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Last Night of Ballyhoo

Letter to Editor Logan advances in championship, loses in quarter finals

Save our neighborhood, save our city

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

November 15, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 91

SUBMITTED BY TRI-CITY INTERFAITH COUNCIL The 50th annual Tri-City Interfaith Council Thanksgiving Service will take place Monday, November 21 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church. This year’s theme is “To build a better world: Give thanks, then share!” Since 1962 when three Protestant Christian churches gathered for Thanksgiving worship, this holiday service has evolved to reflect dramatic changes in the religious diversity of the Bay

Area. In 1965, Vatican II encouraged dialogue between Catholics, Protestants, and Jews. Then in the late 1980s, representatives from the Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Baha’i, Unificationist, Unitarian Universalist, Mormon, Sikh, Jain, Zoroastrian, and Ohlone Indian communities joined to share in the Thanksgiving Service. The liturgical fabric of the program is rich in readings from sacred prayers, as well as chants, songs, beautiful traditional costumes, dancers and musicians. Participants will be welcomed by local mayors. continued on page 4

SUBMITTED BY SHIRLEY SISK The Tri-City League of Volunteers (LOV) is planning to serve 5,000 people on Thanksgiving Day at the Newark Pavilion or deliver to the homebound in Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, San Leandro, San Lorenzo and Castro Valley. There is little time and, to date, there is a desperate shortage of the following: Turkeys – need 300 – have 31 – short 269 Hams - need 980 - have none Cranberry Sauce – need 130 more cans Pre-baked pies - need 500 - have 6 promised – short 494 Instant Potato Mix – need 125 lg. Boxes – have 2 Stove Brand Top Dressing Mix – need 50 lg. Boxes – have none Sandwich Bread – need 200 loaves – have nothing right now Chicken Broth – need 40 large cans – have 2 – short 38 Canned Corn – need 257 more Canned Green Beans – need 628 more Canned Yams – 29 oz. – need 48 Oval Aluminum Roasting Pans – need 650 – have 50 – 600 short Mayonnaise Packets – need 2,300 Butter - both 1 lb. boxes (40 needed) and individual patties (box of 400) Bottled water – need 20 case of 24 – have nothing right now Dessert plates – need 1,000 – have none Sandwich bags – need 3,000 – have none Large lunch bags – need 2,500 – have nothing right now These are just a few of the many food and supply continued on page 16

BY MICHELLE MOTOYOSHI What happens when Tri-City residents come together for a good cause? They give a young girl hope. On Saturday, November 19, at St. Anne’s Church in Union City, Tri-City, residents can donate blood at a blood drive in honor of Logan High School student, Zoe Inciong. This past September, Zoe was diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer known as Ewing’s Sarcoma. She has been undergoing intensive chemotherapy at the Kaiser Pediatric Oncology Center in Oakland. In mid-December, Zoe will begin radiation treatment with continued on page 8

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Does a relaxing massage sound good after a busy day of shopping? Saturday massages at the Washington Women’s Center are here just in time for the holidays. “A massage is a great way for women to take a break from the busy holidays, and we have a number of holiday specials starting at the end of the month,” said Kathy Hesser, RN, Women’s Center coordinator. “Saturdays are more convenient for a lot of women.” The Women’s Center offers a peaceful, welcoming environment where women can feel comfortable getting a massage, she said. Women have their own private dressing area with individual lockers for their personal items. They are also provided with a fresh robe to slip into and hot towels. “We have experienced, licensed massage therapists who tailor their massages to each woman,” Hesser added. “A lot of ladies tell me the Women’s Center is the best kept secret in town because it’s such a wonderful place to get a massage.” If you have never had a massage, you are in for a real treat. Massage involves kneading, pressure, and fluid strokes on different areas of the body. It works on the soft tissues, relieving pain and stiffness in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Besides feeling great, massage offers a number of health benefits, according to Hesser. It can calm the nervous system and promote a sense of relaxation and wellbeing, reducing stress and anxiety. Massage can also help to improve blood circulation, stimulate the lymphatic system, which aids the immune system, and prevent and relieve muscles cramps and spasms. Massage Types A number of massages are offered at the Washington Women’s Center, including Swedish massage, which uses long, fluid strokes and deep, circular motions to reduce tension, improve circulation, and relieve muscle tension. The sports massage is similar to the Swedish massage but is tailored for women who work out frequently or are involved in sports. It helps improve flexibility, and prevent or treat injuries. Deep tissue massage works deep into the muscle to help ease and release muscular tension. It uses slower, more forceful strokes to target the deeper layers of the muscles and connective tissue. The pregnancy massage is for expectant mothers. It helps alleviate back pain and aids circulation, providing some relief from the discomfort of pregnancy.

November 15, 2011

Massages are offered by appointment at the Washington Women’s Center on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Tuesdays and Thursdays until 7 p.m.) Several holiday massage specials will be offered starting on November 29. Treat yourself or a girlfriend, sister, or other woman in your life during the holidays. Call (510) 608-1301 to schedule a massage.

Therapeutic massage integrates neuromuscular therapy and reflexology with Swedish strokes to help relax and restore balance to the body. If you are just looking for a foot massage or a quick upper body massage, the

Washington Women’s Center offers those as well. The foot reflexology is a gentle massage of the foot that helps to relieve continued on page 4

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

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T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

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11/16/11

11/17/11

11/18/11

11/19/11

11/20/11

11/21/11

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

Think Pink: Women's Center Update Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Citizen's Bond Oversight Committee Meeting October 5, 2011 (New) Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage?

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea

Voices InHealth: Bras for Body & Soul

Women's Health Conference: Chronic Pain Management

Women's Health Conference: Beyond Sadness - Depression (Late Start)

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start) New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Your Concerns InHealth: Symptoms and Treatment Decisions in End of & Percutaneous Life Care (Under the Skin) Treatment Keys to Healthy Eyes

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy (Late Start)

Men's Health Fair: Heart Healthy Living

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center

George Mark Children's House - A New Way Home Osteoporosis Update: (Late Start) Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Diabetes in Pregnancy

Insurance Information for People with Diabetes (Late Start)

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You? Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 9, 2011 (New)

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 9, 2011 (New)

Diabetes and Your Hormones (Late Start)

Partnering with Your Doctor to Improve Diabetes Control (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Living with Heart Failure & Heart Irregularities (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: Washington's Community Cancer Program Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

World Kidney Day

Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children Crohn's & Colitis, Stomach (Late Start) Cancer and Irritable Bowel Disorders Voices InHealth: Learn About Foods That Washington's Community Help Your Digestive System Cancer Program

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 9, 2011 (New)

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression? (Late Start)

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Kidney Disease Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Disaster Preparedness Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Diabetes in Pregnancy

Inside Washington Hospital: Pediatric Care

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Citizen's Bond Oversight Committee Meeting October 5, 2011 (New)

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Men's Health Fair Panel Discussion

Citizen's Bond Oversight Committee Meeting October 5, 2011 (New)

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run!

Minimally Invasive Treatment Inside Washington Hospital: for Common Gynecologic The Green Team Conditions

Voices InHealth: Cyberbullying - The New Schoolyard Bully (Late Start)

New Surgical Techniques for Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement (Late Start)

Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Eat Better!

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help (Late Start)

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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he discovery of modern antibitibiotics Week” each November. This include longer-lasting illnesses, extended • Do not take antibiotics prescribed for otics dates back to 1929, when year’s observation is scheduled for Novem- hospital stays and the need for more exsomeone else. The antibiotic may not be British scientist Sir Alexander ber 14 – 20. The objective of the campensive and potentially toxic medications. appropriate for your illness and may delay Fleming observed that a type of paign is to increase awareness of antibiotic “There are some tests we can use to diag- proper treatment and allow bacteria to mold called Penicillium notatum could resistance and the importance of appropri- nose bacterial infections, such as throat multiply. prevent the growth of Staphylococcus bac- ate antibiotic use. swabs to detect strep throat and urine tests To ensure the proper use of antibiotics, teria. Ten years later, two other sciWashington Hospital has an Anentists, Ernst Chain and Howard timicrobial Stewardship CommitFlorey, found a way to isolate the tee that evaluates the use of antibiotic penicillin and used it to antibiotics within the hospital. treat soldiers for battlefield wound “We look at the drugs that are infections and pneumonia during included in our ‘formulary’ of World War II. medications used in the hospital By 1946, penicillin became and compare them to lab results of available to the general public for what bacterial infections are most treating bacterial infections includcommon in the hospital,” Dr. ing strep throat, pneumonia and Martin says. “We want to be sure scarlet fever. Additional antibiotics we are prescribing the right drug such as sulfa drugs, streptomycin for the right problem, in the right and tetracycline came on the mardosage and for the right amount of ket in the late 1940s and early time. We also provide this infor1950s, launching the age of antibimation to our patients’ physicians otic therapy. so they can make the best choices The success of antibiotics was for their patients.” one of the most significant medical Unused or expired medications, achievements of the 20th century, including antibiotics, should not greatly reducing the incidence of be discarded in the trash or flushed illness and death from infectious down the toilet. Washington Hosdiseases. Unfortunately, over the pital offers Tri-City area residents a years, many disease-causing bacteconvenient, safe and environmenria have become resistant to antibi- Taking antibiotics when they are not needed may actually increase your risk of getting an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection tally sound option for disposing of otic therapy, partly due to overuse later on.When antibiotics fail to work, the consequences can include longer-lasting illnesses, extended hospital stays and the need old medications. for more expensive and potentially toxic medications. For more information about the CDC’s “Get Smart About Antibiotics” cam– and misuse – of antibiotics. paign and the proper use of antibiotics, visit their Web site at www.cdc.gov/getsmart “Antibiotic resistance has beDrop-off sites are come a huge public health concern,” says “Antibiotics work only on bacterial infor bladder infections,” Dr. Martin says. “In available at the infectious disease specialist Dr. Dianne fections, not on the viruses that cause other cases, the diagnosis of a patient’s illfollowing locations: Martin, who co-chairs the Infection Concolds, the flu and most sore throats and ness as viral or bacterial is based on the trol team at Washington Hospital. bronchitis,” Dr. Martin explains. “In many physician’s observations and experience. If • Washington Hospital - Main Lobby “In the past, as bacteria became resistant cases, people will pressure their physician your physician does prescribe an antibiotic, 2000 Mowry Avenue, Fremont to some antibiotics, new antibiotics came on to prescribe antibiotics even when the doc- it is important to follow the instructions • Washington Hospital Community the market,” she notes. “In the 1970s and tor has told them they most likely have a properly. For example, if you only use the Health Resource Library 1980s, for example, there were a couple of virus. Some patients have actually become antibiotic for a couple of days instead of tak2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington new antibiotics introduced every year. Today, angry and left the doctor’s office when an- ing the full dose, it can cause antibiotic reWest), Fremont however, there aren’t as many new antibitibiotics were not prescribed.” sistance in any remaining bacteria.” • WTMF at Nakamura Clinic otics coming out because of the high cost of The CDC notes that taking antibiotics The CDC offers some additional use33077 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City drug development. Now we’re seeing only a when you have a viral infection may actuful tips to remember regarding proper use couple of new drugs each decade. There has ally increase your risk of getting an antibiof antibiotics: • WTMF at Newark been some effort to get the federal governotic-resistant bacterial infection later on. • Do not save some of your prescription 35500 Dumbarton Court, Newark ment to encourage more development of Repeated and improper uses of antibiotics for the next time you get sick. Discard any • WTMF at Warm Springs new antibiotics, but we also need to be are primary causes of the increase in drugleftover medication once you have com46690 Mohave Drive, Fremont smarter about how we use the antibiotic resistant bacteria. Such antibiotic resistpleted your prescribed course of treatment. drugs that are available.” ance can cause significant risks for people • Take an antibiotic exactly as your physician For more information about the CDC’s Since 2008, the Centers for Disease with common infections that once were tells you to. Do not skip doses or stop taking “Get Smart About Antibiotics” campaign Control and Prevention (CDC) has sponeasily treatable with antibiotics. When anthe medication before the full course of treat- and the proper use of antibiotics, visit sored the annual “Get Smart About Antibiotics fail to work, the consequences can ment even if you are feeling better. their Web site at www.cdc.gov/getsmart/

Next to heart disease, cancer is the leading cause of death in America. So, what’s the No. 1 cause of death due to cancer? Lung cancer—and this is true for both men and women. Lung cancer kills more people than breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancers combined. This fact is even sadder when you realize that lung cancer is one of the most preventable forms of the disease. “Eighty percent to 90 percent of lung cancers are caused by smoking,” says Jason Chu, MD, board certified pulmonologist and critical care specialist on the medical staff at Washington Hospital. “About 45 million people in this country smoke, and there is a direct correlation between smoking and lung cancer. So, until tobacco use is sharply decreased, lung cancer will continue to be our No. 1 cancer killer.” continued on page 9

Eighty to 90 percent of lung cancers are caused by smoking. If you or someone you know is a smoker, remember that Thursday, Nov. 17, is the Great American Smokeout. For more information about the Smokeout, visit the American Cancer Society Web site at www.cancer.org or call toll free at 1-800-ACS-2345.


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tension. Chair massage is done while seated and usually covers the head, neck, shoulders, back, arms, and hands. “We also have a hot stone massage that I really recommend if you have never tried one,” Hesser said. “It’s a wonderful way to get the muscles to release and relax. Warm stones are placed in certain areas like the neck and spine.” Holiday Specials The Washington Women’s Center is offering several holiday specials starting November 29, making it easier to treat yourself or a girlfriend, sister, or other woman in your life during the holidays. Massage packages make great gifts, Hesser added. Packages start at $100 for the De-Stress package, which includes six 15-minute chair massages. The Balance Package includes six 30-minute massage

sessions of your choice (Swedish, therapeutic, or foot reflexology) for $180. The Rejuvenation Package includes six 50-minute sessions of your choice (Swedish, therapeutic, deep tissue, or sports) for $270. To learn more about the holiday specials, call (510) 608-1301. Massages are offered by appointment at the Washington Women’s Center on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. During the week, you can get a massage from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Washington Women’s Center is located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West). To schedule a massage, call (510) 608-1301. For information about other services offered at the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

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Those who attend are invited to bring refreshments for a time of fellowship following the service. Canned goods will be collected and an offering will be received for Tri-City Volunteers, a well-known local service organization. Parents are encouraged to bring children and youth to this inspiring and educational program. The Thanksgiving service provides a unique opportunity to become acquainted with the varied cultural and religious traditions of our community.

Tri-City Interfaith Council Thanksgiving Service Monday, November 21 7:30 p.m. St. Joseph Catholic Church 43148 Mission Blvd. (near Washington), Fremont (510) 656-2364

If approved by the Board of Directors, the service restructure on the Dumbarton Express will be implemented on December 16, 2011. Comments may also be submitted by voicemail at (510) 891-7201. To leave comments in Spanish, call (510) 891-7291, or in Chinese, call (510) 891-7292. To request sign or foreign language interpreters at the hearing, call (510) 891-7201. The proposed cuts in bus service are detailed on AC Transit’s website at www.ACTransit.org, available in printed format at the District’s General Offices, 1600 Franklin Street, Oakland, and at a variety of other locations, including main county and city offices and main libraries within the District’s service area. For information on locations and availability in your specific area, call (510) 891-4764. Dumbarton Bridge Bus Routes Public Hearing Wednesday Nov 16 4 p.m. Second floor AC Transit Headquarters 1600 Franklin Street, Oakland (510) 891-4764 www.ACTransit.org

Dumbarton Bridge bus routes slated for changes SUBMITTED BY AC TRANSIT The AC Transit Board of Directors will consider the restructure of the Dumbarton Express lines in southern Alameda County, specifically adjusting service in Fremont and Newark. The modifications could result in a reduced bus service but would not curtail operations by more than 3,073 annual service hours. To gauge the potential impact on customers, the Board will solicit input at a public hearing on Wednesday, November 16, 2011, at 4 p.m. on the second floor at AC Transit headquarters, 1600 Franklin Street, Oakland. The Dumbarton Express service connects the South Bay to the East Bay via the Dumbarton Bridge. Service restructuring will include the elimination of Line DB3 and some trip eliminations and schedule changes to lines DB and DB1.


November 15, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS

T

he Fremont Art Association’s Digital Photography Group (FAA-DPG) offers another exciting photo adventure—this time, a walk through the Marine Headlands to capture the Golden Gate Bridge in the sunset and twilight on Saturday, November 19 from 2 p.m.-9 p.m. Award-winning photographers Cooksey-Talbott and Jacline Deridder will lead this free photo walk. Learn about making ambient light night photos and create open flash night photos after the sun has set completely, weather permitting. Meet at the newly located Fremont Art Centre, 37695 Niles Boulevard in Fremont (corner of J Street) at 2 p.m. and proSF Skyline by Cooksey-Talbott

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ceed as a group on an hour and a half drive to Marin Headlands. The cost of gas will be shared when car-pooling. Sunset will be around 5 p.m. – we will position on the headlands by 4 p.m. Wear walking shoes and bring a hat, coat, water, snacks, camera, batteries, memory, lens hood, tripod, remote shutter release and lens kit. Optional: Flashlight,

small or large, and photo flash. For questions, call Cooksey at (510) 742.0548. Participants must be over 18 and sign a Release of Liability. To view a map of the destination and for more info, visit: www.faadpgning.com. The Third Saturday (S3) Photography Group is a free street continued on page 32


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Honda Civic Si All New, Surprisingly Powerful BY STEVE SCHAEFER The Honda Civic Si is the performance version of the popular Civic compact - and has been for decades. My experience with a loaded 2012 model proves that it's still got what it takes to entertain - while going easy at the gas pump. 2012 marks Civic’s ninth generation. It’s nearly 40 years since the tiny, MINI Coopersized hatchback debuted. The efficient, cute

City and 41 Highway and 9/8 green scores—hybrid level numbers—and the Hybrid itself delivers 44/44 and 9/9 – good for SmartWay Elite rating. The styling of the ’12 is reminiscent of the radically different 2006 model, but now has more expressive folds and angles, although the front isn’t all that different. The new tail lamps look a lot like those on the Mercedes-Benz C-Class. It’s hard to imagine that it’s not intentional.

www.skinlaseressentials.com

and quiet Civic was the perfect solution to the first gas crisis of 1973. Civics were the cutest thing on the road, and came in jelly bean yellow, orange, and red. I wanted a yellow one badly, but it wasn’t until 1986 that I finally acquired one of my own. By then, they didn’t offer yellow anymore, and had changed their proportions substantially, so my car ended up being white with black trim—no chrome. That was the cool look then, much different from the chrome accents cars use today. 1986 was the first year of the Si. It still had some connection to its tiny predecessor, but with more sharply-drawn lines and a rear window that dropped off like a cliff. There are times when I wish I still had mine—it would be a collectible antique by now. The new, Canadian-built Civic stretches out significantly longer than my car, and the Si now comes as a coupe or a sedan—back in ’86 it was a hatchback only. Over time, the Civic has grown to the size of the old Accord—and even larger. Now, it realistically could be a good family car. People love their Civics. More than 8.8 million have been sold in the United States alone since the model’s debut. It’s perennially in the top ten models when the annual sales numbers are counted. Civic engines have grown larger and more powerful over the years. The standard Civic today features 140 horsepower from a 1.8liter inline four. With the Si, you get much more—a 2.4-liter powerplant with a generous 201 horsepower. That’s 22 percent more than last year’s Si, making it a quick performer. My '86 mustered only 90 horsepower, yet that was about 50 percent more than the standard Civic that year. Today's Si offers a six-speed manual transmission only, versus the five-speed manual that was considered advanced in 1986. The Civic, especially in Si guise, gives you fun plus economy. The EPA rates it at 22 City, 31 Highway, averaging 25 mpg. My Rallye Red coupe earned just over 28 miles per gallon -admittedly spending a lot of time on the freeway, but that’s still a very good number. If you want better, the Civic line is broader than ever this year, with the HF ultra efficient model, the Hybrid, and the Natural Gas models offering even better economy. The EPA’s Green Vehicle Guide gives the Si a 6 for both Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas scores—just enough for SmartWay status. The 1.8-liter standard engine gets 6/7. The HF model earns even better ratings, 29

A new interior retains the two-level instrument panel and in the Si, a sporty character with lots to move the eye. The plastics feel a little inexpensive and there is a lot of "rice paper" pattern surface, but the layout is perfect. Leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob add a dash of upscale flavor. Everything works well, too—Honda has long had its ergonomics together. The 360watt premium audio system features seven speakers and drowns the place in sound. Nothing like that in my ’86. The car is definitely larger and heavier than the Civics of old, but still drives tautly. The electric power-assisted power steering feels natural, and being disconnected from the hydraulic system, takes nothing away from the engine power. The four-wheel disc brakes, coupled with the anti-lock system, brake assist and Electronic Brake Distribution, guarantee that there’s plenty of stopping power, even if you get a little overexcited and exceed the posted limits (be careful). Priced at $24,475, with no options, my Civic was positioned right where the compact sporty hatch market begins. It’ll give VW GTIs and other cars some serious competition. Civics start at $16,575 for the DX with manual transmission. The car’s reputation on top of its sharp new look and upgraded power should be enough to keep the Si popular.

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

United Sikhs need your vote SUBMITTED BY MANDEEP SINGH Chase is having a $3 million giveaway to 100 different charities. UNITED SIKHS is one of those and we are very close to being in the top 10. The organization with the most votes will get $250,000. 2nd to 5th place will get $100,000 and 6th to 100th place will get $25,000. Please help UNITED SIKHS get to number 1! There is little over a week left, so we have little time to move up the list. The voting event is taking place on facebook. So, you do need facebook in order to vote. If you do not have facebook, please forward this information to your friends and family that do have facebook. Two simple steps (both required): 1. Go here http://bit.ly/tmIlQd and "Like" the Chase page 2. Click on "Vote and Share" Make sure to "Like" the Chase page AND click on "Vote and Share." That's it! After you vote, please if you can, pass this information along and get at least five other people to vote. Your help is greatly appreciated and this will go a long way towards helping out all of our communities. If you need more information on what UNITED SIKHS does, please visit www.unitedsikhs.org.


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Bicyclist hit and run

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD November 10: A reporting party called to request that the police check up on a former roommate, a 56 year-old male victim with Alzheimer’s who was being mistreated by an 18 year-old male, who was abusive to the victim. When officers tried to make contact, they could hear a struggle inside and, upon entry, the victim confirmed that roommate had been physically holding him down, preventing him from letting police inside. The roommate has a no-bail warrant, and crawled into an attic space to hide and managed to escape. The roommate is wanted for the warrant. Officer Franchi investigated. Officer Gourley investigated a residential burglary on Kathleen Street. Suspect(s) made entry by smashing the rear sliding glass door. Loss is cash and jewelry. Officer Foster investigated a residential burglary on Granado Street. Suspect(s) made entry through an open side window. Loss is a laptop computer, cash and jewelry.

SUBMITTED BY LT. KELLY MUSGROVE, UNION CITY PD On November 12 at approximately 4:47 a.m., Union City police responded to a report of a possible hit-and-run collision at the intersection of Mission Boulevard and Decoto Road. Upon arrival, officers located a bicyclist with possible life-threatening injuries. Evidence suggested the bicyclist was struck by a northbound vehicle on Mission Boulevard. The bicyclist was transported to a local trauma center. This collision is under investigation. If you have any information regarding this collision, please contact the Union City Police Department at (510) 471-1365 or Traffic Officer Michael Silva at (510) 675-5292.

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Dr. Trang La (a Logan High School alumnus, class of 1996). Not surprisingly, Zoe’s treatments have been costly, leaving little money for Zoe to do the things that a normal 15 year-old gets to indulge in, things that help lighten her load “so things don’t suck.” Friends and family have established an account for Zoe so that she has money to do these things. They’ve named the account according to its precise purpose: “So Things Don’t Suck.” To help raise money for the fund, local Zumba instructor Mimi Quiroz organized Zumba for Zoe, an evening of high-energy Zumba that was held at Logan High School October 21. The event raised over $5,000 for Zoe and her “So Things Don’t Suck” fund. The turnout overwhelmed the Inciongs, Zoe in particular. In fact, despite her doctor’s advice that she stay home due to her low white blood cell count, Zoe decided to make a brief appearance at the fundraiser to thank everyone in person. “My parents must have sensed just how much I really wanted to, because they decided to sneak me out with the condition that I

wear a mask,” Zoe wrote in her blog. “I happily and quickly agreed. I'm so glad and feel satisfied that I got to see Ms. Mimi Quiroz (who threw this all together), all the other Zumba instructors, my Uncle John Francisco (who DJed), and everyone else who contributed to the night and thank them all IN PERSON…All in all, it was definitely worth the risk.” The outpouring of support for Zoe has extended beyond the Zumba fundraiser. Previously a member of the JV water polo team at Logan High, Zoe attends games whenever she feels up to it. At a recent varsity match between Logan and Mission San Jose, the Logan team members yelled “For Zoe!” at every timeout. Logan ended up trouncing MSJ. “At one point, I almost wanted to apologize to Mission's coach for bringing Zoe,” said Ria Inciong, Zoe’s mom. “(Logan High) played extremely well; they were focused, determined, and, some might even say, inspired.” Ria added, “Randy (Zoe’s dad) and I got a bit choked up each time we heard the team yell ‘For Zoe!’” Though Zoe has received immeasurable support from the TriCity community, the giving has not been a one-way street. Zoe’s attitude and determination have inspired many, even those she has

not personally met. But perhaps no one has been more inspired by Zoe than her own mother. “How is it that at 15, she's already processed through her situation and accepted that she's where she's supposed to be? While Randy and I are still going through anger, denial, sadness, and even bargaining,” says Ria, “Zoe's jumped ahead of us to acceptance. I think that we need to follow her lead.” But Zoe is not content only to inspire others; she is also determined to give back in more concrete ways. The blood drive is just one way Zoe would like to give back to the community that has given her and her family so much support. The blood drive will be held on Saturday, November 19, 2 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. at St. Anne’s Church, 32223 Cabello Street in Union City. Donations to Zoe’s “So Things Don’t Suck” can be sent to: Zoe Inciong "So Things Don't Suck" 30530 Del Valle Place Union City, CA 94587 You can find Zoe’s blog at http://www.carepages.com/care pages/Zoe-means-Life. Blood Drive Saturday, November 19 2 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. St. Anne’s Church 32223 Cabello Street, Union City

Treasurer Lockyer announces new manager for CA 529 College Savings Plan SUBMITTED BY JOE DEANDA State Treasurer Bill Lockyer announced TIAA-CREF Tuition Financing (TFI) today became program manager for ScholarShare, California’s 529 college savings plan, a move that strengthens ScholarShare by giving families lower management fees, additional investment options and an improved website. “We’re excited about the benefits California families will receive with TFI managing ScholarShare,” said Lockyer, chairman of the ScholarShare Investment Board (SIB). “The improvements will make saving for college cheaper, easier and more effective. The importance of a college degree continues to grow, but tuition and other costs are rising right alongside. To set aside money to pay those costs, families need the strongest possible tools. ScholarShare is one of those tools, even more so with TFI at the helm.” “We are pleased to work closely with the ScholarShare Investment Board,” said Doug Chittenden, TIAA-CREF senior vice president and head of TFI. “We look forward to serving Californians saving for college by offering them a well-diversified plan with low-cost investment options and a variety of educational tools.” After soliciting bids, the SIB unanimously selected TFI in June to replace Fidelity Investments as ScholarShare’s program manager. Existing account holders have been informed of the switch and ScholarShare’s new, improved features. Account holders are not required to take any action. Their assets automatically will be transferred to a similar investment product with the option to change investment products once per calendar year. The new ScholarShare plan will offer 19 investment portfolios, compared to 15 under Fidelity. Annual asset-based fees will range from .18 percent to .62 percent, compared to .25 percent to 1.06 percent under Fidelity. New online tools include a more user-friendly, easy-to-navigate website, and a mobile site that allows account access from smartphones. Prospective account holders can use the website to get information about the plan, use a calculator tool to estimate savings goals and sign up for a new account. Existing account holders can use the website to manage their account, make additional contributions, change or add investment options and enroll in automatic payroll deductions, among other options. Named for the section of IRS code under which they were created, 529 plans are highly regarded for their tax-advantaged status. Any earnings on investments grow taxdeferred. Withdrawals, when used for tuition and other qualified higher education expenses, are federal and state tax-free. ScholarShare has no annual account maintenance fee, no income limit and offers a high maximum contribution limit of $350,000. Accounts may be opened online with as little as $25. The program currently holds more than $4.3 billion in assets. For information about the SIB, visit www.treasurer.ca.gov/scholarshare.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

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November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, a national campaign dedicated to turning the spotlight on lung cancer—what it is, how it can be diagnosed and treated, and how to prevent it. Every year, about 220,000 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed and about 155,000 people die of the disease. “These statistics really haven’t changed much over time,” comments Dr. Chu. “Medicine has made advances in diagnosing and treating the disease, but we haven’t made inroads into lowering the death rate.” In recent years, especially with the introduction of PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, doctors’ ability to diagnose and analyze the type and severity of lung cancer has been improved. Lung cancer treatment has also advanced with more tolerable medications and less invasive surgical procedures. PET scanning has made it possible to confirm a diagnosis of and perform the very important function of staging lung cancers— meaning that the extent to which a tumor has spread can be described. However, the fact remains that lung cancer is very difficult to diagnose early, when chances for successful treatment and longer life expectancy are greater. Currently, only about 15 percent of lung cancers are detected early. “Symptoms from lung cancer don’t usually occur in its early stages, so patients have no reason to see their doctor,” reports Dr. Chu. “And, there is no way to screen for the disease. When a diagnosis of lung cancer is made early, it’s usually because a doctor has been very vigilant in aggressively testing someone who is at high risk or because the patient has come in to be treated for another problem and the lung cancer is found as a result.” There are two general types of the disease: small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung

cancer. The second is far more common, accounting for nearly nine out of 10 cases. Each type grows in a different way. Small cell lung cancer is more aggressive than the non-small cell form, but it is also more responsive to treatment with chemotherapy. Unfortunately, by the time most small cell lung cancers are diagnosed, they have already spread to other areas of the body, according to Dr. Chu. Patients with this type of cancer must be treated with four or five cycles of system-wide chemotherapy. Non-small cell lung cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of these approaches. “Treatment can be very rigorous and difficult, so patients need to discuss the various options thoroughly with their doctors, other care providers, and their family and friends,” states Dr. Chu. “When a diagnosis of lung cancer is made, everyone is affected. We need to realize that lung cancer patients can’t take the journey alone.” Lung cancer treatment is usually damaging to a patient’s physical well-being and quality of life, Dr. Chu explains. So, patients need lots of support from family and friends physically, emotionally and spiritually. Many patients have difficulty sleeping and are fearful of a recurrence of the disease after treatment, and it is not uncommon for them to become deeply depressed. None of this is a pretty picture, and that’s why finding ways to prevent lung cancer is critically important, experts say. “Just think, if smoking stopped completely, we could just about wipe lung cancer off the face of the earth,” advises Dr. Chu. If you or someone you know is a smoker, remember that Thursday, Nov. 17, is the Great American Smokeout. Right now is the time to quit smoking. You’ll be giving your health and the fight against lung cancer a big boost. For more information about the Smokeout, visit the American Cancer Society Web site at www.cancer.org or call toll free at 1-800-ACS-2345. Other stop smoking resources include: National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov 1-877-44U-QUIT American Lung Association www.lungusa.org 1-800-LUNGUSA (586-4872) The American Heart Association (www.heart.org) has a special Quit Smoking page for kids.

Cancer Care Programs at Washington Hospital Washington Hospital offers high quality cancer treatment services in your backyard. To learn more about cancer care at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/cancercare.

Fremont Bank Donates to KGO Radio’s Thanksgiving Charities SUBMITTED BY LEE DAWSON Fremont Bank will donate online credit card processing services to support news talk radio station KGO’s (810 AM) fundraising efforts for the St. Anthony Foundation’s Thanksgiving dinner, part of the station’s 23rd annual Thanksgiving Charities drive. This will be the bank’s third year of supporting this important community event. The KGO Thanksgiving Charities drive also supports Sacred Heart Community Service, St. Vincent de Paul (Alameda County) and Fresh Start (Walnut Creek). “We are proud to again support KGO Radio on their long-standing Thanksgiving Charities. At a time when fees for financial services are rising, our contribution saves St. Anthony’s Foundation costs of approximately $2,000. They have worked tirelessly for close to a quarter of a century helping the community and those in need, and we applaud their remarkable efforts,” said Fremont Bank’s executive vice president Howard Hyman. “We encourage our staff and clients to visit the KGO Radio website to learn more and support the organizations that are part of this special event.”

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Bay Area Leo Club chartered

L

ions International, the world’s largest service club, with 46,000 clubs and 1.35 million members gained an additional club and 42 new members Saturday, November 5 as Bay Area Leo Club was officially installed at TOP Buffet in Fremont. Sponsored by San Mateo Metro Lions Club, this group under the leadership of President Dustin Chiang will focus on serving the local community and worldwide organizations that “make our world a better place.” LEO organizations are (an acronym for Leadership, Experience and Opportunity) under the leadership of Lions Clubs International. These clubs involving over 150,000 young people in 139 countries serve their communities under this banner; all dedicated to making a difference. Lions International is dedicated to local, national and international service projects with a special emphasis on a challenge by Helen Keller in 1925 to become

BY NISHA PATEL On Saturday, November 19 the South Bay Community Church (SBCC) in the Warm Springs district of Fremont will

be holding a benefit gospel concert to raise funds for Malawi’s Clean Water Project (W.A.S.H.). By “adopting” the village of Chikwina/Mpamba, the church has partnered with World Vision’s $50 million, nationwide project W.A.S.H., and is aiming to raise $10,000. The goal of the Clean Water Project is to help communities in Malawi achieve sustainable access to safe water, maintain improved sanitation facilities, and educate the people on more effective hygiene techniques. South Bay Community Church has been a part of a ten-year partnership with World Vision for such projects, and has made significant improvements to the lifestyles of the native people of Malawi. Church members have made two trips to Malawi within the last few years. During the most recent visit in 2009, SBCC sponsored the village for which they built a community center for the local people. This community center has been used for a myriad of purposes, some of which in-

"knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness." She asked, “Will you not help me hasten the day when there shall be no preventable blindness; no little deaf, blind child untaught; no blind man or woman unaided?” One of the first activities of the new group will be to organize a fundraising activity in January 2012 to support Doctors Without Borders. Charter members of the group, freshmen at Mission San Jose High School, all agreed that the major attractions of the new group was a desire to make a difference, community service hours necessary for high school graduation and inclusion in decisions determining which organizations will receive the results of their fundraising efforts. They noted that in many other organizations, these choices are pre-determined or left to others in the upper echelon of the hierarchy. Bay Area Leo Club Board of Directors: Dustin Chiang-President; Megan Ren-Vice President; Sriya Maram-Co-Treasurer; Kelly

clude a voting facility for regional elections, storage areas for AIDS workers, a health care center and recreation center where seasonal functions are held. Head Pastor Bryan Murphy, who was on the

trip, recounts, “Since the last visit, it is wonderful to see that [the community] is food secure.” There are now fish ponds, small farm animals, crop harvests, and enough resources to feed the whole village. Through efforts of “microlending,” the village has established small businesses, which include juicing businesses and

Lee-Co-Treasurer; Joshua ChaoSecretary; Zixin Chen-Memberat-Large; Allen Hsiao-Member-at-Large; Aarti Panda-Member-at-Large Charter Members: Nicholas Cai, Joshua Chao, Shweta Chawla, Laura Chen, Zixin Chen, Dustin Chiang, Abby Choi, Michael Dong, Hannah Folk, Nathan Fong, Allen Hsiao, Austin Hsu, Stephanie Hsu, Alex Jiang, Rajvi Joshi, Austin King, Isha Kumar, Amandi Kwok, Kelly Lee, Katherine Lin, Justin Liu, Aarthi Madadi, Akshay Mahesh, Momina Mahmood, Sriya Maram, Katie Mei, Jay Menon, Somya Moyya, Aarti Panda, Melissa Peng, Iyesha Puri, Megan Ren, Manjima Sarkar, Anna Tang, Kevin Tang, Shenlum Tang, Akshaya Thananjeyan, Luke Wang, Hanson Wang, Jason Wu, Kevin Zhang, Sandy Zhang, Lillian Zhao. To contact the Bay Area Leo Club, visit www.bayarealeoclub.org

fish farming, all of which help sustain daily needs. Within the ten-year partnership, South Bay Community Church has adopted 200 children in Malawi and has also been giving an annual contribution of approximately $15,000 per year. Local artists and choirs will be performing at Saturday’s concert; most artists have either donated their time to provide the entertainment or have drastically reduced their fees to make their acts more cost-efficient for the church. Fea-

tured will be selections from: Derrick Hall & Company, Allen Temple Men’s Choir, men’s ensemble “Purchased,” Hip-Hop artist “Zeal,” vocalist Janice Davis and the SBCC Choir. The benefit will start at 5 p.m. with a social hour, followed by the concert from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. During the gathering time and intermission, the church will be selling original handmade clothing items from one of the Malawi village’s businesses. South Bay Community Church had a benefit concert in 2008, during which $10-15,000 was raised for World Vision’s projects in Malawi. Church members hope to make this year’s event a success as well, since all proceeds will be going directly towards the cause. Malawi Benefit Gospel Concert Saturday, November 19 5 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 490-9500 www.sobcc.org Tickets: $25


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Two more dams vulnerable to quakes Over the last couple of years, we have been receiving more and more information about the seismic stability of our local dams. A couple of weeks ago, the Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors heard yet another presentation about our ongoing seismic stability studies. The preliminary findings show that two dams, Calero and Guadalupe, are susceptible to significant damage if a major earthquake were to occur in their close proximity. The board is concerned for public safety, above all else. As a result of these new findings, our staff promptly took action to operate the reservoirs under new storage restrictions to minimize the chance of the dams failing and an uncontrollable release of the water behind them. Both dams now are operated to maintain the water level no more than 25 feet below their crest. The experts have assured us that this safety buffer is conservative and appropriate. While we are confident that we are operating our dams safely, we are continually preparing for potential disasters. I represent the water district on the Santa Clara County Emergency Preparedness Council, which is made up of all 15 cities, the County, and the water district. Because we are part of the council, we regularly coordinate and share information with other public agencies to prepare for disasters. The type of damage that the experts predict for these dams is a slumping of the crest (top) and cracks in the dam. If this were to happen when the reservoir was full, water could flow over the top of the dam, eroding the crest and ultimately, releasing water downstream. Both of these dams are in the Guadalupe Watershed, which means the water released would flow toward the Guadalupe River, which would be unable to contain the massive flow. Including these two dams, we currently have five dams that are under storage restric-

tions. This has a significant impact on our water supply. Anderson Reservoir, the largest of our ten reservoirs, is restricted to about 68 percent of its capacity. In all, our reservoir storage capacity is currently reduced by 27 percent. Some may wonder how this happened. Were these dams built poorly? No, they were built using the state of the science at that time. We now know much more about how earthen dams behave in earthquakes, and we know much more about the various faults that crisscross the Bay Area. These new studies are using the latest, modern field and lab investigation and analytical techniques. We have initiated a capital project to plan for a retrofit for Anderson, and another project has been initiated to address Calero and Guadalupe dams. We do not yet know what the potential solutions are or how much they will cost. The good news is it is possible to retrofit dams with these kinds of issues. And one more piece of good news: this study has revealed that Almaden Dam is more seismically sound than previously thought. As a result, our expert consultants and an independent technical review board have recommended that the current storage restriction on Almaden Dam be lifted. If the state Division of Safety of Dams approves, an additional 326 acre-feet of water storage will be available in the reservoir. Over the next few years, you’ll continue to hear a lot about our dams. More studies will be completed. Plans for retrofits will be developed. Construction will commence, and ultimately, we will end up with safer dams and a more reliable water supply. As always, I am available for questions or comments as your District 3 representative for the northern areas of Sunnyvale and Santa Clara; Alviso; Milpitas; and the north San Jose and Berryessa communities. Feel free to contact me at (408) 234-7707. Director Richard Santos Santa Clara Valley Water District

New Haven Board update SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE The Board of Education on Tuesday night agreed to move ahead with the process of calling a special election next May to ask voters to approve a parcel tax to help relieve budget pressures caused by the state’s ongoing financial crisis. The Board also approved commissioning a community survey to gauge which priorities are most important to voters and the tax level they are willing to support. The survey likely would take place during the first week of January, so results could be available before the election filing deadline, February 2. Last year, the District asked voters to approve a $180 per parcel tax to raise approximately $3 million. Measure B garnered 66.4 percent of the vote, a handful of votes shy of the two-thirds majority needed to pass. As a result, the District was forced to increase class sizes and reduce the length of the school year by five days; all employees also are taking a sixth day without pay. The number of stipends for athletics, band, forensics and other after-school activities has been reduced, and further cuts to those programs were avoided only because of a one-time $100,000 donation from the independent New Haven Schools Foundation. Also, the Board: Approved a one-year contract extension for Superintendent Kari McVeigh, through November 30, 2015. Was introduced to Dr. Olivia Lynch, the new Director of K-12 Programs. Dr. Lynch, who has more than 30 years of professional experience in education, already has worked with James Logan High School on its redesign efforts, in her role as a coach for large high schools with academies.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Fed to conduct 4th round of bank stress tests BY DEREK KRAVITZ AP ECONOMICS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Nov 11 - The second-ranking member of the Federal Reserve said the central bank will conduct a fourth round of stress tests in the coming weeks to determine if U.S. banks can withstand a recession. Vice Chairman Janet Yellen said Friday that the tests are necessary to ensure a stable U.S. economy. She made the comments during a speech at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. In her speech, Yellen also noted the increased downside risks that Europe's debt crisis poses to financial markets and the global economy. “We are monitoring European developments very closely, and we will continue to do all that we can to mitigate the consequence of any adverse developments abroad on the U.S. financial system,” she said. The Fed oversees Wall Street's biggest banks, including Citigroup, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase & Co., and Wells Fargo. The Fed has performed periodic stress tests on the 19 banks it watches since 2009. The central bank has said the stress tests are a key part in its ongoing efforts to make sure that banks and the entire financial system - are stable. Banks that don't pass the stress tests are asked to take steps to raise new capital in case of big losses. Previous tests were done in 2009, late 2010 and early 2011.

Democratic forum meeting SUBMITTED BY JAN GIOVANNINI-HILL The next regularly scheduled General Meeting for the Tri-Cities Democratic Forum will be on Wednesday, November 16, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. Our guest speaker this month will be District 2, Alameda County Supervisor, Nadia Lockyer, who will be doing a review of her first year in office. Her topics will include the accomplishments and priorities she has focused on in the first eleven months as our Supervisor. Please join us at 6:30 p.m. this month to enjoy a no-host Dinner at Chandni’s Restaurant ($15 per person); and to sign-in, meet some new and old friends, and have our usual social networking time. Meetings begin at 7:30 p.m. at Chandni's Restaurant, 5748 Mowry School Road, Newark. Membership is open to registered Democrats who want to further the purposes of the local TriCities Democratic Forum. All are welcome to attend our meetings and special events. Please visit www.tricitydems.com for further information and details.

It’s time to enter the DuPont Challenge

Challenger space shuttle, and is true to the flight’s educational mission – to “touch the future.” The competition also celebrates 25 years of inspiring students to excel and achieve in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). “Education is crucial to the future of American competitiveness. We must keep America at the cutting edge of scientific discovery and technological innovation. To achieve this, we need to inspire students and teachers to share in our excitement for the possibilities innovation can bring to our growing population by encouraging the pursuit of careers in science, engineering and related fields,” said DuPont Chair and CEO Ellen Kullman. “The DuPont Challenge provides an excellent opportunity for students to demonstrate their creativity and advance their contributions to a better society through scientific discovery, invention and innovation.” All students in grades 7-12 across the United States and Canada may submit their essay entries from November 15 to January 31, 2012. Essays are evaluated in two divisions: Junior Division (grades 7, 8, and 9) and Senior Division (grades 10, 11, and 12). More than $100,000 in prizes will be awarded. The top three winners in each division plus a parent and their sponsoring science teacher receive an expenses-paid trip to The Walt Disney World® Resort and Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Fla., in addition to savings bonds for the winning students and grants for their sponsoring teachers. For the 2012 competition year, Britannica Digital Learning, a division of Encyclopædia Britannica, has been added as a new sponsor. They will be providing a selection of its high-quality interactive products as prizes for the winning students and their schools, as well as for students earning Honorable Mention. To obtain information on entry requirements and rules and regulations, as well as awards and prizes for all levels, students and teachers should visit www.thechallenge.dupont.com. As additional inspiration for this year’s competition, The DuPont Challenge has assembled collectible trading cards featuring 25 “STEM Women All-Stars,” female scientists who have made significant STEM contributions to our lives. The 2012 DuPont Challenge Science Essay Competition is sponsored by DuPont in collaboration with NBC Learn, Britannica Digital Learning, The Walt Disney World® Resort, NASA, National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), and A+ Media. For more information, visit www.thechallenge.dupont.com.

SUBMITTED BY TARA C. STEWART The DuPont Challenge Science Essay Competition is seeking entries starting November 15. Now in its 25th year, the contest was created to honor the memory of the heroes of the 1986

SUBMITTED BY LUNA SALAVER In the spirit of holiday giving, BART Station Agents and Train Operators (Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 members) are teaming up to host a food and “Toys for Tots” drive. Volunteers will collect non-perishable food items and brand new toys at selected stations through Friday, November 18. If you would like to donate to families in need, please bring your donations during peak commute hours (6 am - 9 am and 3 pm - 6 pm) to the following stations in Alameda County: Downtown Berkeley, Rockridge, 19th Street, San Leandro, Dublin/Pleasanton and Fremont The non-perishable food and new toys you donate will be distributed by county to families in local communities.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

SUBMITTED BY BILL EVERETT Music at the Mission presents Written in the Stars: Existentialist Poetry, Zen Buddhism and the American Song, featuring the music of John Jacob Niles. This inspiring and colorful, multi-media performance will explore the music and life of famous Kentucky composer and balladeer, John Jacob Niles, whose work greatly influenced the Folk Revival of the 1950s and ‘60s. The concert will weave together live performance with video, highlighting each era of the composer's life from his early popular songs to the rarely performed Niles/Merton Songs, op. 171 and 172. In the summer of 1967, John Jacob Niles met the Trappist monk Thomas Merton. Niles had spent his career collecting, cataloging and arranging American folk music, especially that of his native Kentucky. His work became a huge influence on popular folk musicians of the ‘50s and ‘60s, including Joan Baez and Peter, Paul and Mary. Merton was a well-traveled poet, social activist, and scholar in comparative religion, whose great admiration for eastern religion had helped open dialog between East and West. The two struck up an instant friendship founded in their shared interest in Zen Buddhism and existentialism. Niles was devastated by the untimely death of Merton the following year. He spent the next four years setting Merton's poetry to music

and the result was the haunting and beautiful collection of Niles/Merton Songs, op 171 and 172. Come and join Kentucky mezzo soprano Sherri Phelps and pianist Rachel Taylor in exploring the meeting of these two great minds. Mezzo Soprano Sherri Phelps is an active soloist throughout the Southeast including operatic, oratorio, and concert repertoire. Her performances include The Haydn Festspiele where she appeared as Alto Soloist in Beethoven’s “Missa Solemnis” in the Haydnsaal in Eisenstadt, Austria. She also had the pleasure of working with the late Roscoe Lee Brown at the Music at the Mission Concert Series narrating Stravinsky’s “L’histoire du Soldat.” Dr. Phelps had the honor of being Alto Soloist with The Classical Music Festival Broadcast of Haydn’s “Lord Nelson Mass” live from St. Stephen’s Dome in Vienna, Austria. She was delighted to sing the world premiere of Craig Bohmler’s song “Keys” as well as the rest of his song cycle “Songs of Loss” with the Mission Chamber Orchestra of San Jose under the baton of Emily Ray. Her credits include a benefit concert with the Fremont Symphony Guild, Aspen Opera Center in the role of Myrtle in “Still Life,” the alto solos in Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony,” Mozart’s “Requiem” and Handel’s “Messiah,” the latter multiple times with the Lexington Philharmonic. Dr. Phelps has sung as soloist under the renown Jonathan Wilcox, and Sir Neville

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Marinner as well as many other conductors over the course of her career, and has recorded a role in Aaron Copeland’s “Tenderland” with Kirk Trevor. She is also an active teacher with experience at Western Kentucky University, and Murray State University, as well as maintaining a private studio. Dr. Rachel Taylor currently serves as a piano instructor at Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) and the director of F.A.M.E., a new preparatory department of music at EKU. She currently maintains a private piano studio in Georgetown, Kentucky and previously served on the faculties at The College-Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati, Grinnell College, Coe College, Cornell College, and the Preucil School of Music. Dr. Taylor is a Nationally Certified Teacher of Music (Music Teacher’s National Association), holds numerous certifications, serves on the faculty of the Stephen Collins Foster Summer Music Camps and is the director of the Middle School Piano Camp. Founded by Aileen Chanco in 2005, Music at the Mission restores the luster of Mission San Jose’s early 19th century reputation as an active center for musical performance by presenting a vibrant mix of contemporary and historic music in the intimate acoustics of the Mission. Chanco draws on the wealth of the accomplished Bay Area’s musical community, inviting the region’s top performers to come together in a celebratory atmosphere of music making and exploration of chamber music in various combinations ranging from duos to small orchestral configurations. Inspired by the success of their first concert, Chanco presented a new chamber music group, the Adorno Ensemble, in the spring of 2005. Her artistic vision was to present “a new type of chamber music se-

ries for the new century” to stimulate greater interest in classical music among the next generation. The result is programming with engaging concerts built around themes that provoke critical thought and continued exploration from the audience. Informative pre-concert talks and postconcert “Meet and Greet the Artist” receptions provide close contact with the artists, where she hopes the audience will feel actively engaged in the experience as a participant rather than just an observer. The series has grown to be an important part of the Tri-Cities arts scene and draws audience members Bay Area-wide. Acclaimed artists presented include New-York based, ETHEL string quartet, soprano Lucy Shelton, pianist Stephen Gosling and actor David Ogden Stiers. Alongside the more traditional programs, the series also champions American new music and has programmed contemporary works by composers from Latin America, China, Azerbaijan and the Republic of Georgia and has given premieres of several works by new composers in its short history. Tickets for November 19 are $25 for general admission and $20 for students and seniors when purchased at the door. Online tickets are $28.50 general admission and $23 for students and seniors at http://www.musicatthemission.vbotickets.com/events. Music at the Mission: Written in the Stars Saturday, November 19 8 p.m. (pre-concert talk begins at 7:15 p.m.) Old Mission San Jose Church 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont http://www.musicatthemission.vbotickets.com/events www.musicatmsj.org Tickets: $20 - $28.50

A common-sense moral code SUBMITTED BY SUSANNE REICH It may seem rather ambitious to try to fight crime with a booklet, but that is precisely what a group of South Bay residents is doing: distributing thousands of copies of a little booklet called The Way to Happiness door-to-door in Eastside San Jose. To date, more than 7,000 copies have been distributed. Scientology Volunteer Coordinator Elaine Manley says, “The news media tells us that crime is getting worse in San Jose and we know that local communities have been

hampered by budget cuts. I felt it was time that we stepped up to help make San Jose a safer place.” The Way to Happiness was written by L. Ron Hubbard in 1981 to be the first moral code based on common sense. Its purpose is to help arrest the current moral decline in society and restore mutual trust among people. It was specifically written so that it could be followed by anyone, of any race, color or creed. More information and an online version of The Way to Happiness can be found at www.thewaytohappiness.org or by calling 866-544-TWTH (8984).

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

November 15, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

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Tri-City Stargazer NOVEMBER 16 – NOVEMBER 22, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: I have frequently written about Pluto during the last two years because it is making such prominent aspects to other planets. Pluto was reduced in stature to a “dwarf” planet by the world’s scientists. But for astrologers, this planet is the most powerful symbol of life, death, and transformation that we know. Whatever sign Pluto is in represents a backdrop of our lives, both personal and collective, for many years. It entered Capricorn in late 2008 and will remain in that sign until 2024. Capricorn is the sign of business, capitalism, banks, and all traditional institutions. The resulting havoc is clear on the global scale. In this article I will present how it affects each sign. Read both your sun and rising signs for greater clarity. This is a keeper article because it lasts so very long.. Aries (March 21-April 20): The Rams will be focused on improving and applying leadership skills. Your personality profile includes natural leadership, so this is not really new, but you will be focusing attention on adding a more profound layer of management to this operation. Many will be building their own businesses and rubbing elbows with people of power. Taurus (April 21-May 20): You will be changing your life through education, the law, or possibly international work (Internet included). Your associations with formal bodies, i.e., religious or college institutions, will alter your perspective and your outlook. Many have decided to refresh their formal education or even begin anew in a different track. Major life changes will evolve through partners. Gemini (May 21-June 20): Circumstances are changing concerning income that is generated through investments, a partner's resources, or inheritance. This includes whatever income is outside of salary. It is important that you educate yourself in each of these areas. Some will begin to manage resources for other people. You must adopt a longer range perspective on your life.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): Many Moon Children will experience changes within their marriages. The unwritten "rules" are up for grabs. Be wary of circumstances that might lead singles to believe you must marry or take on a partnership. Others may be contemplating divorce or separation from partner(s). One or more relationships will not continue as you have known in the past. Your perspective will be completely altered in this arena. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): It is important to allow your job skills or your work environment to change. This is inevitable. The circumstances may be altered to the point that how you do your work is totally modified. You need to access new abilities. Giving better attention to your health routines will be required. Inherited physical weaknesses may be recognized so that you can resolve or prevent problems. Virgo the Virgin (August 23-September 22): Those of childbearing age will feel pressed toward the next decision. Do you want a baby in your future or do you not? If children are not the subject, then personally creative births of other kinds will beg to be noticed and experi-

enced. For either of these areas, it will feel as though it is imperative to make something happen. Libra (September 23-October 22): You will be making important decisions concerning property, security and family. Circumstances beyond your control may change your perspective altogether on how or where you want to live in the future. Your need to create security may pressure you to redefine your identity. You will be pressured to know yourself far more deeply than ever before. Family secrets may be uncovered. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Habitual patterns of negative thought will be brought to the surface and eradicated. Long held beliefs will require a fresh examination in order for you to move forward. It is time to add new management skills to your life. Language and communications with others will be affected, and you will acquire greater power in this area. Apparent losses will bring blessings in their wake. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): The source of your self-esteem and personal values will change in major ways. In the western world, we measure self-

esteem by income and what we do for a living. This pattern of thinking will deepen and broaden for you. Some will become wealthy and others will become paupers. It depends upon what “lessons” you need. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Pluto will be traversing your sign until 2024. During that period you will come to know yourself more deeply than you might have thought possible. Many will concentrate upon growing their personal power and influence. You must maintain your high-minded principles, lest powers greater than you send you toppling. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): Truths of your history that you may never have known or acknowl-

edged will bubble to the surface to help you mature. Some may encounter old family skeletons that make a large difference in how you perceive your life story. Old mysteries and shadows will come to light and shift from unconscious enemies to far more conscious friends. Pisces (February 19-March 20): Your perspective will alter dramatically concerning your sense of community and contacts. You will prefer to seek out the relationship(s) that have the potential for depth. Beware of overly intense persons or organizations who want to take over your life and use your energy. The Fish, who always think they are invisible, will be surprised to discover that they have more influence than they ever imagined.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

continued from page 1

BY MAURICIO SEGURA That time of year is upon us once again. The time when cooks everywhere rush to the grocery stores seeking out the finest turkeys, stuffing, potatoes, yams, and “secret” ingredients they'll need to conjure up their annual culinary masterpieces. This feast will be set on the table for the entire family to enjoy, with thanks given for another year of life. Unfortunately, that scenario is getting more and more difficult to accomplish in these recession ridden times. There are families struggling to put just a regular dinner on the table each night, let alone a full multi-course meal. Then there are people with no families, and of course, the homeless. This is where the Taiwanese Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with the Centerville Presbyterian Church and others come in… to fill the need and give people who have limited means a great Thanksgiving feast. The annual Free Thanksgiving Dinner and an Evening of Entertainment will be held on November 22, from 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. inside the Centerville Presbyterian Church's gym. Eat a full Thanksgiving meal while enjoying local choirs, singers, and dance troupes performing on stage. Great free raffle prizes will also be given away throughout

items needed to help make this a happy holiday for those in need or those that are alone this Thanksgiving. You may also call (510) 793-5683 for an update on needs. LOV’s Community Service Center at 36120 Ruschin Drive, Newark in the former Ruschin School is open to receive donations Monday - Friday from 8:30 am until 5 pm. Or you may call for pick up. If you don’t have time to shop, monetary donations are very much welcome so that we may purchase what is needed.

the evening. “It will be a night of great food, fellowship, and entertainment,” says John Hsieh, founder of the Taiwanese Chamber of Commerce. Now in its 13th year, the event was begun when Hsieh noticed similar events in surrounding cities, particularly Oakland. “I brought up the idea to the Taiwanese community and contacted the Centerville Presbyterian Church to see if they would let us use their facilities, and the rest is what you see today.” About 700 people have shown up yearly to enjoy great food and entertainment. Hsieh adds, “We just want people to relax and enjoy the holiday. It's not just open to the homeless. There are families in need, there are elderly people who can't cook on their own, who knows, there may even be people who feel lonely and just want to be around a group. Those are the people we would like to see come out. But everyone is welcome, no one will be rejected. There are no requirements.” The entire menu is catered and consists of typical Thanksgiving food: turkey, ham, mashed potatoes with gravy, yams, veggies, stuffing, salad, bread rolls, fruit, pumpkin pie, and much more. Refreshments will include coffee, punch, and milk, but if you want to bring soda from the

outside, you may. Signature Taiwanese dishes will also be available for people to try. All the food was made available through individual donations by the members of the Taiwanese Chamber of Commerce. This event is sponsored by the Taiwanese Chamber of Commerce of SFBA and Love of Taiwan Association, in Cooperation with Centerville Presbyterian Church, Centerville Free Dining Room, Canaan Taiwanese Christian Church, Formosan United Methodist Church, and Immanuel Presbyterian Church. Volunteers are both needed and greatly appreciated. If interested, please call Tammy Sawyer at (510) 7933575 ext. 11 or John Hsieh at (510) 784-7341 for a list of ways to help out, as well as to enjoy the food and entertainment. Thanksgiving is a time of unity, caring, and sharing. Make your way to the Centerville Presbyterian Church on November 22 where everyone will be family. Free Thanksgiving Dinner and an Evening of Entertainment Tuesday, November 22 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. Centerville Presbyterian Church gym 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 793-3575 ext. 11 (510) 784-7341

NewPark Mall, a perfect place for holiday memories SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG Savor those holiday memories by bringing the family to visit Santa Claus at NewPark Mall. Children of all ages are invited to tell Santa what is on their wish list, and take a photo with the famous man in the red suit. All children who visit Santa will receive a free Christmas coloring book titled “You Mean the World to Me.” Various photo packages are available for purchase. Santa at NewPark Mall November 18 - December 15 Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Sunday, noon – 6 p.m.

December 16 - 18 Friday-Saturday, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Sunday, noon – 7 p.m. December 19 - December 23 Daily 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. December 24 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. (Santa takes occasional breaks throughout the day.) NewPark Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 794-5523 www.newparkmall.com


November 15, 2011

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n Saturday, November 19 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., members of the Kiwanis Club of Fremont, along with the club’s sponsored youth organizations, will be partnering with Safeway stores in Fremont collecting turkeys and other food donations for the holidays. All food will be donated to support Tri-Cities League of Volunteers – LOV’s 23rd annual Thanksgiving Day Feast which last year served 4,550 meals at the Newark Pavilion and to the homebound in Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Castro Valley, San Leandro & San Lorenzo. Participating stores are: Safeway at the Fremont Hub,

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

39100 Argonaut Way, Safeway in South Fremont at 46848 Mission Blvd and Safeway in the Irvington District, 3902 Washington Blvd. Along with the turkeys, Kiwanians will be accepting hams, baked pies, canned goods and other non-perishable items. Safeway will also have pre-packaged bags of groceries, priced at $10 specifically designed to help those in need with food for the holiday. These bags are a part of Safeway’s “Help Us End Hunger (Every Bag Counts) national food drive beginning November 16 through December 24. All bags collected at the Fremont locations will go to LOV’s food pantry and be distributed throughout the

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holiday season. Safeway is partnering with Kraft Foods and locally NBC Bay Area TV. NBC Bay Area will promote the effort to all viewers. Kraft has committed a holiday gift of $400,000 in grant money to be distributed to a number of food banks in each of Safeway’s U.S. operating divisions which will help provide roughly 2 million meals nation-wide. The Kiwanis Club of Fremont urges everyone to help make this holiday a little brighter for those less fortunate. For more information contact Marsha Badella (510) 489-9305.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Letter to the Editor

Carlton Senior Living communities are designed with the active senior in mind. Senior living in Carlton’s Senior Apartments gives active residents over 55 the opportunity for lively social calendars, entertainment, and activities. They can enjoy the benefits that go beyond normal apartment living while at the same time giving up the tiresome demands of home ownership like routine maintenance and household chores like housekeeping.

All-Day restaurant-style dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.

n Saturday, October 29, 2011, we and other members of the Mission Hills Tennis Club received a letter from the owner, Sheena Chang, stating that the club would be closed indefinitely starting November 1st for reno-

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on the property. It is zoned as Private Open Space with recreational purposes. It has been evident for a long time that the ownership has no intention of allowing the club to thrive as it once did. On the contrary, under her

vations. This came as a great shock to the club members, club staff, the junior tennis program, and the whole community. The unexpected closing of the club, on a few days notice, happened right in the middle of the USTA tennis season, and left team captains and players scrambling to find alternate locations for the remaining matches. While it was inconsiderate of the ownership to not consult club membership and give more warning, the trouble and hardship it has caused the long-term staff and junior tennis program is much greater. The outstanding junior program, run by Tompkins Tennis, attracts nationally ranked juniors from around the Bay Area. Tompkins Tennis had to scramble to relocate the program to an alternate site with only a few days notice. We contacted Sheena Chang about the timeframe and nature of the renovations, but she only stated that she plans to submit an application for a remodel/expansion to the city, but gave no further information. The future of this beautiful club, with a history of 35 years of continuous operation, and the surrounding open space known as Kimber Park, seems now to be in question. The story of what has happened to this club is just a small chapter in the saga of Ms. Chang’s quest to develop the Kimber Park open space and pave pristine rolling oaks and redwoods with concrete and unnecessary homes. The first red flag can be traced back to the original purchase of the property in 2004 by Ms. Chang, when she paid $6.2M for a club and open space that was valued at only $1.9M (In 1997, a previous owner purchased it for $1.1M; improvements of $.7K were completed in 1999). The $4.3M premium clearly indicates Ms Chang’s intention to develop the property, since it would be difficult to generate a profit at this price with the legally permitted use. However, no development rights exist

management we have witnessed a noticeable deterioration, starting with reduced services such as elimination of child care, poor maintenance of the facilities and buildings, and allowing blight of the landscape, seemingly all in an attempt to deter new members and drive off current members. In fact, a 6’ high chain link fence has been erected around the entire park, creating an eyesore. Is this all a ploy to rationalize the owner’s need to build homes on open space and convince the City that the land must be developed to prevent further blight? We are afraid the owner is attempting to use the land entrusted to her to manipulate the City Staff, Planning Commissioners and City Council The fact that the future of Kimber Park was settled 40 years ago in an agreement between the original developers and the City, and with the force of law, has not deterred Sheena Chang and her Mission Hills LLC from trying to change the rules of the game. How fair is it to acquire land way below what the market value would be if it were intended to be developed, then try to change the law and make a disproportionate profit at the expense of Fremont residents and our open space? The land Ms. Chang and her LLC bought had restrictions on its usage and she should abide by these restrictions. If Ms. Chang is allowed to change the zoning and deed restrictions of the property to her sole benefit, even at the expense of the community at large, should not all of us be allowed to rezone our residential properties to maximize the value by building apartments, convenience stores or gas stations? Many of us have lost equity in our homes during the ongoing housing crisis, and would like to be bailed out by a change of zoning. Of course, we are not allowed to, because it would be unlawful and would destroy the original design and purpose of our neighborhoods. When any of us buys land, we must abide by the laws and restrictions that govern its usage. Our neighborhoods should not have to pay the price of losing precious open space, because the owner thinks she can manipulate the system to her sole personal advantage. As Fremont residents for the past 12 years, we are appalled that this pristine natural area is even remotely being considered for development. The original development agreement from 1976 clearly states that it is intended to remain protected and private open space with no residential development, that it would forever be preserved as private open space with recreational uses. Furthermore, city staff agrees, as does the Fremont City Planning Commission, that Kimber Park should remain as it was zoned. If Ms. Chang is successful in her efforts to rezone and develop this property, serious concerns would surface about whose interests the government is really serving. Our city officials must weigh the wishes of many Fremont residents, which the law is meant to protect, over the outlandish ambitions of a real estate speculator. Our voices are loud and united - enforce the law for our community and keep the once and forever designated open space for Fremont! DR. BRUCE & RITA MCGAUGHY FREMONT


November 15, 2011

BY MAURICIO SEGURA PHOTO BY DAN SPARKS

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

actor really stood out above the rest. Sure, there were scenes where a certain actor shined, but to say one in particular stood out for the entire performance? It just doesn't happen here. nsightful, delightful, and hilarious are the three J.C. Sales who plays Lala does a wonderful job best words to describe The Last Night of Ballybreathing life into this 20-something, somewhat hoo. Winner of the 1997 Tony Award for best naïve girl obsessed with Gone With the Wind. You play, Ballyhoo is now playing through December 17 feel for her character, a somewhat outsider who lives at Broadway West Theatre. in a dream world because reality isn't offering her Insightful – Set in 1939 Georgia, the play follows what her heart truly desires. the lives of an upper class Jewish family who after Reba, played by Mary Galde, is the queen of the years of southern segregation, have themselves slowly one-liners which makes this play so entertaining. Not only does she do a great job delivering jokes, she does so without missing a beat. Great acting! David McGwire (Joe) and Sara Renee Morris (Sunny) work great together. She is a delight portraying the typical southern bell, and he is the only one in the cast not speaking with a southern drawl. In fact, his New York accent is relatively pleasing to the ear. Martin Gutfried as Peachy, is, as they would say in the south, a hoot! Peachy is a cocky southerner with the world’s most annoying laugh. But it works! Sheila Ellam (Boo) and Spencer Stevenson (Adolf ) play Sara Renee Morris, J. C. Sales, and David McGuire brother and sister. Bitterness undermine their relationship for parted from their heritage to the point where they her, as she is a bit jealous that he doesn't like or now live on a thin line between cultures. Not fully treat her daughter Lala with the same respect as willing to let go of their Jewish roots, but not willing Sunny. The scene where they both get into a to advertise them either. In fact, they themselves are a screaming match is both dramatic and well exebit condescending in the way that they view certain cuted. Jews of less wealth as “the other side” and have no Overall, The Last Night of Ballyhoo is a mustproblem segregating their own kind. That is, of see production. It's as funny as it is thought provokcourse, until one of those “other siders” comes into ing. Well worth a night out at the theater. Shabbat their lives and tries to get them to open their eyes and Shalom! accept their culture. Ballyhoo doesn't bombard the Last Night of Ballyhoo audience with its premise, but it discreetly reveals how November 11 – December 17 the mindset of certain people can be changed within Broadway West Theater Company the area and era they reside in. 4000 B Street, Fremont Delightful – From the set design of the quaint 510-683-9218 living room setup, the Christmas tree, and the acPerformance times are 8 pm on Thursdays, Fritors’ delivery, this is a delight to watch. In-between days and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matithe scenes are sounds of old time radio broadcasts nees: Nov 20, Dec 4 and 11. Nov 20 and Dec 4 of the war as well as pre-swing crooners singing the performances begin with a continental brunch (instandards to help set the era mood. Set changes are cluded in price of ticket) at 12:15 pm, and the few, simple, and quick as to not cause any delays or show begins at 1 pm. The Dec 11 performance distractions. starts at 1 pm with refreshments during intermisHilarious – The one-liners alone, and this play is sion (included in price of ticket). full of them, are enough to have the audience in an Regular ticket prices are $23 general and $18 for induced state of constant laughter. The genius of Students, Seniors and TBA members. Thursday, Ballyhoo is the fact that even though it deals with Nov 17, Dec 8 and 15 performances are $15 for serious subject matter, the jokes and certain situaeveryone, with a bargain Thursday held on Dec 1 tions keep it lively and thoroughly entertaining. all tickets $10. Brunch Sunday performances and Of course a great play can't be put together Opening night are $23 for everyone. All ticket without a great cast, and Director Bryan Freeman prices include refreshments. found the perfect ensemble. Each actor does an For reservations and information, call 510-683amazing job delivering their lines fluently, which as 9218, or check our website at mentioned before, with all the one-liners, timing www.broadwaywest.org. and delivery are everything; so much so that no

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesday Nov 16 - Saturday, Dec 24

Saturday, Nov 19

Saturday, Nov 19

Benefit Gospel Concert

Mudpuddle Music Show R

Holiday Giftique

6 - 8:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

Noon - 4 p.m.

Concert to raise funds for World Vision's Clean Water Project

Evie Ladin & Keith Terry; McNevin & McClellan

South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 490-9500

Mudpuddle 34733 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935

Paintings, jewelry, crafts, sculptures, quilts and more Cinema Place Gallery

1061 B. St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Saturday, Nov 19

Wednesday, Nov 16

Alameda County Superior Court needs Volunteers to support The Information Kiosk in the Fremont and Hayward courthouses. Training provided. Phone 510-891-6209 or e-mail ralvarez@alameda.courts.ca.gov

Eden Garden Club Meeting Monday November 28, 9:30 A.M. The next meeting of the Eden Garden Club will be Monday, November 28, 9:30 AM at the Moose Lodge on Rutledge Road in Castro Valley (just off Castro Valley Blvd. near Lake Chabot Road). Club members will be sharing creative ideas for gift making.

McNevin & Friends$

Saturday, Nov 19

Music at the Mission $

7:30 - 9:30 p.m.

Blood Drive for Zoe

8 p.m. (7:15 pre-concert talk)

Live music from locals with guest artist

2 p.m. - 6:30p.m.

The Vine 37533 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0112

Logan student Zoe blood drive

Written in the Stars: Existential Poetry, Zen and American Song

St. Anne's Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766

Mission San Jose 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont www.musicatmsj.org

East Bay Stompers Band

Saturday, Nov 19

Saturday, Nov 19

7 - 9 p.m.

Butterfly B&B

Restring for Food

Dixie, swing and standards

2 - 3 p.m.

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Bronco Billys Pizza 37651 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 914-7304

Meet at the Granary and walk to "monarch motel" to see butterfly guests in action. Park admission fee

Bring at least 3 cans of non-perishable food for free guitar restringing

Thursday, Nov 17

Friday, Nov 18

Open Mic

7 - 9 p.m.

Tasty Turkey Treats

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

1 p.m. - 2 p.m.

Comedy Short Night

Make a yummy fall snack out of apples, raisins, and other goodies. Park admission fee

Saturday, Nov 18 & continuing

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Nov 19

Saturday, Nov 19

Community Service R

Why Tides Matter

10 a.m. - 12 a.m.

3 - 4 p.m.

Help in native plant garden

Walk and Talk through all things tides

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 x102

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 x102

Saturday, Nov 19

Sunday, Nov 20

Digital Technology EXPO

Afternoon Fun and Games

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free event

1 - 2 p.m.

7:30 p.m. The Courtship of Miles Sandwich (1923) starring Snub Pollard and more

11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Santa Claus greets children; ends Dec 24

Saturday, Nov 19

18th Annual Holiday Boutique & Craft Fair

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Holiday gifts, decorations, bake sale and more

Elks Lodge 38991 Farwell Dr., Fremont (510) 793-5683 Saturday, Nov 19

Autumn Butter

11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Make three different kinds of butter the old fashioned way. Park admission fee

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Alameda County Office of Education

313 West Winton Ave., Hayward (510) 670-4529 Saturday, Nov 19

Holiday Craft & Food Bazaar

Sunday 10:00 AM

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Handcrafted items, jewelry, auction, food

New Bridges Presbyterian Church Adrian Avenue, Hayward

The start of November means fall is in the air; Thanksgiving is just around the corner. It is also time to swim for the Karen Gordin Scholarship Fund. Every Thanksgiving Day, the Hayward Plunge Staff sets aside this day to raise money for the Karen Gordin Scholarship Fund. Karen was a lifeguard who was killed tragically in a car crash ten years ago on November 27, 2001. She was very much loved at the Plunge; and we, as a staff, want to carry on her name and values. This fundraiser allows us to offer free swim lessons to low income families and annually awards scholarships to two college students who are current lifeguards and working toward their career goals.

Unity of Fremont

Old-fashioned farm fun; try your hand at classic American pastimes and games. Park admission fee

9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

SUBMITTED BY NICOLE ROA

Welcome New Spiritual Leader KEN DAIGLE

Saturday, Nov 19

Saturday, Nov 19

NewPark Mall 2086 Newpark Mall, Newark (510) 793-5683

A positive path for spiritual living

Allegro Music 3115 Walnut Avenue, Fremont (510) 793-3500

Music, storytelling, comedy and more

Santa at the Mall

Meetings are free and guests are always welcome. Please call 510-538-1431 for further information.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

This year’s scholarship recipients will be presented at 9:30 a.m. Please come and be a part of the tradition and join us for a swim. We ask for a minimum of $4 donation. All donations are tax deductible. These scholarships are completely funded by donations. Checks can be made out to: The Karen M. Gordin Scholarship Fund Mailed: Bank of the West 1058 B Street Hayward, CA 94541 Hand Delivered: Hayward Plunge 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward Karen Gordin Turkey Swim Thursday, Nov 24 Lap Swim 8 a.m. - 11 a.m. Hayward Plunge 24176 Mission Blvd. Hayward (510) 881-6703


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Sunday, Nov 20

Folk Music Jam

Wednesday - Sunday, Nov 9 Nov 13

Monday-Friday, Nov 6 Nov 30

4:30 - 7 p.m.

Othello $

Creations by Valerie Manning

Bring your instrument

7:30 p.m. (2 p.m. matinees)

5 a.m. - 10 p.m

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004

Shakespeare's classic tale of love, jealousy, and betrayal

Painting by local artist Valerie Manning

Chabot College Little Theatre 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 (510)723-6830

Mission Coffee 150 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 386-5988

Sunday, Nov 20

High Tea and Fashion Show $R

1 - 4 p.m. Men and Women's fashions, jewelry, skin care, prizes and more

Stonebrae Country Club 27900 Fairview Ave., Hayward (510) 581-0223 Sunday, Nov 20

Rope Makin' and Hay Hoistin'

2 - 3 p.m. Learn how to make and use rope the oldfashioned way. Park admission fee

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Tuesday, Nov 22

Free Thanksgiving Dinner

4 - 6 p.m. Sponsored by Taiwanese Chamber and Love of Taiwan Assoc

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223

Continuing Events Friday, Oct 28-Sunday, Nov 20

Landscape Painting

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Artist Showcase

LIFE ElderCare's Fall Prevention program works with older adults, in their own homes, to create a personalized physical activity routine that includes aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility components specifically designed to increase mobility. The program also includes a home safely check, minor home modifications and a medication review. Each week, for 12-weeks, Unitek College LVN students visit each participant to answer questions, provide support and assess progress. The program is free to Tri-City residents.

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 Nov 12

Rhythm and Light

7 - 9 p.m. The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 Nov 12

Patterns of Abuse

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Here is the link to our website where you can view all five videos pertaining to this program. http://lifeeldercare.org/about-us/videos/

November 15, 2011

Photography show

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Saturday, Nov 5 - Wednesday, Nov 9

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

Juried Photography Exhibit

9:30 - 11 a.m.

View Photographic art and mingle with photographers

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Friday, Nov 5 - Sunday, Nov 19

Thursdays - Saturdays, Nov 12 - Nov 19

Servant of Two Masters

Annie Jr. $

A Classic Italian Comedy

7:30 p.m. The popular musical about orphan Annie. Matinee performances Saturdays at 2:30 p.m.

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

8 p.m. Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

T

he first annual High Tea and Fashion Show takes to the runway in Hayward this Sunday, debuting the Original Golf Dress among other fabulous fashions in support of Sun Gallery. “This is the event to attend if you are looking for an afternoon of great fashion, great food, and great fun. There may even be a little risky business!” says Original Golf Dress Company founder Laura Swan. “Another great reason to attend is the opportunity to visit TPC Stonebrae, Hayward’s spectacular private country club that has some of the best views in the Bay Area.” Cabie, Chi Jeans, and Dominique Men’s Wear wear will be featured alongside Original Golf Dress Company, the clothes modeled by members of the golf club with the club valets taking on the male modeling duties. In addition to delectables from the tea tray, the event will also include representatives from Stella and Dot Jewelry, Premier Jewelry, Guittard Chocolate, and Bay Area wineries. Based in Hayward, the Original Golf Dress Company began making its fashions available this past April. “It all started with one woman having an idea and another woman sewing it into reality,” says Swan. After taking an early retirement from 30 years in telecom, Swan turned her focus to the sport she loves: golf. However, she was unable to find an outfit that combined style, comfort, and performance. The search was time consuming and stressful, and the specific apparel guidelines of many golf clubs only added to the frustration. Every swing of the club was a reminder, as Swan had to tuck her shirt back into her skort each time. And after seeing an LPGA player on television reveal an unattractive belly when her shirt rose up with her swing, she went in search of a one-piece outfit. Coming up empty handed, Swan did what most determined and creative people do when unable to find what they’re after: she created her own. With the help of Lori Eldridge, Swan’s designs be-

SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL MCNEVIN On Saturday, November 19 enjoy a Mudpuddle Shop Show with Evie Ladin & Keith Terry (Duo), and McNevin & McClellan. The polyrhythmic heat and funk of Evie Ladin's clawhammer banjo, resonant voice, real stories and rhythmic dance have been heard from A Prairie Home Companion to Celtic Connections, Lincoln Center to Hardly Strictly Bluegrass. Known as a driving force behind San Francisco's Stairwell Sisters, Evie's solo debut Float Downstream (2010) was produced by famed mandolinist/composer Mike Marshall and percussionist/bassist Keith Terry. ...Sing Out! magazine reports "Solid song craft performed wonderfully end to end." (http://www.evieladin.com/) Joining Evie is Keith Terry (On bass, Body Music), a renowned percussionist/rhythm dancer and the founder of the International Body Music Festival (http://www.internationalbodymusicfestival.com/). A surprising and evocative mix of acoustic music and dance, Evie and Keith tease out gorgeous beds of new trad music that support Evie's ripe, catchy stories, and deep interpretations of old songs. "She can write, and she can sing, and she pulls back from the saccharine brink with just enough wit - a sharp intelligence". -Grant Alden, No Depression "Evie Ladin is a natural entertainer with a gift for infusing folk practices with contemporary verve." -San Francisco Chronicle "Using any surface for its rhythmic possibilities, Terry claps his hands, rubs his palms, finger-pops, stamps his feet, brushes his soles, slaps his butt and

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came reality and Original Golf Dress Company was born. The outfit is an all-purpose dress designed for golf, but can easily go from the course out to dinner, running errands, or worn to another sporting event. The Original Golf Dress features a micro nylon/Lycra top, pearl snaps, cotton/spandex stretch skirt, slimming waist band, invisible zipper, and skirt pockets, and is available in a variety of prints, colors, and sizes. It meets all club dress codes, and even comes with ball markers. The High Tea and Fashion Show is sponsored by the TPC Stonebrae Angels, a group initially formed to help other TPC Stonebrae members in times of need, but which has expanded to include assisting local charities. “This event is being held as an annual event to bring together the community and local businesses so we can help raise funds for a local charity,” says Swan. “We’re hoping that we can just keep building it every year.” Of their inaugural beneficiary, Sun Gallery, Swan, a former gallery board member, says, “It is one of the most underrated facilities in town. It offers the greatest programs.” And as the gallery’s street has been cut off due to road work, she says they are just trying to get it some exposure. While there is no specific dress code for the event, the donning of hats is welcomed, though not required. But really, who doesn’t like the chance to dress up a bit? So pull out your own finest fashions and take part in Hayward’s newest good time. Tickets are $25 and advanced purchase is preferred, though tickets will be available at the door. To purchase tickets or learn more call (510) 306-4266. High Tea and Fashion Show Sunday, November 20 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. TPC Stonebrae 222 Country Club Dr., Hayward (510) 306-4266 www.originalgolfdress.com Tickets: $25

belly, pops his cheek, whomps his chest, skips and slides, sings and babbles and coughs, building his music out of a surprisingly varied register of sounds and clever rhythmic variations." –Village Voice More information and videos can be found at http://www.evieladin.com/, http://www.youtube.com/user/evieladin and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVhO9HnFeo. Mudpuddle Shop Show Saturday, November 19 7:30 p.m. (BYO beverage of choice) Mudpuddle Shop 37433 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 info@michaelmcnevin.com www.michaelmcnevin.com $10-15 sliding scale donation (RSVPs strongly recommended, seats about 25 max)

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

FC Milpitas Panthers win Halloween Cup SUBMITTED BY FREDDIE CACAO n the weekend of October 29 - 30, the FC Milpitas Panthers 99G participated in the SCC Breakers Halloween Cup, an annual tournament for Silver/Gold-level competitive soccer teams, held at Cabrillo College in Aptos, CA. Saturday, the Panthers defeated the Los Gatos Pride 1 – 0, a past rival now playing in a dif-

Panthers while pitching a shutout of the Stingrays. On Sunday, the team played their third game of the tournament against another old rival, MVLA Monsoon White. The Panthers started out fast with three quick goals in the first half: a breakaway set up by a nice passthru, a hard shot from just inside the 18-yard box and a great serve into the penalty box for an easy put-in. MVLA was held scoreless in both halves for a 3 - 0 win.

the lead by scoring on a breakaway down the middle of the field. With their backs against the wall, the Panthers started their comeback with improved ball control and timely passing, generating more goal opportunities. The girls’ persistence eventually led to the "equalizer," a fantastic header from the backside set up with a beautiful looping serve from the left side over the Magic's defenders. The Panthers quickly sensed a win, continuing

ferent regional league. Similar to previous match-ups, this game was very close with each team displaying great defense. However, the Panthers were able to score in the second half of the game on a nice header into the goal, set up by a well-placed corner kick. Later that afternoon, the girls defeated an up-and-coming OV Stingrays team 2 - 0. The Panthers dominated play with nice ball control and accurate passing, minimizing their opponent's shot-on-goal attempts and maximizing their own time of possession. This led to easy goals for the

With a perfect record and no goals scored against them, the championship game opponent was a very tough Dublin Magic team who also had a perfect record in their respective bracket. The Magic pressured the Panthers right outthe-gate with their aggressive offensive attacks, generating numerous corner kicks and shots-on-goal and dominating time of possession. Repeatedly, the Panthers thwarted the Magic's relentless attacks with outstanding defensive and goalkeeper play for a scoreless first half. The opponent's pressure continued at the start of the second half and after five minutes of play, the Magic took

their exceptional play and, with less than two minutes left in the game, forced in the "winner." After a Panther forward's hard shot to the Magic goalie forced a momentary loss of control, a linemate quickly sent the ball away from the goalie's outstretched arms to a supporting mid-fielder's charge that finished the job with an emphatic close-range shot into the goal. After the final whistle was blown, the girls raised their hands in triumph and rushed to each other to celebrate. It was a great, hard-fought victory by the Panthers. Congratulations!

O

Logan advances in championship, loses in quarter finals SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER PHOTO BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW James Logan High School (seeded #7) defeated San Leandro (seeded #11) on November 9 in the first round of the North Coast Section Girls' Volleyball Championship Tournament: 25-14, 25-23, 25-14. In quarter final action on November 12, the Colts were unable to overcome an excellent San Ramon Valley squad and lost: 13-25, 1725, 17-25 As Mission Valley Athletic League Champions, Logan ended their season with a final overall record: 24-13; a great year!

Ohlone Women’s Volleyball SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR November 11: Monterey Peninsula defeats @ Ohlone, 3-2 (25-21, 25-21, 21-25, 2527, 15-5)

Hartnell defeats @Ohlone, 3-2 (2517, 25-18, 23-25, 23-25, 17-15) Go Renegades!

Hayward East Bay Impact Girls Fast pitch Softball Summer 2012 Try Outs for A Ball Dec. 3 & 4 and Dec. 10 & 11 Mt. Eden Park 2451 West Tennyson Road, Hayward Ages U12 Ages U14

9am to 11am 11am to 1pm

Ages U16/18

1pm to 3pm

For more info.please contact: Calvin Luis or visit www.eastbayimpact.com


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Renegades end season with a solid performance SUBMITTED BY COACH JAN ERIC NORDMO November 11 Ohlone -0; Foothill -0 Ohlone traveled to Foothill College with a long shot hope of a South Division -Coast Championship. For this to happen, Gavlin would have to put an end to Hartnell’s march to a perfect season and Ohlone would need to defeat Foothill. Both scenarios seemed unlikely but the Renegades made a good run of it. In the end, Ohlone would scratch out a draw against the powerhouse Owls, second in regional play. Still, this was good enough for a third place and a finish of 17 in conference, the best performance for Ohlone in several years. The game was filled with opportunities, but Foothill had the better looks until late in the second half when Ohlone mounted a more sustained press, forcing errors that gave the Renegades several opportunities. Before the press, keeper for the Renegades, Juan Martinez, came up big on several corner kick crosses, making punching saves. The Owls were denied time and time again in front of the Ohlone posts as Raul Chavez and crew, Josh Weinert and Silver Silva were not bending.

Defense kept both side’s sheets clean. Greivin Pacheco Quesada and Dominic Hertz were denied opportunities as Foothill back end kept play off the Foothill goal, but a late foul in the box on Hertz looked to give a penalty shot and the final opportunity to Ohlone. The match official failed to make the call and allowed some fairly physical and open play. Both teams had important standing in the game, a win would tie Foothill for first place in the division and Ohlone’s efforts were as much about pride as about getting a shot at the playoffs. Outstanding play noted by Renegades Quesada, Jonathan Santillan, Hector Romero, David Kulhanek , Josh Weinert, and Martin Lopez. Lopez found several crossing opportunities that keeper Carl Carrwick managed away from the Owl’s net. Leading up to this game in the last five matches, Quesada and Hertz were a solid combination of success in goals and assists. Jeffery Wilson also scored two goals in the final games that helped push the team to what was a very successful conference play with an overall result of 8-7-6, conference result of 7-4-3 and divisional play of 2-1-1. Quesada is currently ranked No. 6 in state with 17 goals and 9 assists;

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Dominic Hertz rounds out in the top 25 with 10 goals and 5 assists. “We came to the game with the idea that we could win.” said Coach Nordmo, “We have been playing well these last several games, a win over a solid Gavlin side earlier this week, solid wins over Skyline (6-1) and Monterey Peninsula (2-1) the weeks previous gave us much needed confidence. We were only moments away from a win over City College San Francisco but suffered a 2-1 loss with a squandered penalty kick and two missed sitters. CCSF was a very good game for us against a strong side. Our only questionable performance was a draw at Las Positas, but even in that contest, we saw our strengths and were denied several great chances to get the win. We are pleased with our strong finish this year and feel that have put together a squad that will finish in the top half of the state, after been near bottom three years ago.” Nordmo commented “Considering the entire season, we played well consistently against all the top teams in the league. Our early challenges were more minor, than major issues. As we moved along in the season we gained good momentum and a good mental attitude. We managed our resources well, injury was not as much an issue for us this year; we have good depth and look forward to building this squad with incoming freshman for a run at the top spot next fall. A big thanks to our players that will be moving on: Taki Bejaoui, David Kulhanek, Edwin Peña, Jonathan Santillan and Joshua Weinert.

Mikhael McKinney

Ohlone hoops are hot! PHOTOS BY DON JEDLOVEC Ohlone men’s basketball is worth watching! Latest results: November 11 (Ohlone 57, Shasta 56) and November 12 (Ohlone 65, Delta 50). The women are heating up the court as well. Check the schedule and support the home team! Bobby McCally

‘Thank You’ coaches; goodbye Class of 2012 Husky water polo players SUBMITTED BY GRATEFUL PARENTS Washington High School Water Polo ended their season in the Second Round of the NCS Division 1 Finals at Miramonte High School in Moraga. Although the season is over for Washington Water Polo, the Spirit of the team carries on. The Boys and Girls team will say goodbye to 21 seniors this year in a traditional “Water Polo Cap” ceremony at an awards banquet. Although the Seniors will be missed, they leave behind many great players who have already signed up for Winter and Summer recreational leagues to prepare for next year. Washington Water Polo started out the 2011 season with three new coaches: Matt Van Derwerken, James Lovlien and Desiree Fasolis. Kari Walsh, an ASU Water Polo Player and graduate as well as a WHS Graduate, also agreed to come back and bring her years of experience and talent to the pool. The parents and players appreciate all their hard work and dedication to the team. Our coaches became involved in a very traditional program with strong player and parent per-

sonalities. All four coaches handled the season with grace and enthusiasm, always making sure that Huskie traditions were carried on. This group of young men and women set a wonderful example of sportsmanship, teamwork and dedication. The Boy’s coaches Van Derwerken and Lovlien brought the team a 21-5 record with an MVAL League Champion title. The Girl’s coaches Fasolis and Walsh finish the season with a 20-6 record and third place in the MVAL. We would not have had such a great season without them. We wish our Water Polo Team, Class of 2012 the best as they complete their Senior Year. Senior Boys: Ryan Aspacio, Blake Barrientos, Joshua Christy, Armand King, Brady Knight, Parker Knight, Brock Liebhardt, Noah McFerran, Elias Mendez, Grant Perry, Daniel Tsay, Mitchell Youhanna. Senior Girls: Cali Bacheldor, Katelyn Clark, Brooke Eicher, Veronica Johnson, Lauren Little, Kelsi Ocon, Megan Ottoboni, Samantha Steadman, Erin Swardenski.

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

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Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Newark City Council Union City Council Union City Council November 8, 2011 Proclamations and Presentations: Resolution honoring Make A Difference Day event supporters and participants Consent Calendar: Cancel City Council meeting of December 27, 2011 Adopt additional amendments to Redevelopment Agency Enforceable Obligation Payment Schedule Approve grant funds for Decoto Green Street Project Removed from Consent: Report of political sign regulations on private property. Oral Communications: Thank you to the Mayor, City Council and staff for installation of a stop sign at Ascot Way. Traffic has slowed.

Consolidate Youth Working Group and Advisory Committee to start meeting on a monthly basis. Need funding for technical assistance. Complaint about unregulated taxi drivers from other locales operating in Union City. Public Hearings: Amend provisions of municipal code for amateur radio antennas and antenna structures to conform to State and Federal regulations Introduce ordinance to increase minimum residential density in the Station District from 45 units per acre to 60 units per acre.

Mayor Mark Green Vice Mayor Jim Navarro Emily Duncan Lorrin Ellis Pat Gacoscos

NEW YORK (AP), OFFER. WANTED. TAKEN. With those three words, Deron Beal of Tucson, Arizona, helped move the yard sale online, only with no money changing hands. Beal is the founder of The Freecycle Network, or Freecycle.org. It's a grassroots gifting network that - thanks to the sour economy and a growing commitment to the environment - has transformed into a global movement of millions offering, wanting and taking all manner of stuff. Staffed by volunteer moderators and loosely overseen by Beal, Freecycle aims to let you share your old TVs, clothes, broken blenders, tire chains and moving boxes with people nearby, using e-mail groups at Yahoo! and on the network's website. There are nearly 5,000 Freecycle groups with about 9 million members in more than 70 countries. Not bad for a guy who was simply trying to keep perfectly good stuff out of landfills, or find homes for stuff charities don't take, in his own community. “It's a win, win, win, win,” Beal said. “Everybody feels good.” Freecycle can be effortless for people who can leave their old magazines, kitchenware or larger items on a porch for pick up, but it can generate a lot of e-mail and suck up more time in larger locales as giver and taker try to untangle their schedules and decide where and when to make an exchange. There's no real navigation at Freecycle. You sign up, wait in some cases to be approved by a moderator, and decide whether to take individual e-mails, daily digests of offerings or read the list online only. Beal got the idea for Freecycle while working as a recycling coordinator for a nonprofit in Tucson. The organization offered jobs to men in shelters to do concierge recycling by picking up things like old computers and office tables at shops, restaurants and other companies, then trying to find homes for them at other nonprofits. ‘We had this old beat-up pickup truck, and would load up the pickup and drive from one nonprofit to the next to see who could use this stuff. It was crazy, and taking way too much work to find new homes for perfectly good stuff,’ he said. ‘So I set up an e-mail group, where anybody

interested could join and they could pick it up themselves.” Beal clearly struck a nerve. On the New York list, in e-mail after e-mail, posters are following the network's instructions and carefully writing subject fields providing their locations and the words “offer,’ “wanted” and hopefully - “taken” for things like “2 very broken laptops: Bronx Morris Park and Hering” or ‘Kraft Grated Romano Cheese (East Harlem).’ And there's the recent: “OFFER: 21” Sony Trinitron TV - UWS,” for Manhattan's Upper West Side, in an e-mail that promises the set is in ‘fine working condition. Picture quality is excellent.” Beds, garment bags, hangers, aquarium pumps, coffee makers, bicycles, toys, cribs, toasters, those paper wrappers for coins, air purifiers - the variety is endless. Some of it works, some of it doesn't. Some of it goes quickly and some might not go at all. Alexandria Tristram, 42, in Manhattan had no luck with a box of old computer cables dur-

Presentations and Proclamations: Introduction of new and promoted employees Sharon Yool of the Retired Teachers Association (FUN Division #91 – Fremont, Union City and Newark) displayed a $693,000 check representing the value of volunteer hours by retired teachers to the welfare of local communities.

Yes Yes Yes Absent Yes

Freecycle network grows globally in bad economy BY LEANNE ITALIE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Newark City Council November 10, 2011

ing her first attempt at freecycling, thinking “someone who tinkers with old computer parts will want it.’ She ended up recycling them herself. Donna Goodhue, a moderator of the Freecycle group in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, got involved in 2004 after seeing a TV news story about the network. At the time, there was a Vermont group near Burlington, but none in her area. While browsing through the list of a nearby county about three years ago, Goodhue found a car that didn't run, at a time when she really needed one. “My son drove over and got it. We boosted the battery and it started right up. It needed brakes and the sun roof leaked, so I would drive down the road with this umbrella open in my car when it rained. I didn't have a car at the time. It got me to work for eight months and it cost about $300 to fix the brakes.” It was a little black Saturn that she traded in for a second-hand

Mayor Smith and Retired Teachers Association representative Sharon Yool

Public Hearings: Amend a Conditional Use Permit to install a liquid nitrogen tank at Matheson Tri-Gas Approve a six-month review of a Conditional Use Permit for Little Flowers Montessori School Consent: Second reading of an ordinance prohibiting medical marijuana dispensaries in Newark Amend a Joint Powers Agreement with Associated Community Action Program Council Matters: Councilmember Alberto Huezo spoke of his service on the council and expressed gratitude for support and civility of Newark, citizens, staff and fellow councilmembers. He noted that he will continue to reside in Newark and is proud to be an American by choice, having entered the United States as an immigrant in 1960. Mayor Smith remarked that Mr. Huezo is a true “American success story.” The next scheduled council meeting on December 8, 2011 will mark the final appearance of both Mayor David Smith and Councilperson Alberto Huezo on Newark City Council. Both declined to run for reelection November 8, 2011. Mayor David Smith Vice Mayor Luis Freitas Alan Nagy Ana Apodaca Alberto Huezo

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

continued on page 27

Application for Board vacancy SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Applications are now available for eligible New Haven Unified School District residents interested in being considered for a provisional appointment to fill an upcoming vacancy on the Board of Education. President Michelle Matthews recently outlined the procedure to be followed to replace member Kevin Harper, who has resigned his position, effective at the end of the calendar year, because he is moving out of the District. The application will be posted on the District website (www.nhusd.k12.ca.us). Applicants are to fill out the document electronically and print and forward a copy to the District, to the attention of Senior Executive Assistant Lori Valdes. Completed applications can be faxed to (510) 471-7108 or mailed to 34200 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Union City, 94587. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Thursday, November 17. No late applications will be accepted. Applications will be reviewed to confirm eligibility, and eligible candidates will be announced. Interviews in front of the full Board are scheduled to take place Tuesday, November 29. After the Board makes its decision, the successful applicant will be seated in January, after Mr. Harper’s resignation takes effect December 31. The appointment will be effective until after the November 2012 election, when Mr. Harper’s term would have expired. The seat will be one of three on the November 2012 ballot.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Page 27

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski

WILLIAM MARSHAK

T

one and context are everything when the word “help” is used. In some cases, it is simply a request for temporary assistance to finish a task while in other situations it can be a desperate, dramatic and final appeal for life itself. In either case, use of the word defies anyone to ignore it and turn away. The thought that this word may, at some point, be uttered by anyone, including someone who currently enjoys the best circumstance, gives pause to even the most selfish of those among us. Lyrics of John Lennon and Paul McCartney in the Beatles 1965 song, “Help” are a musical reminder of the universal call by this four-letter word. The song begins with a plaintive cry that reminds all of us that, at one time or another, we will be the one relying on others and that’s not a bad thing. Time and experience teach not only compassion but the lesson that life doesn’t travel in straight lines… it swerves and dodges developing what many call “character” and others refer to as “fate” or a host of uncharitable names.

During the holiday season, constant reminders of other’s needs are visible on street corners, in front of stores and within them. Pleas for assistance are highly visible: Salvation Army kettles, food and toy drives are plentiful and varied. Short daylight hours and long dark nights are juxtaposed by an abundance of light and cheer; it’s a time for everyone to pause and extend a bit of generosity even when all we have is just a little bit.

which in particular strums your heartstrings. Listen to the lyrics of “Help” and the heartbeat of your community!

Although charities are much more visible at this time of year, their work extends throughout all months; safety nets we provide for our fellow citizens are not strung for only one or two months of the year. Fortunately volunteers and professional organizations that can efficiently handle the crushing needs of our communities are available year round.

I never needed anybody's help in any way

Especially painful is the cruel recession which has stripped many working persons of their ability to provide the essentials of life for themselves and families. More and more people accepting assistance are not homeless or street people; they are working poor that have slipped from a disappearing middle class into near poverty. Is it all gloom and doom? Far from it! The very act of giving to others is an affirmation of an underlying message from each of us to our community - local, regional, global, etc. - of hope and care. As each organization sends its pleas for help, the act of responding is the essential element, not to

Help, I need somebody Help, not just anybody Help, you know I need someone Help! When I was younger, so much younger than today But now these days are gone I'm not so selfassured Now I find I've changed my mind and opened up the doors Help me if you can, I'm feeling down

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

And I do appreciate you being 'round Help me get my feet back on the ground

REPORTERS

Won't you please, please help me?

Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

continued from page 26

Freecycle network grows globally in bad economy Mercury when the time came for a new car, she said. Other finds for Goodhue: a nearly brand-new sewing machine, when somebody upgraded to a digital model. “And my son got an 18-foot boat. It was somebody in New York, because the seat cushions were ripped and they didn't want to bother repairing them. He drove there and got it. They just didn't want it anymore.'' That would be the point, Beal noted. While some people never get rid of their stuff, “If you post an item today you'll usually have 10 responses within a minute” on any given list, he said.

Beal encourages people to wait a day before choosing a recipient to be fair to those who don't hover over e-mail moment to moment. He also thinks it's nice when people “pick their stories,’ seeing how the giftee approaches the moneyless transaction. Are they brusque, businesslike, friendly? Do they plan to distribute your bag of clothes to homeless shelters? ‘Pick the story you like best,'' he said. ‘“My son's going off to college.’ ‘We're helping with a nonprofit and could use that bed.' It's just people helping people.”

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

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Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11601895 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Maung Tin Myint for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Maung Tin Myint to Danny Yap The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 01/20/2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: 10-27-11 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/11 CNS-2199262#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458057 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cakes To Cakes, 39947 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Raghida Assio, 38870 Hayes St., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raghida Assio This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 7, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/15, 11/22, 11/29, 12/6/11 CNS-2205616# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 458122 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: JM Adventure, 31818 Trevor Ave., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Juan Maza, 31818 Trevor Ave., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/08/2011. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Juan Maza This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 8, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/15, 11/22, 11/29, 12/6/11 CNS-2205613# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457144 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Century 21 Banner Realty, 40979 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ciubancan and Associates, Inc., 40975 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 04/1993. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Viorica Ciubancan, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/15, 11/22, 11/29, 12/6/11 CNS-2205612# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457945 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Suju’s Coffee & Tea, 3602 Thornton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Bhoomi Inc., CA., 3602 Thornton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 7/18/2000 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mahesh Patel, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 2, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/11 CNS-2202634# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457946 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Suju’s Coffee & Tea, 4949 Stevenson Blvd., Suite B, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Bhoomi Inc., CA., 3602 Thornton Ave., Fremont, Ca 94536 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/2/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Manesh Patel, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 2, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/11 CNS-2202633# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457728 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Interactive Design Solutions, 4909 Conway Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda; PO Box 546, Fremont, CA 94537 Scott D. Shepard, 4909 Conway Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1989 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Scott D. Shepard This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 27, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29/11 CNS-2201539# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457643 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kumon Math & Reading Center of Union City - East, 34712 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda 34389 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Incredible Learners, Inc., CA, 34389 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jayanthi Subramanian, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 26, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/11 CNS-2199258# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456597 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heartbox Photography, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 27, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194502# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456839-40 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) San Francisco Salt Company, (2) San Francisco Bath Salt Company, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda LJW Incorporated, California, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

GTE Mobilnet of California, LP (dba Verizon Wireless) is proposing to construct a new telecommunications tower facility located at 222 Country Club Drive, Hayward, Alameda County, CA. The new facility will consist of the construction of a 105-foot monopine and a 15’8” by 35’ equipment shelter. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30-days from the date of this publication to: Project 61095415-AMG c/o EBI Consulting, 11445 E Via Linda, Suite 2, #472, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, via telephone at (585) 815-3290 or e-mail agodat@ebiconsulting.com.

Foodies push for homemade food sales law in Calif BY SHAYA TAYEFE MOHAJER ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES (AP), - Mark Stambler's handcrafted bread was a favorite at Los Angeles specialty food shops until public health officials cracked down on the crusty loaves leavened in his garage and baked in a wood-burning oven in his backyard. The home-baked operation ran afoul of strict food preparation laws that prevent Californians from selling homemade goods. “It's a case of regulations that have gone a little haywire,” said Stambler, a soft-spoken man with clean-cut silver hair who has never had a customer complain about his bread. ‘Handcrafted,” “artisanal” and “homegrown” may be buzz words for gourmets, but they can be red flags for regulators concerned about food safety, zoning

or myriad other rules. In recent years, state and local ordinances have surrounded do-it-yourselfers in red tape on everything from sales of backyard flower bouquets to restaurants growing their own vegetables to an underground market peddling home cooked goodies. Foodies are fighting back with so-called cottage food laws. At least 30 states now have laws that allow sales of home-made goods about half passed since the Great Recession began in 2007. Stambler is now looking for a lawmaker to introduce a bill next year that would allow cashstrapped California residents to make a little scratch from scratch cooking. Currently, even bake sales are illegal here unless they benefit a charity. By comparison, homemade foods have a $100 million impact on the economy of West Vir-

ginia, a state with fewer than 2 million residents and high poverty rates, said Buddy Davidson, spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture. The state even teaches home chefs how to market everything from pumpkin butter to baking mixes. Said Janelle Orsi, a lawyer with Oakland, Calif.-based Sustainable Economies Law Center, “With a really high unemployment rate it's kind of impractical to assume that people will eventually just find jobs and it's important for communities and individuals to be able to take their livelihoods into their own hands.” Orsi is working with Stambler on a more permissive cottage food law for California that would allow casual cooks and aspiring pros to sell shelf-stable homemade goods like breads, cookies, cakes, jams, candy, gra-

under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/1/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Lee Williamsen, CEO/Founder This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194499# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456863 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Tadamasa Ramen, 34672 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Shau Ping Ho, 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shau Ping Ho This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193778# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457276 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Power Plumbing & Rooter, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Rameez Khan, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/13/11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rameez Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 13, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193770#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF FREMONT NOTICE OF FUND AVAILABILITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) Para información en español, por favor llame a Leticia Leyva a (510) 574-2072.

following types of projects benefitting low to moderate income Fremont residents in each of the next two fiscal years: FY 2012-2013 and FY 2013-2014: •

Capital projects: Designed to specifically support public facility (and housing in limited cases) acquisition, pre-development, construction, and rehabilitation projects. Housing related public service projects: Targeted at continuing the City’s effort in promoting fair, affordable and accessible housing. Micro-enterprise projects and an Individual Development Account (IDA) project: Targeted at enhancing the City’s efforts in promoting family economic success and self-sufficiency.

In order to be considered for CDBG funding, agencies must meet the following minimum qualifications: (1) Proposed project must meet one of the following CDBG National Objectives: a. Benefit low-moderate income persons b. Prevention/ Elimination of Slums or Blight c. Address Urgent Needs (2) Applicant must be a 501(c)(3) non-profit or public agency. Secular ministries or programs of a religious organization are also eligible. (3) Ability to meet Department of Housing and Urban Development’s CDBG program requirements (4) Ability to meet City’s grant requirements Request for Proposals (RFPs) for FY 2012-2014 CDBG funding will be available on Thursday, December 1, 2011. More information on the funding process will be provided at the CDBG Proposal Orientation: Date: December 1, 2011 Time: 6:00 P.M. Location: City of Fremont Training Room 3300 Capitol Avenue, Bldg. B. Fremont, CA 94538 RSVP: Shanti Jeyakumar, (510) 574-2061 or sjeyakumar@fremont.gov by November 28, 2011 CDBG Proposals are due by Thursday, January 26, 2012 5:00 PM PST at the City of Fremont Human Services offices located at 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building B., Fremont, CA If you have any questions regarding this notice or if your agency is not currently on the City’s RFP list and you would like to receive a RFP notice, please contact Lucia Hughes, at (510) 574-2043 or Leticia Leyva at (510) 574-2072. 11/15/11 CNS-2206412# ORDINANCE NUMBER 763-11 ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY AMENDING Chapter 12.16 of the Municipal Code by applying integrated pest management & best management policies for public improvements The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the City Council on November 8, 2011. This abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. The ordinance was introduced to the City Council on October 25, 2011, and a copy of the full text of the ordinance, as it was second read and adopted on November 8, 2011, is available on the City’s website at: http://www.ci.unioncity.ca.us/ordinances.html A copy of the full text of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours. The City Clerk can be reached by phone at 510-675-5348 if you desire a copy of the full text of the ordinance sent to you via email or by first class mail. ORDINANCE NO. 763-11 WAS PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on November 8, 2011, by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Duncan and Gacoscos, Vice Mayor Navarro, Mayor Green NOES: None ABSENT: Councilmember Ellis ABSTAIN: None APPROVED: /s/ Mark Green MARK GREEN, Mayor ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 11/15/11 CNS-2206012#

CDBG The City of Fremont announces the availability of approximately $850,000 in CDBG funds for the

nola, coffee, tea and baking mixes. California's law would be modeled after an Ohio law, Orsi said, which allows chefs the freedom to succeed because there is no cap on how much someone can make off their ventures. Michigan, in contrast, imposes a $15,000 annual limit. Standing in the way of this commerce now are long-standing public health and food preparation regulations that require permits, inspections and stringent sanitary standards. Clean hands, hair nets (or hats) and vermin control measures are some of the obvious rules to prevent food contamination and illness. Commercial kitchens are required to have stainless steel food preparation surfaces, easily cleanable equipment and nonporous floors, walls and ceilings. The image of a casual cook concocting sweets or other treats in a home kitchen, however, may not inspire confidence in the cleanliness of the operation. While commercial kitchens are occasionally policed by inspectors, an irresponsible home cook with sick kids, or pets running through the kitchen, or a simple failure to wash hands could turn the stomach of a typical American consumer expecting a high standard of cleanliness in food. Local food advocates say a sense of community and a chef's pride in his or her products keep food clean and of high quality. “Even in the finest restaurants and finest restaurant chains,

there are some lapses in the daily food safety efforts, which are intended to keep our population safe from foodborne illness,” said Angelo Bellomo, director of Los Angeles county's Department of Environmental Health. Bellomo recommended that any proposed law include a disclaimer label that the food was not prepared in facilities inspected by health officials and a requirement that sleeping quarters be separate from food preparation areas. Current regulations force wanna-be bakers and chefs to go through a rigorous approval process and use commercial kitchens, which rent for as much as $75 an hour, said Iso Rabins, a local food advocate. That's money that could be spent on the finest ingredients. “I've worked in restaurants most my life and restaurant kitchens are generally far dirtier than any home kitchen you'll encounter - some are clean, but a lot are disgusting,” Rabins said. Rabins is a founder of ForageSF, a group that circumvented state laws by billing its Underground Market event in San Francisco as a club. The $5 admission was considered a membership fee to purchase from food entrepreneurs who didn't go through the permitting process required of other retailers. It drew 50,000 visitors before health officials shut it down in June and issued a cease and desist order, though Rabins still hopes continued on page 33


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Page 29

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

Obituaries

Obituaries David F. Donaldson

Joseph T. Parrish

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 22, 1953 - October 30, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 18, 1962 - November 7, 2011

Dolores Barbara Aguirre

Lesley A. McKenna

RESIDENT OF MANTECA February 4,1938 - November 9, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 25, 1961 - November 8, 2011

Delia C. Hill

Ingeborg Nielsen

RESIDENT OF CONCORD July 2, 1944-November 9, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 24, 1926 - November 10, 2011

Claire M. Shawy

James Stephen Oviatt

SHIRLEY, NY October 26, 1943 - November 9, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 28, 1946 - November 10, 2011

Riva L. Boyden

Dorothy M. Olson

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 18, 1923 - November 10, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 17, 1937 - November 11, 2011

Rudolph J. Ricci, Jr.

Deborah L. Wong

RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO December 18, 1923 - November 10, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 30, 1953 - November 11, 2011

Virgil P. Young, Jr.

Subramanian “Sanjay” Vijay

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 6, 1924 - November 10, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 22, 1967 - November 12, 2011

Jeanne M. Campbell

Elizabeth J. Lindskog

RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 24, 1962 - November 12, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 8, 1928 - November 12, 2011

Sharon Chandler-Tindall RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

Celia Ramirez RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Saokram Bouth RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

Ruperto Vasquez RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Lupe Arriola RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark

William “Bill” Harold Dekker RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 24, 1931 - November 12, 2011

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Newark resident excels in ‘do something’ club activities

Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, Nov 15 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25– 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25– 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont

(L-R): Dana Delucchi ’12, Mary Hartwell ’12, Nicole Dudaney ’12

I

n places such as Africa and India, water-related diseases are a large contributor to many child and infant deaths. Due to the lack of funds, resources, or volition, local and federal governments in developing nations are sometimes incapable of providing its citizens with the basic necessity of clean water. However, Newark resident Nicole Dudaney and a senior at Notre Dame High School in Belmont, is trying to help. After viewing a documentary on the world's dwindling fresh water supply in her AP Biology class, Nicole enlisted the help of her classmates in Notre Dame’s Do Something Club and began fundraising. Through daily bake sales, t-shirt sales, and donations, these students are working toward underwriting a water well for a classroom in Kenya. “We are on target to reach our goal of $250 to help students in Kenya. However, we would like to surpass our initial goal and help an entire village with a water pump. That would require $800 in funds. I believe we can do it.”

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE

Special Life Events

SUBMITTED BY THIEN NGUYEN

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published biweekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

With support from The Water Project, a nonprofit organization working to provide clean, safe drinking water to nearly 1 billion people in developing countries, Nicole and the Do Something Club is raising awareness of these frightening facts and allowing fellow students to donate toward a worthy and life saving cause. Hallmark Two and Hallmark Four state, “We honor the dignity and sacredness of each person,” and “We commit ourselves to community service.” Nicole and her classmates are truly integrating The Hallmarks they have learned in the classroom and applying them to global issues. “This Fundraising initiative reflects the integration of The Hallmarks in all that we do as a school community. The Hallmarks serve as our moral compass as we respond to the needs in our local and global communities,” said Notre Dame Principal, Rita Gleason ’66. If you would like to help Nicole and the Do Something Club in their efforts, please contact Rosemary Boardman at rboardman@ndhsb.org, or call Notre Dame High School at (650) 595-1913.

Wednesday, Nov 16 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apartments, 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apartments, 1300 Kentwood Lane, San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, Nov 17 2:00 – 2:25 p.m. Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 2:45 – 3:40 p.m. Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., San Lorenzo 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Falcon Dr. & Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Creekside Village Apartments, 3999 Sequoia Terrace, Fremont Friday, Nov 18 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. Kidango Grant, 879 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., San Lorenzo

Monday, Nov 21 1:45 – 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, Nov 22 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Nov 23 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Nov 16 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY SIMON WONG

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s of December 2010, the Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial (CVVM) project had raised approximately $20,000 but has since received a $50,000 boost from Castro Valley residents Minda Amsbaugh and Craig Alton. The Me-

Travis Matthew Amsbaugh, July 21, 1985 – September 1, 2011, resident of Castro Valley, U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant and law enforcement officer. (Photo courtesy of Minda Amsbaugh and Craig Alton.)

morial will be built in the Castro Valley Community Park at 18988 Lake Chabot Road to honor veterans and serving members of the nation's six branches of the armed services. The Veterans’ Memorial is 35 ft. in diameter and will be located in a grassy area below Quail Avenue. An American Flag in the center will be encircled by six black granite "Service Stones" and illuminated by lights within a seat-wall without impacting neighbors. Statues, just beyond the periphery of the circle, flank the entrance to the site. Visitors will see them clearly as they enter and approach a black, granite "Entry Stone" set on a plinth. Veterans, civilians (a service background is not required), companies, groups and organizations may purchase an unlimited number of "commemorative bricks" at $100 per brick. They will be arranged on the outer edge of the Memorial's base. Each has up to three lines with 14 characters/spaces per line (including blank spaces and punctuation). The Memorial will accommodate a maximum of 720 commemorative bricks. Each Service Stone represents a branch of the military (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Air Force and Merchant Marines). Only veterans may have their names engraved on the back of their Service Stone which has room for 99 engravings. Names of loved ones or friends who are, or were, veterans are also accepted. Each name has a maximum length of 20 characters, (including blank spaces and punctuation) which will be an inch in height and in capital letters. An engraving is available for $200. continued on page 32

Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial. (Image courtesy of Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial Committee.)

November 15, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 31

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Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

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Norman Hodgson Certified Museum Specialist Personal Property and Collections All Areas - 510-582-5954 *Free Verbal Opinion* Send image of object to: norm2@earthlink.net

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Tri-City voice Newspaper Help Wanted 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com

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Wanted Hair Stylists & Beauty Supply Service people Call Dick Martin

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Log on to www.wholesalecostless.com 510-472-1844 email: apparelwholesale@hotmail.com

Help Wanted Mechanical Engineer in Union City, CA. Design, evaluate, install, maintain and operate manufacturing machinery system. Requires MS Mechanical Engineering. Send resume to: Ajax-United Patterns and Molds, Inc. ATTN Mr. David Yu, 34585 7th Street, Union City, CA 94587

Affordable Appartment Housing Irvington Terrace, an affordable apartment community in Fremont, is opening its waiting list for a limited time for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments. Applications for the waiting list will be available and accepted at the leasing office from Monday, October 31st at 10 am until Friday, November 11th at 4pm, 2011. Staff will be available to answer questions starting October 31st. No need to line up—applications will be randomly ordered after the 31st. Income and other restrictions apply. Beginning Oct 31st, applications will be available at the leasing office located at 4109 Broadmoor Common (at Grimmer). Office hours will be M-F, 10am to 4pm starting Oct 31st. Local preference is available for persons who currently or previously live/work in Fremont. Starting Oct 31st, call 510-979-1159 for more information.

Help Wanted Project Mgr to plan floor design and construction, analyze materials, review architectural/construction docs & estimate costs (Job#P8) Res to Century Carpet Inc, 703 A St, Hayward, CA

WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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continued from page 30 continued from page 5

level art outreach program sponsored by the Fremont Art Association and Cooksey-Talbott Gallery. The group offers a variety of photographic educational opportunities and field trips. It is headed by an award-winning local photographer Cooksey-Talbott. He is assisted by another award-winning photographer, Jacline Deridder. The S3 activities are held on the third Saturday of each month. The lessons are free and open to all who are interested in making photographs and having a good time. Programs range in complexity from beginner to advanced. A Release of Liability is

required of all participants. The group strives to offer events of interest to wide range of photographers; please feel welcome to come and participate. For more information on the S3 program and photography classes, please go to: faadpg.ning.com/events. Sunset and Twilight Photo Outing Saturday, November 19 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Centre 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.fremontartassociation.org Free

BY PATSY LEDBETTER

T

he Hayward Arts Council will sponsor a Holiday Giftique at the Cinema Place Art Gallery in Hayward. Gallery Manager Gail Lundholm is thrilled to host this show at the new Cinema Place Gallery, which has only been open ten months and boasts about eighty visitors a day. This attendance is a huge reception for this wonderful new gallery. Lundholm states, "People will enjoy seeing a variety of well-crafted articles for gift giving. This show will be an example of high quality art among the Hayward Area residents.” Art director Valerie Snart is also very excited for the Giftique to take place. Featured artists are Jean Bidwell, known for her lovely murals around the city of Hayward; Susie Howell, who does beautiful garden sculptures; Peter and Maureen Langenbach, known for their fantastic wood sculptures and gift boxes; and Denise Oyama Miller with her oils, gourds, and art quilts. Some of the other artists are Simone Archer, Marge Barta Atkins, Jaci Daskarolis, Randy Hall, Susan Helmer, Judy Likely, Carol Pulliam, Cindy Sullivan and John and Kathy Ries. Color and variety are the hallmarks of this show which includes paintings, jewelry, crafts, art quilts, sculpture, and many other mediums. So get into the holiday spirit and prepare to pick out some amazing and unique holiday gifts for your family and friends. Better yet, bring them along to Giftique and let them choose for themselves. You will be glad you did. For more information call the Hayward Arts Council at (510) 538-2787 or visit online at www.haywardarts.org.

Six granite benches have been sold for $1,000 each – four to veterans' organizations and two to non-veterans’ groups which donated so the benches could be “named” for a veterans’ organization. The Northern California Corvette Association acquired the last bench in December 2010. The project is expected to cost almost $90,000. This consists of donations in-kind and financial donations. Amsbaugh and Alton are a softly-spoken, quiet couple. Their generosity represents a desire to help complete the CVVM. It is also a small measure of their love for their son, Travis Matthew Amsbaugh, who died tragically in a car accident in Southern California on September 1, 2011, aged 26. Most tellingly, they deeply respect the man who was a worthy member of every community in which he found himself and who understood how to make his way in the world. Mourners from Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, co-workers from his mother’s company and many people, with whom he and his family were not in regular contact but who had touched each others lives at various times, attended his funeral. Travis graduated from Castro Valley High School in 2003 and joined the Marines, an MOS in Aviations Electronics, in March 2004. Following five years of basic training and active duty postings to Pensacola (Florida), Cherry Point (North Carolina) and the Marine Corps Base at Kadena Air Force Base on Okinawa, he returned to the US as a reservist. He attended Rio Hondo College and graduated from the Police Academy in 2009, was recalled by the Marines in March 2010 and served a year in Afghanistan before joining the Department of Public Safety at the University of Southern California on his birthday, July 21, 2011. “Travis surprised us by joining the services,” said Alton. “Minda was not overly pleased but it turned out to be really good for him. He enjoyed it, met numerous people, visited many places and experienced a lot. He collected friends along the way.” “It was something he felt he needed to do. Just this year, I told him I was glad he’d done so and was proud of his accomplishments. ‘So you’re not mad at me anymore, mom?’ was his response,” recollected Amsbaugh with a smile. “He had a large circle of friends and filled the room.

Holiday Giftique November 16 - December 24 Sunday and Wednesday, Noon – 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Noon – 8 p.m. Cinema Place Arts Gallery 1061 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.haywardarts.org

“Despite its name, the CVVM encompasses the whole of the East Bay. It’s for all who have served or who are serving. Every parent wants to eventually dance at their child’s wedding, to hold their grandchildren,” she added, stoically holding back emotion. “This project is a fitting way for us to ensure Travis’ longevity and memory and for others to do the same for their loved ones.” The Memorandum of Understanding between the CVVM Committee and the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD), which approved the project in September 2010, requires full funding to be in place before construction begins. Groundbreaking and dedication are scheduled tentatively for March 2012 and July 4, 2012, respectively. Amsbaugh and Alton’s donation helps substantially but more is needed. “We established the Travis Amsbaugh Memorial Fund when our son passed and, on the day of his funeral, read a newspaper article about the veterans’ memorial. Given that Travis had served as a Marine, it was the right thing to consider supporting the CVVM. On meeting with Castro Valley VFW 9601, from which the project’s committee members are drawn, we learned of HARD’s funding requirement,” explained Amsbaugh and Alton. Additionally, a sporting event has been named in Travis’ honor. The first annual Travis Amsbaugh Bocce Ball Tournament was played on October 1, 2011 at Adobe Park, Castro Valley, and raised $2,000 for the CVVM. Donations to the CVVM can be made via the Travis Amsbaugh Memorial Fund at Bank of the West, 3396 Castro Valley Boulevard, Castro Valley. Call branch manager Sue Hohl at (510) 582-1086. Monies received by Bank of the West are in addition to the personal donation from Travis’ parents. For more information about the CVVM, to request a commemorative brick, Service Stone name engraving or simply to make a donation, visit www.CVVM.info. Alternatively, contact Bob Pirone at (510) 418-6311 and RobertPirone@sbcglobal.net. For those who do not wish to order or donate online, either download an order form at www.CVVM.info or contact Bob Pirone for a form and mail checks (payable to "VFW Post 9601CVVM") to CVVM, 22237 Queen Street, Castro Valley, CA 94546.

SUBMITTED BY SANDI BOHNER

O

n November 19, Earlier Than The Bird the Merchants at Blacksmith Square will be raising funds in support of Valley Humane Society hosting many events throughout the day. Activities start at 7 a.m. with Peach Mimosas by Little Valley Winery at Artistic Edge. Honey tasting by beekeeper Ed Gerardz with an active bee hive and talk about the nature of Honey. Victorine Valley Farms will be having Hot Cider and how to make Olive Oil Dog Biscuits along with Olive Oil Tasting. At noon, activities will expand with Animal Art for sale from various local artists. Bring your pet and have Supie from Sand Scribbles take a picture of your pawed friend. Packages will also be available providing a four frame picture $50 or a fun "kaleidoscope" $15 unframed, $40 framed. Kathleen Hill will be available for those "custom" animal paintings which make great surprising holiday gifts for that special pet owner. And the fan favorite, Robb's metal animal art and many pieces will be available for "rescue" that have gotten hurt throughout the year. Other animal artists will be represented as well. Enjoy cruising around looking at the animal goodies or engaging in conversation with the Valley Humane representative with wine from John Christopher Cellars and Swirl. Swirl on the Side will be featuring the "Adopt a Dog" Flight... featuring Tate Dog Wines from Livermore Valley. Artistic Edge, John Christopher Cellars, Little Valley Winery, Sand Scribbles, Swirl, Victorine Valley Farms and the animal artists will be donating a portion of sales proceeds to Valley Humane Society throughout the day. Come and support this worthwhile organization within our community. Blacksmith Square is located on the corner of N. Livermore Ave and Railroad Avenue in Livermore. For more information, contact Sandi at Little Valley Winery (925) 862-9006

510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont Ca. 94538-1304

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the TriCity Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organizations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 15, 2011

Page 33

Theatre Review BY JANET GRANT

R

odger’s and Hammerstein’s timeless classic, “The King and I” returned to the Douglas Morrisson stage Friday night in a dazzling new production of one of Broadway’s most enduring musical legends. The show opened the Douglas Morrisson Theatre in 1979 and presently is in its fourth revival. Judging by the nearly sold-out house, this crowd favorite is well on its way to another deservingly successful run. “The King and I” has remained one of the most requested musicals by DMT audiences? and to no surprise. This is a richly textured drama woven with romance and culture clash, set in an exotic local and infused with some of the most glorious and unforgettable music ever written for the musical stage. This tale of a British governess brought into the court of the Siam in the 1860s to tutor the King’s many children starts out simple enough. But while keeping a firm grip on their traditions and values, Anna and the King grow to understand and, eventually, respect one another in a unique love story set against the background of historical and cultural conflict and change. DMT’s staging of the “King and I,” expertly directed by Sue Ellen Nelsen and wonderfully choreographed by Dallis Wright-Morash, immediately sends the audience to that place of happy memories with the first strains of the orchestra led by

Musical Director, Marianna Wolff. The much-loved songs and sweeping melodies from the show include: “The March of the Siamese Children,” “Shall We Dance,” “Hello Young Lovers,” and the unforgettable “Getting to Know You.” And with “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” opening the first scene, I could barely keep from tapping my toes. First and foremost, the children of the court are adorable and intensely focused in their roles. Andrew Creekbaum as Anna’s son Louis, and Tee Lew as Prince Chulalongkorn, particularly meshed as their initial distrust turns into a budding friendship. The performances of Anna Cook as Anna Leonowens, and TK Armstrong as the King, are remarkable, with a genuine and believable chemistry between the two actors. The beautiful Ms. Cook brings both warmth and sensitivity to the role of Anna along with just the right amount of assertiveness and spunk. Her gorgeous and

powerful voice sends the wonderful hit tunes she sings soaring through the theater. Mr. Armstrong plays the King with immense charm and energy. His natural performance style exudes power and humor. And his fine baritone voice complements his acting with finess. Equally effective is the chemistry between the exquisite In Hui Lee as the King’s unwilling gift, Tuptim, and Jepoy Ramos as her secret love, Lun Tha. Their blend of incredible voices set the tone for their poignant and ill-fatted romance with two of my favorite songs “We Kiss in a Shadow,” and “I Have Dreamed.” All of the actresses playing the wives of the king are wonderfully expressive and charming and Alexis P. Wong gives an exceptional performance as the king’s head wife, Lady Thiang. She plays her role with elegance and dignity and her beautiful voice brings great power to the passion and conviction of “Something Wonderful.” Jeffrey Tan as the Kralahome is very ef-

fective as the king’s trusted advisor. He brings to his role the right amount of haughtiness and sensitivity with his grudging respect for Anna and his unfailing loyalty to the king. Ben Marafino was also fine in his dual roles as Sir Edward Ramsey and Captain Orton, playing both parts believably. And of course, in a production full of amazing numbers, “The Small House of Uncle Thomas,” still remains the ultimate highlight with its clever play within a play ballet sequence. Performed by the Royal Dancers and Wives, this scene where Tuptim and the court stage a Siamese version of the American Civil War classic novel was amazing and riveting and a pure feast for the senses. From the colorful set…to the lavish costumes…to the enchanting children…to the last strains of the orchestra…Douglas Morrisson Theatre’s production of “The King and I” is a hit not to be missed. Get your tickets quickly before all the shows and all the seats sell out…et cetera, et cetera, et cetera! The King and I Friday, Nov 11 - Dec 4 8 p.m. (Sunday matinee at 2 p.m.) Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22331 N. 3rd Street, Hayward www.dmtonline.org. (510) 881-6777 Adults: $28 Seniors: $25 Students/juniors: $20

Friday, 12:30-5:30 p.m.

continued from page 28

Foodies push for homemade food sales law in Calif to open it again. Others have skirted the law with food swaps - no money changing hands means no enforcement. Home chefs in Los Angeles and San Francisco barter jars, bottles and other individually packaged foods with each other. The gatherings first gained popularity in Brooklyn, N.Y., with a group called BK Swappers, where co-organizer Jane Lerner says she's never heard of someone getting sick from any of the food swaps, which are

held in cities all over the country including Minneapolis, Austin, Seattle and Detroit. ‘The crux of the event is to admire the food you see and then meet people who made it,’ said Lerner. The dishes tend to be brag-worthy, carefully prepared and unique - like spicy mango pickles or homemade Italian cookies. ‘There is definitely an element of showoff happening, but it's very friendly and sweet.”

Many of those who try to sell homemade food as a sideline hope to make it a career. Stambler would rather bake his rye and whole wheat loaves than consult and write grants for nonprofits. He kneads his dough and forms his loaves on a wooden island in his sunny kitchen in a large Spanish-style home with a view of the Rowena Reservoir. A bundle of county fair blue ribbons hang near the pantry as a testament to the quality of his bread.

Before The Cheese Shop in Silver Lake and Wonderful Provisions in Echo Park were busted by health inspectors, they frequently sold out of 50 to 60 loaves he baked every week. Now, he sells about 10 to 15 loaves a week through a local community-supported agriculture group he wouldn't name to protect it from health inspectors. More than anything, Stambler says, “I want to go legit.”

EARTHTALK® E - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE Dear EarthTalk: What is shark finning and why have several U.S. states outlawed it? -- BETSY ENGLUND, TAMPA, FL

market, became the fourth Canadian city to ban shark fins, joining Brantford, Oakville and Mississauga, all also in Ontario, that had bans in place already. Campaigns are underway in both the U.S. and Canada to ban shark fins and shark finning outright coast-to-coast. Mexico has had such a nationwide ban in place since 2007, although enforcement there has been weak. The European Union banned shark finning in 2003 and recently beefed up significantly its own enforcement. Concerned consumers can be part of the solution by not eating shark fin soup, and by encouraging restaurants not to offer it. The Animal Welfare Institute regularly updates a list of restaurants in major metropolitan areas of the U.S. that still serve shark fin soup, and encourages consumers to contact them if they encounter a restaurant serving shark fin soup that is not yet on their list—and to stop dining there. Whether or not such personal actions, added to the various bans in place, will make a dent in

the international shark fin trade remains to be seen, especially given the delicacy’s increasing popularity and affordability. CONTACTS: Animal Welfare Institute, www.awionline.org; WildAid, www.wildaid.org; IUCN, www.iucn.org.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Shark finning is the practice of catching sharks, hackDoug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Enviing off their fins, and returning them to the ocean ronmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions (maimed and unable to swim or circulate oxygen through to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: their systems) where they starve to death, suffocate or get www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: eaten by other predators. Fishermen sell the fins, typically www.emagazine.com/trial. on the black market, for use in shark fin soup, a delicacy throughout Asia and increasingly in other areas of the world with large Asian populations. Analysts value the worldwide market for shark fins at upwards of $1.2 billion annually. “As a result of China’s expanding economy and rising affluence, an increasing number of people can now afford the soup, priced at up to $100 per bowl, and demand has risen dramatically,” reports the non-profit WildAid. “Though shark fin soup represents status in Asian culture, the fin itself adds no flavor, nutritional or medicinal value.” The group adds that the consumption of shark fin poses a serious threat to human health since they contain an extremely high concentration of mercury and other toxins now omnipresent in our oceans. Besides being inhumane, shark finning is taking a heavy toll on shark populations. According to the non-profit Animal Welfare Institute, upwards of 73 million sharks are killed each year for their fins alone. Another 50 million die annually as “bycatch” when they become entwined in fishing nets targeting other seafood (some fishermen do make use of this bycatch by selling off what fins, cartilage, liver oil and meat they can). As a result of these multiple threats, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) estimates that a third of all shark species are nearing extinction, with some species declining by more than 80 percent in recent decades. In October 2011, California became the Photo By Nicholas Wang, courtesy Flickr fourth U.S. state (after Hawaii, Oregon and Washington) to ban shark finning and the im- The practice of shark finning to make shark fin soup, a delicacy mostly in Asian cultures, has taken a serious toll on shark populations worldwide. Besides being inhumane to sharks, consumption of shark fin poses a serious threat to human health since they contain an extremely high concentration of mercury portation of shark fins. Also in October, and other toxins now omnipresent in our oceans. Toronto, Ontario, Canada’s largest shark fin


November 15, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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TCV 2011-11-15