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Spanish Brass

Bollywood in the Bay Area

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

October 11, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 81

BY MEKALA NEELAKANTAN

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repare to enter the “Haunted Hotel” beginning October 15. This year’s Candle Lighters Ghost House, constructed by the local non-profit organization of approximately 130 women volunteers, is a perennial Halloween favorite. A midway of games, food and activities is always a big draw as well as a trip to otherworldly sights and sounds of the Ghost House. Witches, ghosts and goblins are in attendance as well to help the organization raise funds assisting non-profit groups and community projects throughout the Tri-City area. Spooky fun begins at the 19th Century Chadbourne Carriage House on Fremont Boulevard for two weeks on October 15. Exciting days and nights of goblins, ghouls, witches, and warlocks is sure to be a great family experience for newcomers and has become a tradition for many who visit year after year. And the younger ones have nothing to fear; they can be escorted through the Haunted Hotel by “Good Fairies” who will protect them from the scary apparitions that scream and continued on page 6

BY SUZANNE ORTT PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRI-CED COMMUNITY RECYCLING Dog lovers’ alert! The third annual Mutt Strut is coming, so mark your calendar for Saturday, October 15. This fundraiser for the New Haven Schools Foundation, held at the Masonic Home, in Union City is an opportunity to walk or run with your dog to an admiring audience of dog aficionados. continued on page 6

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE California has always been a trendsetter and politics is no exception. One hundred years ago, the Golden State, following years of disappointments including a governor’s veto in 1893 and a defeat at the polls in 1896, became the sixth in the nation in which male voters approved a referendum to grant women the right to vote. That was nine years before congressional passage of the nineteenth amendment to the constitution providing universal women’s suffrage in the United States of America (Note: Although 36 states ratified the amendment by 1920 making it law throughout the United States, it wasn’t until 1984 that Mississippi ratified the amendment to make state votes unanimous). In honor of this tremendous achievement, the Fremont Main Library is hosting a special celebratory event, an afternoon of entertainment and education.

The purpose of this event is to call attention to the historical significance of women’s suffrage and the influence of local people who promoted the suffrage movement. Celebration is the theme and all are welcome to participate. Three key organizations came together to organize this event: American Association of University Women (AAUW), League of Women Voters (LWV), and National Organization for Women (NOW). The Fremont Main Library and the Patterson House have also made significant contributions. Participants from the three sponsoring organizations will present a Reader’s Theater production “highlighting women who were prominent in the suffrage movement in California.” Five main characters will tell their story in their own words, sharing what they accomplished and how the suffrage campaign proceeded. The script was written as a continued on page 17

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Washington Hospital Workshop Shows You How to Quit Successfully

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s the holiday season approaches, it’s easy to put off healthy goals by making excuses. I’ll wait until after the holidays… I’ll make it my New Year’s resolution… I’m too stressed out to make any changes. But if you’ve decided to quit smoking – maybe even tried before to stop – then now is the time to get the support you need to quit. Cigarettes contain nicotine, a powerfully addictive chemical that can take more than just will power to resist. It’s not easy to quit; however, there are steps you can take to overcome the urge to smoke and quit for life. Want to stop smoking? To help those who want to quit, Washington Hospital Healthcare System will hold a two-hour Stop Smoking Workshop on Tuesday, November 1, designed to help participants stop smoking by providing them with essential information and strate-

gies needed to direct their own efforts at quitting. According to Dr. Jason Chu, Medical Director for Pulmonary Rehab and Respiratory Care Services at Washington Hospital, individuals who incorporate the following components into their plans for quitting, maximize the chances of successfully quitting: • Physician intervention: Tell your doctor about your plans to quit and ask for his or her advice. • Counseling: Seek out a social support network. • Pharmacological intervention: Talk to your doctor about new medications that may be able to help you overcome withdrawal symptoms. “What I tell people is to try to be proactive, listen to the advice from your physicians and other health care practitioners and get a support system,” Dr. Chu suggests. “I believe once you become committed to quitting, you will

Quitting smoking can be tough but for those who want to quit, Washington Hospital will offer a free Stop Smoking Workshop on Tuesday, November 1 from Noon to 3 p.m. at the Conrad E.Anderson M.D.Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. A Washington Hospital pulmonologist will talk about the effects of smoking before a trained facilitator leads participants in the stop smoking workshop. To register for this class, visit www.whhs.com and click on the “Upcoming Health Seminars” button.

feel compelled to follow through because you will see the benefits of quitting.” Dr. Chu will talk about the effects of smoking, before a trained facilitator leads participants in the Stop Smoking Workshop, which will take place from 12 to 3 p.m. on November 1, in the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, Room B, at Washington West, 2500 Mowry Avenue, in Fremont. The health risks and conditions attributed to smoking should not

be ignored, Dr. Chu says. He points out that an estimated 80 to 90 percent of people who get lung cancer were smokers at some point in their lives. Additionally, smoking is linked to 90 percent of all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease deaths. Fortunately, those who quit receive immediate benefits that can outweigh the “high” of a nicotine fix. “Data show that within 20 minutes of quitting your heart rate and blood pressure drop, which is not insignificant, con-

sidering that hypertension is a leading risk factor for strokes,” Dr. Chu says. “Over the long term, quitting smoking has enormous benefits, including reduced risk for coronary artery disease and an approximately 50 percent drop in your risk of dying from lung cancer.” “Overall, the health benefits from quitting are significant in both health and longevity.” Other immediate benefits of, cited by smokefree.gov, include: • You feel more in charge of your life and decisions. • Your hair, clothes, and breath don’t smell like smoke. • Your car, home, and kids don’t smell like smoke. • You can smell food and other good smells. • You feel more relaxed. • You don’t have to make sure you always have cigarettes. • You have more money. • You don’t have to be as worried about your health. • You look and feel better. • You feel good about being able to quit. • Your skin looks healthier. • You have more energy. Taking the First Step “Quitting smoking is very difficult,” according to Ruth Traylor, Washington Hospital’s director of Community Outreach. “That’s why it’s important to have a plan. This workshop is the first step in helping participants stay focused on the goal. continued on page 4

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

10/11/11

10/12/11

10/13/11

10/14/11

10/15/11

10/16/11

10/17/11

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Crohn's & Colitis, Stomach Cancer and Irritable Bowel Disorders

Learn About Foods That Help Your Digestive System

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Women's Health Conference: Skin Health Gynecologic Conditions From Infancy to Maturity Voices InHealth: New Sur(Late Start) gical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Raising Awareness About Stroke

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Disaster Preparedness

Women's Health Conference: Beyond Sadness - Depression (Late Start)

Women's Health Conference: Chronic Pain Management

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

What Are Your Vital Signs Telling You? Learn Exercises to Help Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Lower Your Blood Pressure and Slow Your Heart Rate Eat Better!

George Mark Children's House - A New Way Home (Late Start)

Caring for an Older Adult: Everything You Need to Know about Caregiving

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children (Late Start)

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Cancer Caregivers: Panel Discussion

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage?

Cancer Caregivers: Complementary Therapy (Late Start)

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges

Cancer Caregivers: Mobilizing Resources

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Oh My Aching Lower Back!

Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

New Surgical Techniques for Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment Men's Health Fair: Heart Healthy Living

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Take the Steps: What You Should Know About Foot Care (Late Start)

Most Common Cancers and How They are Treated

Brain Health for Seniors

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Eat Better!

Cataracts and Diabetic Eye Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

World Kidney Day Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help (Late Start)

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Learning How to Prevent and Live with Congestive Heart Failure & What is Cholesterol and How to Lower It

Keys to Healthy Eyes

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

Living with Heart Failure & Heart Irregularities (Late Start)

Kidney Disease

Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea

Voices InHealth: Cyberbullying - The New Schoolyard Bully Tips to Making Your Voices InHealth: (Late Start) Golden Years Healthier Demystifying the Radiation (Late Start) Oncology Center

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

Voices InHealth: New Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Treatment

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer Neurological Disorders: How Brain Tumors are Treated

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetics Counseling

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting September 14, 2011

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Your Concerns InHealth: Measles Resurgence

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Do You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression? Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options (Late Start) Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All Inside Washington Hospital: Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care Pediatric Care


October 11, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

National Mammography Day Focuses on Prevention This year, more than 230,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. Perhaps your sister, wife, mother, or best friend has battled breast cancer, which is considered a woman’s disease because it is far more common in women than men. National Mammography Day on October 21 reminds women that regular mammograms are still the best way to fight breast cancer. The daylong observance is part of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month held every October. “Mammography is still the only breast cancer screening test that has been shown to decrease mortality,” said Dr. Mimi Lin, a diagnostic radiologist and director of Mammography at Washington Hospital. “Mammograms are still the gold standard. Since their introduction in the 1980s, mammograms have helped to reduce breast cancer deaths by 30 percent.”

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Bone and Joint National Action Week Promotes Awareness of Prevention, Disease Management and Treatments

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one and joint conditions – including osteoarthritis – are the most common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, according to the United States Bone and Joint Ini-

as osteoarthritis, the Bone and Joint Initiative and other organizations such as the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons sponsor the annual Bone and Joint National Action Week on

“In the lower extremities, it can cause more pronounced pain and a loss of motion, especially with weight-bearing activities.” Oftentimes, people with osteoarthritis in the knees and hips

Washington Hospital’s Center for Joint Replacement (CJR) is led by medical director Dr. John Dearborn (right) and Dr. Alexander Sah. The CJR was named the top joint replacement program in California by HealthGrades in April 2011. Surgeons at the CJR will perform more than 1,400 knee and hip replacements this year. To learn more about the Center for Joint Replacement, call (888) 494-7003 or visit www.whhs.com/joint.

For more information about mammograms and other diagnostic and imaging services or to schedule your annual mammogram screening at the Washington Women’s Center, please call (510) 791-3410 or visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts in the cells of one or both of the breasts. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that can grow into the surrounding tissue or spread to other parts of the body. Mammograms are a low-dose X-ray that can detect changes in the breast tissue. Usually, two X-ray images are taken of each breast. The images make it possible for doctors to detect tumors that can’t be felt, Lin explained. Early Detection “Mammograms allow us to detect cancer early,” Lin said. “We know that cancer caught in the early stages has a very good prognosis, and that late-stage breast cancer has a very poor prognosis. When breast cancer is caught at an earlier stage, women have many more treatment options and can possibly avoid more invasive procedures.” The risk for breast cancer increases as women age, which is why Lin recommends that women begin getting an annual mammogram at age 40. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force created a controversy when it recommended against annual mammograms for women ages 40-49. “Since then a number of professional groups have supported annual mammograms for women beginning at age 40, including the American College of Radiology and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists,” Lin said. “At Washington Hospital, we see the highest number of cancers diagnosed on a year-to-year basis in women in their 40s, so I would say annual mammograms are effective for women in that age group.” When looking at national numbers, one invasive cancer is found for every 556 mammograms performed on women in their 40s in the U.S., according to the American College of Radiology. Accredited Breast Center The Washington Women’s Center offers state-of-the-art digital mammography in a warm and inviting setting, Lin said. The Center has been accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers, a nonprofit organization that has been established to identify and recognize breast centers that provide quality care in the United States. “It’s a rigorous credentialing program that required us to demonstrate excellence in a number of areas,” Lin explained. “We were one of the first nationally accredited breast centers in Northern California.” In addition to advanced diagnostic services, the Washington Women’s Center offers a multidisciplinary team approach to provide women with the best care and treatment options available, she added. At the Center, women also have access to breast cancer information, education, and support. “The Women’s Center is a place where women can feel comfortable and get the services and support they need to stay healthy,” Lin said. “We have seen so many advances in the detection and treatment of breast cancer over the last few decades and we want to make sure local women have access to these services.” For more information about the Washington Women’s Center and the breast health services offered there, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter. Don’t Miss the Think Pink Event this Thursday! To learn more about breast health and other women’s health-related topics, make sure to attend “Think Pink: Quilting Together a Better Life” at the Washington Women’s Center this Thursday, October 13. The special event will take place from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in the Tent Atrium at Washington West, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Attendees are invited to wear pink and join in an evening of educational lectures, information booths, health screenings and fun activities. To register for the Think Pink event or to find out more, go to www.whhs.com/think-pink.

tiative. Further, the prevalence of such conditions is predicted to increase as the “Baby Boom” generation continues to age. “Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis,” says Dr. John Dearborn, an orthopedic surgeon and the medical director of the Center for Joint Replacement at Washington Hospital. “Osteoarthritis is caused by the breakdown of cartilage, the material that cushions the ends of the bones in a joint. As the cartilage deteriorates, bone rubs against bone, causing inflammation and pain. Because aging is a primary risk factor for osteoarthritis, we will see these problems become more common as our population ages.” To increase the awareness of musculoskeletal conditions such

the same dates every year – October 12 - 20. There is no single known cause of osteoarthritis, but there are various risk factors in addition to age, including joint injury, muscle weakness and being overweight. Women generally are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than men. A small percentage of people may have a genetic predisposition. Osteoarthritis develops most frequently in weight-bearing joints such as the knee and hip, but it also is common in the neck, lower spine and the small joints of the hands and feet. “Osteoarthritis can cause pain, stiffness and swelling in whatever joint is affected,” says Dr. Alexander Sah, an orthopedic surgeon at the Center for Joint Replacement.

will avoid weight-bearing activities that cause the pain, and they may become sedentary. “It’s a double-edged sword,” says Dr. Sah. “Resting may make the joints feel better, but lack of physical activity can lead to weight gain and loss of muscle tone – both of which can make the condition worse.” Just as there is no known cause for osteoarthritis, there also is no known cure. “You can’t reverse the process of arthritis, but you can treat the symptoms and slow the progression,” Dr. Sah explains. “Physical therapy and regular exercise can help reduce pain and maintain range of motion. Exercise also can help maintain a healthy weight, which puts less strain on continued on page 16


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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“The class will cover the reasons they want to stop, as well as what has kept them from quitting in the past.” Traylor points out that there is no “right” way to do it. People who want to quit smoking have to figure out the best way for them and the workshop helps them achieve this. Participants will also learn tools to cope with withdrawal, including medications available that can ease symptoms like headaches, nausea, anxiety, insomnia, and intense cravings for nicotine.

“There are also activities, including exercise and relaxation techniques can help reduce some of the anxiety and stress associated with quitting,” she says. Since staying smoke-free for life is the ultimate goal of the workshop, Traylor says part of the focus is on long-term maintenance. “Developing a plan for coping with your triggers will make it that much easier to stick to your goal. For instance, if you smoke at work to reduce stress, you can plan other ways to keep calm, like taking time out to do a few relaxation exercises. Being prepared and having a plan are important elements to successfully quitting.” Tools for success To register for the Stop Smoking Workshop online, visit www.whhs.com; or call (800) 963-7070. For more information or help with quitting, contact the California Smokers’ Helpline at (800) NO-BUTTS or www.californiasmokershelpline.org. To learn more about Washington Hospital and its programs and services, visit www.whhs.com.

TAIZE (Prayer around the Cross) All are welcome to join the Dominican Sisters of MSJ every third Friday of the month (8-9pm) for this reflective prayer of mantra singing, scripture and contemplative sitting. Bless your day and month with this beautiful prayer at the Dominican Sisters of MSJ Motherhouse Taize Friday, Oct 21 8 p.m. – 9 p.m. Dominican Sisters of MSJ Motherhous 43326 Mission Blvd (entrance on Mission Tierra Pl), Fremont, (510) 657-2468

SUBMITTED BY JENNIFER SIMONSEN The Silicon Valley animal population is pushing area shelters to their limits and adopters are needed urgently to “empty the shelters” and provide these dogs and cats with homes. Too many animals and insufficient adoptions result in euthanasia of potential pets. The Humane Society Silicon Valley (HSSV) estimates almost 9,000 animals were euthanized in area shelters in 2010 due to overcrowding. October 2011 is National Adopt-a-Shelter Dog month and the ideal time to save the life of a shelter animal. HSSV is working with area shelters to find homes for these animals from October 1 through October 16, 2011. HSSV provides dogs and cats

with a second chance and acts as a “safety net” for Silicon Valley but cannot continue its mission unless the public continues to adopt pets from HSSV and area shelters. All dogs and cats at HSSV have had personalized medical or behavioral care, so they are ready for a forever home. Many of these rescued animals arrive at shelters as puppies or kittens and HSSV volunteers have bottle-fed, held, nurtured and trained them. Others have been relinquished by their owners. HSSV is a community in which people can connect and share experiences with their animals and each other. As an animal community center, HSSV offers medical care (spay/neuter, vaccinations, micro chipping) and behavioral training including

animal socialization and other classes. Five other shelters in Silicon Valley and HSSV are working together for the first Empty Our Shelters Challenge from October 1-16, 2011. Each shelter is offering some form of special pricing. Dogs and cats can be adopted immediately at: HSSV, Santa Clara County Animal Shelter, City of Palo Alto Animal Services, Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority, City of San Jose Animal Care and Services and Town Cats. The public can help by adopting a sweet, loving dog or cat a family pet. Six shelters, one goal: find as many homes as possible for the homeless animals in Silicon Valley: For more information, visit http://WeCareProject.org


October 11, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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In addition to the “strut,” a plethora of entertainment for the fourlegged attendees and their companions includes food, music and competitions. Dogs and their human partners will play musical chairs, compete in a hot dog eating contest (for dogs only) and listen to the music courtesy of DJ Jay Bennett, the DJ. Chef Fred Penning of Allied Waste and crew will command the barbecue grill. Racing starts at 9:30 a.m. as runners and walkers head for an unofficial track, the perimeter of the field below the Masonic Home. Racers, both canine and human, can circle the track as long as their energy lasts. The costumed canine event allows those so inclined to display clever costumes as a prequel to Halloween. Among the special guests invited to Mutt Strut is Logan High School student Bianca Vieira, who currently wears the crown as Miss Teen California. Tours of Acacia Creek, the new senior housing at the Masonic Home will also be conducted during the event. Executive Director of the New Haven Schools Foundation (NHSF), Barbara Aro-Valle, describes Mutt Strut as, “a fun-filled event that brings dogs and families together in support of scholarships and programs for students sponsored by the New Haven Schools Foundation.” Mutt Strut Saturday, October 15 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Masonic Home 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 471-3850 baro-valle@nhsfoundation.com $25 Individual pack/$45 Family package

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go bump in the dark. Hotel grounds include an array of games, goodies (including famous, fabulous caramel apples), country store and, on October 29, a Kiddie Parade and Scardie Tour. The parade and tour begin at 1 p.m. The Ghost House is managed solely by Candle Lighters members and funded by sponsor donations, from construction to costume and makeup, to the entire Halloween magic of each evening. Students over the age of 12 or in junior high school are welcome to volunteer to help each year by completing a release form located on the Candle Lighters’ website and attending a volunteer sign-up day at the Ghost House. General admission for the Ghost House is $3, game tickets are 25 cents; a brand new addition to the Ghost House allows attendees to pre-purchase “Ghoul-pons,” a perfect way to treat family and friends by giving them passes to various activities in the Ghost House. There are four types of Ghoul-pons: those good for two Ghost House tickets, for two plain caramel apples, $2.50 worth of Games tickets or for a $5 photo booth item. For more information regarding becoming a sponsor, applying for project funding or becoming a volunteer, visit www.candlelighters.com or call (510) 796-0595. Haunted Hotel Saturday, October 15 to Sunday, October 30 Monday through Thursday: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Fridays: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturdays: 2 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sundays: 2 p.m. – 9 p.m. Chadbourne Carriage House at Fremont Hub 39169 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0595

October 11, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

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Counseling Corner

BY ANNE CHAN, PHD, MFT

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his is the third in our series about one Tri City resident who came to me for help with her resume. Our story so far - Jane wanted a resume-makeover with the goal of finding a job with better pay and better potential for career advancement. As an administrative assistant, she likes her job and the people she works with, but she knows she will have to earn more to support the increasing needs of her family. Our first session consisted of pinpointing her interests, skills she likes to use, and companies she wants to work for. Our second session consisted of putting lots of action verbs and details in her resume. The original version of her resume was sparse and gave no indication of how special she was as a worker. We went over her resume with a fine toothcomb, examining each word and sentence carefully. I showed her examples of what she could do with each line of her resume. Most importantly, we added details and vivid description to her resume so that potential employers would get excited about bringing her in for an interview. [I’ve changed the details of Jane’s identity to protect her privacy, but she has graciously agreed to share her story with Tri City Voice readers so that others can learn and from her journey.] After several sessions of hard work, we had a great working draft of Jane’s resume – one that included lots of details and specifics and one that she was proud of. More importantly, I showed her how to tailor her resume to each employer. We made sure that each resume she sent out was specific to the needs of the particular job she was applying for. [Many people make the mistake of sending out the same old resume to each and every job. This is a mistake because they might be sending irrelevant information about themselves. It’s really important that you tailor your resume to each employer so you can show why you can fill their unique needs and specifications.] Jane’s family was impressed with her new and improved resume. But the big question was: Would hiring employers be impressed as well? We would only find out when Jane tested the waters by sending her resume out to prospective employers. The result??!! {{{DRUM ROLL}}} Jane started getting invitations for interviews! All the work we put into her resume was definitely worth it and definitely paying off. Yes, after a few weeks of hard work on her resume, Jane is now hard at work preparing for interviews! I have now spent one session coaching her on job interviewing. Like many people, Jane

was nervous about interviewing because she felt put on the spot and she also felt that she didn’t have the best vocabulary. To ease her nervousness, I started off reassuring her that she didn’t have to use big words during an interview. In fact, I forbade her to try and use big words. Instead I told her, “Just be your self – friendly, enthusiastic, and interested in the job.” We went over practice questions for the interview and I coached Jane on answering in a way that showcased how she could meet the needs of the employer. Quite often, people don’t seem to realize the point of an interview question – they say too little or too much, or they don’t even answer the question directly. The art of interviewing is basically the art of showing the employer that you can meet their needs. Here’s a big tip for how to handle any interview question – in your answer, demonstrate to the employer how you are qualified for the job. This is true of any interview question that is thrown at you. For example, if you are asked about your hobbies, try your best to show how your hobbies can add to the workplace or your skill level. Don’t just talk about your love of cats or hang-gliding! I also went over the mission and culture of each company that Jane was interviewing for. It is vitally important that you research a company before going in for an interview. Know what they are about, what their corporate culture and values are like, and research all you can about their products. You can tie in your research in your interview answers. This helps you to demonstrate your enthusiasm and commitment to the company and their products. Last but not least, it’s important to review your resume carefully before going into a job interview. This will help you remember your own job history and will prep you for any questions that they may ask about your resume. You do not want to be caught offguard with a memory lapse problem if the employer asks you about something in your resume! A successful resume is one that gets you to the job interview stage. In this regard, Jane’s resume makeover was a huge success. The next step is for her to get comfortable and shine during her interviews. She has already made a great start, but her journey in finding a better job continues. Stay tuned! Anne Chan is a career counselor and licensed psychotherapist in Union City. She specializes in helping people find happiness in their careers, lives, and relationships. She can be reached at 510-744-1781. Her website is www.annechanconsulting.com © Anne Chan, 2011

Seneca Center announces merger with Kinship Center SUBMITTED BY MAGGIE FERRILL The Board of Directors of Seneca Family of Agencies is pleased to announce a merger with Kinship Center, a respected statewide leader in the provision of adoption and permanency services for abused, neglected and abandoned children. The merger of these two education, mental health and social service nonprofit agencies adds another dimension to Seneca’s efforts to sustain children and families through their most difficult times. Together, the merged organizations offer a statewide reach, serving children and families from Los Angeles to Sonoma County. Seneca Family of Agencies has served thousands of children and families since 1985, with programs and services throughout the Bay area. Many of these are in the Fremont and Hayward areas, including school-based services at non-public school and public school-based services throughout each school district. “The joining of these two organizations creates one of the most comprehensive service systems for children and families in California,” said Seneca CEO and founder Ken Berrick. “Young people who may have struggled educationally, suffered abuse and neglect, or be coping with mental illness will now have access to an extremely broad array of services, ranging from a therapeutic preschool, to intensive family support programs in the community, to intensive crisis intervention and hospital-type programs. Like Seneca, Kinship Center brings to this partnership a distinguished history of service to children and families with the most exceptional needs.” Kinship Center co-founder Carol Biddle, who has led the Monterey County-based agency since its inception in 1984, will serve on Seneca’s executive leadership team. “Both of our organizations are dedicated to ensuring that every child has the chance for a safe and secure future,” said Biddle. “Together we will have a powerful presence and the capacity to offer the broadest scope of mental health and social services to troubled and traumatized children and to families. This new partnership will be a tremendous asset to communities throughout California.” For information on Seneca’s programs and services, visit www.senecacenter.org or call (510) 654-4004.

www.skinlaseressentials.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Catalytic converter thefts SUBMITTED BY OFFICER MIKE DOYLE, MILPITAS PD The Milpitas Police Department has recently investigated over a dozen thefts of catalytic converters from Toyota 4-Runners, SR5 Pick-up Trucks, and similar vehicles. The thefts are occurring mostly during overnight hours in residential neighborhoods. The suspect(s) have cut the catalytic converters from underneath the vehicles and possibly sold them for the valuable metals within. These thefts are not unique to Milpitas as catalytic converters are being stolen from vehicles throughout the state. The Milpitas Police Department recommends that vehicle owners park their vehicle in a garage, well-lit area, or well-traveled area if possible. Residents who witness suspicious individuals under a vehicle or loitering near vehicles should not take any action, but immediately call 911. Residents should provide a detailed description of suspicious persons, including age, race, clothing, and any other distinguishing features. Residents should also provide detailed vehicle descriptions, including make, model, color, year, license plate number, and direction of travel. Anyone with any information regarding these thefts should call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/citydept/police

Robbery Suspect Sought SUBMITTED BY DET. WILLIAM VETERAN, FREMONT PD Anthony Borquez has been identified as a suspect involved in an armed robbery that occurred at Round Table Pizza in Fremont on 09/13/11.

Alexander Casarez has been arrested for the same robbery and identified as the primary suspect in a series of robberies in which he was armed with a Tech 9 automatic pistol. There is currently a $550,000 warrant for the arrest of Borquez for robbery and weapons charges. The tech 9 pistol used in the robberies is still outstanding, so Borquez should be considered armed and dangerous. Anthony Manuel Borquez is described as 19 years old, 5 '11”, 175 lbs, brown hair and eyes. Anyone with any information as to the whereabouts of Borquez is encouraged to contact your local police department or Det. Josh Ehling at (510) 790-6900.

Governor signs epilepsy bill SUBMITTED BY MIMI CARTER The Epilepsy Foundation applauds California Governor Jerry Brown’s signing of California Senate Bill 161, which authorizes volunteer, trained, non-medical personnel in schools to administer emergency medication to students with epilepsy suffering from prolonged seizures. "This is significant progress for the epilepsy community,” said Susan Pietsch-Escueta, Executive Director of Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Los Angeles. “This legislation will help save lives and reduce unnecessary medical risks for children with epilepsy in California schools.” Appropriate emergency intervention at school, such as access to life saving medications like Diastat, is extremely time-sensitive because prolonged seizures can have devastating results including brain injury and death. Epilepsy California, comprised of the three California Epilepsy Foundation affiliates, worked extensively over the past two years with the bill’s sponsor, Senator Bob Huff, and other legislators to help pass the bill. Epilepsy California’s State Coordinator, Ann Kinkor, who has three children with epilepsy, thanked officials directly. “Thanks to Senator Rubio, Senator Lowenthal, Assembly member Fiona Ma, Assembly Member Hall and of course Senator Huff, today 93,000 students with epilepsy have the right to go to school with the appropriate medical support.” Facing mounting opposition from powerful groups, such as unions representing public school teachers, nurses and others, Epilepsy California has been a strong and reliable negotiator, responding to the demands of these groups while maintaining the strength and integrity of the bill. This issue is not singular to California. The Epilepsy Foundation is aware of multiple situations nationwide where epileptics, who are prescribed Diastat, have been denied access to school daycare, or school-related activities. With the passage of this law, children in California now have the right to participate in free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. “It’s crucially important to be able to administer appropriate emergency care quickly to anyone suffering an epileptic seizure. A prolonged seizure that is not treated appropriately and in a rapid manner can result in brain injury. This landmark law allows affected students to continue to pursue their life goals without significant setbacks when attending school,” said Dr. Brien Smith, chair of the Epilepsy Foundation Board of Directors and Chief of Neurology for the Spectrum Health Medical Group in Michigan. For more information, visit www.EpilepsyFoundation.org


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Amnesty International lecture series SUBMITTED BY KAVITA JAIN Mission San Jose High School (MSJHS) Chapter of Amnesty International has organized a lecture series on their Fremont campus. The goal of the lecture series is to create awareness in students and the community at large on human rights issues faced in our society and globally. It is hoped that this awareness will lead to further engagement and activism in promoting human rights throughout the world. All lectures have open admission, with no entrance fee, and take place after regular school hours. The first series of lectures will be held on the following dates, at 3 p.m., at the MSJHS campus: Friday, October 14 - Min Zin, UC Berkeley Wednesday, October 19 Dr. Michele Elam, Stanford University Wednesday, October 26 - Dr. Tomas Jimenez, Stanford University All speakers are highly accomplished scholars, and experts in their respective fields. Min Zin is an instructor responsible for International Visiting Scholars’ Program at the University of California at Berkeley’s School of Journalism. He has long been actively engaged in the democracy movement in Burma, and has published extensively on this topic. He will speak about his personal experiences while in Burma and Thailand, and discuss the future of Burmese democracy movement.

Dr. Michele Elam is the Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial Professor of English at Stanford University, and the author of The Souls of Mixed Folk: Race, Politics, and Aesthetics in the New Millennium (Stanford University Press, 2011). The title of Professor Elam’s talk will be, “The Civil Rights of Mixed Folk”? Professor Jimenez works in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University, and is the author of Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans Immigration and Identity (U of California Press, 2010). He will be speaking on unauthorized immigration and its impact on human rights. Kavita Jain, vice president of the Mission San Jose Chapter of Amnesty International is spearheading and organizing this lecture series. She can be reached at (510) 673-2627 or kjain1695@gmail.com for more information. MSJHS Amnesty International lecture series Wednesday, October 12; Friday, October 14; Wednesday, October 19; Wednesday, October 26 3 p.m. Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont October 12 and October 26 meetings in “A-wing” cafeteria October 14 meeting in C120 Auditorium Free of charge and open to the community Information: (510) 673-2627 or kjain1695@gmail.com

Kidango receives Packard grant SUBMITTED BY PAUL MILLER, KIDANGO Kidango, a local nonprofit that specializes in early childhood education and child care services, announced today that the Early Childhood Education Teacher Pathway Project Collaborative (ECE Collaborative), whose members include California State University East Bay, Chabot Community College, the Alameda County Child Care Planning Council, Davis Street Family Resource Center and Kidango, has received a $100,000 planning grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation to plan and develop a new approach to workforce development in the early education field modeled on a successful cohort model in Los Angeles. The grant was awarded to Kidango as the lead agency. “For several months,” said Kidango Executive Director Paul Miller, “the Collaborative has had ongoing discussions to explore how we might develop a similar model. Research shows time and time again how critical these early years are in a child’s development and that quality early learning environments pay huge dividends in later academic success and quality of life. However, children have limited access due to many factors, including the difficulties of finding qualified early education workers who often have little incentive to stay in early childhood education jobs as a career.” Three members of the Collaborative, CSU-East Bay, Chabot Community College, and Davis Street Resource Center, are currently in the implementation phase of an East Bay After-School Workers’ Teacher Pathway Project, made possible through the generosity of an earlier planning grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

“It has been a moving experience to see the transformation in participants’ lives, said Executive Director Rose Johnson, Davis Street Family Resource Center,” and the commitment they have in earning their teaching credentials. “In our ECE conversations, it became apparent that we had learned a great deal on what was needed to help students succeed. We are prepared to adopt the best practices already learned. By providing extensive supports to a cohort, offering participants jobs and career counseling, and yes - childcare - we could strengthen quality of early learning programs and see that participants could continue to advance themselves on a career ladder that would provide a decent wage.” The ECE Collaborative selected Kidango to act as the lead and fiscal agent for the project. The agency currently serves over 2,500 children daily in nine cities located in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, and has over 500 employees. Kidango and will provide a critical employer perspective to the project, as well as extensive experience operating two Universal Preschool programs in partnership with school districts. Kidango’s preschool programs are recognized and acclaimed by the California Department of Education, Children Now and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). “We are grateful to the David and Lucile Foundation for its continued commitment and investment in early education,” said Miller. “The Foundation’s vision and support is making a critical difference in access, quality and early learning outcomes for thousands of children in the state and serving as a model for others nationwide.”

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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History PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAUL MCNNIS

A

Warm Springs volunteer fire department was organized in July 1944. John Souza was chosen fire chief, Antone Brazil assistant, and the department operated with equipment loaned by the county. Residents secured 200 signatures on a petition to form a County Fire Protection District, and a public hearing was held January 28, 1945. Tony Vargas,

Fire enveloped the truck and spread to nearby grass and brush. The firemen put out the fire and saved the main truck body without serious injury to anyone. Many of the fires in the area were started by passing motorists tossing out cigarettes. On a Sunday afternoon, the firemen were called to Hidden Valley Ranch to pump out the swimming pool and recover the body of a drowned young man. It was too late to save the victim, but the firemen helped make sure no one else was in the pool. As

Fire Station # 5

In 1956, the district became part of the new City of Fremont and Fire Commissioner Henry Kato reported in April that the Warm Springs department was in fair shape and could wait for the other stations to be brought up to standards before he requested new equipment. The firehouse became Fire Station 5 in the City of Fremont and served until 1992 when it was demolished and replaced by a new 6,080 square foot building, six times the size of the old station. The tiny 1,100 square foot building had served for over 40 years and housed full-time firefighters who ate, slept, and trained there in later years. It was crowded, but there were only two people on duty at a time. Station #5 was the oldest of the 10 current firehouses in the City of Fremont in 1992. It looked more like a single-family home with a garage than an official city fire station. The Warm Springs industrial area developed rapidly and a new station was needed. The city leased space in a parking lot at 46335

Warm Springs Fire Department, 1955

Orville Leitch, and Joe Leal were appointed fire commissioners to manage the district as agents of the county supervisors. The Warm Springs Chamber of Commerce helped raise funds and secure the necessary fire fighting apparatus. The firemen raised $500 for equipment at a whist party in December 1946. The department had no property and no fire station, so Minnie Sarmento Souza provided a location. She lived on a 30 acre farm on Warm Springs Road south of Mission Boulevard. A shed attached to a hay barn

the firemen returned to the firehouse, they were immediately called to fight a grass fire near the county line. It was a busy weekend. Firemen on duty included; John Sousa, Joe Brown, Leonard Baptiste, Tony Vargas, Manuel Duarte, Frank Perry, Joe Sarmento, Ruben Ramos, Tony Brazill, William Borba, and Melvin Leal. Warm Springs residents secured the help of Supervisor Chester Stanley to establish a county fire protection district. Some 200 property owners signed a petition to hold an election and the measure passed eas-

Landing Parkway in 1999 and constructed a “heavy PVC membrane structure” to house one fire engine. Temporary station 11 was designed to protect the south industrial area until a permanent station could be constructed as part of the Catellus project. The City of Fremont took possession of the more permanent Station 11 in 2011. It was constructed on a pattern that was a reverse image of Station 5. It could not be permanently occupied for a while due to City financial problems.

Warm Springs Fire Station 1964

housed the truck described as a 400 gallon pumper. The siren horn was located on top of the tank house. Calls came into Minnie’s home, and she pressed a button to sound the alarm siren. Minnie provided the water from her tank house and opened her home for the monthly meetings of the volunteer firemen. The first time the men took the truck out they didn’t know how to handle the great pressure of the water from the hose and they blew several bales of hay off the stack before they got control of the nozzle and the water pressure. They used up almost all the water but there was enough left to put out the fire. The Warm Springs fire department was called out Saturday, August 23, 1947 to control a fire started by an overturned truck.

ily; the Warm Springs County Fire Protection District was established. Joseph Brown, Orville Leitch, John Leal and Fred Breitwieser were chosen to be the fire commissioners. They voted to keep John Sousa as the district’s first fire chief. The three-year-old fire department staged the first annual Warm Springs Firemen’s Ball in 1948. Proceeds from the dance were used to pay for equipment and department expenses. The district purchased a 60 X 200 foot lot north of Warm Springs School and hired Contractor, L. M. Potts to build a 1,100 square foot fire station. The old fire equipment was replaced in 1953 with a new 500 gallon White-Van Pelt pumper. The old outfit was kept for fighting grass fires.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Leitch Elementary wins Blue Ribbon education award SUBMITTED BY SARAH BALDAUF Congressman Pete Stark (CA-13) notified the James Leitch Elementary School in Fremont, that they have won a 2011 National Blue Ribbon Award. On September 15, Arne Duncan, Secretary of the Department of Education, announced the 300 public and private elementary, middle and high schools that were honored with the award. The schools are being honored for having students who achieve at very high levels or for their exemplary progress in closing student achievement gaps. The school’s principal, Mary Liu Lee, and one teacher will be invited to the awards ceremony in Washington, DC on November 14 and 15. Congressman Pete Stark: “The National Blue Ribbon Award is a wonderful achievement for Fremont’s James Leitch Elementary School. It reflects the dedication and values of the students, teachers, administration, parents and the community. I’m proud to have such an impressive place of learning our district.” Mary Liu Lee, Principal of James Leitch Elementary School: “James Leitch Elementary School is the only K-2 school in Fremont Unified School District. I attribute this amazing achievement to our district leadership, dedicated staff, hard working students, and highly involved parents.” The full list of 2011 National Blue Ribbon Schools can be found here: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/nclbbrs/index.html.

Pat Kite’s Garden

BY PAT KITE Have you eaten a cricket lately? According to World Ark magazine, Insects are the current gourmets dining rage. In addition to crickets, connoisseurs of fine food are chowing down on waxworm fritters, mopane worms, palm weevils, weaver ants, and mealworms. Do you like peanuts, but are allergic? Try roasting locusts, the taste is supposed to be similar. Does seafood give you a rash? Avoid the fish by substituting maggots, which make a tasty ceviche when placed in a citrus marmalade. And if herring has too much salt for your diet, add black witch moth larvae to cheese fondue for a similar palate treat. There are 1462 recordable edible insects. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is not only a way to increase protein in your diet, it’s hoped that the trend will decrease the use of insecticides worldwide. Although I am known for eating just about anything, as my scale can attest, I have yet to try deliberately munching on a bug. I also might feel guilt about eating a cricket. I rather like them chirping about in my garden. Occasionally one wanders into my house, chirp, chirp, and chirp. I usually catch it in a jar and deposit it outside. Yes, I know that crickets eat seeds, seedlings and small fruits, but adults of some types munch on pesky aphids and caterpillars. A 1933 Court case, Ben Hur Holding

Corp. v Rox found a cricket infestation to be quite O.K. Apparently, a tenant felt too many crickets were inhabiting his living quarters and tried to withhold his rent payment. The judge decided against him. “… while a cricket is technically an insect and a bug,” the judge ruled, “it would appear from the study of his life that instead of being obnoxious, he is an intellectual little fellow, with certain attainments of refinement and an indefatigable musician par excellence.” Perhaps this renter should have considered eating his crickets. One hundred grams of cricket contain 121 calories, 12.9 grams of protein, 75.8 mg calcium, 185.3 mg of phosphorous, 9.5 mg of iron and a batch of B vitamins. If perhaps you want some cricket recipes, check out the Internet. Recipes, bug-raising advice and general information: www.insectsarefood.com and www.girlmeetsbug.com. Or, for the kids, pay a visit to the biggest live insect store in the country located in our own Concord, California. The Biggest Little Bug Shop in America, edible, pet and weird insects is owned by Ken the Bug Guy. www.kenthebugguy.com. The shop is located at 1717 Solano Way #10. Open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. If you need to telephone: (925) 827-2847. My grandson, the science fan, is going to love this place. Chirp.

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

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Economy added 103,000 jobs in September BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP ECONOMICS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Oct 07 - The United States added 103,000 jobs in September, an improvement over this summer and just enough to calm fears of a new recession that have hung over Wall Street and the nation for weeks. The Labor Department also said Friday that the nation added more jobs than first estimated in July and August. The government's first reading had said the economy added zero jobs in August. The unemployment rate stayed at 9.1 percent. While the report was clearly better than feared, it also showed the economy is not gaining much momentum, said Tom Porcelli,

chief U.S. economist at RBC Capital Markets. “It moves you away from the ledge,” he said. The report sent the stock market higher. The Dow Jones industrial average was up about 35 points at midday. In the bond market, yields rose, another sign that investors welcomed the news. The unemployment report, one of the most closely watched economic indicators, showed that there are two ways of looking at the economy. On one hand, the news was encouraging for economists. Some of them had feared the nation would lose jobs, raising the risk of a devastating second recession. But everyday Americans can't take much solace from that. Unemployment has been stuck at

Obama fundraiser pushed Solyndra loan BY MATTHEW DALY ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Oct 07 - An Energy Department adviser and former fundraiser for President Barack Obama pushed for a California solar company to receive a half-billion federal loan, despite pledging to recuse himself because his wife's law firm represented the company, newly released emails show. The emails show that Steve Spinner, a former Obama fundraiser who helped monitor a clean energy loan guarantee program, was more actively involved in a loan for Solyndra LLC than administration officials have acknowledged. The emails, released by the administration in response to congressional investigators, show that Spinner was actively involved in a planned September 2009 trip by Vice President Joe Biden to Solyndra's Fremont, Calif., headquarters for a groundbreaking ceremony. Biden did not go on the trip but spoke via satellite. Solyndra declared bankruptcy last month after receiving a $528 million federal loan.

In the emails, Spinner, who founded a sports fitness company, repeatedly pushed Energy Department and White House budget officials to ensure that the loan was finalized before Biden's planned trip. The loan closing was announced at the groundbreaking ceremony on Sept. 4, 2009. “How -- hard is this? What is he waiting for?” Spinner wrote in an Aug, 28, 2009 email to a DOE official. “I have the OVP (Office of the Vice President) and WH (the White House) breathing down my neck on this. They are getting itchy to get involved.'' Later that day, Spinner asked the same DOE official to “walk over there and force him to give you the answer.” The emails refer to a DOE loan guarantee official who was evaluating the Solyndra loan. A White House official declined to comment when asked if Spinner's conduct was appropriate. The Obama administration allowed The Associated Press and other news organizations to read the emails on Friday as it prepared to send them to investigators for the House Energy and Commerce Committee. The panel has been

around 9 percent for more than two years. The economy has to add roughly 125,000 jobs a month just to keep up with population growth, more to bring down unemployment. And it's discouraging news for President Barack Obama. The White House has acknowledged that unemployment will likely average 9 percent in 2012. That would be the highest rate any president has faced when seeking reelection since World War II. Obama, adopting a combative tone as he prepares for next year's re-election campaign, has challenged Congress to get behind his $447 billion jobs bill or risk being run out of Washington. continued on page 13

looking into the Solyndra and more broadly at the $38 billion loan guarantee program. Spinner, who served as an adviser to Energy Secretary Steven Chu from April 2009 to September 2010, pledged in writing not to have “active participation'' in any solicitation, due diligence or negotiation related to the Solyndra loan, which has become an embarrassment for the White House and a rallying cry for GOP critics of Obama's clean energy program. Spinner's wife, Allison Berry Spinner, is a partner at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, a firm in Palo Alto, Calif., that represented Solyndra on the DOE loan. Federal records show the firm received at least $2.4 million in legal fees related to the loan. In one email, Spinner asks a DOE official whether the White House budget office has completed its review of the Solyndra loan. “Any word on OMB? Solyndra's getting nervous,” he wrote, four minutes after receiving an email form Solyndra. Energy Department spokesman Damien LaVera said Spinner acted as a liaison for the loan program under the economic stimulus law, but that he played no role in evaluating individual loan applications. “Because his wife agreed not to participate in or receive any financial compensation from her law firm's work on behalf of any loan program applicant, Mr. Spinner was authorized to oversee and monitor the progress of applications, ensure that the program met its deadlines and milestones, and coordinate possicontinued on page 26


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Economy, continued from page 12 The Obama plan aims to jolt the economy but cutting taxes and increasing spending on schools, roads and other public projects. He has proposed paying for it in part by raising taxes on the wealthy and corporations. Obama's Republican rivals are trying to persuade voters that he is to blame for high unemployment and the sluggish economy. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney told Fox News Channel on Friday that Obama is criticizing Congress simply because he is “looking for someone to blame.” The report included some signs that business activity is increasing. The temporary help industry added almost 20,000 jobs, and the length of the average workweek increased slightly. Wages also rose a bit.

More hiring and better pay could add up to more consumer spending. That accounts for 70 percent of the economy. When people spend more money, it generates demand for businesses, which hire more workers. The private sector added 137,000 jobs, up from August but below July's revised total. The economy lost 34,000 government jobs. Local governments in particular cut teachers and other school employees. Among the industries that added jobs in September were construction, retail, temporary help services and health care. Manufacturing cut jobs for a second straight month. The economy returned in September to something closer to the job growth of earlier this year. In

BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Oct 07 California's governor announced Friday that he signed a bill banning the sale, trade and possession of shark fins to protect the world's dwindling shark population. Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB376 over objections that the fins are used in a soup considered a delicacy in some Asian cultures. California joined Hawaii, Washington, Oregon and Guam in the ban that environmental and animal rights activists hailed for closing off Pacific ports in the U.S. to the shark fin trade. “The practice of cutting the fins off of living sharks and dumping them back in the ocean is not only cruel, but it harms the health of our oceans,” Brown wrote in a statement. The bill had split the Asian delegation in the California Legislature. Assemblyman Paul Fong, D-Cupertino, who authored the bill, said it was needed to protect endangered shark

February, March and April, the nation added an average of more than 200,000 jobs a month. But then manufacturing slowed, consumer confidence crashed, and Washington was caught in gridlock - first over whether to raise the nation's borrowing limit and then on how best to get the economy going. Meanwhile, hiring slowed dramatically. The economy added only 53,000 jobs in May and 20,000 in June. The figures out Friday showed hiring improved in July, slowed slightly in August, and improved again in September. Still, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke warned Congress earlier this week that the economic recovery was “close to faltering,” with slow job growth dragging down consumer confidence.

species, but others called the measure racist because the fins are used in a soup. The fins can sell for $600 a pound, and the soup can cost $80 a bowl. The California market for shark-fin soup is the largest outside Asia. During a legislative debate, Sen. Ted Lieu, D-Torrance, noted the bill would ban only part of the shark while permitting the continued consumption of shark skin or steaks. “I respect the governor's decision and now hope the proponents of AB376 will focus on protecting sharks, such as the spiny dogfish shark, from being endangered due to consumption of its meat, such as in steaks and fish and chips,” Lieu said in a statement. Critics of shark finning, which already is restricted in U.S. waters, estimate that fishermen kill 73 million sharks each year for their fins. They said it is particularly cruel because the wounded sharks often are returned to the ocean to die after their fins are removed. “Californians can be proud of their role in giving these remarkable top predators a

Bernanke, speaking in unusually blunt terms, said he could not blame Americans for being frustrated at the financial industry “for getting us into this mess” and at Washington for not coming up with a strong response. August's figures were revised up to show a gain of 57,000 jobs, up from a previous estimate of zero. July was revised up to 127,000 jobs, from 85,000. September's job gains are weaker than they appear. Nearly half came from the rehiring of 45,000 Verizon employees who had been on strike. And more Americans are working part time even though they would prefer full-time work. That total has increased nearly 900,000 in just the past two months, which suggests that

chance to recover their populations and helping to restore balance to our oceans,” said Assemblyman Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, who co-authored the bill. Brown said researchers have estimated that some shark populations have declined by more than 90 percent. “In the interest of future generations, I have signed this bill,” he wrote. The ban was supported by celebrities, including actress Bo Derek and retired NBA center Yao Ming of China. It also was backed by the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International, and other environmental advocates. Brown signed another bill by Fong, AB853, that allows existing stocks of onhand shark fins to be sold until July 1, 2013. It also makes it clear that sport fishermen who catch a shark can still eat the fin or have the shark stuffed and mounted as a trophy. It also clarifies that the ban would not affect stuffing and mounting of sharks, nor the donation of fins to research or medical institutions. “Sharks need their fins, and we don't,” said Jennifer Fearing, the Humane Society's California director. “The momentum to protect sharks globally has taken a huge step forward.” The ban will take effect Jan. 1, 2012.

many recently created jobs have only been part time. When part time workers are added to those without jobs who are discouraged and have given up looking, the so-called “underemployment” rate rose to 16.5 percent from 16.2 percent. That's the highest level since December. The faltering economy has led many employers to reduce hiring. In the first half of this year, the economy grew at the slowest pace since the recession ended in June 2009. Since then, Europe's debt crisis and stock market declines have heightened fears that the economy will struggle to grow enough to avoid a recession.

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Calif. to move all initiatives to November ballots BY JUDY LIN ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Oct 07 Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a bill moving all statewide initiatives and referendums to November general election ballots. In doing so, he also postpones a scheduled vote next June vote on a rainy day fund. Brown signed SB202 by Democratic Sen. Loni Hancock of Berkeley on Friday. He said it ``restores the original understanding'' that initiatives were to be considered at a general election and involve more people. While a rainy day fund is ``prudent,'' the governor says the state cannot put money into savings when it can't pay its bills. The move has drawn complaints from Republican lawmakers who said the bill was a power grab by union interests seeking to delay anti-labor ballot initiatives that could end up on the June ballot, which features the GOP presidential primary.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

October 11, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Tri-City Stargazer OCTOBER 12 – OCTOBER 18, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The planet Neptune, ancient god of the sea, is prominent during this period. If you hear of opportunities that are “too good to be true,” they probably are. It would be easy to see everything through rose colored glasses this week. You may be seeing reality, and then on the other hand, maybe you are seeing what you want to see. Enjoy your enchantments, but don't bet the house payment on them. Do give attention, however, to genuinely intuitive messages that come your way. Aries (March 21-April 20): Activities involving travel, teaching, education, publication or the Internet are given a green light. In the area of relationships, your patience may be short and you might say things you’ll wish you hadn’t. You have a desire to break free from restraints. Perhaps travel in person or via Internet will offer a diversion. Taurus (April 21-May 20): Warning to those on diet and exercise programs: this week it is just too easy to break training. If you mean what you've promised to yourself, don't go anywhere in which you would be in harm's way. It is a time in which you feel more outgoing and extroverted. Social life is a pleasure. Gemini (May 21-June 20): Take up whatever activities you need on a daily basis to resolve or prevent health problems. You may feel a compulsion to clean up files, closets, or other areas of detail. It is one way of organizing your mind. It is a good time to catalogue, classify, and coordinate details for your next project.

Cancer (June 21-July 21): Your energy level is good. Positive outcomes related to your career or work in the world are reflecting well upon you. Almost anything you set out to accomplish is handled in unusually quick time. You have what it takes to be a warrior on behalf of yourself or others. People will listen to you. Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): At this time you have the opportunity to present a product of your intellectual creation. If you have done your homework, then this may be a serious accomplishment. Love and social life are favored. Aspects are not the best for activities concerning the law, travel, or the Internet. Back up everything! Virgo the Virgin (August 3-September 22): Your ruling planet, Mercury, has just changed signs to Leo. This represents a shift of attention from financial matters to focus on communications, neighbors, siblings, and others who are in your daily environment. You may need to consider the needs of your vehicle now. Give it a checkup and a detailing.

Libra the Scales (Sep 22 - Oct. 22) This is a second major week for you, in which you will be pondering important issues. You are launching a new project in self-definition. Anything new can be intimidating, but remind yourself that you stand on the security of solid research in your field. Scorpio (October 23-November 21): Mercury travels rapidly through your sign between now and the end of Oct. During this period there likely will be greater emphasis on communications, errands, and other short distance travels. Your mind is sharp as a tack and your communications are clear and precise. It is an especially good time for education, whether teaching or learning. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21): Your mind is flying with thoughts, details, questions and answers. You want to discuss them, but you definitely do not want someone else to solve your concerns. You seek the balance of a counterpart, one who may debate things without becoming emotional about it.

Capricorn (December 22-January 19): Well, here it is. The spotlight is on you now. You can take this opportunity to improve your status in the world. It represents the beginning of a new stage in maturity as you demonstrate the wisdom you have accrued. You may be adding a role as a mentor or teacher to your repertoire. Aquarius (January 20-February 18): You are attending to responsibilities this week. It is a fairly serious time in which you feel somehow ethically or morally bound to follow through with commitments to the outside world. It is possible you are teaching others what you have learned.

If you have prepared, you will definitely succeed. Pisces (February 19-March 20): The intuitive visionary in you is especially strong at this time. You may serve as the Voice for a greater spiritual purpose if you keep your ego out of the picture. Give to the Greater Whole whatever is within you that needs expression. But if you do this in service of the ego, you could make a mockery of it.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

plants, leading to early pain and bone erosions. After five years, the failure rate of hip resurfacing is at least five percent, and with some implant designs, over 12 percent. With total hip replacement, the failure rate is close to zero percent after five years.”

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the joints. It’s important to note, however, that those benefits quickly go away when you stop exercising.” Various medications may help patients suffering from arthritis, including the pain reliever acetaminophen and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen, which can be purchased over the counter. Other NSAIDs are available as prescription drugs, and people who take such medications should do so only under the supervision of a physician. “These medications can be very effective in treating mild to moderate arthritis,” Dr. Dearborn says. “For more severe pain, patients can get short-term relief with injections of cortisone into the joint. Another option is injections of hyaluronic acids, which are a component of the normal lubricating fluid found in healthy joints, to provide cushioning for the joint.” In a case where there is a dramatic loss of cartilage, the patient may be a candidate for either partial or total knee replacement. Total replacement would generally be performed if the patient’s cartilage is badly damaged on both sides of the knee and under the kneecap or on one side of the knee and under the kneecap. Partial replacement would be an option for patients

who have cartilage damage on only one part of the knee. “Partial knee replacement is a great option for younger patients whose arthritis has not spread throughout the knee,” says Dr. Sah, who completed a fellowship at Rush Hospital in Chicago where they did a high volume of partial knee replacement surgeries. “It also is a good option for elderly patients who have other conditions that might limit their ability to recover from total knee replacement. Partial knee replacement is less invasive, and the ligaments in the center of the knee are left intact, so it feels more like a natural knee.” For arthritic damage to the hip joint, Dr. Dearborn believes total hip replacement is a less invasive and more effective option than “resurfacing” procedures that involve grinding down the surface of the femoral bone and inserting an implant. “Resurfacing implants are cemented on the femoral side, so they are not as durable as total hip implants and are more prone to loosening,” he explains. “Resurfacing implants also require a metal-on-metal bearing, which also have been shown to be problematic in recent reports from Britain and Australia. Some patients have a hypersensitivity to the metals in resurfacing im-

Center for Joint Replacement Ranked #1 in California In April 2011, Washington Hospital's Center for Joint Replacement was named the top joint replacement program in California by HealthGrades. The center has been ranked among the top 10 in California for six years in a row and among the top 5 percent in the nation for five years in a row. Surgeons at the center will perform over 1,400 knee and hip replacements this year. A new facility for the Center for Joint Replacement will open in the spring of 2012. “Our new facility will have the potential for 40 inpatient beds, as well as our outpatient office and dedicated areas for pre-op testing and patient education,” says Dr. Dearborn. “We also will be able to conduct clinical research and hold conferences for visiting physicians in the same building. The new facility will be more convenient for patients and will place our office space just upstairs from the care unit, allowing us quicker access.” For more information about the Center for Joint Replacement, visit www.whhs.com/joint or call 888-494-7003.

Attend a Meeting (All locations are ADA and transit accessible) Tuesday, October 18 – Berkeley 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. South Berkeley Senior Center 2939 Ellis Street, Berkeley

Mobility matters! SUBMITTED BY TESS LENGYEL

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

The Alameda County Transportation Commission (CTC) will hold a second series of interactive workshops to discuss the Alameda Countywide Transportation Plan (CWTP) update and development of a new Transportation Expenditure Plan (TEP) that will guide investments in transportation throughout the county. This session will provide an overview of the CWTP and TEP; present preliminary TEP project, program and financial information and engage participants in prioritizing transportation improvements. All members of the public are welcome. Individuals who require special accommodations (language interpreters, accessible seating, documentation in alternate formats, etc.) should contact MIG at least 72 hours in advance of the workshop. For more information, call Holly Kuljian, MIG, at (510) 845-7549 or visit www.AlamedaCTC.com/cwtp_tep

Wednesday, October 19 - San Leandro 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. San Leandro Senior Community Center 13909 East 14th Street, San Leandro Monday, October 24 – Oakland 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. East Oakland Senior Center 9255 Edes Avenue, Oakland Thursday, October 27 - Union City 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Union City Sports Center 31224 Union City Boulevard, Union City Wednesday, November 2 – Dublin 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Dublin Public Library 200 Civic Plaza, Dublin

Smith Center Presents! A lively and innovative group, Spanish Brass provides a wide-ranging program from J. S. Bach through Dixieland with original music created for the ensemble. Their versatility appeals to any audience. Noted trombonist Philip Jones says, “To listen to a performance of Spanish Brass... is to experience a blend of Latin temperament, brilliant technique and outstanding musicality.”

Spanish Brass: Luur Metalls Saturday, October 15 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $18-$20 Parking: $2

Free E- Waste and Metal Recycling Drive Saturday, October 15 8:30 AM - 3 PM Drop Off Location Front of Warwick Elementary School 3375 Warwick Road, North Fremont (nearest major intersection Decoto Road & Paseo Padre Parkway)

• Accepted Items = Bicycles, Refrigerators, Microwave Ovens, Washing Machines, Dryers, Vacuum Cleaners, Chain Link Fences, Metal Filing Cabinets, Metal Shelving, Metal Desks, TVs, Computers, Monitors, Laptops, Servers, Network Equipment, DVD & VCR Players, Phones, Cell Phones, Printers, Copiers, Keyboards, Mice, Cameras. Items can be any size. • Funds help send Warwick Elementary School 6th Grade Students to Mt. Hermon Science Camp. • Presented by Blue Star Electronics, LLC www.bluestarco.com and the Warwick 6th Graders.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

SUBMITTED BY SUNNY MOZA

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collaborative effort. Shirley Gilbert from the American Association of University Women is one of the authors. A slideshow on women’s history and a question and answer board will round out the presentation. This is a good opportunity for attendees to network with each other and become informed about issues that may impact them. Miriam Keller is the mastermind behind this event. She has been actively involved in the Women’s Movement since 1963 through the League of Women Voters and the American Association of University Women. Currently serving as president of the local branch of LWV, Miriam has a very full schedule. The League holds candidate forums for the mayoral and council elections, as well as discussing ballot measures, and producing a balanced, nonpartisan brochure to inform voters of upcoming issues and candidates. The inspiration for Miriam’s involvement in women’s groups is very personal. As a student at Purdue University, she majored in chemistry. Her desire was to become a teacher of chemistry, math, and physics. When the time came for her to find a mas-

ter teacher to fulfill her student teaching requirement, she had a difficult time finding someone willing to take on a female student teacher. At this time, the modern women’s rights movement was becoming established. She recalls the passion of the time and how the lack of equality impacted her own life. Since then, Miriam has been active in two women’s groups in six different states. Although uncertain about the perspective of young women today, Miriam hopes that they appreciate the work that the women before them did. Women today continue to do very important work in the area of gender equality—equal pay for equal work, family leave for new parents, and respect for women in the workplace. “I think that reminding ourselves that women did a lot of work to get the right to vote is important,” Miriam says. “We hope people will come and celebrate with us.” 100th Anniversary Celebration of Women’s Right to Vote Saturday, October 15 2:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401

S.A.D Entertainment has completed the post-production of their latest entertaining short movie “Love Fool” (Drama/Romance, Hindi with English Subtitles), written and directed by Sunny Moza (www.sunnymoza.com). “Love Fool” was shot in and around the Bay Area with gor-

geous backdrops of beaches, mountains, and greenery. The movie took about seven days to shoot over a period of two months. And after another three months of post-production, which included editing, background score, sound design, and color correction, the movie will finally be released Sunday, October 16. It is the official selection for the Silicon Valley Film Festival. On how the movie was conceived, Moza said, “When I was taking a film making class back in 2008, one of my assignments was to come up with a story idea. I wrote a few lines of ‘Love Fool’ but didn’t really think of actually making it. Usually an idea fizzles

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out after a few weeks or months but when I read it again in 2010, I was still excited about it. That’s when I decided to make a movie out of it and also take it to the next level by adding some Bollywood elements like having an original composition. Before I knew it, ‘Love Fool’ was born.” One of the main highlights of the movie is the original soundtrack, “Love Fool.” It has a very catchy rhythm with inno-

vative lyrics. The song was recorded and shot in Bollywood-style. It has clever references to the last year’s Bollywood chartbusters “Munni” and “Sheela” as well. It is the first time that a Bollywood-type original song has been used in an independent film of this scale. This really connects Bay Area to Bollywood! For Moza, “Love Fool” is another step towards making a feature length film in the Bay Area. His previous notable short movies include “Kurse” (Horror, Hindi with English Subtitles), “Mahabatein” (Comedy, Hindi) and “Choices” (Drama, Eng-

lish). “Kurse” won the prestigious Audience Award at the Northern California Film Festival and was also screened at the Mississippi International Film Festival in 2010. “Love Fool” features a talented cast of Sunny Moza, Preethi Chandrasekhar, and Neha Goyal. It also introduces, in pivotal roles, two fresh faces – Vanessa Patel and Richa Shukla. The professional crew involved in the project includes Pavan Kumar Raj, Riju Francis, Nidhi Moza, Henry Cheung, Dave Borja, Archita Mandal, Harsha Ramakrishna, Ashok Moza, and Akshay Prem Vyas among others, with the movie being produced by Nidhi Moza and Sharanjit Singh. The posters were designed by local artist Neeraj Dhulekar. The foot tapping music that is being aired on the local radio stations is scored by Bill Sorensen of Revolving Orb Productions, and the original background score is composed by the talented Bay Area musician Nishant Asthana. The title track is sung by Aanand Krishnan and Dhira Khosla. Moza said, “It’s not easy to make films with a full time job. But film making is a team effort and I’m very fortunate to have so many talented individuals around me.” This project again showcases the efforts of independent, creative local individuals in the Bay Area. It is the result of hard work of a highly passionate team. The extremely positive feedback and critique, received so far, goes to show that if the script and its execution are right, audiences are continued on page 33


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE

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hat price would you pay to rise above your circumstances? Would you kill to get out of a lowly existence? Seymour Krelborn learns a hard lesson about the cost of fame and fortune in Stage 1 Theatre’s presentation of Little Shop of Horrors, now running through the end of October. Little Shop of Horrors, directed by Belinda Maloney, is a 1950s-styled rock musical as well as a story with a moral lesson. Written by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, the plot of the musical is a mix of horror, tragedy, comedy, and science fiction. The play is set in the urban slums, “Skid Row,” and features a terrific cast of characters. Seymour Krelborn, played by David Irving, is a poor, gentle, nerdy guy. He was an orphan, abandoned in a home for boys, until Mr. Mushnik (Ray D’Ambrosio) took him in and put him to work in his skid row flower shop. The beautiful Audrey, played by Steph Peek, joins bumbling Seymour in the shop; she is not the sharpest crayon in the box and suffers regularly at the hands of her sadistic boyfriend, Orin Scrivello, D.D.S (Jay Crispell). The little shop is on the verge of closing when Seymour reveals a “strange and interesting plant” that begins to attract customers and news crews when strategically placed in the shop window. Seymour is an overnight success, but at a very high price: the plant requires blood to grow. When will the plant’s voracious, carnivorous appetite become too much for Seymour? All of the characters struggle with the same difficulty: how to rise above their situation. Audrey dreams of a little house in the suburbs complete with a toaster and a flagstone patio. Seymour pines for Audrey but feels that he must become financially successful in order for her to notice him. Mr. Mushnik manipulates Seymour so that he can ride the coattails of his fame. These desires present conflicts and the moral lesson becomes very clear in the end, “no matter what they offer you, don’t feed the plants!” continued onpage 33

On behalf of Winnie SUBMITTED BY DEB BROTHERS I just wanted to thank you for printing the story of Winnie – it resulted in her being united with her owner, and the family is very happy she is safe at home. Thank you again for helping us get Winnie home again.

October 11, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

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Straight talk about you, your job and your leg health BY SIMON WONG PHOTO COURTESY OF HAHS

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he Hayward Area Historical Society (HAHS) hosted the first of its Shrouded Tales Tours on the evening of October 8, 2011, at McConaghy House, Hesperian Boulevard, Hayward. The location has much history associated with it and has been subject to paranormal investigations by the American Paranormal Research Association (www.apraparanormal.com) which will return to Hayward on Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29, 2011, for a twonight presentation of its findings and further investigation, involving

the public, at McConaghy House and the Meek Estate. HAHS’s Collections Manager Heather Farquhar and Education Coordinator Johanna Fassbender briefed approximately 20 visitors, for each of the 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. tours, about the McConaghy family’s history before guiding them room-by-room through the Victorian property and discussing late 19th/early 20th century death traditions and superstitions and paranormal findings. How did families inform the public about a death in the family? What materials were used to make a wreath and why? How were visitors to the grieving family “protected from death?” Funeral services were generally held in the deceased’s home before the funeral procession but why was it considered bad luck to lock the door of the house after the mourners left? Guests were entertained in the Company Parlor but the room would also accommodate the deceased, displayed in his/her coffin for approximately four days watched by someone around-the-clock for signs of life. Why? Embalming was rare, so how did the Victorians combat the odor of putrefaction? If the deceased was embalmed, in continued on page 25

Schools drive property prices SUBMITTED BY WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS Join the Women’s Council of REALTORS (WCR) Tri-Cities Chapter and the school board presidents of Fremont, Hayward, New Haven and Newark Unified School Districts for the WCR monthly luncheon at the Hilton Hotel, Newark, on October 19. REALTORS already know property prices reflect the quality and reputation of their school districts. Hear an update about the great things each school district has to offer. Bryan Gebhardt (Fremont), Lisa Brunner (Hayward), Michelle Matthews (New Haven) and Charlie Mensinger (Newark) will be on hand to answer questions and discuss the correlation between educational standards and associated issues. All, including members of the public, are welcome to attend the luncheon. Women’s Council of REALTORS Tri-Cities Chapter Luncheon Wednesday, October 19 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark Chapter Members: $20 / Guests: $28 For more information, visit www.WCRTC.org or call (510) 886-2662.

SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT Eleven restaurants in Downtown Hayward will participate in a “Restaurant Walk” from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. on October 20, 2011. This event is organized in partnership by the City of Hayward, the Chamber of Commerce and the Hayward Public Library. Participants can purchase a coupon book for $20 that entitles them that night to sample enchiladas at the Shark Shack, crab and salmon devilled eggs at Me Restaurant and Lounge, jalapeno croquettes at the Bijou Restaurant, a pint of beer at Buffalo Bill's and great food at other fine Downtown restaurants. A limited number of coupon books are available from the Hayward Public Library Main Branch at 835 C Street and from the Hayward Chamber of Commerce at 22561 Main Street, Hayward. For more information, contact the Hayward Chamber of Commerce at (510) 537-2424 or e-mail susanoc@hayward.org Hayward Restaurant Walk Thursday, October 20 5 – 9 p.m. Downtown Hayward (510) 537-2424 susanoc@hayward.org $20 for coupon book

The Power of Gravity Standing: A simple activity over long periods of time can damage your legs, in many occupations that is exactly what we do all day. The most common forms of vein damage are varicose and spider veins. In most cases, the damage starts in smaller veins and slowly moves to the larger vessels (except in cases where there is a hereditary weakness). Not all vein damage is visible. Often the most noticeable symptoms of vein problems are numbness or tingling in the feet and ankles, swelling at night or leg pain after a long day on your feet.

If your job requires you to be on your feet all day, graduated compression stockings may be a smart solution for you. The good news is: wearing compression stockings while you work not only helps prevent vein problems from getting worse, but also reduces ankle swelling and leg fatigue. Best of all, they make your legs feel great. Compression stockings are fashionable and easy to put on. A certified fitter will assist you. A special note to pregnant women who work: To prevent vein problems, pregnant women are encouraged to wear graduated compression stockings for at least the last trimester of pregnancy.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY GOSIA GIZYCKI

October 11, 2011

SPANISH BRASS

A lively and innovative group, Spanish Brass provides a wide-ranging program from J. S. Bach through Dixieland with original music created for the ensemble. Their versatility appeals to any audience. Noted trombonist Philip Jones says, “To listen to a performance of Spanish Brass...is to experience a blend of Latin temperament, brilliant technique and outstanding musicality.” Experience their wonderful music when they perform at Ohlone College on October 15. Tickets are $18-$20 and parking $2. Call the box office at (510) 659-6031 for tickets or purchase online at www.smithcenter.com. Ohlone College Smith Center Presents! Spanish Brass: Luur Metalls Saturday, October 15 8 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $18-$20

Reserve your apartment by 10/31/2011 and receive Professional Moving Assistance (Value of $1,200).

All-Day restaurant-style dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Friday, Oct 14

Saturday, Oct 15

Heart Walk

Fall Concert $

Corn Husk Dolls

American Heart Association

8 p.m.

1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Mission Peak Brass Band

Gather husks from corn field and create fold art

7:15 a.m. - 11 a.m. Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-5683 (800) 963-7070

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285 Friday, Oct 14

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Amnesty International lecture series

3 p.m. Min Zin, UC Berkeley

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600 Friday, Oct 14

Halloween Storytime and Learn about Dental Health

Lecture series on human rights Mission San Jose High School SPONSORED BY AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

12:15 p.m. Story time and goody bags

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 Nov 12

Rhythm and Light

7 - 9 p.m. The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357 Saturday, Oct 15

Adapting to Sea-Level Rise

2 - 4 p.m. Panel Discussion, effects on wildlife

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Oct 15

Aging Safely at Home

10 a.m. - 12 a.m. Free Workshop Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 Saturday, Oct 15

Amazing Refuge Race R

2 - 4 p.m. Race with and perform tasks, win prizes. Bring GPS

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Saturdy, Oct 15

Annual Sale of Native Plants 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Native plants that attract hummingbirds and butterflies

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Saturdays - Sundays, Oct 15 - Oct 30

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

6 - 10 p.m. Step into the Haunted Hotel, games, food

Chadbourne Carriage House 39169 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0595 Saturday, Oct 15

Celebration of Women's Right to Vote

2:30 p.m. Slide show, dramatic presentation

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

A prayer centered church of spiritually bonded friends

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM A positive path for spiritual living

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Friday October 14 at 3 pm room C-120: UC Berkeley professor Dr. Min Zin will be talking about human rights issues in Burma. He has personal experience with human rights violations in Burma where he grew up and worked as a reporter. He also worked closely with Aung San Suu Kyi, the most famous Burmese opposition politician. Wednesday October 19 at 3pm A Wing Cafeteria: Renowned Stanford University Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial professor Dr. Michele Elam will talk about civil rights of people of multiracial heritage ("Civil Rights of Mixed Folk"). Wednesday October 26 at 3 pm (tentatively A Wing Cafeteria): Dr. Tomas Jimenez from Stanford University will speak about unauthorized immigration and how it relates to human rights.He is the author of Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans Immigration and Identity. 41717 Palm Ave Fremont (510) 657-3600


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Saturday, Oct 15 - Sunday, Oct 16

Library Book Sale

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 16

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Nature Drawing for Kids R Ages 7-12 learn drawing techniques for outdoor sketching

Step into the Haunted Hotel, games, food

Thursday - Sundays, Oct 14 Nov 12

Masonic Home 34400 Mission Blvd., Union City (510) 675-5396

Noon - 4 p.m.

Paint your Pumpkin $ Paint your pumpkins, contest and prizes costumes and pumpkins

Saturday, Oct 15

Shinn House 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-9352

Observe, Explore and Learn Physics

Sunday, Oct 16

11 a.m.

Weekend Weed Warriors

Explore Energy

1 - 4 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Have a positive impact on the environment. We need your help

Saturday, Oct 15

Owls - Music of the Night R

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Listen to different owl calls and walk the park trails

Sulphur Creek Nature Center 1801 D. St., Hayward (510) 881-6747 Saturday, Oct 15

REI Outdoor School GPS Workshop

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Saturday, Oct 15

Scarecrow Scavenger Hunt

Noon - 1 p.m. Help find missing scarecrow parts. Meet at the barn

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Oct 15

Science for Tykes: Arachnomania $R

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Learn how smells are created - Ages 610

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Public input for redrawing AC Transit wards

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410

Stroll along the tidelands trails

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Sunday, Oct 16

Acorn Soup Making $R

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063

3 p.m.

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Sunday, Oct 16

Farmyard Games

2 - 3 p.m. Old-fashioned fun! Hoop rolling, stilts, potato races and more

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 (510) 574-2053 Wednesdays, Thru Nov 16

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5488 (510) 574-2053

Dr. Michele Elam, Stanford University

Thursdays, Thru Nov 17

Mission San Jose High School 41717 Palm Ave., Fremont (510) 657-3600

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

Wednesday, Oct 19

Mobility Matters

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Talk about transportation matters

San Leandro Senior Community Center 13909 East 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 845-7549 Thursday, Oct 20

Creation Station preschool art workshops R Various times Registration begins Oct 13 (Oct 20 for Oct 27 workshop)

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Open Mic

Turn freshly-harvested Indian corn into fun craft. Family fun

Tuesdays, Thru Nov 15

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Free event, Registration required

Thursday, Oct 20

2 - 3 p.m.

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

1 - 2:.30 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Corn Mosaics

Speech and Language Milestones

7 - 8:30 p.m.

Make acorn soup the old way

Sunday, Oct 16

Tuesday, Oct 18 - Aug 18

Jobs Workshop R

Amnesty International lecture series

5:30 7 p.m.

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker" Theatre Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health R

Wednesday, Oct 19

Twilight Marsh Walk

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Monday, Oct 17

Haunted Tour

Saturday, Oct 15

Photography show

7 - 8 p.m.

7 - 9 p.m.

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

AC Redistricting

7 - 8:30 p.m.

Lively and innovative group, wide ranging program

Patterns of Abuse

Parenting with Purpose

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 544-3249

8 p.m.

Wednesday - Saturday, Oct 4 Nov 12

Monday, Oct 17

How to Maker Your Business Thrive During a Recession R

Spanish Brass: Luur Metalls $

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Wait Until Dark 8 p.m.

Tuesday, Oct 18

Saturday, Oct 15

The work of Sonia Gill, Ruth Koch and Wendy Yoshimura

What's That Smell $

Kids 5-10 become arachnologist for the day

Meek Mansion 17365 Boston Rd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

7 - 9 p.m.

Friday-Sunday,Sep 16-Oct 15

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Family history, Victorian death traditions and superstitions, paranormal findings

Rhythm and Light

Sunday, Oct 16

Shrouded Tales Tour $

St. Regis Retirement Center 23950 Mission ∫Blvd. Hayward (Entrance at Main & E Street)

6 - 10 p.m.

Sunday, Oct 16

GPS and the National Wildlife Refuge center

510-881-7888

Candle Lighters Ghost House $

BBQ, Dog Games, Dog Costume Contest, Awards and prizes

1 - 1:45 p.m.

Free Health Screenings Flu Shots Prizes and Entertainment

Saturdays - Sundays, Oct 15 - Oct 30

Chadbourne Carriage House 39169 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-0595

8 - 10 a.m.

Annual Senior Health Fair Thursday Oct 13th 11am - 2pm

Continuing Events

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Mutt Strut $

Here is the link to our website where you can view all five videos pertaining to this program. http://lifeeldercare.org/about-us/videos/

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Fremont Friend of the Library clearance sale

Saturday, Oct 15

LIFE ElderCare's Fall Prevention program works with older adults, in their own homes, to create a personalized physical activity routine that includes aerobic, strengthening, and flexibility components specifically designed to increase mobility. The program also includes a home safely check, minor home modifications and a medication review. Each week, for 12-weeks, Unitek College LVN students visit each participant to answer questions, provide support and assess progress. The program is free to Tri-City residents.

October 11, 2011

7 - 9 p.m. Presented by Fremont Area Writers

Paddy's Coffee House 3900 Smith St., Union City (510) 791-8639 Friday, Oct 21 - Aug 30

Halloween Train $R

7 - 9 p.m. Ride train through fields and woods. Halloween fun

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 (510) 574-2053 Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Castro Valley Parent Nursery School is hosting its first Holiday Craft Faire and Bake Sale Fundraiser Saturday, October 15. Established in 1949, the school is a non-profit parent-run preschool sponsored by the Castro Valley Adult School. Made up of 50 families with each parent working at the school once a week, the school’s mission is to “assist families in the tasks of parenthood and to improve parenting skills in an environment that fosters cooperation, friendship and community involvement.” The Holiday Craft Faire and Bake Sale will be held on campus, so attendees and prospective parents can get a glimpse of the unique environment. The event will offer a little bit of everything from handmade jewelry, ornaments, quilts, and clothing to plants and delicious baked goods. Organizers hope to raise $300,000 from their fundraising efforts this year in order to conduct a large scale reno-

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vation to the converted house that serves as their school. If the faire and bake sale is productive, it will be made an annual event. All proceeds will go to the Castro Valley Parent Nursery School and are tax deductible. Come out and support the school while getting some great holiday gift items. To learn more about the faire and bake sale contact Marisa Jordan at rissy618@yahoo.com. For more about CVPNS visit www.cvpns.org or call (510) 582-7731. Holiday Craft Faire and Bake Sale Saturday, October 15 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Castro Valley Parent Nursery School 3657 Christensen Lane, Castro Valley (510) 582-7731 www.cvpns.org

Black & White Furball SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINA GIN PHOTOS BY GARY GIN Kittens, cats, dogs, puppies, bunnies and other critters of all colors, shapes, sizes and ages are searching for new homes. Staff and volunteers at the Hayward Animal Shelter are busy grooming their charges for the 8th Annual Black & White Furball animal adoption event which will be held at two locations, Hayward Animal Shelter and at PetSmart, Bayfair Mall, San Leandro. Traditionally, most animals available are black and white, hence the event's name, but prospective owners will also be able to choose animals of all different hues. The Hayward Animal Shelter Volunteers are sponsoring the one-day Hayward event which is offering special adoption prices - adopt one pet at the regular price and a second for $20 OR adopt any black, white or black and white pet for $20 plus the cost of the dog license (if adopting a dog). Adoptions are subsidized by shelter volunteers. Special adoption fees also apply to the two-day San Leandro event, sponsored by the Sunshine Rescue Group, which will offer kittens and cats for adoption - adopt one pet at the regular price and a second for $20 OR adopt any black, white or black and white pet for $20. 8th Annual Black & White Furball Saturday, October 15 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Court, Hayward (510) 293-7200, ext. 7 www.HaywardAnimals.org 8th Annual Black & White Furball Saturday, October 15 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Sunday, October 16 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Bayfair PetSmart 15555 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 276-9176

Hayward Animal Shelter Adoption Fees Female cats/kittens: $107 Male cats/kittens: $97 Female dogs/puppies: $168.50 Male dogs/puppies: $143.50 Male and female rabbits: $50 All other animals - turtles, hamsters, guinea pigs, birds, reptiles, etc.: $20. Dog and cat fees include sterilization, shots (rabies, DHPPV and Bordatella for dogs/puppies, and an FVRCP vaccination for cats/kittens), a microchip, a cardboard carrier for cats, and a license for dogs if the adopters are Hayward residents. If the adopter lives outside the City of Hayward, the license fee is deducted. If a pet enters the shelter already spayed or neutered, the fee is reduced because the shelter does not have to subsidize the procedure. Low-cost Spay/Neuter certificates are available to Hayward residents whose pets are intact (proof of residency required): Male cat/kitten: $20 Female cat/kitten: $35 Male dogs: $45 Female dogs: $60

Social Justice and A.P. Statistics students tackle food deserts SUBMITTED BY BELINDA M. SANDOVAL Eighty students from two disciplines - a religious studies and an A.P. Statistics class - put their hands in the dirt. These students from Moreau Catholic High School (MCHS), Hayward, conducted online research, developed interactive maps, attended an expert panel and blogged with their peers about the intersection of poverty, nutrition and the issue of access to healthy food in low-income communities. MCHS sent these students on a multi-destination field trip through Hayward, San Leandro and West Oakland to visit school and urban gardens. This project is the joint venture of theology teacher, Amy Armstrong, and statistics instructor, Barb Mangiardi, who began developing the interdisciplinary, challenge-based learning unit last year. Even before the field trip, both Armstrong and Mangiardi were aware of the power of inter-disciplinary curriculum paired with real-world challenges. "The Statistics students are actually eager to conduct statistical analysis on this issue," said Mangiardi. "They're emotionally invested in the learning and that's what inter-disciplinary and challenge-based learning is all about," Armstrong added. All students had a youth-led tour and vegetable tasting at Tennyson High School's Project EAT. They divided into two groups and visited either the Dig Deep Farms, a project through Alameda County Sheriff's Activity League, or the Mandela Marketplace, a West Oakland umbrella organization that includes the West Oakland Youth Standing Empowered (WYSE) and the Mandela Marketplace Co-operative Food and Grocery. For more information, visit www.MoreauCatholic.org

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Tri-City Voice has even more local recreational, high school, college and professional sports coverage on the Web. Check out www.tricityvoice.com/sports for daily updates on scores, schedules of events, photos slide shows, and much more. Follow TCV Sports on Twitter at twitter.com/TCVSports

TCV encourages parents, coaches and interested fans to write about and send photos of their favorite local team and players. Although our staff is unable to visit and photograph every game of every team, if you write to us at www.tricityvoice@aol.com, we will try to get the word out. On a limited basis, our photographers can schedule a visit to a game or practice session as well.

East Bay hangs in but loses SUBMITTED BY KELLY HAYES October 7 Though it battled hard throughout and nearly pushed the match to a fifth set, an upset was not in the cards for the Cal State East Bay volleyball team, falling to third-ranked Cal State San Bernardino, 3-1 (25-17, 24-26, 25-14, 25-22). The Pioneers (10-5, 5-5 CCAA) laid down 52 kills and posted five blocks, the undefeated Coyotes (15-0, 10-0) were better, hitting at a .351 clip and notching 12 blocks in the victory. “This team is very solid, but our consistency on the court must improve,” Head Coach Jim Spagle said. “We have to become far more resilient when things don’t go our way and work diligently at turning a negative into a positive. With that said, though, I am proud of the way our athletes competed this evening. We just need to learn to finish strong and maintain our aggressive style of play.” Leading an assertive attack for the Pioneers were sophomore Katie Allen and junior Kitona Offord, who combined for 25 of the team’s 52 kills on the night. Allen paced the team with 13 putaways and added eight digs and an ace. Offord was East Bay’s best hitter, swinging at a .476 clip and posting 12 kills and a block. Juniors Kristin Neary and Danielle Stewart again shared the setting duties, with Neary dishing out 35 assists and leading the team with three aces. Junior Nicole Boyle got in on the action as well, falling just one kill shy of a double-double with 13 digs and nine putaways in the match. At the net, both Morgan Hirzel and Samantha Bruno stepped up to the challenge of the Coyotes’ dangerous middle hitters, combining for seven total

Robert Turbin continues to dominate SUBMITTED BY MEGAN ALLEN Junior running back Robert Turbin (Fremont, Calif.) rushed for 123 yards including an 80-yard touchdown burst on the first offensive play of the game, in Utah State’s 27-24 loss at BYU. Turbin added two catches for 22-yards on the night, including a 24-yard TD reception. He now has at least two touchdowns in all four USU games this season, and at least one rushing TD in his last nine games played. Friday was Turbin’s thirdstraight 100-yard rushing game and the 11th of his career.

Fremont Christian defeats Emery High School in straight sets SUBMITTED BY BILL KRUPPA FCS Emery

October 5 25 25 8 12

blocks along with 13 kills. Senior libero Leslie Ray led the defense, posting 22 digs and just one serve reception error in 23 chances. Allen was also a stellar passer, leading the team with 32 serve reception attempts and only one error. The road to victory went through Cal State San Bernardino’s impressive middle hitters, led by reigning AVCA Player of the Year Samantha Middleborn. The senior laid down 19 kills with just one error on the night, hitting at an astounding .720 clip. Not to be outdone, fellow middle blocker Megan Johnson put away 11 kills and bested Middleborn with a .769 hitting percentage in the match. Johnson also helped the Coyotes post a 12-5 advantage in blocks with eight block assists on the night. The pair were nearly unstoppable, committing just two attack errors and combining to hit at a .736 clip while adding 13 total blocks between them. Morgan Carty gave the Coyotes a double-figure trifecta, laying down 10 kills while posting a double-double with 11 digs. Carty also added five total blocks and a pair of aces for CSUSB, while setter Camille Smith led all players with 42 assists and completed her own double-double with 10 digs. It wasn’t all fun and games for the Coyotes, though, who committed nine service errors and five blocking errors in the match. The Pioneers dropped in seven aces against the CSUSB backline, with three coming in the second set. East Bay also held off set-point for the Coyotes seven times in the match, including a string that saw the Pioneers score four straight points to not only stop CSUSB from gaining a 2-0 advantage but also to come from behind to win in the second set.

James Logan Girls' Volleyball SUBMITTED BY STEVE BURMASTER, LOGAN VOLLEYBALL COACH October 6 James Logan High School Girls' Volleyball defeated Newwark Memorial High School in a Mission Valley Athletic League match @ Newark by scores of: 14-25, 25-11, 2520, 25-15 to remain undefeated in the MVAL with a 5-0 record. Logan’s next match is Tuesday, October 11th @ home vs. Kennedy High School.

Ohlone finds the right combination SUBMITTED BY COACH JEREMY PEÑAFLOR October 3 Ohlone women’s volleyball team traveled to Skyline and returned to a winning track defeating the Trojans 3-1 (22-25, 25-17, 25-20, 25-18). Go Renegades! October 5 Foothill defeats @Ohlone 3-0 (25-14, 25-14, 25-15) October 7 Ohlone defeats @De Anza, 3-0 (25-23, 25-21, 25-13)

Irvington accumulates top team score

25 18

Team leaders for FCS: Erikah Pereira with 6 aces and 1 kill Shelby Bolduc with 2 blocks and 1 kill

Mission San Jose tops Las Lomas SUBMITTED BY COACH VALERIE SALTO October 6 Varsity: MSJ beats Las Lomas 142.65 to 54.85 JV: MSJ beats Las Lomas 140.10 to 30.30

SUBMITTED BY COACH SHANNON THOKE In an October 6th meeting between gymnastics teams of Irvington HS and Washington HS, final team totals of Varsity and Varsity Elite favored the Irvington Vikings 132.70 over the Washington Huskies 114.60. Gymnastic teams will compete for the next four weeks.


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Chabot College Wrestling SUBMITTED BY STEVE SIROY Chabot traveled to Modesto last weekend to compete in a tournament with wrestlers from 16 regional community col-

leges. While placing eighth overall in the tournament, the Galdiators were well represented as four Gladiator grapplers placed in the top five including two championships:

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In the 174 lb. championship match, Chabot's Dwight Flores pinned Bakersfield wrestler Lance Castaneda in 4:55 to become Chabot first Champion of the night. In the heavyweights, Chabot’s Richard Segovia won by Decision over Fresno's Luis Contreras 4- 3 to become Chabot second champion of the night! Currently Richard is undefeated in the state with a record of 11- 0.

At the 184 lb. weight class, Chabot's Naweed Zemaryalai placed fifth. In his consolation finals match, he wrestled and beat Fresno's Preston Hill by a decision of 8 - 4. At the 285 lb. weight class, our number two wrestler, Buddy Barraza, placed fourth, losing his consolation finals match by a score of 7 - 8 to Sierra college wrestler Dan Gusev.

Irvington Football Recap SUBMITTED BY MICHELLE STONE, IRVINGTON HS ATHLETIC DIRECTOR PHOTOS BY MIKE HEITCHEW After a great start to the season and beating the Washington Huskies 37-31, which has not been done in many years, the Irvington Vikings pulled off a third straight come-from-behind victory. This gave the Irvington coaching staff a new sense of hope for plans to build a more competitive program in the future. The Vikings hit a bump in the road on October 6th when, after racking up a 14-point lead against the American Eagles, the lead quickly faded in the fourth quarter resulting in a loss (28-58). Irvington would like to recognize its outstanding players on this year’s Vikings squad: Week of August 28 #51 – Ernie Baung Ernie led the defense with six tackles while anchoring an offensive line that paved the way for 265 yards rushing. He also played every snap of the game. Week of September 11 #7 – Raeshawn Lee Raeshawn was all over the field this week with 10 rushes for 109 yards. He scored three touchdowns, two receptions for 47 yards and an interception on defense. Week of September 18 #8 – Jack Shank Jack had his best game as a varsity player completing six of 10 passes, one touchdown to take the lead with 1 minute 19 seconds left. He also ran for 60 yards, a touchdown, and blocked what would have been the game-winning field goal with 19 seconds left in the game. Week of September 25 #11 – Dvlan Werth Dvlan anchored the defense with eight tackles and an interception. He also added 56 yards on six carries and one touchdown.

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which room was it done? Through which entrance/exit did the coffin leave the house and in which direction did it point? What did the undertakers do when the funeral procession left for the cemetery? The Hayward Area Recreation and Park District saved McConaghy House in 1973, a year after the last family member, John McConaghy, passed away, aged 100. Unfortunately, most of the original contents were scattered before the acquisition but some pieces of furniture and items have been returned for display. According to paranormal investigators, spirits not only attach themselves to properties but also to objects.

“McConaghy House is open to the public on Saturdays between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Today, a member of a small group asked one of the docents ‘Are there any ghosts? Is the house haunted?’ The docent was diplomatic but the visitor interjected and informed her that she had already seen ‘them.’ Apparently, the visitor and her aunt are sensitive to such phenomena and had seen a young girl sitting at the kitchen table,” stated Fassbender. “The McConaghy women passed away in adulthood; the family didn’t lose a daughter in childhood. The kitchen table is not an original piece, so whom did the visitor see?” Portents of death abound in Victorian culture. To modern

minds, these are superstitions but might there be some truth in them? What was mourning jewelry? What are memento mori and their purpose? How does complex Victorian etiquette compare to today’s form and what were the consequences of nonobservance? The Family Parlor is the latter-day equivalent of the family room. At McConaghy House, paranormal investigators recorded a man’s voice saying “Just let them go, Dad.” A member of the public, participating in past investigations, felt a distinct drop in temperature beside her while her body temperature remained normal. Are the McConaghys still in residence or are other people from the past present? In September 2009, investigators recorded the name “Flo” in the Servants’ Room and consulted Farquhar. Might this be John’s wife, Florence, who passed away in July 1939? There is no mention of her in the short, fam-

ily biography on the HAHS website and investigators claimed no knowledge of her as a family member until they consulted the Collections Manager. Visitors who took the hourlong Shrouded Tales Tour of McConaghy House were treated to more electronic voice phenomena (recordings picked up by paranormal investigators using digital recorders) on reaching the attic, one of the more active places in the house for investigators. “The tours are designed to educate visitors about Victorian traditions and superstitions associated with death, in general. However, the information, which includes some of the results of paranormal investigations, presented on each tour focuses on the location to illustrate how customs and values were reinforced. The families and symbolism play important roles,” explained Farquhar. Admission for each tour is $10 for adults, $5 for HAHS members, students and seniors.

The tours are not recommended for children. Proceeds from the tour go to the care and preservation of these historic sites. Space is limited and tickets must be purchased in advance by contacting Heather Farquhar at (510) 581-2516. The Shrouded Tales Tours is an annual series of guided and educational tours organized by HAHS each October. Any groups that would like to take the tours at another time should submit a request to Heather Farquhar at (510) 581-2516. For more about the Hayward Area Historical Society, visit www.HaywardAreaHistory.org Meek Mansion Tour Saturday, October 15 7 p.m. & 9 p.m. 17365 Boston Rd., Hayward San Lorenzo Pioneer Cemetery Tour Saturday, October 22 7 p.m. Corner of Hesperian Blvd., and College St., San Lorenzo

American Heart Association Heart Walk SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS Join the Fremont Art Association’s Digital Photography Group (FAADPG) on an annual photo night-out on Saturday, October 15 from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. to the historic St. Joseph Cemetery in Fremont. This spooky on-site free lesson will be provided by award-winning photographers, Ralph Cooksey-Talbott and Jacline Deridder. This will be a great opportunity to learn night photography. Learn about time exposures, open flash photography, and painting with light. Create the photographs into haunting images through the use of some Photoshop magic. Meet at the newly located Fremont Art As-

sociation Gallery, 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (corner of J street) at 7 p.m. Bring a flashlight, jacket, camera capable of having its shutter locked open in the bulb (B) setting, and a tripod or other support to hold the camera steady. Participants must be over 18 and sign a Release of Liability. For questions, call Cooksey at (510) 7420548. For more info, visit: www.faadpgning.com. Halloween Photo Night Out Saturday, October 15 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Gallery 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.faadpgning.com Free

Shinn House by CookseyTalbott

SUBMITTED BY WASHINGTON HOSPITAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM Washington Hospital invites community members to participate in the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Heart Walk on Saturday, October 15, 2011, at Lake Elizabeth, Central Park, Fremont. Co-sponsored by the Washington Township Medical Foundation, the event will take place from 8 to 11 a.m. The event opens to participants at 7:15 a.m. Attendees have the option of taking part in a one- or three-mile walk and the event will also feature heart health education booths including health screenings, information on CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and general information for people to live a healthier lifestyle. The free event’s goal is to raise awareness of heart disease and to provide a healthy, fun way of promoting overall health and helping to prevent heart disease in our community. Community members can spend a morning in the park and support a great cause by joining an existing Washington Hospital or Washington Township Medical Foundation team, or create their own. For team information, visit

http://tinyurl.com/3svgzj4. Alternatively, just come to the event, enjoy the health fair, walk around the lake and have a great time. For more information and specific details about this event, visit http://tinyurl.com/4xml83t or call (800) 963-7070. American Heart Association 2011 Heart Walk Saturday, October 15 7:15 – 11 a.m. Lake Elizabeth Central Park 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (800) 963-7070 www.whhs.com/heartwalk

Schedule of Events 7:15 a.m. Event officially opens to participants (Staging area: Picnic area behind Aqua Adventure Water Park - Parking available at Paseo Padre Pkwy. and Baylis St.) 7:40 a.m. Team photos begin 8:10 a.m. Program Begins 8:25 a.m. Warm up Begins! 8:30 a.m. Walk Begins! 8:45 a.m. Miracle Mile begins 9:15 a.m. Health information and fun in the festival area


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Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Milpitas City Council

Fremont City Council Fremont CityCounclCouncil October 3 & October 4 October 3rd Scheduled Items: Midtown Preliminary Financing Plan review discussed the disposition, expense and funding of the first phase of development on Capitol Avenue, State Street and extension to Fremont Boulevard. A future phase will include consolidation of the “Civic Center.” Funding recommendations included public and private investment including transfer of City Certificates of Participation to alternate sites, sale of City-owned land outside the Midtown area, remnant parcels, forming a Community Facility District and grants from outside agencies. Development is focused on “Lifestyle mixed-use” which includes office, retail and high density residential. Incentives including an Environmental Impact Review with approved entitlements, reduced development fees, financing impact fees and flexibility of parking requirements will be explored to entice private development. An Arts Program will enhance the Midtown area as well. Follow-up to a Dominic Dutra referral to consider relocating City Hall and a Civic Center complex to the South Fremont/Warm Springs area near the future BART station. Following discussion of the Civic Center in Midtown, council discussed the merits of moving the civic center of Fremont to the vicinity of the future BART station in Warm Springs. Mr. Dutra argued that the location, although in South Fremont, was enticing since it is close to both I-680 and I-880, would provide public transportation access and would develop quickly due to BART, residential, retail and business opportunities. Councilmember Natarajan strongly opposed the proposal and Councilmember Harrison agreed while Councilmember Chan asked a myriad of questions without moving in any particular direction. Mayor Wasserman expressed doubts but all remained in flux until Dutra declared that he believed there was little support for his proposal and withdrew the proposal. October 4th Consent Calendar: Award contract for grade separation improvements at Paseo Padre Parkway/UPRR to AMG Pipeline in the amount of $104,484. Adopt a two-year Memorandum of Understanding with Operating Engineers Local 3. Ceremonial Items: Recognize certified “Green Businesses” in Fremont including: Maid to Order, American Natural & Organic Spices, Del Conte’s Landscaping, Delta Products Corporation, Instor Solutions, Green Leaf Cleaners and, although located in Union City, Bay Printing. Declare 2011 as a Year of Celebration of the 100 Year Anniversary of California women winning the right to vote. Declaring October 7 as California Arts Day Proclaim Make A Difference Day, Saturday, October 22 Other Business: Consider staff recommendations for a Strategic Sustainability Action Plan separating actions into three basic categories: Immediate (2011/12 fiscal year); MidRange (1-2 years); Long-Range (3-4 years). Among the proposals to be considered in a comprehensive list of budget principals, phased outsourcing of landscape and park maintenance, a two-tiered retirement plan, consolidation of IT departments, transition General Fund supported Human Services to Alameda County, implement a rotating 4/10 police patrol schedule, civilianize some public safety positions, consolidate police and fire dispatch and review consolidation with Newark and Union City. Other changes included cell phone usage, increased salary steps, fire department staffing and the possibility of new taxes. The council spoke about the impact of these changes and possible negative impacts, but agreed that in order to sustain City operations, changes must be implemented in a timely manner. All stakeholders should be involved with the process. Public comment included several speakers who cautioned against human services cuts that would create extensive hardship on those who are most vulnerable in Fremont society.

Milpitas City Council October 4, 2011 Presentations Commended Russell Middle School teacher Dawn Hartman for her 8th grade Geometry Class’ achievement of a 100 percent score in STAR Testing for 2011. Council recognized St. John’s Knights of Columbus Council No. 5796 and St. Elizabeth Knights of Columbus Council No. 8747 for their assistance with people with intellectual disabilities. Proclaimed October 9-15, 2011 as Fire Prevention Week. Consent Received September 2011 Odor Control Report. Received work progress report on Emergency Contract Work Order for the Variable Frequency Drives/Pump Motor Assemblies for the Ayer Pump Station; all work currently within $650,000 budget. Amended Enforceable Obligation Payment Schedule which enables the Redevelopment Agency to make payments on pre-existing obligations. Granted final acceptance of Carlo Street Ramp Conversion and release contractor’s bond. Approved amendments to the Emergency Preparedness Commission ByLaws; they include having eight residents or business representatives, eliminating the necessity for Chair and Vice Chair to be residents and recommended deletion of reference to any member being from the industrial community. Approved request to waive fees for the Milpitas Lions Club to host their District Leadership Forum on November 3, 2012; waiver totals $1,827.50, which is 50 percent of facility rental fees. Granted final acceptance of the Alviso Adobe Renovation Phase III and released contractor’s bond; project included structural stabilization and reconstruction of the exterior finishes. Authorized purchase of Cayenta software support and maintenance agreement for financial and utility billing system for a maximum amount of $115,385.76; Cayenta was deemed sole source provider for their software services. Rejected all bids and authorized re-advertisement for bid proposals for the Alviso Adobe Renovation Phase IV, estimated at $2.4M. Garden City Construction, Inc. had previously submitted the lowest bid for the project but later withdrew due to a significant mathematical error in determining the proposal value; staff believes rebidding the project will lead to lower, more responsive bids. Approved new three-year agreement extensions for collection, transportation and recycling of debris with both Allied Waste and Green Waste Recovery. Received report on Emergency Contract Work Order for the replacement of sidewalk segment on Abel Street. Project requires reconstruction and stabilization of soil under the sidewalk and restoration of the concrete sidewalk section; total cost estimated at $75,000; city will solicit bids for the work. Awarded contract to Hansel Ford for the purchase of six 2011 Ford Crown Victoria interceptors to replace aged police vehicles for the maximum amount of $152,387.55; price includes sales and tire tax, and 100,000 mile warranty. Public Hearing Considered two separate appeals to the Planning Commission’s approval of a planned wireless telecommunication tower. Liu Cheng opposed the tower, citing possible negative health effects from radio frequency emissions; Capitol Telecom representative Scott Von Ryan appealed the Planning Commission’s reduced height recommendation from 80 ft. to 60 ft., citing loss of signal strength. Council approved tower and restored height to 80 ft. (3 YES, 1 NO (Esteves)). Unfinished Business Received Health and Safety Report on Friendly Village Mobile Home Park. City Building and Safety Department staff reviewed resident complaints such as broken asphalt, poor drainage causing roadway flooding and damaged driveways; all complaints have been addressed. Vice Mayor McHugh was reaffirmed as the city’s representative to the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) Board of Representatives. The Northeast Group (Milpitas, Santa Clara and Sunnyvale) must select two board representatives and one alternate; selections must be finalized by January 1, 2012. Received a report on crime in Milpitas from Police Chief Dennis Graham; crime in the City has decreased by 5.27 percent compared to 2010; from January to August 2011, crime has fallen overall by 12.42 percent but residential burglaries have increased; future crime reports will be presented every six months. Report on single-use carryout bags moved to a future meeting. Recommendations on additional inmates at Elmwood Correctional Facility; report on Open Government Ordinance compliance and report on Senior Center operating hours moved to next meeting Public Forum Milpitas Food Bank Director Karen Kolander announced the food bank is now at 1440 South Main Street, Milpitas. Robert Marini questioned sewage fee increases for single- and multi-family units. Bill Ferguson disagreed with recently approved contribution limit increases. Mayor Jose Esteves Vice Mayor Pete McHugh Debbie Giordano Jose Gomez Jr. Althea Polanski

Candidate boot camp SUBMITTED BY GOOD GOVERNMENT NOW! Considering running for political office? Candidate Boot Camp on November 12, 2011, is for anyone wishing to know more about what it takes to run for political office and is taught by a team of political campaign experts. Attendees will learn how to run an effective campaign, about the electoral process, fundraising, campaign strategies using volunteers, social networking, direct mail and signs to raise awareness of their candidacy and campaign and compliance with state-mandated reporting requirements. This class is designed for all candidates interesting in running for mayor, city council, school boards, parks and recreation boards, hospital, sanitary and transportation districts and other elected offices. Class size is limited; early registration is recommended. $79 per person before November 1; $99 per person after November 1. The class is organized by Good Government Now! the Political Action Committee of the Hayward Chamber of Commerce. For more information and registration, call (510) 917-2611. Candidate Boot Camp Saturday, November 12 9:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. HARD Southgate Community Center 26780 Chiplay Avenue, Hayward (510) 917-2611

American Red Cross Mobile Blood Drives SUBMITTED BY JARED SCHULTZMAN Kaiser Permanente Friday, October 21 11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Conference Rooms C1, C2 and C3 27400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Ohlone College Wednesday, October 26 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Building 5, Cafeteria 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

For more information, call 1-800RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org. Follow us on Twitter at @ARCBloodNorCal. The Red Cross recommends scheduling an appointment to donate.

YES YES ABSENT YES YES

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Obama fundraiser pushed Solyndra loan ble public announcements,'' LaVera said in an email Friday. Spinner “was not allowed to make decisions on the terms or conditions of any particular loan guarantee or decide whether a particular transaction was approved,” LaVera said, adding that the arrangement was approved by the Energy Department's ethics officer. Spinner now is a senior fellow

at the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank closely identified with the Obama administration, where he focuses on energy policy. A biography on the CAP website says Spinner “helped oversee the more than $100 billion of loan guarantee and direct lending authority for the Title XVII Loan Guarantee Program and the Ad-

vanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing loan program.” An administration official, speaking on condition that he not be identified because of the congressional investigation, said Friday that Spinner “clearly was actively involved in facilitating between DOE and OMB,” the White House budget office, but said his main focus was the

planned Biden trip for the Solyndra groundbreaking. Administration officials cited an August 2009 email from Aditya Kumar, an aide to former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel, now Chicago mayor. Kumar asks Spinner who are Solyndra's major investors and receives a detailed answer. The White House “doesn't

even know the names of the (Solyndra) investors,” said the official, refuting oft-repeated claims by some GOP lawmakers that the Solyndra deal was approved to benefit Oklahoma billionaire George Kaiser, a Solyndra investor and Obama fundraiser. Follow Matthew Daly's energy coverage on Twitter at http://twitter.com/MatthewDalyWDC


October 11, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

Ethan’s Legacy as well. Well reasoned and concise discussions are welcome and expected from our leadership but too often, time is wasted on speeches that add little to what has been previously reviewed. It seems that each councilperson is intent on putting a comment or two – or three or four or more – on the record.

WILLIAM MARSHAK

Y

ears ago, I spent many late nights in college bull sessions discussing what seemed at the time, to be critically important issues. In retrospect, some of these meetings were aptly named as “bull” but they did allow a group of young, relatively immature and inquisitive minds to follow a variety of paths to explore the nature of things. One memorable session involved a soliloquy by a good friend, “Ethan,” who spent at least an hour asking the question… “Where does it all come from?” He spoke of how human consumption is dependent upon an almost incomprehensible, intricate web of production, transportation and delivery systems. Although nothing was solved in those discussions, the intensity and earnest involvement is unforgettable. Listening to some of the remarks, questions and oratory at City Council sessions transports me back to those days and pays homage to Ethan. The major difference is time spent listening to this type of discourse in a dorm room as a college student versus watching elected leaders follow the same pattern. I have to admit that some sense of enjoyment can be gleaned from these performances but they are tempered by a feeling of dismay

Halloween Storytime /Learn About Dental Health

A recent referral by Dominic Dutra to consider moving the Civic Center of Fremont to Warm Springs offered an interesting comparison of “bull” sessions. While the idea was certainly novel and offered a diversion from the extensive planning and expense that has already been expended by City staff and council, it was as one councilperson put it, not only on the edge of the box, but beyond it. Serious discussion included asking a developer in the midst of planning for a “midtown” project if a whimsical relocation would alter his assessment of Fremont. Ethan would be proud! Following definitive statements by Councilmembers Dutra, Natarajan and Harrison, it was disappointing to hear Councilmember Chan simply ask questions without any resolution and Mayor Wasserman appear to be baffled when confronted with a decision. Round after round of comments, questions, comments and more comments left the council stalled, lapsing into a silent pit of inaction. To his credit, finally Councilmember Dutra took the reins noting that the sense of the council was to retain its commitment to the current focus of Midtown… the matter was dropped.

Join Dr. Jenny and her assistant Shirley and learn how to help your child develop good dental health plus listen to some Halloween stories. Each child will receive a goody bag from the Easter Bunny. This event is sponsored by the staff at New Park Mall Dental. This free 45 minute program will be held in the Storytime Theatre of the Children’s Area. Storytime Friday October 14 12:15 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 kpacheco@aclibrary.org

Circular logic and reluctance to make decisions is not only detrimental to a clear visionary process but can be a serious flaw when trying to send a message to those in the private sector who choose to invest in Fremont’s future. When councilmembers utter the dreaded words: “I don’t have much to add” or “Just a few quick comments,” a signal of empty oratory is in the air. While such discussions were often enjoyable in college bull sessions, they do not always carry the same sense of importance and significance in City Council Chambers. Although Ethan has passed on and I miss him, his voice is often loud and clear in my weekly sojourns to council meetings.

PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye Lou Messina ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

REPORTERS

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Alyson Whitaker WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

This type of behavior would be simply an interesting sideline to business as usual except that in many instances this IS business as usual. Review of the Dutra

County receives important grant SUBMITTED BY MIKE DONOHOE

SUBMITTED BY KAREN PACHECO

referral was held during a special meeting of the council that followed another item… a Midtown Preliminary Financing Plan. It is weird to discuss how to finance a major commitment to a portion of the City followed by a lengthy discussion of whether to drop the whole thing and completely reorganize the Capitol Avenue corridor.

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

The Santa Clara County Office of the Sheriff will receive $499,250 in Child Sexual Predator Program (CSPP) grant funding from the United States Department of Justice’s Community Oriented Policing (COPS) Office. “Every child deserves a safe and secure childhood. There’s nothing more important than protecting our children from the unfathomable crimes committed by child sexual predators and exploiters. This funding will assist in the fight against the very real problem of child sexual abuse and exploitation,” Supervisor Cortese, who declared 2011 the “Year of the Child” in Santa Clara County, stated President of the Santa Clara Board of Supervisors Dave Cortese, who declared 2011 the “Year of the Child” in Santa Clara County. The COPS CSPP grant provides funding directly to law enforcement agencies to establish and/or enhance strategies to locate, arrest, and

prosecute child sexual predators and exploiters and to enhance state sex offender registration laws. COPS CSPP aims to support community policing initiatives throughout the United States by promoting partnerships between local law enforcement, U.S. Attorneys’ Offices, the U.S. Marshals Service and other community partners to collectively reduce and prevent child endangerment by sexual predators. “Our community has clearly indicated that keeping our children safe is one of its highest priorities. I’m thrilled the Office of the Sheriff will partner with the United States Marshals Service and United States Attorneys’ Office to develop aggressive strategies to combat crimes against our children in Santa Clara County and throughout 11 other California counties,” said Supervisor Cortese. For more information please contact Mike Donohoe at (408) 299-5030.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG11585997 Superior Court of California, County of ALAMEDA Petition of: CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: CHARLES EDWIN GRANNIS to SYRAH MAE GRANNIS The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 12/01/2011 Time: 2:30 p.m., Dept.: 608, Room: n/a The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: TRI-CITY VOICE Date: AUGUST 23, 2011 ----JUDGE of the Superior Court 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11 CNS-2182612#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456648 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Hydrolypozene, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Matt Bidner, 4767 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Matthew Bidner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 28, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11 CNS-2183282# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455792 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MD Consulting, 2884 Cutler Ave., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Yong Song, 2884 Cutler Ave., Fremont, CA 94536

This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Yong Song This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 1, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/11 CNS-2183268# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456173-75 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. Family Child Care Taxes, (Renewed) 2. Family Child Care Taxes and Payroll (Renewed), 3. Family Child Care Payroll Service, 34670 Calcutta Dr., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Alison T. Jacks, 34670 Calcutta Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by as individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on (1) 6/11/08, (2) 10/28/09, (3) 9/7/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Alison T. Jacks This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 15, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/11 CNS-2178694# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455871 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sharpe Image Beauty Salon, 5462 Newpark Mall Rd., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Satwinder Chayra, 37353 Ingraham St., Newark, CA 94560 Amritpal Singh, 180 Elm Court, H, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 This business is conducted by a General Partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9/6/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Satwinder Chayra, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration.

The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/11 CNS-2178689# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455910 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TLT BBQ, 39257 Cedar Blvd., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda TLT International, 39257 Cedar Blvd., Newark, CA 94560; CA This business is conducted by a corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 03/01/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) TLT International /s/ Nan Tang, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 7, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/11 CNS-2175354# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456073 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cakes Oh Cakes, 39947 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda; Mailing Address: 38870 Hayes St., Fremont, CA 94536 Raghida Assio, 38870 Hayes St., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Raghida Assio This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 13, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/11 CNS-2175147#

BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900722 for Clerk Recorder System, Thursday, October 27, 2011, 10:00 a.m. – City of Dublin, 100 Civic Plaza, Regional Meeting Room, Dublin, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on January 19, 2012 County Contact : Stefanie Taylor (510) 208-9610 or via email: stefanie.taylor@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 10/11/11 CNS-2187300# CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 16-2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT, AMENDING VARIOUS SECTIONS OF ARTICLE 21.7 OF FREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE TITLE VII (PLANNING AND ZONING), CHAPTER 2 (ZONING) REGARDING THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORDINANCE On September 20, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance amending various sections of Article 21.7 of Fremont Municipal Code Title VII (Planning and Zoning), Chapter 2 (Zoning) regarding the Affordable Housing Ordinance. The Ordinance was adopted at a regular meeting of the City of Fremont City Council held October 4, 2011, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Mayor Wasserman, Vice Mayor Chan, Councilmembers: Natarajan and Harrison NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: Councilmember Dutra A certified copy of the full text of Ordinance No. 16-2011 as adopted is available for review upon request in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont. SUSAN GAUTHIER DEPUTY CITY CLERK 10/11/11 CNS-2187175# CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 15-2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT AMENDING THE PRECISE PLAN FOR PLANNED DISTRICT P-2005-80 (VILLA D’ESTE) LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF ARDENWOOD BOULEVARD AND PASEO PADRE PARKWAY IN THE NORTHERN PLAIN PLANNING AREA On September 20, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance amending the precise plan for Planned District P-2005-80 (Villa D’este) located at the southeast corner of Ardenwood Boulevard and Paseo Padre Parkway in the Northern Plain Planning Area. The Ordinance was adopted at a regular meeting of the City of Fremont City Council held October 4, 2011, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Mayor Wasserman, Vice Mayor Chan, Councilmembers: Natarajan, Harrison and Dutra NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAINED: None

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900722 for Clerk Recorder System, Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 2:00 p.m. – General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th floor, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY

A certified copy of the full text of Ordinance No. 15-2011 as adopted is available for review upon request in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont. SUSAN GAUTHIER DEPUTY CITY CLERK 10/11/11 CNS-2187172#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 28th DAY OFOctober 2011at or after 11:00ampursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Thornton U-Haul, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Esemerelda Ablang B178 7/30/2011 Michael Basilio C102 8/1/2011 Donald Hewitt C241 8/19/2011 David Perdue, Jr C272 8/16/2011 10/11, 10/18/11 CNS-2187651# AMENDED NOTICE OF WAREHOUSE LIEN SALE I am an attorney at law retained to collect these debts. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the mobilehome described below will be sold as is at public sale on November 3, 2011 at the hour of 10:30 a.m., at Space 95 Palm Drive, Tropics Mobile Home Park located at 33000 Almaden Blvd., Union City, California in order to satisfy the lien claimed by the owner of the above mentioned mobilehome park for storage and other related charges incurred by Rebecca M. Cruz, Geraldine L. Beam and Kelly P. Engineer. The mobilehome park owner may participate in the public sale. Rent & Storage $4,240.96 Meter Fee - $ 2.00 Water - $ 49.23 Sewer - $ 149.31 Trash - $ 194.14 Total Claim - $4,635.64 The sale will be free and clear of all claims, liens and encumbrances of record except for possible liens of unpaid mobilehome registration fees and unpaid taxes, if any. The Mobilehome Park owner has enforced a judgment for possession of the premises. Presently there is no right to keep this unit on Space 95 Palm Drive. However, after the sale is concluded, the management may entertain offers of financial consideration from the buyer in exchange for granting the buyer permission to leave the unit on-site in the future. In the event that a post-sale agreement re: future occupancy is not reached, then the Mobilehome Park owner reserves the right to require the removal of the mobilehome within 48 hours after the sale. Prospective purchasers must tender a cashier’s check for the full amount of the purchase immediately at the conclusion of the sale. Except for the warranty that this sale is authorized by law, absolutely no warranties of sale are made. The park reserves the right to postpone and reschedule the sale without further notice. The general public will have access to the Mobilehome Park premises for purposes related to this sale. This sale does not include any contents of the unit and the successful bidder is responsible for the lawful disposition of all remaining contents of the unit. The Mobilehome is described as: One (1) Boise Cascade Park Home Single Family Mobile Home; California HCD Decal No.: AAA5653; Serial Nos.: S1317X/XXU; HUD Label/Insignia Nos.: 527131 & 527132; Length: 40’; Width: 20’. Tropics Mobile Home Park’s claim for sums unpaid for March 1, 2011 through September 30, 2011, is set forth above and must be paid by the registered owner or other party in interest within 10 days of this notice in order to redeem the mobilehome, remove it from Space 95 Palm Drive and stop the sale. The Registered Owner’s payment of the sums demanded by this Notice will not reinstate the tenancy (and sub-tenancy, if any) under a rental agreement in default. NOTICE TO CONSUMER: The law gives you the thirty (30) days after you receive this Notice to dispute the validity of the debt or any part of it. If you do not dispute it within that period, I will assume the debt is valid. If you do dispute it - by notifying me in writing to that effect - I will, as required by law, obtain and mail to you proof of the debt. The law does not require me to wait until the end of the 30 day period before proceeding to collect this debt. If, however, you request proof of the debt within the thirty (30) day period that begins with your receipt of this Notice, the law requires me to suspend my efforts (through litigation or otherwise) to collect the debt until I mail the requested information to you. DATED: 09/26/11 /s/ Michael W. Mihelich, Attorney for Tropics Mobile Home Park (951) 786-3605 10/4, 10/11/11 CNS-2181623#

Fremont Symphony honors Showstopper Yoko Young SUBMITTED BY SUSAN L. ROSE The Fremont Symphony Orchestra presents “Showstopper,” a benefit to honor dancer, choreog-

rapher, and teacher extraordinaire Yoko Young on Sunday, October 16 at 5 p.m. at the Newark-Fremont Hilton. Event sponsors are the Ohlone Foundation and Assemblyman Robert Wieckowski.

Yoko Young has been associated with the Fremont Symphony for many years, beginning in the 1970s when she coordinated fashion show fundraisers. She provided dancers for the Symphony performances of Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” and Saint-Saëns’ “Carnival of the Animals,” and since 2005 has produced and choreographed the Symphony’s popular “Nutcracker” ballet each holiday season. Yoko was born in Tokyo and began studying dance at the age of four, learning Fujima (traditional Japanese dancing). She went on to study classical ballet under Sakiko Hirose of the Tokyo Ballet, Madame Messers of the Bolshoi Ballet, and Roy Tobias of the New York City Ballet. She has also studied jazz under the tutelage of Rod Alexander. Yoko was Prima Ballerina and soloist for the Hirose Ballet Company and Tokyo Bal-

let Theatre in such standards as “Swan Lake,” “Sleeping Beauty” and “Don Quixote,” and danced “Carmen” with the Opera national de Paris in France. An accomplished choreographer, Yoko choreographed such musicals as “Once Upon a Mattress,” “Little Mary Sunshine,” “Annie,” “The Wizard of Oz” and “Peter Pan” and traveled to Japan with some of them. She was a member of the Sister City Commission of Fremont and has taken groups of dancers to represent the city at celebrations in Fukaya, Japan, one of Fremont’s Sister Cities. In 1993, she was appointed by the Governor of Saitama Prefecture, Japan, to be Cultural Ambassador to the World, representing 92 cities and over 6.5 million people. Yoko established her own studio in 1995 and earned the title “The Best Studio in the West” her first year. Her superb chore-

ography has earned her numerous awards, including the Diamond Award for best choreography from American Dance Competition, Kids Artistic Revue’s Choreographer of the Year awards every year since 2000, and Teacher of the Year in 2006, 2007 and 2008. Yoko trained 50 of her students to perform with professional Russian dancers in the Moscow Ballet’s production of “Nutcracker.” In 2002 Yoko was featured as the cover story for the nationally syndicated magazine Dance Teacher, and had the only studio in California to be selected as one of the Top 50 Studios in the Nation by Dance Spirit magazine. Her studio also made the cover of Time for Kids in 2003. In 2005 she was asked to choreograph the Dallas Cowboys’ halftime show at Texas Stadium featuring singer Sheryl Crow. Eight students from her studio were featured in the show, which

was televised by CBS on Thanksgiving Day and seen by 60 million people. Yoko Young is a true gem for the City of Fremont and the Symphony is proud to honor her. The fundraiser will feature dancers from Yoko’s Academy, dinner, wine, silent and live auctions, and the raffle of an iPad 2 with Keyboard Dock. Tickets are $75 for adults and $40 for children under 18. Call (510) 371-4859 to order, or visit online at www.fremontsymphony.org. Showstopper fundraiser Sunday, October 16 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. Newark-Fremont Hilton 39900 Ballentine Dr., Newark (510) 371-4859 www.fremontsymphony.org Tickets: $75 adults, $40 children (18 and under)

High-speed rail to issue environmental report for Fresno-to-Bakersfield section SUBMITTED BY RACHEL WALL The California High-Speed Rail Authority announced on October 5, 2011, that it will issue a Revised Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR)/Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Fresno-to-Bakersfield section of the high-speed train project in spring 2012. This additional analysis of alternatives in the Fresno to Bakersfield section will not impact the construction schedule, set to begin late 2012 in Fresno, nor will it affect the Draft EIR/EIS for the Mercedto-Fresno section. In response to stakeholder, agency and public feedback on the high-speed train alignment

that bypasses Hanford to the east, the Authority will re-introduce an alternative route, along with an alternative station location to serve the Kings/Tulare region along that portion of the Fresnoto-Bakersfield section. The Authority will also investigate improvements to the existing Fresno-to-Bakersfield alternatives. This step will also afford additional time to review the information contained in the current Fresno-to-Bakersfield Draft EIR/EIS. “Our job is to oversee and provide the best possible highspeed train project for California. We encourage the public to take advantage of this additional step in the Fresno-to-Bakersfield environmental process by continuing to review the current Draft EIR/EIS and provide additional

comments next year on the revised document,” said Roelof van Ark, CEO of the California High-Speed Rail Authority. “Construction will still begin on schedule in Fresno next year.” The Hanford West Bypass alternative was identified in the 2005 Statewide Program EIR/EIS and including this alternative is consistent with input from regulatory agencies. Rather than issuing a Final EIR/EIS for the Fresno-to-Bakersfield section in January as previously scheduled, the Authority will now use the coming 5-6 months to further engineer the additional Hanford West Bypass route and new station alternative, conduct the additional environmental analyses needed, seek “value engineering” opportunities to reduce costs and make other necessary revisions in-

cluding those based on comments received through October 13, 2011, after which a “Revised Draft EIR/Supplemental Draft EIS” will be issued for public comment. Subsequent construction packages are scheduled to begin in mid- to late-2013, after the Fresno to Bakersfield section environmental review has concluded. Planned construction is composed of approximately 140 miles, depending on the alternative selected, and has an estimated contract value of nearly $6 billion. Constructing the backbone of the state’s high-speed rail segment is anticipated to generate tens of thousands jobs over the span of construction. The formal comment period for the Fresno-to-Bakersfield Draft EIR/EIS section will still end on

October 13, 2011, and the revised document, to be issued in spring 2012, will have a separate, additional 45-day formal comment period. The public is encouraged to take advantage of the additional time for the Fresno-to-Bakersfield environmental process to provide further comments on the revised Draft EIR/Supplemental Draft EIS after it is released in the spring. Only comments submitted during the official comment periods will be treated as formal comments and subsequently responded to, in writing, as part of the Final EIR/EIS. As noted, the Merced-to-Fresno section’s environmental review schedule will not change; the formal comment period for the Merced-to-Fresno section will end on October 13, 2011. For more information, visit www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Page 29

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

L

Special Life Events

Marriage

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge

important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat

mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at

Obituaries

low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published bi-weekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the

Greater Tri-City Area.

Obituaries

Dolores M. Davies RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 24, 2011 - October 3, 2011

Josephine Guevara RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 27, 1937 - October 3, 2011

Edward H. Jordan RESIDENT OF NEWARK March 24, 1929 - October 4, 2011

Sharon L. Jacobs RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 3, 1941 - October 6, 2011

Alfonso A. Garcia RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 23, 1935 - October 7, 2011

John S. Luis RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 12, 1929 - October 7, 2011

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Margaret M. Rodriguez RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 2, 1915 - October 6, 2011

Khanh G. Vuong RESIDENT OF NEWARK April 16, 1925 - October 6, 2011

Vera R. Owen RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 20, 1921 - October 7, 2011

Edward DeCosta RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 31, 1927 - September 17, 2011

Darryl N. Rawlinson RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 21, 1951 - October 9, 2011

Jack R. Knoll RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 28, 1924 - October 7, 2011

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

FD1007

Protect against the seasonal flu… get vaccinated SUBMITTED BY RENEE SNYDER Flu is a serious, contagious disease that can lead to hospitalization and even death. It is recommended to have a yearly flu vaccination because it is the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. As a service to the community St. Rose Hospital, Hayward, will provide free seasonal flu vaccines for adults 18 years and older. No appointment necessary. Offer good while supplies last. For more information call the Education and Training Department at St. Rose Hospital (510) 264-4044. Free Flu Vaccinations Various dates St. Rose Hospital Hospital Boardroom 27200 Calaroga Avenue, Hayward (510) 264-4044 Free Flu Vaccinations Monday, October 17 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 18 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday, October 24 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 26 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, November 2 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477

Special cat adoption program To combat over population, the Fremont Tri-City Animal Shelter is holding an emergency cat adoption program in an effort to save the lives of cats. Due to the influx of kittens from the summer months, the shelter has a large number of cats and kittens that need to find new homes and families as soon as possible. Adopters must go through the normal screening process. Once the adoption is completed, the pet is free and includes the microchip, spay or neuter, and rabies vaccine normally provided with an adoption. Planning to adopt this fall or winter? Adopt a cat NOW, when the need is greatest! This past Saturday, the Tri-City Animal Shelter adopted out 15 cats and kittens. We still have many more anxiously waiting for a new family to take them home. Come visit us today! Come visit us at: 1950 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont Animal Shelter Hours: Tuesday - Friday Noon - 5 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

Tuesday, Oct 11 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr. Union City 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., Union City 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Oct 12 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 4:15 – 4:50 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St., Fremont 5:50 – 6:25 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:40 – 7:10 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, Oct 13 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Ln., Fremont 4:55 – 5:30 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 So. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Fremont Monday, Oct 17 1:00 – 2:10 p.m. Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., San Leandro 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cherryland School, 585 Willow Ave., Hayward 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, Fremont

Tuesday, Oct 18 2:30 – 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 – 4:20 p.m. California School for the Deaf, 39350 Gallaudet Dr., Fremont 5:25 – 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 – 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, Oct 19 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 2:00 – 2:45 p.m. Eden House Apts., 1601 165th Ave., San Leandro 3:00 – 3:35 p.m. Ashland Village Apt., 1300 Kentwood Ln., San Leandro 4:40 – 5:15 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Oct 19 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park, 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 – 4:00 p.m. Foothill School, 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fall library exhibitions SUBMITTED BY DIANE DANIEL

E

ver visited the Cal State University, East Bay (CSUEB) campus in Hayward and wondered about the names of rooms and halls, such as the Biella Room, Meiklejohn Hall, or why the main routes to campus are named Harder Road and Carlos Bee Boulevard? Also, why does the Senior Court contain tributes to Charles Schultz and Aldous Huxley? Did a Lucas crew really film on campus in 1979 and why does Theatre and Dance use “Highlands” in the title of its summer series? The answers to these and many other campus quandaries are revealed by “Hidden Gems of the CSUEB Campus,” one of two fall exhibitions at the University Library, 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward. “Hidden Gems” delves into the campus’ early spaceman mascot, a hall named for a professor who taught at CSUEB for two years and the ranch that became our stomping grounds. “Our campus, though relatively young, has a rich history of personalities who have helped shaped where we are, today, and what we aspire to be in the future. This exhibit reveals CSUEB’s past contributors and highlights our hillside's natural beauties,” said Linda Dobb, University librarian and interim Associate Provost. The exhibition evolved from brainstorming sessions by Dobb and Richard Apple, Library Special Collections and Archives Coordinator, with input from Craig Wilson, Professor Emeritus of Education, who provided Dobb with information, the Senior Court plaques and other forgotten tidbits. “It’s amazing what you notice, if you look, such as the tree named for Ted Pelatowski or the 9/11 memorial on campus,” said Dobb. “Hidden Gems” will be on display through the end of 2011. For those unable to attend in person, the information is available at www.historigraphics.com/ge ms/ This fall’s second library exhibition honors the United States Constitution and includes a challenging 10point quiz on our fundamental rights.

Hidden Gems of the CSUEB Campus Through end of 2011 University Library 25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard, Hayward www.historigraphics.com/gems/

October 11, 2011


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

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WORK FROM HOME! Be your own boss! No stocking, delivering products. Not MLM, 25 yr. old INC 500 company! Residual income! Contact Adriane at 510-938-3139 or www.workinathome.biz

Meets Every Thursday Night 7-9pm Victory Center A.M.E. Zion Church 510-586-5747 Ilona or 510-520-2769 Tom Corner of E St. and 9th St. Union City

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Class A Route Delivery Drivers Needed in Manteca Benefits: Average Salary $68K Great Benefits (Medical, dental, vision, life insurance, 401K) Strong stable company Requirements: At least 1 yr. verifiable tractor trailer experience No more than 1 moving violation or accident in past 3 years Can pass physical, drug screen and background check Must apply on line: www.MBMcareers.com

Overeaters Anonymous offers a program of recovery from compulsive eating using the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of OA. There are no dues or fees. For more information about meeting times, or other questions about OA, you may contact Bev at 510-783-2680 or visit the OA website at: www.oa.org.

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If you love cats and kittens... and have a little time and lots of TLC to share, we need YOU. PURRFECT CAT RESCUE is a not-for-profit group, and we have cats and kittens who need some TLC. We also need help with our adoption showcase on the weekends. We provide the training. In return, you will get the joy, laughter, furry purrs and the heartwarming satisfaction of knowing you are just doing the right thing. www.purrfectcatrescue.org or call 510-739-1597

Southland Senior Club The club is open to all Seniors 50+ Various Activities at the Club include: Line Dancing Lessons, Card Playing, Tap dancing. Chance to work on Jigsaw puzzles or read books. A good supply of both are free for borrowing. Various Crafts including Knitting, Sewing Trips and events Free cookies, coffee or tea

510-264-0850 Mon -Thur from 10am-3pm Fri 10am-1 pm. Closed Sat & Sun Southland Shopping Center. The Club is located in the Food Court.

Are you a writer? Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

SR 92/I-880 interchange reconstruction relieves traffic congestion SUBMITTED BY MTC The State Route-92/Interstate-880 interchange in Hayward was originally built in the 1950s and considered advanced at the time. In the meantime, Bay Area growth has led to congestion on the region’s roads and freeways and continued growth is forecast. The newly reconstructed interchange will accommodate a 56 percent-increase in peak-hour traffic volumes projected to occur by 2025. Two new “direct connectors” that replace the original “cloverleaf” design. A “cloverleaf” design resembles a four-petal cloverleaf from

The new design reduces mergingand weaving- related accidents and improves overall traffic safety and operations. More than 235,000 commuters use the SR 92/I-880 interchange, daily. The reconstructed facility relives traffic congestion. On October 7, 2011, Caltrans, the Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA, a sister agency to Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)), the Alameda County Transportation Commission (ACTC) and the City of Hayward celebrated the completion of the $245M project. “Caltrans has worked diligently with its partners to help relieve traffic congestion, im-

SR-92 connector ramp; reconstruction of Calaroga Bridge; reconstruction of ADA-compliant Eldridge Pedestrian overcrossing (from Peterman Avenue on the west side of I-880 to Eldridge Avenue on the east side of I-880); improvements at Hesperian Boulevard Interchange; added auxiliary lanes on I-880, from Winton Avenue to SR-92 and from SR-92 to Tennyson Road in both directions. “We’re very pleased with the construction of this complex and successful project whose completion entailed more than 2,500 closures, often requiring detours affecting at least one direction of

and Bay Area voter-approved Regional Measure 1 (RM 1), which established a base auto toll of $1 for all seven state-owned Bay Area toll bridges. The revenues generated by the toll increase were identified for use for certain highway and bridge improvements, public transit rail extensions, and other projects that reduce congestion in the bridge corridors. The project also includes $9.6M from Alameda County voters' passage of Measure B, a half-cent county transportation sales tax. "This is certainly a day for cel-

Before reconstruction: SR 92/I-880 interchange, Hayward

After reconstruction: SR 92/I-880 interchange, Hayward

above. Technically, it is a fourway interchange on two levels where all left turns are made by turning to the right in a 270-degree loop. However, this requires exiting and entering traffic to merge into the same lane, known as weaving. The old-fashioned cloverleaf design suited traffic conditions in the 1950s but a more efficient and effective design is needed, today, to ensure the mobility of people and goods.

prove the quality of life for residents and daily commuters and improve goods movement for area businesses,” said Caltrans Acting Director Malcolm Dougherty. The new interchange features two direct connectors (a new eastbound SR 92 to northbound I-880 connector ramp and a new westbound SR-92 to southbound I-880 connector ramp); widened southbound I-880 to westbound

Water-efficient landscape education program SUBMITTED BY BAWSCA The Bay Area Water Supply & Conservation Agency (BAWSCA) is offering free classroom lectures and hands-on workshops that focus on sustainable landscaping; use of California native and drought -tolerant plants; creating healthy soil; understanding water conservation; alternatives to lawn; habitat gardening; edible landscaping; parent/child gardening workshop and water-efficient irrigation practices. On October 22, learn how to transform a waterthirsty lawn to a low- maintenance and water-efficient landscape by using California native plants in the Alternatives to Lawn class in Fremont with Noelle Marquis. Attend Dave Phelps’ Water Efficient Plant Selection and Design class in Hayward on October 29 and learn how to design a sustainable, low-maintenance, water- wise garden. Incorporate native plants into your space and save water, time and money. Lori Palmquist will teach basic drip irrigation design and installation, choosing the right components, watering techniques, and system maintenance for your landscaping in her Water-Efficient Drip Irrigation Class on November 5 in Milpitas. Hands-on workshops have limited space. Attendees should dress appropriately for gardening. For a full list of classes and locations, visit http://tinyurl.com/3p3hmxf. To register for a class, email landscape@bawsca.org or call (650) 349-3000. Alternatives to Lawn Saturday, October 22 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Alameda County Water District 43885 South Grimmer Boulevard, Fremont Water Efficient Plant Selection and Design Saturday, October 29 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Hayward City Hall 777 B Street, Hayward Water-Efficient Drip Irrigation Saturday, November 5 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Community Room Barbara Lee Senior Center 40 N. Milpitas Boulevard, Milpitas Free classes

travel at the interchange,” stated Bijan Sartipi, Caltrans District 4 director and an MTC/BATA commissioner. “Despite the complexity, Caltrans and the two prime contractors, Flatiron Construction and Granite Construction, achieved a cost savings in excess of $1M while creating thousands of direct and indirect jobs in the transportation industry.” The project was funded primarily by the MTC-sponsored

but also to finance the new Benicia-Martinez and Carquinez bridges, the San Mateo/Hayward Bridge widening, rehab of the Richmond/San Rafael Bridge, construction of the Richmond Parkway, improvements to the Dumbarton Bridge approaches and several other projects." Community involvement with the SR-92/I-880 Interchange project helped Caltrans to minimize impacts during construction. “The SR 92/I-880 interchange project represents a partnership between Caltrans and the city of Hayward, most notably

ebration and to say ‘Thank You’ to Bay Area voters and toll-payers,” commented Alameda County Supervisor and MTC Commissioner Scott Haggerty. “Completion of the SR 92/I-880 Interchange project wraps up the entire Regional Measure 1 program approved by voters back in 1988. Toll funds were used not only to provide relief for the congestion that has bedeviled the SR 92/I-880 Interchange for decades

the neighborhood Citizens Advisory Committee who helped steer the project and ensure that the interchange was constructed in a manner that met the goals of the project while minimizing the impact to city residents,” commented Hayward Mayor Michael Sweeney. “The fact that this project was constructed in such a fashion speaks to the impact citizens can have on the transportation planning process.”

Public meetings planned for AC Transit redistricting process SUBMITTED BY AC TRANSIT Federal and state laws require the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) to adjust its ward boundaries every 10 years to equalize populations following the completion of the federal decennial census. To aid in the redistricting process, the agency’s Redistricting Committee and staff have developed proposals that will be vetted at a series of outreach meetings. Community members, elected officials and interested parties are encouraged to attend the meetings and offer their views and recommendations. At these meetings, the proposed boundary configurations – with descriptions, maps and demographics – will be displayed for public comment. Individuals who are unable to attend the meetings can find the redistricting plans on the District’s website at www.actransit.org (click on “Ward Redistricting”). The public can also offer input and request additional information about the process and the proposed plans by emailing districtsecretary@actransit.org. The District’s wards are also available via the web at www.redrawca.org (click on “See Local Lines” and select Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District). At this site, the public can delineate communities of interest, draft plans and submit them to the District Secretary. The deadline to submit comments on the initial redistricting plans is October 28, 2011. AC Transit Redistricting Meetings Monday, October 17 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Conference Room 2A Hayward City Hall 777 B Street, Hayward

SUBMITTED BY KIM HUGGETT The Hayward Chamber of Commerce invites nominations for its Business Person of the Year who will be honored at the 68th annual Hayward Chamber of Commerce Celebration Awards Gala on January 28, 2012, along with Hayward's Police Officer, Firefighter and Educator of the Year. Identify your nominee and submit answers to the questions below to the selection committee at the Chamber office by October 31, 2011. The selection committee will evaluate nominees according to responses to each of the questions, so please number your answers. All nominations will be held in strictest confidence. 1) Give three reasons why your nominee deserves recognition; 2) How long and why has the nominee maintained his/her business in Hayward? 3) Describe the person's business. For example, what products or services are provided, how many employees work there, what factors have contributed to its success? 4) Describe the person in terms of their business innovation, imagination, creativity, resourcefulness and dealing with challenges; 5) What are some interesting or special characteristics that single out your nominee from others in the same industry?

Thursday, October 20 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Bayfair Mall Community Room (Upper level near escalator, use Entrance 3) 15555 E. 14th Street, San Leandro

6) Describe the nominee's service or volunteer efforts in the community, such as work with service clubs, nonprofit organizations, city commissions or committees, or the chamber of commerce.

Monday, October 24 7 – 8 p.m. North Berkeley Senior Center 1901 Hearst Avenue, Berkeley

Nominations should be sent to: Hayward Business Person of the Year Committee, Hayward Chamber of Commerce, 22561 Main Street, Hayward, CA 94541. The Hayward Business Person of the Year Award is sponsored by Kaiser Permanente.

Thursday, October 27 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. AC Transit General Offices 2nd Floor Board Room 1600 Franklin Street, Oakland

For more information, call (510) 537-2424, fax (510) 537-2730 or visit www.Hayward.org


WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

October 11, 2011

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continued from page 17

willing to accept even a low budget movie. For Moza and his team, this movie is another successful step towards making a full-length feature film. The screening event is a 90minute program which includes

live performances, question/answers, other videos, and raffle prizes. Snacks will be provided free of charge and you'll automatically be entered in the raffle drawing with a chance to win prizes (must be present at the

continued from page 18

time of announcement at the screening event). Part of the evening’s proceeds will go to a non-profit charitable organization. The DVD of the movie will be released on the screening day and will include exclusive be-

comedy with some mild portrayals of violence, it is suitable for the whole family. Pick up a few tickets and come join the fun of Community Theater at Stage 1 in Newark. You’ll be glad you did. Just remember, “Don’t feed the plants!” Little Shop of Horrors October 14, 15, 21, 22 8:00 p.m. October 9, 16 2:30 p.m. Newark Memorial High School 39375 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 791-0287 www.stage1theatre.org Students 17 and Under: $10 Adults: $20 Groups of 12 or More: $18 per person

Students at School for the Blind to Bake Pies SUBMITTED BY LAWANDA VANN A grass roots program to teach visually impaired youth to bake pies was the brainchild of a local chef for retirees. Now the work is being taken to California where Chef Frank Zerafa will direct a pie baking session at the California School for the Blind in Fremont on Wednesday, October 19. Chefs from Washington and California will assist as well as local Lions members of the Fremont Dawn Breakers Lions Club. Two years ago Zerafa had his first pie baking class with about 40 students at the Washington State School for the Blind. It was such a success he was asked to help make it an annual affair. Through his local club, Zerafa was inspired by local blind students’ talents and drives and wanted to do something innovative using the tools he had at hand— namely, baking tins and rolling pins— to inspire them to do something new to build self-confidence and perhaps dream of a culinary career. Zerafa, Executive Chef for Kamlu Retirement Inn, a Holiday Retirement Corporation property, is also a member of Lions International, whose mission in part is to support vision programs around the world. Student Pie Baking Class Wednesday, Oct 19 2 p.m. California School for the Blind 500 Walnut Ave., Fremont

Halls of Madness cancelled For the past 11 years, a local haunted house has appeared to scare and support a local non-profit organization to help the Tri-City community. Called “Halls of Madness,” this was not designed as a trip for the faint-hearted, but its focus demonstrated a big heart in support of S.A.V.E. (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments). Since 2000, each year, nonperishable food items are collected for SAVE. Community high school students volunteered their time helping to build, work and tear down the haunt every year. (Due to a neighborhood complaint and subsequent action by the City of Fremont, Halls of Madness will be unable to operate this year.)

Serra Theaters 200 Serra Way #37, Milpitas http://lovefool.sunnymoza.com Tickets: $11.99 (early bird), $14.99

Additional community banks receive funding for small businesses and job creation SUBMITTED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

The set and costumes perfectly reflect the placement and mood of the play. The shop is very rundown. There are winos, bums, and litter strewn about the landscape. The costumes of the street urchins who served as the chorus shifted in response to the action of the story—dark dresses when the mood becomes sinister, green for monetary success. The cast is full of very talented singers, especially Steph Peek, who is a beautiful woman with a beautiful voice. Jay Crispell fully embodies the role of the abusive dentist and boyfriend to Audrey. The choreography and growth of the plant was very well done. This show is a great opening to the 2011-2012 season at Stage 1 Theatre. Though a darker

hind-the-scenes footage, previews, and auditions. Go to http://lovefool.sunnymoza.com to purchase tickets. Early bird pricing is available October 1 – 10 for $11.99; regular price ticket is $14.99.

Love Fool Sunday, October 16 2:30 p.m.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury announced on September 28, 2011, that 16 additional California community banks received a total of $103.1M as part of the final wave of funding provided through the Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF). The SBLF, established as part of the Small Business Jobs Act signed into law by President Obama, encourages community banks to increase their lending to small businesses, helping those companies expand their operations and create new jobs. A total of 30 California community banks have received an aggregate SBLF funding of $274.5M. “Billions of dollars in SBLF funds are being put to use in communities across the nation, spurring small business growth and job creation,” said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Neal S. Wolin. “These investments, which will help propel lending by Main Street banks, are good for our economy and good for America’s small businesses.” Small businesses play a critical role in the U.S. economy and are central to growth and job creation. Small businesses employ approximately half of all Americans and account for about 60 percent of gross job creation. However, small business owners faced disproportionate challenges in the aftermath of the recession and credit crisis, including difficulty accessing capital.

The SBLF helps small businesses meet this challenge by providing capital to community banks that hold less than $10 billion in assets. The dividend rate a community bank pays on SBLF funding is reduced as that bank increases its lending to small businesses – providing a strong incentive for new lending to small businesses so they can expand and create jobs. The SBLF is one part of the Obama Administration’s comprehensive agenda to help small businesses access the capital they need to invest and hire. The State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI), which is also a key part of the Small Business Jobs Act, allocates $1.5 billion to new and existing state programs that will leverage private financing to spur $15 billion in new lending to small businesses and small manufacturers. The Obama Administration has also supported 17 direct tax breaks that provide tax relief of more than $50 billion for small businesses. These tax breaks were designed to support job creation and retention, entrepreneurship, investment and growth. The Administration has also worked with Congress to extend and expand existing Small Business Administration loan programs that helped put more than $42 billion in the hands of small businesses and deliver other important benefits to help small businesses expand and hire. For more information about the SBLF program, visit http://tinyurl.com/2d4oj8y

California community banks receiving $103.1M funding include: OBDC Small Business Finance (Oakland, CA) - $219,000 California Bank of Commerce (Lafayette, CA) - $11.0M FNB Bancorp (South San Francisco, CA) - $12.6M Security California Bancorp (Riverside, CA) - $7.2M First Northern Community Bancorp (Dixon, CA) $22.8M Low Income Investment Fund (San Francisco, CA) - $7.5M Community Valley Bank (El Centro, CA) - $2.4M Opportunity Fund Northern California (San Jose, CA) $2.2M Rural Community Assistance Corporation (West Sacramento, CA) - $4.3M The Bank of Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA) - $1.9M California Coastal Rural Development Corporation (Salinas, CA) - $870,000 Valley Economic Development Center, Inc. (Van Nuys, CA) - $661,000 Partners Bank of California (Mission Viejo, CA) - $2.5M Promerica Bank (Los Angeles, CA) - $3.8M Capital Bank (San Juan Capistrano, CA) $3.1M Bank of Commerce Holdings (Redding, CA) - $20.0M

Fresh & Easy to launch ‘Thank You’ card SUBMITTED BY BRENDAN WONNACOTT Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market is rolling out its new Friends of Fresh & Easy “thank you” card to all its stores the week beginning October 10, 2011, following a successful trial of the program at seven stores in Bakersfield. The card was well-received by customers during the pilot and membership in “Friends of Fresh & Easy” more than doubled shortly after the card was introduced. Fresh & Easy had originally planned to trial the card this Fall and roll out the program to all stores by the end of the year. The “Friends” card builds on the international success of Tesco’s Clubcard and the “Friends of Fresh & Easy” email program. “Friends” is a digital points-based program where customers can earn one point for every dollar they spend at Fresh & Easy. “Friends” can exchange their points for cash-back rewards and will receive personalized bi-weekly emails with real-time updates on points earned and targeted bonus point coupons. For more information, visit www.FreshAndEasy.com.

SUBMITTED BY MELANIE WEBBER Restore Hetch Hetchy (www.hetchhetchy.org) Executive Director Mike Marshall will headline a forum on the restoration of Hetch Hetchy as part of “The Comprehensive Keith: 100th Anniversary Celebration” Exhibition at Saint Mary’s College. The exhibit celebrates renowned artist William Keith, a lifelong friend of naturalist John Muir and features Keith’s panorama of the Hetch Hetchy Valley, which he painted after a November 1907 sketching trip to the valley with Muir. Muir, who called the Hetch Hetchy Valley "one of nature's rarest and most precious mountain temples," led the fight against the 1913 clear cutting and flooding of the Hetch Hetchy Valley. Moderated by by Mike Taugher, an environmental reporter, the forum also features a repre-

sentative of the San Francisco Public Utilities commission and Michael Marchetti, Ph.D., professor of biology, Saint Mary’s College. The forum is titled Can – or Should - Hetch Hetchy Valley Be Restored? The forum is free. Museum admission is $5. Can – or Should - Hetch Hetchy Valley Be Restored? Tuesday, Oct. 18 Saint Mary’s College 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Saint Mary's College of California 1928 Saint Mary's Rd., Moraga, http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/arts/hearst-artgallery/exhibition-schedule.html For more information about Restore Hetch Hetchy visit www.hetchhetchy.org


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October 11, 2011

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