Page 1

Robotics Report

Football League Action

Olive Hyde offers Rhythm and Light

Page 16 Page 25

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK

INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

October 14, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 82

“A mobster’s deaf nephew needed a job…” begins a tale told by Ronald Burdett, Vice President of Community Relations for Sorenson Communications®. Engrossed in the story, it is easy to forget that the narrator is actually two people: the person telling the story using American Sign Language

enhanced by body language and expressive facial characterizations… and a skilled interpreter. Bridging the communication gap between deaf and hearing communities in the United States has come a long way from the days of Alexander Graham Bell who, while promoting communication for both deaf and hearing people and married to a deaf

woman, retained a curiously antithetical attitude toward deafness. Although attitudes in both hearing and deaf communities vary, there is little debate that communication within each group and between them is essential. What may be taken for granted by those with hearing, can become a formidable obsta-

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 28

continued on page 7


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED CRONBACH

BY JANET

October 10, 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of California women winning the right to vote; nine years before passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. California was the sixth state to win the vote. Women suffragists and the men who supported them waged an eight month long campaign, which narrowly passed in California, with San Francisco leading the opposition. Western states were the first to embrace what was

October 14, 2011

then considered a radical political position. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, it was a widely held belief that a woman’s place was in the home, and that women had no place in politics. The League of Women Voters, the American Association of University Women, the National Organization for Women, Patterson House and the Fremont Main Library have collaborated on a commemorative celebration to the be held at the Fremont Main Library on Saturday, October 15, at 2:30 p.m. Please join us for a Reader’s Theater per-

formance highlighting women who were prominent in the suffragette campaign in California. A display featuring campaign posters, photographs and ephemera from the suffragette effort is available for view on the second floor of the Fremont Main Library through October 31. The Fremont Main Library is a branch of the Alameda County Library system and is located at 2400 Stevenson Boulevard, Fremont. The Library is wheelchair accessible. No reservation is required. For an ASL interpreter, call the library at least seven working days before the event. For more information, contact the Fremont Main Library at 510-745-1401 or Janet Cronbach at 510-745-1429. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Meeting Room Saturday, October 15 2:30 p.m. 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1429 TTY: 888-663-0660 www.aclibrary.org

Book Sale Fremont Friend of the Library clearance sale

Saturday, Oct 15 - Sunday, Oct 16 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

10 a.m. -3 p.m. Saturday and 12 noon- 3 p.m. Sunday Clearance Book Sale - $3 per grocery bag. The Public Library as a vital community resource and an invaluable tool critical to the culture, education, and welfare of our diverse community. Support Fremont Friends of the Library.

Old Library/Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Parkway (Enter Central Park at Sailway Drive), Fremont (510) 494-1103


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Friday, Oct 14

Saturday, Oct 15

Fall Concert $

Adapting to Sea-Level Rise

8 p.m.

2 - 4 p.m.

Mission Peak Brass Band

Panel Discussion, effects on wildlife

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturdays - Sundays, Oct 15 - Oct 30

Saturday, Oct 15 - Sunday, Oct 16

1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

Library Book Sale

Saturday, Oct 15

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

6 - 10 p.m.

Fremont Friend of the Library clearance sale

REI Outdoor School GPS Workshop

Step into the Haunted Hotel, games, food

1 - 1:45 p.m.

Old Library/Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Parkway (Enter Central Park at Sailway Drive., Fremont (510) 494-1103

GPS and the National Wildlife Refuge center

Saturday, Oct 15

Chadbourne Carriage House 39169 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0595

3 p.m.

Aging Safely at Home

Saturday, Oct 15

Min Zin, UC Berkeley

10 a.m. - 12 a.m. Free Workshop Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627

Celebration of Women's Right to Vote

Saturday, Oct 15

Saturday, Oct 15

Mutt Strut $

Scarecrow Scavenger Hunt

2:30 p.m.

8 - 10 a.m.

Noon - 1 p.m.

Slide show, dramatic presentation

BBQ, Dog Games, Dog Costume Contest, Awards and prizes

Help find missing scarecrow parts. Meet at the barn

Masonic Home 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5396

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Oct 15

Saturday, Oct 15

Observe, Explore and Learn Physics

Science for Tykes: Arachnomania $R

11 a.m.

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Explore Energy

Kids 5-10 become arachnologist for the day

Friday, Oct 14

Amnesty International lecture series

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 Friday, Oct 14

Halloween Storytime and Learn about Dental Health

12:15 p.m. Story time and goody bags

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 - Nov 12

Rhythm and Light

7 - 9 p.m.

Saturday, Oct 15

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Amazing Refuge Race R

Saturday, Oct 15

2 - 4 p.m.

Corn Husk Dolls

Race with and perform tasks, win prizes. Bring GPS

1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Heart Walk

American Heart Association

Saturday, Oct 15

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 544-3249

7:15 a.m. - 11 a.m. Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-5683 (800) 963-7070

Owls - Music of the Night R

Shrouded Tales Tour $

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

7 - 9 p.m.

Listen to different owl calls and walk the park trails

Haunted Tour

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

Mauricio Segura Angie Wang Jessica Noel Waymire

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew

WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye Lou Messina

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman

Annual Sale of Native Plants 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Native plants that attract hummingbirds and butterflies

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Saturdy, Oct 15

The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman

Gather husks from corn field and create fold art

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Family history, Victorian death tradi-

Sulphur Creek Nature Center

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

tions and superstitions, paranormal findings

Meek Mansion 17365 Boston Rd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 Saturday, Oct 15

Spanish Brass: Luur Metalls $

8 p.m. Lively and innovative group, wide ranging program

Serra Theaters 200 Serra Way #37, Milpitas http://lovefool.sunnymoza.com

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352

Wednesday, Oct 19

Friday, Oct 21 - Oct 30

Mobility Matters

Halloween Train $R

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

7 - 9 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 16

Sunday, Oct 16

Talk about transportation matters

Corn Mosaics

Weekend Weed Warriors

Ride train through fields and woods. Halloween fun

2 - 3 p.m.

1 - 4 p.m.

Turn freshly-harvested Indian corn into fun craft. Family fun

Have a positive impact on the environment. We need your help

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

San Leandro Senior Community Center 13909 East 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 845-7549

Sunday, Oct 16

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Saturday, Oct 15

Farmyard Games

Sunday, Oct 16

Twilight Marsh Walk

2 - 3 p.m.

What's That Smell $

5:30 7 p.m.

Old-fashioned fun! Hoop rolling, stilts, potato races and more

11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Stroll along the tidelands trails

Learn how smells are created - Ages 610

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Sunday, Oct 16

Sunday, Oct 16

Acorn Soup Making $R

Nature Drawing for Kids R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Monday, Oct 17

Make acorn soup the old way

Ages 7-12 learn drawing techniques for outdoor sketching

AC Redistricting

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Public input for redrawing AC Transit wards

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

October 14, 2011

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Paint your Pumpkin $

2:30 p.m.

Noon - 4 p.m.

Monday, Oct 17

Official selection for Silicon Valley Film Festival

Paint your pumpkins, contest and prizes costumes and pumpkins

7 - 8:30 p.m.

Jobs Workshop R Free event, Registration required

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Tuesday, Oct 18

How to Maker Your Business Thrive During a Recession R

7 - 8:30 p.m. 5:00 pm – DOORS OPEN 6:30 pm - WARM-UP BINGO GAMES – Payout $150 7:00 pm - REGULAR BINGO GAMES – Payout $250 FLASHBOARD GAMES that pay as much as $1,199 *Lightening * Pull Tabs * Door Prizes * Snack Bar * Bingo played on paper, no machines

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd (cross street: Dowe Ave) Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org/bingo

Various times Registration begins Oct 13 (Oct 20 for Oct 27 workshop)

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Wednesday, Oct 19

Amnesty International lecture series

3 p.m. Dr. Michele Elam, Stanford University

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600

Continuing Events Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 5 Oct 23

Annual Fine Art Show

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Thursday, Oct 20

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

Open Mic

7 - 9 p.m. Presented by Fremont Area Writers

Paddy's Coffee House 3900 Smith St., Union City (510) 791-8639 Friday, Oct 21

Job Fair - Free Parking

39399 Cherry Street, Newark

"Love Fool" $

at SACBC BINGO

Creation Station preschool art workshops R

10:30 a.m. 1 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 16

Enjoy Friday Night BINGO

Thursday, Oct 20

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410

Sunday, Oct 16

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Tri-Cities One-Stop Career Center & Ohlone College Newark Job Fair

Reception and Awards Sunday Oct 9th

Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 - Nov 12

Patterns of Abuse

11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Photography show

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Monday - Thursday, Oct 6 Oct 19

Sunday, Oct 9 -Oct 31

Wednesdays, Thru Nov 16

Roving Artists Exhibit

Photorealistic watercolor painting exhibit

3 - 5 p.m.

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

12:30 - 2 p.m.

Exhibit Reception (exhibit until Oct 31)

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5488 (510) 574-2053

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

Mission Coffee Roasting House 151 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 474-1004 (510) 623-6920

Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 Nov 12

Tuesday, Oct 18

Patterns of Abuse

Parenting with Purpose

Thursdays, Thru Nov 17

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

7 - 8 p.m.

Photography show

Speech and Language Milestones

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Friday-Sunday,Sep 16-Oct 15

Tuesdays, Thru Nov 15

Dennis Collins' paintings of Mayan artifacts and relief sculpture

Wait Until Dark 8 p.m.

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker" Theatre Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health R

1 - 2:.30 p.m.

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 (510) 574-2053

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 (510) 574-2053

9:30 - 11 a.m.

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 14, 2011

A Life-saving Screening New technologies improve colorectal cancer screening and staging

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 142,500 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year—and nearly 51,400 will die of the disease. But up to 60 percent of those deaths could be prevented by screening tests that detect colorectal cancer early, when it can be more successfully treated. “The gold standard of screening is a colonoscopy,” says Arun Srivatsa, M.D., a gastroenterologist on the medical staff at Washington Hospital. “With a colonoscopy, we can detect and remove pre-cancerous polyps—growths inside the large intestine. This prevents them from turning into cancer. Tests that only detect cancer, such as tests that measure blood in the stool, don’t allow for removing polyps.”

Making Testing More Effective In a colonoscopy, a thin, flexible tube with a miniature camera is inserted through the rectum to look inside the large intestine while the patient is under moderate anesthesia. Flexible sigmoidoscopy, a similar procedure, only views about the first half of the colon. Plus, anesthesia is generally not used for sigmoidoscopy, so there may be some discomfort. “Doing a sigmoidoscopy is a bit like doing a mammogram only on one side,” Dr. Srivatsa notes. “The worst part of a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy usually is preparing for it, taking medication the night before to clean out the colon and possibly an enema that morning. Since preparation is the same for either procedure, you might as well view the entire colon.”

Recent improvements in colonoscopy include high-definition endoscopes that produce clearer, high-resolution images. Dr. Arun Srivatsa, a Washington Hospital gastroenterologist, is using a new high-definition diagnostic tool called endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) that can better detect cancer within the colon and adjacent tissues. Washington Hospital is the first facility in the East Bay to offer EUS.

60% of colorectal cancer deaths can be prevented if the disease is detected and treated early Another new diagnostic tool, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), combines endoscopy and ultrasound to obtain detailed images of internal body structures. A small ultrasound device embedded in the tip of the endoscope is inserted via the mouth or rectum. EUS equipment was installed this spring at Washington Hospital, making it the first facility in the East Bay to offer EUS. “Endoscopic ultrasound can be used for ‘staging,’ providing information about the spread of cancer within the colon and adjacent tissues,” Dr. Srivatsa says. “It also can scan other nearby body structures, giving us a much wider view with very detailed images. We can use EUS to evaluate the pancreas, liver, esophagus, stomach, gall bladder, spleen, lungs and the adrenal gland above the kidney in addition to the colon. “If a CT scan shows a lump somewhere, we can use EUS to get a better picture and biopsy the suspicious area at the same time without puncturing through the skin,” he says. “It’s a less invasive method of imaging and performing biopsies that avoids damage to other body structures.”

Getting a Better View Recent improvements in colonoscopy include highdefinition endoscopes that produce clearer, high-resolution images. Washington Hospital now has PENTAX i-SCAN equipment that uses a high-definition video chip and monitors that are like HD TVs. “The i-SCAN provides better polyp detection, especially in the right colon, which is harder to view,” Dr. Srivatsa says. “We are the only facility in Fremont to offer i-Scan colonoscopies. The i-Scan also can be used to examine the esophagus, stomach and small bowel.” The risk of colorectal cancer increases with age, so the CDC and American Cancer Society both recommend colonoscopy screenings at least every 10 years for people over age 50. People with a higher risk for colorectal cancer should be screened earlier and more often. In addition to age and family history, some other risk factors include smoking, lack of exercise, obesity, a diet high in red meat and excess alcohol consumption. “With the latest technology right here in Fremont, patients don’t have to cross the bay for accurate diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer or other gastrointestinal disorders,” Dr. Srivatsa says. “The preparation is still not a pleasant prospect, but that’s one night of discomfort in exchange for peace of mind knowing that your insides are healthy.”


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 1

cle for deaf people. Several companies, Sorenson Communications® chief among them, have concentrated on serving the deaf community through technology that enhances the speed and accuracy of deaf-to-deaf and deaf-tohearing communication. Some communications, critical as 9-1-1 service or mundane as voice mail, present challenges when attempting to transmit information quickly and accurately. How is a message left when the receiving party is unavailable? How much time is wasted when essential information is required to respond to an emergency? Voice Relay Service has been a great help allowing typed messages from a deaf person to be spoken, in turn, to a hearing person. This can be slow and cumbersome and even when computer email systems allow direct communication, there is little to speed up a one-way transfer then waiting to allow another one-way transfer for dialogue. Video relay services have helped to speed up the process, but without rapid communication and local assistance, efficient resolution of emergency situations can be problematic. The Sorenson Communications® group presentation at California School for the Deaf in Fremont on October 6 was met with enthusiastic applause (hand waves) by the audience. Introducing the unique “ntouch® VP Videophone, the newest in a series of communication devices with innovative

features such as a light ring that flashes with a unique pattern to signal and identify favored callers and auto-focused high resolution video transmission. Sorenson also provides inten-

sive training for interpreters to facilitate the enhanced video message system. The ability for deaf customers to send and receive phone calls through signing rather than laborious typing and waiting for a reply is a quantum leap. A unique phone number to send, receive and hold video calls also represents a major change. Videophones take a variety of forms including an appliance for television sets and computers to software for hand-held devices and mobile apps. According to Burdett, these systems are built specifically for the deaf community to accommodate their requirements since other devices typically have been developed with hearing customers in mind. As a consequence, many “advantages” of phones de-

signed for hearing people and are of little or no use to deaf consumers. Swift, in-focus transmission of visual signals is critical to capture quick body movements and facial expressions of American Sign Language. In emergency situations, fast transmission of information may be the difference to assure success. To demonstrate the importance of communication and the critical function of a qualified and honest interpreter, Burdett finished his story: The nephew was hired to collect payoffs from mob “clients.” As weeks went by, collections failed to equal amounts due and the uncle became suspicious. Through an interpreter, he asked his nephew about the discrepancy. At first the nephew denied any wrongdoing, but facing a fatal consequence, he quickly confessed that he had buried the money under a nearby tree. The interpreter translated his confession… “I didn’t take the money; I don’t know where it is!”… And the nephew was dispatched. Guess who got the money! Many thanks to the following for their time and patience: Ron Burdett, Vice President of Community Relations, Sorenson Communications Dustin Bassett, Executive Interpreter, Sorenson Communications Ann Bardsley, Public Relations Director, Sorenson Communications www.sorenson.com

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 14, 2011 Tribune Media Services

Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu.

Real Steel (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:40, 3:45, 7:00, 10:05

Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. -

The Ides of March (R) Fri. Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 4:25, 7:05, 9:50

3:15, 7:00, 10:40

2:05, 4:45, 7:35, 10:10

1:40, 7:20

Behind the Screen (NR)

Sat. 7:30 P.M.

Forgotten Sweeties (NR) The Haunted House (NR) Liberty (NR)

Dream House (PG–13) Fri. -

The Ides of March (R) Fri. -

Footloose (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 10:50, 12:10, 1:35, 2:55, 4:15, 5:50, 7:05, 8:40, 10:05, 11:20 Sun. - Thu. 10:50, 12:10, 1:35, 2:55, 4:15, 5:50, 7:05, 8:40, 10:05

The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. -

Wed. 12:00, 2:35, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15

Thu. 11:35, 2:15, 4:55, 8:00, 10:30

Wed. 11:40, 2:00, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30

The Thing (R)Fri. - Wed. 11:00, Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 7:00, 9:00

Secret of the Rocket (NR)

Fri. & Sat. 1:00, 4:00, 8:00 Sun. 1:00, 4:00 Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

Killer Elite(R)Fri. & Sun. - Thu. The Big Year (PG) Fri. - Thu.

Wed. 11:00 A.M. Thu. 12:00 P.M.

Real Steel (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 1:05, 2:35, 4:05, 5:35, 7:05, 8:35, 10:05 The Big Year (PG) Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45

The Ides of March (R) Fri. Thu. 11:20, 1:50, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45 The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

11:50, 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:10

The Ides of March (R) Fri. -

Wed. 11:05, 12:20, 1:45, 2:50, 4:35, 5:30, 7:05, 8:20, 9:45 Thu. 11:05, 12:20, 1:45, 2:50, 4:35, 7:05, 9:45

To Be an Astronaut (NR) Astronaut (NR) Sat. & Sun. 12:00, 3:00

Thu. 11:30, 1:50, 4:20, 6:55, 9:15

The Thing (R) Fri. - Thu. 10:45, 12:05, 1:25, 2:45, 4:05, 5:20, 6:40, 7:55, 9:10, 10:35 Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 1:55, 7:25 Sat. 7:25 P.M.

50/50 (R) Fri. - Wed. 11:30, 2:15, 4:50, 7:20, 10:00

The Thing (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30

The Metropolitan Opera: Abduction (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Anna Bolena Live (NR) Sat. 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 9:55 A.M. (R) What's Your Number? Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 2:00, 7:40 7:05, 10:30 National Theatre Live: One Sat. 7:40 P.M. Man, Two Guvnors (NR) Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Wed. The Metropolitan Opera: Thu. 7:00 P.M. 11:05, 4:35, 10:05 Anna Bolena Live (NR) Sat. Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. 9:55 A.M. Wed. 1:50, 7:25

Dream House (PG–13) Fri. -

Wed. 11:25, 2:00, 4:45, 7:35, 10:25

50/50 (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:25, Footloose (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.

50/50 (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30,

5:05, 7:40, 10:20

Abduction(PG–13)Fri. & Sun. -

4:55, 7:20, 10:00

Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 4:40, 10:20

Thu. 11:15, 4:40, 10:15 Sat. 4:40, 10:15

Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. -

Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

Footloose (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

10:50 P.M.

Thu. 1:45, 7:30

11:10, 1:50, 4:30, 7:15, 9:55

Courageous(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 2:05, 5:00, 8:00, 10:55

11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00

11:00, 12:20, 1:45, 3:05, 4:30, 5:50, 7:20, 8:35, 10:10 Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10

Killer Elite(R) Fri. - Wed. 11:10, 1:50, 4:40, 7:25, 10:20

Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 12:45, 4:00, 7:05, 10:10

No Other Woman (NR) Fri.

& Sat. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

11:00, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:01 Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Sat. 10:00, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:00

The Big Year (PG) Fri. & Sat.

11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30

Solarmax (NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00

The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. -

What's Your Number? (R)

An Evening With the Munsters (NR) Sat. 7:00 P.M.

Sat. 6:00 P.M.

Fri. 1:00 P.M. Thu. 10:00, 1:00

Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00

Real Steel (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

Tales of the Maya Skies (NR)

Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Fri. 2:00, 6:00

1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20

Sun. - Thu. 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30

12:25, 1:45, 3:10, 4:30, 5:45, 7:30, Rascals (NR)Fri. & Sat. 11:05, 2:00, 8:40, 10:20 Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 5:00, 8:00, 11:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:05, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00

Fri. 11:00, 12:00, 3:00 Sat. & Sun. 11:00, 2:00 Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00

Thu. 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 8:15, 9:40, 11:10 Fri. - Thu. 1:00, 4:25, 7:30, 10:45 Footloose (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Sun. - Thu. 10:55, 11:55, 2:05, 3:10, 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 5:15, 6:25, 8:15, 9:40

Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

Fri. - Wed. 11:15, 1:40, 4:15

Thu. 11:00, 4:30, 10:10 The Big Year (PG) Fri. - Wed. Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 2:25, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 Dookudu (NR) Fri. - Thu. 11:40, The Thing (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 11:45, Thu. 11:45, 2:25, 5:00, 7:30, 10:15 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00

Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 50/50 (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 No Other Woman (NR) Fri. Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. Thu. 12:15, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:25 11:00, 4:30, 10:00 Oosaravelli (NR) Fri. - Thu. 12:25, 3:50, 7:10, 10:30 Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. Thu. 1:45, 7:15 Real Steel (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 10:55, 11:55, 2:05, 3:10, 5:15, 6:25, Dream House (PG–13) Fri. -

11:10, 4:50, 10:30 Sat. 4:50, 10:30

Spy Kids: All the Time in Labios Rojos (R) Fri. & Sat. the World in 4D (3D) (PG) 11:50, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30, 11:55

The Ides of March (R) Fri. & 2 for 1 - Contagion / Killer Sat. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, Elite (NR) Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:20, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30, 10:45, 12:01

4:25, 6:35, 9:30, 11:40 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:20, 4:25, 6:35, 9:30 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15, 9:30 Thu. 11:00, 4:25, 9:30 Thu. 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 8:15 50/50 (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:35, 12:45, 2:00, 3:10, 4:25, 5:35, 6:50, 8:00, 9:15, 11:40 The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 11:35, 12:45, 2:00, 3:10, Sat. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15, 4:25, 5:35, 6:50, 8:00, 9:15 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, Abduction (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 8:00, 10:15 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55 The Thing (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:00, Courageous (PG–13) Fri. & 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, Sat. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45 7:45, 9:00, 10:15, 11:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, Cowboys & Aliens (PG–13) 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:15 Thu. 11:00, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, Fri. - Thu. 10:30 P.M. 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. 2:00, 7:20 What's Your Number? (R) Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45, Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. 12:30 Thu. 11:20, 4:40, 10:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 Dream House (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 The Metropolitan Opera: Anna Bolena Live (NR) Sat. Drive (R)Fri. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:55 A.M. 9:30, 12:01 Sat. 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Ghostbusters (PG)Thu. 7:30 P.M.

Footloose (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

11:00, 12:20, 1:40, 3:00, 4:20, 5:40, National Theatre Live: One 7:00, 8:20, 9:40, 11:00, 12:20 Man, Two Guvnors (NR) 11:20, 12:40, 2:20, 3:50, 5:20, 7:00, Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:20, 1:40, 3:00, Thu. 7:00 P.M. 8:30, 10:10 4:20, 5:40, 7:00, 8:20, 9:40

Real Steel (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Attracted to the light in California, artist Sonia Gill moved to the Bay Area from Wisconsin and in 1976 attended The California College of Arts and Crafts. With a degree in Painting she set up her studio in Oakland, later moving it to Emeryville. After purchasing an old or-

rhythm of the shapes she sees in her photographs. Former environmental planner and yoga teacher, Ruth Koch began to study drawing and painting in the early 1990s at Merritt College in Oakland. Inspired by repetitive patterns in nature and rhythmic interplays of color and shape, she continues to find painting a

Page 9

Wendy Yoshimura was born in an internment camp for Japanese Americans at Manzanar, California, during World War II. Upon release after the war, her family moved to Japan. In 1957, when Wendy was fourteen, her family moved to Fresno. Eventually Wendy's love of art led her to the California College of Arts and

Nestin Pear-Ruth Koch: “Nesting Pear” by Ruth Koch

SUBMITTED BY DIANE LEYS "Rhythm and Light," a show featuring the work of three Bay Area women artists, will open at Olive Hyde Art Gallery with a reception from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, October 14 and run through November 12. The work, selected by Curator Sandra Hemsworth, "evokes a feeling of the quiet simple moments" we experience in nature and show a "mastered control of the brush and the mediums of watercolor, oils and acrylics." Everything about the work recalls her "early springs and summers in California."

illuminates flower petals, fruit, and glass.

“California Poppies” by Wendy Yoshimura

chard in Mendocino County, she began her exploration of the orchard in watercolor, oil, and acrylic. Using digital photographs of her orchard, Sonia recreates the photo emphasizing the lights and darks and

“Let Me Try” by Sonia Gill

deeply satisfying and meditative process. Ruth's work has been shown extensively in Northern California museums and galleries, receiving many awards along the way.

Crafts in Oakland. She feels that at CCAC she confirmed that her love and passion was best expressed in her art. Using watercolor she paints the subtle moments when morning light

Rhythm and Light: The Work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch, and Wendy Yoshimura October 14 - November 12 Thursday - Sunday Noon - 5 p.m. Opening reception Friday, October 14 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 791-4357 www.fremont.gov/Art/OliveHydeArtGallery


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

October 14, 2011

Obituaries

Darryl N. Rawlinson Dolores M. Davies RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 24, 2011 - October 3, 2011

Josephine Guevara RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 27, 1937 - September 3, 2011

Edward H. Jordan RESIDENT OF NEWARK March 24, 1929 - October 4, 2011

Helen M. Carter RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 9, 1931 - October 7, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 21, 1951 - October 9, 2011

Jack R. Knoll RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 28, 1924 - October 7, 2011

Ronald C. Butler RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 4, 1958 - October 10, 2011

Francisco I. Vargas RESIDENT OF MODESTO May 3, 1921 - October 11, 2011

Alfonso A. Garcia RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 23, 1935 - October 7, 2011

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible.

John R. Perez RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 27, 1927-October 8, 2011

Marjorie S. Anderson RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 16, 1916 - October 12, 2011 Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

FD1007

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Math Science Nucleus announces nature classes SUBMITTED BY JOYCE BLUEFORD Oct 15 Sat (11-5 pm) Wetlands in the Fall, Free Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon, 1999 Walnut Ave, Fremont. Children go on a scavenger hunt and earn points to redeem for prices. Make a Tule Doll. Special tours for adults (register for times). Scavenger hunt (no registration re-

quired) Click here for more information:http://msnucleus.org /watersheds/tule/events.html Registration for Lam Junior High Lecture Series, Dr. Bill Quirk, Astrophysicist Oct 22 (Sat). 2-3:30pm 4074 Eggers Drive, Fremont. Tickets required (registration starts Oct 12) Please note if you signed up before and did not attend to the Sept lecture you may not sign up

again)http://msnucleus.org/eve nts/lam/lecture02.html Volcanoes for the Family, Oct 29, Sat. 2-3:30 Start your own igneous rock collection. Registration required.http://msnucleus.org/eve nts/satscience.html Coming: Dec 3, Under the Stars, Annual Fundraiser and Reception http://msnucleus.org/cnhm/ decfund.htm

Stark to Hold Town Meetings

Vote-bymail

SUBMITTED BY SARAH BALDAUF

SUBMITTED BY ALAMEDA COUNTY REGISTRAR OF VOTERS

Rep. Pete Stark (D-CA) will host two Town Hall Meetings Saturday, October 15th, in Fremont and San Leandro. Likely topics will include the Free Trade Agreements with Columbia, Panama and South Korea, and how they may impact jobs and local industry; the ongoing machinations of the Super Committee to reduce the deficit; and the ten-year anniversary of the War in Afghanistan. Constituents are encouraged to come share comments and ask questions of the Congressman. Fremont 9:00 am – 10:30 am Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Wing A San Leandro 11:00 am – 12:30 pm San Leandro Library Lecture Hall 300 Estudillo Ave.

Voters may request a Vote-By-Mail Ballot at any time from now until November 1, 2011 for the November 8, 2011 Consolidated District Election by completing the application on the back of their sample ballot, by sending a written request to the Registrar of Voters or by completing the online Vote-By-Mail application at www.acgov.org/rov. The Vote-By-Mail period for this election is from Monday, October 10 through Tuesday, November 1, 2011. All requests for Vote-By-Mail Ballots must be in writing and include the voter’s signature. Law precludes the Registrar of Voters from issuing a ballot based on a telephone request. Requests may be mailed to: Alameda County Registrar of Voters, 1225 Fallon Street, Room G-1, Oakland, CA 94612. The Registrar of Voters must receive all written requests for Vote-By-Mail Ballots no later than 5:00 p.m. on November 1, 2011. Voted ballots must be returned to the Registrar of Voters or any polling place within the cities of Emeryville, Newark and Livermore no later than the close of polls on Election Day. Postmarks are not accepted. For more information, contact the Registrar of Voters at (510) 272-6973.

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 14, 2011

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Retired men-Enjoy leisure time with friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion on third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Ron Holladay (510) 656 9017 rdholladay@yahoo.com http:www.sirinc.org

Karaoke Club Monthly social karaoke Meet & sing tamil songs, have fun while helping people in need. Open only to Bay area (San Jose - Santa Clara - San Francisco). Register @ www.tamilkaraokeclub.com or email Sing@TamilKaraokeClub.com

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Serious Mental Illness Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 website: wwwsshsa.org

Tamil Radio Show Tamil Radio Show "Kaalai Thendral" on every Saturday 10 AM to 12 PM on KLOK 1170 AM Also Listen Live @ www.arimausa.com

FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Jan, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email joerose07@yahoo.com http://NAMI-f2.blogspot.com www.NAMI.org/f2f

Christmas Craft Boutique Saturday, Dec 3, 2011 from 10 am to 3 pm. Tables available to rent to sell your crafts for $25 For more information call 510-793-6285 Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd, Fremont

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB Demos, Displays, & Treats October 22 - 1-4pm FREE Open to the public Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta, Fremont fremontfosters.com RSVP to Linda 510-794-7002


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Master Sudoku

1

3 5

Sudoku Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

9 8 4 6 2

7 8

Sudoku Solutions on page 15

4 letter words Ahem Flux

7 9

5 8 3

5 letter words Boner Borne Chomp Layer Maple NAACP Odium Quits Stein In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you Zebra

4

2

B 2 4 9 8 3 C C 2 8 0 3 6 E F 1 D 9

4 9 7 6

crack the code.

10

17

11

3

16

10

3

18

25

18

10

10

16

25 23

8 20

5

5

1

17

3

5

7

5

1

24

13

21

3

2

18

10

14

21

5

16

2

20

11

10

8

26

18

5

2

14

16

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9

7

20

5

8

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13

20

5

25

21

3

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7

7

14

14

15

18

1

2

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11

10

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21

17

2

19

25

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

18

16

13

8

24

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2

11 24

3

10

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22

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3

9

10

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12

13

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23

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26

6 6

16

17

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7 letter words Aimless Dragoon Imbibes Seminar 8 letter words Dwellers Jaundice 9 letter words Boyle's law Crescendo Editorial Mass media Overstate Quizzical Sloppy Joe Unskilled Whereupon Xylophone

E

6

3 B 9

B

F

Word Search Flowers

Acacia Agave Aloe Anemone Arnica Arum Aspic Avens Balm

Briar Canna Chaplet Clarkia Coleus Erica Flag Gardenia

P I N K M L D S P L A G A V E

O A T U L I P G A R D E N I A

Geum Gorse Heliotrope Iris Ixia Lantana Lily Lotus

F

3 A 6 4

8 5 9 7

0 E 6 A

D

4 A

6 5

B A 8 6

3 B 2 E D 8 2 0 B D 2 F 1 0 4

6

6 letter words Eczema Florin In-laws Reefer

7 1

I A S Y U L A N P L Y U C C A

N K V P P Y T A A J V M O K X

S L C E I A O R V W V I O L A

E I V H N C A N E R I C A N C

Lupin May Mimosa Musk Nosegay Papaver Peony Pink

3 B C D 0

3 F

5

T A L A A S D I R W H I N O L

T G C E B P F C I R P H E S A

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L M E U S I X I T A N R N A I

Poinsettia Rose Salvia Sepal Silene Thyme Toad-flax Tulip

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T S S I S E P A L O C A N N A

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Viola Whin Wold Yucca Yulan

S H E L I O T R O P E D W T S


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

In Calif, wine grapes good but in short supply TRACIE CONE ASSOCIATED PRESS FRESNO, Calif. (AP), Oct 11 _ Imagine preparing a gourmet meal short of key ingredients and you'll understand California winemaker Jason Haas' dilemma this year. The one-two wallop of a late freeze and early rains have combined in this 2011 vintage year to create a dearth on the Central Coast of thin-skinned white grapes such as Viognier, Marsanne and Grenache blanc, critical ingredients in Haas' Tablas Creek Rhone-style blends. “Our Viognier is down 80 percent,'' said Haas, adding the later-emerging red grapes fared better against the weather. “Usually when we're down, it's down uniformly across the board. It's going to be a challenge to do the blending this year.” Across the state yields are down in 2011 but quality is predicted to be exceptional, thanks to Mother Nature delivering a mild summer season. Without drastic temperature spikes that cause sugar levels to climb too quickly, clusters are spending more time developing flavor nuances on the vine. continued on page 27

October 14, 2011

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 575,000 Median $: 528,000 Lowest $: 140,000 Average $: 447,571 ADDRESS

ZIP

19516 Alana Road 19268 Almond Road 18604 Crane Avenue 4641 Cristy Way 2755 Somerset Avenue 7235 Lamar Loop 22285 West Lyndon Loop

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

440,000 320,000 528,000 560,000 140,000 570,000 575,000

2 2 4 2 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1182 986 2088 1171 1887 2240

1947 1949 1958 1947 2002 2000

08-26-11 08-30-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-29-11 08-31-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 37 Highest $: 1,865,000 Median $: Lowest $: 145,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

4558 Alhambra Drive 94536 424,000 36075 Asquith Place 94536 500,000 3419 Bridgewood Trc #104 94536 145,000 3572 Dalton Common 94536 250,000 1331 Ewe Way 94536 635,000 37804 Freesia Court 94536 950,000 36200 Gibraltar Court 94536 492,000 37987 Lavender Common 94536 410,000 37200 Meadowbrook Cmn #102 94536 227,000 4575 Northdale Drive 94536 690,000 38866 Northern Common 94536 380,000 4564 San Juan Avenue 94536 325,000 39171 Walnut Terrace 94536 260,000 40425 Chapel Way #306 94538 165,000 5612 Chestnut Common 94538 151,000 40362 Condon Street 94538 285,000 5521 Crimson Circle 94538 522,000 3026 Rockett Drive 94538 250,000 49002 Cinnamon Fern Cmn #506 94539 417,000 562 Enos Street 94539 1,005,000 47515 Fortner Street 94539 755,000 43215 Fresco Terrace 94539 695,000 43447 Gallegos Avenue 94539 705,000 41709 Higgins Way 94539 736,000 569 Kell Common 94539 935,000 48936 Lady Fern Common 94539 610,000 306 Mission Tierra Place 94539 1,865,000 1853 Nakoma Court 94539 805,000 44886 Parkmeadow Drive 94539 510,000 1544 Sioux Court 94539 1,375,000 34677 Agree Terrace 94555 279,000 5035 Amberwood Drive 94555 768,000 5096 Amberwood Drive 94555 696,500 33948 Capulet Circle 94555 480,000 33160 Falcon Drive 94555 720,000 2863 Welk Common 94555 530,000 34585 Winslow Terrace 94555 610,000

3 4 1 3 4 5 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 4 3 2 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 5 3 3 6 2 3 4 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1700 2160 936 1168 1901 3162 1645 1717 1061 1974 1178 1136 1104 1052 1006 950 1422 950 1229 2172 1858 1472 1092 1434 1819 1941 4654 2163 1317 3378 934 2080 1950 1241 2293 1591 1611

1957 1965 1986 1971 1995 2001 1965 1978 1984 1955 1995 1954 1984 1983 1971 1955 1994 1954 2009 2005 1960 2006 1961 1960 1989 2008 2004 1978 1962 1978 1987 1989 1989 1986 1979 1987 1988

08-31-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-30-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-31-11

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 45 Highest $: 474,000 Median $: Lowest $: 103,000 Average $: ADDRESS

757 Bluefield Lane 103 Burbank Street 105 Burbank Street 109 Burbank Street 119 Burbank Street

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541

SOLD FOR BDS

239,500 364,000 304,000 325,500 359,500

3 -

522,000 582,635

135 Burbank Street 143 Burbank Street 149 Burbank Street 752 City Walk Place #11 19054 Corfu Place 1648 D Street 433 Hampton Road 21564 Meekland Avenue #24 302 Sunset Boulevard 2457 Creekside Court 24528 Marie Drive 327 Beale Drive 25466 Charles Avenue 28425 East 11th Street 197 Goodrich Street 24359 Groom Street 27722 Havana Avenue 1158 Inglewood Street 1167 Inglewood Street 553 Janice Avenue 27989 Mandarin Avenue 27835 Manon Avenue 690 Mardie Street 657 Overhill Drive 326 Revere Avenue 927 Snowberry Court 26558 Stanwood Avenue 29225 Taylor Avenue 24912 Townsend Avenue 693 Woodchuck Place 3125 Arden Road 26622 Calaroga Avenue 29092 Caravan Lane 29112 Caravan Lane 25938 Kay Avenue #319 2547 Lakeport Drive 27489 Lemon Tree Court 27448 Ponderosa Court 25813 Scripps Street 1280 Stanhope Lane #343

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1146 -

1956 -

08-30-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-30-11

325,000 325,000 320,500 285,000 220,000 210,000 355,000 103,000 168,000 155,000 235,000 198,000 200,000 270,000 322,000 115,000 220,000 206,500 225,000 355,000 350,500 205,000 250,000 329,500 265,000 162,000 298,000 426,000 260,000 411,000 190,000 300,000 395,000 420,000 125,000 474,000 175,000 150,000 345,000 121,000

3 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 7 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 4 2

1651 1418 1376 1146 1250 952 940 936 853 1101 1271 1623 1645 1064 1000 1593 1059 1609 2650 1370 1267 1322 1031 1185 1547 2198 1470 2742 656 1301 1750 1777 1148 1945 1474 1440 1280 1007

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 688,000 Median $: Lowest $: 232,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

2242 Farmcrest Street 1326 Highland Court 141 Parc Place Drive 328 Smithwood Street

95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

688,000 232,000 335,000 478,000

4 3 2 4

ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

37135 Arden Street 94560 360,000 36599 Beutke Drive 94560 203,500 36520 Cedar Boulevard 94560 300,000 8316 Del Monte Avenue 94560 455,000 6292 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #346B94560 158,000 6245 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #B94560 165,000 6276 Lido Court 94560 335,000 35786 Lundy Drive 94560 620,000

4 3 3 2 2 3 3

2010 2001 1978 1954 1930 1989 1947 1991 1949 1950 1950 1992 1952 1950 1954 1953 1953 1955 1954 1930 1908 1947 1951 1972 1953 2000 1956 1969 1947 1956 2009 2009 1989 2007 1971 1970 1959 1989

08-31-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-29-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-30-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-31-11

335,000 433,250

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1939 1155 1104 1370

1989 1971 2005 1959

09-14-11 09-16-11 09-20-11 09-15-11

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 620,000 Median $: Lowest $: 158,000 Average $: ADDRESS

265,000 267,944

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545 94545

300,000 324,563

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1597 1544 1144 1632 905 1132 1666 2123

1960 1959 1962 1976 1982 1981 1979 1978

08-31-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-29-11 08-26-11


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 17 Highest $: 629,000 Median $: Lowest $: 88,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

2098 Benedict Drive 213 Best Avenue 255 Bowling Green Street 134 Garcia Avenue 1137 Lucille Street 1782 Starview Drive 14381 Trinidad Road 1432 View Drive 16006 East 14th Street #212 757 Majestic Way #27 16830 President Drive 872 Serra Drive 1105 Belleau Street 660 Fargo Avenue #1 15156 Farnsworth Street 15215 Farnsworth Street 2331 Riverside Court

SOLD FOR BDS

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579 94579 94579

362,000 255,000 259,000 265,000 275,000 460,000 250,000 629,000 88,500 159,000 310,000 362,000 238,000 165,000 289,000 245,000 529,000

3 2 3 4 3 5 3 3 1 2 3 3 3 3 4 3 4

ADDRESS

ZIP

15936 Mills Avenue 15732 Paseo Del Campo 17050 Via Flores 1608 Via Lobos 57 Via Morella 17351 Via San Ardo 16205 Yale Avenue

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

BUILT

CLOSED

1601 1012 1103 2284 1176 2255 1196 3356 791 918 1415 1981 1134 1180 1310 1114 2778

1959 1924 1941 1921 1946 1964 1963 1955 1987 1987 1955 1954 1958 1965 1950 1950 1999

08-31-11 08-30-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-26-11 08-26-11

302,000 411,429

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

255,000 320,000 302,000 308,000 300,000 295,000 1,100,000

1041 1552 1134 1500 1917 1031 1059

1951 1944 1947 1955 1951 1951 1951

08-26-11 08-31-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-29-11 08-30-11 08-30-11

3 3 3 4 3 3 3

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 880,000 Median $: Lowest $: 112,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

35213 11th Street 32736 Artistry Loop 179 Aurora Plaza 2426 Balmoral Street 4942 Bridgepointe Place 32416 Edith Way 2327 Gem Avenue 1859 Hartnell Street 4111 Lunar Way 4495 Martin Street 32756 Regents Boulevard 31302 San Andreas Drive 32371 Sheffield Lane

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

Driving While 80

265,000 302,382

SQFT

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 07 Highest $: 1,100,000 Median $: Lowest $: 255,000 Average $:

348,000 559,000 165,000 370,000 112,000 405,000 355,000 328,000 212,000 880,000 525,000 530,000 385,000

3 3 3 3 1 3 3 4 3 5 3 4 4

370,000 398,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1431 2104 1100 1492 672 1752 1298 1522 1255 3759 1904 1860 1463

2007 1998 1984 1968 1985 1972 1965 1973 1970 2007 1984 1969 1969

08-26-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-29-11 08-31-11 08-29-11 08-26-11 08-31-11 08-30-11 08-31-11 08-26-11 08-26-11 08-26-11

D E 5 6 A 4 1 2 B 8 F 3 C 7 0 9

3 1 2 4 D E 5 B 7 F 9 A 0 C 6 8

Sudoku Solutions

9 6 7 5 8 1 4 2 3

4 5 8 3 2 7 9 6 1

1 2 3 4 6 9 5 7 8

8 1 6 9 7 3 2 5 4

3 7 2 8 5 4 6 1 9

5 4 9 6 1 2 8 3 7

2 9 1 7 4 5 3 8 6

7 8 4 2 3 6 1 9 5

6 3 5 1 9 8 7 4 2

5 4 8 1 9 7 F 0 E D 2 C 3 6 A B

B 9 A C 4 2 8 3 F 0 7 6 D E 5 1

2 0 3 E C A D 6 1 9 5 B 4 8 F 7

7 F 6 D B 1 E 5 4 3 A 8 9 2 C 0

1 D F 5 E B 6 C A 7 3 2 8 0 9 4

6 3 9 2 F 5 4 A 0 1 8 E 7 B D C

4 B 0 A 7 8 9 1 6 5 C D E F 2 3

E C 7 8 2 0 3 D 9 B 4 F A 5 1 6

8 7 1 3 6 D C F 2 A 0 9 B 4 E 5

F A C 9 0 3 B E 5 4 6 7 1 D 8 2

0 2 4 B 5 9 7 8 C E D 1 6 A 3 F

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A 6 D 0 3 F 2 7 8 C 1 4 5 9 B E

C 8 E 7 1 6 0 9 D 2 B 5 F 3 4 A

9 5 B F 8 C A 4 3 6 E 0 2 1 7 D

BY ANGELA SZETO

Navigating Russian Hill in San Francisco and finding parking is hard enough if you’re a millennial driving a VW Bug, but imagine what it’s like if you’re 80 and trying to parallel park uphill! Everyone ages differently so there’s not an arbitrary cutoff point for when a person should stop driving. However, studies show that the rate of fatal accidents increases for drivers above the age of 70. So, how do we talk to our parents about their driving? It’s definitely more difficult than trying to borrow the car keys when we were 16 years old. We all equate the act of driving to being free and independent. In talking with our parents about driving, we need to be respectful and understand that this is a transition for all parties involved. First and foremost is to approach your parents before driving becomes a concern. Talk with them about how aging affects driving and the steps that they should take to maintain safe driving practices. Have a checklist available that encourages open discussions about: 1) Yearly vision tests 2) Annual hearing tests 3) Effects of medication 4) Changes in their range of motion and strength during driving 5) Memory concerns

6) Driving the right car 7) Buying the right products for your car, i.e., bigger rearview mirror (check out (www.disabilityproducts.com) 8) Alternatives to driving, i.e., offer rides, pay for public/private transportation. It also helps for our parents to hear input from different impartial parties (including siblings, friends, doctors, etc.) regarding best driving practices. Talking with parents about the cost saving techniques on not owning a car (insurance/tax/parking rates) is another option. If you need to discourage your parents from driving, borrow their car when yours is in the shop. During that time, encourage them to use alternative transportation (Muni, BART, or private drivers) and discuss their experience with them. Should your parents still insist on driving, you can actually request your local DMV to help by administering a driving test for them due to a report that they were driving erratically on the street. Be prepared with constructive solutions to their objections. Remember that this represents a loss of independence for them and like any other transition they will need time to adjust. By Angela Szeto, geriatric care specialist with Home Care Assistance in San Francisco. Angela can be reached at aszeto@homecareassistance.com.


Page 16

BY FRANK TOBE This holiday season, people are looking to get their money's worth from gift giving. Gifts need to be phenomenal, practical or inexpensive. In the phenomenal category, what's more exciting than getting a robot as a holiday gift? For Grandparents and teenagers: Parrot AR.Drone QuadriCopter - $299

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Two cameras, front-facing and bottom-facing, stream live video to the screen of your tablet or smartphone for capture. Augmented Reality (AR) apps enable dog fights and video games. $299 at Amazon plus the cost of the apps. For Mom: iRobot's Scooba bathroom floor cleaning robot - $299 A floor-washing robot for bathrooms, kitchens and other non-carpeted floors. Removes up to 98% of common household bacteria from hardwood, tile and linoleum floors. Cleans bathroom floors better than competing robotic products. $299 from Amazon plus $13 for cleaning fluid. For Dad: Adaptive cruise control robot option for new cars - $599 $2,495 With embedded robotic systems, cars keep getting smarter and safer all the time. Adaptive cruise control is a “smart” system that actively maintains a

preset distance between vehicles rather than a preset speed. A laser or radar range finder sensor in the front of the vehicle measures the distance to the vehicle ahead and automatically maintains a safe distance as traffic speeds up and slows down. Available in higher-end versions from most car companies at

prices ranging from $495 to $2,500. Lane awareness, night vision pedestrian detection, and car-to-car danger warning systems are in the wings.

For science-interested kids 10 and older: LEGO Mindstorms NXT kit - $273 Buildable, programmable robot kit with sensors, servo motors and a microprocessor. LEGO kit includes 612 pieces, 4 sensors, 3 servo motors, and 32-bit microprocessor with Bluetooth and USB links to PC and Mac software with drag and drop programming. Instructions for four different robot configurations. $273 from Amazon. For girls younger than 10: Penbo the affectionate waddling penguin - $45 Specially designed for preteen girls, Penbo is affection to her owner and her baby. She re-

sponds to touch and sound and has a pouch. Can operate autonomously or with remote control. $45 at Amazon. - ORFijit the squishy dancing friend - $42 Similar to MyKeepon but less altruistic, Fijit from Mattel is an interactive, pokable plaything for young girls. $49 plus the cost of the app available at Amazon. For the philanthropic: MyKeepon - $49 (part of the proceeds go to support autism research). Originally developed to study nonverbal interaction and social development with autistic children, its $30,000 price tag kept it away from most. Now reconfigured to be a toy, a portion of the revenue will be used to enable researchers and practitioners to use the $30,000 Keepon version of the robot in autism therapy. Available exclusively from Toys R Us in the U.S. for $49. - OR Donate a $280,000 PR2 to your alma mater's robotics lab. Life-sized robot able to navigate in human environments and grasp and manipulate objects. Open-source library of functions includes folding laundry, fetching beer, playing pool, etc. Ideal gift from alumni to robotics lab at alma mater. $280,000 for two-armed personal robot; $200,000 for single-armed PR2. Both with integrated Kinect device. For everyone: Sphero: A sphere with inside lights that can be controlled with smartphone apps. Coming to mar-

October 14, 2011

ket in time for the holiday season, Sphero is a robotic ball controlled by your smartphone (iOS and Android). $129 plus the cost of the app from Sphero. For readers of all ages: Selected books about robots and robotics - $10-$221 Best sellers, thought provoking, scary, insightful, detailed this hand-picked selection of books about robots will provide hours of interesting reading and valuable additions to robot fans libraries. Available from Amazon - $10 to $221

Frank Tobe spent over 25 years as consultant to the DNC and major presidential, senatorial, congressional, mayoral campaigns and initiatives all across the U.S., Canada and internationally. In early 2008, in a personal effort to learn about the robotics industry and the future of robotics, and with an eye toward selectively investing in publicly-traded and privately owned robotics businesses, he began an intensive research project that took him to Japan, Korea, Germany, throughout the US and the Internet. The Robot Report is designed to track the business of robotics and provide in-depth opinion and insights. For more information, visit: www.therobotreport.com and www.everything-robotic.com.


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Family Giving Tree Needs Warehouse Space SUBMITTED BY BARBARA LEWIS

F

amily Giving Tree (http://www.familygivingtree.org) is in urgent need of warehouse space from November 21, 2011-January 7, 2012 in which to process donations of gifts to this year’s 22nd annual Holiday Wish Drive. The drive will serve approximately 60,000 Bay Area children this holiday season. “With the Holiday Wish Drive gearing up and gift delivery from host organizations beginning in early December, the need to acquire warehouse space now is very urgent,” says Family Giving Tree Chief Operations Officer David Bratton-Kearns. “We need a minimum of 100,000 square feet with a lot of open floor space. For a complete listing of our needs, see our Warehouse Wish List on our website.” According to Bratton-Kearns, any location within Silicon Valley is suitable. “In past years, we have relied on the generosity of companies like Cisco Systems, NVIDIA, Wells Fargo, Juniper Networks and iStar Financial that have provided temporary warehouse space for us during our Holiday Wish and Back to School drives. We urge any company with sufficient empty space to contact us as soon as possible. They may contact me, David Bratton-Kearns, at davidbk@familygivingtree.org or 408-946-3111, extension 200, or Program Manager Al Galan at al@familygivingtree.org or 408946-3111, extension 228.” During the Holiday Wish Drive, low income children who have registered with recipient social services agencies and schools are identified and interviewed to name their specific gift wishes. The Holiday Wish Drive requests are printed on cards and distributed by the Family Giving Tree to host companies, schools, churches and community organizations throughout the Bay Area. Businesses place Giving Trees in areas where their employees and/or customers may donate gifts. Participants choose a card from the tree, purchase the requested gift and return it with the wish card. Approximately 6,000 volunteers at the Family Giving Tree’s warehouse collect, sort, wrap and distribute the gifts to the recipient agencies for presentation to the individual children. SUBMITTED BY GLENDA ACOSTA The Eden Fraternal Order of Eagles #1139 of Hayward, Calif., will celebrate Danish heritage for a great cause Saturday, Oct. 15, as they hold an aebleskiver breakfast to benefit various charities supported by the club. The breakfast is from 8:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m. at the Eden Aerie, located at 21406 Foothill Blvd., in Hayward. This event is open to the public with breakfast available for $7. Each breakfast comes with Danish aebleskivers (similar to a pancake puff ), scrambled eggs, ham and fresh fruit. A raffle will be held with proceeds also benefitting the club’s various charities. The Eden Eagles has maintained a presence in the Hayward community since 1905 and currently hosts 61 Aerie and 56 Auxiliary members. For information contact Glenda Acosta at 510-584-1568

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD October 7 A victim was home sleeping when she was awakened when her bedroom door opened. She looked toward the door and saw the suspect standing in the doorway, who then ran out of the residence. A neighbor saw three juveniles running from the area toward Fremont Boulevard. An area check failed to locate the subjects. The suspects were described as a black male juvenile, a white male juvenile and the third a male of unknown race. Entry was made through a first floor window. Detective Zemlock continued surveillance on a suspect wanted for ramming into Detective T. MacDonald’s vehicle. Det. Zemlock tracked the suspect to a home on Dairy Avenue in Newark. Detectives Martinez and Snelson arrived to assist along with NPD units and two FPD units. The suspect was observed getting into a vehicle which left the residence and NPD marked units initiated a car stop; the suspect was taken into custody without incident. Brier Elementary snack shack was burglarized. A residential burglary was interrupted. Grandpa dropped off his 9 year-old and 6 year-old grandkids at their house on Capa Drive after school. When the 6 year-old opened the door, he surprised a burglar inside the house. The suspect ran out and was not located. Residential burglary attempted at 34700 Siward Drive. The victim came home late on October 6

October 14, 2011

to find the front door open and some windows pried. No loss. Residential Burglary was committed at the 4900 block of Roselle Common. Loss was four firearms. A residential burglary was committed at 36900 block of Reynolds Drive. Loss was a ‘97 Nissan Sentra which was located parked in a driveway in Union City. The vehicle was recovered. Attempted residential burglary at the 5440 block of Sunstar Common. The alarm activated and owner was notified by the alarm company. Owner returned home an hour and a half later and found window was pulled out of frame. No loss. Residential Burglary at 4000 Lorenzo Terrace via window entry - Loss to be determined. October 8 CHP tried to make a stop on a vehicle in the area of Lakeview and West Warren. The female driver failed to yield and began to accelerate away but lost control and rolled her vehicle. The driver was taken to the hospital and CHP’s major accident team was called out. They believe the driver was likely under the influence. FPD units provided traffic control for CHP. October 11 The victim called to report that he posted a car for sale on Craigslist. One potential buyer made an appointment, but was beaten to the punch by an earlier buyer. When she found out she was too late to buy the car, she displayed a gun to the seller and the actual buyer. The victims were able to provide a license plate. The registered owner of the vehicle has

two guns registered to her. Officer Shadle is conducting follow up. During the above call, another brandishing call came in. In this case, the victim said that another male in the complex pointed a machine gun at his house. What he didn’t tell dispatchers is that this occurred hours earlier, and the victim knew it was an airsoft rifle. The victim, an employee at a Fremont funeral home, was robbed as she locked-up for the night. A male suspect shoved her against the wall and demanded money. Officer Stone is investigating. Officers Harvey and Hollifield were dispatched to Sora Terrace and initiated CPR until FFD arrived and took over. A 76 year old male was transported. FFD thanked Hollifield and Harvey for their quick response and credited them with saving the man's life. Great job Bryan and Josh. A residential burglary occurred at the 35800 Block of Cabral. Loss was laptop and camera equipment. CSO Anders investigated a commercial burglary that occurred at the Smoke Shop (40796 Fremont Boulevard). The unknown suspect(s) entered the business via the roof. Once inside, the suspect(s) stole cash from the register and cigarettes. Officers responded to a bank robbery that occurred at US Bank. The suspect, described as a 45year-old male, black beard, short dark hair, wearing a white shirt and black pants, entered the bank and handed the teller a demand note. The suspect was last seen running toward Raley’s. Investigated by Officer Bocage.

Temporary Road Closures Automall Parkway at Osgood Rd will be closed on the following schedule due to construction. Please avoid if possible. Friday night, October 14 thru Saturday morning, October 15 10 p.m. – 7 a.m. Saturday night, October 15 thru Sunday morning, October 16 10 p.m. – 7 a.m. Monday night, October 17 thru Tuesday morning, October 18 10 p.m. – 4 a.m.

Suspects arrested in stolen vehicle SUBMITTED BY SGT ABBIE SERRANO, MILPITAS PD On October 9, 2011, at about 11:17 p.m., Milpitas Police Officers responded to the 1200 block of Escuela Parkway for the report of a reckless driver. Arriving within two minutes, officers located and stopped the vehicle near Escuela Parkway. During the investigation, it was discovered the vehicle was involved in a hit-and-run collision, where the driver drove over a median, damaging the landscaping. As officers continued their investigation, they learned the 1999 GMC was stolen from a home in Orangevale, California. All three occupants of the vehicle were taken into custody. Based on the investigation, Ronald Warner was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail and both of the 15 year-old juveniles were booked into Juvenile Hall. The charges ranged from possession of a stolen vehicle, conspiracy, hit-and-run, and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Anyone witnessing this incident or that has information regarding this incident or other criminal activity occurring in this jurisdiction is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime tip.asp


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. ROBERT DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD October 12 Officers responded to the Hilton Hotel at 10:29 a.m. on reports of a robbery. The suspects, three Hispanic Male Adults, tried to rob jewelry salesman of his product. The victim (40 years old from Southern California) fought with the suspects and was stabbed during the robbery. The suspects fled southbound on Balentine Drive in what was described as a black, newer Toyota Camry without any of the victim’s property. The suspects were all described as being in their twenties with short cropped hair and wearing dark clothing with dark bandanas over their faces. Two of the suspects were described as approximately 5’6” to 5’7” and 130-140 lbs. The third suspect was described as approximately 5’8” to 5’9” and 185 lbs. The victim was transported to a local hospital for his non-life-threatening injuries and is expected to fully recover. It appears the suspects were lying in wait for this specific victim. At 11:44 a.m., Officers responded to 6100 block of Joaquin Murieta Avenue for a report of a residential burglary that had been interrupted by the homeowner. The victim reported that while he was sleeping in his bedroom, he was suddenly awoken by somebody across the hallway in another room. When the victim opened his bedroom door, he saw a male juvenile and female juvenile standing by the bedroom sliding door. The juveniles ran out the back slider and jumped down to the ground floor level, running through the complex. The victim recognized the juveniles as associates of a nearby condominium. Officers made contact at that residence and subsequently arrested a 16-year-old female along with a 17-year-old male for burglary. No property appeared to have been taken from the residence.

Throughout the month of October, Fremont Firefighters will be supporting "Susan G. Komen for the Cure" by replacing their blue work t-shirts and wearing a special-made pink uniform tshirt to be worn as their “duty shirt” on their middle work shift. Wearing pink supports the cause and raises awareness in the fight against breast cancer. Additionally, Fire Administration employees will also show their support for the cause by wearing pink each Wednesday in October. Last year at the IAFF 50th Convention, delegates from the United States and Canada collectively supported and encouraged all IAFF members to participate in campaigns honoring women fighting cancer. "Going Pink" during the month of October has the endorsement Fremont Fire Chief Bruce Martin and Local 1689.

Armed Robbery SUBMITTED BY SGT RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD On October 10, 2011, at approximately 9:22 p.m., a black male adult entered La Noria Liquor store, located at 108 Dixon Road and robbed the night clerk at gunpoint. The suspect fled the store with an undisclosed amount of cash and was last seen running northbound in the parking lot, towards Dixon Road. The suspect is described as being about 30 years of age, 5’11” in height, 200 pounds, and last seen wearing a black hooded sweatshirt; which was covering his face. Anyone witnessing this robbery or has information regarding this robbery or other criminal activity occurring in this jurisdiction is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime tip.asp

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 14, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES

CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following: Municipal Code Amendment The City of Union City is proposing to amend Chapter 12.16 of the Municipal Code by applying Integrated Pest Management & Best Management Policies, the City Council of the City of Union City does hereby find the following Ordinance to be necessary and desirable to achieve the purposes of Title 12, Public Improvements, of the Municipal Code of the City of Union City , and to promote the public health, safety, morals, comfort, convenience, and general welfare of the residents of the City of Union City. For further information regarding the above, contact Nelson Kirk, Public Works Supervisor, at (510) 675-5422. Written comments will need to be received by the Public Works Department or City Clerk prior to Tuesday, October 25, 2011. CITY COUNCIL MEETING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011 Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City. City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278. MINTZE CHENG Public Works Director

BULK SALES

CNS#2188078 Date: Oct. 07, 2011 RICHARD O. KELLER Judge of the Superior Court 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189928#

NOTICE OF INTENDED TRANSFER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sierra Solar Power Inc., a Delaware corporation whose address is 45655 Northport Loop East, Fremont, California 94538, intends to transfer to Solexe), Inc., a Delaware corporation whose address is 1530 McCarthy Boulevard, Milpitas, California, 95035, the following property: epitaxial silicon deposition (Epi) equipment, including spare parts, consumables, and components. This property is located at 45655 Northport Loop East, Fremont, California 94538. The transfer will be made on or after October 28, 2011. Dated: October 10, 2011. Solexel, Inc. By S/ Mehrdad Moslehi, CEO 10/14/11 CNS-2189654#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11598965 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Parminder Singh for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Parminder Singh filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Parminder Singh to Parminder Singh Banga The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/09/2011, Time: 8:45 am, Dept.: 514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11599077 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Tiffany Johnson in behalf of River Doucette for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Tiffany Johnson in behalf of River Doucette filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: River William Doucette to River William Johnson The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: November 18, 2011, Time: 8:45 a.m., Dept.: 514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: October 11, 2011 C. Don Clay Judge of the Superior Court 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189790#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456727 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: A Virtual Management, 34888 Travertine Way, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Midji Rovetta, 34888 Travertine Way, Union City,

CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Midji Rovetta This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 30, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189920# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457110 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: JK Doc Prep Services, 24000 Watkins St., Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Jagrup Singh Judge, 28770 Fox Hollow Dr., Hayward, CA 94542 Kulmir Kaur Judge, 28770 Fox Hollow Dr., Hayward, CA 94542 This business is conducted by Husband and Wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jagrup Singh Judge This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 11, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189808# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456697-456698 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Universal Shippers, (2) Unireld, 40896 Chittern Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Universal Relocations LLC, CA, 40896 Chittern Dr., Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by limited liability company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 09/29/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Adarsh Dattari, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 29, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before

the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189804# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456355 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Data Scale, 42430 Blacow Rd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Terry B Lowe, 2370 Raven Rd., Pleasanton, CA 94566 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/1995 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Terry B Lowe This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189801# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456646 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Tesla Group, 39899 Balentine Dr., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda, P.O. Box 853, San Lorenzo, CA 94580 Tesla Group, California, 39899 Balentine Dr., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Deborah Morrison, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 28, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2189512# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 457040 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Rubi Service & Cleaning, 33300 Mission Blvd. #12, Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Jose Luis Alarcon Saavedra, 33300 Mission Blvd. #12, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is

true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jose Luis Alarcon Saavedra This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 7, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2188512# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456905 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ABHA Enterprises, 41277 Roberts Ave. Apt #18, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Shekhar Srivastava, 41277 Roberts Ave. Apt #18, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shekhar Srivastava This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on October 5, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4/11 CNS-2188038# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456085 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: A Bright Idea, 30073 Ahern Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Corina Rodriques, 6237 Robertson Ave., Newark, CA 94560 Mark Spahn, 30073 Ahern Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by a Joint Venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/1/2003 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Corina Rodriques, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 13, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/11 CNS-2185924#


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PUBLIC NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456494 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kumon Math & Reading Center of Union City - East, 34716 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda 34383 Epling Terrace, Fremont, Alameda, CA 94555 Incredible Learners, Inc., CA., 34383 Epling Terrace, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jayanthi Subramanian, Director / President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 26, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/11 CNS-2185119# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455917 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DR LOCK MOBILE SERVICE, 8096 JUNIPER AVE., NEWARK, CA 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: PO BOX 716, NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA BHRACHIAH CHEZKIYAN, 8096 JUNIPER AVE., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BHRACHIAH CHEZKIYAN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b),

where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182312# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455870 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ARUNTEK, 37353 INGRAHAM STREET, NEWARK, CA 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: ARUNTEK, PO BOX 1287, NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA AMANDEEP CHAYRA, 37353 INGRAHAM ST., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-6-11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ AMANDEEP CHAYRA, OWNER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182309# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456388 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BAY AREA INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CENTER, 1372 OCASO CAMINO, FREMONT, CA 94539, County of ALAMEDA YAJUAN CHEN, 1372 OCASO CAMINO, FREMONT, CA 94539 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business

under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ YAJUAN CHEN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182299# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456266 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SUNNYSIDE HOME, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538, County of ALAMEDA BONIFACIO TORRES COSTINIANO, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538 LEI DONG COSTINIANO, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538 This business is conducted by HUSBAND AND WIFE The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BONIFACIO COSTINIANO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182268#

Donkey, dogs among candidates for NM town 'mayor' AP WIRE SERVICE CORRALES, N.M. (AP), Sep 22 - Apparently, there's a lot of barking, pecking and galloping in one New Mexico town's election. That's because dogs, horses, a chicken, a donkey, and a pair of alpacas are among the candidates aiming to become “pet mayor” of Corrales. The eight beastly candidates have been campaigning since mid-August and their owners -- or campaign managers -- have been urging residents to cast $1 ballots online and at participating local businesses. The election is part of the annual Corrales Harvest Festival scheduled for this weekend and proceeds go to Kiwanis Foundation of Corrales. Sherman, a horse, was giving out horseshoes for votes. Asked if his campaign was buying votes, his campaign manager said they were from Chicago. Corrales Mayor Philip Gasteyer is scheduled to announce the winner on Sunday.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456057 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kids Little Scissors, 36476 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Subhash Grover, 321 Orchard Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-15-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Subhash Grover This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2180441# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456379 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Crown Maintenance Co., 34188 Siward Dr., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Sumi Choi, 34188 Siward Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sumi Choi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 21, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before

the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2180230#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be accepted in the office of the Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services, 2000 Embarcadero Cove, Suite 400, Oakland, CA INFORMATIONAL MEETING/ BIDDERS’ CONFERENCE – S. COUNTY RFP #BHCS 12-03, Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Primary Prevention Services, Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 9:00 AM, 39155 Liberty Street, Suite H800 Pacific Room in Building EFGH, Fremont, CA INFORMATIONAL MEETING/ BIDDERS’ CONFERENCE – N. COUNTY RFP #BHCS 12-03, Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Primary Prevention Services, Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 3:00 PM, Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services, 2000 Embarcadero Cove, 5th Floor Alameda Room, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on December 2, 2011 County Contact: Gilda Mansour (510) 567-8189 or via email: gmansour@acbhcs.org Attendance at the conference meetings is not required. The RFP is available via the GSA website— www.acgov.org under Current Contracting Opportunities 10/14/11 CNS-2189472# Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 MANDATORY NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE AND SITE WALKTHROUGH RFP #900812 - 700/800 MHz Public Safety Radio Coverage, Monday, October 31, 2011, 2:00 P.M. – Eden Area Multi-Service Center, 24100 Amador Street, California Poppy Suite 225-226, Hayward, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on December 6, 2011 County Contact : Jeff Thomas (510) 208-9613 or via email: jeff.thomas@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/14/11 CNS-2188162#

Chicago named most 'mustache-friendly' AP WIRE SERVICE ST. LOUIS (AP), Sep 28 - Chicago may be known as the Second City, but when it comes to mustaches, the Windy City is No. 1. The St. Louis-based American Mustache Institute on Wednesday proclaimed Chicago the most ``mustache-friendly'' city in America. For the honor, Chicago will host the institute's annual `Stache Bash charitable benefit on Oct. 28. The tongue-in-cheek institute interviewed 200 “mustached Americans” in 100 cities to determine the most mustache-friendly locale. The institute's chairman, Aaron Perlut, says the heritage of retired Chicago Bears players who continue to wear mustaches helped set Chicago apart. Houston was second to Chicago, followed by Pittsburgh, Oklahoma City, Okla., and Detroit. The ‘Stache Bash event will be at Joe's Bar in Chicago and will help raise awareness and funds for cancers affecting men.


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Regulations not a huge jobs killer BY CALVIN WOODWARD AND CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Oct 11 - Is regulation strangling the American entrepreneur? Several Republican presidential candidates say so. The numbers don't. The anti-regulatory fervor was in evidence Tuesday night in the latest GOP debate, but rhetorical flourishes, on that and other issues, masked far more complex realities. A look at some of the claims and how they compare with the facts. MITT ROMNEY: “All of the Obama regulations, we say no. It costs jobs.” RICK PERRY: Regulations “are strangling the American entrepreneurship out there.” RICK SANTORUM: “Repeal every regulation the Obama administration put in place.” THE FACTS: Labor Department data show that only a

tiny percentage of companies that experience large layoffs cite government regulation as the reason. Since Barack Obama took office, just two-tenths of 1 percent of layoffs have been due to government regulation, the data show. Businesses frequently complain about regulation, but there is little evidence that it is any worse now than in the past or that it is costing significant numbers of jobs. Most economists believe there is a simpler explanation: Companies aren't hiring because there isn't enough consumer demand. The conservative National Federation of Independent Business asks its small-business membership each month to name the single most important problem they're facing. Last month, the most common response was “poor sales,” cited by 28 percent. Government regulation came in second, at 18 percent. Concerns over regulation

have increased in the past two years - only 11 percent cited it in April 2009, not long after Obama entered the White House. But the rise hasn't been outside historical norms. More small businesses complained about regulation during the administrations of President Bill Clinton and the President George H.W. Bush, according to an analysis of the federation's data by the liberal Economic Policy Institute. High levels of economic uncertainty are another drag on business, but economists say that's less due to regulation than to fights over government spending and taxes. Both consumer and business confidence fell in August, for example, as the White House and Congress wrangled over the nation's borrowing limit. But that was a bipartisan dispute that can't be solely pinned on Obama.--REP. MICHELE BACHMANN: “We have a big prob-

lem today when it comes to Medicare, because we know that nine years from now, the Medicare hospital Part B Trust Fund is going to be dead flat broke.” She also charged that “President Obama plans for Medicare to collapse, and instead everyone will be pushed into Obamacare.” THE FACTS: Bachmann is mixing up Medicare while exaggerating the danger of insolvency. Part B is not for hospital payments, but for outpatient care, and it's technically impossible for that part of Medicare to go broke because it is financed by the federal government's general fund and by beneficiary premiums. Medicare's Part A is the hospital trust fund, and it is now projected to become insolvent in 2024, 13 years in the future. Even then it would be able to pay 90 percent of its obligations, a far cry from “dead flat broke.” When the fund has been threatened in the past, Con-

gress has come through with changes that restrained program growth, largely by cutting provider payments. There is no evidence to support her charge that Obama plans for Medicare to collapse; his health care law envisions nothing like that. In fact, a Republican budget that Bachmann voted for would make far larger changes to the program for the next generation, converting it to a voucher-like system.--HERMAN CAIN: Repeatedly touted his 9-9-9 tax plan as a “bold” overhaul of the tax code that would get the economy back on track, and be embraced by the nation. THE FACTS: Cain's plan is bold, and some economists think it includes features that would help the economy. But it is unlikely that the millions of low- and middle-income families who would face significant continued on page 23


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tax increases will embrace it. The wealthy, however, would probably love it because they would get big tax cuts. Cain would eliminate the payroll taxes that fund Social Security and Medicare, and replace the progressive federal income tax with a flat 9 percent tax on income. He would lower the corporate income tax from 35 percent to 9 percent, and impose a new 9 percent national sales tax. Cain argued Tuesday night that low-income workers would pay less because he would eliminate payroll taxes, which total 15.3 percent of wages, when employer and employee shares are included. But his analysis omits the fact that most low-income households make a profit from the federal income tax because they qualify for so many credits, deductions and exemptions. The result is that most low-income families currently pay less than 9 percent of their income in federal taxes. Nearly half of all U.S. households - mostly low-and middle-income families - pay no federal income taxes at all, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation, the official scorekeeper for Congress. Additionally, all households would face a new 9 percent national sales tax, again disproportionately impacting those with lower incomes who spend all or most of their money. High-income households would get a tax cut from the lower income tax rate. Also, Cain's proposal would eliminate taxes on capital gains. --ROMNEY: “On Day One, I will issue an executive order identifying China as a currency manipulator...If you're not willing to stand up to China, you'll get run over by China. And that's what's happened for 20 years.”

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

JON HUNTSMAN: “I don't subscribe to the Don Trump school or the Mitt Romney school of international trade. I don't want to find ourselves in a trade war.... We have to get used to the fact that, as far as the eye can see into the 21st Century, it's going to be the United States and China on the world stage.” THE FACTS. Economists largely agree with Huntsman, who was U.S. ambassador to China earlier in the Obama administration, that confronting China head on over currency manipulation would bring retaliation against U.S. business. The policy debate among Republicans - Democrats, too - is whether that risk is worth it. Few dispute that China manipulates its currency by pegging it to the dollar. However, opponents of confronting China worry about a trade war that the fragile global economy cannot afford. China may have more to lose than the U.S. if trade in goods were curtailed. But Washington depends heavily on China to buy U.S. Treasury securities to help finance its budget deficits. --PERRY: Pointed to “the 54,600 jobs that have been created” by two state funds used for attracting businesses to Texas or helping new companies get started. THE FACTS: The funds have not delivered that many jobs yet. Lucy Nashed, a Perry spokeswoman, said figures for 2011 are not available, but as of the end of 2010, the funds had only created 30,749 actual new positions in the state. To be sure, the 89 firms that have received $439.5 million in state money have several years to create the jobs. But one study found nearly half the companies that got money had not met their goals. In many cases, the governor's staff allowed the companies

to renegotiate their contracts or pay back a percentage of the funds they received. --BACHMANN: “I think if you look at the problem with the economic meltdown, you can trace it right to the federal government, because it was the federal government that demanded that banks and mortgage companies lower platinum-level lending standards to new lows. It was the federal government that pushed the subprime loans.'' THE FACTS: It might be argued that the government pursued policies under both Democratic and Republican presidents to promote home ownership, such as setting up mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to make more affordable mortgages possible, and the tax deduction for home mortgages. But it's a stretch to suggest that federal regulators forced banks to make mortgage loans to people who could not afford them. And neither Bachmann nor most other Republican presidential contenders are calling for a repeal of the home-mortgage deduction. Many of the subprime loans that inflated the housing bubble were not made by banks, but by mortgage companies that weren't regulated by the federal government. A big reason they made the loans was because they could profit by selling them to Wall Street investment banks, which made money by packaging them into securities and selling them. --Associated Press writers Tom Raum, Stephen Ohlemacher and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar in Washington; Brian Bakst in St. Paul, Minn.; and Chris Tomlinson in Austin, Texas, contributed to this report.

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Fremont Christian volleyball report SUBMITTED BY BILL KRUPPA Tuesday evening Fremont Christian School visited Oakland Military Institute with the Varsity Volleyball winning in three games. FCS 25 25 25 OMI 15 11 13 Players of the game for FCS: Erikah Pereira with 6 aces and 2 kills Megan Takata with a perfect serving night with 5 aces Wednesday evening FCS faced SF Waldorf at home, losing in three games FCS 24 9 17 SFW 26 25 25

Logan volleyball continues winning ways SUBMITTED BY COACH STEVE BURMASTER

James Logan High School Girls' Volleyball defeated Kennedy 25-11, 25-18, 25-15 at home to complete the 1st round of the MVAL round robin format. JLHS is now 6-0 in the MVAL Go Colts!

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

UC San Diego edges Cal State East Bay in thriller SUBMITTED BY KELLY HAYES The Cal State East Bay volleyball team took the first two sets from No. 16 UC San Diego before the Tritons pulled off an astounding comeback to claim a 3-2 (21-25, 20-25, 25-12, 25-21, 15-13) victory in five sets on October 8 at Pioneer Gym. Though the Pioneers (10-6, 5-6 CCAA) outhit UCSD and had three players post double-digit kills, the Tritons (11-4, 7-4) won the final three sets to avoid extending their losing streak to four matches and finish the first half of the conference season with a win. In a match where neither team hit at a high percentage, the Pioneers finished with 57 kills – their third-highest total this season – to out-do the Tritons, whose kills per set average entering the week ranked 12th in all of Division II. Sophomore Katie Allen and juniors Nicole Boyle and Kitona Offord led the way, combining for 43 of East Bay’s 57 putaways. The trio provided a balanced attack for the Pioneers, who got 46 assists from junior Kristin Neary, her second highest total of the season. Allen laid down 16 kills and notched 10 digs, while Boyle had 14 kills and 17 digs leading to a pair of double-doubles, their fifth and sixth of the season, respectively. Offord was again efficient on the attack, leading all players by hitting at a .312 clip with 13 kills and posting a match-high five total blocks. In the back row, Leslie Ray posted a team-high 25 kills and got help from Boyle and Allen, as well as Tatum Bales, who came off the bench to provide some stellar defense with

17 digs, a new season-high for the sophomore. Neary also posted a double-double, adding 13 digs to her 46 assists and two total blocks. UC San Diego managed just one more block than the Pioneers, who got help in the middle from Morgan Hirzel with three blocks and six kills and Samantha Bruno, who tallied five kills and one block assist. UCSD’s Hillary Williamson and Lauren Demos paced the team with 14 and 12 kills, respectively. Williamson completed the doubledouble with 26 digs to lead the team, while three other players – Brittany Lombardi, Roxanne Brunsting and Janessa Werhane – posted double-figure digs to allow the Tritons to live up to their top ranking in the conference in digs per set. Brunsting and Amber Hawthorne shared the setting duties, dishing out 26 and 21 assists, respectively. Both Brunsting and Williamson posted solo blocks to help the Tritons finish with an 8-7 advantage at the net. UC San Diego also took advantage of a poor serving night from the Pioneers, who had 13 service errors, while dropping in eight aces of its own, led by Williamson’s four. Cal State East Bay will look to start off the second half of the CCAA campaign on a high note, as it takes to the road next weekend to meet Cal State Dominguez Hills and Cal State LA for the rematches of the league opening set. The Pioneers and Toros are set for a 6 p.m. first serve in Carson on Oct. 14, while the Golden Eagles will look to complete the season sweep at 7 p.m. on Oct. 15 in Los Angeles.

October 14, 2011

Moreau Catholic continues to roll past opposition SUBMITTED BY COACH ROSE BORJA The Lady Mariners continue to roll with their winning streak today (October 11) by beating Bishop O'Dowd - 70. It's been a long time coming but Moreau Catholic finally overcame BOD's domineering streak and blasted the Dragons to remain undefeated in the league. Moreau's first win for the match unfortunately was a forfeit of BOD's #3 doubles team. Scheduled to play for Moreau at the #3 doubles line were sophomores Kimberly Omaque and Aryssa Bembo. This will be the duo's second appearance playing #3 doubles. The #1 and #2 doubles team won their matches easily by beating their opponents in straight sets. The #2, #3 and #4 singles spot won their matches as well in straight sets. The #1 singles spot of Nicole Dawang and Jenny Budd was an intense match to watch. Budd was ahead in the first set 5-2 but Nicole fought a hard battle to come back and win the next five games to overtake Budd's lead in the set and winning it 7-5. Dawang controlled the second set and finished Budd off with a 6-3 win giving Moreau Catholic their final score of 7-0. Congratulations to the Lady Mariners! Here are the individual scores: Singles: 1S) Nicole Dawang (MC) d. Jenny Budd (BOD) 7-5, 6-3 2S) Jana Lee (MC) d. Kristina Lorch (BOD) 6-0, 6-0 3S) LIsa Wilson (MC) d. Megan Crayton (BOD) 6-0, 6-4 4S) Sachi Shetty (MC) d. Xani Chrys (BOD) 6-1, 6-0 Doubles: 1D) Amanda Ang/Ianne DeLeon (MC) d. Michelle Fournier/Makda Medhanie (BOD) 6-0, 6-3 2D) Ashley Ma/ Alyssa Gonzales (MC) d. Sienna Parker/Caitlin Walsh (BOD) 6-0, 6-0 3D) Kimberly Omaque/Arssya Bembo (MC) d. (Forfeit) 6-0, 6-0 Moreau Catholic HAAL Record 8-0 Go Mariners!


October 14, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Football League Action SUBMITTED BY NANCY CROSS In the National Pool, the 49ers held their lead with a dominating performance over the Eagles, 50 to 0, in just three

the 49ers by a 20-point win over the Steelers. They are just one game back. The coach attributes this to their innovative play calling and conditioning program. In the American Pool, there is

against the Chargers on Saturday. Here are the scores from Saturday’s action: Chiefs 52 - Chargers 0 Giants 32 - Panthers 0 49ers 50 - Eagles 0

quarters. In this pool the 49ers’ offense has been very impressive by running up over 224 points this year. Their defense has been very stingy just giving up 6 points. The Bucs kept pace with

another tight race - the Raiders and the Viking, both winning Saturday. Right now, in the Continental Pool, the Chiefs are the team to beat. They ran up 52 points

Bucs 20 - Steelers 0 Rams 40 - Redskins 8 Vikings 32 - Jets 6 Bears 22 - Patriots 18 Raiders 52 - Broncos 0

SUBMITTED BY BRETT HUFF The MVU U16 Adrenaline traveled to De Anza HS in San Pablo to face the WCCYSL Odyssey on Saturday. After adjusting to the speed of the artificial turf field, the Adrenaline defeated the Odyssey 2-0 with stout defense and the tending of goalie Samantha Stephens. Both Adrenaline goals were netted by Allison Huff playing tough in front of the Odyssey net. Sunday at Central Park in Fremont, Adrenaline played the shorthanded San Pablo Comets to a 6-0 win. The San Pablo girls played with heart and spirit the entire game but could not generate any significant offense against the defense of the Adrenaline and the goalie tandem of Stephens and Huff who combined for the shutout. Goals were scored by Ahern, Huff, Swartz, Mejia, Hayes, and Petersen. Starting tender Stephens was moved to forward for the second half and Huff came in to complete the shutout in net. The girls are 6-0 in league play and lead their division.

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October 14, 2011

Full bladders, wasabi alarm earn Ig Nobels BY MARK PRATT ASSOCIATED PRESS

SUBMITTED BY FRANK MCCLUNG (FROM NOW ON KNOWN AS ‘MAC’S DAD’) Mac just won his first college golf tournament October 11 at the Firestone Invitational in Akron, OH. Not only did Mac win, but his score propelled St. Mary’s to the team title as well. The St. Mary’s team now has 2 wins in their first four events this year and will most likely be ranked in the top 25 in the nation when new rankings are posted. As some of you know in most college events they play 36 holes the first day (carrying their own bags, no caddies allowed) and then 18 more on the second day. Mac had been playing well this year with three top 25 finishes, but was not getting as much out of his scoring as he had been expecting. Last week at Edgewood (South Lake Tahoe, Ca) he finally got a good result in the final round, 70 in very blustery conditions. That tied for the second lowest round of the entire event. Mac’s first 18 was solid and he finished birdie, birdie for a 71. Unfortunately, that was the low score for our team in that round and we were in ninth place going to round two (BTW – They don’t stop, they just keep playing). Well the afternoon was something special. Mac fired a -6 (66) and led the team to a -9 score that put Mac in first place and the team one shot off the lead. When the players and teams were reseeded for Tuesday’s final round, Mac was playing in the final group with the two guys who were a shot off the lead as individuals and whose teams (Indiana and SMU) were the leaders after day one. I was a little nervous (to say the least) as I went to work Tuesday. I checked in with Golfstat for the first time right about the time that Mac should have been making the turn. When I looked at the scores I could not believe what I was seeing. Mac had put up five birdies in the first nine holes! I was hopping up and down, pumping my fist in the hallway like a crazy person. I figured that he must have looked over at the other two guys that he was playing with on the 10th tee and thought, “you guys got something for that!” He proceeded to close with eight pars and a bogie for a -4 (68) and won the event. He had three rounds under par (71-66-68) and won by four strokes! You can read the article on the SMC web site: http://www.smcgaels.com/SportSelect.dbml?&DB_OEM _ID=21400&SPID=12529&SPSID=101580

BOSTON (AP), Sep 29 - Driving while desperately needing to urinate isn't a crime, but maybe it should be. Peter Snyder and his colleagues found that having a bladder at its bursting point reduced attention span and the ability to make decisions to the same degree expected with low levels of alcohol intoxication or 24 hours of sleep deprivation. The research earned them the 2011 Ig Nobel prize for medicine. “When people reach a point when they are in so much pain they just can't stand it anymore, it was like being drunk,” said Snyder, a professor of neurology at Brown University in Providence, R.I. “The ability to hold information was really impaired,” he said. This year's winners of the dubious distinction handed out Thursday at Harvard University for head-scratching scientific discoveries included a team of Japanese scientists who invented a fire alarm that smells like wasabi; a European mayor who solved his city's parking problems with a piece of heavy military equipment; a Norwegian researcher who explored the science behind sighing; and the numerous people throughout history whose mathematical calculations to predict the end of the world have fallen flat. The 21st annual awards sponsored by the Annals of Improbable Research were handed out by real Nobel laureates and featured the usual doses of silliness, including a mini-opera about the chemistry in a coffee shop and the ritual launching of paper airplanes. The point of Snyder's work was to determine the effects of pain on decision-making. Working with

full bladders is a “low cost, low risk” way of causing pain that can be resolved easily, simply by going to the bathroom. The research, done with scientists at Australian universities, was also fun. The group even crowned an unofficial withholding champion - the person who could go the longest before his bladder exploded. Australian researcher David Darby held out for three hours. Vilnius, Lithuania Mayor Arturas Zuokas won the Ig Nobel peace prize for his heavy-handed way of dealing with parking scofflaws. He crushed their cars with a military armored personnel carrier. “I just decided that it was time to teach bullies who had no respect for the rights of others a lesson that left an impression,” he said in an email. In a video posted on YouTube, Zuokas crushes a Mercedes-Benz blocking not just a bicycle lane, but also a pedestrian crossing, in Vilnius' picturesque Old Town. Zuokas was coy when asked whether the car-crushing was a stunt - the well-dressed owner did not appear to be too angry - but said the plan appears to have worked. The city has returned to what the mayor calls “more standard and boring” means of controlling parking scofflaws: issuing tickets and towing vehicles. But he warns he has the tank on standby. The chemistry prize went to Japanese researchers who invented a fire alarm that emits the pungent odor of wasabi, the sinus-clearing green paste served with sushi. “Wasabi odor is useful as a fire alarm to deaf people who failed to wake up with a conventional mode such as sound, vibration or flashing light,” said Makoto Imai, professor of psychiatry at Shiga

University of Medical Science. The key is allyl isothiocyanate, the compound in wasabi that gives out its distinctive smell and can be detected even during sleep. The team settled on wasabi after trying about 100 odors, including rotten eggs. Karl Teigen's research, which won him the psychology prize, perhaps best embodies the spirit of the Ig Nobels. His study on why people sigh has no practical applications as far as he can determine. He and his students decided to study sighing simply because they found no one else had. “People think that others' sighs chiefly express sadness and sorrow, but that their own sighs are more often due to resignation and giving up,” said Teigen, a psychology professor at the University of Oslo in Norway. “We studied the giving up aspect experimentally by giving people puzzles that looked simple, but they could not solve. And they sighed. We think they sighed because they had to give up a hypothesis, an idea, a hope, or an attempt - and perhaps be ready for a new one.'' Most winners were delighted to take home the prize. “It certainly caught me off guard,” said Snyder, the Brown professor. “But at heart I am a teacher, and I am concerned that scientific literacy in this country is on the decline. The Ig Nobels show that science isn't always dry and technical, and can be fun.'' Teigen played on the Ig Nobels' own catchphrase to describe his feelings. “Ig Nobel prizes are assumed to make people laugh and then think - and I would add: then sigh.” --Online: The Annals of Improbable Research, http://improbable.com


October 14, 2011

In Calif, wine grapes good but in short supply continued from page 14

While that could add up to a great vintage, some wines might be in short supply, especially lower-priced wines sold under store labels. “The issue there is that there might not be as much wine left over to make $3.99 bottles,” said Haas, past president of the Rhone Rangers Board of Directors. “There's always some left over that gets bought up cheap at the end. There may be less of that around.” Despite a reduction in quantity the prices of name brand bottles should remain stable, winemakers say, just as they are during gluts. Winemakers say that once prices are established on the market, it's hard to change with a fickle public. So 2011 is set to go down as the year in which California winemakers make less money than 2010, when the Golden State's wine sales reached $30 billion. It also will be known as a crazy weather year for growers _ or as the growers like to say “normal.” “You plan for normal, but you know that it's never going to be normal,” said David Beckstoffer, who farms 3,000 acres in Napa, Mendocino and Lake counties. The Napa Valley Grapegrowers' Association president said some yields are down as much as 50 percent, and his is coming in as much as 20 percent low, making it difficult to fulfill contract obligations. A late cold front in June stunted development along the coast and covered newly emerging Sierra foothill grapes in snow. An early winter-like storm last week threatens bunch rot on unripened clusters in some vineyards, especially those with white grapes still hanging, though the chardonnay season is winding down. In between growers enjoyed a mild summer that was ideal for grape development. The harvest of many reds, which often peaks in September, has not yet begun in some areas. If the

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forecast dry weather remains for a few weeks, growers say the recent rains will invigorate vines and help with the steady ripening. “I'm feeling significantly more positive about the vintage than I was six weeks ago, thanks largely to the nearly perfect ripening conditions we had through August and September,” Haas said. Growers are faring better than their colleagues in Oregon, where the coolest growing season in 50 years threatens to keep some vineyards from reaching high enough sugar levels. Assessing the overall California vintage in such an unpredictable year is a vineyard-by-vineyard process, says Jim Fiolek, executive director of the Santa Barbara County Vintners' Association, where growers scrambled to harvest thinskinned pinot noir grapes this week before rain could damage them. “Or in some areas, it's a row by row situation,” Fiolek said. “People are harvesting certain blocks and even certain rows two and three times because all of the fruit didn't ripen at the same time. It's a magnificent story of what makes Santa Barbara different.” The grape-growing valleys of Santa Barbara County are unique between Alaska and Tierra del Fuego in that they open directly to the Pacific Ocean, he said. The mild weather and cooling breezes allow the region to grow 60 varieties of grapes in the Santa Ynez Valley alone, but it also means the impacts of the weather affected everyone differently. “In terms of harvest yields, there will be some shortages because of the frost and because of the weather we had during bloom set,” he said. “There will be some shortages due to the rain in September, and some due to the rain we had in October. The thing is you can't cover the entire wine industry or region or even a vineyard sometimes with one description. That's what makes this so wonderful.”

New Haven School District board report SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE The Board of Education on October 4, received a presentation from Superintendent Kari McVeigh about the ongoing work to create a Union City Kids’ Zone. The product of discussions initiated by the Superintendent that led to a partnership involving the District and several other agencies and community organizations, the Kids’ Zone would provide cradle-to-career services for the District’s most vulnerable students and their families. Starting point for the effort would be the Decoto neighborhood. Preliminarily, goals are to see: New positive patterns of behavior incorporated in the culturally rich values, traditions and fabric of the community; Families set goal and priorities for college/career readiness; That all children have access to high-quality early education that supports healthy development across all domains (cognitive, physical, social/developmental) and prepares them for school success; Community social services integrated in a way that allows community members access to sufficient health and wellness services; All students in the Kids’ Zone achieve at high levels academically. Partners include the City of Union City, Union City Leisure Services, Kidango, Centro de Servicios, the Fremont Family Resource Center, Congregations Organizing for Renewal, the Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center, Safe Routes to School, the YMCA and Washington Hospital. Also during the meeting, the Board received the 2010-11 Student Achievement Report. The Division of Teaching & Learning reported that New Haven students are continuing to make progress academically, mirroring some of the trends seen at the state level. But an achievement gap still exists, with a continuing need for more focus on traditionally underserved groups. A strong basis for continued growth is in place and will be nurtured by continued work on key initiatives such as Writers’ Workshop, Targeted Leadership walkthroughs and learning sessions, a focus on equity and English Learners, the expansion of Critical Literacy to all elementary sites, Reading Apprenticeship at the middle schools and high schools, interventions for struggling students, and an ongoing examination of grading and assessments. The District also is focusing on recognizing “bright spots” that can be replicated elsewhere and is training staff in Human System Dynamics as a way to better recognize and approach key issues. Goals for 2011-12 are that, by spring 2012: 78 percent of students will be identified as proficient by English/language arts scores or reading assessments or 100 percent will meet reading growth targets. Students who start the year below grade level in reading will exceed their growth target by scoring 1.5 times the expected target. On behalf of Alvarado and Cesar Chavez middle schools, the Board also received a commendation from the Alameda County Board of Supervisors for “CPR7” cardio-pulmonary resuscitation training and recognized AMS student Wilson Hoang, who single-handedly taught CPR to nearly 100 people after receiving the CPR7 training last year.


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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

October 14, 2011

PLACES OF WORSHIP Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.the-resurrectionbc.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


October 14, 2011 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

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Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894 WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

October 14, 2011

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

Victory Center AME Zion Church 33527 Western Ave., Union City (510) 487-0233

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org

New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org


October 14, 2011 First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808

The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999

Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2011-10-14  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper

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