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Juried Photography Exhibit

Fall 5K and Health Fair to benefit those in need

Time changes this weekend Turn your Clock back one hour on Saturday night

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

November 1, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 87

BY SUZANNE ORTT PHOTOS COURTESY OF NICOLE GREEN Union City’s James Logan High School teacher, Michelle Galaria, co-chair of the Science Department, was honored with Animalearn’s Humane Educator of the Year Award on October 15 in Anaheim, CA. Galaria, who teaches biology and ecology, also serves as site coordinator of the Service Learning Waste Reduction Program (SLWRP) and advisor to the Sustainability Club. She shares Science Department chairing duties with Paul Bisbiglia. Animalearn, under the auspices of the National Association of Biology Teachers, recognized continued on page 7 (L to R) Laura Ducceschi, Director of Animalearn; Teacher honoree Michelle Galaria, with Nicole Green, Associate Director of Animalearn.

Michelle Galaria demonstrates a new frog dissection model.

SUBMITTED BY MYRON FREEDMAN Interest in the Civil War is strong again in 2011, the 150th anniversary of America’s bloodiest conflict. Most Americans regard the war as an East Coast affair and may be surprised to learn the Federal government went to great lengths to protect the Bay Area’s Golden Gate from Confederate raiding vessels. To safeguard the silver and gold shipments leaving the San Francisco area, the United States installed a series of forts and batteries to stand watch against any attacks. Several of these installations still survive. The Hayward Area Historical Society will present researcher and Civil War re-enactor Ernie Manzo and his program “The Ring of Fire,” an illustration of the Bay Area’s Civil War relics at 6 p.m. on November 10, 2011. Admission is free. For more information, call (510) 581- 0223.

History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Mayoral Candidate Ray J. Rodriguez

Newark Votes

As an adult, I cherish my experience of growing up in Newark; it instilled in me what I want for every child growing up in Newark to grow up in a safe community with that small town feel. On November 8, 2011, voters will choose the new Mayor for Newark. Voters have the opportunity to enhance and strengthen our beloved city by choosing a Mayor that will lead Newark into the future.

2011 and we need to use the technology available to improve and expedite communications with our community. Currently, Newark has two commissions - the Planning Commission and the Senior Commission. I will add a youth commission to give our young people in Newark a voice and a parks and recreation commission to allow citizens the opportunity to provide guidance on recreational activities. For the business community, I want to create a business attraction forum in which local business owners can talk to each other and to prospective Newark businesses. This is just the beginning. As Mayor, I will strengthen Newark by ensuring our long-term sustainability while protecting the elements we love. For more information about my campaign please visit my website www.AnaApodacaForMayor.com

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37

Researcher and Civil War re-enactor Ernie Manzo

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

A

Mayoral Candidate Ana Apodaca

One of my priorities as Mayor will be to diversify our economic base so that we are not reliant on retail sales tax revenue when planning our budget. Newark has incredible potential and is an attractive opportunity for business owners across the Bay Area. I will approach economic issues proactively and attract businesses that make sense for Newark. As Mayor, I will uphold a high level of public safety and continue to think outside of the box to find the resources needed to fund public safety. We must provide our police and fire departments with the tools they need to ensure our community is safe. Whether that means implementing a Volunteer Policing program, securing resources for better equipment or finding the funding to put more officers on our streets. Newark needs to communicate better with our community. I will revamp our website so community members are notified of updates on issues important to them. It’s

The Ring of Fire Thursday, November 10 6 p.m. Hayward Area Historical Society 22380 Foothill Boulevard, Hayward (510) 581- 0223 www.HaywardAreaHistory.org

INDEX

Mayoral Candidate Al Nagy

lthough some have already cast their ballots by mail, many Newark voters will head to the polls November 8, 2011 to vote for their choice for a new mayor, at least one new councilmember and a school bond measure. The following are statements by or for each candidate and bond arguments:

Candidates for Mayor of Newark Ana Apodaca

continued on page 32

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


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November 1, 2011

Radiology Expert Explains Safety Measures Used During Imaging Procedures

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o address parents’ concern and help answer questions about the safety of using X-ray exams on infants, a radiology expert from the Washington Outpatient Imaging Center has addressed the topic in a public service announcement now airing on Washington Hospital’s InHealth Channel, Comcast cable channel 78, and on the Web. X-rays, used to help physicians accurately diagnose a wide variety of injuries and conditions, are forms of radiant energy, like light or radio waves, according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). These energy waves can penetrate the body, enabling a radiologist to produce pictures of internal structures, which can be viewed on photographic film, a television screen, or computer monitor. These pictures help physicians diagnose a range of conditions and injuries, but there are specific concerns when it comes to infants and young children, according to Mimi Lin, M.D., a radiologist on the Washington Hospital Medical Staff. “At Washington Hospital, patient safety is our first priority,” Dr. Lin explains. “We take these concerns seriously. “As new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures utilizing ionizing radiation are discovered, there has been an increase in

their use. One recent study found that by the age of 18, the average child receives more than seven radiographic exams.” According to data published by the ACR and RSNA, the average person in the United States receives about 3 (mSv) millisieverts— the scientific unit of measurement for radiation dose—per year from naturally occurring radioactive materials and cosmic radiation from outer space. But when it comes to X-ray exams and the very young, Dr. Lin explains that infants and children require special precautions because their cells divide quickly, making them more vulnerable to the effects of radiation. “Our approach at Washington Hospital is to always use the lowest possible dose of radiation for useful diagnostic imaging,” she says. “This is a guiding principle for any imaging procedure, regardless of age. To that end, radiation should be limited—or ‘coned’—to the area of concern. Taking full body X-rays of infants, or ‘babygrams,’ is a practice that has been widely discredited and is not done at Washington Hospital.” Precautions taken during X-rays for infants and children, according to Dr. Lin, include proper shielding of the gonads, including breast shielding for girls, whenever possible, something she calls a crucial step in protecting these most vulnerable of patients. She adds that in certain situations, ultra-

In a recent study, researchers found that by the age of 18, the average child receives more than seven radiographic exams. Dr. Mimi Lin, a Washington Hospital medical staff radiologist who is featured in a public service announcement about young children and X-rays, says that special precautions must be taken because the very young are more vulnerable to the effects of radiation.

sound scanning, which uses no radiation, may be effectively substituted for X-rays. Pramela Ramachandran, M.D., neonatalogist and medical director of the Washington/Packard Children’s Special Care Nursery, also weighs in on the precautions when it comes to imaging procedures for infants. “The whole goal is to minimize radiation to the babies while getting the essential studies done for the management of these babies,” she says. “The precise method is to limit the study to the area of concern and prevent the exposure of the babies to radiation.” Dr. Lin goes on to explain the role of the radiological technologists, the professionals in charge of performing diagnostic X-rays safely and effectively. She points out that, in California, X-ray technicians must graduate from a post-secondary training institution approved by the state to be eligible for certification. Upon completion of a program of study, they also must pass an examination given by the American Registry of Radio-

logic Technologists (ARRT) to be registered as certified X-ray technicians. Following certification, the state also requires X-ray technicians to remain current with their skills by completing 24 hours of study every two years in the subjects of Xray technology or safety. Dr. Lin encourages parents of infants and young children to be active participants in their child’s care. In the PSA she outlines questions parents should ask when their child’s physician orders a diagnostic procedure. “As with all medical procedures, the benefits must be weighed carefully against the risks,” she says. “The bottom line is that any diagnostic test or procedure ordered for you or your child by your physician should also include a conversation about the risks and benefits involved.” To view the public service announcement, or for more information about the Washington Outpatient Imaging Center, visit www.whhs.com/imagingcenter/ or call (510) 494-7032, extension 6461.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

11/01/11

11/02/11

11/03/11

11/04/11

11/05/11

11/06/11

11/07/11

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Washington Women's Center: Sorry, Gotta Run!

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions

Think Pink: Women's Center Update

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Women's Health Conference: Beyond Sadness - Depression (Late Start)

Neurological Disorders: How Brain Tumors are Treated

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

New Surgical Techniques for Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help (Late Start)

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

World Kidney Day

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier (Late Start)

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression? (Late Start)

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options (Late Start)

Kidney Disease

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Think Pink: Breast Cancer and Vitamin D

Women's Health Conference: Skin Health From Infancy to Maturity (Late Start)

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Diabetes and Your Hormones (Late Start)

Diabetes in Pregnancy

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure & What is Cholesterol and How to Lower It (Late Start) Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions Insurance Information for People with Diabetes

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Living with Heart Failure & Heart Irregularities (Late Start) Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types? Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Surgical Interventions for Voices InHealth: Sleep Apnea Voices InHealth: Bras for Cyberbullying - The New Body & Soul Schoolyard Bully (Late Start) Inside Washington Hospital: (Late Start) Advances in Cardiac Care Men's Health Fair: Heart Healthy Living

Men's Health Fair: Stroke and Interventions Used

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

Personal Emergency Preparedness Training & Learn How to Access Community Services Quickly and Easily (Late Start)

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Men's Health Fair Panel Discussion

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center

Disaster Preparedness Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care Inside Washington Hospital: Pediatric Care

Brain Health for Seniors (Late Start)

Skin Care and Prevention Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team of Skin Cancer Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting October 12, 2011

Partnering with Your Doctor to Improve Diabetes Control

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy (Late Start)

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Eat Better!

Prostate Enlargements and Cancer (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Inside Washington Hospital: Stroke Response Team

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You? Learn Exercises to Help Lower Your Blood Pressure & Slow Your Heart Rate

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

George Mark Children's House - A New Way Home (Late Start)

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage?

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment


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Washington Hospital has been Serving the Needs of District Residents for More Than 50 Years

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ashington Hospital came into existence more than 50 years ago, thanks to the efforts of a group of citizens who foresaw the need for local, high quality medical care. Since that time, your community hospital has grown alongside the local communities it serves, expanding to meet citizens’ needs. Throughout our 50 year history of service to this District, Washington Hospital

brace this commitment, it is also our duty to the residents of the Washington Township Health Care District to be transparent with our finances and let you know that it is at great expense that we provide benefit to this community. Last year Washington Hospital provided $42 million in health care services to the District’s medically indigent. This figure includes care provided for free and also care

In addition to this commitment to the uninsured and the underinsured, Washington Hospital also spent an additional $3 million directly on community health programs and services. One of those programs is called Washington on Wheels. You may have seen around town this fully equipped mobile health clinic traveling throughout the Tri-City area providing free or low cost

We also take a leadership position on other community based support by donating to third party, non-profit health care providers like George Mark Children’s House and community clinics in the form of free lab and radiology services. All told, Washington Hospital provided more than $120 million in aid to the community in 2010. This figure is more than 25 percent of Washington

Washington Hospital, since its formation, has remained committed to providing the highest quality health care to all patients who need it, regardless of their financial circumstances. In fact, Washington Hospital provided more than $120 million in aid to the community—more than 25 percent of Washington Hospital’s total expenses—in 2010. To find out about free and low-cost services and programs available at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com.

is, and always has been, focused on providing the highest quality health care to each and every patient who needs it, regardless of their financial circumstances. That is why we take our focus on charity care so seriously, which is a tremendous help to those who are most in need. Washington Hospital does not turn away patients who need care but do not have insurance. While we wholeheartedly em-

provided to the Medi-Cal population that Washington subsidizes since the Hospital is compensated much less than the cost of providing this care. Furthermore we work hard to help get people on insurance programs and last year obtained Medi-Cal approval for 530 patients. An additional $75 million was written off as subsidization of Medicare patients and bad debt due to insufficient means to pay for their health care.

Vitamins and Supplements: Useful, or Harmful? A recent article in the October 11 issue of The New York Times reported on two new studies that once again raise questions about the effectiveness and risks of taking vitamins and other dietary supplements: • The Iowa Women’s Health Study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, followed 38,772 older women over a 19-year period (the mean age was 61.6 years at the baseline year in 1986). The study concluded that in older women, several commonly used dietary vitamin and mineral supplements, including multivitamins, may be asso-

To help people learn more about the potential risks and benefits of vitamins and other dietary supplements, Dr. Barbara Kostick, a family medicine specialist on the medical staff at Washington Hospital, will be presenting a seminar sponsored by Washington Hospital. The class will be held on Tuesday, November 8, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

ciated with an increased mortality risk. The association was strongest with supplemental iron. • A separate study of high-dose vitamin E and selenium use among 35,000 men, reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association, found that the vitamin users had a slightly higher risk of developing prostate cancer. (The doses studied in the trial were 200 micrograms of selenium and 400 international units of vitamin E, continued on page 4

health screenings, immunizations, flu shots, and other preventive services. We also run community education classes and screenings that allow residents and patients to stay in the loop on what Washington Hospital has to offer. In addition to helping us stay connected with the community, they are a great way to help detect medical issues before they advance any further.

Hospital’s total expenses. While this is a significant cost, we believe that it is our obligation and mission to provide care to this community. Washington Hospital is proud to do its part to not only engage with the community on a regular basis, but also to deliver free and/or subsidized health care to those who need it most. We look forward to continuing this long tradition.


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Vitamins and Supplements: Useful, or Harmful? while most multivitamins contain only about 50 micrograms of selenium and 30 to 200 international units of vitamin E.) “The problem is, we get confused by all the conflicting information about vitamins and other dietary supplements, since the data seem to change every week,” says Dr. Barbara Kostick, a family medicine specialist on the medical staff at Washington Hospital. To help people learn more about the potential risks and benefits of vitamins and other dietary supplements, Dr. Kostick will be speaking at a Health & Wellness seminar sponsored by Washington Hospital on Tuesday, November 8 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The seminar will be held in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. At the seminar, Dr. Kostick will conduct a survey among participants to determine what questions they have regarding dietary supplements and address the most common concerns. Possible areas of discussion may include: • How do you know if you need a dietary supplement? Are there tests to determine if you have a nutritional deficiency? • Are there any dangers associated with taking dietary supplements? • Can dietary supplements cause adverse effects or reactions with prescription medications?

• Are “natural” vitamins and supplements better and safer for you? • How safe and effective are herbal supplements such as St. John’s wort and ginkgo biloba? Is it safe to take herbal supplements that have a combination of ingredients? • Are “energy drinks,” “vitamin waters” or foods that contain supplements safe and beneficial? • How safe and effective are supplements that claim to help you lose weight or improve athletic performance? “It’s true that some dietary deficiencies can cause certain diseases,” Dr. Kostick notes. “For example, not enough vitamin D can cause rickets, not enough vitamin C can cause scurvy, and not enough vitamin B1 (thiamine) can cause beriberi. These diseases were prevalent prior to the 20th Century when obtaining a nutritionally sound diet was more difficult, but most people don’t get these diseases anymore because we have better access to a variety of healthy foods.” Multivitamin supplements were first introduced in 1934 by the Nutrilite Company, and they have been promoted ever since as ‘insurance’ for good health. The “shotgun” approach of taking a daily multivitamin, however, is not necessarily the best scientific approach. “There really is not much data on the effectiveness of multivita-

SUBMITTED BY CAROLYN POPESCU Gamers of all ages will get a sneak peek of the hottest new video games, compete in challenges, win prizes and more when Great Mall hosts the 2011 Simon GamePlay tour connecting fans of all ages to the hottest video games before they are officially launched and available in stores. This exciting and interactive event will feature a “Nintendo 3DS Lounge” decked out with couches, snacks and games. Plus, participants can enjoy 10

mins – or most other dietary supplements – for primary prevention of disease, despite marketing myths that are not based on science,” Dr. Kostick says. “On the other hand, some dietary supplements have been shown to be helpful,” she adds. “For example, taking folic acid during pregnancy can help prevent certain birth defects. Proper doses of calcium and vitamin D can help prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures in postmenopausal women. Younger women with heavy menstrual periods may benefit from supplemental iron if they are anemic.” Dr. Kostick suggests that rather than depending on a multivitamin, people should look at their own health risk factors and work with their physicians to develop individualized plans for taking only the supplements they need for the time of life they are in. “The bottom line is that if you are healthy, chances are that you can get all the nutrients you need from eating a well-balanced diet, although you may need certain supplements for specific conditions,” she asserts. “Getting plenty of exercise helps, too. You can’t correct a lack of physical activity with a multivitamin.” To register for the upcoming seminar on November 8, visit www.whhs.com.

gaming pods including two mature zones, with a variety of products from leaders in the video gaming industry, including 2K Play, Capcom, Eidos, SEGA, Namco-Bandai, Warner Brothers Interactive, THQ, 2K, Atari, and Edios/Square Enix. Simon Gameplay Saturday, Nov 5 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 956-2033 www.facebook.com/GreatMall FREE


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Galaria’s dedication to improving humane testing methods at her school. She adopted dissection alternatives in her classroom, demonstrating beneficial and effective methods to fellow teachers, administrators, and students. Animalearn recognized that Galaria was the clear choice for this year’s award. Nicole Green, assistant director of Animalearn stated, “She has worked tirelessly to make a difference in the educational practices at the school, all the while inspiring her students to also choose the compassionate path in the field of science.” An example of this effort occurred last spring when one of her students, Ben Mabie, presented his views to the New Haven Unified School District Board regarding alternative dissection policies. The award includes a donation of approximately $1,000 in high quality dissection alternative tools for the classroom. Galaria, with the input of her science colleagues, is entitled to choose the equipment to be donated. A new synthetic frog dissection model provides the realistic experience of

dissecting a frog without trauma to students or frog specimens. Galaria spent her time seeing other demonstrations and discussing science matters with other teachers; she was too busy to go to Disneyland. Galaria said the award has inspired her to accomplish more. “The award is a positive beacon for our school and it reminds me to celebrate the compassion that surrounds me when I am dealing with resistance.” She feels this award is a symbol to her students to work toward a more humane world. Educators and administrators need to be informed about the benefits of non-animal teaching tools and the California education code regarding animals and laboratory safety. A practical aspect also needs to be considered. Galaria says, “Non-animal tools are less costly, reusable, non-toxic and result in equal or superior student performance.” Lynette Hart, professor at UC Davis Veterinary School, is perplexed by animal dissection in high schools while it is being phased out in veterinary and medical schools. UC Davis has developed

comparative anatomy labs, which use reusable materials only and developed the virtual heart CD, and is currently modifying The Virtual Human to be accessible on personal computers. The medical school at Stanford uses the New Virtual Dissection Table and Virtual Creatures Web interactives. Numerous university-created dissection alternatives can be found at www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/animal_alternatives/dissalts.ht m. A lending library is available through Animalearn and Science Bank from which models and software are available for schools who wish to use alternatives to traditional animal dissections. Schools only pay the return freight. The newly developed nontraditional techniques are not only humane but also increase students’ safety and educational experiences. Focus on these beliefs will keep Galaria involved; she is a teacher who wants to make a difference. For additional information on Animalearn, visit the website http://www.animalearn.org/.

Brain health and Alzheimer’s Judith L. London, Ph.D., a psychologist licensed in New York and California who has treated people with Alzheimer's and other dementias in public long-term care facilities for more than sixteen years, will discuss communication breakthroughs in the treatment of Alzheimer’s. She has been adjunct professor at New York University, a stress management trainer and workshop leader, and a featured columnist on addictions. London conducts seminars on Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and maintaining brain health. Subjects covered in this workshop: • Respecting the value of life at all stages • Communicating with those who have dementia • Brain health – how to keep it in tip top shape and boost your brain power

• Caring for the care-giver and practical resource assistance for care-givers Brain health and Alzheimer’s Saturday, Nov 5 9 a.m. - noon (registration & refreshments at 8:30 am) Prince of Peace Lutheran Church 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-3219 Attendance at this event is free, but please reserve your spot today by e-mailing us at healthybrainatpop@gmail.com

www.skinlaseressentials.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont PoliceLog SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD October 28 Officers responded to Lucky’s at 5000 Mowry Avenue on a report of a person down near the store. When officers and Fremont Fire Department arrived, they determined the 44-year-old male was deceased. The death does not appear to be suspicious; however, the male had a history of illegal drug use and was in possession of methamphetamine. Investigated by Officer Valdes. Officer Stillitano conducted a patrol check at 3rd Street Park and attempted to contact a subject who fled on foot but was quickly apprehended and arrested. It was later determined that the subject was wanted on a felony burglary warrant. Officer Edwards followed up on an investigative lead from his residential burglary investigation yesterday. A subject was arrested for possession of stolen property.

October 29 Officer Lawrence arrested a subject for multiple auto burglaries at Motel 6. Dispatch received a call from a reporting party who stated he was at a house party on Mission View and was stabbed. Multiple callers stated there was a fight in the street in the area of Mission View. Officers arrived and located the reporting party, with multiple stab wounds to his torso. Officers also contacted another victim, who was stabbed in the chest. Both were transported to Eden Hospital with nonlife threatening injuries. Both victims were uncooperative. Further investigation revealed they possibly stabbed each other in the confrontation. October 20 The Century House was burglarized by an unknown suspect. Two victims were confronted by three males at Northgate Savoy while walking to their apartment. Suspect #1 snatched a gold chain from the male victim’s neck while Suspect #2 snatched a gold chain from the other victim. All three suspects were described as black male adults 22-23 years old.

Union City Police Log October 25 Officers responded to the Safeway parking lot located at 1790 Decoto Road to investigate a report of a male subject pointing a gun at a female. Arriving officers found that the subject had fled prior to police arrival and met with the victim and witnesses that remained in the area. Through the course of the investigation the officer learned that a couple was walking out of Safeway, as another couple was walking in. The couple walking out consisted of the subject and a female witness. The couple walking in consisted of the victim and a male witness. The victim recognized the female the subject was walking out of the store with as her brother’s ex-girlfriend and began to yell and curse at her. The subject and female witness ignored the victim’s verbal assault and walked to his parked car. The victim continued her verbal assault and threatened to kill the female that was accompanied by the subject. At one point the victim attempted to open the pas-

senger’s side door and spat on the vehicle. The subject fearing the victim had a weapon, stopped his vehicle as he was backing out and exited his vehicle; pointed a handgun at the victim and told her to back away. At this time the subject identified himself as an off duty police officer. The victim’s male friend came up to their location, and the subject told him to get the victim away from them. The subject and his friend left the scene and later arrived at the Union City Police Department to report this incident, as the officer was on scene was obtaining statements from the victim and witnesses there. The victim did not wish prosecution, but this case is being sent to the District Attorney’s office for review. October 26 Officers responded to the area of Railroad Avenue and “E” Street to investigate an accident involving a motor vehicle and a train. Officers learned that the driver was approaching the train

tracks and stopped her car at the railroad tracks. The railroad crossing arms had already lowered behind her vehicle, preventing her from backing up. As the train passed her location at about 70 MPH, it clipped the front of the driver’s vehicle. The train came to a stop near “H” Street. The driver appeared unharmed, but was transported to a local hospital to be examined. Community Oriented Policing and Problem (COPPS) officers received a complaint during the week at the Medallion Apartments. The involved tenant was a sex registrant on parole for aggravated sexual battery. COPPS officers responded to the apartment and, with the assistance of patrol officers, conducted a parole search of the apartment. A 17year-old female was found living at the residence in violation of numerous of the conditions of parole. The parolee, who was not home, arrived a short time later and was detained. The parolee was taken to jail and the juvenile was returned to her mother.

Transition at 12:01 a.m. BY AISHA KNOWLES At one minute after midnight on November 1, 2011, Paramedics Plus will become the new private 9?1?1 ambulance provider for Alameda County. Paramedics Plus, dispatched by the Alameda County Regional Emergency Communications Center (ACRECC), operated by the Alameda County Fire Department (ACFD), will provide ambulance service for all 9?1?1 patients within the County with the exception of those cities that provide ambulance service through their fire departments (Alameda, Albany, Berkeley and Piedmont). While Alameda County will be its first operation in California, Paramedics Plus currently provides emergency services in counties in Florida, Oklahoma and Indiana. It is anticipated that Paramedics Plus will respond to 120,000 ambulance calls a year, resulting in 90,000 transports to local hospitals. Over 340 emergency medical technicians and paramedics, and more than 20 mechanics and support staff transitioned to Paramedics Plus from AMR, the predecessor provider in Alameda County.

Cops: Couple's copper theft for wedding netted $18 AP WIRE SERVICE ELLWOOD CITY, Pa. (AP), Sep 28 - Police say a western Pennsylvania couple desperate for money to pay for their wedding netted just $18 for the stolen copper wire they cut from more than a dozen utility poles. North Sewickley police say 23-year-old Joseph Russell and 24-year-old April Cater cut down the wires on August 9, four days before their wedding. Russell says he was desperate for money because he'd just lost his job and lost a $1,000 deposit after his reception hall abruptly closed down. Sgt. Jeff Bezce says the couple clearly expected to get more money than they got from the scrap where they sold the copper. Russell tells WPXI-TV he will pay for the damages. Utility officials say it will cost about $400 to repair the 18 poles that were damaged.


November 1, 2011

BY FRANK TOBE’S THE ROBOT REPORT

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e've read about their use in last year's Deepwater Horizon Gulf of Mexico oil spill and their underwater repair work, traipsing the corridors and collecting rubble at Fukushima nuclear power plants, the exploits of James Cameron and his amazing underwater photos and movie about the Titanic, read the science journals about new autonomous drilling rigs and underwater platforms, and seen the recent finding and salvaging of the black box from the 2009 Air France crash. Just last week the largest ever cache of precious metal found in the sea - 200 tons of silver worth $230 million - was discovered along with the wreck of a British cargo ship sunk during the Second World War by a German U-boat. Almost every day I find a press release reporting marine contracts of one type or another. For exam-

ple Shilling Robotics just received an order for two 3,000m ROV systems for delivery to the South Korean navy. They will be used for submarine rescue and towing/salvage operations. There's no doubt that the underwater robot business is emerging. Underwater robots are very new and many of them are still in their initial phase of evolution. Most of them are actually inspired by the design engineering of nature. These robots look like sea creatures and have achieved a certain degree of motion but are still not good enough to gel with underwater sea life. Although the application and target problems are limitless, most of them are presently focused on specific areas like oil, gas, and mineral exploration, data collection and monitoring underwater changes, search and rescue, and military and defense scenarios. Nevertheless, oceans cover two-thirds of the planet and largely remain unexplored. Has

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

the time for a real underwater industry finally arrived? Where are the biggest opportunities? What are the major technical and business challenges? And which companies have already started impacting this new industry? Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) and remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) extend our ability to explore the deep sea much in the same way that space rovers have enhanced

multi-mission robot which has survived and come back with shark bites and dents, working at a fraction of the cost of ship-based methods and at lesser risk. The price is in the $125,000 to $150,000 range depending on sensors and could go higher

our understanding of remote planets. UUVs are now becoming cost-effective tools in applications ranging from deep-water survey for the offshore oil and gas industry to military operations to tracking sea life. The need for increased ocean observation for commercial as well as scientific purposes offers great potential for UUVs to enhance the performance of conventional ship-based operations, as well as the ability to operate in difficult-to-access areas such as below the Arctic ice. Here are three American companies (from the online Service Robots for Government and Corporate Use directory of The Robot Report) which exemplify this emerging industry. Each has a different technological orientation, market presence and sales plan - but all are emerging companies in the marine robotics business. iRobot, pioneer of the cleaning robotic systems business and provider of the military's PackBot bomb disposal and other dangerous missions robots, has entered into marine robotics with a bang. iRobot has a balanced commercial, defense, research portfolio and is diversifying with cross-over products in the marine and healthcare sectors. In a recent talk with David Heinz, iRobot's VP of Maritime Systems, interesting aspects of their Enhanced Seaglider unmanned underwater vehicle and their whole family of underwater products came to light. He is convinced that underwater is where iRobot is going to be spending a lot more time. The Seaglider robot is a data collector. It measures temperature, salinity and other quantities in the ocean and is integrated with a global satellite system for automatic measurement and transmission of data. It is battery powered, capable of 3 to 4 dives and underwater glides per day and lasts for around 10 months on a single charge depending on the mission. More than 135 Seagliders have been delivered to various government agencies, US defense and research organizations. With high endurance, the Seaglider is a

with more expensive payloads. Lots of underwater applications are addressed by iRobot's line of maritime robots. Two of the most important are likely to be harbor defense and tracking of illegal underwater activities. Other applications provide data support in aquatic monitoring, supplementing (with the prospect of replacement) sonobuoy systems used by the navy, hurricane monitoring for oil platforms, mine warfare, harbor defense (eg: operating a picket line with triangulation software to alert drug agencies when drug trafficking is suspected, etc.) It can also be used to detect underwater nuclear radiation and temperature monitoring and some development has already started in this direction. There are a few challenges; one of them is an inability to operate in shallow waters because the devices get sucked with currents. Another interesting robot is the wave glider from Liquid Robotics, a company focused on serving the scientific and oceanographic research communities. A submerged glider connected with a surface float by a 7 meter long tether, it is based on a look-down concept and scans data from the surface and within 20 meters of the underwater glider. Wave gliders harvest wave energy for its thrust and that gives it an added advantage of not being limited by any on-board power source although the abovewater float is solar powered and uses that power for satellite communication. The Wave Glider supports a wide variety of sensor payloads and can keep station or travel from point to point. Data and instructions are transmitted to and from shore via satellite. Applications include climate continued on page 11

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November 1, 2011

Auto Review

Toyota FJ Cruiser Reporting for Duty BY STEVE SCHAEFER he Toyota FJ Cruiser is a modern interpretation of the legendary FJ40, but it is essentially Toyota's version of the Hummer. So, it may look

and BFG All-Terrain tires with wheel locks. A 4.0-liter V6 with 260 horsepower and 271 lb.-ft. of torque gives the car plenty of punch, but it's pretty quiet to the ear. The FJ Cruiser gained a more powerful

woofer in back), leather steering wheel, privacy glass and more. The FJ Cruiser comes with Toyota's STAR Safety System™ that includes Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Traction Control (TRAC), an Antilock Brake Sys-

blocky and tough, but it's got modern Toyota guts and interior. The inside panels are upright and some wear body color, like a Jeep. The windshield is so short and wide that it needs three wipers! The driver’s side gets a dash-top glove compartment—not recommended for storing your spare Milky Ways. The low roofline obscures traffic lights that hang above, so you sometimes find yourself craning your neck to see one change to green. A separate side visor neatly complements the front visor when it’s pulled into duty. The ride is firm but smooth and the big SUV is easy to drive. Parking takes extra care because of a huge blind spot created by the stylish but wide side pillars. The interior controls look heavy and chunky but actually feel like lightweight plastic—a bit of an illusion. White on black gauges impart a businesslike feel as does the genuine 4WD lever (no pushbuttons), while the leatherwrapped steering wheel provides just a touch of upscale feel. My Toyota FJ Cruiser test vehicle arrived in Army Green nonmetallic, regular old green. The wheels were steel - painted utilitarian flat black. The rest of the trim was blacked out, too. It’s part of the 2011 annual Trail Teams Special Edition. While most FJs I’ve seen are in bright primary colors with jaunty white roofs, this one looked like a mean, fighting machine. Inside, the seats and door trim wore special complementary green fabric. Under the hood, cyclone preair cleaners trap sand and dirt. The standard Off-Road Package beefs up chassis performance with trail-tuned Bilstein® shock absorbers, rear differential lock and the active traction control (ATRAC) system, engine, fuel tank and transfer cases, skid plates, rock rails, plus Toyota Racing Development (TRD) alloy wheels

and more efficient engine last year, along with a change to regular-grade fuel. The EPA gives the car, with four-wheel drive and automatic transmission, 17 City and 21 Highway (avg. 19 mpg). The EPA Green Vehicle Guide ratings are 5 for Air Pollution and just 3 for Greenhouse Gas. You can have this rugged offroader in four-wheel or twowheel drive (if you plan to stay in town most of the time). The 4x4 model offers a choice between a six-speed manual transmission and an electronically shifted fivespeed automatic transmission; the 4x2 model is equipped exclusively with the five-speed automatic. My tester had the automatic, which varies the shifting pattern based on road conditions and driver input. The FJ’s tough, wide stance is based on a boxed steel ladderbraced frame to which the welded steel body is mounted. Skid plates for the engine, transfer case (on 4x4 models only) and fuel tank are standard. You ride high in this transport device—like you would in a 4Runner—and feel like you’re looking over the ordinary cars out on the road. With the FJ Cruiser's standard 32-inch tires, ground clearance is 9.6 inches (8.7 inches for 4x2 models). The “utility” part of the Sport-Utility Vehicle means a rear door that opens horizontally - like the door of your house - and second row seats that fold down for maximum utility. You need to order Upgrade Package 3 ($3,650) to get all the Trail Teams stuff. That includes more than just green paint - you also receive illuminated round markers on the mirrors, a backup camera in the rearview mirror, an electronically controlled locking rear differential, active traction control, remote keyless entry, an upgraded JBL 11-speaker audio system (with a monster sub-

tem (ABS), Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD) and Brake Assist (BA). The roll-sensing side curtain airbags can detect a potential rollover and signal the VSC system to help reduce a lateral skid. In addition, the rollover sensor can signal the standard seat-mounted side airbags and side curtain airbags to deploy. 2012 FJ Cruisers start at $26,800 for the two-wheel-drive model. The automatic-equipped four-wheel-drive model begins at $28,390. My 2011 tester topped out at $31,775. All prices include delivery charges. I'm not one for big off-road vehicles, but this one was fun and I thought I saw people looking at me and thinking, "What did that guy do to his car?" Preview: the 2012 Trail Teams Special Edition is Radiant Red!

T

SUBMITTED BY ASHA CHANDRA The City of Fremont Human Services Department is partnering with The Coming of Age: Bay Area, an organization which captures the talent, energy, and expertise of people 50+ to present Explore Your Future. This two-

day workshop is designed to assist individuals to create a real Action Plan to reach their career and/or volunteer goals. Discussion topics will include: What has influenced me? Who am I now? How can I realize my dreams? How do I create an engaged life? The two day, low-cost, fun, and thought provoking workshop

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.

will be held on Thursdays November 3 & 10 from 1-5 p.m. at the Fremont Family Resource Center, 39155 Liberty Street (at Capitol), Pacific Room, #H800, Fremont. Cost is $49 for Coming of Age members or $69 for nonmembers. Fee includes comprehensive workbook. Preregistration is required. Scholarships may be available. For more information, to become a member, or to register online, visit www.ComingofAge.org/BayArea or call (888) 308-1767.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

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science, tsunami warning, protected area monitoring, marine mammal observation, port and harbor security, transportation safety, maritime domain awareness, search and rescue, and commercial apps like fishery management, aquaculture, pollution detection and natural resource discovery. Military/government apps include naval oceanography, intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance, monitoring and managing economic zones, etc. Teledyne Technologies is an aerospace/defense conglomerate and provides electronic and engineered subsystems for defense, space, environmental and nuclear applications. Robotics represent just a small portion of their overall revenue, however, three whollyowned subsidiaries provide notable maritime products. Teledyne Benthos provides a line of modular UUVs and ROVs including the Stingray and MiniROVER. These ROVs are used for mine warfare, in-situ biological sampling, port and harbor security and ship hull inspection. They are also used for under-ice surveying, interior and exterior pipe inspection, salvage operations and offshore structure surveys. Their clientele include military, oil and gas companies, oceanographic institutes and marine and biological science research organizations.

Teledyne Brown Engineering recently received a $53.1 million contract with the Navy to manufacture 100 Slocum LBS-G (Littoral Battlespace Sensing-Glider) gliders to acquire critical oceanographic data to improve fleet positioning during naval maneuvering. The LBS-G glider is a torpedo-shaped unmanned underwater vehicle about 2 meters long and uses changes in buoyancy along with its wings and tail-fin steering to glide through the water. Teledyne Webb Research has a novel way of describing their Slocum line of gliders: "A unique mobile network component capable of moving to specific locations and depths and occupying controlled spatial and temporal grids." Mobile network being the key descriptors. These battery and thermal energy powered gliders are used for subsurface sampling, carrying a wide range of sensors, patrolling for weeks and months at a time, interacting with multiple vehicles with minimal personnel and infrastructure to study and map the dynamic subsurface waters "around the clock and calendar." Perhaps the biggest opportunities for marine robotics, at present, are still with governments for their defense, security and oceanographic surveillance - and with big companies for their exploration of oil, rare earth materials, and maintenance and construction of underwater platforms. As marine applications expand to areas such as aquaculture and other commercial marketplaces, these robots will be constantly updating our current perception and

understanding of sea life and the world beneath the water with lots of new findings. The current apps - all of which are performed autonomously for long periods of time at a fraction of the cost of present methods - are the just the tip of the iceberg in this emerging marine sector of the service robotics industry.

New Haven District School Board updates SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Kevin Harper, a member of the New Haven Unified School District Board of Education for the past seven years, is moving out of the District and will resign his position, effective at the end of the calendar year, he announced at the Board meeting on October 18. Mr. Harper and his wife, Jean, who have two sons who attended New Haven schools, are in the process of building a home in Castro Valley. While construction is being completed, they plan to live in San Francisco. Elected to the Board in 2004, Mr. Harper served as President in 2007-08. He was re-elected to the

Board in 2008 and currently serves as Clerk. To fill the coming vacancy, the Board will have the option of calling a special election or make a provisional appointment. Board President Michelle Matthews stated that the Board would begin taking applications from New Haven residents interested in being appointed. When applications are available, the District will announce details about the appointment process, including the application deadline and the date(s) for candidates to interview with the Board. The appointment will be effective only until after the November 2012 election, when Mr. Harper’s term continued on page 33

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November 1, 2011

Calif. cities take pension reform to the ballot BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Oct 29 - San Francisco's public pension system took a beating during the recession, which has left it carrying a hefty unfunded liability for its 26,000 current and 28,000 retired employees. The city's pension obligation is growing by $100 million a year, leaving less funding for police and fire protection, park maintenance and health services for the needy. Unable to keep up, San Francisco is among several California cities asking voters to help tackle the public pension problem - which is now one of the biggest causes of municipal budget shortfalls. In San Diego, city leaders and reform advocates recently submitted more than enough signatures to qualify an initiative to change the city's charter on pension calculations. If it qualifies, it would appear on the June ballot. And San Jose's mayor has set a goal of placing retirement reform before voters in a March special election; labor groups are offering a compromise plan. Local governments are increasingly turning to voters for help to rein in the cost of public pensions as the state continues to wrestle with the issue. Talks stalled earlier this year between Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown and Republican lawmakers after they failed to reach a compromise on tax extensions. Brown failed to generate support for his proposed changes and is now offering a plan to raise the retirement age to align with Social Security and move new state workers to a hybrid system where guaranteed benefits are combined with a 401(k)-style plan. Pension reformers say voters support efforts to roll back enhanced retirement benefits that were handed out during economic boom years. It was a time when pension funds appeared so flush that some cities stopped asking employees to pay into their retirement programs. As pension costs shoot up, taxpayers have been asking why they are on the hook to pay guaranteed lifetime pension and health care benefits for public employees as defined-benefit pensions have all but disappeared from the private sector, replaced by 401(k) plans that have tanked in value. “When you look at the math, you realize there's no way that cities and counties can keep up with the escalating pension costs,” said San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, who has made pension reform his campaign centerpiece for mayor. But any proposal to change retirement benefits for current and retired public employees will almost certainly invite legal challenges from unions that represent police officers, firefighters, librarians and city hall workers. Robert Bezemek, an Oakland union attorney who represents re-

tired public employees, says less generous benefits are easy to negotiate for new hires but the courts have been fairly consistent about maintaining existing retirement contracts because employees have vested rights. He said an employer, whether it's a city or state government, must prove financial hardship and the courts often recommend replacing benefits with something of similar value. “When a promise has been made, it has to be kept,” Bezemek said. For example, the California Supreme Court this month declined to hear a challenge from Orange County, which lost its effort to roll back enhanced pension benefits for sheriff's deputies. But how clear do those promises have to be? Local governments struggling with unfunded pension liabilities are closely watching another case the state's high court heard out of Orange County. The county argues that it was within its right to lower health care costs by separating retirees from current employees, which increased retirees' premiums. The Retired Employees Association of Orange County argues retired employees have a contract right to be pooled with current employees, which lowers their costs because they are pooled with younger and healthier workers. The state requires public employers to negotiate in good faith with their employees under the Meyers-Milias Brown Act. Even if a union agrees to concessions, cities often have charters that dictate how retirement benefits are accrued and handed out. Those kinds of changes require voters to weigh in, driving a string of local ballot measures. Voters in Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo and Redding recently approved measures aimed at containing their pension costs. This November, San Francisco voters will have their pick between two pension proposals. San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and a broad coalition of labor and business groups have put forth Proposition C, which could save the city as much as $1.3 billion over 10 years. Adachi, the public defender, collected enough signatures for Proposition D, which is estimated to save as much as $1.7 billion over that same period. While there are many differences between the competing measures, both share a similar goal: They require current city workers to contribute a larger portion of their salaries now to pay for their golden years. Lee said unlike most measures, labor backed Proposition C knowing that it could serve as a model for sustaining public pensions without bankrupting municipal governments. “We had to come to consensus here very quickly because the cost increases on the pension and health care side was going to hurt

Groupon's fall to earth swifter than its fast rise BY MICHELLE CONLIN AP BUSINESS WRITER NEW YORK (AP), Oct 21 Only a few months ago, Groupon was the Internet's next great thing. Business media christened it the fastest growing company ever. Copycats proliferated. And in-

vestors salivated over the prospect of Groupon going public. Today, the startup that pioneered online daily deals for coupons is an example of how fast an Internet darling can fall. Groupon is discounting its expectations for the IPO that in June was valued as high as $25 billion. In a regulatory filing Fri-

the very employees we were negotiating with - and they knew that,” the mayor said. San Diego Councilman Carl DeMaio, a mayoral candidate who is making that city's initiative his campaign centerpiece, has crafted one of the most aggressive plans in the state. His initiative not only would transition new hires to defined contribution, or 401(k), plans, but also ``picks the lock'' of existing pensions by increasing the amount city employees must contribute to their own plans and freezing the salaries used to calculate their pension benefits for five years, possibly longer. “You see it happening up and down California,” DeMaio said. “The reality has sunk in that government, lifelong guaranteed pensions are not sustainable.” Advocates for pension reform, such as San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed, have warned that without more concessions from current employees, city services will continue to be devastated. Without savings, the city would have to fill the deficit by closing all branch libraries and community centers, making further cuts to police and firefighters, and eliminating park rangers. Reed says San Jose would not be able to continue its senior nutrition program or maintain traffic signs and street lights. Several bargaining groups representing San Jose police officers, firefighters, architects and engineers, middle managers and maintenance supervisors submitted pension reform plans they said would net the city $467 million in pension savings. They are hoping a compromise will keep the mayor from heading to the ballot in 2012 but Reed is seeking $882 million in savings by increasing employee contributions, reducing benefits and raising the retirement age. George Beattie, a 51-year-old San Jose police lieutenant who is close to retirement after 23 years of service, says he worries Reed is contemplating severe rollbacks, such as raising the retirement age for working police officers to age 60, which will violate workers' rights and invite costly legal challenges. He said the police association already has agreed to concessions such as higher pension and health care contributions. Beattie, who estimated he is on track to earn 70 percent of his $155,000 annual salary in retirement, said voters and elected officials might be worried about the bottom line, but if city officials don't negotiate with employees, they will ultimately drive away qualified men and women, jeopardizing the city's safety and well-being. “You're going to make a bad situation worse,” he said. The San Jose city council has until early December to vote whether to place the mayor's proposed charter change on the March ballot. day, the company said that it expects a valuation that is less than half that at between $10.1 billion and $11.4 billion. It's the latest twist for Groupon's IPO, which was one of the most anticipated offerings this year. In June, after Groupon filed for the offering, the SEC raised concerns about the way it counts revenue. Then the stock market plunged. Now Groupon faces concerns about the viability of its daily deals business model. The novelty of online coupons is wearing off. Some merchants are complaining that they are losing money - and


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customers- on the deals. And competitors are swarming the marketplace. “Groupon is a disaster,” says Sucharita Mulpuru, a Forrester Research analyst. “It's a shill that's going to be exposed pretty soon.” Groupon shows what can happen when a startup experiences steroidal growth in an unproven industry. To its defenders, the Chicago company is a victim of its success, its stumbles emblematic of a business in infancy. After all, Groupon has hordes of fans who rave about the company's deals and its liberal refund policy. And some merchants see the company has a way to get much-need exposure. “It's free marketing and it brings in a lot of people,” says Cono Moreno, owner of Brooklyn's Verde restaurant. But critics say the issues Groupon is facing are symptomatic of something more troubling: questionable accounting, an overvalued business model and an industry that is turning into the digital equivalent of junk mail. Groupon is expected to go public Nov. 4. The company could not comment for this story due to the quiet period for its IPO, during which time company officials are barred by regulators from discussing anything about the firm. But interviews with analysts, investment managers and merchants tell the story of a company that grew too fast as it raced to go public. Groupon's beginning Groupon began in 2008 when computer programmer Andrew Mason, a Northwestern University grad and former punk band keyboardist, figured out how to get people excited about the low-margin business of coupons. Mason's brainchild: sign up merchants to offer coupons online through a website and Groupon's email subscriber list. Shoppers who see these ads on their computers, tablets or mobile phones can then buy the coupons, getting bargains on everything from knee socks to

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Botox. The deals are targeted toward customers' cities and preferences. Groups bidding on coupons equals voila - Groupon. By 2010, Groupon was in nearly 100 cities and 25 countries. Groupon's staff ballooned to nearly 10,000. Mason, now 30, was on his way to becoming the next tech billionaire. The scene was set for an IPO. In June, Groupon filed documents with the SEC reporting $713.4 million in revenue in 2010, making it the first company to surpass the $500-million revenue mark in its third year, according to Forbes magazine. But Groupon began facing a growing perception that its business was unstable. The online deal space was getting jammed with competitors, like Living Social, Amazon.com and Google. They are among the many copycats who are attempting to do what Groupon does. Big merchants are also running their own daily deals online. At the same time that competition is building, consumers are questioning the quality of Groupon's offerings. Those who are disgruntled with Groupon often broadcast it on Yelp, the user review website that rates merchants. There's even something called the “Yelp Effect,” named for the way angry customers drive down the merchants' Yelp ratings. “Most of the deals are for femalecentric services like spas and nails or for high-ticket non-necessities like skydiving and travel,” says Richard Breen, a Greenville, S.C., marketing executive who used to use Groupon. “I typically delete it each day now without opening the email.” When she first started using Groupon in 2008, Sabrina Kidwai, of Alexandria Va., was happy with the deals site. But then she used a Groupon for a picture canvas for a family photo. She placed the order three days before the Groupon's expiration, but the merchant was so overwhelmed with the response to the deal that it couldn't fulfill her order. What ensued was a customer service nightmare that ended with

Kidwai getting her picture canvas two months later. “I definitely think there are some wonderful deals, but users really need to pay attention and speak up when the company provides you with a bad experience,” she said. Adding to growing customer discontent, Groupon, which was initially seen by small mom-and-pop shops as a way to drum up new business, was losing favor with some of them. Merchants began to do the cruel math on the daily deals. Restaurants offering $50 of food for just $25 only collect $12.50 not even enough to cover the cost of the food. Some businesses also complain that the deals for new customers anger long-time patrons. Others say that the bargains attract high-maintenance types who don't turn into loyal customers. “Your restaurants are full packed with people who aren't making you any money,” says Paul Evans, a Kansas City marketing executive who advises clients against using Groupon. Take Jessie Burke, for instance. Last year, the owner of Portland's Posies Café offered a $13 coupon for $6. The café was deluged with customers and Burke ended up having to take $8,000 out of personal savings to cover payroll. “It is the single worst decision I have ever made as a business owner,” Burke said in a blog post that quickly went viral. Andres Arango, founder of natural jewelry company muichic.com, had a similar experience. He sold 80 coupons - $35 of jewelry for $15 in two days. But of that $15, he only got $7.50. And he still had to dole out $35 worth of jewelry. As far as customers? “They never came back,” Arango said John Byers, a Boston University computer science professor who conducted a study on thousands of Groupon deals, wrote that he found that “Offering a Groupon puts a merchant's reputation at risk. The audience being reached may be continued on page 33

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Amtrak hits record 30 million passengers BY JOAN LOWY ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Oct 13 - Amtrak trains carried more than 30 million passengers in the past 12 months, the most in one year since the passenger railroad was created four decades ago, railroad officials said Thursday. Ridership during the budget year ending on Sept. 30 was 30.2 million passengers, up 5 percent over the previous year. Ticket revenue was up by more than 8 percent despite significant weather-related disruptions in much of the country. Amtrak has set ridership records eight out of the last nine years. A decade ago, it carried 21 million passengers a year. ``Amtrak is fulfilling its national mission and is part of the solution to meet America's growing transportation and energy needs,'' Joseph Boardman, Amtrak's president and chief executive officer, said in a statement. Despite its success in attracting riders, Amtrak's critics in Congress are squeezing the railroad's federal subsidies and trying to take away its most valuable routes in the rail corridor that links Washington, Philadelphia, New York and Boston. The House Appropriations Committee's transportation subcommittee last month approved a budget that sharply reduces Amtrak subsidies. In June, House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman John Mica, R-Fla., proposed soliciting bids from other railroads for the right to service the 456-mile Northeast Corridor, which is the heart of Amtrak's operations. He said it was taking the railroad too long to achieve consistently high-speed service equivalent to trains in Europe and Asia. Amtrak has proposed its own plan to upgrade its Northeast Corridor track and trains and to eliminate bottlenecks so that trains can travel up to 220 mph. Trip time between Washington and New York would be reduced to 96 minutes and between New York and Boston to 93 minutes. But the plan would be phased in over 30 years and cost $117 billion to implement. The railroad is seeking private investment to pay for some of the cost. ``Americans are returning to the rails in record numbers, yet Republicans are pulling out all of the stops in their rush to auction off Amtrak's assets to the highest bidder on Wall Street,'' Rep. Nick Rahall of West Virginia, top Democrat on the transportation committee, said. ``It makes no sense to tear apart a railroad and its workforce while they are succeeding at their jobs.'' Amtrak was created by Congress in 1971 after passenger railroads failed in the face of competition from airlines and interstate highway travel. With the U.S. population expected to exceed 400 million people by 2050, nightmarish congestion is forecast for the nation's already crowded highways and airports.


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Are you a writer?

November 1, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: For the first two weeks of November, it is generally unwise to take initiatives. Your intentions may be misunderstood or you may be dealing with deceptive people. People in general will be fatigued and oversensitive. Avoid pointing fingers at yourself or anyone else. World news may be thoroughly confusing and some of it will be flatly in error. Chemical or radioactive explosions are possible. Be extremely careful if you must deal with anything related. Aries (March 21-April 20): Good fortune and good news come your way this week. The areas of positive omens are via the Internet, people at a distance, the law, education, publication and/or travel. These probabilities are the result of effort you have made in the past. You are in favor with many now. Romance, however, may prove disappointing. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Venus, your ruling planet, enters the 8th sector and will remain there through Nov. This week is one of sacrifice of your resources. After that, the rest of Nov. Suggests favorable influences and opportunities concerning gifts or other financial resources that come through other people. Gemini (May 21-June 20): For the next two months you will want to experiment with and try on multiple points of view. You probably will be taking "polls" among friends and associates. Your capacity for objective thinking grows during this period and it is generally a good time to discuss relation-

ship issues with partners and close associates. Cancer (June 21-July 21): Activities involving learning or teaching are especially favorable now. Pay attention to new people you meet and what information they tell you. You are likely to encounter one who can help you find the next step in your career/work. Organizing files and papers so you will be ready to make a new beginning is also favored. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): This is a fairly routine week for the Lions. Most of your activities will go as planned. Keep everything backed up as you approach Nov. 8. You may have nuisance problems related to high tech equipment. Expect the unexpected at that time. Virgo the Virgin (August 3September 22): Mercury, your ruling planet, moves into the sector of life related to children, recreation, personal creativity, and romance. Your attention will be focused in these areas through the end of the year. Be-

ware of setting plans in stone, because Mercury will retrograde on Thanksgiving and cause you to reverse decisions. Libra (September 23-October 22): Your ruling planet is Venus, goddess of love and the arts. "She" moves into a new sector now through the end of Nov. Your attention will be drawn to parties in neighboring areas and with those of your usual environment. Those with siblings may enjoy improved relationships through this period. Scorpio the Phoenix: (October 23 - November 20) You have poured on the energy and now you are bringing a project to its end. You may feel exhausted and burned out. Don’t listen to the internal critic. He/she always gets noisy when you are fatigued. A week of rest will do wonders for you. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): Both Mercury and Venus enter your sign this week. Venus, goddess of love and beauty, will be traveling "with you" through November. Her presence gives you an air of poise and peo-

ple will simply like how you look. Mercury is a long term visitor, beyond the end of this year. Communications of all types will be prominent. Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Life concerning romance and children continues to be favored by a Jupiter trine which lasts through March, 2012. Do not follow the temptation to manipulate or take control in these areas or you will meet resistance. Maintain faith that things will generally flow in your direction. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): At the beginning of this week your energy is high and your social life favorable.

You have invitations from everywhere. Be careful not to go over the top with promises and self-expectations. Toward the end of this week there will likely be a droop, sort of like the day after Christmas. If you avoid going too high then the drop will be minimal. Pisces (February 19-March 20): It is possible you will be feeling hurt and disappointed over a situation with a loved one. People just don't always respond to us as we wish. Sometimes they are distracted by life situations of their own and are unable to appreciate what we offer. If a friend seems oblivious, try not to take it personally.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

to benefit those in need BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE all is full of crisp, cool mornings and family-centered holidays. This November, let’s remember all we have to be thankful for and try to share our abundance with those who are struggling. A great way

public awareness of the Health Center.” Brunelli has been with the Center for two months and strongly believes in its cause. “In these tough economic times, with people facing the loss of jobs, loss of insurance, it is a safety net for the community.” He feels that good health is the

ogy, a photo or scan of the patient’s skin condition can be taken and sent to a doctor to determine if the patient needs immediate care. Kaiser Permanente Fremont and the Fremont Bank Foundation are sponsoring the Fair this year. Festivities begin at 9 a.m.

to help those in need, and to improve your own health, is to join the first annual Tri-City Health Center 5K Run/Walk on November 5 at Lake Elizabeth in Central Park. The purpose of the race is to raise funds for the Center’s annual “Expanding Our Care” fund, which allows them to improve health care options for patients. Tri-City Heath Center, located in Fremont, is committed to “serving everyone, regardless of their ability to pay.” The Center opened in 1970 as a women’s health clinic and expanded their services over the last 40 years to include dental care, behavioral health services, and primary medical care for low-income and homeless patients in the area. Many patients are uninsured. A multi-lingual staff welcomes families whose native language is not English. Jim Brunelli, the new Associate Development Director at TriCity Health Center, says the Fair “was an opportunity to do something healthy and a way to create

foundation for everything we do, enabling us to work and care for our families. The education and services provided by the Center provide everyone in the community the opportunity for a strong start in life. In addition to the 5K, Fremont’s Tri-City Health Center is hosting a free Health Fair. The Fair is a forum to advance healthy living and introduce the community to the many great services provided by the Center. Snacks, music, activities for kids, and free health screenings are just a few of the features attendees can expect. Wellness Education booths provide information on Center services such as prenatal care, nutritional services, breast cancer awareness, and a “healthy home model,” exemplifying a relaxed home atmosphere. The Center hopes to raise enough money to expand their services to include telemedicine—a remote form of care that can reduce patients’ wait time to see a doctor. With tele-dermatol-

with check in for race participants. The Run/Walk begins at 10 a.m. and awards and raffle drawings follow at 11:30 a.m. Participants who commit to raising at least $250 have the distinction of being a Tri-City Health Center Partner. Partners receive a special THCH hoodie as part of their race registration. Runners and walkers of all ages are encouraged to join and any level of fundraising is gratefully received. Direct donations to the Center are also welcome. Check out the Center’s Web site to join this race for a great cause!

F

Tri-City Health Fair and 5K Run/Walk Saturday, November 5 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Race starts at 10 a.m. Central Park 40000 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 770-8040 http://www.tri-cityhealth.org $25 entry fee for race participants

Library District expands eBook collection SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL AND MARINA HINESTROSA The Santa Clara County Library District has expanded its electronic book collection with its most recent addition of Kindle® eBooks. With just the click of a button, members of the Santa Clara County Library District can now borrow from the library website ebooks that are compatible with a wide variety of electronic devices. “We are very pleased with the Library District efforts to provide services that are in sync with the needs and preferences of our diverse library users,” said County of Santa Clara Supervisor Mike Wasserman, Delegate of the Santa Clara County Library District Joint Powers Authority. “I am sure many library members appreciate the benefit of downloading eBooks and other resources without having to leave home.” The addition of Kindle eBooks to the Santa Clara County Library District started last September, when Overdrive and Amazon launched Kindle® compatibility to approximately 11,000 United States public and school libraries in its network. With this significant step, Santa Clara County Library District members have gained access to an increasing eBook collection with a vast inventory of fiction and nonfiction titles. The ebooks are available to all ages and compatible on different e-readers, including all major Window and Mac desktops, and mobile devices such as the iPad, Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble NOOK, Android and Amazon Kindle. “The demand for our online and digital services continues to grow,” said Santa Clara County Librarian and Executive Director Melinda Cervantes. “All of our libraries have sample e-readers and our staff is ready to assist those who want to learn how to download eBooks and other resources from our Library catalog.” The popularity of eBooks and e-audiobooks continues to increase throughout libraries that are part of Santa Clara County Library District. In May 2011, 2,938 eBooks were downloaded. The library also has downloadable audio eBooks in its collection. When eaudio books were added, downloads increased to approximately 5,300. The Santa Clara County Library District has simple instructions available for each device in the website at http://www.santaclaracountylib.org/ and members can text, e-mail or visit librarians at a library for assistance.


November 1, 2011

SUBMITTED BY RICK LAPLANTE PHOTOS COURTESY OF MICHAEL RITCHIE The New Haven Boosters Association is helping the New Haven Schools Foundation fulfill a $100,000 donation to the District that helped save after-school activities for the 2011-12 school year. In that regard, the Boosters will hold a fund-raising carnival and chili cook-off on Sunday, November 6 at James Logan High School. The “Carnival of Thanks,” from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., will include game and food booths, a talent showcase with prize giveaways and 50-50 fund-raisers that will give participants a chance to donate to the activities fund and also win gift baskets and cash prizes. Entry to the carnival is free. Tickets for individual games sell for 50 cents each.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Another highlight will be a chance for chili-makers – and chili-lovers – to participate in a cook-off, sponsored by Texas Roadhouse. Setup for the event begins at 11 a.m. Contestants are asked to fix a crock pot of their best chili, enough to provide 3040 samples. Tasting cups and spoons will be provided but contestants should bring all other materials and fixings. The entry fee has been reduced to $25 for adults/$10students; a tasting fee is only $5. Sampling of the entries is from noon to 1 p.m., followed by the final judging. A cash prize will be awarded to the winning entrant who is chosen as the best chili chef. To enter, email Florence Graham (Florence.graham@att.net). “We are looking for groups to share in the fun with a food or game booth,” said District parent and Boosters member Natalie Haney, who has taken the lead

SUBMITTED BY ALLISON ALDINGER

M

ission Valley ROP is proud to honor Culinary Arts Instructor Chef Mari Moschetti as the 2011 MVROP Teacher of the Year. This high honor is given by Mission Valley ROP each year to one outstanding Career Technical Education instructor. Chef Moschetti was presented with the 2011 MVROP Teacher of the Year Award at the MVROP Governing Council Meeting on Thursday, October 20. Chef Moschetti has been teaching Culinary Arts at Mission Valley ROP since

role in organizing the event. “We are also looking for groups who wish to join our talent showcase. “Let’s get all school sites, sports groups and school activities represented.” Several groups already have signed up for booths. Logan’s cheerleaders will do face-painting and offer a bean-bag toss, and the girls’ softball team is planning a bounce house. The track and field and cross country teams will sponsor 40-yard dash, broad jump and other competitions, and the football team will have a passing contest. The wrestling

2006. She has taught at a total of six high schools during this time. Chef Moschetti has created many lessons involving how to grow and use organic produce in cooking, working with local farmers to obtain fresh and seasonal produce, incorporating green cleaning products into the classroom, and started a recycling/composting program in her J.F. Kennedy High classroom. Chef Moschetti, in collaboration with KHS teacher, Brenda Calvert, pioneered the creation of the Green Ventures Academy. Student concepts for this academy include: sustainability, “green awareness,” and farm-to-table cooking. Chef Moschetti

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team will serve hamburgers, hot dogs, linguisa and drinks. To volunteer, or to get more information about carnival booths or the cook-off, e-mail Ms. Haney (nathaney1@gmail.com). The New Haven Boosters Association is leading the effort to raise $50,000 in funds toward the Foundation’s $100,000 pledge to the District to help fund stipends for the coaches and advisers who lead extra-curricular and co-curricular activities. For general information about the Boosters, e-mail Michael Ritchie (mritchie02@yahoo.com).

provides an exciting hands-on learning environment where students learn, take ownership of their future, and explore their passion for Culinary Arts. Outside of the classroom, Chef Moschetti is currently writing a cookbook for cooks ages 3-18. She believes you are never too young to begin your culinary adventure, learn how to prepare healthy meals, and help out in the kitchen. Mission Valley ROP (MVROP) is the regional occupational program for the tricity area. Established in 1969, MVROP has been instrumental in preparing students for successful business, medical, and

Carnival of Thanks Sunday, November 6 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. James Logan High School, parking lot 1800 H Street, Union City For information, email: mritchie02@yahoo.com Admission to the carnival is free. Tickets for individual games are 50 cents each. Chili cook-off entry fee: $25 adults/$10 students. Contact: nathaney1@gmail.com. Benefit for New Haven Schools

technical careers. Through a partnership with Fremont, New Haven, and Newark Unified School Districts, Career Technical Education is provided to nearly 4,000 students (high school and adult) each year. Our 45,000 square foot Mission Valley ROP Career Technical Training Center is located in the heart of Fremont. For more information about MVROP Governing Council meetings, to view photos and find out more about Chef Moschetti’s achievement, or to learn more about the MVROP Culinary Arts Program, visit us at www.mvrop.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Carlton Senior Living communities are designed with the active senior in mind. Senior living in Carlton’s Senior Apartments gives active residents over 55 the opportunity for lively social calendars, entertainment, and activities. They can enjoy the benefits that go beyond normal apartment living while at the same time giving up the tiresome demands of home ownership like routine maintenance and household chores like housekeeping.

All-Day restaurant-style dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

UNITED SIKHS open Western Regional Office in Fremont BY KASHMIR SHAHI UNITED SIKHS celebrated the opening of its Regional Office in Fremont on Saturday, October 22. Established in 11 countries around the globe and now with offices in California and New York, the organization strives to serve local communities in an efficient and productive manner. At the Opening Ceremony, the organization introduced its work and vision to members of the Sikh American and Bay Area communities. A large gathering including elected officials, members of the civil and human rights advocacy, humanitarian and educational communities; government officials from Department of Justice, the US State Attorney for Northern California and the Community Relations Service

were present during the opening ceremony. D. Paul Montiero, Associate Director of Community Relations at White House was an honored guest. Hardayal Singh, Director United Sikhs, said that since Fremont is the center of the American Sikh population in the Bay Area, it is a perfect location for the West Coast office. “Whether it is mentoring young kids, whether it is feeding needy people, or helping other counties in natural disasters and whether it is protecting the civil rights and civil liberties of all the people, UNITED SIKHS work should be saluted”, said Paul Monteiro, Associate Director, White House Office of Public Engagement in his keynote speech. Northern District of California Hon. Melinda Haag congratulated the organization for opening its second office in the western region and extended an invitation to discuss any civil rights issues. “UNITED SIKHS played incredibly important role in building bonds with diversities.” The center in Fremont offers education programs such as the After School Education Assistance Program, SAT tutoring for high school students, and the youth leadership program. Plans are in place for health programs such as screenings and education, as well as legal assistance programs. Kashmir Singh, Western Region Director UNITED SIKHS, reiterated that, "the office is envisioned to be a substantive resource for the community and will enable Sikhs to integrate with the mainstream community." Fremont City Mayor Bob Wasserman and Human Services Director, Suzanne Shenfil welcomed the new office and announced the partnership of UNITED SIKHS office with family resource center. Enthusiastic support from community and partner agencies is essential to make this office a success not only for the organization but to the regional communities as well.

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November 1, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Saturday, Nov 5

All Souls Day

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Nov 4 - Nov 19

3 p.m.

Servant of Two Masters

Remembrance of departed loved ones Cedar Lawn Cemetery

8 p.m. A zany comedy

48800 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont (510) 656-5565

Jackson Theater, Smith Center at Ohlone College

Wednesday, Nov 2

43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Friday, Nov 4-Saturday, Nov 5

Saturday, Nov 5

Women's Alive Fall Conference $R

Envision Downtown

Call for time

Development/design of Downtown Hayward

Tuesday, Nov 1

Job Lab

10:30 - 3 p.m. Help with your resume, online job search and more

Castro Valley Masonic Center 4521 Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley (510) 431-1211 Wednesday, Nov 2

November Guest Artist

7 - 9 p.m. Plein-Aire artist Mark Monsarrat shares work

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 Thursdays, Nov 3 - Nov 17

Creative Writing Workshop

10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Inspiration and motivation for writers

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 745-1504 (510) 667-7900 Thursday, Nov 3

Dumbarton Rail Corridor Project

6 - 8 p.m.

Pam Farrel, international speaker/author, "Men are like Waffles" Women are like Spaghetti

Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 651-2030 x233 www.bridgescc.org Saturday, Nov 5

A Journalist's Journey: From Fremont to Foreign Correspondent R

1 - 2 p.m.

3 - 7 p.m. Food and entertainment while celebrating artists

10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 Saturday, Nov 5

Holiday Art Craft Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Unique gifts for the holidays

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766

Award-winning Afghan-American journalist Fariba Nawa

Saturday, Nov 5

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627

9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturdays, Nov 5 - Nov 12

Advanced Excel Workshop $

8:30 a.m. -5 p.m. Apply advanced Excel features to business applications

Hyman Hall, Room 112 Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6258

Public information meeting; open house

Fremont Community Center 40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont

El Color Caliente de la Cultura Recepation

Saturday, Nov 5

Alzheimer's Workshop

9 a.m. - Noon

Holiday Boutique 60 booths with Arts & Craft, food and more

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702 Saturday, Nov 5

Holiday Craft Faire

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Unique Crafts, Holiday items. Entertainment - Drawings – Food

Union City Leisure Services Dept 33623 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 489-5348

Breakthroughs in communication Thursday, Nov 3

First LEGO League Presentation on Chicken Contamination

3:45 - 5:30 p.m. Gomes Elementary School students share their innovative food safety solution

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Friday, Nov 4-Saturday, Nov 5

Prince of Peace School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 789-8651

Saturday, Nov 5

Holiday Crafts Faire

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Crafts, decorations, and gifts for sale. Refreshments, entertainment, hourly drawings.

Holly Community Center 31600 Alvarado Blvd., Union City (510) 471-6877

Craft Fair

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Arts and Crafts for sale

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 Friday, Nov 4

Fall Dinner and Dance $R

5:30 - 10 p.m. Adults 50+ are invited to dance and dine. Len Rogers & Co. Band

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766 Friday, Nov 4

Latina Leadership... Leading the Way $R

8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Accomplished Latina leaders discuss business challenges, culture, and vision

Hilton Oakland Airport 1 Hegenberger Road, Oakland (510) 931-4199

A prayer centered church of spiritually bonded friends

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM A positive path for spiritual living

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Luncheon Bingo The Hayward Eagles Auxiliary is having their monthly luncheon bingo on Monday November 14 at 12 noon at the Eagles hall, 21406 Foothill Blvd. near hwy 580. The hostess Glenda Acosta along with her helpers will be serving turkey with all the trimmings, salad, rolls and dessert. The price is $7.00, which includes a free bingo card. There will also be a raffle, 3 tickets for $1.00. The proceeds from this luncheon will go to the Kidney Fund. Please come join them to support this worthy charity.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Saturday, Nov 5

Ridge Trail Nature Hike $R

Monday, Nov 7

Holiday Fine Art, Craft & Pottery Fair

1 - 3:30 p.m.

Genealogy Study Group: First Meeting R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

3.0 mile adult-only hike lead by a naturalist Ridge Trail

Handmade gifts; proceeds benefit the District's Art and Special Needs Programs

May Road, Hayward (510) 881-6700

Kenneth C. Aitken Center 17800 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley (510) 881-6738

Saturday, Nov 5

Saturday, Nov 5 - Wednesday, Nov 9

Juried Photography Exhibit

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. View Photographic art and mingle with photographers

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Saturday, Nov 5

Lunch and Fashion Show R$

11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Tea & Treasures

9 a.m. - 3:30p.m. Holiday boutique and Tea, 50 Vendors

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 Saturday, Nov 5

Tri-City Health Fair and 5K Run/Walk

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Saturday, November 5th 9am-2pm Kimber Hills Academy - Parking lot 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont Drop off your old electronics (working or not). Free of charge! Items accepted: televisions, computers, laptops, monitors, plasma screens, keyboards, microphones,cell phones, calculators, VCR’s, DVD players, speakers, computer wires, telephones, microwaves, etc... No limit. Broken okay. Donations support the Class of 2012 Washington, D.C. trip! Matching funds will be given to FCC by our partners at Recycle1234.com! Call or email for a home or business pick up 510-972-4515 or info@recycle1234.com. Reference: Kimber Hills Academy Questions: contact – anestrada@sbcglobal.net

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 745-1504 Tuesday, Nov 8

Easy-to-Grow Native Plants

7 - 8:30 p.m. Learn about trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals that will thrive in this area.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Tuesday, Nov 8

Fremont Central Park Field 9 & 10

November Reading Series

40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 790-5546

Benefit for New Haven School District and American Association of University Women

Monday-Friday, Nov 6 Nov 30

Acacia Creek 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 441-3719

Painting by local artist Valerie Manning

Creations by Valerie Manning

5 a.m. - 10 p.m Mission Coffee 150 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 386-5988

12 noon - 1 p.m. Chabot College Faculty Readings by Stephen Woodhams and Stephanie Zappa

Chabot College , Little Theatre 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 Tuesday, Nov 8

Raising the well balanced student

7 - 8:30 p.m. Free lecture by Dr. Amy Alamar, Stanford University

Mind and Meditation

Sunday, Nov 6

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Family Day at the Theater

Free workshop on calmness of mind, increasing energy and focus

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600

Classic Car & Hot Rod Car Show and "A Christmas Carol" Theater Show

Wednesday, Nov 9

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 (510)709-9209

FREE**FREE**FREE

Discover your roots! Meets 1st and 3rd Mondays of each month

Run and Health Fair

Saturday, Nov 5

E-Waste Collection Event

12:30 - 2 p.m.

Hayward-Castro Valley Moose Lodge 20835 Rutledge Rd., Castro Valley (510) 723-6936

Find it Fast! R

4 - 5 p.m. An introduction to the Internet using Kid's Place, Alameda County Library's Website for kids. Workshop is for children in grades 4 - 6.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Wednesday, Nov 9

Hooked on Books

4 - 5 p.m. Grades 2-3 book discussion

Fremont Main Library Wednesday - Sunday, Nov 9 Nov 13

Othello $

7:30 p.m. (2 p.m. matinees) Shakespeare's classic tale of love, jealousy, and betrayal

Chabot College Little Theatre 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 (510)723-6830


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Thursdays - Saturdays, Nov 12 - Nov 19

Monday-Friday, Nov 6 Nov 30

Annie Jr. $

Creations by Valerie Manning

7:30 p.m.

5 a.m. - 10 p.m

The popular musical about orphan Annie. Matinee performances Saturdays at 2:30 p.m.

Painting by local artist Valerie Manning

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 Tuesday, Nov 15

Mission Coffee 150 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 386-5988 Saturday, Nov 5 - Wednesday, Nov 9

Tri-City Elder Coalition Networking Meeting R

Juried Photography Exhibit

12:30 - 2 p.m.

View Photographic art and mingle with photographers

Gene Ososfsky, Esq: Veteran's Pension Benefits to Help Vets Age in Place. RSVP by Nov 10

Acacia Creek 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 441-3719 (510) 441-3740

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Friday, Nov 5 - Sunday, Nov 19

Servant of Two Masters

Continuing Events

8 p.m. A Classic Italian Comedy

Friday, Oct 28-Sunday, Nov 20

Landscape Painting

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Artist Showcase

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290 Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 Nov 12

Rhythm and Light

7 - 9 p.m. The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 Nov 12

Patterns of Abuse

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Photography show

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Wednesday - Sunday, Nov 9 Nov 13

Othello $

7:30 p.m. (2 p.m. matinees) Shakespeare's classic tale of love, jealousy, and betrayal

Chabot College Little Theatre 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 (510)723-6830 Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053 Thursdays - Saturdays, Nov 12 - Nov 19

Annie Jr. $

7:30 p.m. The popular musical about orphan Annie. Matinee performances Saturdays at 2:30 p.m.

Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210

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SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER A fantastic celebration is planned for the public in conjunction with El Color Caliente de la Cultura, the current exhibit at Sun Gallery running through November 19. On Saturday, November 5, an amazing roundup of food and talent will enhance the celebration of the artists in El Color Caliente de La Cultura. The reception will begin at 3 p.m.; Taquitos are being provided; attendees please feel free to bring a side dish or a desert. A blessing ceremony by Aztec Dancers will kick off the entertainment at 4 p.m., Mexican singer Jesus Cisneros will perform from 4:30 p.m. – 5 p.m., followed by Grupo Folklorico Tlapalli from 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. Chilean Dancers and Tango Dancers, Suzanne and Lance Bare perform from 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. and the reception ends at 7 p.m. If you have never experienced the energy and excitement of Aztec Dancers and the Grupo Folklorico Tlapalli, now is your chance. Rounding the evening off will be the sultry moves of the Tango dancers. We hope you join us for the celebration. Please note that this event also serves as a fundraiser for Sun Gallery and there is a suggested donation of $5 at the door. El Color Caliente de la Cultura Reception Saturday, November 5 3 p.m. – 7 p.m. Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 sungallery.org Suggested donation: $5

SUBMITTED BY DONNA KREHBIE Castro Valley Library is offering a free, creative writing workshop throughout November 2011 on Thursday mornings, between 10:30 a.m. and noon. The three-week workshop is facilitated by John Manion, a Castro Valley resident, retired educator and university administrator. This workshop, open to adults embarking on creative writing, offers inspiration and motivation. The subject matter may be fiction or non-fiction including essays, opinion pieces, journal and travel writing. This year’s workshop will focus on creative writing for beginners, meets on three consecutive Thursdays (November 3, 10 and 17) and requires participants to commit to attend all three sessions and bring a page of their writing with copies to share with the group at each meeting. Participants should register for this class at the Library Information Desk or call (510) 6677900. Castro Valley Library, a branch of the Alameda County Library system, is at 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Castro Valley, and is wheel chair accessible. An ASL interpreter will be provided with seven days’ notice. For more information, contact the Library at (510) 667-7900 or visit www.aclibrary.org/branches/csv. Creative Writing Workshop Thursdays November 3, 10, 17 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 3600 Norbridge Avenue Castro Valley (510) 667-7900 www.aclibrary.org/branches/csv

Women Alive Fall Conference hosted by Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Ave., Fremont

November 4-5 Send us your event information tricityvoice@aol.com

Pam Farrel, international speaker and best-selling author of “Men are Like Waffles, Women are Like Spaghetti” will be speaking on “The Best Decisions a Woman Can Make!” Breakout sessions include topics on relationships, parenting, and interpersonal skills. Tickets are $35. Register on line at www.bridgescc.org.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Newark Girls Softball League celebrates 40 years SUBMITTED BY MIKE MCHUGH Fifty years ago most girls did not participate in sports. It wasn’t that they weren’t motivated or athletic it was that there just were no opportunities available in organized sports. With the passage of Title IX, a federal law granting girls and women in high schools and colleges the right to equal opportunity in sports, more and more girls are participating in organized softball, soccer and various other sports. Newark Girls Softball League, created in 1972 by a small group of parents, has grown to 240 girls in the Newark, Fremont and Union City area. The season begins in late February and finishes just before Memorial Day. During that time the girls play two games a week and have a tournament at the end of the season. Many of the girls continue to play on the league’s very successful traveling teams throughout the Summer and Fall. NGSL is not just about playing sports. Last year the league had two movie nights for the girls, the Easter Bunny brought candy to the games just before Easter, and there was a huge family picnic at the end of the season. To get the girls ready for the

season there is even a sliding clinic where the girls practice sliding on cardboard with corn starch for lubricant; the girls go home looking like little “ghosts.” On game nights parents can go out to eat at the league’s well stocked Snack Shack. In 2012 the league is planning a carnival and more movie nights and the Easter Bunny will probably be making an appearance again with candy for the girls. If you would like your daughter to have lots of fun, meet new friends and get some exercise, NGSL’s registration will be held at Snow Elementary, 6580 Mirabeau Drive, Newark: • Saturday, November 12th from 10 am until 1 pm • Wednesday, November 16th rom 6 pm until 8:30 pm. • Saturday, November 19th from 10 am until 1 pm Bring a birth certificate and registration is $100 for a full season of fun. There are discounts for multiple siblings or if you bring a buddy with you to sign up at the same time. The league has a phone number, 510-273-9067 and website, ngsl.info.com for more information.

JFK Profile in Courage national essay contest SUBMITTED BY RACHEL FLOR The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation announced today that the national John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Essay Contest, with a first place prize totaling $10,000, is now open and accepting submissions from U.S. high school students. The deadline for entries is Saturday, January 7, 2012. Students and teachers may access the contest’s website by visiting the Profile in Courage Essay Contest at www.jfklibrary.org. The annual contest invites students from across the nation to write an essay describing an act of political courage by a U.S. elected official who served during or after 1956. The essay contest is sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation and generously supported by John Hancock Financial. The contest is a companion program of the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award™, named for President Kennedy’s

1957 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Profiles in Courage, which recounts the stories of eight senators who risked their careers by taking principled stands for unpopular positions. The winner of this competitive annual contest will be awarded a $5,000 cash prize and an additional $5,000 to grow in a John Hancock Freedom 529 College Savings Plan. The student’s nominating teacher is awarded a John F. Kennedy Public Service Grant in the amount of $500 to be applied toward school projects involving student leadership and civic engagement. The essay contest winner and nominating teacher will also receive an expense paid round-trip to Boston, where they will be honored by Caroline Kennedy at the annual John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award ceremony in May of 2012. A second place winner receives $1,000 and up to five finalists each receive $500. “This national essay contest fittingly honors President Kennedy, who believed deeply in the power of the individual and

Ohlone Baseball Ohlone College vs. De Anza College SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR Women’s Volleyball October 28 Ohlone defeats De Anza, 3-0 (25-15, 2518, 25-18) Go Renegades!

Ohlone College traveled to Oakland and split a doubleheader with Laney College in fall baseball September 27. Ohlone lost the opener 5-1, but starting catcher, Ryan Beal did his part, reaching base three times. He was hit by a pitch and walked twice, and stranded on base each time. Defensively, Ryan threw out the only wouldbe base stealer at second by a comfortable margin. Ryan and Ohlone return to action on Tuesday, November 1, when Ohlone travels to Chabot College.

the promise of our nation’s young people,” said Tom McNaught, Executive Director of the Kennedy Library Foundation. “It is gratifying to see how readily students today can identify and understand acts of political courage and their importance in our democratic society, as well as the role courage plays in today’s political climate.” “As we mark the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s presidency and we approach the 150th anniversary of John Hancock Financial in 2012, there is no better time for America’s youth to deepen their appreciation of politics and history by participating in the Profile in Courage Essay Contest,” said Carol Fulp, Senior Vice President, Corporate Responsibility and Brand Initiatives for John Hancock Financial. “This national high school competition is a reflection of John Hancock’s commitment to education, literacy and civic involvement.” Last year, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation received 2,002 essays from high school students in fifty states and American citizens studying in Guam, Canada and France. For more information about the Kennedy Library Foundation and the Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, visit www.jfklibrary.org.

Logan subdues Kennedy; now 8-0 SUBMITTED BY JOHN HERNANDEZ Kennedy Titans were next to try to stop the Logan Colt steamroller on Friday, September 28, but to no avail. The Logan Colts defense stepped up the first and second time the Kennedy Titans touched the ball. With interceptions on the Kennedy 30 and again on their own 40-yard line, the Colts denied the Titans of any significant gains in the first quarter of play. The Colts’ offense moved the ball effectively, using a combination of passing and ground attacks, scoring 41 points by halftime. In the third quarter, Logan’s offense slowed as the Titans battled with some hard hitting. However, the fourth quarter saw the Colts renew their dominance and finish the game with a 49-6 victory.


November 1, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Main Street Village

Page 25

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

opens Wednesday SUBMITTED BY KATIE DERRIG City, County and State leaders will gather Wednesday, November 2nd to celebrate the Grand Opening of Main Street Village Apartments. The development of 64 new units for very low-income families and individuals developed by Allied Housing and MidPen Housing received a GreenPoint score of 218 from Build It Green, the highest rating for any multi-family development in California to date. On-site supportive services provided by Abode Services include many community amenities, including a computer lab, vegetable garden, and children’s play area.

LIFE ElderCare's Fall Prevention program works with older adults, in their own homes, to create a personalized physical activity routine that includes aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility components specifically designed to increase mobility. The program also includes a home safely check, minor home modifications and a medication review. Each week, for 12-weeks, Unitek College LVN students visit each participant to answer questions, provide support and assess progress. The program is free to Tri-City residents. Here is the link to our website where you can view all five videos pertaining to this program. http://lifeeldercare.org/about-us/videos/

Allied Housing is an affordable housing developer specializing in supportive housing for families and households with special needs, such as persons living with disabilities or households moving out of homelessness. Allied Housing is in strategic partnership with Abode Services to end homelessness in our community. For further information visit: http://www.abodeservices.org/allied.html. It is the mission of MidPen Housing to provide safe, affordable housing of high quality to those in need; to establish stability and opportunity in the lives of residents; and to foster diverse communities that allow people from all ethnic, social, and economic backgrounds to live in dignity, harmony and mutual respect. For more information visit: www.midpen-housing.org Abode Services’ mission is to end homelessness by assisting low-income, un-housed people to secure stable, supportive housing, and to be advocates for the removal of the causes of homelessness. Abode Services will be the service provider at the Main Street site. For further information visit: www.abodeservices.org.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY DONALD G. JAMIESON PHOTO COURTESY OF PHIL GRASSO Editor’s Note: Last year, the original principal of Walters Junior High School, Donald G. Jamieson, visited and organized a luncheon with the staff. He took the time to explain the school’s history and some of its artifacts such as the fireplace, clock and rock mural, now situated in the office. We would like to share Mr. Jamieson’s story, in his own words, with our readers.

desks and chairs did not arrive until midday. By opening day there was already a first addition under construction that consisted of the multi-use building, music, P.E. shower & locker rooms, library and four classrooms at-

andro where he had worked for the Boys Clubs of America. George and Peggy would come to various evening functions at the school when invited, such as to the Dedication Ceremony and musical events. They were friendly and enjoyed being a part of the school named for his grandfather. They donated two clocks to the school, one a metal-faced mantle clock that is in the Principal’s Office and another smaller brass one that used to be on the Principal’s desk, but seems to have been stolen in one of the break-ins. They also donated a picture album with pictures of some of the family. Other pictures are unknown. George and Peggy Cash did not have any children. Thus, the George M.

November 1, 2011

when a small girl she used to follow George Walters when he was plowing the fields. Maggie Rix married Joshua Chadbourne for whom a school is named in the Mission area. As for my own educational background, in 1958, after teaching for four years, I became the first Vice Principal at John M. Horner School, later Junior High. In 1960, I was then appointed as Principal for the Walters School where I served from 1961 - 1968. The two Vice Principals who served under me were John Lanthier and Ernie Severson. But, as the land transactions were not progressing very quickly the school did not open until a year later (1961). As a result I

G

eorge M. Walters came to Washington Township in the early 1850’s. According to an 1878 Historical Atlas he owned 132 acres of farmland at Washington Corners along what is now Fremont Blvd., both north of the corner toward Centerville and south towards Warm Springs. The property extended north, to where the Old Irvington Grammar School was located, opposite Connolly’s Furniture Store and south to Carol Avenue. To the west, it likely included the Irvington Cemetery. Walters and his wife, Fannie, donated the little park at Five Corners where the flagpole and monument are now located. Up until about 1960 the monument was in the middle of the intersection and cars had to negotiate the corner by driving around it. Until I-880 was built this was State Highway 17, the main road between Oakland and San Jose. The Walters’ lived in a large farm house immediately south of the brick building on the corner. The brick building housed Ed Rose’s Hardware Store in the 1950-60’s and is now Bay Street Coffees and Broadway West Theatre. I was able to go through the Walters’ house in 1960 just before they tore it down. The sister of Ben Cramer was in charge and my dealings at that time were with her. She lived in Mission San Jose. I would have liked to move the house onto a farm but had no financial means to buy it and do that. However, I did purchase, from the family, a mirror that still hangs on the wall over our piano at home and salvaged enough of the white picket fence to put up in our backyard when we lived at 1818 Berry Ct., in Fremont. The family donated the marble fireplace to the school that was originally installed in the Old Library but in 1968 placed it into the enlarged Principal’s Office. The Architects, Falk and Booth, were approached about using the front door of the house for the Principal’s Office, but fire code regulations prevented that from being done. After touring the house, various items were donated to the school such as some old clothing that was later displayed at the Dedication Ceremony in 1962 and then donated to the Fremont Women’s Historical Society. The school was named in honor of George M. Walters as he was one of the first three men on the Irvington School Board. The doors opened in September 1961 with about 400 students housed in the central “T” shape of the building. The first year most of the core classes were held at the Noll Elementary and Linda Vista Elementary Schools. From Noll they could walk back and forth, but from Linda Vista they were bussed. On the first day of classes, we had a short day as the student

Gathered around the Walters Junior High fireplace, current Principal, Brian Weems (seated) with Alameda County Board of Ed Trustee, Eileen McDonald (left) and Alameda County Superintendent of Schools, Sheila Jordan (right).

tached, and a science, home economics and metal shop along the driveway. For three or four years we had many portable buildings in use that the teachers and students liked because they had air conditioning. Then in 1967 a second addition started that expanded the facilities to its present size. The new rooms were occupied about Easter vacation time in 1968. The Walters’ had two daughters. One died at the age of 12 years old and was buried in the front yard. Unless she has been moved, she is under the parking lot in the small shopping center just south of the brick building on the corner. The second daughter, Ida, married George Cash. I know nothing about them except that they had two children, Fannie and much later George (Jr.), possibly 20 years. Fannie married Ben Cramer who was a plumber and had his shop in the “lean to” attachment on the east side of the brick building. It is still there to this day. I met them in regard to business way before I knew who they were and by the time I found out that she was Walters’ daughter they had died or gone away somewhere. The Cramers had no children. Contact was made with grandson George Cash (Jr.) and his wife Margaret (Peggy). They lived in Oakland or San Le-

Walters branch of the family died out. Their will shows that they donated half their estate to the Boys Club of America and the other half to San Jose State College (University) for athletic scholarships. George (Jr.) said there was a lighthouse in New England named for his Cash grandfather. He was proud that on both coasts his family is remembered. George and Fannie Walters are buried in the Irvington Cemetery along with George and Ida Cash, Fannie and Ben Cramer and George (Jr.) and Margaret Cash. From Chapel Way you can see the large monument with “Cash” on it and “Walters” on the back side. The plot is three or four rows back from the street. In another related piece, Timothy Rix and his wife had a daughter by the name of Margaret (Maggie). The wife and mother died when Maggie was young and for reasons that I do not know Maggie went to live with the Walters family. It may be that the picture on the wall in the Library shows Maggie as the smaller girl in front of a building along with George Walters. That building still exists and is next to the brick building on Bay St. In 1961, I was able to visit with Maggie when she was in Craig’s Rest Haven in the Warm Springs District, though she was very old and not able to remember much. She did say that

was able to work with the architects on many issues about the design of the Walters School. We decided to duplicate the Horner School with appropriate changes. One change was to not have low windows in the classrooms. Another was to tile the halls and use gray grout so as to not show any pencil marks students might make. Another was to place an outside door in each classroom so students would not always have to use the halls while passing between classes, thus avoiding noise and traffic jams. In later additions we were able to enlarge the office area, build a much larger library and make other changes including a tennis court. One year, possibly 1964 or 1965 twenty-two new teachers were hired due to increased enrollment. During my last year at Walters (1967-1968) there were about 1,200 students enrolled in the two grades and contrary to what happened in the three other district junior highs, Walters Jr. High achieved full accreditation through WASC. I enjoyed very much my years as principal at Walters Jr. High. Around 1965, we took the name of “junior high” when unification took place and thought it would sound better to be associated with the secondary schools in curriculum planning and the like. The School Board agreed and the name has remained until this day.

Safeguard donations SUBMITTED BY STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE Attorney General Kamala D. Harris issued a consumer alert on October 21, 2011, advising Californians how to make safe, informed donations this October, which is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and at any other time of year. The following five tips will help avoid "sound-alike" organizations and scam artists that use high-volume donation periods to prey on people’s goodwill. Avoid giving your credit card number to a telephone solicitor. Avoid giving cash to an individual or responding to an e-mail solicitation. Instead, seek out known organizations and give directly by calling the organization, visiting its official website or mailing a check to the listed address. Research an organization before making a donation by visiting: California Attorney General's Registry of Charitable Trusts (http://oag.ca.gov/charities), Better Business Bu-

reau's Wise Giving Alliance (www.give.org), Charity Navigator (www.charitynavigator.org). Learn about an organization by asking the right questions. Does the organization only support research? Does it fund community health programs? How are donations used? What percentage of donations is used for charitable activities? Avoid generic claims like "Supports Breast Cancer Programs" and look for a name, label or logo that you recognize and can verify. Ask the organization not to store your credit card information. Californians who believe they have been victimized by a fraudulent charitable solicitation should file a complaint with the Attorney General's Registry of Charitable Trusts at http://ag.ca.gov/charities.php. For additional tips on charitable giving, visit http://ag.ca.gov/charities/charit_giving.php.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Page 27

Tradition are not always bound to thoughts and mores of the past.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

O

ne memorable song, Tradition,” of the hit musical, Fiddle on the Roof, explains the role of each family member of humble households of an early 20th Century Russian village, Anatevka. Each tradition is explained and everyone is expected to conform to these parameters. The primary character, Tevye, longs for a little more actually a lot more - but knows that each villager fulfills a purpose whether suited for it or not. The 1964 production blossomed into a long-term theater run and revivals, a successful movie and songs that have survived for decades. There is something endearing in the story of those who work hard to simply survive and try to pass on what they think is the best of their culture to future generations. Unfortunately, as the story progresses, children

This is an observation and lesson that continues throughout the breadth of humanity across the globe, but is much more evident in areas of extensive interaction between cultures. Our slice of the globe is such a place; the struggle between traditional cultural values is visible and, at times, painful to observe. Fortunately, our “melting pot” provides an atmosphere of leavening when all points of the compass meet. Here, we all differ in dress, speech, color and style, not so much as small groups that stand out from the rest but a plethora of many differences providing exposure that become less strange and foreign with familiarity. Holidays are celebratory and inclusive; all are invited to understand and participate, if desired. Autumn Festival Moon Cakes, the Festival of Light –Diwali are part of us now. Thanksgiving comes soon, followed by Hanukkah and Christmas. These and many other festivals are no longer unfamiliar to our community, rather important threads in the fabric of our lives. The recent opening of an office of United Sikhs in Fremont underlines the mosaic of our population. In many communities, this would be an oddity, yet in the Greater Tri-City Area, it is a natural extension of who and what we are.

At the end of the play, the Fiddler on the Roof leaves for new lands with Tevye and the others who must leave Anatevka. Although change is inevitable and brings its own challenges, each of us has our own Fiddler carrying strong traditional values. Hopefully, there is a sense of identity and purpose within us that is flexible enough to adapt to our neighbors and community while respecting ancestry and knowledge gained through generations of trial and error. One stanza of “Tradition” illustrates the overall theme of the challenge when old meets new. Waiting for a life “match” of a mate, the youngest daughter sums it up saying, “It's not that I'm sentimental. It's just that I'm terrified!” A community united through knowledge leaves little room for terror. Welcome United Sikhs.

The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation announced today that the national John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Essay Contest, with a first place prize totaling $10,000, is now open and accepting submissions from U.S. high school students. The deadline for entries is Saturday, January 7, 2012. Students and teachers may access the contest’s website by visiting the Profile in Courage Essay Contest at www.jfklibrary.org. The annual contest invites students from across the nation to write an essay describing an act of political courage by a U.S. elected official who served during or after 1956. The essay contest is sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation and generously supported by John Hancock Financial. The contest is a companion program of the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award™, named for President Kennedy’s 1957 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Profiles in Courage, which recounts the stories of eight senators who risked their careers by taking principled stands for unpopular positions. The winner of this competitive annual contest will be awarded a $5,000 cash prize and an additional $5,000 to grow in a John Hancock Freedom 529 College Savings Plan. The student’s nominating teacher is awarded a John F. Kennedy Public Service Grant in the amount of $500 to be applied toward school projects involving student leadership and civic engagement. The essay contest winner and nominating teacher will also receive an expense paid round-trip to

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

JFK Profile in Courage national essay contest SUBMITTED BY RACHEL FLOR

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Boston, where they will be honored by Caroline Kennedy at the annual John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award ceremony in May of 2012. A second place winner receives $1,000 and up to five finalists each receive $500. “This national essay contest fittingly honors President Kennedy, who believed deeply in the power of the individual and the promise of our nation’s young people,” said Tom McNaught, Executive Director of the Kennedy Library Foundation. “It is gratifying to see how readily students today can identify and understand acts of political courage and their importance in our democratic society, as well as the role courage plays in today’s political climate.” “As we mark the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s presidency and we approach the 150th anniversary of John Hancock Financial in 2012, there is no better time for America’s youth to deepen their appreciation of politics and history by participating in the Profile in Courage Essay Contest,” said Carol Fulp, Senior Vice President, Corporate Responsibility and Brand Initiatives for John Hancock Financial. “This national high school competition is a reflection of John Hancock’s commitment to education, literacy and civic involvement.” Last year, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation received 2,002 essays from high school students in fifty states and American citizens studying in Guam, Canada and France. For more information about the Kennedy Library Foundation and the Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, visit www.jfklibrary.org.

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11601895 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Maung Tin Myint for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Maung Tin Myint to Danny Yap The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 01/20/2012, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador St., Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happening Tri-City Voice Date: 10-27-11 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/11 CNS-2199262#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457643 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kumon Math & Reading Center of Union City - East, 34712 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda 34389 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Incredible Learners, Inc., CA, 34389 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as

true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jayanthi Subramanian, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 26, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22/11 CNS-2199258# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456597 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Heartbox Photography, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye, 4463 Hyde Common, Unit 312, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maria Veronica Eugenio Abelaye This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 27, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194502# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456839-40 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) San Francisco Salt Company, (2) San Francisco Bath Salt Company, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda

LJW Incorporated, California, 33231 Transit Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/1/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Lee Williamsen, CEO/Founder This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2194499# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456863 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Tadamasa Ramen, 34672 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 Shau Ping Ho, 3883 Milton Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shau Ping Ho This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193778#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457276 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Power Plumbing & Rooter, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Rameez Khan, 4940 Antioch Loop, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/13/11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rameez Khan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 13, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/25, 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/11 CNS-2193770# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456757 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mantiques, 37390 Niles Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. Joseph J. Tarquini, 5325 Brophy Dr., Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/1/11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Joseph Tarquini This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 30, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/18, 10/25, 11/1, 11/8/11 CNS-2191181#

GOVERNMENT CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF PROPOSED ORDINANCE As Introduced October 18, 2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT AUTHORIZING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONTRACT BETWEEN THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FREMONT AND THE BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES’ RETIREMENT SYSTEM On October 18, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance authorizing an amendment to the contract between the City Council of the City of Fremont and the Board of Administration of the Public Employees’ Retirement System. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is posted in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capital Avenue, Fremont, and is available for review upon request. The second reading for adoption is currently scheduled for November 8, 2011, at 7:00 pm, at City Hall, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont. SUSAN GAUTHIER DEPUTY CITY CLERK 11/1/11 CNS-2198785# Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be accepted in the office of the Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/BIDDERS CONFERENCE – N. COUNTY RFP #9001211- Lead Evaluation Services, Monday, November 14, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/BIDDERS CONFERENCE – N. COUNTY RFP #9001211Lead Evaluation Services, Tuesday, November 15, 2011 at 10:00 AM, Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA Response Due by 2:00 PM on December 7, 2011 County Contact: Dennis Jordan at (510) 567-6852 or via email: dennis.jordan@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 11/1/11 CNS-2198250#

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE

Senator Ellen Corbett SUBMITTED BY TEALA SCHAFF Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (DSan Leandro) has been awarded the 2011 Women of Achievement by the National Women’s Political Caucus (NWPC) of California. The award honors women who have demonstrated leadership on women’s issues, worked to improve the lives of women and made a significant difference in their communities. A mother, lawyer and educator, Corbett has long devoted herself to serving the East Bay, first as a community activist and then rising through the ranks of elected office, from city council to become the first female mayor of San Leandro to state legislator. Throughout her three decades of public service, Corbett has fought hard to advance women’s rights, support California families, stimulate economic development, protect the environment and safeguard consumers. During the 2011 legislative session, Corbett authored four important bills – SB 534, SB 622, SB 636, and SB 861 – that will significantly improve the lives of women. Gov. Jerry Brown signed each of them. “On this 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote, I’m proud to accept this award,” Corbett said. “However, none of this could have been accomplished without the hard work of so many strong women who went before me.” Corbett is serving her second term in Legislature’s upper house, where she holds the number two leadership post, Senate Majority Leader. In 2010, she was the second woman ever to be elevated to the position. As Majority Leader, Corbett is responsible for setting the Democratic agenda, managing the Senate’s Floor operations and serving as chief adviser to the leader of the body, Senate President pro Tempore Darrell Steinberg. Throughout her career, Corbett has focused on strengthening California’s economy, standing up for consumers and protecting our natural resources while encouraging the growth of our green economy.

Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477

Tuesday, Nov 1 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25– 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25– 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont

A life-long resident of the East Bay, Corbett served in the state Assembly from 1998 to 2004, was first elected to the Senate in 2006 and reelected in 2010. She represents the 10th Senate District, an East Bay district that includes the cities of San Leandro, Fremont, Hayward, Union City, Pleasanton, Milpitas and Newark and part of San Jose, as well as the communities of Castro Valley, San Lorenzo and Sunol. The NWPC of California celebrated its 40th anniversary at a reception over the weekend of October 15/16, 2011, that included honoring Senator Corbett. NWPC was established in July 1971 by 300 dedicated feminists who were committed to electing progressive women to every level of government. Since 1971, NWPC has endorsed and supported more than 50,000 progressive women for appointment and election to public office. For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett

Wednesday, Nov 2 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St. San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apartments, 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apartments, 1300 Kentwood Lane, San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, Nov 3 2:00 – 2:25 p.m. Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 2:45 – 3:40 p.m. Bay School, 2001 Bockman Rd., San Lorenzo 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Falcon Dr. & Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Creekside Village Apartments, 3999 Sequoia Terrace, Fremont Friday, Nov 4 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. Kidango Grant, 879 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., San Lorenzo

Monday, Nov 7 1:45 – 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 – 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont Tuesday, Nov 8 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Nov 9 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Nov 2 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas

BART announces new General Manager SUBMITTED BY JAMES K. ALLISON Transportation professional Grace Crunican is taking over as the new BART General Manager. Crunican was appointed Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at a Special Board meeting, ending a nationwide search for the next General Manager of the Bay Area’s premiere public transportation system. “The Board selected Ms. Crunican because of her 32 years of experience in the public transportation industry,” BART Board President Bob Franklin said. “She brings a transparent and inclusive approach, ideal qualities to lead the BART organization in providing safe and reliable transportation service for its passengers and the communities of the Bay Area.” “I believe any endeavor is stronger through partnerships,” Crunican said. “I will work to build those partnerships from the first day of my job. This includes reaching out to BART’s customers, the communities BART serves, employees and other stakeholders. As BART’s General Manager, I will coordinate with other regional transit agencies, planning and funding organizations, our partners at the local, regional, state and federal level to enhance the services we provide daily.”


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Page 29

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Special Life Events

Marriage

Obituaries

Harvinder Virk Janice Elaine Crapo RESIDENT OF NEWARK December 18, 1936 - October 14, 2011

Nick Bruckner RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 6, 1932 - October 20, 2011

Irene B. Lesh RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 13, 1915 - October 29, 2011

Orlando O. Lau RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 18, 1926 - October 30, 2011

RESIDENT OF BRENTWOOD May 3, 1942 - October 18, 2011

Glen W. Alberici RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 13, 1965 - October 21, 2011

George R. Redfearn, Jr. RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 2, 1928 - October 24, 2011

George W. O'Toole

Sharon Chandler-Tindall RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 22, 1957 - August 5, 2011

Celia Ramirez RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1932 - August 8, 2011

Saokram Bouth

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 30, 1913 - October 25, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 28, 1941 - September 11, 2011

Lucille M. Reeder

Ruperto Vasquez

RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 30, 1918 - October 26, 201

Tong “David” Tong RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 19, 1911 - October 23, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 27, 1922 - October 5, 2011

Lupe Arriola RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 15, 1926 - October 10, 2011

George M. McCarthy RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 12, 1928 - October 28, 2011

Leon W. Mineau RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 9, 1920 - October 27, 20111

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Tri-City Cremation & Funeral Services FD2085 (510) 494-1984 5800 Thornton Ave., Newark

Obituaries

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published biweekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Special Life Events New Parks and Recreation Director SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL/LAUREL ANDERSON The County of Santa Clara announced on October 25, the appointment of Robb Courtney to serve as the new Director of Parks and Recreation. Courtney, who has worked in the parks and recreation field for more than 20 years, including 18 years in management and supervisory roles, is currently the Parks Director for the City of Seattle. Prior to accepting the Seattle position three years ago, Courtney served as Parks and Recreation Manager for the City of Gresham, Oregon. “Courtney’s experience in park development, natural resource management, and program and services planning and delivery will be a tremendous asset to the County Parks and Recreation Department,” said County Executive Jeffrey V. Smith. Courtney has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from California State University, Northridge. He also has held parks and recreation related positions with a number of organizations, including in California where he began his career as an Aquatics Director with the Oakland Office of Parks and Recreation, Recreation Coordinator for the Santa Clarita Parks and Recreation, Recreation Supervisor for the City of Foster City, and Community Services Administrator for the City of Glendale. “I am very excited to be given this opportunity to work with Santa Clara County Parks,” said Courtney. “It is an honor and a privilege to join the rest of the Parks and Recreation staff in stewarding one of the premiere regional park systems in California.” Courtney’s appointment as Director of Parks and Recreation is effective November 7, 2011.

Special Life Events

Jason Mahon Jason Mahon was sworn in on September 27, 2011, as a director of the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board, commonly referred to as Stopwaste.org. He has been appointed to the eleven-member county board by the county board of supervisors and joins other elected and appointed leaders. The Recycling Board is responsible for programs that promote source reduction, residential and commercial recycling, recycled product procurement and market development. This also includes county-wide policies like mandatory recycling and county-wide plastic bag bans and fees, both of which are currently under review by the board. Mahon co-founded Premier Organics in 2002, an Oakland-based manufacturer of organic nut butters with more than 45 employees. For the past two years, Harvard University's Initiative for a Competitive Inner City has recognized his organization as one of the fastest growing companies in the country. "Watching our own company grow and generate more waste really motivated me to be more active in finding solutions,” said Mahon. He first became involved with waste and garbage issues when working with Premier Organics' team members on training programs about what is recyclable and compostable and how to dispose of hazardous waste like batteries and paint. Mahon has also led a reusable pallet wrapping project (partially funded through Stopwaste's mini-grant program) and was able to persuade other food industry participants to conduct trials and, ultimately, implement reusable pallet wrapping programs of their own. A grocery product may be wrapped and unwrapped on a pallet with single-use plastics more than five times before the consumer takes it home. The program implemented by Mahon was designed to reduce that waste. "I could see our company hitting a point of diminishing returns in trying to reduce waste that required a review of how garbage systems and garbage policies work together. Small changes to a big system can reduce thousands of tons of waste,” he stated. Over the past two years, Mahon has toured in-county and out-of-county garbage handling facilities, conducted hundreds of interviews with people in the garbage industry and studied garbage and recycling franchise contracts. For more information, visit www.StopWaste.org


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE Continuing a tradition he started six years ago, a local real estate agent is making certain that every third-grade student in the New Haven Unified School District has a dictionary. For the second year in a row, Sunil Sethi and his partners are also supplying the students with thesauruses. And this year, Mr. Sethi – with the help of fellow agent and former New Haven teacher Steven Fong – also is inviting students to participate in an essay contest. “We’re very happy with the progress the District, teachers, and students have made in raising schools’ scores, but this year we want kids to start thinking more about their future,” said Mr. Sethi, who will sponsor “The Year 2021 Essay Contest.” “We want to encourage kids to think with their parents/guardians and write an essay about what they want to do when they grow up. The year 2021 is the year this year’s class of third-graders will graduate from high school.” All students who submit an essay will receive a recognition award and the essays will be published in a compilation that will be available online and offered to be displayed in each classroom. With help from a handful of partners, Mr. Sethi purchased more than 1,000 dictionaries and more than 1,000 thesauruses that he will be delivering to students at each of New Haven Unified’s seven elementary schools. “If you want to raise a home’s value, you have to play with the following parameters: improve school scores, improve the neighborhood (reduce crime and improve neighborhood cosmetics), and improve the home’s condition. Only one of these is in your control, but the other two are more important factors,” Mr. Sethi said, “so it makes a lot of sense for homeowners to focus on helping students do better in school. Partnering again with Mr. Sethi this year are Mr. Fong and local insurance agent Kristie Turner, who “loved delivering the books so much last year, she committed to sponsoring for 2011 immediately after delivering the 2010 dictionaries,” Mr. Sethi said. New partners are Alameda County Supervisor Nadia Lockyer, whose District includes New Haven and Risha Kilaru of Prospect Mortgage. For more information contact Rick La Plante at: rlaplante@nhusd.k12.ca.us.

Creations by Valerie Manning will be on exhibit throughout the month of November at the Mission Coffee Roasting Company, 151 Washington Boulevard in Fremont. A reception will be held on Sunday, November 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 pm. Valerie is a survivor of cancer, CHF and diabetes and feels blessed to be able to bring art into the homes of people who may never have a chance to see beautiful sites like Yosemite, Big Sur, or ocean sunsets. Most of her works are of landscapes, many of which came from her creative imagination; like her “Pathway to the Moon,” “Little Italy,” “Snow Town,” “Nature at Work,” and “Foggy-Wedding Mountain in China.” The abalone shell in her “Dancing Starfish” painting seems to emerge from the painting. Some of her paintings, like “Summer Home” and “Redwood Forest” entice viewers into the scene. Creations by Valerie Manning Sunday, Nov 6 to Wednesday, Nov 30 Reception: November 6 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. Mission Coffee Roasting Company 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-9635


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

November 1, 2011

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 31

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Call for a FREE Assessment 510-790-1930 or 1 888-794-1930 www.homehealthcareregistry.org

What’s It Worth? H&H APPRAISAL SERVICES

Norman Hodgson Certified Museum Specialist Personal Property and Collections All Areas - 510-582-5954 *Free Verbal Opinion* Send image of object to: norm2@earthlink.net

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Log on to www.wholesalecostless.com 510-472-1844 email: apparelwholesale@hotmail.com

HASTINGS TERRACE/EAST APTS 510-793-2535, 510-792-4983

Computers: Software Developers sought by ISTS Worldwide, Inc, http://www.istsinc.com for permanent positions. (i) w/exp in J2EE Architecture & Java Technologies (ii) Design, development & support of .Net Applications using .Net, C#, C++,ASP.NET, Oracle, SQL, SQL*Plus, PL/SQL, SQL Server & Java in client/server environment. Must be willing to relocate/travel to client sites across USA. Send resume to HR, 39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 390, Fremont, CA 94538 or email to hr@istsinc.com

IT Professionals ISTS Worldwide, Inc, http://www.istsinc.com has permanent positions for i) Datawarehousing Analyst for Analysis, Design, Development,Testing, Installation, & configuration, of Data Warehousing applications. (ii) QA Analyst for evaluation & testing & compliance of software applications (iii) Software Developer w/exp in J2EE Architecture & Java Technologies. MS/BS in Comp Sci/Eng related field w/1-5 yrs exp. Must be willing to relocate/travel to client sites across USA. Send resume to HR, 39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 390, Fremont, CA 94538 or email to hr@istsinc.com

Business for Sale Organic Dry Cleaning Plant and Drop off Store. Both Located off of Fremont Blvd. in busy shopping areas. 3,238 sqft. All organic machines purchased 6 months ago. Dry Cleaning Plant includes water filling center Call! Price is negotiable.

650-346-2964 Jensen

Affordable Appartment Housing Irvington Terrace, an affordable apartment community in Fremont, is opening its waiting list for a limited time for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments. Applications for the waiting list will be available and accepted at the leasing office from Monday, October 31st at 10 am until Friday, November 11th at 4pm, 2011. Staff will be available to answer questions starting October 31st. No need to line up—applications will be randomly ordered after the 31st. Income and other restrictions apply. Beginning Oct 31st, applications will be available at the leasing office located at 4109 Broadmoor Common (at Grimmer). Office hours will be M-F, 10am to 4pm starting Oct 31st. Local preference is available for persons who currently or previously live/work in Fremont. Starting Oct 31st, call 510-979-1159 for more information.

Help Wanted Project Mgr to plan floor design and construction, analyze materials, review architectural/construction docs & estimate costs (Job#P8) Res to Century Carpet Inc, 703 A St, Hayward, CA

HELP WANTED

Martins

Full Service Beauty Salon Hair and Beauty Supplies

Wanted Hair Stylists & Beauty Supply Service people Call Dick Martin

510-790-7159 37211 Fremont Blvd.,Fremont

Southland Senior Club

Great Rates! Great Results Classified Ads 510-494-1999 www.tricityvoice.com

The club is open to all Seniors 50+ WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz

Various Activities at the Club include: Line Dancing Lessons, Card Playing, Tap dancing. Chance to work on Jigsaw puzzles or read books. A good supply of both are free for borrowing. Various Crafts including Knitting, Sewing Trips and events Free cookies, coffee or tea

510-264-0850 Mon -Thur from 10am-3pm Fri 10am-1 pm. Closed Sat & Sun Southland Shopping Center. The Club is located in the Food Court.


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Newark Votes Al Nagy Newark Councilman Alan Nagy has enthusiastically declared his candidacy for Mayor of Newark. Nagy states that his many leadership roles serving on the City Council, being Vice Mayor seven times, and service in community organizations have provided him with the Leadership - Experience - and Dedication to prepare him for being Mayor. Nagy was selected as Newark’s Volunteer of the Year in 2009 for his leadership role in developing the Viola Blythe Center and his volunteer work with Graffiti Abatement and the Newark Library League. In addition, Nagy chairs the Senior Citizens Advisory Committee and is Treasurer of the Newark Library League. He also chairs the Washington Hospital Development Corporation. A central theme of his campaign is economic development. Economic development provides the “fuel” for job creation and revenues needed to support services important to Newark citizens. He will create a “blue-ribbon” panel of representatives from the Chamber of Commerce, business, marketing and real estate professionals to help create jobs and attract or retain business. “Newark is a great place to do business and we’ve got to get that message across”. Another important area Nagy stresses is Public Safety. “Providing Newark citizens superior public safety services is critical. He will work to implement or enhance programs like Neighborhood Watch, CERT, Volunteers in Policing, a Citizen Notification System and additional staffing for the Special Enforcement Team. These programs are invaluable for extending the ability of the City to fight crime, respond to emergencies and enhance disaster preparedness. “The ability to manage the City effectively with reduced revenues is paramount in today’s economy.” His Council experience and professional training as a project manager who routinely handles a multi-million dollar budget, will serve the community well. Nagy will also strive for close cooperation with the School District, recognizing that good schools are essential to a healthy, vibrant community. Nagy goes on to stress the importance of programs that enhance the quality of life of our seniors, children and families. He cites the re-opening of the Senior Center and funding of the Summer Youth program as examples of programs he supports in this area.

Ray J. Rodriguez Ray J is one of us; Ray moved to Newark in 1973 from New York City because he wanted to raise his family in a safe and nurturing environment. Ray believes that Newark remains a place to which people are drawn because of its small town feel. He is married and has seven children and five grandchildren, eight of whom have graduated from Newark schools. Ray has been a business owner in Newark since 1984. “My family and I love Newark and I am committed to keeping it a safe place to live. Newark is good but together we can make it great.” Ray J is an experienced leader who has served the Newark community as a School Board Member since 1995. In his tenure, he has been president several times. Ray has also been president of the Mission Valley ROP and has chaired a countywide Hispanic Scholarship Program. Ray has been part of LOV Newark’s Advisory Board and many LOV programs. Ray has served on various City committees since 1990 and has collaborated in the

founding of Avanzando Newark. Ray has always been motivated in serving his community and he is well known as a problem-solver, reaching out to families in need. He has served as a Deacon in a local church. Ray is a U.S. Marine Vietnam Veteran. Vote Ray J. Rodriguez for Newark Mayor. Rodriguez4NewarkMayor@g mail.com

Candidates for Newark City Council Richard “Rick” Bensco I am unique in my candidacy in that I have two small children in our school system. I have a BA degree from the University of Hartford with em-

phasis in Marketing. After college, I started and ran a successful small business for almost 10 years before moving to Newark in 1995. My campaign is focused around three main issues that are woven together - crime, schools and business. When we address these three issues with a comprehensive approach, we can make Newark a safer and better place to live and grow. “Bridging The Gap between the School System and Town Hall” is my campaign slogan. Heading up a youth violence joint task force, working with the schools, the Department of Parks and Recreation and Newark Police Department are my top priorities. Setting up a clear set of measurable goals and seeking out volunteers and paid staff to carry them out will be step one. We need a proactive approach to filling our empty business space. We have an Economic Development Department. Let's get them re-focused. We need light manufacturing and office parks, not another Dollar Store. We missed the retail boat, so to speak. A diversified business base will help Newark's tax base. I am a fiscal conservative. Quite simply, we have often spent too much for what we get or need. A look at our budget is only an overview. We all remember the “$100,000 lawn mower” in the midst of a financial emergency. I'll bring a businessman’s perspective and research skills to our City Council. Businesses often hire “fresh new talent” to bring a new set of eyes with a unique perspective to many financial decisions. We don't get our fair share of grants! Our tax money is leaving Newark to help other towns. I will work to tailor grant proposals for our town’s needs. In closing, a vote for Rick Bensco is a vote to end youth violence, help our schools, raise property values, increase business and see your ideas put into action. I would appreciate your vote. Facebook/Rick Bensco New For Newark

Mike Bucci Like many of you, I’m a lifelong Newark resident. Our city and its people have done more for me then I could ever begin to

explain. Because of my many great experiences with Newark, I have respectfully participated in much charity work. While the service I’ve offered to our city helps improve our general quality of life, I can do more - much more. It’s time to further my motivation and put my innovative ideas to work for our city. As councilmember, I pledge to diligently focus on my threepoint plan: 1. Jumpstart Newark’s stagnant economy. 2. Support first-time home-buyers. 3. Clean-up the destructive crime that’s plaguing our city. A brighter future starts with business revitalization. It’s hard enough to start a business with costly licensing fees and miles of red tape. My mission is to pursue businesses that will succeed, making Newark economically sound. First, reduce business license fees by 50 percent in the first year and create incentives for businesses to hire Newark residents. Second, help Newarkians find work and stay in their homes benefits us all. The Area 2 TOD Development is an important step toward that goal. It will help achieve the 50,000 resident benchmark required to qualify for California redevelopment funds enabling us to start our own First-Time Home-Buyer Program. Finally, it has become painfully apparent that gang activity in Newark is getting worse. Our police need the tools to further control the streets including curfews and gang injunctions. I see a better Newark in our near future. It’s time for a committed voice to get us there, stepby-step. I have a deep-rooted love for Newark. This is my opportunity to give something back. I want you to experience a stronger, safer, healthier Newark. Imagine a Newark where business is flourishing, where we can make the much-needed upgrades to our schools without the need of Bond Measures, an environment where we support businesses to reach success. I want to make you believe in better, to again believe in Newark and believe in me. Because when we succeed, Newark succeeds. http://www.mikebucci4newar k.org/campaign/

Maria “Sucy” Collazo I am a 40-year Newark resident, one of three daughters of immigrant parents who came to

the United States from Mexico in search of a better life. They had a vision and a dream. They settled here in Newark with my two sisters and me and built a successful business in Old Town. Today, my husband Vicente and I, along with our family, still operate the Mexico Tortilla Factory. I am running for City Council to give back to the city that has

been so good to me and my family. I want to do it for my two sons who were born, raised, and attended church and school here. My business knowledge and skills are coupled with a deep desire to continue "Building the Dream, Together" for all of Newark. I will work collaboratively with my fellow council members to focus on gang prevention and neighborhood security, to rebuild our reserves and actively pursue new revenue, to fill our vacant commercial properties and to work with our school district to develop joint projects for student success. I want to help Newark continue to prosper and to provide for the safety, security and quality of life of everyone living here.

Jack Dane Having lived and worked in Newark for more than 45 years, I have come to understand the long term issues our local govern-

ment faces. As a long-time proponent of fiscal responsibility and government accountability, I have worked tirelessly to provide transparency between city officials and local voters. By providing a platform for local officials to present thoughts on my live local cable TV show and the forum for local residents to provide feedback, I feel I have gained invaluable knowledge from both camps. Additionally, my years as a registered tax preparer and business tax advisor has afforded me innumerable opportunities to provide seasoned tax advice to thousands. Fiscal discipline, in this current economic crisis, is first and foremost in everyone’s mind if we are to continue to provide critical services to our community. Accountability means taking a hard look at current spending and curtailing unnecessary costs in order to divert monies to our city reserves. With a solid reserve fund, Newark will weather future economic downturns where other cities may fail. To look to the city’s future means we need to encourage our youth in ways that may not be prevalent today. Youth opportunities may not only rest in providing teen employment but also by engaging our young people with after school activities, both inside and outside of civic events, that give each a significant sense of pride in their city. This should be paramount within local government discussions geared toward solving the issues facing young people today. In order to grow and maintain our business tax base, local government will need to take a more proactive role in singing the praises of our fair city. The centrally-located city of Newark not only serves the East Bay as a strategic I-880 corridor stop but also doubles as a beautiful bayside locale. Wooing new business and keeping them should be at the top of our collective lists. Fiscal discipline, renewing our commitment to youth programs and growing our business tax base are just three of the many important issues I intend to address as Newark’s newest council member.

Luis L. Freitas Your city officials and staff are committed to proving the best to the residents of Newark. I am proud to be a part of that team! I have served as a member of the

City Council since 1995 and served as Vice Mayor five times since then. My goals are public safety, fiscal responsibility and quality of life. My business experience and experience volunteering in the community provide me with a balanced perspective needed to make the very best decisions for the City of Newark. I am a 35-year resident of Newark and have been married to my wife Fatima for 36 years. We have two children, Mark and Nicole, and two granddaughters, Madison and Marisa. I have been a local business owner for more than 20 years and a member of the local Chamber of Commerce. I also serve on many committees at the county level. Your vote on November 8, 2011, will enable me to continue providing Leadership for Newark’s Future!

Newark Unified School District Measure G Newark Quality Education and Safe Classrooms Bond Measure requires 55 percent approval for passage. "To preserve quality education, provide safe and modern schools, and qualify for matching funds, shall Newark Unified School District update aging classrooms, libraries, and science labs to meet earthquake/fire/safety standards; improve access for students with disabilities; remove asbestos, lead and hazardous materials; and improve energy/operational efficiency to maximize funding for instructional programs; by issuing $63 million in bonds at legal rates, with independent oversight, no money for administrators' salaries, and all funds staying in Newark?" Arguments in favor of Measure G in the official voter guide include: Your YES vote on Measure G will provide locally controlled funds that can’t be taken by Sacramento to update our classrooms so Newark students are prepared for college and 21st century jobs. Your YES vote is critical. Improving energy and operational efficiency will generate approximately $500,000 in savings every year, which will go directly toward protecting academic programs and retaining qualified teachers. If Measure G passes, Newark schools will be eligible for matching funds that would otherwise go to other communities. Measure G will also boost our local economy by creating and protecting local jobs. Arguments opposing Measure G in the official voter guide include: Measure G is a $63M bond that will cost homeowners approximately $5,000 that will take decades to pay off with fees and interest. Existing debt already costs Newark taxpayers over $5M annually. This proposed bond is larger than the entire budget for the Newark Unified School District by 108 percent. Since 1971, U.S educational spending has grown from $4,300 to over $9,000 per student after adjusting for inflation. Has doubling spending helped? Since


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1971, reading and math scores have flat lined. Measure G is written to allow the District to use the money to offset expenses. This allows Newark Unified School District

to increase spending, without making necessary budget cuts. This will decrease accountability within the district. California voters voted to have a required 67 percent majority

for the approval of all tax increases. Measure G is an attempt to get around this. Measure G is a bond, only 55 percent of voters is needed for it to pass. Newark Unified School District

would benefit from better management and accountability, not an influx in revenue that allows continued fiscal irresponsibility. Tax Payers are in peril. All levels of government intend tax increases

to support government spending. Debt spending is ruining Newark, our schools and our future.

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Groupon's fall to earth swifter than its fast rise more critical than their typical audience or have a more tenuous fit with the merchant.” Groupon also has faced trouble behind its own doors. After only two months, its public relations chief quit in August. The next day, CEO Mason wrote a 2,500word email to the staff defending Groupon against critics. That email was leaked to the press and then lambasted by some analysts and members of the investment community for violating terms of the quiet period. Two seasoned executives hired as COOs also left. The latest, former Google sales vice president Margo Georgiadis, resigned after five months to return to Google. Her departure coincided with Groupon's announcement that it was restating its revenue by around half. “It's like watching a Ben Stiller movie and waiting for the next painful moment,” says Mulpuru, the Forrester analyst. The next chapter After Groupon filed documents for its IPO in June, the SEC - and the investment community - began asking serious questions about the company. The first concern stemmed from how Groupon accounted for its revenue. Groupon roughly splits the money it collects from customers with merchants. But in the filing, Groupon reported all of its gross billings as revenue. Standard accounting principles dictate that Groupon should have used net revenue - the amount it keeps after paying the merchant. For example, Groupon reported $1.52 billion in revenue for the first half of 2011. But after the SEC questioned it, Groupon in late September submitted new documents that showed that net revenue in the first half of this year was actually $688 million. Groupon was overstating its revenue by roughly half. Groupon's growth has no doubt been quantum. Since November, 2008, it has signed up 142.9 million email subscribers and has had more than 30 million customers. But only 20 percent of subscribers have purchased a Groupon. And only 10 percent have purchased more than one. Groupon also faces concerns about how it has used its money. On Oct. 7, in its fourth amendment, Groupon disclosed that it had spent half its net revenue - $345.1 million - on marketing costs alone during the first half of this year. Analysts think of those costs as how much Groupon is paying to acquire subscribers. Additionally, there are questions about how the company has used investor money. Traditionally, investor money is used to grow a business before it goes public. But according to Groupon's SEC filings, $810 million of the $946 million it raised went to early investors and insiders. That includes $398 million to Groupon's largest investor, shareholder and executive chairman, Eric Lefkofsky. “Taking this money raises questions about the integrity of the company and enormous questions about the quality of the management team,” says Mulpuru. “Groupon's primary problem first and foremost is greed.” Meanwhile, the company's debt has skyrocketed. Groupon's ratio of debt to capital is 102 percent. By comparison, the ratio for social-networking site LinkedIn is about 30 percent and gaming site Zynga's is about 49 percent. “Those companies are all in normal territory,” says Ed Ketz, a Penn State accounting professor. “But Groupon's is excessively high.” In Friday's filing, the company laid out third-quarter financial figures that showed it is getting closer to profitability. For the three months ended Sept. 30, Groupon narrowed its net loss of $10.6 million on revenue of $430.2 million in part by lowering marketing spending. That compares with a loss of $49 million on revenue of $81.8 million in the same period last year. Groupon, which rejected a $6 billion takeover offer from Google Inc. last year, disclosed in the Friday filing that its revenue has grown from $1.2 million in 2009's second quarter to $430.2 million in the third quarter of this year. The company has its supporters. Groupon has been funded by such venture capital heavyweights as Andreessen Horowitz, firm of Netscape founder Marc Andreessen. Andreessen declined to comment, but in an August essay in the Wall Street Journal, he wrote that companies like Groupon would “eat the retail marketing industry.” “We are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swaths of the economy,'' he wrote. ----Michelle Chapman in New York contributed to this report.

New Haven District School Board updates

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would have expired and the seat will be one of three on the ballot. In other New Haven Board of Education meeting news: The Board received a presentation from representatives of a group of parents, teachers, classified employees, administrators and business/community leaders advocating for the District to make another attempt to pass a parcel tax, to relieve some of the budget pressures caused by the state’s ongoing financial crisis. The group, including supporters of the Measure B parcel tax that missed passing by a handful of votes last spring, asked the Board to commission a poll of the community to

help determine: 1) what priorities voters would support; 2) how much voters would be willing to pay; and 3) whether a May mail-in ballot (similar to Measure B) or the November general election would give the effort a better chance to succeed. The Board agendized a decision for the upcoming November 1 meeting. Also, the Board appointed Dr. Olivia Lynch as the new Director of K-12 Programs, replacing Joe Feldman. Mr. Feldman -- who has helped lead District initiatives in secondary instruction, Gifted and Talented Education, grading and equity -- is leaving at the end of the month to

become vice president of a non-profit peer health organization. Dr. Lynch has more than 30 years of professional experience in education, providing services and supports on a number of initiatives and programs in schools, districts, educational organizations and with the federal Department of Education. A coach with ConnectEd with the University of San Diego’s program for large high schools with academies, she already has worked with James Logan High School on redesign efforts. She also has worked on school reform in Hayward, Oakland and Petaluma, as well as in New York, New Jersey, Mississippi and other states.

Octogenarians and nonagenarian honored

Nonagenarian Gail Moore; Octogenarians Irene Volbrecht, Jean Ficklin and Norma Burns

SUBMITTED BY GENE DIAS PHOTO BY MIRANDA MILLER

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mid an autumn setting of gold, orange, brown and green, arranged by President-Elect Stephanie Moody, 123 members of the California Retired Teachers Association #91 of Fremont, Union City and Newark (FUN) honored three octogenarians and a nonagenarian at a recent lunch gathering. The meeting was chaired by Mary Kay Henderson who accepted the presidency for another term. Octogenarians honored included: Irene Volbrecht, Jean Ficklin and Norma Burns. Nonagenarian Gail Moore was also recognized for her many years of service. Moore has served as Travel Organizer for Division #91 since 2000 and is currently planning a visit to the Mario Chiodo monument – Remember Them: Champions for Humanity - in Oakland. Honorees received certificates of appreciation and potted yellow roses; arranged and made by Judy Molander and Muriel Rodrigues. Guest speaker, Karen Blount, Community Engagement Specialist for the Fremont Police Department, spoke about protection against burglaries and scams targeting mature adults. The next luncheon/meeting of the FUN Division will be held mid-January 2012.

High-speed rail delays release of business plan SUBMITTED BY RACHEL WALL Board Chairman Tom Umberg today directed California High-Speed Rail Authority staff to postpone its planned release of the business plan until at least November 1, 2011, to give Gov. Jerry Brown’s new appointees a chance to fully immerse themselves in the plan and offer their own feedback. "The California High-Speed Rail Authority has put together an extensive business plan that comprehensively addresses the future of this project,” Umberg said. “At the same time, we have new appointees to the Board who weren't able to be a part of its development. This postponement will give them the necessary time to participate.” Staff at the California High-Speed Rail Authority had originally set October 14, 2011, as a working deadline, though it was not a requirement and does not otherwise affect the project’s schedule but that was before the Governor’s appointment of two new members to the Board, Dan Richard and Michael Rossi. Additionally, Will Kempton, former director of the California Department of Transportation and a peer reviewer of the project, wrote in a letter dated September 16,

2011, that “Very frankly, our experience with projects of this type has shown that patience and careful planning at the beginning always pay off in the end.” “I look forward to having this extra time to delve into the business plan, which numbers in the hundreds of pages, and take a close look at the funding, ridership and implementation information it presents,” Richard said. “Governor Brown, the Legislature and all Californians will be well-served by a plan that lays the foundation for the future of this sorely needed transportation option.” The November 1, 2011, publication of the plan will commence a 60-day public comment period, which includes public meetings to be scheduled in November and December 2011. The California High-Speed Rail Authority is developing an 800-mile high-speed train system that will operate at speeds of up to 220 miles per hour, connecting the state’s major urban centers, including the Bay Area, Central Valley, Los Angeles and San Diego. Initial infrastructure construction will begin in the Central Valley, the backbone of the system, in 2012. The project is being funded through a voter-approved state bond, federal funding grants, local funding, and public-private partnerships. For more information, visit www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov


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Juried Photography Exhibit BY EMMA VICTORIA G. BLANCO

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dvancements in technology did not overlook the photography industry. And the ubiquitous Smartphones make it extremely convenient to tap into the photographer in each of us. But how many of us can boast an actual talent for taking and editing photographs that are breathtaking and/or inspirational enough to be considered Art? It takes both a keen eye and honed skill-set to capture a moment with a camera. The Fremont Cultural Arts Council (FCAC) is once again proud to present the 18th Annual Juried Photography Exhibit to showcase amazing works of talented and award-winning local photographers. With assistance from the City of Fremont’s Recreation Services Department, the FCAC, the Fremont Photographic Society, and the Photogenesis photo clubs of Fremont are pleased to sponsor the popular show and invite everyone to the Opening Night Public Reception on Friday, November 4 at the Fremont Main Library’s Fukaya Room. Photographs will be on display from November 5 through December 9 during normal library hours in the main

“Lighthouse Evening” by Alan Bickett

second place; the photograph is a black and white image converted from a color digital image taken in Felton, California, during a camera club field trip. His “Cascade Falls” and “Hands Spinning Yarn” also won Merit Awards. Brandt is an Air Traffic Controller working out of the Oakland ARTCC located in Fremont. He has been a member of the Fremont Photographic Society and Photogenesis camera clubs for about 15 years and photography is his hobby. Ian Bornarth submitted four entries; two were accepted to the show and one, “Grand Canyon

"Lake Elizabeth Mist" by Alvin Dockter

reading area behind the first floor information desk. As in previous years, a panel of three judges – prominent representatives from the photography industry – had the unenviable task of selecting the winning photographs based on Artistic Merit, Originality, Difficulty, and Technical Aspects. Alison Brooks, Dick Stahlke, and Claudia Peterson were not allowed to know the names of the photographers or the photographs’ titles during the selection process. Brooks is past president of the Northern California Council of Camera Clubs (NCCCC), has been involved in photography for over 25 years, and for several years owned and operated Negative Space Photography, a professional darkroom. Stahlke, who also served as past president of the NCCCC, has been photographing seriously since 1993 and actively competes at the Master’s level with the Contra Costa Camera Club. Peterson is the president of 6C (a coalition of six Bay Area camera clubs) and is an award-winning wildlife, portrait, and still-life photographer. This year 51 Fremont photographers and members of Fremont photography clubs submitted their photographs for the chance to win recognition and cash prizes. From a total of 176 entries, 105 images from 41 photographers were deemed worthy for display. The recipient of the "People's Choice Award" will be determined at the Opening Night Reception, and the Merit Award winners will be announced around 7:30 p.m. First time entrant Rick Brandt of Pleasanton submitted five photographs; all five were selected for display and four are award winners. “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, NY,” a high dynamic range (HDR) image comprised of five different images, won first place. Brandt’s “Steam Engine #6” won

Storm,” placed third. Bornarth has been a past participant of and an active volunteer at the FCAC Juried Photo Shows. His winning photograph was taken at the Grand Canyon last fall as a storm was passing. He explained, “It created beautiful light streaming into the canyon. I often photograph landscapes, storms and other weather [to] generate some of the most dramatic scenes to photograph.” Bornarth is a professional photographer and a photography instructor at the Art Institute of California, Sunnyvale. Marina Grabovskaya became a member of the Fremont Photographic Society only two months ago. She submitted two entries and her “Curious Cat” won a Merit Award. “I took that picture a couple of [years] ago in Quebec, Canada. We were walking along a street in Quebec, enjoying the city's architecture and ambiance, and all of a sudden I saw that kitty in a window trying to reach toys behind the glass.” P. Kay Hill-Hatten’s five entries were all accepted, with “Waiting in Truckee” winning a Merit Award. It is a digital photograph taken with an Olympus E420 camera and printed on Epson Ultra Premium Luster paper with pigment inks. She explained, “The photo itself is a young dog tied up in the dirty entrance to an old bar, calmly waiting for the person that left her there. It just sat there [and] gave me kind of a look while taking her photo, with those blue eyes.” Hill-Hatten considers herself an “artist-photographer,” adding, “Photography, I'm somewhere in between it being a profession or a hobby.” Raul Lopez of Hayward feels “blessed to be one of the winners in this year’s FCAC Juried Photo Show.” Photography is a new hobby for him and a great one at that since his black and white entry entitled “From Days Past”

won a Merit Award. Lopez explained that the photograph is “a front shot of an abandoned old car in a field at Bodie State Park located in the Eastern Sierras. The tall dry grass embraces the front fenders, there is no glass in the windshield and the side opening hood covers look like they might fall off at any time. An old structure sits in the background slightly to the right with hills of dry grass extending as far as the eye can see. The glorious crown to this scene is the beautiful, enormously puffy clouds that fill the sky.” All five of Koushik Biswas’ entries were accepted to the show and “Lighthouse at Chicago” is a Merit Award recipient. The photo was taken while Biswas was on a boat tour at Navy Pier, Chicago. “It was a cloudy/rainy day and I was a bit sad as there were so many things to capture but light was not sufficient enough. On the way back, I think God listened to my heart and showed some rays of hope and the sun peeped [out] just for a few minutes. The position of my tour boat and the timing of the light [were] really crucial [elements to the photograph]; overall, I think it’s a very straight shot and [I] was lucky enough to capture the essence of the perfect moment of time and light,” Biswas explained of the winning photograph. Despite this year being the show’s 18th, it does appear to be a year of firsts. Brandt’s photographs’ winning first and second place, as well as Merit Awards is indeed an unusual occurrence. “I don’t think this has ever happened before,” said Jason Cheng, the show’s Chairman for the sixth year in a row. He added, “When the judges make their decisions, it is done in blinded fashion. They have no way of knowing who the photographers are.” Also a first at the reception is the chance for people to inquire about the potential sale of the photographs. Cheng stated, “I am sometimes asked if the photographs in the exhibit are available for sale. This is entirely up to the photographer but in many cases they are interested in selling their photographs. This year there will be an opportunity at the opening night reception for any interested parties to leave their contact information and we will have the photographer contact them directly. This is something new that we are trying out this year.” A list of the prints selected for exhibit, as well as lists of previous years’ award winners can be found online at www.fremontculturalartscouncil.org. All are invited to the reception to meet the talented photographers and learn more about their passion for creating art through photography. Juried Photography Exhibit Nov 5 through Dec 9 Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont Opening Night Reception Friday, November 4 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room (510) 745-1400 www.fremontculturalartscouncil.org

November 1, 2011


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