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A laughing matter

MVU Black wins memorial tournament

Stay Tuned for the Aurora

Page 17 Page 16 Page 24

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER “El Color Caliente de la Cultura-The Hot Color of Culture” will heat up the main gallery of Hayward’s Sun Gallery from October 5 – November 19. This exhibition will explore the concept of vibrant color and its influence on Hispanic cultures. Color is a INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

September 30, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 78

means to convey emotional and spiritual expressions and feelings. When you think of Latin America, you think of vibrant living color and warm tropical tones. Color symbolizes many different ideas and portrays multicultural themes without words. The beautiful colors used in Latin American art have influenced artists around the world, and this exhibition will present works of art that highlight that influence on the use of color. The participating artists come from all cultures, but each one uses color in an intensely expressive way. Work will be on display from Gary An artist reception is planned for Saturday, November 5 from 3 p.m. – Paul Barbossa Prince, Montana Murdoch, D’arci Bruno, 7 p.m. with food, music, and dance performances. “El Color Caliente de la CulturaMichelle Ritchie, Elizabeth The Hot Color of Culture” Rojas, Vasanthi Victor, Amiee October 5 – November 19 Johnson, Jacqueline Cooper, Wednesday – Saturday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Marjorie Wagner, Ian SamArtist’s Reception mis, Tina Banda, Deborah November 5, 3 p.m. – 7 p.m. Vinograd, and Sarah Sammis. Sun Gallery Please check www.sun1015 E St., Hayward gallery.org for a full list of (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org participating artists.

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 28

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD ARTS COUNCIL

H

ayward Arts Council is organizing “Paintings & Textiles” at the John O'Lague Galleria, Hayward City Hall. The exhibition will run from September 30 to December 2, 2011. A reception will be held at the John O'Lague Galleria on October 14, 2011, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Public is welcome. Lara Magruder is a Northern California fiber artist with a background in painting and sculpture. She uses rug hooking and non-traditional materials, images and techniques to explore pattern, shape and texture. Lara has exhibited her mixed-fiber, hooked rugs and

Above: Oil by Jeanne Rehrig Left: Textile by Lara Magruder

to California in 1978. She attended the San Francisco Art Institute and earned a Master’s of Fine Art in Painting in 1984. After graduation, she remained in the Bay Area where she has worked and displayed artwork at various venues. Her art is derived from forms and patterns found in nature. She uses images from life and photographs as references and is attracted to the diversity of shapes within microscopic organisms and constantly amazed by their similarity to natural forms visible to the naked eye. For more information, contact Hayward Arts Council at (510) 538-2787, Thursday – Saturday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. or visit www.HaywardArts.org hand-made felt at the Farnsworth Art Museum, the Carnegie Center for Art and History and at the Shelburne Museum. She is a member of the Surface Design Association, studied painting and sculpture at the San Francisco Art Institute and at the California College of Arts and Crafts. Jeanne Rehrig was born and raised in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and attended Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia for two years before moving

Paintings & Textiles Friday, September 30 – Saturday, December 2 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hayward Arts Council John O'Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787 www.HaywardArts.org


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Friday, Sep 30 $

Friday, Sep 30

Saturday, Oct 1

Celebrate A Night Out With Your Family$

SAVE Breakfast Eye Opener $R

Dia de los Muertos art workshop$R

6 p.m.

7:30

1 - 4 p.m.

Bring your family to BINGO Newark Senior Center

Educate, empower issues of domestic violence

7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 Friday, Sep 30 R

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 574-2250

Hands on workshop to create shadowbox to celebrate Dia de los Muertos Hayward Area Historical Society Museum

CERT training

Friday, Sep 30

22380 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

6 - 9 p.m.

Spanish Story Time

Saturday, Oct 1

Learn skills for emergency preparedness Chabot College , Little Theatre

4 - 5 p.m.

Family Science Series

Stories, songs and rhymes for children who speak and wish to improve Spanish Fremont Main Library

2 - 3:30 p.m. Microscopes: Explore the land of small wonders.

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6600 Hayward Summer Concert Series

Saturday, Oct 1

Math Science Nucleus 4074 Eggers Dr., Fremont (510) 790-6284

A Trip Back in Time

Saturday, Oct 1

5:30 p.m.

10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Herd of Cats (Jazz) Hayward City Hall

History of Don Edwards wildlife. Stroll through the trails.

Interfaith Blessing of the Animals

777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Friday, Sep 30

Friday - Saturday, Sep 30 Dec 2

Saturday, Oct 1

Paintings & Textiles

Apple Cider Pressing

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

11 a.m. - Noon

Oils by Jeanne Rehirig: Textiles by Lara Magruder

Make apple cider

John O'Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 (510) 881-7974

11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Saturday , Oct 1

Monster Bacteria and other Suspicious Critters Explore the salt marsh's hidden habitats

Alviso Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., San Jose (408) 262-5513 x102 Saturday, Oct 1 Oct 1

Nature Detectives: October Observational Outing

Bring your pet or a picture to be blessed

Saturday, Oct 1

Saturday, Oct 1

10 a.m. - 12 a.m.

2 p.m.

Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 656 2348 (510) 793-3970

Exercise gently, deep breathing and stretching

Meet the teacher. Raffle, prizes and more Silver Creek Academic Academy

75 North Milpitas Blvd., Milpitas (408)719-1805 Saturday, Oct 1 Oct 1

Skills of the Past $

9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Learn the skill to twine Tule (marsh plant) with cordage to create a comfortable mat Coyote Hills Regional Park

8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Oct 1

10 a.m. - 12 a.m.

Tomato Battle $

Special 2-hour class, hike shore line, picnic and beach comb Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

Noon

4901 Breakwater Ave.,Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Oct 1

Rotten tomato fight, music

Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (415) 447-3205

Niles Canyon Railway Train Rides $ 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Journey through beautiful Niles Canyon

Niles Depot Station 37001 Mission Blvd., Fremont (408) 249-2953

Laughter Yoga

3 p.m.

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

Open House

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Alyson Whitaker

WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

Saturday, Oct 1

Sunday, Oct 2

Sunday, Oct 2

Tuesday, Oct 4

Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Open House

Gorgeous Goats

Summer Concert

1 - 2 p.m.

1 - 5 p.m.

Transitioning from Employee to Entrepreneur R

12 noon - 4 p.m.

Kids exercise and groom goats Ardenwood Historic Farm

Original Rock Music

See how injured and orphaned animals are treated and rehabilitated

Ohlone Wildlife Rehabilitation Center 37175 Hickory Street, Newark (510) 797-9449 www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Sunday, Oct 2

Celebration-Dedication Lampert Knoll Picnic Site

10 a.m. - 12 a.m. New picnic site in honor of Art Lampert

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Sunday, Oct 2

Middle Eastern and Greek Food Festival

6 - 10 p.m. Food, music, activities, kids welcome (Sat 11 a.m. - Sun noon)

St. James Orthodox Church 195 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 449-7534

Quarry Lakes 2250 Isherwood Way, Fremont (510) 795-4895

Sunday, Oct 2

Sunday, Oct 2

Noon - 4 p.m.

Gathering of Ohlone Peoples

10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Ohlone tribes share culture and history, music, dance, games and more

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Sunday, Oct 2

Golf "FORE" Newark Kids$R

7:30 a.m. Golf, prizes, lunch (Proceeds to support Newark Youth Programs) Sunol Valley Golf Club

6900 Mission Rd., Sunol (510) 793-5683 (510)578-4407

Pink Flamingo Pee Wee Golf Tournament Putt your way through Niles - special gold themes - miniature golf

Niles District Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-9868 Sunday, Oct 2

Sausage & Suds Music Festival

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Enjoy great music, beer and sausages

Downtown San Leandro Parrott Street between East 14th and Washington Ave., San Leandro

Hayward Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward Monday, Oct 3

Jobs Workshops R

7 - 8:30 p.m. Free event Registration required

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063 Monday, Oct 3

Meet the Author: Matt Johanson

7 - 8:30 p.m. Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 574-2063

A documentary on China's first feminist

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 Saturday, Oct 8

Shark Day

Wednesday, Oct 5

12 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Blessing of the Animals

The Sharks are coming, Games, Crafts, Prizes and sharks Don Edwards Visitor Center

7 p.m. Pet blessing in memory of St Francis of Assisi

St. Anne's Church 32223 Cabello St., Union City (510) 471-7766

1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Continuing Events

Wednesday, Oct 5

Evening of Dixieland Jazz

7 - 9 p.m.

Tuesday, Sep 20 - Saturday Sep 24

Dance to Dixieland music

Excell Workshop$

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980

Swiss Park 5911 Mowry Ave., Newark (510)793-6279

8:30 a.m. -5 p.m.

Tuesday, Oct 4

Wednesday, Oct 5

After school Art Class$

Hayward/Union City Business Expo $

6 p.m. Yosemite Epics: Tales of adventure from America's greatest playground

3:30 - 5:30 p.m. Kids learn to draw

Learn the basics of Microsoft Excel

Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285 (510)742-2303

4:30 - 7:30 p.m. Market your business to local business owners and residents St. Rose Hospital Grand White Tent

Thursday, Sep 22 – Sunday, Sep 25

6 - 11 p.m.

Parent Project$

27200 Calaroga Ave., Hayward (510) 952-9637 (510) 537-2424

6 - 9 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct 5

13 week series on effective teen parenting Family Resource Center

Meet the Filmakers: "Autumn Gem"

447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 945-4022

Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 Tuesday, Oct 4

39155 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 574-2000

Film Festival Third World Independent Film Festival$ Great Mall

6-8:00 p.m.

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 5

Friday-Sunday,Sep16-Oct 15

Wait Until Dark 8 p.m.

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker" Theatre Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 Monday - Friday, Thru Sep 30

Artist's Guild of the East Bay

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. John O'Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 Tuesdays, Thru Nov 15

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health R

1 - 2:.30 p.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 (510) 574-2053 Wednesdays, Thru Nov 16

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5488 (510) 574-2053 Thursdays, Thru Nov 17

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 (510) 574-2053 Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games Center-

ville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053

Invite a friend, and join the congregation at the 10:30 service OUTSIDE of St. James' Episcopal Church with the Blessing of Animals and Holy Communion. All animals welcome, including stuffed ones. Chaos is expected, but to minimize it, please contain your pet appropriately. For socially-challenged animals, pictures can

be blessed in absentia. St. James is located in Fremont at the corner of Thornton and Cabrillo Terrace. This event is held near the Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi. St. Francis was a friar of the Roman Catholic Church who lived in the Middle Ages (1182-1226) in Italy. He founded the Franciscan Order and is

Science Lecture for Children SUBMITTED BY KAREN PACHECO

Global Warming: The Science Behind It All Free programs presented by local high students, members of Science For Youth especially for school-age children. Global Warming Friday October 7 4 p.m. – 5 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Don’t Shoot SUBMITTED BY AMY CHENEY David M. Kennedy, DON'T SHOOT: One Man, A Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America, in conversation with Alameda County Chief Probation Officer David Muhammad and Oakland Police Chief Anthony Batts. Don't Shoot tells the story of Kennedy's long journey toward a solution. It began with listening to people on the ground, and what he heard was that there was a trust gap between law enforcement and the community. Closing that gap became the cornerstone of his approach, organizing powerful gatherings in which offenders came together with law enforcers and diverse community members and were asked to stop the violence. It's not that simple, but then again it is-the magic of the approach and of the book. Don't Shoot combines the street verite of The Wire, the social science of Gang Leader for a Day, and the moral urgency and personal

journey of Fist Stick Knife Gun. But beyond that, Kennedy will show, unmistakably, that there can be real solutions. Literal Justice is a partnership between Alameda County Library Write to Read Program/Juvenile Hall, the Alameda County Probation Department and community organizations. Future Authors include: Dr. Victor Rios, Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys and Jennifer Tilton, Dangerous or Endangered? Race and the Politics of Youth In Urban America (2012 Jan. date TBA). Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, with Angela Davis and David Muhammad. (2012 March date TBA). DON’T SHOOT Tuesday, October 4 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church 685 14th Street, Oakland (800) 838-3006 http://www.brownpapertickets.c om/event/193007

associated with kindness to animals. St. Francis is also credited with being the first to create a manger scene at Christmas. Blessing of the Animals Sunday, Oct 2 10:30 a.m. St. James Episcopal Church Thornton & Cabrillo Terrace, Fremont


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

Get your blood cholesterol checked every five years

O

ne in every six adults in this country has high cholesterol. This is serious, because high blood cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease, the leading cause of death for both men and women in America today. September was National Cholesterol Education Month. If you missed it, it’s never too late to learn about cholesterol and what you should be doing to minimize your risk of deadly heart disease, heart attack and stroke. The problem is, you can have high cholesterol and not know it. “You can’t rely on any physical signs to tell you your cholesterol level is too high, because having high cholesterol does not necessarily cause symptoms,” warns Steven A. Curran, M.D., a family practice physician with Washington Township Medical Foundation. “In this sense, high cholesterol is a silent killer.” You also can’t feel safe because you have no family history of high cholesterol or you had a normal cholesterol test 10 years ago. That’s why the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute recommends that all adults have their blood cholesterol checked every five years. If a problem is identified, you should have the test more often. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a fat-like substance that exists in every cell of your body. It helps to make hormones and vitamin D and to aid digestion. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs and can also get it from the foods you eat.

Most people can prevent high cholesterol through diet and exercise.You should eat a sensible diet low in saturated fat and high in fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains.You should also maintain a healthy body weight and exercise regularly.

Too much cholesterol in your blood stream contributes to the formation of plaque inside the blood vessels leading to your heart, called coronary arteries. This condition is called atherosclerosis. Plaque build-up can harden over time and narrow your coronary arteries, limiting the flow of the blood that carries oxygen to your heart muscle. “When plaque builds up, it can break open, causing a blood clot to form. Large clots can partially or completely block the blood flow through the coronary artery, and this can lead to a heart attack,” explains Dr. Curran. Plaque build-up in other arteries of your body, such as the ones supplying oxygenrich blood to your brain or arms and legs, can cause other

problems—carotid artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease. Find out your cholesterol level A simple blood test can tell you your total cholesterol level, as well as levels of HDL (high density lipoproteins), LDL (low density lipoproteins) and triglycerides. A total cholesterol of less than 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered ‘desirable,’ putting you at a lower risk for heart disease. A cholesterol of 200 to 239 is considered “borderline-high.” A cholesterol of 240 or more is considered high. A person with high cholesterol has more than twice the risk of heart disease as a person whose cholesterol is below 200. “Knowing your LDL and HDL is also important,” adds

Dr. Curran. “LDL is sometimes called the ‘bad cholesterol’ because it can lead to cholesterol build-up in the arteries. HDL is like the ‘garbage truck’ of the blood because it goes into the arteries and helps to clean them out. HDL carries excess cholesterol to your liver, which removes it from the body.” A high level of triglycerides can be associated with an increased risk of heart disease. It may also be a sign of metabolic disease, such as diabetes. Listen to your mother The good news is that, for most people, high cholesterol is preventable. “The best way to prevent high cholesterol is to listen to the advice of your mother,” explains Dr. Curran. “That means, eat your veggies and go outside and play.”

Most people can prevent high cholesterol through diet and exercise. You should eat a sensible diet low in saturated fat and high in fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains. You should also maintain a healthy body weight and exercise regularly. People who already have high cholesterol can usually get their level under control through a combination of these lifestyle changes and, if needed, medication under the supervision of a physician. Even if you are on medication to lower your cholesterol, it is still important to maintain a healthy diet. “Medication can make it easier to control your cholesterol, but it’s not a license to go overboard with your diet,” states Dr. Curran. “The advantages of a healthy diet shouldn’t be overlooked.”

Learn More For more information about cholesterol and heart disease, visit the web site of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: www.nhlbi.nih.gov. The site includes an online Risk Assessment for Estimating Your 10-year Risk of Having a Heart Attack. To complete the assessment, you will need to know your total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. For more information about cardiac care service at the Heart Program of Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com or call (510) 745-6503.


September 30, 2011

SUBMITTED BY JAMES MCGEE

M

y uncle took me out to lunch today. It wasn’t an ordinary lunch at all, but a very extraordinary one. We attended a luncheon for the Golden Gate Chapter of the Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge. The gathering was not large in size, but large in stature and pride with nine World War II veterans, including my uncle, in attendance. There were men from the infantry, artillery, even from famed General George Patton’s army. One was a machine gunner, one was a scout, one was tall and steady, and one was slow and quiet, but all were from our greatest generation, a generation that put country first; a generation that fought bravely for America and for the freedom of other countries from Nazi Germany. The guest speaker was a vibrant and thankful woman named Lucie who was born in Cologne, Germany, a young child of six years old when American GI’s occupied her hometown in 1944. She shared fond memories of strong and kind U.S. troops that turned away the Nazi regime. The young girl would grow up to be a translator for the United States government and eventually join the Army Reserve where she would meet the love of her life, coincidentally a veteran that had served in Cologne in 1944 and who had fought in the Battle of the Bulge. Recently widowed, Lucie now travels all around the country and fights her own battle, the battle to ensure that veterans are not forgotten and receive the care and assistance that they are entitled to.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

During the lunch I shared a picture and stories of my father-in-law who had landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day and had also fought at the Battle of the Bulge. The veterans and family members listened respectfully and commented on just how terrible the beach landing had been and just how brave he must have been to survive the battles. One of the veterans that I met was Armando, who had grown up in California and was drafted at 19 years old and ended up serving with the Massachusetts regiment in Europe. He told the story of how he made it through the war without injury until the last day of the Battle of the Bulge when he was wounded by Nazi mortar fire, sending shrapnel into his knee and shoulder. The shrapnel was removed from his knee weeks later, but the shoulder injury was not operated on until over 20 years later when he finally gave in to the lingering pain. He said he could never throw a ball or pick up a baby after being wounded, but he said that’s okay, “you just have to learn how to live life”. The lunch with my uncle today was a powerful occasion and a stirring memory that I will never forget. I was honored to be in the presence of our greatest generation, looking a bit older than they had during that valiant stand in Europe in 1944, but not looking any less proud. We should take a hint from Armando and just learn how to live life, and we should never forget the contribution that our veterans and their fallen comrades made so many years ago.

Travis Amsbaugh’s family presents a $50,000 donation for the Castro Valley Veterans Memorial on September 23. Photo by Robert Souza

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011 Tribune Media Services

Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Mon. 11:40, 2:25, 5:15, 8:00, 10:35

The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Thu. 11:55, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15

Courageous(PG–13)Fri. - Thu.

What's Your Number? (R) Spy Kids: All the Time in Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 the World in 4D (PG) Fri. -

10:15, 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10

Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Mon. Crackerjack (R) Sat. 7:30 P.M. 11:50, 2:35, 5:20, 8:05 Yukon Jake (NR) Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. Stupid but Brave (NR) Mon. 10:30, 1:10, 3:50, 6:45, 9:30 Dookudu (NR) Fri. - Mon. 11:45, 3:30, 7:05, 10:40

Dream House (PG–13) Fri. &

11:20, 2:00, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10

Sun. & Mon. 12:20, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30, 10:45

Drive (R) Fri. - Mon. 11:55, 2:30,

Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Tue. 5:05, 7:45, 10:25 & Thu. 1:55, 7:25 Killer Elite(R)Fri. - Mon. 10:55, Wed. 1:55 P.M. 1:45, 4:50, 7:40, 10:45 Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:05, 1:50, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50 10:45, 12:05, 2:00, 3:15, 5:10, 7:10, Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. 8:15, 10:15, 11:15 Sun. & Mon. 10:45, 12:05, 2:00, 3:15, 11:00, 4:30, 10:00 5:10, 7:10, 8:15, 10:15 Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. Rise of the Planet of the Thu. 1:45, 7:15 Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Mon. 11:35, Dream House (PG–13) Fri. 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:05 Thu. 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 Straw Dogs(R)Fri. - Mon. 1:30, 7:20 Drive (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:25, The Lion King (G) Fri. - Mon. 5:00, 7:35, 10:10 12:45, 3:05, 5:40, 8:25, 10:45 Killer Elite (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:10, The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 Mon. 11:25, 1:50, 4:25, 7:25, 9:40 Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Warrior (PG–13) Fri. - Mon. 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20 10:20, 4:10, 9:55 Straw Dogs(R)Fri. - Tue. & Thu. What's Your Number? (R) 11:15, 4:45, 10:05 Fri. - Mon. 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:50, 10:30 Wed. 11:15 A.M. The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. 2:00 P.M.

The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Thu. 11:25, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

Fri. - Wed. 2:20, 7:05

Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 7:00, 9:00

The Lion King (G) Fri. - Tue. 1:20 P.M.

Fri. & Sat. 1:00, 4:00, 8:00 Sun. 1:00, 4:00 Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00

Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Fri. 2:00, 6:00 Sat. 6:00 P.M.

Dinosaurs Alive! (NR) Fri.

3:00, 7:00

Mysteries of Egypt (NR)

Fri. 1:00 P.M.

Astronaut (NR) Sat. & Sun. 12:00, 3:00

5:45, 8:00, 10:15, 12:30 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15

Mausam (NR) Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 3:40, 7:05, 10:30

Solarmax(NR) Fri. 11:00, 12:00,

To Be an Astronaut (NR)

Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain (R)Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30,

Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:20 9:00, 10:15, 12:20 Sun. - Tue. 11:15, 12:35, 2:00, 3:20, 4:45, 6:15, 7:30, 9:00, 10:15 Wed. 11:15, 12:35, 2:00, 3:20, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Thu. 11:15, 12:35, 2:00, 3:20, 4:45, 6:15, 7:30, 9:00, 10:15, 11:45

Fri. 6:00, 9:00 4:00, 8:00

Sun. - Wed. 11:15, 2:20, 5:25, 8:30

Killer Elite(R)Fri. & Sat. 11:15, What's Your Number? (R) 12:35, 2:00, 3:20, 4:45, 6:15, 7:30,

Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:01 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 2:00, 50/50 (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:35, 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 12:45, 2:00, 3:10, 4:25, 5:35, 6:50, 10:00 8:00, 9:15, 10:25, 11:40 Sun. - Wed. 11:35, 12:45, 2:00, 3:10, The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 4:25, 5:35, 6:50, 8:00, 9:15, 10:25 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 Abduction (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

Midnight

Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. Contagion (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:20, 2:00, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25

Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30

Sun. - Tue. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15

11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45, 12:20 What's Your Number? (R) Sun. - Thu. 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45 Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 11:05, 4:30, 10:05 Courageous (PG–13) Fri. Sat. 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05, Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. - & Thu. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45 12:20 Wed. 1:50, 7:15 Sun. - Wed. 11:05, 2:00, 4:55, 7:50 Sun. - Wed. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45 Don't Be Afraid of the Thu. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. Dark (R)Fri. - Wed. 11:30, 4:50, 10:20 11:00, 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05 Dream House (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:15, 12:35, 2:00, 3:15, 4:45, Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. Phantom of the Opera at Sat. & Thu. 12:20, 3:00, 5:40, 8:20, 6:00, 7:30, 8:40, 10:15 the Albert Hall - Live (NR) 11:00 Thu. 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15 Sun. - Wed. 12:20, 3:00, 5:40, 8:20 Sun. 11:00 A.M. Drive (R) Fri. - Wed. 11:40, 2:35, Dream House (PG–13) Fri. & Phantom of the Opera at 5:10, 7:45, 10:15 Sat. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, the Albert Hall - Encore (NR) Killer Elite(R) Fri. - Wed. 11:10, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05, 12:20 Wed. 7:30 P.M. 1:55, 4:40, 7:20, 10:10 Sun. - Wed. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20,

Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Wed.

50/50 (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05 Abduction (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:40, 2:15, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15

Dolphin Tale (PG) Fri. - Thu. 50/50 (R)Fri. - Mon. 11:15, 12:25, 11:10, 4:30, 9:55 1:55, 3:00, 4:30, 5:30, 6:55, 7:55, 9:20, Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Fri. Abduction (PG–13) Fri. & Sat.

1:30, 7:20

Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00 The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Tue. 11:00, 3:35, 6:00, 8:15, 10:30

Wed. 2:15, 7:20

Phantom of the Opera at the Albert Hall - Encore (NR)

10:20

The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Wed.

The Lion King (G) Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 2:25, 6:55, 11:25 (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05, 12:20 50/50 Phantom of the Opera at 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 Sun. - Tue. 2:25, 6:55 Sun. - Wed. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, the Albert Hall - Live (NR) 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45 (PG–13) Fri. Wed. Abduction Sun. 11:00 A.M. 11:25, 12:40, 2:00, 3:20, 4:50, 5:55, Thu. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Tue. 12:10, 4:40, 9:10 Phantom of the Opera at 7:25, 8:35, 10:10 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05 Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, the Albert Hall - Encore (NR) Colombiana (PG–13) Fri. Bad Teacher (R)Fri. & Sat. 12:01 10:15, 12:30 Wed. 7:30 P.M.

What's Your Number? (R)

Wed. 7:30 P.M.

12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:15, 11:30 Sun. 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:15 Mon. - Wed. 11:00, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:15

Spy Kids: All the Time in Force (NR) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:15, the World in 4D (3D) (PG) 2:20, 5:25, 8:30, 11:35

Fri. 11:00, 12:00, 3:00 11:05 50/50 (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 2:45, Fri. - Mon. 11:00, 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:45 Sat. & Sun. 11:00, 2:00

Abduction (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

Wed. 11:05, 4:55, 10:30

Tue. 11:35, 4:35, 9:40 Wed. 11:35, 4:35

Sat. 12:20, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30, 10:45, Secret of the Rocket (NR)

5:15, 7:45, 10:15

Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Drive (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00,

Thu. 1:50, 7:15

Dream House (PG–13) Fri. 10:50, 12:15, 1:25, 2:55, 4:05, 5:35, Thu. 11:30, 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00 7:55, 8:40, 10:30, 11:20 (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Sun. 10:50, 1:25, 4:05, 5:35, 7:55, 8:40, Moneyball 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00 10:30 Mon. 10:50, 12:15, 1:25, 2:55, 4:05, The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. 2:10 P.M. 5:35, 7:55, 8:40, 10:30

Moneyball (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45 (PG–13) Thu. 12:01 11:25, 1:00, 2:25, 4:00, 5:25, 7:00, Thu. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, Real Steel Midnight 8:30, 10:05 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

County unveils LEED Gold organics processing facility SUBMITTED BY KAREN STERN

W

aste Management of Alameda County (WMAC) unveiled its $11M, state-of-the-art LEED Gold Organics Processing and Transfer Facility at the Davis Street Resource Recovery Complex, San Leandro, on September 22, 2011. Only the third Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Gold building in San Leandro, it is the first industrial building designed to Gold standard in the city. “Our commitment to greening the environment extends beyond our natural gas collection vehicles and single-stream recycling services. We’re building green,” said Jack Isola, senior district manager of the Davis Street Resource Recovery Complex. “The Organics Processing and Transfer Facility is the keystone to future developments at Davis Street.” The building’s distinguishing features include stateof-the-art biofilter to eliminate odor; high-speed roll-up doors to contain odor and prevent bird entry; day-light via translucent panels and solar tubes; mechanically-stabilized embankment walls built with 100 percent recycled aggregate; 95 percent of construction waste recycled; 40 percent of building materials sourced locally; and 20 percent of building materials from recycled sources. Additionally, local contractors provided the majority of construction services and 92 percent were union jobs. The 34,967 sq. ft. building includes 1,127 sq. ft. of office space. The balance is dedicated to the processing and transfer of 150,000 tons of yard trimmings and food scraps annually. Residential organics are sent to WMAC’s Organics Material Review Institute (OMRI)-listed composting facility in Marin County. Excess materials are sent to third-party composters and

in the case of nearly 500 tons of Christmas trees to bio-fuel facilities. “This economic and environmental investment reflects our dedication to helping Alameda County and the Bay Area reach higher diversion goals,” said Barry Skolnick, Waste Management Area Vice President. “It also reflects our commitment to our host community, the City of San Leandro, and our many neighbors. Together, we’ll build a greener future.” A prototype natural gas collection vehicle, currently being tested in the City of Oakland, was on hand at the inauguration. Powered with bio-fuel made from landfill gas at the Altamont Landfill, Livermore, the truck entered the new facility after the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Attendees included representatives from the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, City of San Leandro, the Oro Loma and Castro Valley sanitary districts and many others. They toured the new building as well as the $1.5M Public Area Materials Recovery Facility (PAM) that opened in August 2011 with eight new green jobs at Davis Street. The PAM is designed to process 60,000 tons of construction and demolition material annually, diverting recyclables from landfills. Clean construction lumber is sent to WMAC’s mulch facility in Fremont where the wood is ground into mulch for gardening. It is part of the closedloop approach of WM EarthCare, a new landscape product line of locally-sourced, 100 percent recycled compost and mulch available at WMAC’s seven Bay Area facilities. To learn more about WM EarthCare, visit www.wmearthcare.com. For more about landfill gas to bio-fuel powering Waste Management collection vehicles, visit www.altamontlandfill.wm.com. For more information about Waste Management, visit www.wm.com or www.thinkgreen.com.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Johnetta E. Stephens RESIDENT OF STOCKTON January 5, 1964 - September 8, 2011

Marriage

Special Life Events

September 30, 2011

Obituaries

Willem Boon RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 30, 1926 - September 24, 2011

Bruce Baker

Ronald Denis Chell RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 29, 1954 - September 19, 2011

RESIDENT OF LIVERMORE February 23, 1960 - September 21, 2011

Lourdes J. Andaya

Kenneth E. Moseley RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 9, 1940 - September 19, 201

RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 10, 1937 - September 25, 2011

Camilo G. Carig

Lincoln Thomas, Jr RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 15, 1947 - September 22, 2011

RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE January 6, 1948 - September 25, 2011

Elwyn G. Reedy

Bruce C. Lundeen RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 28, 1950 - September 23, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 8, 1927 - September 27, 2011

Karl Kaufman

Si Jie Yan RESIDENT OF UNION CITY April 5, 1919-September 23, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 5, 1935 - September 29, 2011

Irving A. Williams RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 27, 1928 - September 25, 20111

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible.

Berge • Pappas • Smith

James M. Saunders RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 14, 1943 - September 27, 2011

Dallas W. Wyhs RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 2, 1928 - September 27, 2011

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

FD1007

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 11

are slowly disassembled and returned to their original state,” says Pugh. He has suggested the possible existence of a cosmic “Rosetta Stone” that may give us insight into a kind of poetic shorthand left by extraterrestrials. Or perhaps simple messages of a more prophetic nature: truths that can only be expressed cryptically, out of some basic hive-awareness that resonates from all life here on Earth. Pugh’s photographs have appeared in several solo shows, including (locally) Sun Gallery and Faultline Photographics in Hayward, Ten10 and The Overpass Gallery in San Jose and Florentine Village Resort, Los Gatos. Group shows have included an

SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER Sun Gallery will host a photographic exhibit by Howard Pugh in the Ken Cook Room beginning October 5 and running through November 12. For the last five years, Howard Pugh’s photography has focused on discovering possible meanings and “messages” through patient, close-up explo-

rations of the world of rusted iron, peeling paint, scraped dyecast metals, eroded concrete, and various other human-fashioned things decaying and dissolving under the sun. “I feel there is an underlying force at work here, trying to reach out, trying to communicate, in a purposeful albeit unintelligible way, by the very way in which the things we have wrought and brought together

international circle of likeminded artists (Movement of Aleatoric Modern Artists) in Art Basel - Miami, Florida, and “Magic in the Mix” at PhotoCentral here in Hayward. His work is also being added to several private, corporate, and important public collections, and recently appeared in the book “Aleatoric Artists of the Twenty First Century.” Patterns of Abuse October 4 – November 12 Wednesday – Saturday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sun Gallery 1050 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Sons in Retirement Retired men-Enjoy leisure time with friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion on third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Ron Holladay (510) 656 9017 rdholladay@yahoo.com http:www.sirinc.org

Karaoke Club Monthly social karaoke Meet & sing tamil songs, have fun while helping people in need. Open only to Bay area (San Jose - Santa Clara - San Francisco). Register @ www.tamilkaraokeclub.com or email Sing@TamilKaraokeClub.com

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB 45TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR Meeting, Demo, & Sharing 2nd Monday of Month - 7PM At Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont Visit Fremontfrosters.com Fremontfrosters@gmail.com Contact Linda 510-794-7002

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home. The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Fremont Cribbage Club Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

BLOCK WIDE GARAGE SALE DOZENS OF HOMES Saturday, September 24, 2011 8AM-2PM Cedar Commons-II HOA in Newark On Toulouse St off Haley St Nearest cross streets Haley St and Cedar Blvd

Serious Mental Illness Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 website: wwwsshsa.org

Tamil Radio Show Tamil Radio Show "Kaalai Thendral" on every Saturday 10 AM to 12 PM on KLOK 1170 AM Also Listen Live @ www.arimausa.com

FREE 12 week course for caregivers of someone with serious mental illness Jan, 2012 - 9-11:30am Fremont, Registration required. call Joe Rose 510-378-1578 Email joerose07@yahoo.com www.NAMI.org/f2f

Christmas Craft Boutique Saturday, Dec 3, 2011 from 10 am to 3 pm. Tables available to rent to sell your crafts for $25 For more information call 510-793-6285 Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd, Fremont

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

FREMONT FROSTERS CAKE DECORATORS CLUB Demos, Displays, & Treats October 22 - 1-4pm FREE Open to the public Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta, Fremont fremontfosters.com RSVP to Linda 510-794-7002


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Master Sudoku

6

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Sudoku Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

5

1 2 8 7

Sudoku Solutions on page 15

9

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4 letter words Deed Flux Lure Yoga

1

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Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 670,000 Median $: 338,000 Lowest $: 330,000 Average $: 423,250 ADDRESS

ZIP

20924 San Miguel Avenue 19975 Stanton Avenue 3969 Wilson Avenue 6167 Mt. Diablo Court

SUBMITTED BY WENDY WINSTED Do you enjoy interacting with people and are you interested in learning to work with wildlife? If so, join the enthusiastic team of wildlife docents at Sulphur Creek Nature Center. Docents play a vital role in educating people about the wildlife around them and inspiring ways to peacefully co-exist. As a docent, you will learn the natural history of local wildlife, how to handle domestic and wild animals and ways to use professional, interpretive techniques to convey your knowledge and enthusiasm to others. Docents help connect the community with wildlife by participating in schools programs, rest-home programs, festivals and special events. Training is offered on an ongoing basis, applications are currently being accepted and interviews will begin on November 2, 2011. Registration is $60 and includes a T-shirt, name tag and training material. Sulphur Creek Nature Center is located at 1801 D Street, Hayward, and is under the auspices of the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District. For further information and applications, call (510) 8816747 or visit Sulphur Creek Nature Center. For more information about the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District, visit www.HaywardRec.org

94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

355,000 330,000 338,000 670,000

3 2 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1283 810 944 3022

1948 1951 1947 1990

08-23-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-19-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 31 Highest $: 1,168,000 Median $: Lowest $: 203,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

250 Barton Drive 94536 83 Blaisdell Way 94536 13 Blue Coral Terrace 94536 481 D Street 94536 38732 Huntington Circle #136 94536 342 I Street 94536 3285 Kemper Road 94536 4304 Lenoso Common 94536 4879 Mayfield Drive 94536 37789 Peachtree Court 94536 37302 Pinehurst Terrace 94536 3242 Puttenham Way 94536 37453 Southwood Drive 94536 3374 Clifton Court 94538 3531 Dayton Common 94538 43198 Mayfair Park Terrace 94538 39959 Paseo Padre Parkway 94538 4339 Providence Terrace 94538 5632 Spry Common 94538 4645 Stratford Avenue 94538 39667 Whitecap Way 94538 474 Crystalline Drive 94539 40926 Durillo Drive 94539 167 East Las Palmas Avenue 94539 43627 Excelso Drive 94539 130 Quinault Way 94539 5227 Amberwood Drive 94555 34350 Eucalyptus Terrace 94555 33050 Lake Mead Drive 94555 4362 Pecos Avenue 94555 2898 Sterne Place 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

360,000 519,000 355,000 648,000 240,000 725,000 580,000 203,000 670,000 839,000 490,000 507,500 500,000 300,000 455,000 330,000 635,000 445,000 305,000 410,000 421,000 1,168,000 842,500 1,081,000 1,128,000 706,000 688,000 658,000 300,000 400,000 449,000

984 1372 1773 2304 724 2040 1708 972 2056 2754 1537 1714 2034 1270 1430 1308 3038 1437 1118 1744 1483 2295 1536 2279 2648 1759 1869 1593 1060 1476 1390

1952 1984 1987 1955 1989 1999 1973 1971 1954 2001 1997 1972 1955 1958 1999 1987 1981 2008 1994 1963 1962 1985 1965 1975 1984 1977 1989 1992 1970 1972 1969

08-18-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-18-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-18-11 08-23-11 08-22-11 08-23-11 08-18-11 08-18-11 08-19-11 08-18-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-18-11

3 4 3 4 2 4 3 2 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 4 3

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 33 Highest $: 575,000 Median $: Lowest $: 94,000 Average $: ADDRESS

123 Burbank Street 125 Burbank Street 127 Burbank Street 129 Burbank Street 153 Burbank Street 22531 Center Street #210 889 Chenault Way 577 Cherry Way 18488 Haven Street 720 Longwood Avenue 731 Paradise Boulevard 867 Sueirro Street

ZIP

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541

500,000 559,935

SOLD FOR BDS

364,000 305,000 340,000 305,000 301,000 135,000 250,000 127,500 203,000 210,500 195,000 225,000

3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3

236,000 250,788

22726 Zaballos Court 2417 Creekside Court 956 Highland Boulevard 24663 Karina Court 25676 University Court 410 Balmoral Way 27878 Biscayne Avenue 329 Chambosse Drive 24927 Diadon Drive 316 Lexington Avenue 27797 Mandarin Avenue 31650 Medinah Street 28088 Thackeray Avenue 25087 Thomas Avenue 12 Trestle Drive 29583 Vanderbilt Street #209 27796 Vasona Court #6 27496 Bahama Avenue 27410 Lemon Tree Court 2823 Seadrift Circle 27549 Stromberg Court

BUILT

CLOSED

1910 1651 1860 1651 952 1070 1051 1090 1105 854 1040

2010 2010 2010 2010 1994 1951 1926 1942 1952 1942 1950

08-18-11 08-22-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-22-11 08-22-11 08-18-11 08-18-11 08-19-11

330,000 130,000 242,000 550,000 114,000 347,000 200,000 260,000 236,000 490,000 145,000 350,000 283,000 250,000 135,000 110,000 94,000 215,000 138,000 575,000 121,000

2 1 4 5 1 3 3 3 3 6 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 3 3 5 2

1760 785 1588 3385 823 1153 1000 1530 967 2474 1000 1630 1161 960 870 878 874 1128 1254 2600 988

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 840,000 Median $: Lowest $: 180,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1665 Cortez Street 1062 Mente Linda Loop 174 Parc Place Drive 1033 Phoenix Court 369 San Petra Court #4 688 Wessex Place

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

342,000 460,000 353,000 653,000 180,000 840,000

3 3 2 4 2 4

ADDRESS

ZIP

39931 Cedar Boulevard #215 6146 Civic Terrace Avenue #B 5767 Dichondra Place 5566 Greenpoint Court 36859 Newark Boulevard #C 6475 Thomas Avenue

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

229,000 162,500 488,000 335,000 220,000 350,000

3 2 5 3 3 3

ZIP

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579

SOLD FOR BDS

455,000 177,000 340,000 235,000 650,000 233,000 150,000 190,000 185,000 315,000 315,000 330,500 330,000

3 2 3 2 6 2 3 2 3 3 4 4 3

08-18-11 08-18-11 08-22-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-22-11 08-19-11 08-22-11 08-18-11 08-18-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-18-11 08-22-11 08-18-11 08-19-11 08-18-11 08-18-11 08-18-11

353,000 471,333 BUILT

CLOSED

1336 1810 1104 2008 924 3155

1955 2007 2005 1998 1971 1984

09-02-11 09-02-11 09-01-11 09-01-11 09-01-11 09-02-11

229,000 297,417

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1283 890 2676 1469 1330 1730

1985 1986 1987 1978 1987 1959

08-19-11 08-19-11 08-23-11 08-22-11 08-19-11 08-19-11

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 650,000 Median $: Lowest $: 150,000 Average $: 755 Bridge Road 402 Callan Avenue 2448 Driftwood Way 1106 Hyde Street 2797 Lakeview Drive 1057 Minerva Street 1455 166th Avenue 2010 167th Avenue 15268 Hesperian Boulevard 16622 Kildare Road 1560 Mono Avenue 15105 Thoits Street 1650 Vida Court

1949 1991 1958 2008 1981 1956 1954 1950 1950 1958 1954 1956 1956 1952 1991 1988 1985 1957 1971 2006 1970

SQFT

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 488,000 Median $: Lowest $: 162,500 Average $:

ADDRESS

SQFT

94541 94542 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545

315,000 300,423

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1726 1156 1196 1048 3877 969 985 992 1400 1425 2384 1749 1169

1932 1981 1963 1900 1964 1946 1915 1952 1980 1972 1917 1951 1956

08-18-11 08-18-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-22-11 08-18-11 08-23-11 08-22-11 08-19-11 08-22-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-18-11


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

A young Californian will have the chance to participate in the tree lighting ceremony Entry forms for the statewide drawing must be postmarked by October 7

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 398,000 Median $: 313,000 Lowest $: 268,000 Average $: 336,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

16032 Bayberry Lane 686 Paseo Del Rio 17257 Via La Jolla 17120 Via Piedras 17134 Via Valencia

SOLD FOR BDS

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

365,000 268,000 313,000 398,000 365,000

3 3 3 4 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1948 986 1407 2042 1277

1994 1944 1950 1947 1951

08-16-11 08-22-11 08-22-11 08-18-11 08-19-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 560,000 Median $: Lowest $: 212,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

4357 Agena Circle 33022 Alicante Terrace 4407 Chippendale Court 34720 Clover Street 4239 Comet Circle 4421 Pinewood Court 1141 Platinum Street 237 Tamarack Drive

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

230,000 300,000 415,000 382,000 212,000 378,000 560,000 351,500

3 3 3 3 4 3 5 3

351,500 353,563

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1255 1344 1274 1382 1583 1274 3655 1835

1971 1997 1974 1970 1972 1974 2006 1957

08-18-11 08-23-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-19-11 08-18-11 08-19-11

Sudoku Solutions

8 6 7 1 9 3 4 2 5

5 1 4 7 2 6 3 8 9

9 2 3 5 8 4 6 1 7

6 4 9 2 3 1 7 5 8

1 3 5 9 7 8 2 4 6

2 7 8 6 4 5 9 3 1

7 8 2 4 5 9 1 6 3

4 5 6 3 1 7 8 9 2

3 9 1 8 6 2 5 7 4

0 3 8 5 6 A 2 4 9 D C 7 B F E 1

2 E A F D 0 C B 6 4 1 3 5 8 7 9

4 9 C B 7 5 3 1 F 0 E 8 6 A D 2

6 D 1 7 8 9 F E 2 B 5 A 0 C 3 4

C 1 7 6 A F 5 D E 2 B 9 8 4 0 3

A 2 B 9 4 8 0 7 3 5 F 6 1 D C E

D 4 F E B 6 1 3 C 8 A 0 9 5 2 7

3 0 5 8 9 2 E C 1 7 4 D F B 6 A

B A 3 D 5 4 6 2 7 1 9 F E 0 8 C

1 5 9 C 3 E 8 A 0 6 2 4 D 7 B F

7 6 4 0 1 D 9 F B E 8 C 3 2 A 5

8 F E 2 C B 7 0 D A 3 5 4 1 9 6

F 8 6 3 0 C A 5 4 9 7 B 2 E 1 D

E B 2 A F 3 D 9 5 C 0 1 7 6 4 8

5 C 0 1 2 7 4 6 8 3 D E A 9 F B

9 7 D 4 E 1 B 8 A F 6 2 C 3 5 0

SUBMITTED BY MARIA BENECH Children love Christmas trees and especially turning on the Christmas lights. Now imagine the thrill for the child who gets a chance to turn on the 10,000 lights that illuminate the 65-foot Christmas tree that’s erected in front of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. The U.S. Forest Service and its partners are inviting all Californians between the ages of five and 17 to participate in a drawing to win an allexpense paid trip to Washington, D.C. to participate in the 2011 Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in early December with Speaker of the House John Boehner. “A young Californian will have the chance to participate in the tree lighting ceremony this year because the Stanislaus National Forest is supplying the 65-foot white fir that will stand on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building. The tree is known as the “People’s Tree” and is a gift from Californians to the entire nation,” said

Maria C. Benech, U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree coordinator. The trip, which is paid for through private donations, covers the cost of travel for the winning child and an accompanying parent or guardian. Interested participants must move quickly, however. Entry forms for the 2011 Capitol Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony must be postmarked by Friday, Oct. 7. Entry forms and other information about the drawing and the history of the U.S. Capitol Tree are available at www.capitolchristmastree2011.org. The website also includes specifications and shipping directions for handmade ornaments, which are being sought to decorate the Capitol Christmas Tree. Individuals of all ages, including artists and crafters, are encouraged to create and donate ornaments for the Capitol Christmas Tree. Ornament makers are being encouraged to use recycled or natural materials for their creations.


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

Doing real science with NASA

Stay Tuned for the Aurora BY DR. MARC RAYMAN

mous flow of electricity right into Earth's atmosphere. When the charged particles collide with the thin air 60 miles or more above the ground, the gases in the atmos-

across the space between the Sun and us. The new GOES-R satellite will keep track of these charged particles from the Sun as part of its regular duties. Help GOES-R

Sometimes, the night sky is filled with dancing curtains of blue-green light, with patches of red and pink. It’s the aurora borealis, also called the northern lights. The closer you live to the North Pole, the more likely you will see an aurora. The same light show is also visible near the South Pole, where it is called the aurora australis, or southern lights. The auroras look like Earth is performing for us, with the sky for a stage. However, the Sun is actually directing the show. The Sun is always sending out a stream of electrically charged particles called the solar wind. When the particles get The aurora borealis, as seen from Bear Lake,Alaska. (Credit: U.S.Air Force/Joshua Strang) close to Earth, they start to feel the effect of phere give off light like the gather up all this data. Play the Earth’s strong magnetic field. glowing gas in a neon light fun, colorful game Satellite InEarth is like a giant magnet, tube. Nitrogen may turn red, sight on The Space Place at with its field curving all around blue, and violet, and oxygen http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/satelthe planet and coming together can color the sky red and green. lite-insight. into almost a funnel shape near Although auroras occur This article was provided each of Earth’s two poles. This every year, some years the Sun through the courtesy of the Jet field is called Earth's magnetos- is more active. Sometimes, Propulsion Laboratory, Califorphere. It protects us from the huge explosions on the Sun nia Institute of Technology, solar wind, most of the time fling tremendous numbers of Pasadena, California, under a steering the charged particles charged particles into space. contract with the National Aeroaway from our planet. But the If these happen to be aimed nautics and Space Administramagnetic field also traps some at Earth, we can be treated to tion and support from the U.S. of the charged particles and an especially marvelous disDepartment of Commerce Nafunnels them down toward the play two or three days later, tional Oceanic and Atmospheric poles. Then we get an enoronce the particles have raced Administration.


September 30, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“The human race has only one really effective weapon, and

life, and people build up and carry around that stress in their bodies. Laughter Yoga provides tools to break that clenched,

Trained by Dr. Kataria and Steve Wilson of World Laughter Tour, Certified Laughter Yoga Teacher and Certified Laughter Leader Lydia Gonzales have brought the joy and healing of laughter to seminars and workshops, corporate presentations, support groups, and wellness events all over the Bay Area. She leads a free monthly class at the Hayward Library that is open to all. “Sometimes four people show up, sometimes 28 people show up. I never know,” says Gonzales. Attendees have included young and old, male

that is laughter.” Mark Twain. It’s no news that laughter is a good thing. We watch funny movies and sitcoms, go to stand-up comedy shows, tell jokes, make faces, and do countless other crazy things to get a good laugh. There are even groups that use laughter to relieve stress and improve health. Laughter Yoga was developed in 1995 by Dr. Madan Kataria who extensively researched the proven health benefits of laughter. He convinced four others to join him in a Laughter Club at a park in his neighborhood in Mumbai, India, to test his discoveries, eventually developing techniques and exercises of his own. Laughter Yoga is a combination of laughter, deep breathing, and stretching using a series of exercises designed to help release tension and encourage relaxation. Stress is a fact of

stressed feeling, and reminds people of ways they can use their laughter. Laughter conditions the abdominal muscles, reduces blood pressure and heart rate, improves lung capacity and oxygen levels in the blood, aids mental function, helps fight infection, and a host of other positives, not to mention it feels good! Over 6,000 laughter clubs in 60 countries can’t be wrong!

and female, even those who don’t speak English. But there is no language barrier; you just watch and follow along. “You laugh in the same language,” says Gonzales. She has a special love for sharing laughter with seniors, many having dealt with grief, loss, loneliness, and depression. Laughter Yoga is a gentle exercise they can do, and

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

continued on page 21

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. BILL VETERAN, FREMONT PD September 25 FPD dispatch received reports of a suspected drunk driver in the area of Mission Boulevard/Mowry Avenue. The vehicle traveled north on Mission Boulevard at a high rate of speed and collided with a white pickup and a green pickup stopped for a red light (N/B Mission Boulevard/King Avenue). The green pickup overturned and its driver was pronounced dead at the scene; the driver of the white pickup sustained minor/moderate injuries. The suspect was treated for moderate injuries and awaits felony charges. While conducting traffic control for the above listed fatal DUI traffic collision at Nursery/Niles, an officer observed a vehicle run over traffic control cones and almost collide with his parked patrol car (with full emergency lights activated). The officer contacted the driver of the car who admitted to consuming alcoholic beverages in celebration of the Oakland Raiders victory. The driver was arrested for DUI. At the same traffic control location, another officer observed a vehicle drive past the traffic control cones and come close to striking his vehicle. The officer contacted the driver of the car and arrested him for DUI. September 26 Officers responded to an inprogress residential burglary on Philadelphia Place after a neighbor witnessed two male juveniles enter the home via a window. The

September 30, 2011

witness confronted the males as they exited the house and informed them she had called the police. The males dropped the loss and fled in a waiting vehicle being driven by a third suspect. Both suspects are described as Hispanic, 14-15 years old, thin build. Officers responded to Washington Hospital on a report of a subject who was being treated for a gun shot wound to his buttocks. The victim said he was alone on Hastings, just north of Mowry, when a suspect attempted to rob him. The victim fought back, and during the struggle, the suspect shot the victim. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male, 2022 years, 5’10”. The suspect fled south on Hastings. September 28 Another auto burglary at Starbucks Mowry/Farewell. Loss was cell phone. Strong arm robbery of a female on Alder for her necklace. Suspect vehicle was a white Toyota Sienna van, 3-4 adult Hispanic male suspects. A residential burglary on Apricot was interrupted and a 25-yearold male was arrested. The side door was kicked in to gain entry. A female associate was located at Mission Ranch. Call of a Hispanic male adult with a gun at 2147 Mowry (medical complex). A 50-year-old male was located and the gun found to be a replica. A strong arm robbery was reported at Washington High School. A black male juvenile suspect fled but was caught after a foot pursuit.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR. BOB DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD September 25 A Newark police officer followed up on a petty theft case from the previous day in which the suspect had stolen the victim’s wallet, cell phone, etc. and then used one of the credit cards at Safeway. After obtaining video of the sales transaction, the officer identified a possible suspect and coordinated an early morning probation search.Erik Koskela of Newark was taken into custody without incident at his home and admitted his involvement after being confronted with video still shots of him using the victim’s credit cards.The victim’s cell phone and credit cards were also recovered during the search. At 2:18 p.m., a neighbor on Garrone Place called Police to report a possible residential burglary in progress involving three juvenile suspects. Three suspects ran out of the side yard where they were greeted by officers. The three juveniles were taken into custody and found to have marijuana branches stuffed in their waistbands. A check of the residence yielded a forced rear door, some graffiti on the interior walls and a cabinet in the garage that had been used to dry freshly harvested Marijuana. Subsequent investigation revealed the homeowner was eventually going to use this residence as a rental property but had not yet done so. It appears the juveniles had noticed

the house vacant for several months and had been using it as a place to hold parties and process marijuana plants unbeknownst to the homeowner. NPD officers responded to 6300 block of Baine Avenue at 7:53 p.m. on a report of a stabbing. Upon their arrival, NPD units located the 15-year-old male stabbing victim who was uncooperative with the investigation. The victim was transported to Eden Hospital with what appeared to be non-life threatening injuries. Witnesses are encouraged to contact the Newark Police Department with information. No further details. At 10:17 p.m. an officer initiated a traffic stop of a vehicle on Cedar Court; the driver, Michael Billingsley was told to exit the vehicle for a parole search. Billingsley put several items in his mouth in an attempt to conceal them. Billingsley was eventually taken into custody but not after he had swallowed some contraband. Officers also recovered some cocaine that Billingsley had in his possession. September 27 Officers were dispatched to 39600 block of Eureka Drive at 6:18 p.m. on a possible commercial burglary in progress. Upon arrival officers contacted Jayne Whitted of Union City, Patrick Erwin of Fremont and Rhonda Mc Donald of Fremont who were attempting to take construction material stored in the parking lot. The suspects were cited and released at the scene. SUBMITTED BY LT. BEN HORNER, UNION CITY PD On Monday, September 26, 2011, UCPD officers responded to 10th and H St. to investigate the report of a “vicious dog attack.” Officers located a 19-year-old victim who had received a dog bite while attempting to stop an unprovoked attack on her small terrier. The female victim was walking her dog on a leash when they were continued on page 26


September 30, 2011

T

o combat over population, the Fremont TriCity Animal Shelter is holding an emergency cat adoption program in an effort to save the lives of cats. Due to the influx of kittens from the summer months, the shelter has a large number of cats and kittens that need to find new homes and families as soon as possible. The Tri-City Animal Shelter is instating the “Free to a Great Home” Program. Under the program, previously sterilized cats may be adopted at no charge from October 1st – October 8th (Fremont residents will be required to pay a $12 cat license fee).

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Adopters must go through the normal screening process. Once the adoption is completed, the pet is free and includes the microchip, spay or neuter, and rabies vaccine normally provided with an adoption. Planning to adopt this fall or winter? Adopt a cat NOW, when the need is greatest! Come visit us at: 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont Animal Shelter Hours: Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 p.m. Saturday: 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

SUBMITTED BY SGT RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD On September 26, 2011 at approximately 11:56 p.m., Milpitas Police officers responded to the Milpitas Inn located at 66 South Main Street for a suspicious subject trying to open car doors in the motel parking lot. The first officer arrived on scene within 37 seconds of the call and obtained information from witnesses that the subject had forced his way into room #105, which was vacant per motel management. Officers searched the motel property and located Tyler Scott Graeber, a transient from Florida, hiding in bushes. The witnesses identified Graeber as the subject seen forcing his way into a motel room and trying to open car doors. Based on the investigation, Tyler Scott Graeber was booked into the Santa Clara County Jail for burglary and unauthorized entry of property. Anyone with any information regarding this incident or other criminal activity occurring in this jurisdiction is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/cr ime_tip.asp.

Tyler Scott Graeber

Page 19


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 30, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CNS-2182309#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455917 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DR LOCK MOBILE SERVICE, 8096 JUNIPER AVE., NEWARK, CA 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: PO BOX 716, NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA BHRACHIAH CHEZKIYAN, 8096 JUNIPER AVE., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BHRACHIAH CHEZKIYAN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182312# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455870 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ARUNTEK, 37353 INGRAHAM STREET, NEWARK, CA 94560 MAILING ADDRESS: ARUNTEK, PO BOX 1287, NEWARK, CA 94560, County of ALAMEDA AMANDEEP CHAYRA, 37353 INGRAHAM ST., NEWARK, CA 94560 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-6-11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ AMANDEEP CHAYRA, OWNER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456388 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BAY AREA INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CENTER, 1372 OCASO CAMINO, FREMONT, CA 94539, County of ALAMEDA YAJUAN CHEN, 1372 OCASO CAMINO, FREMONT, CA 94539 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ YAJUAN CHEN This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182299# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456266 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SUNNYSIDE HOME, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538, County of ALAMEDA BONIFACIO TORRES COSTINIANO, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538 LEI DONG COSTINIANO, 5652 BUTANO PARK DR., FREMONT, CA 94538 This business is conducted by HUSBAND AND WIFE The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ BONIFACIO COSTINIANO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2182268# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456057 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

Kids Little Scissors, 36476 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Subhash Grover, 321 Orchard Dr., Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-15-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Subhash Grover This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2180441# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456379 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Crown Maintenance Co., 34188 Siward Dr., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Sumi Choi, 34188 Siward Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Sumi Choi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 21, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21/11 CNS-2180230# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455855 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Antonia’s Women’s Accessories, 27957 Leidig Court, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Antonia Mendoza, 27957 Leidig Court, Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 09/06/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be

false is guilty of a crime.) Antonias Wome’s, Accessorie’s /s/ Antonia Mendoza This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2174392# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456020 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Vocal Xtreme, 4456 Technology Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda VX Enterprises Inc., CA., 4456 Technology Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-12-2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chien-Ming Chang, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2174375# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455953 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DC Food & Discount, 37531 Dusterberry Way, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Shah Mahmoud Ahmady, 1512 Reiger Ave., Hayward, CA 94554 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shah Mahmoud Ahmady, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 8, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-

tion 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2172920# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454599-600 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Tandoori-N-Curry Restaurant, (2) Lazzat Restaurant, 40559 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Farooqui Foods Inc., 1770 Clear Lake Ave., Milpitas, CA 95035 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mohammed Javed Farooqui (CEO) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 02, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2172657#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be accepted in the office of the Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/BIDDERS CONFERENCE – N. COUNTY RFP #9001011LAB, Laboratory Analysis of Lead-Containing Samples, Tuesday, October 11, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/BIDDERS CONFERENCE – N. COUNTY RFP #9001011LAB, Laboratory Analysis of Lead-Containing Samples, Wednesday, October 12, 2011 at 2:00 PM, Alameda County Lead Poisoning Prevention Department, 2000 Embarcadero, Suite 300, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 PM on October 26, 2011 County Contact: Dennis Jordan at (510) 567-6852 or via email: dennis.jordan@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 9/30/11 CNS-2182224#


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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“Now they’ve got a whole new way of expressing joy,” Gonzales says. “It’s a real easy way for people to open up and enjoy being around people again.” Laughter Yoga has many different layers; it’s healthy and fun, and is a social bonding where you connect with people in a different way. Gonzales sees a transformation in her students from when they first arrive to how they are at the end of class. “There’s a real change and it’s real fun to watch.” Her class is carried out standing or in chairs; there is no need for mats or lying on the floor. She doesn’t deny you might feel silly, but it’s important to be comfortable and make eye contact to share the laughter. Gonzales instructs students not to over do it; there should be no forceful laughter, but more of a giggly laughter. “We simulate laughter to stim-

ulate laughter,” she says. Warm ups include a humming that blossoms into laughter, which helps loosen and relax the jaw; silent or “library” laughter; pulling faces to loosen facial muscles; working an imaginary hula hoop; shoulder rolls; and inhaling the scent of an imaginary flower with a deep exhalation. Exercises are diverse and can change from class to class. You might find yourself constructing a ball of laughter and passing it from person to person, riding an imaginary bike, blowing bubbles to the appropriate Don Ho song, reading from a jar of quotes, or sharing an embarrassing moment. “Everyday life has a lot of fuel for laughter,” says Gonzales, stressing that students are laughing with each other, not at each other. Students can even stage a temper tantrum, then open an

imaginary a box that holds their biggest desire inside. This illustrates how quickly your attitude can change. Gonzales says we’re conditioned to laugh in response to

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something, but Laughter Yoga is about laughing just because, and instituting that into daily life. “We’re laughing because it feels good, for nothing at all,” she says. First timer Jeanne McArthur said the class was definitely a fun and positive experience and there were things she could take away and use. Ben Bennett has been doing Laughter Yoga for around five years. He has been through sickness and operations, had asthma as a kid and suffered from a collapsed lung. He says he can’t lift weights or do floor exercises, but he can laugh. Ben says he’s told his friends about it, but can’t convince anyone to come; they think it’s silly. He believes if they would just let their guard down and try it they would be surprised. “It’s not silly at all, it’s just good fun,” Ben says. “There’s nothing bad you can say about it.” Laughter Yoga is a safe environment, easy and fun loving where everyone is on the same level, with any negativity or judgement left at the door. Adults are so often required to be serious, buttoned up, pulled

together; Laughter Yoga gets you back to an almost child-like place of freedom, lightness, calm, and openness. All you need is comfortable clothes, a bottle of water, and a ready to laugh attitude. Laughter Yoga is also offered at San Leandro’s Senior Community Center the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Fees are $8 for residents and $10 for non-residents; you must be 50 or above to register. Call (510) 577-3462 or visit www.sanleandrorec.org for more information or to sign up. For more information on Laughter Yoga at the Hayward Library, contact Trudy Toll at (510) 881-7974. To learn more about Laughter Yoga visit www.laughteryoga.com, www.worldlaughtertour.com, or www.laughinglydia.com. Laughter Yoga Saturday, October 1 3 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7974 Free


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Sony to stop paying theaters for 3-D glasses BY RYAN NAKASHIMA AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER LOS ANGELES (AP), Sep 27 Sony Corp.'s movie studio has put theater owners on notice that it will stop paying millions of dollars per film for disposable 3-D glasses starting next May, just before it is to release a couple of summer blockbusters “The Amazing Spider-Man” and “Men in Black III” - in 3-D. The move was announced in a letter sent to theater owners, according to a person with the studio. The person was not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity. The abrupt policy change comes as studios are struggling to adapt their business to falling DVD sales, while digital sales have not made up the difference. Moviegoers, who already pay an additional couple dollars or more for 3-D movie tickets, could be annoyed if they are burdened with a new expense amid high unemployment and a weak economy.

Sony's move was first reported by The Hollywood Reporter earlier Tuesday. Sony's worldwide president of distribution, Rory Bruer, told the magazine that the studio was trying to give theater owners a long lead time before the move goes into effect. It is unclear who will pay for the glasses: theater owners, who are financing the billions of dollars necessary to equip theaters with 3-D and digital equipment; advertisers; or even by consumers who might have to buy 3-D glasses and keep them for their next visit. Spokespeople for major theater chains Regal Entertainment Group and AMC Entertainment Inc. did not immediately respond for a request for comment. John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theatre Owners, also did not respond to a message seeking comment. At least one rival studio said it is not jumping on the bandwagon. Warner Bros., a unit of Time Warner Inc., said it was keeping its current system in place for now, al-

though it wouldn't specify what its deals were with theater companies. “The glasses issues are complicated and they vary from studio to studio,” said Warner Bros.' head of domestic distribution, Dan Fellman. “We certainly will do what's right for us. Right now, we really don't have any plans to change the way we do business.” Average ticket prices in the U.S. and Canada rose 6 percent to $7.89 in 2010, according to Hollywood.com, but the price in major cities like New York and Los Angeles can easily double that. Last year, some New York theatergoers saw red when it appeared that several theaters flirted with a $20 ticket price for “Shrek Forever After” in 3D, before dropping prices. Overall U.S. box office revenue in 2010 was only kept from falling due to higher prices helped by 3-D upcharges as attendance fell. So far this year, attendance is down nearly 6 percent and revenue is down nearly 4 percent at $7.8 billion.

September 30, 2011

6 hotel trends from disappearing tubs to new fees BY BETH J. HARPAZ AP TRAVEL EDITOR NEW YORK (AP), Sep 26 - Pump bottle on the shower wall or individual shampoos and lotions you can take home? Luxurious tub for a self-indulgent bath or no tub at all? A friendly greeting from a well-informed local or a code transmitted electronically that will open your hotel room door with no human interaction at check-in whatsoever? Here are some details on six hotel trends bubbling up in the industry right now, and how they affect your stay. INCREASING FEES: Your hotel bill may include some unpleasant surprises. Not just the usual $20-aday resort and amenity fee, which you pay whether or not you use the tennis courts and pool complex, but how about a required $12 housekeeping surcharge or a fee for storing your luggage in the lobby? Total fees and surcharges collected by U.S. hotels are increasing from $1.7 billion in 2010 to a record $1.8 billion in 2011, according to new research from Bjorn Hanson, dean of New York University's Preston Robert Tisch Center for Hospitality and Sports Management. Hanson recommends that consumers ask when getting a rate for a hotel what if any requisite fees will be added to the bill. If you're booking online, you may have to hunt


September 30, 2011

around the listing to see what might be added to the quoted rate in addition to taxes. LOBBIES AS SOCIAL HUBS: Colorful seating, free Internet service and trendy cocktail and coffee bars are helping to turn once-sterile hotel lobbies into social hubs. Hanson says while baby boomers might see the lobby as a place to meet at 6 p.m. sharp before heading to a prearranged restaurant location, younger travelers may prefer to gather more informally in the lobby, hang out for a while, socialize and take their time choosing where they'll spend the evening. They might check email, go online using a cell phone or iPad to look for dining recommendations, or try whatever snacks or drinks are readily available from the lobby market or bar. Hilton's new Home2 Suites extended stay brand was launched earlier this year with a lobby concept designed to bring business travelers out of their rooms. Tables and colorful couches offer inviting space for informal meetings as well as areas where anyone can plop down with a laptop and a beverage rather than sitting alone in a room watching TV. DISAPPEARING TUBS: Unless you're booking a suite, your next stay in a hotel room may not offer the luxury of a bath. Many newly built hotels are offering showers only. Marriott, for example, is “advising our newly built hotels to put showers in 75 percent of the rooms and bathtubs in 25 percent of the rooms,” according to Marriott spokeswoman Laurie Goldstein. “Our research shows that business travelers prefer showers to baths but families like the flexibility of a bathtub as well as a shower.” So if you're traveling with a small child who's going to need a bath before bedtime, call ahead to make sure your room has a tub. PUMP DISPENSERS: The advent of pump dispensers in

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

hotel bathrooms is good and bad news for those guests obsessed with the tiny bottles of shampoo and individually wrapped soaps that have been a beloved amenity for decades. The good news: If you need more shampoo than what may be as little as a half-ounce in those small plastic containers, you can pump as much as you want from the dispenser. No more fighting with your roommate over that tiny bottle or running to the front desk before your 6 a.m. shower to get another one. You can also feel greener if you use the pump. No more adding plastic throwaways to the waste stream. The bad news: What if you simply love those little bottles? The hand lotion is the perfect size to slip in your purse; and if you have leftover shampoo, the container is small enough to get through airport security. Or what if you find the pump dispensers unappealing? Some guests think they're unsanitary and prefer to use an unopened individual soap or shampoo. Fortunately, Hanson says, hotels that have switched to pump dispensers often have complimentary bottles or wrapped soaps upon request at the front desk. CHECKING IN ELECTRONICALLY: Who needs to wait on line at the front desk to check in? Some of Starwood's Aloft hotels are offering ``Smart Check-In'' to Starwood Preferred Guest program members. Members are sent a keycard with radiofrequency identification technology, and on the day of a planned stay, a text message is sent to the guest's mobile device with a room number. Upon arrival, the guest proceeds to that room, and the keycard will open the door. The technology is in place at Alofts in Brooklyn and Harlem in New York City, Lexington, Mass., Dallas, Jacksonville, Fla., and London.

Hanson says fully electronic check-in technology is being adapted by the hotel industry very slowly, but even as it becomes more widespread, he expects most hotels will still want staff in the lobbies to welcome guests and provide other services - if only to cater to an older generation that prefers human interaction to a touchscreen. LOCAVORE OPTIONS: The locavore and hyperlocal trend that has taken over the food world is fast becoming de rigueur in the hotel industry, particularly at high-end and boutique properties where chefs are growing their own herbs and even hosting their own beehives. The W in San Francisco in September had a local beekeeper, Jack Ip, install hives on a rooftop with a goal of eventually producing honey for use in the hotel menu. In New York City, the Andaz Wall Street hotel in Lower Manhattan sponsors a farmers market May through November in an arcade next to the hotel where produce, bread and other goods are sold by farmers and other vendors. The Andaz also sells fresh-squeezed juices and sandwiches in the market, and customers include hotel guests and neighborhood residents. “Guests will come down and mingle with residents,” said Andaz spokeswoman Rachel Harrison. “It allows them to feel they're really a part of the neighborhood. We want guests to feel like locals.” Hotel Indigo, which has 30 properties in the U.S. and another eight worldwide, also partners with local vendors and purveyors to showcase local seasonal fare, like a barbecue pork sandwich on the menu at the Hotel Indigo in Asheville, N.C., and a local craft beer called SweetWater served at the Hotel Indigo in Atlanta. Hotel Indigo is also working with celeb chef Curtis Stone on a continued on page 26

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September 30, 2011

TCV encourages parents, coaches and interested fans to write about and send photos of their favorite local team and players. Although our staff is unable to visit and photograph every game of every team, if you write to us at www.tricityvoice@aol.com, we will try to get the word out. On a limited basis, our photographers can schedule a visit to a game or practice session as well.

MVU Black wins memorial tournament SUBMITTED BY JUNE HEATON It was a bittersweet victory for MVU-93-GIRLS-BLACK, Fremont’s U18 soccer team, as they took First Place in the Hannah Welker Memorial Tournament, in Morgan Hill, September 25, 2011. The team dedicated their win to the tournament’s namesake, Hannah Welker, a former teammate of seven participating MVU girls’ (including three from MVU-GIRLS-WHITE). Hannah was tragically killed in a car accident in 2008 at the young age of 12. With their hair coifed with green and white ribbons that donned the number 47, Hannah’s jersey colors and number, MVU BLACK shut out all four of their opponents in the two day tournament. Afterwards, the team accepted their awards from Hannah’s father, Blaine, and sister Katie, who were pleased the MVU girls were on the receiving end of the tournament prizes. Tournament Winners, MVU-93-GIRLS-BLACK, pose for photo in front of Hannah Welker banner.

Cross country meet

Mission San Jose High School’s first 2011-12 league cross country meet versus Washington High School was held on Wednesday September 21, 2011. Photos by Russell Engle


September 30, 2011

Fremont Christian vs Contra Costa Christian SUBMITTED BY BILL KRUPPA Women’s Volleyball Fremont 28 25 14 18 Contra 30 18 25 25 Top Fremont Christian players: Hannah Arionus with 5 aces and 4 kills Shelby Bolduc with 6 kills, 1 block, and 2 assists

Chabot @ Ohlone Chabot - 2; Ohlone - 3 Renegades Open Conference play with close win over Chabot

Ohlone positioned itself early on to go ahead but a foul in the Chabot box would not be called and the Renegades were put to battle a solid Chabot side led by Alfredo Navarro and keeper Gonzalez Alejandro. Moments later, another opportunity as Greivin Pacheco Quesada would again be dropped atop the Chabot box went unnoticed by the center official. The game was not going to come to Ohlone easy, as Chabot got the go-ahead late in the first half when a corner kick, cleared on the line by Ohlone, was stopped short on the edge of the penalty box by

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Women’s Volleyball Ohlone @ San Jose City College Tournament SUBMITTED BY JEREMY PEÑAFLOR September 23 Hartnell College defeats Ohlone College, 3-0 (25-22, 25-23, 25-16) Ohlone College defeats Skyline College, 3-0 (25-16, 25-23, 25-19) September 24 Ohlone College defeats Diablo Valley College, 3-2 (22-25, 2725, 25-18, 17-25, 15-11) Modesto College defeats Ohlone College, 3-1 (25-15, 25-19, 14-25, 25-22)

Navarro for a quick shot and goal for Chabot. Moments later Ohlone would have the same opportunity off a corner and Greivin Pacheco Quesada would find the goal… but the official called it back and placed a foul on the Renegades. The home side saw a total of four yellows including one on the bench for a technical foul. Two minutes before the end of the first half, Ohlone was squashed by a shot from the far right side that got by the back line and Keeper Juan Mortinez. Half two: Ohlone came out focused and intense. The game was fought hard by the midfield of Ohlone anchored by Luis Chavez and Hector Romero. A hard push by the Renegades on the backline gave Quesada a chance to slot Martin Lopez for a header… the Renegades’ first goal. Chabot countered and put

Moreau Catholic at San Leandro HS SUBMITTED BY COACH ROSE BORJA September 27 Moreau Catholic 5 San Leandro 2 Singles 1S) Dawang (MC) d. Guiao (SL) 60, 6-1 2S) Lee (MC) d. Chen (SL) 6-1, 6-1 3S) Wilson (MC) d. Vien (SL) 6-3, 6-1 4S) Shetty (MC) d. Pabilona (SL) 62, 6-0 Doubles 1D) Deng/Morey (SL) d. Ang/Ma (MC) 6-1, 6-0 2D) Drake/DeLeon (MC) d. Huang/Feliciano (SL) 6-4, 6-3 3D) Yee/Tang (SL) d. Palanca/Limun (MC) 7-6, 6-3 Moreau record 5-0

an attack on the Ohlone goal, but Raoul Chavez was defending and managing his back line keeping the visitors at bay. As the game wore on, the Renegades again pushed, but later Quesada’s quick defensive run put pressure on the Chabot back line that forced a turnover putting the duo of Quesada-Lopez to task again. The game was hard fought with fouls, intensity and tenacity on both ends. With ten minutes left, Ohlone stole the ball off a midfield push by Chabot and Quesada would now find Dominic Hertz for the finish up the middle. "We kept our focus", said Coach Nordmo, "We have been getting better and better at this. We feel our team is accelerating and learning from our mistakes. In the past we may have peaked early, we really feel we are our way up now."

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continued from page 23

September 30, 2011

6 hotel trends from disappearing tubs to new fees

contest called “Locals Know Best - Dish on the Dish,” in which the public is invited to

nominate favorite dishes from neighborhood eateries. The contest runs through Oct. 15

continued from page 18

and nominations can be submitted via Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/hotel

event at the Hotel Indigo in Chelsea, 127 W. 28th St., from noon to 1:30 p.m.

Update on New Haven schools SUBMITTED BY RICK LA PLANTE

both attacked by a three-year-old female Pit Bull and a four-month-old Rottweiler/Pit Bull mix. Two Union City Public Works employees were passing by in a vehicle when they witnessed the attack and intervened. Both employees attempted to force the pit bull to let go of the terrier but it would not. One employee grabbed a shovel out of his work truck and hit the pit bull several times until it let go of its grip on the small dog. Unfortunately, the terrier died during the attack. The employees were able to tie up one dog and follow the other until they located where the dog lived. UCPD Animal Control Officers, assisted by Fremont PD Animal Control, took both dogs into custody and they are currently quarantined at the Tri-City Animal Shelter pending a “vicious dog hearing.” The case is under investigation to determine whether both animals have current vaccinations. Authorities are asking anyone with additional information in regard to this incident to please call the union City Police Department (510) 471-1365. Reference UCPD Case #110926009. The Union City Police Department also has a tip line for callers that want to leave anonymous tips for the police department (510) 675-5207 (tips@unioncity.org).

indigo. You can meet Stone Sept. 30 and give him your recommendation in person at an

Another New Haven Unified School District elementary school has joined the “800 Club” of schools meeting or exceeding the state’s goal for student achievement. Emanuele Elementary raised its Academic Performance Index by 19 points – from 781 in 2009-10 to 800 in 2010-11 – meeting the state’s target score and continuing a steady ascent over the past several years. As recently as 2007-08, Emanuele’s API was 738. Alvarado Elementary and Kitayama Elementary also made double-digit gains on the API. Alvarado improved by 17 points, to 852, and is up an impressive 111 points since 2004-05. Kitayama improved 13 points, to 841, and is up 55 points during the same six-year period. Five of the District’s seven elementary schools are now members of the “800 Club,” led by Eastin Elementary, with a score of 911, and also including Pioneer Elementary, at 839. Alvarado Middle School also is part of the “800 Club,” at 815. Conley-Caraballo High, the District’s continuation high school, also made notable gains. Although API calculations vary somewhat for small schools and con-

Appointments Hayward City Clerk Miriam Lens administered the Oath of Affirmation to the following appointees on September 20, 2011: Dion Griffin and William Roberts to the Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board.

tinuation schools, CCHS raised its score 126 points, from 579 in 2009-10 to 705. API scores at the District’s other schools are: Hillview Crest Elementary, 759; Searles Elementary, 761; Cesar Chavez Middle, 732; James Logan High, 734. The annual API results, recently released by the California Department of Education, are scores of between 200 and 1,000 assigned to all schools and districts in the state, based on the results of standardized tests taken each spring. A minimum score of 710 is required to meet federal accountability guidelines. All New Haven schools are well above the federal accountability level; however the District still is in “Program Improvement” according to the federal measure known as Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Despite the improvement at Emanuele and Kitayama, both schools are in “Program Improvement” for the first time, as are Searles and Cesar Chavez, joining Alvarado Elementary and Hillview Crest. “It’s clear from the state results that our District can be very proud of the improvement that’s been made over the past several years,” Superintendent Kari McVeigh said. “But the federal requirements simply continue to accelerate at an unrealistic rate, which is why so many districts are being labeled Program Improvement.

Heather Enders, Suzanne Gayle, Braxston Banks, Christopher Catlow, David Haines, Desmond Henry, Tawana Smith and Vishal Trevedi to the Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force. Isabel Sanchez to the Library Commission Dr. Doris Yates to the Personnel Commission:

“Frankly it’s become a designation, nothing more, because unless something changes, it’s a mathematical certainty that every district in the state is going to be in Program Improvement in the next couple of years.” The District’s API score dropped slightly, from 778 to 775, but still is well above the federal minimum and still is up 44 points over the past six years. AYP scores also slipped slightly; the percentage of students scoring proficient and above is 57.7 percent (down from 57.8 percent) in English/language arts and 53.5 percent (down from 56.4 percent) in mathematics. The dip in API and AYP math numbers may be attributable to the District’s decision to increase access to advanced math courses at the secondary level, Director of Assessment and Evaluation Craig Boyan noted, explaining that fewer highperforming students were in general math and more in algebra and geometry. “Advancing these students to higher levels of math may initially result in some lower scores in the general math courses,” he said. “That should improve as adjustments are made in the future.” More information is available on the California Department of Education website (www.cde.ca.gov).

“I served as a Human Services Commissioner from 1998 to 2007 and, during that time, acted as liaison to the City of Hayward's Paratransit Committee,” said Dr. Doris Yates, Cal State University East Bay. “Having been absent from City involvement for approximately four years, I felt the need to reconnect. I’m delighted to have been given the opportunity to serve again and look forward to fulfilling the role of Personnel Commissioner.”


September 30, 2011

EARTHTALK®

SUBMITTED BY KELLY HAYES Behind a pair of dominant performances from Katie Allen and Samantha Bruno, the Cal State East Bay volleyball team posted its first sweep of the CCAA season with a 3-0 (25-18, 25-18, 25-14) victory over Cal State Monterey Bay on Tuesday, September 27. The Pioneers (8-3, 4-3 CCAA) hit at a .321 clip and out-blocked the Otters (5-6, 2-6) 9-4 to bounce back from a tough loss at SF State on Saturday night. “I really liked the passion and intensity that the team displayed this evening,” Head Coach Jim Spagle said. Allen and Bruno were quite the tandem in the front row on Tuesday, contributing 11 and 10 kills, respectively, and combining for 11 block assists. The pair committed just five attack errors, with Bruno swinging at a .500 clip on the night. Meanwhile, Kitona Offord added eight kills and posted a .615 hitting percentage, making no errors on the attack and assisting on a pair of blocks. “Kristin Neary and Danielle Stewart were outstanding, both in their set distribution as well as their backcourt defense,” Spagle said. “Our three primary passers, Leslie, Nicole and Katie, were stellar all night and Nikki Long and Samantha Bruno really came ready to play.” Setter Danielle Stewart posted a double-double, dishing out 17 assists and posting 14 digs and ran the offense well, along with Kristin Neary, who contributed 15 assists. In the back row, libero Leslie Ray led all players with 19 digs in the match and had just one reception error in 20 servereceive opportunities. Allen and Nicole Boyle also found success in serve reception, with Boyle committing one error in 11 chances and Allen posting a perfect 1.000 reception percentage with no errors in 14 attempts. “Kitona had another dominant night, and if there is any better libero in our conference than Leslie, I have not seen it,” Spagle said. As a team, the Pioneers committed just nine attack errors in 106 attempts, while holding the Otters to an .096 hitting percentage and forcing 21 attack errors. East Bay’s .321 attack percentage was a new match high, while its 42 kills on the night established a season-high for three-set matches. Melanie Lashbrook’s 11 kills and Lacee Ventura’s 10 digs led Cal State Monterey Bay. Cal State East Bay will look to continue its success this weekend when it travels to Cal State Stanislaus and Chico State for its second conference road trip. The Pioneers and Warriors are set for a 7 p.m. first serve at Fitzpatrick Arena in Turlock on Friday.

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E - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE

Dear EarthTalk: What is “genetic pollution” as it pertains to the bioengineering of animals, fish and plants, and what happens if they cross breed with their wild cousins? - R. Ahearn, Rome, NY Genetically modified organisms are those that have been altered by scientists to include genes from other organisms (known as transgenes) that may impart specific benefits. For instance, crop seeds that have added genes which resist the effects of herbicides can allow farmers to spray their fields liberally with herbicides to kill undesired weeds without the fear of killing their marketable crop along with them. Genetic pollution is the release into the natural environment of these altered genes, creating the risk that they might breed with wild plants or animals and spread out uncontrollably. Reports author Jeremy Rifkin in his landmark 1998 book, The Biotech Century: “Some of those releases…could wreak havoc with the planet’s biosphere, spreading destabilizing and even deadly genetic pollution across the world.” To follow through on the previous crop seed example: If herbicide-resistant, genetically engineered crops were to breed with their wild cousins, it could lead to the creation of super-weeds undeterred by control efforts. The weeds could, in turn, edge out native species and drive them to extinction, causing an overall loss of genetic diversity. According to Greenpeace, crop genetic diversity is “essential for global food security” and a lack of it can be linked to many of the major crop epidemics in human history, including the Southern corn leaf blight in the U.S. in 1970. They quote noted botanist Jack Harlan who said that genetic diversity is all that “stands between us and catastrophic starvation on a scale we can not imagine.” To track the growing problem of genetic pollution, Greenpeace International, along with GeneWatch UK, launched the GM Contamination Register in 2005 (the “GM” stands for Genetic Modification). This free online database details publicly documented incidents of contamination arising from the intentional or accidental release of genetically modified organisms into the environment as well as any accompanying negative agricultural side effects. Individuals, public interest groups and governments make use of the register to see where, when and how contamination has occurred. So far in 2011 alone more than a dozen cases of contamination—from Australia, Asia, Europe and the U.S.—have been reported in the register.

The release of genetically modified organisms into the environment threatens genetic diversity, which is essential for global food security. And a lack of genetic diversity in agriculture, says Greenpeace, can already be linked to many of the major crop epidemics in human history. Photo: Punch Stock

Gene pollution as it pertains to crops is only part of the concern. A Canadian company, AquaBounty, is seeking approval from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to sell genetically modified Atlantic salmon in the U.S. These fish have a growth hormone gene from Chinook salmon (native to the North Pacific) and an anti-freeze protein gene from another fish, the ocean pout (native to the Northwest Atlantic). The resulting transgenic salmon produce growth hormones all year long—not just during the warmer months like other fish—and as such reach maturity faster than their non-genetically modified counterparts. “There are concerns about the impact of GM salmon on wild salmon should it escape into rivers or the Atlantic ocean, because it could out-compete wild salmon for food, or breed with them producing offspring that may be less fit to survive,” reports GeneWatch UK. “This could have serious negative effects on declining or endangered wild salmon populations.” CONTACTS: GeneWatch UK, www.genewatch.org; Greenpeace International, www.greenpeace.org/international; GM Contamination Register, www.gmcontaminationregister.org; AquaBounty, www.aquabounty.com. EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine ( www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe; Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.


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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

September 30, 2011

PLACES OF WORSHIP Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.the-resurrectionbc.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


September 30, 2011 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

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Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894 WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

September 30, 2011

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

Victory Center AME Zion Church 33527 Western Ave., Union City (510) 487-0233

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org

New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL

Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org


September 30, 2011 First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net

The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597

Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133

Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

Mt. Eden Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333

Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org

Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808

The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999

Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2011-09-30  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper

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