Plain Cute, Best Dressed, Best Holiday Dressed and Best Owner/Pet Look-alike categories. The majority of entrants were dogs; a rabbit and several cats made an appearance. Unexpectedly, a pot-bellied pig (Just Plain Cute category) on a leash trotted past the judges’ stand followed by a pony, crowned with antlers, and a small dog atop the “reindeer’s” back. Manasseh Howard cleverly fitted Sampson, his black,

Duper Pooper Scooper “Precision” Drill Team appeared in their pajamas, bathrobes and dressing gowns, equipped with implements to keep the parade route clean. A deposit in front of the review stand was removed from the asphalt with aplomb, followed by a demonstration of what to do with a small plastic bag; they succeeded in winning the Best Group Entry. Curiously, two members bore a striking resemblance to half of the Hayward Chamber Players who performed recently as a quartet; pianist Cathy O’Connor, violist Ted Seitz and their Prospect Hill neighbors entered into the spirit of the occasion. The organizers are keen to see more Hayward schoolchildren and their pets and school groups in the Hayward Schools Pets category, next year. 2010 marked the return of the Santa Paws Parade. Originally organized by the Lions Club, pet parades began in the city in 1925 and attracted families from far and wide. Hayward’s annual parade became the largest in Alameda

So far, the 2011 parade has raised $1,130 online for the Hayward Animal Shelter; registration fees are being counted. Online donations can still be made at www.hayward-ca.gov/santapawsparade. The monies will supplement the Shelter’s funds to buy blankets, pillows and pay for procedures needed to improve the quality of life of its homeless animals. Winners in each category received rosettes. Visitors and parade participants were entertained by tap-dancing Christmas trees, had their pictures taken with Santa, shopped at the pet boutique, petted pets from the Hayward Animal Shelter and were able to adopt. To donate, visit www.hayward-ca.gov/santapawsparade or contact Gloria Ortega at (510) 583-4262 or gloria.ortega@hayward-ca.gov. For more information about animal adoption, call Hayward Animal Shelter at (510) 2937200 ext 7 or visit the Shelter at 16 Barnes Court (at Soto Road and Jackson Street), Hayward.

December 20, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 31

CLASSIFIEDS Home Health Care Provider's Corp. A Reliable Source Providing In-Home Health Care For the ELDERLY Since 1997 Open 24 hours 7 days a week Licensed # 038521

Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

What’s It Worth?

Garden Apartments

H&H APPRAISAL SERVICES

Norman Hodgson Certified Museum Specialist Personal Property and Collections All Areas - 510-582-5954 *Free Verbal Opinion* Send image of object to: norm2@earthlink.net

$975 Jr 1 Br w/spec, 1 & 2 Bedrooms Available FREMONT’S BEST HOUSING VALUE Water, Garbage, Carport included Swim Pool/ Rec Room/Laundry Close shopping & Fwy Gated Security Walk to Bart/HUB 1 & 2 Bedroom No Sec 8/Pets

HASTINGS TERRACE/EAST APTS 510-793-2535, 510-792-4983

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL A BUSINESS? We have been matching buyers and sellers for 29 plus years

For a FREE and NO OBLIGATION consultation Call me TODAY! BTI GROUP- SALES & ACQUISITIONS Tashie Zaheer CELL: 510-750-3297 Machine Tools supplier- (Estate Sale) Copy Center, printing & Publishing Beauty Salon in South Bay Textile Art Collection by world fame artist, Christo

$175K $95K $69K $995K

MERCHANT ENTERPRISES PRESENTS

Help Wanted Delta Products looks for Sr. Electronics Engineer in Fremont, CA. visit www.deltaamericas.com for details. Reply to HR, 4405 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 Fax: (510) 668-0696.

Thousands of products at Low Cost Prices clothes shoes vacations franchies and much more How you can save hundreds of dollars by simply ordering at 70-80% below department store prices direct over the internet

Log on to www.wholesalecostless.com 510-472-1844 email: apparelwholesale@hotmail.com

Help Wanted Help Wanted A wholesale/manufacturing co. in Fremont is seeking a F.T. Forklift Driver, and a F.T. Inventory Control Manager. Experience required. Fax resume with salary requirement to: 510-770-9458

Lite-On, Inc. is looking for Engineering Manager for Power SBG group in Milpitas, CA.Visit www.liteon.com for details. Reply to HR, 720 S. Hillview Dr., Milpitas, CA 95035, Fax: (408) 941-4596.

Help Wanted VP, MDI Global Operations (Safran HRS, Inc. – Newark, CA) Req’s Bach’s deg. in Eng., Comp. Sci., Technology, or Bus. Admin. (or foreign equiv.) & 5 yrs’ exp. managing multinational, multi-site supply chain operations for a security or detection/scanner technology co. w/in a group w/ at least $1 billion in revenue. All of the stated exp. must incl. the following: managing supply chain / mnfg. Ops. of at least 100 people & large teams of sr. managers in supply chain & mnfg. roles in more than 2 different countries simultaneously w/ resp. for hiring, firing, compensation, & development decisions; overseeing profit & loss operations valued in excess of $100 million; & managing supply chain activities for a combination of long, medium, & short cycle product lines simultaneously, incl. managing the performance of the service parts network across multiple countries. Must also have exp. ensuring compliance w/ radiation safety / health protection, U.S. export controls, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Cost Accounting Standards, & Hazardous Materials Handling regulations. Must be certified in at least one of the bus. or mnfg. methodologies, such as 6 Sigma (Black Belt or Master Black Belt) or Lean manufacturing. Executive-level position at Morpho Detection, a leading provider of advanced explosive and narcotics detection technologies. Apply online at https://www.appone.com/MainInfoReq.asp?R_ID=580484.

WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

US charges ex-Fannie, Freddie CEOs with fraud continued from page 1

Before the SEC announced the charges, it reached an agreement not to charge Fannie and Freddie. The companies, which the government took over in 2008, also agreed to cooperate with the SEC in the cases against the former executives. The Justice Department began investigating the two firms three years ago. In August, Freddie said Justice informed the company that its probe had ended. Many legal experts say they don't expect the six executives to face criminal charges. “If the U.S. attorney's office was going to be bringing charges, they would have brought it simultaneously with the civil case,” said Christopher Morvillo, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice in Manhattan. Robert Mintz, a white-collar defense lawyer, says he doubts any top Wall Street executives will face criminal charges for actions that hastened the financial crisis, given how much time has passed. Mudd, 53, and Syron, 68, led the mortgage giants in 2007, when home prices began to collapse. The four other top executives also worked for the companies during that time. In a statement from his attorney, Mudd said the government reviewed and approved all the company's financial disclosures. “Every piece of material data about loans held by Fannie Mae was known to the United States

government and to the investing public,” Mudd said. “The SEC is wrong, and I look forward to a court where fairness and reason not politics - is the standard for justice.” Syron's lawyers said the term “subprime had no uniform definition in the market” at that time. “There was no shortage of meaningful disclosures, all of which permitted the reader to assess the degree of risk in Freddie Mac's” portfolio, the lawyers said in a statement. “The SEC's theory and approach are fatally flawed.” According to the lawsuit, Fannie and Freddie misrepresented their exposure to subprime loans in reports, speeches and congressional testimony. Fannie told investors in 2007 that it had roughly $4.8 billion worth of subprime loans on its books, or just 0.2 percent of its portfolio. That same year, Mudd told two congressional panels that Fannie's subprime loans represented didn't exceed 2.5 percent of its business. The SEC says Fannie actually had about $43 billion worth of products targeted to borrowers with weak credit, or 11 percent of its holdings. Freddie told investors in late 2006 that it held between $2 billion and $6 billion of subprime mortgages on its books. And Syron, in a 2007 speech, said Freddie had “basically no subprime exposure,” according to the suit.

VTA Solicits Public Comments SUBMITTED BY BRANDI CHILDRESS As the Congestion Management Agency for Santa Clara County, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) is responsible for preparing and adopting the county-wide transportation plan: Valley Transportation Plan (VTP). The VTP outlines transportation programs and investments for Santa Clara County over a 25-year period. The VTP is updated every four years, aligning with updates to the Regional Transportation Plan prepared by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The last update, VTP 2035, was adopted by the VTA Board in January 2009. The public is invited to review an updated list of transportation proposals and provide comments. These proposals will then be contained in the VTP 2040 document that will be adopted in January 2013. These public meetings will provide an opportunity for the general public to provide input and feedback to help shape the preparation of the VTP, and learn more about Santa Clara County’s transportation needs and planning process. These meetings are a follow up from meetings held in April 2011. Tuesday, December 20 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority

3331 North First Street, Auditorium, San Jose Take VTA bus line 58; light rail is nearby Tuesday, January 3, 2012 4 p.m. - 6p.m. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, Cultural Heritage Center 150 E. San Fernando Street, 5th Floor, San Jose Take VTA bus lines 63, 64, 72, 73, 81; Dash: 22, 23, 522; light rail is nearby Wednesday, January 4 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Centennial Recreation Center 171 W. Edmundson Ave., Meeting Room 2, Morgan Hill Take VTA bus line 68 Wednesday, January 4 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. City of Mountain View City Hall, Atrium Room 500 Castro Street, Mountain View Take VTA bus lines 35, 22,522; light rail is about 3 blocks away This item will be on the VTA Board of Directors January 5, 2012 meeting agenda. Can’t make a meeting? The general public is encouraged to review the updated list of transportation proposals and to provide comments by visiting www.vta.org/vtp or call VTA Community Outreach 408-321-7575.

The SEC says its holdings were actually closer to $141 billion, or 10 percent of its portfolio in 2006, and $244 billion, or 14 percent, by 2008. Syron also authorized especially risky mortgages for borrowers without proof of income or assets as early as 2004, the suit alleges, “despite contrary advice” from Freddie's credit-risk experts. He rejected their advice, “in part due to his desire to improve Freddie Mac's market share.” Fannie and Freddie buy home loans from banks and other lenders, package them into bonds with a guarantee against default and then sell them to investors around the world. The two own or guarantee about half of U.S. mortgages, or nearly 31 million loans. During the financial crisis, the two firms verged on collapse. The Bush administration seized control of them in September 2008. So far, the companies have cost taxpayers more than $150 billion the largest bailout of the financial crisis. They could cost up to $259 billion, according to their government regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Administration. Mudd was paid more than $10 million in salary and bonuses in 2007, according to company statements. He was fired from Fannie after the government took over. He's now the chief executive of the New York hedge fund Fortress Investment Group. Syron made more than $18

million in 2007, according to company statements. His compensation increased $4 million from 2006 because of bonuses he received - part of them for encouraging risky subprime lending, according to company filings. It's not clear what portion of the bonuses was for his efforts to promote subprime lending. Syron resigned from Freddie in 2008. He's now an adjunct professor and trustee at Boston College. The other executives charged were Fannie's Enrico Dallavecchia, 50, a former chief risk officer, and Thomas Lund, 53, a former executive vice president; and Freddie's Patricia Cook, 58, a former executive vice president and chief business officer, and Donald Bisenius, 53, a former senior vice president. Lund's lawyer, Michael Levy, said in a statement that Lund “did not mislead anyone.” Lawyers for the other defendants declined to comment Friday. Based on the outcomes of similar cases, the lawsuit might not yield much in penalties against the former executives. In July, Citigroup paid just $75 million to settle similar civil charges with the SEC. Its chief financial officer and head of investor relations were accused of failing to disclose more than $50 billion worth of potential losses from subprime mortgages. The two executives charged paid $100,000 and $80,000 in civil penalties.

Fines against executives charged in SEC civil cases can reach up to $150,000 per violation. SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro has asked Congress to raise the limit to $1 million. The SEC has brought other cases related to the financial crisis since it began a broad investigation into the actions of Wall Street banks and other financial firms about three years ago. Goldman Sachs & Co., for example, agreed last year to pay $550 million to settle charges of misleading buyers of a complex mortgage investment. JPMorgan Chase & Co. resolved similar charges in June and paid $153.6 million. Citigroup Inc. agreed to pay $285 million to settle similar charges, though that settlement was recently struck down by a federal judge in New York City. Most cases, however, didn't involve charges against prominent top executives. An exception was Angelo Mozilo, the co-founder and CEO of failed mortgage lender Countrywide Financial Corp. He agreed to a $67.5 million settlement with the SEC in October 2010 to avoid trial on civil fraud and insider trading charges that he profited from doling out risky mortgages while misleading investors about the risks. Associated Press writers Marcy Gordon in Washington and Larry Neumeister in New York contributed to this report.

Niles Canyon Project Continued from page 13 less ecologically damaging alternatives. Highway widening may make the road more dangerous for drivers and cyclists.” If CalTrans pursues a future project between Rosewarnes and Farwell underpasses in lower Niles Canyon, it cannot rely on the discredited 2006 project approval, but must initiate a new environmental review process with proper public notice, consider public comments, and apply for new state and federal permits. The three phases of the project would widen much of Niles Canyon Road between Fremont and Interstate 680 to provide 12foot lanes, a 2-foot median, and up to 8-foot shoulders. In total, CalTrans proposes cutting 600 trees along Alameda Creek and filling the creek and floodplain with over four miles of cement retaining walls and rip-rap. This would significantly damage steelhead trout habitat and remove rare sycamore forest. CalTrans internally “approved” phase one in 2006 without issuing a notice of determination or otherwise alerting the public that the project had been finalized. CalTrans hid project approval from permitting agencies and the Alameda Creek Alliance, which raised concerns about impacts to steelhead trout and other protected wildlife. CalTrans filed a “Negative Declaration,” claiming no significant environmental impacts, rather than preparing the required Environmental Impact Report for a project with significant impacts. Phase two would cut nearly 500 more trees in the middle of

the canyon and add almost two miles of retaining walls and armoring along the creek. CalTrans began environmental review for phase two in 2010, but reopened the public comment period after a storm of opposition and protest from the community. CalTrans has refused to consider any substantive changes to phase two. Construction on the second phase was scheduled for 2012, but the lawsuit over phase one and public opposition will likely delay the project. The City of Fremont sent a letter to Governor Brown requesting he intervene to stop the project, citing “extreme” and “shocking” environmental impacts and “blatant disregard for getting input from the public.” Fremont is investigating a ban on large trucks in the canyon, since trucks cause a disproportionate number (38%) of traffic accidents and most fatal accidents. Fremont joined conservation and community groups in calling for a halt to the project and reevaluation of the need for road widening once a truck ban is in place. Hundreds of local residents opposed the project at public meetings and protested the tree cutting. Save Niles Canyon, Save Our Sunol, Friends of Coyote Hills, Southern Alameda County Sierra Club, East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society and Tri-City Ecology Center are also opposing the project. Save Niles Canyon reviewed safety data CalTrans used to justify road widening, premised on a purported high numbers of fatal accidents. CalTrans cited 13 fa-

talities over the past decade, but several incidents were outside the canyon or project area. The majority involved driving under the influence as a major or contributing cause of the accident, a factor unlikely to be prevented by road widening. Niles Canyon Road is statistically safer than the average state road. CalTrans’ project may actually make the canyon more dangerous for drivers and cyclists by increasing vehicle speeds. There are less destructive alternatives CalTrans has not evaluated such as flashing lights, radar speed signs, median barriers, rumble strips, focusing on localized problem areas, trimming selected trees, or other measures within the existing roadway. Alameda Creek is an ‘anchor watershed’ considered regionally significant for restoration of threatened steelhead trout to the entire Bay Area. Since 1997, numerous organizations and agencies have cooperated on restoration projects to allow migratory fish from the Bay to reach spawning habitat in upper Alameda Creek. Thirteen fish passage improvement projects, including dam removals, construction of fish ladders, and installation of fish screens, have been completed in the watershed since 2001. Several more projects in the lower creek are expected to be completed by 2013-2105, allowing steelhead to migrate into Niles Canyon in the project area and further upstream into the upper watershed for the first time in half a century. For more information, visit: www.alamedacreek.org

Rebates offered on clothes washer purchases SUBMITTED BY FRANK JAHN The Alameda County Water District, in partnership with PG&E and the Union Sanitary District, is offering Tri-City residents a $100 rebate on the purchase of a qualifying high-efficiency clothes washer. The rebate program begins on January 1, 2012 and ends on December 31, 2012 (or until funds are depleted, whichever comes first).

“A high efficiency clothes washer can save nearly 8,000 gallons of water over the course of a year,” said Stephanie Nevins, ACWD Water Conservation Administrator. “Savings like that reduce water bills, benefit our limited water supply, and reduce the amount of treated wastewater discharged into the Bay.” Nevins estimates that nearly 24,000,000 gallons of water will be saved annually if the District meets its goal of is-

suing 3,000 rebates during 2012. To qualify for a rebate, residents must purchase an eligible washer, have water service provided by ACWD, and have natural gas or electricity distributed by PG&E. For complete details on the program and to obtain a list of qualifying washers, residents are encouraged to visit www.waterenergysavings.com or call ACWD’s Water Conservation Department at 510-668-4207.

“Since its inception in 1996, more than 23,000 rebates have been issued under the Washer Rebate Program, resulting in a cumulative water savings of about 1 billion gallons,” said ACWD Board president Judy Huang. The program is considered for reauthorization by the Board each year. For more information, please visit www.acwd.org.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 20, 2011

Page 33

Moreau class publishes children's books SUBMITTED BY TONY RODRIGUEZ

The gift-giving ways of Christmastime continue to gleam throughout the community of Moreau Catholic High School. On December 13, thirty-two stu-

dents from Bible As Literature, a Scripture-based junior and senior elected course, proudly made their way next door to the kindergarten classroom of Saint Clement Elementary School. After their short study of the "Infancy Narratives" con-

tained within the Gospels of both Matthew and Luke, Bible As Literature designed a communitybased, service-learning project targeted to reaching out to their younger neighbors in the spirit of liturgical evangelization. As their culminating piece of

assessment, students of Bible As Literature each wrote, illustrated, and published a children's book that offered their exegetical interpretations from either Infancy Narrative. Students were then partnered with a kindergarten student, with whom they read

their books and discussed the birth of Christ. These books were then gifted to their new kindergarten buddies as a hopeful keepsake to help better celebrate the Christmas Season.

Students from the kindergarten class at Saint Clement Elementary School and Moreau Catholic High School's "Bible As Literature" class

[From left to right] Calyx Embry, Joseph Calub, Tina Comic, Kristen Leahy, Megan Gelico, Kelsen Adeni, and Lisa Machado proudly display their "Infancy Narrative" children's books they each wrote, illustrated, and published.

Penalties assessed against some California Hospitals SUBMITTED BY ANITA GORE The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced on December 8 that 14 California hospitals have been assessed administrative penalties after it was determined the facilities’ noncompliance with licensing requirements caused, or was likely to cause, serious injury or death to patients. The following hospitals received penalties: Fresno Surgical Hospital, Fresno, Fresno County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is $50,000. Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, Valencia, Los Angeles County: The hospital failed to implement policies and procedures for the safe administration of medication. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is $50,000. Kaiser Foundation Hospital – South San Francisco, South San Francisco, San Mateo County: The hospital failed to implement its established policies and procedures for the safe and effective administration of medication. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is $50,000. LAC+USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the fifth administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $25,000. Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Palo Alto, Santa Clara County: The hospital failed to implement policies and procedures for the safe administration of medication. This is the second administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $50,000. Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, Mission

Viejo, Orange County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the fourth administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $100,000. 1. San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, San Francisco County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This is the second administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $50,000. 2. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County: The hospital failed to develop and implement safety measures which ensure the protection of a patient. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is $50,000. 3. Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, La Jolla, San Diego County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the sixth administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $100,000. 4. St. Jude Medical Center, Fullerton, Orange County: The hospital failed to implement policies and procedures for the safe administration of medication. This is the third administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $75,000. 5. Sutter Solano Medical Center, Vallejo, Solano County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is $50,000. 6. Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, Los Angeles County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a pa-

tient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the second administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $75,000. 7. UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, San Francisco County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This is the sixth administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $75,000. 8. Ventura County Medical Center, Ventura, Ventura County: The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when the hospital did not follow its surgical policies and procedures. This resulted in a patient having to undergo a second surgery to remove a retained foreign object. This is the second administrative penalty issued to this facility. The penalty is $50,000. Administrative penalties are issued under authority granted by Health and Safety Code section 1280.1. Incidents that occurred prior to 2009 carry a fine of $25,000. New legislation took effect January 1, 2009, that increased fines for incidents that occurred in 2009 or later. Under the new provisions, an administrative penalty carries a fine of $50,000 for the first violation, $75,000 for the second, and $100,000 for the third or subsequent violation by the licensee. Incidents that occurred prior to 2009 are not counted in determining the amount of a fine. When hospitals receive their survey findings, they are required to provide CDPH with a plan of correction to prevent future incidents. Hospitals can appeal an administrative penalty by requesting a hearing within ten (10) calendar days of notification. If a hearing is requested, the penalties must be paid if upheld following an appeal. All hospitals in California are required to be in compliance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations governing general acute care hospitals, acute psychiatric hospitals, and special hospitals. The hospitals are required to comply with these standards to ensure quality of care. www.cdph.ca.gov


December 20, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 34

Protect your family from dangerous carbon monoxide SUBMITTED BY PG&E As temperatures begin to drop, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) urges customers to be mindful of the dangers associated with carbon monoxide. Several tragic cases of carbon monoxide poisoning take place each year during the winter months as people try to stay warm. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, tasteless and odorless gas that is created by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and wood. If unsafe concentrations of carbon monoxide are not detected, the result can be fatal. Customers should never use generators, charcoal or barbeque grills inside the home. When using the fireplace to stay warm, make sure the flue is open, so the byproducts of combustion can vent safely through the chimney. Many customers in PG&E’s service area use natural gas furnaces to stay warm. PG&E reminds customers to make sure all natural gas furnaces and appliances inside the home are in proper working order. Natural gas appliances that do not burn properly can produce carbon monoxide. Customers should inspect the flame on all gas appliances. A blue flame indicates complete combustion and the appliance is working properly. A lazy, yellow or white flame is a warning sign that the appliance is not burning properly and could be producing carbon monoxide. If customers suspect there is a problem with a natural gas appliance inside their home, they should call PG&E immediately at 1-800PGE-5000. A gas service representative will be dispatched to do a thorough inspection. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headaches, drowsiness, dizziness, nausea and convulsions. Because carbon monoxide is hard to detect, someone with mild poisoning can go to sleep and continue to breathe the carbon monoxide until severe illness or death occurs. People may also mistake their symptoms for a viral infection like the flu. To help prevent cases of carbon monoxide poisoning, PG&E offers the following tips to keep customers healthy and safe: Install a carbon monoxide detector to warn you if concentrations become dangerously high. As of July 2011, all California singlefamily homes are required by law to have one. Place it near sleeping areas, where they can wake you. When using the fireplace, make sure the flue is open, and the chimney is venting properly. Do not idle cars inside the garage and do not 95 allow snow to block tailpipe emissions when operating a vehicle outdoors. $8.25 + Certificate E.T.F. Make sure water heaters and other natural Most cars, van's & truck's extra gas appliances have proper ventilation. Older With this coupon only. appliances and room heaters that are not vented Exp. 12/30/11 externally should be inspected annually. Have a trained professional inspect furAIR CONDITIONING SERVICE naces and other gas appliances. To schedule an 95 inspection with PG&E, customers can call 1+ FREON 800-PGE-5000 or visit our website at Easy Service we will check for www.pge.com. leaks Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. Never use generators, propane heaters, barWith this coupon only. beques or charcoal indoors. Exp. 12/30/11 Ensure that generators are properly installed and operated outdoors. For more genTIMING BELT SPECIAL erator safety tips, please visit 95 + parts www.pge.com/generator/.

SMOG INSPECTION

$25.

$24.

*We will review your car’s scheduled maintenance report and perform all necessary services on the scheduled maintenance (to the right)

FREE DIAGNOSTIC on Check Engine Light or Service Engine Soon Light (If work done here) Don’t ignore that “Check engine” light. It could be a signal of a serious problem Exp. 12/30/11

TRANSMISSION SERVICE LUBE, OIL AND FILTER

Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the United States. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit www.pge.com/about/newsroom.

4-cylinder - P/S, A/C $25.00 each Call for a quote Most cars and Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp.12/30/11

$29.

+ Coolant

Drain, Pressure Test Cooling System & Radiator Cap. Check Water Pump, Clamps Belts & Hoses Most cars and Light Duty Trucks. With this coupon only. Exp. 12/30/11

+ disposal fee

Includes: 5 Quarts Fluid* New Filter & Gaskets, Check For Leaks Most cars and trucks. *Special fluids extra. With this coupon only Exp. 12/30/11

RADIATOR FLUSH 95

$19.95

$79.95

$89.

Includes: Up to 5 qts. Oil - Oil Filter Lube All Fittings - Fill Up All Fluids - Safety Inspection Most cars. With this coupon only. Exp. 12/30/11

MINOR TUNE-UP 4-CYL.

$24.

95

6-CYL.

$49.95

8-CYL.

$69.95

12-Month or 12,000-Mile Warranty - Includes: Spark Plugs, Check All Ignition Parts, Adjust Timing. Most cars and Trucks. Platinum Plugs Extra. With this coupon only. Exp. Exp. 12/30/11


TCV 2011-12-20