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Stephen Gutierrez honored

Shared remembrances of ‘The Help’

Community supports classroom pets in grand style Page 9

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

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SUBMITTED BY DESRIE CAMPBELL

T

his year marks the 30th annual International Day of Peace. This occasion was created by the United General Assembly in 1981 in a resolution unanimously adopted by every nation. The occasion provides an opportunity for individuals, organizations, and nations to create practical acts of peace on a shared date. It was established to coincide with the opening of the General Assembly. The United Nations announced earlier this year that the theme for INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

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September 16, 2011

this year’s International Day of Peace 2011 is ‘Make Your Voice Heard’. The first Peace Day was celebrated in September 1982. In 2002 the General Assembly officially declared September 21 as the permanent date for the International Day of Peace. This annual global observance now occurs in all countries and cultures and encompasses many types of institutions and organizations involving hundreds of millions of people of all generations. By creating the International Day of Peace, the UN devoted itself to worldwide peace and encouraged all of mankind to work in cooperation for this goal. During the discussion of the U.N. Resolution that established the International Day of Peace, it was suggested that: "Peace Day should be devoted to commemorating and strengthening the ideals of peace both within and among all nations and peoples…This day will serve as a reminder to all peoples that our organization, with all its limitations, is a living instrument in the service of

Vol. 10 No. 74

peace and should serve all of us here within the organization as a constantly pealing bell reminding us that our permanent commitment, above all interests or differences of any kind, is to peace." One focal point across the entire planet will be the minute of silence at 12:00 noon, in all time zones worldwide, on Sept. 21 as requested by Ban Ki-moon, Secretary General of the United Nations. A local event will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 21 at Lake Elizabeth, Fremont (by the Peace Pole, Near the Boat House, Snack Shack). Sponsored by Pax Christie and the newly-formed Interfaith Women of Peace, the community is invited to celebrate peace in our community. This will be a time to embrace our community and share in peace and harmony. The Interfaith Women of Peace consists of a diverse group of women who promote peace through friendship and understanding. We enrich our lives by learning about the cultural and spiritual traditions of our diverse communities. Please join us as we unite with millions of people of all faith traditions throughout the world to pray for peace.

International Day of Peace Wednesday, Sept 21 6 p.m. Lake Elizabeth, Fremont (Sailway Dr. near boat house) www.internationaldayofpeace.org

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 28

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY TRACY YOTT PHOTO SUBMITTED BY TRACY YOTT

September 16, 2011

members from as far as South San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose. With an average of 19 players each Wednesday night during the 2010-2011 Season, the club holds a nine-game tournament where each player faces nine random opponents. $10 of the $11 entry fee creates a prize pool, which is awarded to the top scores (25 percent of the total number of players) for the evening. The Grass Roots points system allows for rating players locally, regionally and nationally. Club director Tracy Yott was introduced to cribbage while stationed at Treasure Island in

Visitors to the Centerville Round Table Pizza on Tuesday or Wednesday nights will see a group of people in the corner having a superb time. They are playing cribbage, a two-person card game dating back to its inception in England during the early 1630s. The Pilgrims brought the game to America where it has flourished ever since, especially during the Great Depression. In 1979 the American Cribbage Congress (ACC) was formed to standardize the rules and promote the game, nationally. Members of the American Cribbage Congress Grass Roots Club #43, Fremont Soon after, the ACC Grass Roots program 1983. In 2004, he learned of the ACC and GR was formed to promote cribbage through organ43. He tells newcomers that he has learned more ized play at the home-town level. One of 184 acabout playing the game strategically in the last tive clubs in the U.S. and Canada, members of seven years than in the previous 21 years of Grass Roots (GR) Club #43 can be found every “kitchen table” games. Tuesday and Wednesday evening “salting the The ACC sanctions tournaments almost every crib” and avoiding the dreaded “string of pearls.” weekend of the year at various locations throughDuring the summer, GR 43 director Tracy out North America. The largest, the ACC Open, Yott initiated a Beginners’ Club on Tuesday held every February in Reno, Nevada, attracts an evenings to welcome people who have not played average of 1,000 players, all vying for the cribbage for a long time or would like to learn. $10,000 first prize. The annual Tournament of With no entry fee or membership required, playChampions, an invitation-only tournament, is ers are introduced to tournament-style cribbage, held the same weekend, typically attended by apimproving their play by learning new strategies proximately 500 players. and, most importantly, making new friends. By ACC Grass Roots Club #43 welcomes all levAugust 2011, the new program was a success and els of player to join us on a free trial basis on it was decided to continue the beginners’ sessions Tuesdays and Wednesdays. through the remainder of 2011. Once players feel For more information, visit www.cribbage.org, comfortable, they can try their luck on Wednesemail cribbagegr43@yahoo.com or call Tracy Yott day nights with the “Big Boys.” at (510) 793-6472. Alternatively, simply visit Members are of all ages and from all walks of Round Table Pizza, 37480 Fremont Boulevard, life. GR 43 has thrived since its charter in 1987. Fremont, on Tuesdays or Wednesdays between Playing in various establishments in Newark and 6:00 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. Fremont over the years, the club currently has 26


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Friday-Sunday, Sep 16-Oct 15

Wait Until Dark 8 p.m.

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker" Theatre Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 Friday, Sep 16

Science Lectures for Children 4 - 5 p.m. Reptiles

and more

Saturday, Sep 17

Union City Branch Library

B Street (between Foothill and Watkins) Hayward (510) 537-2424 www.hayward.org

Barnyard Birdwatching

34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 745-1504 (510)667-7900

Saturday, Sep 17

Saturday, Sep 17

Costal Cleanup in AlvisoR

Outdoor Paint Out

9 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Clean up the wetlands and area near the refuge Alviso Environmental Education Center

Paint and mingle with artist

Saturday, Sep 17

Parent Nursery School Open House

10 - 11:30 a.m. Fremont Parents' Nursery School 4200 Alder Ave., Fremont (510) 793-8531 Saturday, Sep 17 Pressing Plants

Friday - Sunday, Sep 16-Sep 18

Learn how to press and preserve plants, take home finished flowers Ardenwood Historic Farm

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Original Art and Craft Show

Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (415) 447-3205 800-346-1212 Saturday, Sep 17

Learn about the different domestic and wild birds at Ardenwood Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Tour the school and activities for kids

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Pleasanton Harvest Festival

2 - 3 p.m.

11 a.m. - Noon

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Sep 17

1 - 4 p.m.

1751 Grand Blvd., San Jose (408) 262-5513 x102

Make soap, learn about lavender enjoy lavender flavored refreshments Coyote Hills Regional Park

Saturday-Sunday, Sep 17Sep 18

Lovely Lavender$

8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Driver's Edge Training for TeensR

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Must have a valid learner's permit or license

Saturday, Sep 17

BBQ to Die For$

11 a.m. - 3 pm.

Saturday, Sep 17

Raising funds for historic cemetery, Music, Raffle, BBQ Meek Park

Old Fashioned Ice Cream Noon - 1 p.m.

240 Hampton Rd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

Make old fashioned ice cream, use natural farm ingredients Ardenwood Historic Farm

California’s Great America 4701 Great America Pkwy., Santa Clara (408) 262-2133 x 131 www.driversedge.org Saturday, Sep 17

Saturday, Sep 17

U.S. Citizenship Workshop

College Prep Teen Workshop

1 - 2:.30 p.m.

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

3 - 4 p.m.

Informational workshop about the naturalization process Castro Valley Library

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

Art, Wine and Specialty Brew Street Party

Noon to 5 p.m. Live music, vendors, games, car show

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

What’s Happening’s

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™ 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

Writing your college admission essay

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS

Lake Elizabeth Central Park 1100 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 793-5683 Saturday, Sep 17

Re-Think Your Lawn

10 - 11:30 a.m. How to tear out your lawn without tearing out your lawn

Regan Nursery 1268 Decoto Rd., Fremont (510) 303-7296 Saturday, Sep 17 Sep 17

Soulciety Third Anniversary Celebration 2 - 6 p.m. Live music, family entertainment

Hayward Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward

BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Rajeswari Ramanathan Alyson Whitaker

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew

WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Saturday, Sep 17

Sunday, Sep 18 Sep

Friday, Sep 23

Educator and Community Open House

Summer Concert Blues Music

Seniors' Night Out$

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

1 - 5 p.m.

Dinner, music, dance

Learn about Math/Science Nucleus. Sign up school field trips

Hayward Memorial Park 24176 Mission Blvd., Hayward

Newark-Fremont Hilton Hotel 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510)818-9888

Math Science Nucleus 4074 Eggers Dr., Fremont (510) 790-6284 Sunday, Sep 18

Mixing Compost

11 a.m. - Noon Look for worms, insects and other critters to help make a good garden Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Tuesday, Sep 20

Hichael Herrera & Friends

6:30 - 8 p.m. Classical and Jazz music scored for guitar ensenble Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave. Castro Valley (510) 745-1504 Tuesday, Sep 20

End of summer BBQ BBQ for Tri-City elder Coalition

Sheep and Wool

Alma Via of Union City 33883 Alvarado-Niles Rd., Fremnt (510) 368-0067

Learn how to turn wool shorn into sweaters Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Alsion Montessori Foundation Gala Dinner

6:30 - 9 a.m.

Snakes, Stories and Spirals

For a Greener Future Speaker Rex Northern, with Cleantech W Silicon Valley

Meet snakes. Creat a snake spiral craft to take home. Coyote Hills Regional Park

8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Arts Benefit for Children's Art Programs$ 5:30 - 9 p.m. Dinner, silent auction, music and dancers Sun Gallery

1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050

Continuing Events Mondays-Fridays, Thru Sep 16

Flight of Imagination

8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Fridays)

Monday - Friday, Thru Sep 30

Artist's Guild of the East Bay

8200 Gateway Blvd., Newark (510) 494-8800 (510)445-1127

Phantom Art Gallery at Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 510) 745-1421 Friday-Sunday, Sep 16-Oct 15

Wait Until Dark 8 p.m.

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker"

Thursdays, Thru Nov 17

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. John O'Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 (510) 574-2053

Tuesdays, Thru Nov 15

Fridays, Thru Nov 18

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health R

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

1 - 2:.30 p.m.

9:30 - 11 a.m.

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 (510) 574-2053

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053

Exhibit by artist Vinay Verma Friday, Sep 23

Sunday, Sep 18

10 a.m. - Noon

Friday, Sep 23

12:30 - 2:00 p.m.

Sunday, Sep 18

2 - 3 p.m.

5- 8 p.m.

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218

September 16, 2011

Wednesdays, Thru Nov 16

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5488 (510) 574-2053


September 16, 2011

BY J. DENNIS WOLFE Before we talk about Medicare Open Enrollment, let me first respond to all of you who contacted me about my last column. Yes, I do believe the hospital could do better in its administration and financial management. However, I could make that comment about almost every hospital in the country. When any large entity such as a community hospital, serves the public, the public has an obligation to attend the entity's public meetings and voice their concerns. I stand by my praise of the care rendered and wish to make it clear that the two issues - hospital management versus hospital care - are different matters. Now, onto the Open Enrollment Period (OEP) for Seniors. The most important date on any Senior's calendar is not when OEP starts, but rather when it ends. That has been changed to December 7th - NOT December 31st, as it has been for the last few years. OEP starts October 15 this year. In previous years it began on November 15. Last year the OEP ran right until the end of the year and caused mass chaos with paperwork flying between CMS and private insurers. So, in order to end it sooner (now December 7th), they had to start earlier (October 15th). Are you confused yet? Well, just remember those two dates - OEP Starts on 10-15/2011 and ends on 12/07/2011! During OEP you can disenroll from one Medicare Advantage (MA) policy and enroll into another one. You cannot disenroll from an MA policy and switch back to a MediGap without providing evidence of insurability. Of course, there are exceptions. Yes, it is complicated. During OEP you can also move from one Part D prescrip-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

tion drug program to another. You can also switch to another Part D plan beginning January 1, 2012, ending on February 14, 2012. Whatever MA medical plan change you make during the OEP, none matter except the last decision made prior to December 7th. The last decision as to which MA plan you select is what will become effective on January 1, 2012. A huge note of caution to our Senior community - who do you trust to seek guidance when considering a change? CMS - The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services sets rigid guidelines for those of us professional brokers who seek to advise and sell MA products (with/without Part D). I have noticed fewer and fewer of my contemporaries who take the time to get certified and I understand why. It is a time-consuming process with several courses and tests required in order to become certified. I applaud this as it eliminates insurance salespeople and leaves the process to professional brokers. I am in the process, as of this writing, of working to complete the courses and tests. So here is what you need to know. A professional, certified broker or even a large entity (such as a local senior center or a hospital) cannot hold a sales presentation and call it an "educational event." That is considered a "bait and switch" tactic under the guise of offering to help you better understand all of this. Large entities are handicapped even further and may still abuse the trust you place in them. They cannot talk about products and cannot refer you to brokers, either. The extent of their advice is exclusively limited to help you better understand Medicare. Further, they can only use CMS materials.

Dennis Wolfe is the author of The Sick Solution, a discussion of healthcare cost-delivery reform, In 1976 he founded Wolfe Insurance Services specializing in employee benefits. For his creation of what we now call Community Health Fairs, Wolfe won the nationallyprestigious Dublin Award. In early 2010 Dennis founded Health Care Claims Consulting, LLC., a website-based business of experts across the country to help people obtain proper health care services and resolve claims issues. He can be reached at dennis.wolfe@comcast.net and is available for speaking engagements.

If you suspect you are being "led" to speak to a specific broker or feel that a particular product or carrier is being suggested, let me know. You are in control and no one should be abusing your trust in them by using their position of purported credibility in this way. Be safe and secure. Ask the broker or the large entity to provide a copy of their AHIP certification and that issued by each carrier they represent to you. This is serious stuff. Only a few insurance carriers have the stability to even be in the senior market, which is why I am so adamant about this year's OEP and following the CMS rules. It matters! Stay healthy. Stay tuned. Get involved. Learn what is being done. Your life now does indeed depend upon it.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 16, 2011

W.O.W. Mobile Health Clinic Offers Flu Shots, Primary Care Services

T

here are many ways to stay healthy. Actions like eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and getting enough sleep at night can go a long way. But when influenza–or "flu"– season comes along, one of the best ways to make sure that you and family members stay healthy is to get a flu shot annually, according to Ruth Traylor, Washington Hospital's Director of Community Outreach. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. "The flu is contagious, but can be prevented through good hand hygiene and flu shots," Traylor says. The timing of flu is very unpredictable and can vary from season to season, though most experts recommend getting vaccinated in the fall. Flu activity most commonly peaks in the U.S. in January or February, according to the CDC. However, seasonal flu activity can start as early as October and continue into May. W.O.W.! The Washington On Wheels (W.O.W.) Mobile Health Clinic, which travels the TriCity area providing quality health care services primarily to uninsured and underserved District residents, is now offering flu shots for $25. "One of the great things about the W.O.W. clinic is that it serves all community mem-

bers regardless of ability to pay," Traylor points out. For more than nine years, the W.O.W. Mobile Health Clinic has brought critical health care services directly to uninsured and underserved residents in the Washington Township Healthcare District. Every week, the 36-foot mobile unit travels to locations throughout

W.O.W. van provides care for respiratory issues, colds and flu." Why you don't want the flu The flu is caused by a virus and can cause mild to severe illness–and at times can lead to death. Different from a cold, it usually comes on suddenly with increased severity and may have the following symptoms listed by the CDC:

though this is more common in children than adults Get the care you need The W.O.W. Mobile Health Clinic is a fully functioning clinic staffed by a nurse practitioner under the direction of Dr. Steven Curran, a Washington Hospital physician. Services provided range from physical exams, blood pressure, blood

To qualify for free or discount services, patients must go through eligibility. For more information on the mobile clinic schedule or to make an appointment, call (510) 608-3203.

Where You Can Find the W.O.W. Mobile Health Clinic For access to flu shots and a range of other primary care services, visit the W.O.W. Mobile Health Clinic at the following locations. (Or call (510) 608-3203 to make an appointment.) • Every Tuesday - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Family Resource Center, 39155 Liberty Street, Fremont. • First Friday of each month - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Fremont Senior Center, 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont.

The Washington On Wheels (W.O.W.) Mobile Health Clinic is now offering flu shots for $25. For more details about the services available through Washington On Wheels, visit www.whhs.com/wow or call (510) 608-3203.

Fremont, Union City and Newark delivering quality care to children, adults and seniors. "Our goal is to improve the overall health of people in our District by increasing and expanding the reach of preventive health services, such as screenings," says Traylor. "And if you do get sick this season, the

• Fever or feeling feverish/chills (though not everyone with the flu will have a fever) • Cough • Sore throat • Runny or stuffy nose • Muscle or body aches • Headaches • Fatigue (tiredness) • Vomiting and diarrhea,

sugar and cholesterol screenings to child and adult immunizations, including flu shots, nutritional counseling and many other medical services. According to Traylor, the clinic serves more than 4,000 patients a year and demand for services continues to grow steadily each year.

• Second Thursday of each month - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Silliman Activity Center 6800 Mowry Avenue, Newark. • Fourth Monday of each month - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Ruggieri Senior Center, 33997 AlvaradoNiles Road, Union City. • (Also provides service to Fremont and Newark Unified School Districts. Please call for a schedule.)


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE Ohlone College Workforce Education and Career Development is offering a Microsoft Excel Workshop Series on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. This series will enable participants to get the knowledge and skills to create and use Microsoft Excel 2010, participate in lectures and get hands-on training, and update and enhance your current Excel skills. There are three levels of courses to meet your needs: Beginning: September 17 and 24 Learn the basics of Microsoft Excel Intermediate: October 22 and 29 Apply intermediate Excel features to business applications

Bilingual poll workers needed for November 2011 election SUBMITTED BY THE ALAMEDA COUNTY REGISTRAR OF VOTERS Bilingual Poll Workers are needed for the November 8, 2011 Consolidated District Election to work at the polls in the cities of Emeryville, Livermore and Newark. In addition to gaining the rewarding experience of being part of the election process, poll workers will be paid for their Election Day service and attending training. Those interested in being a Bilingual Poll Worker must be fluent in English and Chinese or English and Spanish, be a registered voter in Alameda County and attend mandatory training. For more information and to complete an application form, visit www.acgov.org/rov/workers.htm or contact the Registrar of Voters office at (510) 272-6971.

Advanced: November 5 and 12 Apply advanced Excel features to business applications The cost is $109/workshop (16 full hours of instruction)or master Excel by signing up for all 3 workshops for only $172.50. Register online at http://ohlone.augusoft.net or by phone at (510) 742-2303. Excel Workshops September 17 and 24, October 22 and 29, November 5 and 12 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Ohlone College Hyman Hall, Room 112 43600 Mission Boulevard, Fremont (510) 742-2303 http://ohlone.augusoft.net Cost: $109 per workshop, $172.50 for all three

Non-profit groups raise funds with California hunting tags SUBMITTED BY VICTORIA BARR The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) invites non-profit organizations to help wildlife by auctioning big game hunting license tags for the 2012-13 season. These tags will allow the highest bidder to hunt bighorn sheep, deer, elk and pronghorn antelope in California. Only 13 of these special fund-raising tags are reserved for 501(c)(3) non-profit groups which compete for a chance to auction them. Hunters can only buy them through such auctions. The possibility of winning such a rare prize generates a great deal of interest and attracts bidders to the groups’ fund-raising events to enable them to raise more money for their organizations. A call for applications and all required application forms are on the DFG website at http://tinyurl.com/6895unq. Applications must be submitted by 3 p.m. on October 5, 2011. Fish and Game Code section 4334 requires the proceeds from the sale of these prized tags to be returned to DFG to fund programs that benefit bighorn sheep, deer, elk and pronghorn antelope. In last year’s auctions, tags for hunting three bighorn sheep, two pronghorn antelope, two elk and eight deer raised more than $402,000 for the research and management of these native wildlife species. Organizations that have previously applied or expressed interest in future opportunities to sell these tags have been notified. Representatives of non-profit groups without Internet access may request a printed application package by calling the DFG Wildlife Branch at (916) 445-4034, sending a fax to (916) 4454048, or writing to Ms. Victoria Barr, DFG Wildlife Branch, 1812 Ninth Street, Sacramento, CA 95811. For more information about the California Department of Fish and Game, visit www.dfg.ca.gov

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 16, 2011 Tribune Media Services

Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Thu.

The Adventurer (NR) Sat. 7:30 P.M.

The High Sign (NR) Isn't Life Terrible? (NR) Bacon Grabbers (NR)

11:20, 2:10, 5:05, 8:05, 10:45 Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:35, 4:20, 7:00, 9:45 Fri. - Thu. 12:15, 2:55, 5:35, 8:15, 10:50 Cowboys & Aliens (PG–13) Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 2:35, 7:50 Wed. 2:35 P.M.

Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:05, 2:40, 5:10,

7:55, 10:25 Drive (R)Fri. & Sat. 11:15, 12:35, 1:55, 3:10, 4:35, 5:55, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00, 11:10 Sun. - Thu. 11:15, 12:35, 1:55, 3:10, Bucky Larson: Born to Be a 4:35, 5:55, 7:15, 8:35, 10:00 Star(R)Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 2:00, 7:40 I Don't Know How She Sat. 2:00 P.M. Does It(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:10, Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 10:05 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. 6:40, 9:00, 11:15 11:10, 1:50, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50 Sat. 11:15 P.M. Don't Be Afraid of the Sun. - Thu. 6:40, 9:00 Dark (R) Fri. & Sun. - Thu. 11:10, Rise of the Planet of the 4:50, 10:25 Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, Sat. 11:10 A.M. Drive (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:50, 2:25, 2:20, 4:50, 7:35, 10:10 5:00, 7:35, 10:10 Spy Kids: All the Time in I Don't Know How She the World in 4D (PG) Fri. Does It (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, Thu. 2:15, 7:30 2:00, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45 Spy Kids: All the Time in Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. - the World in 4D (3D) (PG) Thu. 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15 Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 5:00, 9:50 Rise of the Planet of the Straw Dogs(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:45, Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:15, 2:25, 5:15, 8:00, 10:45 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10:00 The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, Spy Kids: All the Time in 1:45, 4:40, 7:35, 10:20 the World in 4D (PG) Fri. The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Thu. 11:00 A.M. 11:10, 3:25, 6:45, 10:15 Straw Dogs(R)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. 2:15, 4:55, 7:45, 10:30 12:45, 3:30, 6:00, 8:20, 10:35 The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Thu. 11:40, 2:00, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. The Smurfs (PG) Fri. & Sun. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. Thu. 10:50, 1:20, 3:50 Sat. 10:50, 1:20 2:00 P.M. Warrior (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:30, The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. 3:55, 7:25, 10:30 Thu. 11:25, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Warrior (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:30, Way Back Home (NR) Fri. Thu. 11:25, 2:05, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 3:40, 7:05, 10:20

Mayweather vs. Ortiz Fight Mayweather vs. Ortiz Fight Live (NR) Sat. 6:00 P.M. Live (NR) Sat. 6:00 P.M. Abduction (PG–13) Thu. 12:01 Midnight

Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Thu. 12:10 A.M.

Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:45, 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:10, 10:25

Killer Elite(R)Thu. 12:15Midnight Moneyball (PG–13) Thu. 12:05

Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Midnight Star(R)Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 11:55, 5:20, 10:40 Wed. 11:55, 10:40

Captain America: The First Avenger (PG–13) Fri. - Thu.

Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Captain America: The First 11:30, 2:05, 4:40, 7:25, 10:00 Avenger 3D (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Drive (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:35, 2:10,

10:55, 4:45, 10:30

1:50, 7:40

4:55, 7:30, 10:10

Rise of the Planet of the Shark Night (PG–13) Fri. & Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, Thu. 1:15, 5:50

1:55, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40

Straw Dogs(R) Fri. - Thu. 12:00,

2:35, 5:15, 7:55, 10:30 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. 2:00 P.M. The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Thu. 11:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:05 Warrior (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:20

Sat. 1:15, 5:50, 1:15 Sun. - Tue. 5:50, 1:15 Wed. 5:50 P.M. Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 11:00, 3:30, 8:00, 10:35

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (PG) Fri. -

3:00, 7:00 Sun. 1:00, 4:00

Mysteries of Egypt (NR)

Fri. 6:00, 9:00 Sun. 11:00, 2:00 Solarmax (NR) Fri. 4:00, 8:00 Sun. 12:00, 3:00 Astronaut(NR) Sun. 12:00, 3:00

11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

Mere Brother Ki Dulhan (NR) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:30, 2:35, 5:40, 8:45, 11:50 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:35, 5:40, 8:45

Thu. 11:35, 4:35, 9:40 Rise of the Planet of the Spy Kids: All the Time in Apes (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu. the World in 4D (3D) (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Fri. - Thu. 2:15, 7:05

Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30

Straw Dogs(R) Fri. - Thu. 11:15, Shark Night (PG–13)Fri. - Thu.

2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20 The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:05, 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 3:15, 7:00, 10:10 Cosmos 360(NR)Fri. 7:00, 9:00 The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. Secret of the Rocket (NR) 1:20 P.M. The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. Fri. 3:00 P.M. Thu. 11:00, 3:35, 6:00, 8:15, 10:30 Sun. 11:00, 2:00 Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 12:00 Warrior (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:20, Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 Fri. 4:00, 8:00 Sun. 1:00, 4:00 Wed. & Thu. 10:00, 1:00, 3:00

Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Fri. 2:00, 6:00 Dinosaurs Alive! (NR) Fri.

I Don't Know How She Does It (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu.

American Graffiti (PG) Sat. 7:00 P.M.

12:30, 5:10, 9:50

Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 2:50, 7:30, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 2:50, 7:30 Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (PG) Fri. -

Thu. 12:20, 5:00, 9:40

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (3D) (PG) Fri. - Thu. 2:40, 7:20

Straw Dogs(R)Fri. & Sat. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05, 12:20 Sun. - Wed. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45 Thu. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 7:10, 8:30, 9:45, 11:05 The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30

The Help (PG–13) Fri. 11:30, 1:05, 2:45, 4:20, 6:00, 7:35, 9:15, 10:50, 12:30 Sat. 11:30, 1:05, 2:45, 6:00, 9:15, 10:50, 12:30 Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 1:05, 2:45, 4:20, Thu. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50, 6:00, 7:35, 9:15 12:01 Thu. 11:30, 1:05, 2:45, 4:20, 6:00, 7:35, Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 9:15, 10:50 7:40, 9:50 The Lion King (G) Fri. - Thu. Bodyguard(NR) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:15, 1:30, 3:45, 6:00, 8:15, 10:30 Bucky Larson: Born to Be a 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00 Star(R)Fri. - Wed. 11:25, 4:15, 10:05 Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00 The Lion King 3D (G) Fri. & Thu. 11:25, 4:15 Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Sat. 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20, 11:35 Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Star(R)Fri. & Sat. 2:00, 7:20, 12:25 Sun. - Thu. 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20 11:10, 1:45, 4:20, 7:30, 10:25 Sun. - Thu. 2:00, 7:20 Warrior (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Thu. Contagion (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Captain America: The First 11:25, 12:55, 2:30, 4:00, 5:35, 7:05, 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:20, 4:45, 6:00, Avenger (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 8:40, 10:10, 11:45 7:25, 8:45, 10:00 11:10, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00 Sun. - Wed. 11:25, 12:55, 2:30, 4:00, Sun. - Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00 5:35, 7:05, 8:40, 10:10 Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:40, 2:20, 5:05, Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Way Back Home (NR) Fri. & 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30 7:50, 10:30 Sat. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 12:01 Drive (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 2:00, Contagion (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 11:00, 1:35, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20, 11:55 4:40, 7:20, 10:15 - Thu. 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:00, 10:30 Mayweather vs. Ortiz Fight Final Destination 5 3D (R) Fri. Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 1:35, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20 Live (NR) Sat. 6:00 P.M. Fri. - Thu. 1:50, 7:15 Crazy, Stupid, Love. (PG–13) I Don't Know How She Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:05 Abduction (PG–13) Thu. 12:02 Midnight Does It(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 12:30, Don't Be Afraid of the 2:50, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10 Dark (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 4:40, 9:50 Dolphin Tale 3D (PG) Thu. Rise of the Planet of the Drive (R) Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:00, 12:01 A.M. Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, Killer Elite(R)Thu. 12:01 Midnight 1:55, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15 7:45, 9:00, 10:15, 11:30 Saving Private Pérez(PG–13) Sun. - Wed. 11:00, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, Moneyball (PG–13) Thu. 12:01 Fri. - Thu. 12:05, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:15 Midnight


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY KIMBERLEY PRATT Thanks to local community members, Union City’s Alvarado Elementary School students are able to learn about biology, ecosystems and compassion while caring for classroom pets in science. Boulevard Pet Hospital, Castro Valley, is donating vet care for three guinea pigs - Einstein, Darwin and Newton. All three cavies were abandoned and neglected; one needed severe medical care before finding a home at Alvarado Elementary. Rosendo Pardo of Galaxy Cabinets, Redwood City, has generously donated a guinea pig cabinet for the orphaned animals. The beautiful, custom-made cabinet gives the classroom pets a comfortable, safe home and teaches the students about habitats and compassionate care of animals. The cage, called “Pig Towers,” illustrates a rags-to-riches story for the abandoned animals and sparks discussion of Alexis Pardo holding Darwin in front of "Pig Towers." responsible animal care. A real, live biology study is taking place as a red-eared slider turtle named Squirt has recently started laying eggs. Boulevard Pet Hospital’s Dr. Schuchman is providing the students with on-going X-rays of the eggs and helped design the newly installed turtle habitat. Many thanks to Galaxy Cabinets and the Boulevard Pet Hospital. Your generosity is helping many students deepen their knowledge of science.

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Eliseo C. Reyes, Jr. RESIDENT OF HAYWARD April 23, 1948 - September 7, 2011

Johnetta E. Stephens RESIDENT OF STOCKTON January 5, 1964 - September 8, 2011

William J. Monlux RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 17, 1927 - September 9, 2011

Ernest A. Machado RESIDENT OF UNION CITY September 26, 1925 - September 12, 2011

William M. Sullivan RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 28, 1923 - September 13, 2011

Manuel L. Lobato RESIDENT OF NEWARK March 5, 1928 - September 14, 2011

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

FD1007

Marriage

Special Life Events

September 16, 2011

Obituaries

Stella M. Clark RESIDENT OF MENLO PARK May 12, 1917 - September 9, 2011

Geoffrey J. Cook RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 13, 1947 - September 11, 2011

Sr. Mary Agnes E. Lanthier RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 5, 1913 - September 11, 2011

Gregory E. McCann RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 14, 1955 - September 11, 2011

Aruna Arikatla RESIDENT OF SANTA CLARA April 8, 1967 - September 11, 2011

Cornelia Balzouman RESIDENT OF SAN JOSE February 14, 1923 - September 13, 2011

L

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible.

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.


September 16, 2011

"The best doctor in the world is the veterinarian. He can't ask his patients what is the matter he's got to just know." - Will Rogers

H

ardly a week goes by without a client or friend telling me that their child wants to be a veterinarian. To bolster the case for why they think their child will be an excellent veterinarian, the parent will rattle off all of the great contributions that their child has done to help save animals, or assist in their care. I can readily relate to these kids who are passionate about becoming veterinarians. The love of the profession started early for me too; at the age of seven. I would research and write reports and presentations about the history of veterinary medicine and the contributions of animals. It was a craze and love of animals that drove me to this profession. I would recommend that anyone who wants to be a veterinarian (or any profession for that matter) immerse themselves in learning everything and anything about the profession. It should start with the study of animals. Veterinarians, especially the good ones, really understand animals. They know how they behave when

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

they are happy and when they are upset. I spent many years just learning about how to care for them, walking them, and learning how to properly restrain them. Besides the love and concern for animals, future veterinarians must love academics, especially science and math. Getting into veterinary school is very difficult due to limited number of veterinary schools in the country and the popularity of the profession. An undergraduate program consisting of four years comprises of lot of science and math classes along with basic courses. Ideally, one should strive for a GPA of 3.5 or above to be considered a good candidate for veterinary school. In addition, students must have demonstrated many hours of work at a veterinary hospital to be considered for veterinary schools. A good veterinarian loves animals, but doesn't allow that love to get in the way of what is best for that animal. To love an animal requires that you are able to care for and do what is best for them regardless of your personal wishes. In some cases, that can involve euthanasia when you know that a pet is suffering from a disease or in pain.

Dr Raj Salwan is a second generation Veterinarian and has been around veterinary medicine for over 23 years. His interests include Internal Medicine, Surgery, Emergency/Acute care, and general small animal practice. He currently works at American Animal Care in Fremont and can be reached via email at drsalwan@aol.com or www.americananimalcare.com.

Other times, that may require causing discomfort or a "small amount of hurt" to treat a patient. Having this level of fortitude is essential to become a successful veterinarian. Many just can't do this, and will compromise with the idea that they will care for animals, but not as a veterinarian... and there is nothing wrong with that. Veterinary school is a four year program covering many species from dogs and cats to cow, sheep, horses, birds, and small mammals. After completing veterinary school, one can take the national board and state board examinations to obtain a license to practice veterinary medicine. If one has the desire to become a veterinarian, he or she will invariably achieve that goal if dedicated, persistent, and willing to make small sacrifices to achieve this.

Page 11


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 16, 2011

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/H ome.aspx?cid=6149

(510) 739-1000

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home.

Tamil Radio Show Tamil Radio Show "Kaalai Thendral" on every Saturday 10 AM to 12 PM on KLOK 1170 AM Also Listen Live @ www.arimausa.com

Fremont Cribbage Club

Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

The V After School Program 2:30 - 6:00p.m. Mon-Fri Homework Help/Tutoring Arts & Crafts, Physical Activities. Guitar Lessons Learn Spanish Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church

35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark (510) 793-1902 vidyalayanewark@yahoo.com

Sons in Retirement Retired men-Enjoy leisure time with friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion on third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Ron Holladay (510) 656 9017 rdholladay@yahoo.com http:www.sirinc.org

Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 website: wwwsshsa.org

Karaoke Club Purrfect Cat Rescue Monthly social karaoke Meet VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: If you & sing tamil songs, have fun love cats & kittens & have a while helping people in little time & lots of TLC we need. Open only to Bay area need YOU. We provide (San Jose - Santa Clara - San training. Also, need help Francisco). Register @ with our adoption showcase www.tamilkaraokeclub.com on the weekends. or email Sing@TamilKawww.purrfectcatrescue.org raokeClub.com or call 510-1597

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 13

Master Sudoku

6 4

Sudoku

2

7 3 9 2 5 3 8 8

8 7

9 3 1 6 2 9 7 8

Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

3 4 2

Sudoku Solutions on page 15

3 letter words Ice Jug Vex Was

1

crack the code.

19 21

1

16 23

8 12

13

5

20

22

2

16 16

1

17 2

9

6

4

16

3

2 22

14

2

16

1

23

25

18

1

21

19

8

3

18

16

18

5

16

3

2 18

2

4

4 12

16

18

18 11

2

16

4

16

22

8

5

4

8

18

24

16

17

5

8

18

3

8

17

21

2

26

15

1

23

7

4

6

1

22

1

2

15

26

18

1

1

3

26 12

16

5

19 8

16

21

19 4

2

21

17

1

4

26

1

8

2

18

3

12

13

8

2

17

4

15

25

8

2

21

9

18

16

16

10

8

18

14

4

1

24

17

1

17 12

18

26 8

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3

2

7 letter words Conifer Egghead Ovoidal Reviews 8 letter words Abscissa Amnesiac Europium Seraglio

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

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21

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26

10 letter words Broomstick Playacting Quid pro quo Rehearsals

E 8 2 C

4 letter words Away Opal Oust Pass Rood Toil Undo In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you Zeal 6 letter words Cobweb Eraser Fjords Liquid Oxygen Rakish Sonata Upside

7 4

Word Search Famous People

Alan Jackson B. B. King Bob Dole Bono Carl Sagan Cher Elvira Eminem

Fergie Gillian Anderson Gordon Brown Greg Norman Jay Leno Joan Rivers Kimberly

3 8 1 A E C E 0 D 7 5 A 0 4 A C 4 B F 3 4 B 3 6 D F E

N A N C Y R E A G A N V W K G

A L C M S T F C E U P Y I I O

N A A A H E N B U N U E L M R

Stewart Madonna Mary Hart Nancy Grace Nancy Reagan Pele Prince Seal

C N R D A D B A O G Z L L B D

Y J L O K K F E R G I E I E O

6 0 1 1 5 6 1 2

D 5 E A

A 2 4 D F

G A S N I E C E D A C H E R N

R C A N R N G R N E B J N L B

Selena Shakira Ted Kennedy Willie Nelson Yoko Ono

A K G A A N X A M M O A E Y R

4 D 5 9 1 2 4 0 A 8 8 0 A F 7 2 4 1 D A 6 E F B 7 9 1 9 C 3 6 C 6 8 0 0 2

C S A C O E N A Y I B Y L S O

E O N R X D R P O N D L S T W

S N M B E Y R S K E O E O E N

A A O R H I E J O M L N N W D

N N S A N A Y E O E E O T A B

O O R C L J O A N R I V E R S

B

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N T E L V I R A O F Q N H T Y


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Property values increase statewide SUBMITTED BY ANITA GORE Following two consecutive years of declining assessed values, the total value of state-assessed and county-assessed property rose to $4.382 trillion for 2011-12, an increase of $11.6 billion (0.3 percent) from the previous year, Betty T. Yee, First District Member of the Board of Equalization announced on September 6, 2011. The value of county-assessed property increased by $5.3 billion (0.1 percent) to $4.297 trillion. The value of state-assessed property, mainly privately-owned public utilities and railroads, totaled $85.3 billion, an increase of $6.3 billion (8.0 percent). Year-on-year percentage changes ranged from a high of a 19.5 percent gain in Colusa County to a low of a 5.3 percent decline in Plumas County. The increase in Colusa County is largely related to utility assessments, which comprise more than one-third of the county’s assessment roll, and was driven by the construction of a new power plant in the county. In all, 20 counties posted year-on-year increases in assessed value, although most of the increases were modest. Excluding Colusa County, only three counties (Kern, Madera and Trinity) grew by more than two percent. Thirty-eight counties experienced year-on-year declines in value, with Plumas the only continued on PAGE 15

September 16, 2011

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 06 Highest $: 505,000 Median $: 380,000 Lowest $: 310,000 Average $: 404,000 ADDRESS

ZIP

4575 Alma Avenue 19150 Vaughn Avenue 5316 Briar Ridge Drive 5275 Greenridge Road 19019 Mt. Hood Way 32075 Palomares Road

94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

440,000 310,000 319,000 505,000 380,000 470,000

4 2 3 4 2 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2654 891 1568 1834 1350 984

1947 1949 1978 1960 1989 1920

08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-12-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 15 Highest $: 1,187,000 Median $: Lowest $: 103,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

3380 Alder Avenue 4509 Bianca Drive 38455 Bronson Street #220 4188 Eggers Drive 38426 Glenview Drive 3685 Nutwood Terrace #213 3405 Pennsylvania Common 451 Rancho Arroyo Parkway 38597 Royal Ann Common 55 East Las Palmas Avenue 49183 Honeysuckle Terrace 671 Iroquois Way 34185 Donahue Terrace 34831 Dorado Common 34641 Pueblo Terrace

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555

ZIP

22765 7th Street 400 Craven Court 22010 Lucia Street 325 Rotary Street 1346 Roosevelt Avenue 25517 Scripps Street 28299 Sparrow Road 21451 Gary Drive #2

94541 94541 94541 94541 94544 94545 94545 94546

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

490,000 398,000 103,000 535,000 725,000 200,000 186,000 807,500 177,500 1,187,000 762,000 750,000 745,000 360,000 291,000

1480 1508 750 1456 1784 990 944 2677 1008 3913 2010 1784 2102 1102 918

1973 1957 1970 1960 1954 1984 1981 1967 1971 1974 2006 1975 1990 1987 1989

08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-15-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11

3 3 1 3 3 2 2 4 2 5 3 3 2 2

SOLD FOR BDS

250,000 95,000 238,000 255,000 205,000 380,000 293,000 116,000

3 3 3 3 4 3 2

880 Aaron Park Drive 880 Cameron Circle 56 Cedar Court 358 Celebration Drive 1239 Claridad Loop 1361 David Lane 129 Ethyl Court #4 1338 Highland Court 1293 Knollview Drive 1534 Mt. Shasta Avenue 562 Shelley Court 332 Silverlake Court 1101 South Main Street #404 1855 Strawberry Lane

ZIP

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

238,000 229,000

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1237 1040 1373 1200 1571 1232 936

1954 1950 1950 1955 1959 1964 1961

08-12-11 08-09-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-15-11 08-11-11 08-12-11 08-15-11

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 1,000,000 Median $: Lowest $: 170,000 Average $: ADDRESS

490,000 514,467

SOLD FOR BDS

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 380,000 Median $: Lowest $: 95,000 Average $: ADDRESS

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 02 Highest $: 414,000 Median $: Lowest $: 233,000 Average $: ZIP

SOLD FOR BDS

6023 Joaquin Murieta Avenue #B94560 38760 Larkspur Street 94560

233,000 414,000

3 4

SQFT

BUILT

1487 1522

1984 08-15-11 1963 08-12-11

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 515,000 Median $: Lowest $: 110,500 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1400 Carpentier Street #208 55 Harlan Street 971 Karol Way 347 Lafayette Avenue 3421 Monogram Street 1523 Pearson Avenue 352 Rosewood Court 465 West Estudillo Avenue 1627 140th Avenue 14820 Bancroft Avenue 407 Bradrick Drive 3838 Carmel Way 16006 East 14th Street #217 2353 Seacrest Court

SOLD FOR BDS

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579

160,000 268,000 291,000 175,000 322,000 300,000 240,000 150,000 351,000 263,000 425,000 291,000 110,500 515,000

2 3 4 2 3 3 2 3 5 2 5 3 2 4

268,000 275,821

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1176 1298 1528 1251 1577 1456 1049 945 1675 1174 1822 1096 901 2778

1983 1940 1954 1930 2000 1943 1940 1981 1947 1948 1953 1954 1987 1999

08-15-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-11-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-15-11 08-12-11 08-15-11 08-12-11

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 03 Highest $: 300,000 Median $: Lowest $: 230,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

16289 Galway Court 169 Via Linares 1592 Via Lucas

SOLD FOR BDS

94580 94580 94580

250,000 300,000 230,000

4 3 3

250,000 260,000

SQFT

BUILT

1273 1024 1078

1954 08-12-11 1951 08-12-11 1954 08-12-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 02 Highest $: 408,500 Median $: Lowest $: 233,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

4724 Palos Way 31262 San Andreas Drive

SOLD FOR BDS

94587 94587

233,000 408,500

3 5

CLOSED

CLOSED

233,000 320,750

SQFT

BUILT

1298 2613

1972 08-15-11 1978 08-12-11

CLOSED

519,000 538,500

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

850,000 660,000 460,000 370,000 585,000 519,000 170,000 245,000 719,000 545,000 1,000,000 846,000 360,000 210,000

2247 1527 1243 1772 1605 924 1155 2412 2030 2590 2598 1013 980

1900 1999 1969 2000 2006 1991 1971 1971 1978 1966 1997 1993 2007 1971

08-24-11 08-23-11 08-19-11 08-24-11 08-19-11 08-25-11 08-23-11 08-24-11 08-19-11 08-18-11 08-25-11 08-25-11 08-24-11 08-23-11

3 4 3 3 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 2 2

ADDRESS

233,000 323,500

Sudoku Solutions

4 5 3 9 8 7 2 1 6

2 1 6 3 4 5 9 7 8

9 8 7 2 1 6 5 4 3

6 4 5 8 9 1 3 2 7

3 9 8 7 6 2 4 5 1

7 2 1 4 5 3 6 8 9

8 6 4 1 2 9 7 3 5

1 7 9 5 3 4 8 6 2

5 3 2 6 7 8 1 9 4

F 7 4 D 3 E 8 2 6 C 9 5 0 A 1 B

3 6 B E D 5 0 A 7 8 4 1 2 9 F C

8 5 C 9 F 1 4 7 0 B A 2 6 D E 3

1 A 2 0 6 9 B C E F D 3 5 8 7 4

2 E 3 5 9 4 D B C 1 6 F 8 0 A 7

9 8 D C 7 2 A F 4 3 0 B E 1 5 6

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0 3 E 7 5 C 9 6 1 2 8 4 A B D F

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4 1 6 B 2 D 7 3 A 5 F 0 9 E C 8

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5 D 0 6 E A 2 9 F 4 B C 7 3 8 1

E C A 8 B F 1 5 3 D 7 9 4 6 0 2

B F 1 3 4 7 C 8 2 0 E 6 D 5 9 A


September 16, 2011

county declining by more than five percent. For the third consecutive year, declines in assessed values were especially concentrated in the State’s Central Valley. Assessed values dropped by 2.9 percent in the Greater Sacramento Area, and declined 2.7 percent in the North San Joaquin Valley. However, assessed values actually grew by 1.4 percent in the Southern San Joaquin Valley, driven by the 2.4 percent growth experienced by Kern County. The assessed valuation in California’s 15 coastal counties (which account for more than 60 percent of total assessed valuation) gained 0.9 percent. By contrast, valuations in the 43 inland counties fell 0.6 percent. Southern California assessed values increased 0.7 percent. The increase in San Francisco Bay Area values was a modest 0.3 percent, in line with the statewide figure. Of the dozen counties with rolls exceeding $100 billion, seven posted an increase in assessed value, while values in five fell. Values increased in the counties of San Mateo and Orange (1.0 percent), Santa Clara (0.9 percent), San Francisco (0.5 percent), San Diego (0.4 percent), and Alameda (0.1 percent). Declines in value include the counties of Sacramento (3.7 percent), Riverside (-1.2 percent), San Bernardino (-0.5 percent), Contra Costa (-0.4 percent), and Ventura County, which was only down slightly, virtually unchanged by percentage. Los Angeles County, with the largest assessment roll at $1.079 trillion, increased by 1.4 percent, up $15.0 billion over 2010-11. For more information about taxes and fees in California, visit www.boe.ca.gov and www.taxes.ca.gov.

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Help for Solyndra employees

SUBMITTED BY SENATOR ELLEN CORBETT

More than two dozen employers will attend a special jobs fair for former Solyndra employees from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Friday, September 23, 2011, at Ohlone College Newark Center, 39399 Cherry Street, Newark. Free parking is available on-site. Employers participating include Alion; AsteelFlash; Carl Zeiss, Meditec; East Bay Innovations; Echo First; Global Foundries; Intevac; Lam Research; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Lehigh Southwest Cement; MiaSolé; Micron; Precursor Energetics; Recurrent Energy; Siemens Building Technologies; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; SolarCity; Solaria; Solexant; Sungevity; SunPower; SunRun; Thermo Fisher Scientific; Tesla Motors; Xilinx, and more. The Alameda County Workforce Investment Board is coordinating the event. For more information, visit www.eastbayworks.com/alamedacounty. Job Fair for Former Solyndra Employees Friday, September 23 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Ohlone College Newark Center 39399 Cherry Street, Newark www.eastbayworks.com/alamedacounty

Roadwork on Paseo Padre Parkway SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD Expect delays on Paseo Padre Parkway between Stevenson Boulevard and Mowry Avenue, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for roadwork on the following dates:

September 13 – 16: Paving operations September 19 – 23: Utility adjustment September 26 – 30: Traffic striping

Page 15

Oldest person to mark 115th birthday in Georgia AP WIRE SERVICE MONROE, Ga. (AP), Aug 26 - A birthday party is planned at a Monroe nursing home for Besse Cooper, who is listed as the world's oldest person. Cooper will mark her 115th birthday Friday. Family members and a researcher from the Guinness Book of World Records will attend the ceremony. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports (http://bit.ly/rikpbf ) Cooper will receive a plaque from the organization that determines who's the oldest person in the world. Cooper was declared the world's oldest last January. In May, Guinness learned that Maria Gomes Valentin of Brazil was 48 days older. Valentin died June 21. Cooper was born in Tennessee and moved to Georgia during World War I to find employment as a teacher. She has 12 grandchildren and more than a dozen great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Her husband, Luther, died in 1963. --Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH Over 40 people from all walks of life, gathered at Eileen McDonald’s home in Newark

Jim Crow era laws. Even while caring for and helping to raise the children of their white employers, the maids are regarded as sub-human and made to feel invisible.

September 16, 2011

tendent for Alameda County Board of Education, to contact others who could speak about their experiences. The women who agreed to participate shared a common bond - that

Bobbie Brooks (center front) and Eileen McDonald (right front) make their points.

on a late August evening. “I was so moved after I finished reading ‘The Help,’ that I thought of a fun idea - to invite some friends to my home to speak about their experiences growing up in the South,” explained McDonald who serves on the Alameda County Board of Education. Written by Jackson, Mississippi native, Kathryn Stockett, the book has become a runaway bestseller as its readership spread through word of mouth, church groups and book clubs. Furthering the buzz is the current movie version, drawing large numbers since the beginning of its August release. Set in the early 1960’s, during the stirrings of the Civil Rights movement, the story details the harsh realities and bigotry faced by a group of African-American maids, under

The book and movie portray the perseverance and fierce determination of these strong AfricanAmerican women in the face of prejudice and adversity. McDonald elaborates further on her reasons for the gettogether, “I wanted to hear from people who lived the experience first hand,” says McDonald. “While I organized the event for my book club and a few close friends, I quickly learned that there was a real thirst for discussion on this topic. Thankfully this special evening not only quenched some of that thirst but opened our hearts even more to encourage and celebrate the equality everyone deserves.” She adds that when the planned speaker unexpectedly canceled, she asked Bobbie Brooks, a retired Asst. Superin-

of either having grown up in the South or having family there. Overall, as African-Americans, they had experienced varying degrees of prejudice. Bobbie Brooks grew up in Louisiana, where her parents were sharecroppers. Her family migrated to California in hopes of a better life. Education was important to them and Brooks attended UC Berkeley in the 1960’s. Her mother was a maid and later a cosmetologist, while her dad was a janitor. Brooks spoke of seeing many African-American women in crisp white maid’s uniforms on their way to work in the morning. She somehow felt that they seemed proud of her for pursuing her own dream of an education. Little did they know that, besides being a Drama major, she was something of a political


September 16, 2011

activist, participating in many protests at the time. But what surprised Brooks most was that even in “progressive” Berkeley, she endured being called the “N” word by the mother of a fellow student. “I was shocked,” said Brooks. “My mother said to appreciate people for who they were, not their color. Don’t let bad experiences rule your view of love and community.” To promote advocacy skills and to recognize overlooked academic efforts by African-American students, Brooks helped form the Southern Alameda County Alliance of African-American Educators, eight years ago. An annual event is held each spring at Chabot College, to honor students in six different categories. Last year the ceremony spot-

lighted 553 students. To help defray event expenses, Brooks states that donations are always gladly accepted through (http://www.caaae.org/sacaaae/). “This is important because these kids aren’t being honored in their public schools. We can make changes ourselves,” says Brooks. “The book reminds us of what a strong stock we come from.” Another speaker, Alma L. Davis, described life in Centerville, Mississippi, growing up as part of a family of eight. “Mississippi was one of the worst states in the union, regarding segregation. We went through a

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 17

(Left to right) Standing: Bobbie Brooks; Seated: Deborah Raymond and Alma L. Davis

lot. My mother didn’t work but my dad, as a sharecropper had

to give 80 percent of the crop to the white landowner and could only keep 20 percent. He was a hard worker and was able to send all his kids to school,” stated Davis. Later on, Davis’ father became a bus driver. She remembered that when the state wanted to integrate schools, whites decided not to send their kids to public schools but instead to private schools. “African-Americans couldn’t even go near those areas where they were,” says Davis. “I saw a lot of problems in Mississippi.” Davis adds that she went to a black school. “We were not

allowed to mingle with white students,” she says. “To see a movie, blacks went upstairs and used different doors. We had to order food at the back door of restaurants, because we couldn’t go inside.” Eventually, her father managed to save enough money to buy land and build a house, so that the family could own their own home. Participant Deborah Raymond, who had grown up in California, spoke of a trip to the South when she was a young girl. “In 1961 I was living in Los Angeles and I went to Mississippi to visit relatives. My dad’s mother (my grandmother) was dying in a hospital in Jackson, Mississippi. Those days, all family members had to take care of their family in the hospital, not nurses,” explains Raymond. She was surprised about how difficult life was in Mississippi. “One of my aunts had 20 kids, another 22. The men had to get up at 5:30 a.m. to pick cotton.” Raymond remembers an incident when she went into a store to purchase something. The owner first called her a derogatory term for a black child and added,

“You’ve got to say ‘yes sir and no sir,’ when speaking to me.” Soon afterwards, rumors started going around town about her being an ‘uppity girl’ who had too many clothes, for a black child. Raymond’s family was worried that something could happen to her. They immediately put her into a car and drove straight to Memphis, Tennessee and then on to Chicago, where she stayed until her father could re-join her. “The movie and book are reminders of what had happened,” says Raymond. “Racist people are filled with hate, but ‘The Help’ is about ‘woman power’ and the determination of the women.” At the age of 16, Wanda Williams moved from Louisiana to California, but she recollects attending segregated schools in the South. A clear memory is that she never went out alone but was always with an adult. The one time she went out at night with a group of friends, they were threatened and harassed by whites. Williams added, “Reading the book or seeing the movie provides teachable moments if people be-

come conscious of how you treat others and about racism.” Cassandra Van Buren, a former Arroyo High School classmate of Eileen McDonald, shared her story. Van Buren’s father was African-American and from the South while her mother was white and from Oregon. Van Buren grew up in San Leandro, where the family experienced housing discrimination but somehow, she explained, her parents were able to purchase a home. However, because she was light enough to pass for white or Hispanic, her parents encouraged her to do so. Van Buren wasn’t comfortable with this charade, and when she was older, identified herself as African-American, which caused friction in her family. Although not from the South, retired educator Vivien Larsen had her own share of prejudice. Coming from Chile, Larsen became a teacher in Oakland, assigned to some of the toughest kids; she proved herself up to the challenge. But, she felt that when she attempted to enter administrative levels of the education system, she was blocked due to racism. Larsen admired the maids who were the focus of the movie/book. “A lot of strength was exhibited by the AfricanAmerican women, working for others and then doing the same for their own home and family,” she says. Ultimately, what will be remembered from the evening was that those who gathered at Eileen McDonald’s home, generously shared their thoughts, based on their own personal experiences. Just like ‘The Help,’ their painful, tearful and touching stories resonated with those present. Through talking and sharing of common experiences, perhaps the healing can begin.


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

Fremont Police accepting Explorer applications The Fremont Police Department is currently accepting applications for the teen Explorer Program. The Explorer Program is a fun and safe way for teenagers to learn more about the field of law enforcement and get community service hours. Explorers donate between 5-20 volunteer hours each month by participating in a number of department activities including; ride-a-longs, traffic control, building tours and special events. All new Explorers are required to attend a one-week Explorer Academy in San Diego during their first year. If you are between the ages of 14 - 18 and think that you might be interested in learning more about becoming a Police Explorer or a future career in law enforcement, please visit the Department's Volunteer web-page at http://www.fremontpolice.org/explorers/explorers.html Applications will be accepted through September 30, 2011.

September 16, 2011

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY CMDR BOB DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD September 10 Last night’s lightning storm caused significant damage to transformers on Thornton Avenue between Willow Street and the wildlife refuge. P.G. & E workers spent most of the day making repairs and Reserve Officer Adams worked traffic control until 3 p.m. to slow

traffic down in the area. Officers responded to Motel 6 to investigate a possible missing person case at 10:06 a.m. Ahmad Morati of Fremont wanted to report his wife and kids had been missing for a year. Officer Johnson arrested Morati for being drunk in public. Officers learned the family is not missing and Morati is restrained from contacting the family.

Fremont Log SUBMITTED BY DET. BILL VETERAN, FREMONT PD

September 9 A Pizza delivery worker reported being robbed at gunpoint in the area of Lake Garrison Street. The suspect stole money, pizza and the victim’s cellular phone. The suspect was described as a black adult male, 19-20 yrs, 6’, 170 lbs., dark jeans, baseball cap, shoulder length curly hair. A citizen called FPD to report a male pointing an assault rifle at another group of males. Officers were initially unable to locate the suspect and/or victim. Approximately 20 minutes later, the victim called FPD to report this incident. The victim reported that her ex-boyfriend brandished what appeared to be a rifle at her and threatened her life. A team of officers conducted a stakeout of the suspect’s known residence. Officer Decker eventually made

September 11 A victim of an assault with a deadly weapon walked into the station at 9:50 a.m. to report that he was involved in a fight with his roommate at his residence on Thornton Avenue. The victim sustained a small, non life threatening stab wound to his right hand. Santiago Casso of Newark was arrested. September 13 The Victim; a truck driver

contact with the suspect via cell phone. At the urging of Officer Decker, Underwood agreed to surrender at a friend’s house on Mariposa Way. The suspect was taken into custody without incident. Officer Kennedy drove by Chili’s on Fremont Boulevard and he saw a male run from him. He eventually caught the male near Elephant Bar. Follow-up led to the discovery that the suspect had just run from Target after stealing a 22-inch TV. The juvenile was arrested for commercial burglary and resisting a police officer. Units were dispatched to Los Dos Amigos for a promiscuous shooting. Bar patrons stated the shooting sounded like it occurred east of their location. Officer Macciola’s investigation led to the possible victim being identified, who ended up being uncooperative. A search led to 12 casings found in the parking lot east of Los Dos Amigos. No one was injured and no strike marks were found to any businesses. September 10 Officers responded to 3300 Juliet Circle at 6:44 a.m. on a report of a shooting that just occurred. The uncooperative caller stated a male had been shot and was lying in the roadway in front of her home. When officers arrived, they located a 33-year-old

delivering gas at the Chevron Station on Stevenson Boulevard called NPD at 9:47 a.m. to report a brandishing of a weapon. The victim reported the suspect had brandished two knives at him then fled on foot. Officers arrived and detained Robert Earl Longstreet of Newark at gunpoint. Officers recovered knives from him and he was identified. Mr. Longstreet went to Santa Rita Jail.

male who had been shot numerous times. The victim was able to communicate with officers, but could not provide any suspect information. The victim was transported to Eden where he underwent surgery for non life-threatening injures. As the investigation continued, details began to emerge, including suspect information and possible motive. Detectives were called out and took over the investigation. Although the investigation is on-going, Detectives have developed suspect information and are currently following up with the information. The suspect was located and arrested on 9/11/2011. A 12-year-old child was sexual assaulted while attending a sleep over at a family friend’s house. Officer Spear investigated the incident and obtained a full confession from the suspect, who was arrested and booked at Fremont Jail. September 11 A family arriving home on Winding Lane from a trip was robbed at gunpoint by two suspects. After pulling up in their driveway the wife and children went inside the house and the husband stayed outside to retrieve luggage. The husband was confronted and forced inside the house. Once inside suspect #1 held the family at guncontinued on page 21


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

Possession of stolen property SUBMITTED BY SGT DAVID OSTRANDER, MILPITAS PD On September 10, at 2:04 p.m., Milpitas Police Officers responded to a report of a person shot in an apartment complex parking lot in the 400 block of Dixon Landing Road. Officers arrived and found Alejandro Jose Perez, Jr., 28year-old Hispanic male, Antioch resident with a gunshot wound to his right lega. It was initially reported that an unknown gunman shot Perez but officers later discovered Perez accidentally shot himself. Perez was treated at a local hospital and released to police custody. Officers found the gun Perez used during the incident and discovered it was stolen from another jurisdiction. Perez was arrested for possession of stolen property, possession of a loaded firearm, possession of a firearm by a person with a prior felony conviction, delaying a police officer, violation of probation, and a warrant for passenger in a vehicle possessing an open alcoholic beverage container. Perez was booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail. Alejandro Perez Anyone with any information regarding this investigation is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime tip.asp

Robbery suspects arrested SUBMITTED BY LT STEVEN PETRAKOVITZ MILPITAS PD On September 12, 2011, Milpitas Police officers arrested two individuals who robbed a person of his marijuana and wallet. On September 11, 2011, the Milpitas Police Department was contacted by the victim, who lives in Sunnyvale. He said he was robbed of his property, at gunpoint by two males and they were last seen running through the Gerome Rogers walkway from Columbus Circle leading to the ball fields behind Russell Middle School. The victim gave officers a detailed description of both suspects. The victim and suspects met through the website Craigslist.org and agreed to meet in the 1300 Block of Columbus Drive so the victim could sell his marijuana. During the meeting, the juvenile suspect allegedly pointed a gun at the victim and demanded his property. The suspects took the victim’s wallet and marijuana and fled on foot. After a lengthy investigation, the two suspects were detained at two different locations, in Milpitas. The victim positively identified both suspects, one of which was Gerome Rogers, age 19, Milpitas resident; they were arrested for armed robbery and conspiracy. The victim’s wallet and all of the marijuana was recovered. The minor was booked into Santa Clara County juvenile hall. Rogers was booked into Santa Clara County jail. Anyone with any information regarding this case is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime tip.asp

Unlucky burglar targets home of Minn. sheriff AP WIRE SERVICE WINONA, Minn. (AP), Aug 26 - A burglary suspect apparently didn't notice that the Minnesota house he was targeting had a sheriff's squad car parked outside. Winona County Sheriff Dave Brand says his wife called him Thursday evening to say someone was trying to break into their Lewiston home. Brand says he rushed home and found a man reaching through a broken glass door trying to unlatch the door. The sheriff says he wrestled the 37year-old man to the ground and held him until police arrived. A KAGE-AM report (http://bit.ly/oZLFQe ) says the suspect produced a breath-alcohol test of 0.33, more than four times the legal limit for driving. Brand says the suspect had walked by the sheriff's own squad car to enter the garage and steal the hammer used to smash the glass door. No one was hurt. Information from: KAGE-AM, http://www.winonaradio.com

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 16, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455855 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Antonia’s Women’s Accessories, 27957 Leidig Court, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda Antonia Mendoza, 27957 Leidig Court, Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 09/06/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Antonias Wome’s, Accessorie’s /s/ Antonia Mendoza This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2174392# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 456020 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Vocal Xtreme, 4456 Technology Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda VX Enterprises Inc., CA., 4456 Technology Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 9-12-2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chien-Ming Chang, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 12, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2174375# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455953 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DC Food & Discount, 37531 Dusterberry Way, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Shah Mahmoud Ahmady, 1512 Reiger Ave., Hayward, CA 94554 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is

true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shah Mahmoud Ahmady, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on September 8, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2172920# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454599-600 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Tandoori-N-Curry Restaurant, (2) Lazzat Restaurant, 40559 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Farooqui Foods Inc., 1770 Clear Lake Ave., Milpitas, CA 95035 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Mohammed Javed Farooqui (CEO) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 02, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7/11 CNS-2172657# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454742 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ocean Vista Education Group, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. 36610 Cherry St., Newark, CA 94560. Jun Lu, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539. Kam Hong Lui, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jun Lu Kam Hong Lui This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section

14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2166025# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455364 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Key Estates & Capital, (2) Key Funding, 33031 Garfinkle St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda. Gurpreet Randhawa, 33031 Garfinkle St., Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gurpreet Randhawa This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 19, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2166023# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455113 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: D.P.’s Final Touch Maintenance, 4138 Bullard St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Davin Payne, 4138 Bullard St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on August 10, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Davin Payne This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 12, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165377# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454924 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PrinSilk Productions, 39326 Mariposa Way, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 7628, Fremont, CA 94537 Steven Ree Worley, 39326 Mariposa Way, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Steven Ree Worley

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165363# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455173 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BJ’s Best In The West Gourmet Caramel Corn, 4940 Everglades Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ruth J. Tanner, 4940 Everglades Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ruth J. Tanner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 16, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165289# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454780 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Great Massage Finder, 38750 Paseo Padre Parkway, #C7, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. JDR Financial Group, Inc., CA, 38750 Paseo Padre Parkway, #C7, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jun Hao Qiu, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/26, 9/2, 9/9, 9/16/11 CNS-2163081# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. 454967 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cajun Boiling Seafood & Sushi Bar, 4812 A Thornton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 Rolando H. Aranzamendez, 31770 Alvarado Blvd. #134, Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rolando H. Aranzamendez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/26, 9/2, 9/9, 9/16/11 CNS-2160962#

GOVERNMENT NOTIce is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office, 5325 Broder Blvd., Dublin, CA 94568 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900914 for Alameda County Sheriff’s Office Jail Management System, Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 2:00 p.m. – Glenn E. Dyer Detention Facility, 550 – 6th Street, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900914 for Alameda County Sheriff’s Office Jail Management System, Wednesday, September 28, 2011, 10:00 a.m. – Santa Rita Jail, 5325 Broder Boulevard, Dublin, CA Responses Due by 2:00 p.m. on October 19, 2011 County Contact: Lieutenant Garrett Holmes at (925) 551-6553 or via email: gholmes@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 9/16/11 CNS-2174519#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et. .seq.), the undersigned will sell at public auction, on October 6, 2011 personal property including but not limited to furniture, clothing, tools, and/or other household items located at: Public Storage 22317 35360 Fircrest St . Newark , Ca 94560-1004 (510) 792-7172 Time: 9:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A062 Wilmer Clark A071 Debbie Leslie B043 Latonya Richards D127 Nijua Torres E022 Harlene Nickson P040 Robert Gregory P115 Cory Ellis Public Storage 08026


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PUBLIC NOTICES 37444 Cedar Blvd , Newark , Ca 94560-4134 (510) 790-0112 Time: 10:30 AM Stored by the following person (s): 2027 Gregory Allen 2064 Micheal Muriset 2073 Maria Herrera 2092 Eric Obera 3003 Porscha Gulley 6002 Pamela Porter 8014 Annucci Construction 8015 Annucci Construction Public Storage 27265 38290 Cedar Blvd. Newark , CA 94560-4604 (510) 793-7093 Time: 11:00 AM Stored by the following person (s):

D074 Monaliza Cabbat

(510) 657-6077 Time: 12:45 PM Stored by the following person (s): A032 Lourdes Oravillo A097 Kevin Reneau A214 David Valenzuela A245 Gwen e Quiett A277 Reginald Page A303 Paul Steinert A361 Raymond Turner A378 Jonathan Hoang D046 Angela Derush D099 Cathy Silva Public Storage 00303 4444 Enterprise Street Fremont , CA 94538-6307 (510) 656-7268 Time: 1:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A044 Don Umbarger

Public Storage 24613 4555 Peralta Blvd Fremont, Ca 94536-5736 (510) 792-3490 Time: 11:45 AM Stored by the following person (s): A178 Amber Brown B208 Darrell Mcpherson B211 Sharon Meneses C325 Wanda Mitchell E592 Lisa Bufton E602 Joaquin Vigil E616 Jason Grand E639 Steve Armentino Public Storage 24211 42101 Albrae Street Fremont , CA . 94538-3123

continued from page 18 Kwik and Conven-

Fremont Log point while suspect #2 ransacked the family home. Loss included cash, jewelry and a cellular phone. An investigation is ongoing. A female walking alone on Cavendish Place was confronted by a male, who tried to rob her at gunpoint. The suspect was described as a black adult male in his late teens or early 20’s, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans. Units set up a perimeter and attempted to track the suspect with K9 Dax. Officers stop three juveniles in the area but the in-field line-up was not successful. September 13 Officers responded to the

ient Market, 3157 Walnut Avenue on a report of a battery that just occurred. The suspect, a 48year-old transient, attempted to steal beer from the store. When the clerk attempted to get the beer back, the suspect punched him in the face and attempted to flee. The clerk was able to lock the suspect in the store until the police arrived. The suspect was arrested for robbery and transported to Santa Rita Jail. September 14 Officers were dispatched to check the welfare of a female after her husband called and said she was suicidal. The female had left in her vehicle after dropping her children at school and could not immediately be reached. After extensive searches of the area and checking cell phones, the female eventually called her

SUBMITTED BY HEATHER MELLON Volunteers are needed for McConaghy House to lead tours or help with children’s programs. McConaghy House is a historic house museum operated by the Hayward Area Historical Society, located on

husband and said she was headed east on highway 580. She also told him that she had taken numerous medications. The female was eventually traced to Turlock where she was stopped and contacted by medical personnel. She was placed on a psychiatric hold and transported to the hospital. Case investigated by Officer Contrada. After having a few drinks nearby, a 45 yr old male picked up his vehicle from the Trimboli Car Wash and proceeded to perform some “doughnuts” in the street. He lost control of his vehicle and crashed into a pole nearby and was subsequently cited for DUI after being transported to San Jose Regional for injuries. Officer Stone is investigating. Two hooded, masked, and gloved Hispanic adult male suspects robbed the Warm Springs Round Table at gunpoint. The two escaped on foot fleeing southwest toward Safeway. Possi-

Public Storage 27019 47209 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont , CA 94539-7461 (510) 659-6993 Time: 2:30 PM Stored by the following person (s): A087 Heidi Conchin A104 Myleah Morris A138 Susan Wood A146 Carmelo Lopez A158 Lequawn Mcdowell A161 Chylia Cain A316 Eric Blanchard C049 Michael Jantzen C136 Carolina Perez C142 Robert Schmidt C159 Ricardo Nalawagan jr C241 Ryan Abney C294 Marla Kay Karr

ble getaway vehicle was a light colored American sedan with a getaway driver nearby. There were multiple witnesses; the loss was Currency. September 15 Officers were dispatched to the 32700 block of Mono Lake on a report of a family battery. A male had battered his sister after a dispute. When officers arrived, they found the male sitting in the backyard. He decided to walk away from Officers Ceniceros and Francisco and tried to hop a fence. Seeing a taser pointed at him, he surrendered, was arrested for resisting arrest and transported to Santa Rita. Officer Fowlie received a stolen vehicle report involving a backhoe taken from Nursery Drive and Mission Blvd. Soon after taking the report, Lojack is turned on and the vehicle is tracked to Skylark and Mann in Union City. Witnesses say a truck dropped the backhoe off at that location this morning and

Hesperian Boulevard next to Kennedy Park, Hayward. The two-day training for volunteers is on Thursday, September 22 (6:00 – 8:30 p.m.) and on Saturday, September 24 (10:00 - 12:30 p.m.). For more information or to sign-up for the training,

C409 Marla Kay Karr All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Terms, rules and regulations are available at sale. Dated on this 16th day of September 2011 and 23rd day of September 2011, by PS Orangeco, Inc., 701 Western Avenue, Glendale, CA 91201, (818) 2448080, Bond No. 5857632 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2174200#

drove off. The only description was an Hispanic adult male. The family of a 15-year-old male called FPD to report that he was chasing his brother around the house with a butcher knife. At one point it was reported that he had four knives, and was threatening to kill relatives, all because someone called him an insulting name. Officers responded to the 5300 block of Burnside Court and contacted the male outside. He was placed on a psychiatric hold. Officer Snyder handled the case. It was reported that 15-20 males were fighting in the street on Lincoln Avenue. Officers learned that two teenagers walking down the street challenged some adult males who were minding their own business on their porch. The adults didn’t back down and a minor scuffle ensued. Ultimately, one of the juvenile’s fathers went to jail for an outstanding DUI warrant. Officer Tarango made the arrest.

call Johanna at (510) 581-0223 or email education@haywardareahistory.org. For more information about the Hayward Area Historical Society, visit www.HaywardAreaHistory.org.


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CA gay history referendum faces long ballot odds BY LISA LEFF ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), At churches, shopping centers, schools, and local tea party meetings in California, fired-up volunteers have started gathering signatures for a ballot referendum that would repeal the nation's first law requiring public schools to include prominent gay people and gay rights' milestones in school lessons. Organizers of the Stop SB48 campaign- Senate Bill 48 was the law approved by the California Legislature and signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in July - are telling would-be voters the new mandate would inappropriately expose young children to sex, infringe on parental rights and silence religion-based criticisms of homosexuality. Those are talking points successfully used by proponents of Proposition 8, the 2008 ballot measure that banned same-sex marriage in California. But so far, Mormon and Catholic church leaders and conservative groups who spearheaded the Proposition 8 campaign have not joined the effort to qualify the gay history referendum for the June 2012 ballot, leaving less-experienced Christian conservatives to lead the charge without the organizational prowess and funding to hire paid signature gatherers. Political operatives say they can't recall any citizens' initiative continued on page 26

September 16, 2011

Italy confirms China talks amid bond help reports BY ALESSANDRA RIZZO ASSOCIATED PRESS ROME (AP), Sep 13 - Italy confirmed it held talks with Chinese officials amid speculation Rome is looking to persuade Beijing to buy its bonds or invest in its companies, while premier Silvio Berlusconi flew to Brussels Tuesday to discuss the market turmoil. The eurozone's third-largest economy is trying to convince investors that it can manage its debt load, find buyers for its bonds and avoid becoming the next victim of Europe's debt crisis. News of the talks with China sent the Milan stock market higher on the open, following market tensions across Europe. But the rebound was shaky, with stocks fluctuating. Bond prices likewise received little support from the news especially after the country had to pay a euro-era high

interest rate in a five-year bond auction. Though the Italian Treasury raised (euro) 3.86 billion ($5.27 billion) from the sale of five-year bonds, it had to pay an interest rate of 5.6 percent. That was the highest rate it has had to pay since the euro was established in 1999 and marked a fairly hefty rise from the previous auction's equivalent of 4.9 percent. UniCredit bank gave a mixed review to the auction. “While in terms of pricing we regard the auction as disappointing, demand was fine in our view, considering the current market environment and the high amount sold,” said Chiara Cremonesi, a fixed-income strategist at UniCredit. In Brussels, Berlusconi discussed the government's austerity package with European Union President Herman Van Rompuy, ahead of a key vote in

the Italian parliament. The austerity measures seek to slash spending by more than (euro) 54 billion ($70 billion) over three years. They will be put to a vote of confidence in the lower house of parliament for final approval Wednesday, Berlusconi said. The Senate has already cleared them. The European Central Bank has bought Italian bonds in the open market to keep down their yields, which indicate the rates at which the country would be able to borrow on the market. But Rome appears to be looking farther away, too. A spokesman for Finance Minister Giulio Tremonti confirmed the meeting with the chairman of China Investment Corp., Lou Jiwei, but declined further comment. The Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times said the continued on page 23


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continued from page 22

meeting took place last week in Rome, without citing sources. Reports said the meeting also included officials of China's foreign currency regulator and the Cassa Depositi e Prestiti, an Italian government investment vehicle. CIC was created in 2007 to invest a portion of Beijing's $3.2 trillion in foreign reserves, the bulk of which are held in safe but low-earning assets such as U.S. Treasury debt. The fund says it has assets of $409.6 billion, which includes stocks in a wide array of major Western companies. “Europe will continue to be one of China's main investment markets,” said Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu at a regular news briefing. “We will also expand fi-

nancial and economic cooperation and investment cooperation with European countries to jointly address the financial crisis.” Beijing hopes eurozone countries will “take effective measures to ensure the safety of China's investments,” Jiang said. Fiat and Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, speaking from the Frankfurt Auto Show, said the possible involvement of China could be read in two ways: on the one hand, were Beijing to absorb some of Italy's debt, it would be a vote of confidence in Italy; on the other, the fact that Rome “had to go there, in and of itself is not a good sign.” Analyst Romeo Orlandi, an expert on China, echoed that assessment,

saying the development was positive for Italy, but not without dangers. “In principle it's a win-win situation: Italy needs money, China has the world's largest reserves. But this means that we must sell pieces of Italy to China,” Orlandi said, adding that the talks may be an indication of how serious Italy's financial troubles are. Orlandi said Beijing is usually cautious in its investment, and that the solution to Italy's woes does not lie in China. “But we are in a situation where even a little crutch can be helpful,” he said. --Associated Press writers Joe McDonald in Beijing and Colleen Barry in Frankfurt contributed to this report.

Large US banks must show how they would wind down BY MARCY GORDON AP BUSINESS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Sep 13 The largest U.S. banks will be required to show regulators how they would break up and sell off their assets if they are in danger of failing. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. voted 3-0 Tuesday to approve the rules, which were mandated under the financial overhaul passed by Congress last year. They are designed to reduce the chances of another government bailout of Wall Street banks in the event of another financial crisis. The rules require banks with $50 billion or more in assets to submit so-called living wills to the FDIC, the Federal Reserve and the Financial Stability Oversight Coun-

cil and send revised plans annually. Among the banks affected are Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. The biggest banks of the group would have to start filing their plans next July. The others wouldn't be due until 2013. The FDIC says that 124 financial firms plus will be subject to the requirements, 26 of which are U.S. banks or financial firms. The rest are U.S. subsidiaries of banks based in foreign countries. The rules would also apply to 37 federally insured banks and thrifts. Those institutions have about $3.6 trillion in deposits, or nearly 60 percent of all federally insured deposits, according to the FDIC. Regulators would have the power

to seize and dismantle banks that threaten the broader financial system. They also have the power to designate other firms as potentially threatening the financial system and require them to submit plans. The plans must include detailed information on a bank's businesses and operations, structure, assets and liabilities, capital cushion held against risk, and how much they owe other big financial institutions. If their operations change, the banks would have to submit revised plans within 45 days. Based on their review of the plans, the regulators are empowered to order banks to make changes to their operations, such as selling assets or divisions. They also can reject the plans and order banks back to the drawing board.

Alaska woman punches bear in snout to save dog AP WIRE SERVICE JUNEAU, Alaska (AP), Sep 01 - A Juneau, Alaska, woman says she knows it was stupid to punch a black bear in the snout to save her dog. But Brooke Collins says the attack happened so fast that all she could think about is keeping her dachshund, Fudge, from being killed. The 22-year-old says as soon as she let her dogs out Sun-

day, Fudge started barking and she saw the bear carrying him like a salmon. Collins told the Juneau Empire (http://bit.ly/qJVzQ3) she did the first thing she thought of and punched the bear's face and scooped away her dog when it let go. The startled bear took off through bushes to a mountain. Fudge suffered some claw and bite marks, but they weren't deep. Collins says he appeared to be more shocked than injured.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY KELLY HAYES The Cal State East Bay Athletics Department is preparing to host a celebration of its 50th anniversary later this month and is inviting all Pioneer alumni to attend the weekend of events Sept. 23-26 including alumni games, an alumni barbecue and the 15th annual Cal State East Bay Golf Classic, as well a pair of California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) soccer doubleheaders. In 1961, the university started the intercollegiate athletics program beginning with men's basketball in December of that year. Since then, Pioneer teams have captured a total of seven national championships and more than 80 conference titles, producing over 420 All-Americans and Academic All-Americans, and garnering numerous other awards and honors, both on and off the In honor of the many accomplishments of Pioneer student-athletes, coaches and staff since the program's inception, the Athletics Department is welcoming alumni, fans, faculty and staff to a full weekend of events. The celebration will kick off with a chance to see the current Pioneers in action, as the men and women's soccer teams will take on Cal State Stanislaus on Friday at 4:30

p.m. and 7 p.m., respectively. During halftime of the men's game, current student-athletes who have earned conference, regional or national recognition will be honored. At halftime of the women's game, the department will honor former coaches and administrators who have helped make the athletics program what it is today. Saturday will celebrate former Pioneer athletes as they take to the fields, pools and courts for alumni games in a variety of sports, including soccer, tennis, water polo and basketball. Following all the action, athletics alumni and their families are invited to attend a free barbecue celebration from 3-6 p.m. The celebration continues on Sunday with more CCAA soccer action; the Pioneers take on Chico State at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. During the men's game, the 1988 NCAA Division II Championship women's soccer team will be honored, while the women's game will feature recognition of all former student-athletes in attendance at the game. The 15th annual Cal State East Bay Golf Classic, being held at Monarch Bay Golf Club in San Leandro on Sept. 26, will cap the celebration weekend. Participants will join the Cal State East Bay Athletics Department staff and coaches for 18 holes

Fremont Christian volleyball falls short against Irvington SUBMITTED BY BILL KRUPPA September 13 FCS: 10 21 13 Irvington: 25 25 25 FCS: Megan Takata 3 aces, 3 assists Jennifer

Morita 3 kills Hannah Arionus 3 kills Irvington: Jinny Yan 13 kills, 2 aces Ashley Torres 4 kills, 13 assists Danielle Hubacer 4 kills, 1 ace

as well as a silent auction, raffle and banquet lunch. Included in the entry fee are greens fees, golf cart, polo shirt, team and individual awards, tournament gift bag, breakfast and lunch. Sponsorship opportunities across a wide range of levels are also available for individuals and businesses to show their support for the Pioneers. All proceeds from the tournament benefit the Richard and Susan Sherratt Athletic Scholarship Endowment which provides financial support for student-athletes who otherwise may not have the opportunity to attend Cal State East Bay and participate in intercollegiate athletics. Rich Sherratt '70, a Pioneer baseball alumnus and CEO of Ballena Technologies in Alameda, and his wife Susan created the endowment with a $25,000 gift in 2009. The golf tournament is the largest fundraiser of the year for the Athletics Department, which is entering its first season as an active member in NCAA Division II. In addition to commemorating the 50th anniversary of the department, the weekend will also celebrate the 2011-12 campaign as the first in which the Pioneers are eligible for conference and NCAA playoffs and championships, following the three-year probation period during the transition back to Division II.

September 16, 2011

Cal State East Bay has counted many successes in its return to Division II competition over the last two years. In 2010, the Pioneers had a pair of CCAA Freshmen of the Year honorees in basketball player Lauren Lucchesi and baseball player Charlie Sharrer, water polo player Claire Pierce took home conference Newcomer of the Year honors and water polo coach Lisa Cooper was named Division II National Coach of the Year. Last season the accolades continued to roll in, as the volleyball team finished tied for second in the CCAA, with Head Coach Jim Spagle collecting CCAA Coach of the Year honors, and water polo had its best-ever finish at the conference tournament, with Pierce earning her second straight Division II All-America award. Alumni games, the alumni barbecue and the golf tournament all require registration. More information can be found at: http://eastbaypioneers.com/sports/2011/7/ 20/GEN_0720112954.aspx?id=59

50 year celebration Sept 23 - 26 CSUEB (510) 885-3038

Moreau tops Tennyson SUBMITTED BY COACH ROSE BORJA Sept 14, 2011 Moreau Catholic defeated Tennyson High 7-0 at Tennyson Moreau's League record is 3-0 Individual scores Singles: 1S) Nicole Dawang (MC) d. Gur-

want Khabra (THS) 6-2, 6-1 2S) Lisa Wilson (MC) d. Navrreet Khabra (THS) 6-0, 6-0 3S) Sachi Shetty (MC) d. Gianna Uson (THS) 6-0, 6-0 4S) Ashley Ma (MC) d. Harjot Jhaj (THS) 6-0, 6-1 Doubles: 1D) Amanda Ang/ Melissa Palanca (MC) d. Adrienne Pimarucut/Al-

endre Ulantad (THS) 6-2, 6-0 2D) LeiAhn Drake/Ianne DeLeon (MC) d. Vanessa Anilao/Erica Reyes (THS) 6-2, 6-0 3D) Gel Limun/Catherine Lopez (MC) d. Thuy Che/Surhdep Brar (THS) 7-5, 6-3 JV Scores MC – 2, THS - 0


September 16, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

U-11 Newark Soccer Fire captures first place at the Central Marin Classic August 27-28

Robert Turbin sizzles at Utah State University

SUBMITTED BY NICOLE ROSS

SUBMITTED BY MEGAN ALLEN Robert Turbin, student-athlete from Fremont, recently had an outstanding week for Utah State University. A Junior, running back Turbin rushed for 180 yards on 18 carries with two touchdowns in Utah State's 54-17 romp over Weber State, and surpassed the 2,000 career yard mark along the way, becoming just the eighth USU running back to reach that plateau. It was Turbin’s ninth career 100-yard outing; the 180 yards just 10 yards shy of his careerbest. The two TD’s bring Turbin’s total to four for the season and 25 for his career.

SPARC, Inc. will partner with CityServe’s Compassion Network, for the second consecutive, to host Community Impact Work Day 2011 on Saturday, September 17, 2011, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Tropics Mobilehome Park, 33000 Almaden Boulevard, Union City. About 200 volunteers from all over the TriCity Community will assist Tropics residents with a number of different household tasks which include yard work, power washing, handyman work, window washing and pre-granted special requests. All services are free on September 17, if approved into the program. So far, 60 homes have been assessed and approved for repairs. Participating Tropics residents will have the opportunity to receive a free lunch with the CityServe volunteers at 12 p.m. and take part in an ice cream social and movie viewing at 2 p.m. For more information, contact Nicole Ross at (949) 515-5100 ext. 208.

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BY DIANE DANIEL PHOTO BY BARRY ZEPEL

S

tephen Gutierrez, professor of English, has earned praise for his literary knowledge, understanding, perception and insight. Add to those compliments a new honor: Cal State East Bay’s 2010-11 George and Miriam Phillips Outstanding Professor. Gutierrez, head of the university’s creative writing program, was selected by his Cal State East Bay peers, who say that he influences the lives of students through “his rigorous yet supportive approach.” Colleagues also credit him for contributing to the English Department through programs such as the annual Distinguished Writers Series, which he and colleague Susan Gubernat coordinate. Leroy M. Morishita, CSUEB’s interim president, will mention the award and introduce Professor Gutierrez at the university’s fall convocation on September 19. The George and Miriam Phillips Outstanding Professor for 201011 designation will be bestowed on Professor Gutierrez at the Faculty Honors Convocation March 1. At that time Gutierrez will address the gathering. Gutierrez’s commitment to students and to the craft of writing makes him an essential part of the English Department,” said Dennis Chester, associate professor and chair of English. In nominating Gutierrez, Chester said, “His work with young aspiring writers is admirable, and students are always eager to take his classes. I

can’t think of anyone more deserving of this award than Steve Gutierrez.” “Professor Gutierrez exemplifies the highest goals of the scholar-teacher,” said Kathleen Rountree, interim dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences. “His own writing has been recognized and lauded nationally and regionally, and his students praise him for being a committed and positive

teacher who encourages every young writer to find his own authentic voice.” Dozens of supporting letters from students and alumni tell a consistent story of a “kind, gentle, professor dedicated to teaching and mentoring,” someone who is “able to draw out the best from his students, inspire by example, and invest inordinate time in anyone wishing to continue in the field.” A number of students said that Gutierrez – a successful author and playwright – was the reason they selected creative writing as an option within the English major, noting that they “had the confidence in themselves to pursue a career in writing because of him.”

September 16, 2011

Grant Bergland, a 2010 CSUEB graduate with a bachelor’s degree in English, has continued his studies, including recent participation in a competitive writing program in Iowa. “Here at Columbia (University), and last summer in Iowa, I had many other instructors,” Bergland said "None of them have yet rivaled Steve in the quality of instruction or level of commitment to student work.” Other students offered similar praise for Gutierrez. “For the first time in my academic career, I felt that a professor saw me and saw my needs,” wrote Janet Burns, a graduate student who previously attended one of Canada’s top universities. Writing – not teaching – was his original goal as Gutierrez earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Chico State University and an MFA (master’s in fine arts) in creative writing from Cornell University. However in 1990, his friend Ernesto Trejo – a poet and teacher– was suffering from cancer, so he asked Gutierrez to teach his fiction writing class at Fresno City College. Instantly, he knew teaching was his calling. By 1992 Gutierrez had landed a tenure-track position at Cal State East Bay (then known as Cal State Hayward) teaching fiction writing, and two years later his wife, Jacqueline Doyle, was working in the same department as a tenured professor, moving over from Fresno State. While the resident of Castro Valley has taught a wide-range of English courses, his favorites are the writer’s workshops in continued on PAGE 27


September 16, 2011

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continued from page 22

CA gay history referendum faces long ballot odds

that made the state ballot without professional petition circulators in almost three decades. “If someone wrote a million-dollar check, we would be guaranteed to get this on the ballot,” said Pacific Justice Institute President Brad Dacus, whose legal aid firm wrote the proposed measure and is cosponsoring the signature-gathering effort. “That's not the case at this point... We are counting on people in churches and communities and families making the extra effort to get it done.” Supporters have until Oct. 12 to collect 504,760 signatures from registered voters to qualify the measure for the ballot. Conventional wisdom among political consultants is that it will be difficult to meet the requirement with such a short window and only volunteers. Sacramento political consultant Wayne Johnson, whose firm has worked on more than a dozen ballot initiative campaigns, said that with the samesex marriage ban tied up in the courts, a presidential election on the horizon and many Christian parents with children in private schools, conservative groups with the most cash and experience may sit out this fight.

“We are in a different environment and a different economy,” Johnson said. “How much of your resources and energy can be devoted to preserving the status quo?” Still, no one is ready to write off the repeal attempt, especially if a donor steps up in the next few weeks to fund professional petitioners. If ever there was a measure that could galvanize the electorate, it's one dealing with gay rights and school children. “On an issue like this one, sometimes an abundance of passion, on both sides, can make up for a lack of money,” said Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at the University of Southern California and a former GOP campaign spokesman. “A well-organized and very emotionally committed grassroots base may be able to get this on the ballot even without significant funding.” The new law takes effect Jan.1 but state education officials say it is unlikely to be fully implemented until at least the 2015-16 school year. It adds lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people, as well as European Americans and people with disabilities to the lengthy list of social and ethnic groups whose

“roles and contributions” California public schools must include in California and U.S. history lessons and teaching materials such as textbooks. The law also prohibits any instructional materials that “reflect adversely” on gays or particular religions. Because of the state's budget straits, the California Department of Education's timeline for adopting new textbooks has been pushed back until 2015. The work of revising the history and social studies curriculum framework that determines what students learn and at what grades has been suspended until further notice. Fears that kindergartners will be hearing about prominent gays in history are misplaced, said Sherry Skelly Griffith, governmental relations specialist for the Association of California School Administrators. Currently, California students do not receive any significant social studies until they study state history in fourth grade. They begin learning about U.S. history in eighth grade, but do not study 20th Century social movements, the most logical place for gay history to receive a serious treatment, until they are juniors in high school.

Educators who devise the curriculum are unlikely to include the sexual orientation of historical figures unless it is relevant, Griffith said. “Frankly, there isn't time to get into people's personal lives...” she said. “Your textbook needs to address broadbrush themes.” The group organizing the petition drive is the Capitol Resource Institute, a nonprofit organization that has fought gay rights bills, including measures that recognized slain gay rights leader Harvey Milk's birthday. Three years ago, the institute unsuccessfully attempted to qualify a referendum that would have overturned a law prohibiting discrimination in schools based on sexual orientation. Founded in 1987 as an antiabortion lobbying group by two wealthy Christian businessmen from Orange County, former California Senate Republican leader Rob Hurtt and banking heir Howard Ahmanson Jr., the group has also championed a bill that would have made it more difficult to obtain a divorce in California and opposed others that would have made spanking a crime and stiffened penalties for hate crimes

Its annual income in 2009, the last year for which information was available, was a little over $282,000. Karen England, the institute's executive director, said that along with the Pacific Justice Institute, several other staunchly conservative groups with long histories of activism have endorsed the repeal and are rallying their members. England said she is convinced that the group will succeed. “We are going to do what it takes to ensure victory to get the referendum on the ballot,” she said. Equality California, the state's largest gay rights group, has launched a web site to counteract the information being put out by the campaign. Executive Director Roland Palencia said his group assumes the measure will be on the ballot, given the organizational muscle that evangelical churches demonstrated during the Proposition 8 campaign. Gay rights activists will try to portray the backers of the repeal as extremists who are out of step with most Californians. “If it qualifies ... we will put up a fight.” he said

Stephen Gutierrez honored, from page 26

never cruelly, I hope. I have learned and continue to learn tremendously from my students, both about life and about writing. They bring me freshness and intelligence from their very modern worlds,” said Gutierrez. Though poised and collected on the surface, Gutierrez says he has his share of demons drawing him to the underdog, making him attuned and sympathetic to the diversity of students he meets, some of who may lack confidence

in their in-born talents. The professor has found that by short-circuiting his own shyness and exposing his vulnerabilities and struggles, his students can move beyond the “chokehold of artistic reticence” and evolve into fine writers. “I became a good teacher, if I am such, by letting go and being absolutely myself in the classroom, as far as that is possible,” Gutierrez said. “I also chose to share, in the last few years, more

directly, certain ideas I have about stories,” said Gutierrez. The professor annually looks forward to the day when he gets to phone the student fiction writers who will be published in the English Department’s literary magazine, Occam’s Razor. Each student he contacts expresses joy and astonishment in learning they soon will be published writers. Just like those excited students, Gutierrez is thrilled and

humbled by his selection as the CSUEB Professor of the Year. “I know whoever else I (was being considered with) is equally deserving,” Gutierrez said. “I just feel fortunate to be selected and am happy to be part of Cal State East Bay in this time of immense change, not only here, but in the world. These are exciting, scary times. This award gives me all the impetus to go forward positively with whatever I have to offer.”

fiction (beginning, intermediate, advanced and graduate), where he says he “can have a true dialogue with students.” “I teach differently each time I go in the classroom, because each writer needs something different, ultimately, and a cookie cutter approach will not do,” said Gutierrez. “I respond and listen to the other students, and I offer my own unvarnished opinions, advice, and pointed suggestions;

nnn


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FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

September 16, 2011

PLACES OF WORSHIP Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.the-resurrectionbc.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, Sundays at 6:00 PM) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org


September 16, 2011 Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org

Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729 Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730

Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com

First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161

Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org

Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org

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Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org

New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886

Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org

New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org

Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894 WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776 Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159 Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org


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HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860 Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727

September 16, 2011

First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com

Victory Center AME Zion Church 33527 Western Ave., Union City (510) 487-0233

Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont

MUSLIM

510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc

Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858 Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org

New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937 Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL

Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org


September 16, 2011 First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net

The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597

Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133

Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535

Mt. Eden Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333

Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org

Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444

Page 31 31 Page

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808

The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999

Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org

or send email tricityvoice@aol.com


TCV 2011-09-16  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper

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