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Mission Trails Open Studios

Health Expo and Run to the Lake

Drum Corps Show Returns to Fremont

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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

Vol. 10 No. 53

July 5, 2011

www.tricityvoice.com

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI Hayward will be singing the blues once again when musical artists converge for the annual Hayward Russell City Blues Festival July 9 and 10. A unique and indigenous American sound, the blues was born in southern AfricanAmerican communities from spirituals, field hollers, chants,

Above: Rod Piazza Left: Taildragger

work songs, and ballads. The music uses guitar, harmonica, piano, drums, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, and double bass together with continued on page 6

BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH PHOTO BY ANDREA SUE Searching for the perfect prom dress has often driven most moms and their daughters to distraction; an arduous process, looking for the perfect fit. But thanks to a clever promotion by Duck Tape® brand, Chelsey Sue of Newark was able to resolve that “sticky” situation, by replacing fabric with duct tape. Chelsey was a senior this year and home-schooled through Fremont Christian School, when she and her

S mother, Andrea Sue, began looking into scholarships to help pay for college. “My mom actually first saw the contest on a scholarship website and showed it to me as a joke. I thought it would be an awesome way to be creative and possibly earn money for college,” said Chelsey. Mrs. Sue added, “My daughter is very creative; she’s a singer and an artist and this was something she wanted to do.” To enter the Duck Tape® brand duct tape “Stuck at Prom® Scholarship Contest”, interested entrants and their required partner, had to submit an application between March 7 and June 13. For a chance to win scholarship money, participants were required to use duct tape to create original and unique prom outfits and accessories. Prom couples completed the process by submitting a photograph after attending their prom events. On June 17, Duck Tape® brand announced the top 10 contest finalists including Chelsey and Alexander. Now it is up to the public to pick their favorite “Stuck at Prom” couple. Visit continued on page 17

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

ummer is here and with long days and summer nights comes an inclination to kick back, listen to some cool sounds with a brew in hand and enjoy a soft, warm breeze. The Newark Chamber of Commerce agrees with this sentiment and on Saturday, July 9th and Sunday, July 10th, provides the perfect venue to relax with music, a plethora of microbrews, wine tasting plus food and craft vendors to satisfy all interests. On Sunday, from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., there will be the added bonus of Farmers’ Market. Free entry to Summerfest includes live music on stage by The Diehards with Susan Harlow, Zydeco On Our Mind, Phil Berkowitz and the Dirty Cats, Highway 4, Dog Without Warning, The Resistance, and Rock 'n Roll Time Machine featuring band members from California Dreamin'. Motorcycle and car shows plus kids park will ensure that everyone in the family has a great time.

SummerFest Saturday, July 9 and Sunday, July 10 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. West side of NewPark Mall. 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark (510) 744-1000 www.newarksummerfest.com

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


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Dietitian to Discuss the Why’s of Weight Gain and the How’s of Losing Pounds

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enopause and weight gain. Is there a better example of adding insult to injury? With a long list of symptoms—that can include hot flashes, insomnia and changes in sexual interest or response—gaining weight while eating the same and doing the same amount of physical activity as you normally do can feel like a real slap in the face. But weight gain, particularly that which qualifies as obesity, is not just a nuisance. It can be a very real health threat. For women looking for strategies to reverse the trend of added weight brought on by menopausal changes, Washington Women’s Center is holding an Evening Lecture on Wednesday, July 13, with Macaria Meyer, R.D., a clinical registered dietitian on the Washington Hospital staff. “Obesity is unhealthy at any age, but it becomes a serious health problem in women during the menopausal years,” Meyer states. So what exactly happens during menopause that causes this tendency toward an increase in weight? “Weight gain is much more pronounced in menopause due to a hormonal decline of estrogen and testosterone that seems to significantly impact the changes in a woman’s body composition,” Meyer explains. “This hormonal

shift appears to conPlus, regular physical actribute to the loss of tivity is shown to reduce muscle mass and the risk of both colon strength, which in cancer and breast cancer. turn leads to inac“Weight gain is not intivity and thus stantaneous,” Meyer says. worsening obesity.” “You don’t go to sleep one But how—or night at an ideal weight and more accurately wake up the next day being where—women overweight. It might seem store fat during this that way for some people, stage changes as but the reality is that weight well, and not for gain is gradual.” the better. One solution, she says, “Most imporis to anticipate problems tantly, this horbefore they occur and monal change seems start taking action as soon to redistribute fat to as possible. the abdomen,” ac“Women in their cording to Meyer. younger years should be “Abdominal obesity aware of the changes that is associated with have been known to hapchronic inflammapen during menopause tion and increased and prepare for them,” risk for type 2 diashe adds. betes, heart disease, For women looking for strategies to reverse the trend of added weight During her talk next brought on by menopausal changes, Washington Women’s Center is and cancer.” Wednesday, Meyer will go holding an Evening Lecture on Wednesday, July 13, with Macaria Meyer, That’s right. over the relationship beR.D., a clinical registered dietitian on the Washington Hospital staff.The education session will take place from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Washington tween menopause and Even cancer risk goes up with added Women’s Center Conference Room located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, weight gain before talking Suite 150 in Fremont. Register online at www.whhs.com. pounds, particularly about steps to take toward for post-menopausal woman. breast (in postmenopausal reversing this trend, including According to the National Can- women), endometrium (the lining two of the biggest tools to comcer Institute at the National Instiof the uterus), colon, kidney, and bating weight gain with a focus tutes of Health (NIH), in addition esophagus. on weight stored in the midsecto increasing the risk of coronary Now for the good news: Curtion area. heart disease, stroke, high blood tailing weight gain before the “Weight loss and physical expressure, and diabetes, obesity also onset of menopause can lower the ercise are the main approaches in increases the risk of cancers of the risk of many of these cancers. combating central (midsection)

obesity,” she says. “Based on clinical trials, women are likely to benefit from 30 minutes of daily moderate walking combined with a resistance training program twice a week.” So what’s wrong with diet and walking alone? Simple. Research shows that a reduction in fat mass—not just weight loss—is better achieved with an exercise program that includes moderateintensity resistance training. Another benefit is that resistance training is a key ingredient in avoiding the loss of bone mass associated with osteoporosis. “A hypo-caloric diet along with aerobic and resistance training are a must during menopause to help induce weight loss, if you are overweight, or to prevent weight gain before it starts,” according to Meyer. “That said, before embarking on any type of activity or exercise, everyone should consult a physician first.” To learn more about how to prevent or reverse the trend of weight gain during menopause, join Macaria Meyer, R.D. next Wednesday, July 13, from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Washington Women’s Center Conference Room, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150. To register for this class, call (800) 963-7070 or visit www.whhs.com

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

07/05/11

07/06/11

07/07/11

07/08/11

07/09/11

07/10/11

07/11/11

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

Women's Health Conference: Pain and Rehabilitation

Think Pink: Women's Center Update

New Techniques to Treat Back Pain

Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

Women's Health Conference: Chronic Pain Management

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Washington Women's Center: Arthritis Exercise Program (Late Start)

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Inside Washington Hospital: Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Pediatric Care Cooking Demonstration: Diabetes and the Kidneys (Late Start) Learn About Healthy Eating Take the Steps: What You (Late Start) Should Know About Foot Care New Surgical Techniques Raising Awareness About (Late Start) Kidney Disease for Minimally Invasive Stroke Knee Replacement Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Learn How Exercise Can Help Diabetes

Your Concerns InHealth: Nutrition for People with Measles Resurgence Kidney Disease

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Personal Emergency Preparedness Training & Learn How to Access Community Services Quickly and Easily

Alzheimer's Disease Research Update

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

cisions in End of Life Care

Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Women's Health ConferNow is the Time ence: Skin Health From Infancy to Maturity (Late Start) Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

World Kidney Day

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: De-

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Your Concerns InHealth: Sun Protection

Planning Your California

Inside Washington Hospital: Advance Health Directive: The Green Team

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Heart Health for People with Diabetes

Influenza and Other Contagious Respiratory Conditions

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Get Back On Your Feet: New Treatment Options for Ankle Conditions

Disaster Preparedness Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Osteoporosis Update: Learn About Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Voices InHealth: Washington's Community Cancer Program

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Maintaining Heart Health Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment with Diabetes

Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself (Late Start)

Now is the Time

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Bras for Body & Soul (Late Start)

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting June 8, 2011

Partnering with Your Doctor to Improve Diabetes Control

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

Management of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Your Concerns InHealth: Pediatric Care – The Pre-School Years

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy (Late Start)

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Men's Health Fair: Heart Healthy Living

Voices InHealth: Nursing Excellence - Journey to Magnet Status

Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

Brain Health for Seniors (Late Start)

Are You at Risk for Diabetes? - Learn the Signs

Voices InHealth: Medicine Safety for Children (Late Start)

Diabetes Management: When to Call for Help (Late Start)

Oh My Aching Lower Back! Do You Have Sinus Problems?

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Diabetes and Your Hormones (Late Start)

Weight Management for Seniors & Learn How to Eat Better!

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

Men's Health Fair: Meniscal Tears of the Knee


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‘MyPlate’ Diagram Replaces ‘MyPyramid’ In an effort to make it easier for people to make food choices that promote better health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently introduced a new, simpler icon called “MyPlate,” to replace the “MyPyramid” image as the government’s primary food group symbol. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently introduced a new simpler icon called “MyPlate,” to replace the food pyramid. The new guide is divided into four different sized sections that should make up a healthy meal. To learn more about healthy eating choices, visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov.

“The new MyPlate concept is based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans established by the USDA,” says Washington Hospital’s Clinical Nutrition Manager Kimberlee Alvari, R.D. “It also reflects a recommendation from the Child Obesity Task Force, chaired by First Lady Michelle Obama, that dietary information for consumers needs to be simpler and easier to understand.” Alvari notes that the MyPyramid diagram was sometimes confusing for consumers with its more complicated descriptions of the recommended number of servings for various food groups. “The MyPlate icon uses a simple place-setting diagram with a plate and cup to illustrate the quantities of fruit, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy products that should make up a healthy meal,” she explains. “This makes it easy for mom and dad to view their child’s plate, rather than count the number of servings. You don’t have to be a registered dietitian to understand it.” The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasize three basic messages: Balance Calories • Enjoy your food, but eat less. • Avoid oversized portions. Foods To Increase • Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables. • Switch to fat-free or low-fat dairy products. • Make at least half of your grains whole grains. Foods To Reduce • Compare the amount of sodium (salt) in foods like soup, bread and frozen meals, and choose foods with lower sodium content. • Drink water instead of sugary drinks. “Portion size is an important issue,” Alvari emphasizes. “You need to consider the person’s body size and level of activity when determining the proper portion size. Plus, you should remember that the MyPlate diagram is based on a 9inch plate, not an extra-large dinner plate.” Alvari recommends seasonal and local produce as the best option for choosing fruits and vegetables. “Especially this time of year, there are lots of great-tasting and affordable fruits and vegetables available at local farmer’s markets,” she says. “Many grocery stores also now identify produce that is locally grown. When fresh produce is not available, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables are options, but you should watch out for added salt or sugar.” To reduce the amount of salt and sugar in your diet – especially in processed foods – Alvari suggests reading product labels carefully. “Look for products that are labeled as ‘reduced sodium’,’ and there should be only 140 milligrams of sodium or less per serving,” she says. “You also should look for labels that say ‘no sugar added,’ and reduce your intake of sugared drinks – including fruit juice, which has natural sugars in it.” In addition to helping combat the rising incidence of obesity in the U.S., improved eating habits based on the MyPlate concept can help prevent a number of adverse health conditions. “I have taught classes on how to eat healthy for cancer prevention for years, based on a similar plate concept developed by the American Institute for Cancer Research,” Alvari says. “This type of eating can help prevent a number of other chronic conditions such as diabetes. People on specialized therapeutic diets for chronic conditions – such as kidney disease – should always consult their physician or dietitian before making any changes in their diet.” Information to help consumers make healthy eating choices can be found at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov. The website provides practical information on building healthier diets, with resources and tools for evaluating your diet, nutrition education and other nutrition information. Information about the older MyPyramid guidelines will remain available for health professionals, nutrition educators and other interested individuals in a special section of the new website. The USDA also is encouraging people to get actively involved in the new MyPlate initiative by taking photos of their plates and sharing the photos on Twitter with the hash-tag #MyPlate. “Approximately half of the U.S. population is under age 30, and Twitter is a new way to reach younger audiences with this important message,” Alvari says. “Hopefully, this new, simpler way to learn about good nutrition will lead to a healthier lifestyle for people of all ages.” Washington Hospital Offers Nutrition Counseling Washington Hospital’s Outpatient Nutrition Counseling program is available by appointment to provide nutrition counseling for individuals with specific medical needs as well as those who wish to maintain optimal health. Call (510) 745-6542 or visit www.whhs.com/nutrition for more information.

Learn How Brain Tumors are Treated at Upcoming Health and Wellness Seminar

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ou may be surprised to know from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The presentation ment, remove it surgically, treat it with that benign brain tumors, those will be held in the Conrad E. Anderradiation, or perform radiosurgery. that are non-cancerous, are son M.D., Auditoriums located at Radiosurgery is a minimally invamore common than expected. In fact, 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington sive procedure that can effectively treat one in every five people will develop a benign brain tumor during their lifetime. The good news is that not all of these tumors grow, and many never cause any symptoms or problems. “The more common types of benign brain tumors are meningiomas, acoustic neuromas and pituitary adenomas,” explains neurosurgeon Sandeep Kunwar, M.D., co-medical director of the Gamma Knife Program at Washington Hospital’s Taylor McAdam Bell Neuroscience Institute. “In the past, doctors would Sandeep Kunwar, M.D., (above left) neurosurgeon and co-medical director of the Gamma Knife Program at Washwatch these tumors and, ington Hospital will talk about how brain tumors and other brain disorders are treated using the latest Gamma if problems arose, they Knife technology at a free seminar on Tuesday, July 12 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The lecture will take place in the Conrad E. Anderson M.D. Auditoriums located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont. Register would remove them during an open surgical online at www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070. procedure.” West) in Fremont. To reserve your many tumors, abnormalities and func“Today, we have the option of raspot, register online at www.whhs.com tional disorders of the brain, head and diosurgery, which uses highly focused and look under Upcoming Seminars, upper neck. Although called surgery, radiation to treat many benign tuor call (800) 963-7070. the procedure does not require an incimors—as well as some malignant tuMost common brain tumor sion. Nevertheless, it can have the same mors—without damaging nearby Nearly one-third of all tumors precise result as open surgery with the healthy tissue. With the Gamma originating in the brain are called added benefits of a minimally invasive Knife, we avoid the need for anesthesia meningiomas. These masses get their procedure. Radiosurgery is virtually while minimizing the risk of infection name because they are located in the painless, and recovery is faster and easand blood loss. Tumors up of up to 3 meninges, the membrane that surier with most patients returning to regcentimeters can be treated effectively.” rounds and protects the outer surface ular activities the next day. The Leksell Dr. Kunwar will talk about how of the brain and spinal cord. Gamma Knife, which is used at Washbrain tumors and other brain disorders Doctors have several options in ington Hospital, is the gold standard are treated and the latest Gamma treating meningiomas, depending on for radiosurgical treatment of many Knife technology at a free Health & the patient and the type and location brain tumors. Wellness seminar sponsored by Washof the tumor. They can monitor the continued on page 4 ington Hospital on Tuesday, July 12 tumor periodically with no other treat-


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WHICH OIL FOR YOUR VEHICLE?

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hen replacing or topping off engine oil, always use one with the “viscosity” (tendency to flow slowly or quickly) recommended by the manufacturer. To find the viscosity of single- or multi-grade motor oil, check the starburst display on the container that shows the numerical code developed by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The lower the number of a single-grade oil, the better it flows at cold temperatures. With multi-grade oils, the first number in the code (such as “10W” in SAE 10W-30) means the oil can be pumped by the engine at a temperature as low as a single-grade 10W oil. The second number indicates how well the oil will flow when heated to 212 degrees F. or higher.

Do you have any questions about which sort of oil your car needs? When’s the last time you got an oil change, anyway? If you have any questions or if you can’t remember your last oil change, come down to BAY STAR AUTO CARE and talk to one of our ASE-certified technicians. Not only can we make sure you’re putting the right kind of oil in your engine, we can perform an oil change and maintenance check that helps keep your car running cleanly and safely. Give us a call today for an appointment. HINT: If thicker oil is used in place of a recommended thinner oil, improper lubrication may result, especially in today’s technologically advanced engines.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

With radiosurgery, a meningioma or other benign tumor is not removed. Rather, the mass is converted into scar tissue and stops growing. This procedure has been very effective in treating many tumors with a greater chance that they will never grow back. Early treatment can help avoid serious consequences Acoustic neuromas are located on the main nerve leading from the inner ear to the brain. This type of benign tumor represents between 5 percent and 10 percent of all brain tumors found in adults. Acoustic neuromas are usually slow growing and symptoms, such as hearing loss or problems with balance, often appear gradually. When acoustic neuromas are detected early, treatment can help to avoid serious consequences, including total hearing loss. An acoustic neuroma can even be life threatening if it grows big enough to press on the patient’s brain stem. Treatment options for acoustic neuromas include traditional open surgery or minimally invasive endoscopic microsurgery to

remove the tumor, radiation therapy to slow or stop tumor growth, or radiosurgery. “Medical opinion about treating acoustic neuromas has shifted lately,” says Dr. Kunwar. “In the past, watchful waiting to monitor tumor growth was a viable option, but recent data shows that early treatment before the tumor grows can result in an improved outcome and a better chance of preserving a patient’s functional hearing.” Gamma Knife radiosurgery to treat an acoustic neuroma has proven to be an excellent alternative to surgery or radiation therapy. There is improved control of tumor growth, better preservation of hearing, and a lower chance of injury to the facial nerve, which can occur as a result of surgery. “Data now shows that outcomes from radiosurgery to treat acoustic neuromas and meningiomas are superior to complete tumor removal,” reports Dr. Kunwar. Benefits of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Minimally invasive Gamma Knife radiosurgery is nearly painless and has no risk of infection

when compared with conventional surgery. It is a particularly good option for high risk patients with condition like diabetes or hypertension. Most patients are able to return home on the day of treatment and resume normal activities the next day. “One advantage of surgical removal of a tumor is that it eliminates pressure on the brain,” comments Dr. Kunwar. “The bottom line is that, if the patient is experiencing a lot of pressure, traditional surgery is still recommended.”

Learn More About Treating Brain Tumors For more information about Washington Hospital’s Gamma Knife Program, go online to www.gammaknifeneurosurgery.com. To learn more about the Taylor McAdam Bell Neuroscience Institute at Washington Hospital, go to www.whhs.com.

Diane Shepherd named Hayward Teacher of the Year STORY AND PHOTO BY ROBIN MICHEL Plans are underway to salute eighteen Alameda County educators at the Alameda County Office of Education’s Annual Teacher of the Year event, which will be held October 6 at the Arts Education Center in San Leandro. Included in that select number, is third grade teacher Diane Shepard, who teaches at Bowman Elementary School in Hayward. In May, Hayward Unified School District recognized Shepard for this honor at a Board meeting where her colleagues, who nominated her for this well-deserved honor, turned out to cheer her on. Shepard was described as “the consummate educator” and lauded for her classroom management strategies, curriculum plans, and masterful teaching. An educator for 32 years, Shepard volunteers her lunchtime to tutor students who have fallen behind in a particular area. Her class achieved the highest math scores on the 2008 STAR test of all of third grade classes in Hayward and she continues to run a strong math program. “Diane is the kind of teacher who builds a strong community in the classroom, drawing students in with activities that include class songs, chants, and creative projects,” said fellow educator Susan Day. She gave examples of Shepard’s extra effort, citing opportunities for students to decorate their own unique hats to wear for special events, take part in rich experiences, special field trips and plays, and how she provides “Lunch in the Garden” as a reward for students who have earned special time with their teacher. In addition to providing extras for her students, Shepard has served on many school and District committees throughout the years, including the Curriculum Council, School Site Council, Amenities, and the Literacy Committee. Colleagues commend her “consistently high level of commitment, thoughtful suggestions, challenging questions, and willingness to take on extra work.” A leader and mentor to other Bowman teachers, Shepard keeps up with the most current research in order to find the most effective strategies and methods to assist her students’ learning.


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vocals to express the troubles of life, with all its longings, hopes, and sorrows. The blues has a number of subgenres and styles developed in various areas of the country by many influences; a small area of Hayward played a memorable part in a big musical history. Russell City was an unincorporated area of Hayward situated along the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks about 10 miles south of Oakland, serving as home to poor Danish farmers and Latino and Filipino laborers. With the turmoil of World War II, many African Americans migrated to the city from the south, drawn by cheap housing and work in the shipyards. Jazz musicians were among their number and soon Russell City vibrated to the sounds of the blues. From the 1940s through the early 1960s names like Big Mama Thornton, T-Bone

Walker, Fillmore Slim, Jimmy Mamu, Big Joe Turner, and Bobby Webb could be found on the scene, providing the very lifeblood of Russell City. Numerous musicians honed their skills at establishments like The Country Club, the California Cafe, Miss Alves Place, Leona’s Hightower Club, and any other place they could play, developing a new West Coast sound and a legacy that lives on today.

While the landscape of Russell City fell to industrial growth by 1966, the music has remained and is celebrated each year at the blues festival thanks to the efforts of the Bay Area Blues Society and the City of Hayward. In its 12th year, “The Tradition Continues” with a gathering of great artists including Lenny Williams; Rod Piazza and the Mighty Flyers; Johnny Rawls; Taildragger; Queens of Chicago Blues Deitra Farr, Demetris Taylor; Artwork Jamal; Ernie Johnson; Blues Harp Explosion featuring special guests Darrell Mansfield, Sean McGroarty, Martin Lane, and Vinnie Flores; and Bobby Joe Neeley, Guitar Mac. Warm up to the main event with Blues Week July 5 through 10, offering photo displays, lectures, and performances at Hayward Library, Sun Gallery, Hayward Arts Council at Cinema Place, Buffalo Bills, and The Bistro. Join the kick-off party at The Bistro July 8 from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and return for the after party July 9, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Don’t miss this chance to get a taste of Hayward’s musical history and groove to the sweet sound of summer blues. Tickets are $20 per day when purchased in advance or $25 at the door, $32 for a two-day ticket purchased in advance, and $15 for seniors (62 and up) and students per day in advance or $20 at the door with ID. Tickets may be purchased at www.highsierratickets.com, The Bistro on B Street and Main, or The Cobbler on Foothill Boulevard. Hayward Russell City Blues Festival Saturday and Sunday, July 9 and 10 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Hayward City Hall Plaza 777 B St., Hayward (510) 836-2227 www.bayareabluessociety.net Tickets: $15 - $35


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Ohlone Humane Society

BY NANCY LYON I wouldn’t take a bet on it considering the record setting deluge a few short days ago... but just maybe summer is really going to happen. If the gods of climate change look favourably upon us and gas prices don’t skyrocket to greater heights, some will be hitting the road to the great outdoors with fur-family in tow. Sounds like all fun and adventure? It can be but before you start dusting off your trusty camping gear and loading up for the open highway, it’s a good idea to remember that your animal travelling buddy isn’t a piece of equipment to stuff into your back seat just before taking off. You might want to take a moment to consider the following travel tips. • Even animals that are closely bonded with you can become frightened in a strange environment and bolt out of open doors and windows. It’s a bad idea to take it for granted that your usually steady fur-buddy will not become unnerved by out of the ordinary occurrences. Use a leash when outside your car or motel room. • Whenever a member of your animal family travels with you by car or by another means, she should wear a special identification tag in addition to her regular one. Write her name, your name, the person to contact at your destination, their phone number, a destination address, or that of a friend or relative, in case you need to be reached. Having her micro-chipped can act as a backup but should not be depended upon entirely. • Consult with your veterinarian concerning mild sedation if you think that she may need it during the trip. Travel by Car Checklist • If your dog or cat is not used to travelling by car, make short trips with her a week or two in advance of the trip to accustom her to motion and to teach her how to behave. Her reaction will let you know if sedation may be needed. Actually, accustoming her to travel in a vehicle should be done early on for vet visits, etc. • Dogs should be taught to lie quietly, keep their heads inside, and not interfere with the driver or passengers. Don't let your dog stick her head in the wind. It can irritate eyes and cause problems. • Cats are often frightened by car travel, but some cats adjust quickly. While some people feel it’s OK to let a cat to find its own place in the car, it is hazardous. It is best to confine a cat in familiar and comfortable carrier containing a favorite blanket and toy. • Folding kennels or crates especially designed for station wagons can be most useful for dogs and cats. • Accustom her to being on a leash or harness. Always use the leash when travelling. Even better is a pet harness (available at most pet stores) that connects to the car's seatbelt; it allows some movement while keeping her

safely restrained. Animals can quickly bolt into traffic or become lost in a strange place if not properly restrained. • If stopping overnight, check in advance to find a motel that will permit animals to spend the night. Don’t leave her to sleep in the car; it can be scary and even dangerous. • Never leave her out of sight in an unattended vehicle. Heat stroke and death can happen even in cars parked in the shade with the windows cracked. • Have a suitable travel kit: an adequate supply of her regular food and water dishes, can opener (if needed), a few treats, a favorite toy, a blanket, comb or brush. Just in case - a sedative (if prescribed by your veterinarian or Bach Flower Rescue Remedy available in health food stores), paper towels, spray room deodorant if you will be staying overnight at a hotel or motel, a scooper and plastic bags to clean up after “accidents.” Entry Requirements • If your destination is across state lines, nearly every state has laws on the entry of animals. For information, call or write to the State Veterinarian, State Department of Animal Husbandry, or other appropriate authority. • Interstate health certificates must accompany dogs entering nearly all states. In some cases, this certificate must be in the hands of the state regulatory agency in advance of the entry. • All but four states require proof of an upto-date rabies inoculation for dogs and many require it for cats. The rabies tag must be securely attached to the collar. Some animals must have an entry permit issued by the destination state's regulatory agency. Receipt of the interstate health certificate may be required before the permit can be issued. Some states limit the time during which the entry permit is valid. • A few states have border inspections of all animals being transported while others have random inspection by highway patrol officers. Local Laws Most communities have animal control ordinances. Keeping your dog leashed, immunized and under control will protect her and the public. For rules governing dogs in California State Parks: http://www.parks.ca.gov/pages/24317/files /dogloversguidetosp.pdf California’s State Parks are on the legislative chopping block and if signed by Governor Brown, your favourite park may no longer open to the public. Check first. Pet Friendly general travel information: http://dogfriendly.com/server/travel/guide s/us/usstateCA.shtml

Travelling with an animal friend can be a challenge but the key to success is to plan ahead. By doing your homework and using commonsense protections, travelling with them can be adventure. But be alert and always remember that there is risk involved. If you are unsure in any situation – don’t take chances.

510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont Ca. 94538-1304

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org Hundreds of healthy, adoptable animals are available at the TriCity Animal Shelter and other local shelters and rescue organizations. Visit www.petfinder.com where you can enter your city or zip code and search by breed, size, gender and other criteria. Nearly 12,500 rescue groups list more than a quarter-million animals available for adoption. Please save one today.

Hosted by the Niles Main Street Association, the Niles Dog Show is Saturday, July 16. The Pooch Pow Wow, offers canines a chance to show off their best talents, assets, and even good looks. Mutts and purebreds alike will be judged in six fun classes: Best Costume, Prettiest Female, Handsomest Male, Most Unusual Mix, Oldest Dog, and our newest category Handlers under the age of 12. Retail booths offering food, drink, pet supplies, unique gifts, canine art, and other items are available.

Show participants must register and pay an entry fee of $20 the day of the show, which includes a goodie bag and entry in one class. Additional classes are $5 each. Pre-registration is recommended, and pre-paid entries receive a $5 discount. Participants may register online at www.niles.org/dogshow.html or call Deborah Carey, registrar (510) 790-0306. So if you are planning on entering, register your pooch soon, because only the first 200 dogs will be admitted to the show.

www.skinlaseressentials.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT PD In June, Tri-City Animal Shelter celebrated 23 years of community service. The shelter first opened on June 4, 1988. The TriCity Animal Shelter is a collaborative effort of community groups and the Cities of Fremont, Newark, and Union City. In 2005, the City of San Leandro entered into an agreement with the Tri-City Animal Shelter for shelter services. In 2010, the shelter staff was successful in returning 446 animals to their homes, 576 went to non-profit rescue groups, 202 were transferred to other local Humane Societies/ SPCA, and 787 of our animals were adopted through the Tri-City Animal Shelter to loving homes. This success rate can be contributed to the efforts of the shelter staff, rescue groups, shelter volunteers, and the community. The Tri-City Animal shelter is dedicated to

providing humane and compassionate care for all animals. The staff is committed to providing a clean and comfortable environment for all animals that are in their care. The City of Alameda contacted the Fremont Police Department and made an inquiry regarding shelter services for their city. The inquiry asked to see if our Shelter had the capacity to accept the City of Alameda’s animals. The City of Alameda was looking for alternative options for animal services due to budget restrictions. Unfortunately, there has been some misinformation regarding this matter in the press recently that has caused undue community concern. The Police Department received this request and conducted a thorough evaluation of our facilities, staffing, and the additional number of animals Alameda would bring to our Shelter. After careful consideration, the Police Department de-

Union City Police Blotter June 24 Officers investigated a single vehicle collision into a residence on Miramonte Way and citizens reporting a gas leak at the location of the accident. The vehicle had sheared off the natural gas meter to the residence; Alameda County Fire and PG&E were asked to respond. The immediate neighborhood was evacuated and within two hours, PG&E was able to shut off the natural gas and allow people to return to their residences.. No one was injured as a result of the collision or the gas leak. June 25 Hayward PD requested the assistance of Union City Police to investigate an in- progress prowler or burglar at a residence on Lafayette Street near the Union City / Hayward border. A Union City Police Officer and his K-9 partner located the suspect hiding in a back yard. The suspect surrendered without further incident. June 26 At 8:31 p.m., the Union City Police Department received multiple “911” calls reporting shots being fired at 657 Whipple Road. When officers arrived, they located a 23-year-old Hispanic male suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. The Alameda County Fire Department responded and paramedics provided medical aide. The victim was transported to a local area hospital and underwent surgery for his injuries. Anyone with information related to this case is encouraged to call the Union City Police Department Tip Line at 510-675-5207 or email information to tips@unioncity.org. June 28 A robbery was reported in the area of Decoto Road, near Union Square. The victim advised that he was walking home from the BART station when confronted by two suspects blocking his path. The suspects demanded that he give them his ring. When the victim resisted, the two suspects simulated being armed with a firearm. The victim

handed over his ring and the suspects ran to an awaiting car and fled. June 29 A landlord contacted members of the Community Policing and Problem Solving Unit to voice concerns of suspicious activity occurring at his rental residence located on Klondike Drive. The landlord was advised that the people renting the residence were out of the country, and asked officers to accompany him while he conducted on emergency inspection of the property. It was discovered that the locks had been changed and the residence converted to an indoor nursery with approximately 500 marijuana plants. An elaborate lighting and water systems had been installed inside the residence. The Major Crimes Task Force is continuing the investigation. June 30 Two thefts of fireworks were reported from a lot used for storage by the fireworks promoter for Alameda County cities. American Promotional Events had obtained approval to use the location for the storage of “safe and sane” fireworks distributed to the fireworks stands in Newark, Union City, and Dublin. Apparently the theft of 31 fireworks display boxes totaling approx. $4,178 were taken in the past two day from a trailer at the location. July 1 The combined Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team from Union City and Newark, as well as the SWAT Team from Fremont served two search warrants related to ongoing investigations of gangs, violence and drugs on 7th Street and Crest Lane and took two subjects into custody, one at each location. In addition, the teams then served five arrest warrants for the 2008 Kennedy Park homicide that occurred in 2008. Three of five wanted individuals were taken into custody and units were dispatched to arrest the remaining suspects at locations in other cities.

termined we currently do not have the resources to accept the additional animals from the City of Alameda and continue to maintain our current level of service to the communities and organizations we serve. This decision was made, prior to much of the public dialog, and was based on our current capacity to humanely house animals, adoption/euthanasia rates, staffing concerns, and the negative impact on our animals. The Tri-City Shelter has strived to mirror the SPCA and Humane Societies by emphasizing adoptions and providing rescues options for all animals in our care. We will continue to move in this direction, and we feel that this decision would support our efforts. We welcome all community members to visit the Tri-City Animal Shelter, and we are currently looking for foster parents for underage kittens. If you’re interested, please inquire at the Tri-City Animal Shelter. Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-6630 Tuesday – Friday: Noon - 5 p.m. Saturdays: 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Sundays, Mondays, Holidays

Indecent Exposure SUBMITTED B LIEUTENANT STEVEN PETRAKOVITZ, MILPITAS PD June 22 Milpitas police officers responded at approximately 12:50 p.m., to a report of a suspicious person inside the Dollar Tree store located at 1350 S. Park Victoria Drive. The victim said the suspect, who was identified as Rumualdo Meza, was following her throughout the store and fiddling with his pant zipper. Milpitas Police Officers contacted Meza inside the store and found his pants were unzipped and his genitals exposed. He was

arrested for indecent exposure and when taken to the police department, gave officers a false name. After being fingerprinted, his true identity was revealed and it was discovered he had a no-bail warrant for disorderlyconduct. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Milpitas Police Department Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 5862500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/go vernment/police/crime_tip.asp


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Fremont Police Blotter June 30 A 15-year-old juvenile reported that a male brandished a firearm at her near the intersection of Paseo Padre Parkway/Gomes Road. It was also reported that the suspect threatened to shoot the victim. Officers tracked down the suspect and arrested a 69year-old male. Case investigated by Officer Richards. Walmart (Osgood Road) employees detained two males for suspicion of theft. One suspect fled prior to police arrival but after a short foot pursuit, the third suspect was apprehended. A 20-year-old male was arrested for theft of a laptop computer. Case investi-

gated by Officer M. Smith. An off duty officer, called Officer Bobbitt to report suspicious persons changing the tire on a Honda in the area of Davis Street/Davis Court. The Honda was reported stolen out of Hayward; Jon Flores, Antoinette Fernandez and David Sandoval were arrested at 40223 Davis Street, where the vehicle was parked. A female victim’s necklace was taken by two black adult males while standing in the parking lot of the Glenmoore Green Apartments. One of the assailants apologized with the word, “sorry” as he ran away. The suspects remain at large.

Assault with deadly weapon

Possession of controlled substances for sale

SUBMITTED BY SERGEANT RAJ MAHARAJ, MILPITAS PD

SERGEANT DARYL SEQUEIRA

At approximately 12:30 a.m. on July 2, a caller from the 1300 block of Calle Oriente called 9-1-1 to report two subjects physically fighting; one person armed with a knife. Milpitas Police Officers arrived within two min-

utes from the time of call and contacted the victim, who had a stab wound. The victim was, later treated and released from a local hospital for a non-life threatening injury. Officers learned the suspect was Joshua June Bince Andres, a 20 year old male, Milpitas resident who was contacted at his home and taken into custody without incident. Andres was booked into Santa Clara County Jail for Assault with a deadly weapon. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 5862400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

June 23 At approximately 8:55 a.m., Milpitas Police Department detectives executed a search warrant in the 200 block of La Pala Drive in the City of San Jose regarding a narcotics investigation. During the search, detectives located approximately five ounces of crystal methamphetamine, one ounce of cocaine and $2000 cash.

The suspect, identified as Jose Manuel Pacheco-Quezada, a 19-year-old San Jose resident was arrested and booked into the Santa Clara County Main Jail for possession of controlled substances for sale. Anyone with any information regarding this case is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can also be given anonymously by calling (408) 586-2500 or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov/government/police/crime_tip.asp

Tip-A-Cop SUBMITTED BY OFFICER GENE SMITH, MILPITAS PD On Monday, July 25, the Milpitas Police Department, in conjunction with Special Olympics of Northern California is hosting a Tip-A-Cop event at Outback Steakhouse restaurant, 1246 Great Mall Drive in Milpitas. The event will be held from 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. and all proceeds will benefit the Special Olympics. The Milpitas Police Department will also be offering free Child ID Fingerprinting at the event.

Tip-A-Cop is a fundraising event where Police Officers will be serving the customers at a restaurant. Donations help provide local athletes with free year round training and competitions in 12 sporting events. Please help us to help the community. See you there!

SUBMITTED BY ANITA GORE The statewide sales and use tax rate will decrease from 8.25 percent to 7.25 percent on July 1, 2011. The 1 percent decrease applies, generally, to all taxable transactions in California. In areas where voters have approved additional sales taxes, the total tax rate applied to purchases will be the statewide base tax rate of 7.25 percent, plus any applicable local sales tax. Retailers should check the

Tip A Cop Monday, July 25 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. Outback Steakhouse 1246 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 586-2526.

BOE website, www.boe.ca.gov, for updates. Part of a 2008-09 budget agreement, Assembly Bill x3 3 temporarily increased the General Fund portion of the sales and use tax rate by 1 percent in April 2009 and will sunset on June 30, 2011. The sales and use tax rate in California currently ranges from 8.25 percent to 10.75 percent, depending on whether additional regional voter-approved sales taxes apply. Beginning July 1, 2011, the range will be 7.25 percent to 9.75 percent. For California Sales and Use Tax rates effective July 1, 2011, visit http://tinyurl.com/422a5jn. To view the special notice, visit http://tinyurl.com/3fz9h3x. For more information on other taxes and fees in California, visit www.taxes.ca.gov.

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History

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARNOLD GEORGE, CHERLY GARDETTO-PEREIRA

T

he neighborhood known as “Sack City,” and later became Alder Avenue, was once part of the grazing lands of Mission San Jose. Located north of the town of Centerville, the area was later owned by Elias Beard. Stretching a half-mile in length from the County Road (now Fremont Blvd.) was a road labeled Sack City Lane on assessors' maps. The origin of the name is unknown, but because the road came to a dead-end abutting the Patterson ranch, it seems likely that its sack-like shape gave rise to the name.

George Silva Rosa with mother, Maria 1915

In the 1870s Sack City Lane was adjoined by 14 parcels ranging in size from three to eight acres. All of these properties were owned by Portuguese immigrants from the Azores or children of Azorean immigrants. Vegetables and fruit - particularly cherries and apricots - were cultivated, often by owners who also had other jobs. A number of them worked on large farms, such as the Patterson Ranch. One of the parcels was sold by Beard to Manuel Rodrick in 1867. His heirs sold the property to Antonio Francisco in 1897, who in turn sold it to Antonio Silva Rosa in 1898. Upon his death, the land passed to his son, Francisco Silva Rosa, whose son, George Silva Rosa, owned it by 1929. Three years later George sold it to Arthur Peterson. It passed to J. C. Wallman who sold it some time before 1942 to Charles and Henry Gianbruno in whose family it remained for over 60 years. A neighbor of the Gianbrunos, Arnold George grew up in Sack City in the 40s and 50s. By that time the street was already named Alder, but the Sack City designation lived on. He remembers an idyllic childhood in a neighborhood surrounded by orchards "as far as the eye could see." He knew all the farmers and describes walking out the back

Francisco Silva Rosa, 1920

door to hunt pheasants in their orchards. Many of the neighbors were hunters, and hunting dogs were a common site. Boys on the street rode their bikes and played baseball. The elementary school bus picked them up at the door, but they had to walk to Main St. (now Fremont Blvd.) to catch the bus to Washington High School. Arnold describes the neighborhood as he knew it through a virtual walking tour down the street. Entering Alder Ave. from Main St., the first house on the right belonged to Pat and May Francis, cousins of the George family. They had two children, Patrick and Bernadine. While Pat did some farming, he also worked at the Graham Foundry in Newark. Next door lived Dallas and Lois Paul with their two boys, Dallas and Ray. Not farmers, they owned the local mortuary, The Chapel of the Palms. Active in many community organizations, they entertained frequently. The Cunha family who farmed came next, followed by Pete and Rose Lemos who had an apricot orchard. They also had six children, and some pigs, cows and rabbits. Their next door neighbors were the Georges.

Arnold George, Clifford Dinsmore, 1946

Clarence and Margaret had three children - Michael, Arnold, and Vivian. They grew some cherries, but mostly apricots. Clarence worked for the Centerville School District for many years and retired as Head Custodian at Kennedy High School. He was a Centerville Volunteer Fireman from the 30s until the city incorporated in 1956. Their next door neighbors were not farmers. Clifford and Bonnie Dinsmore had five children, and he operated the Red and White Store in Alvarado. The Gianbruno brothers lived on the adjacent property. Charley was friendly with the neighborhood children, but Henry was more reserved. One favorite memory is that they owned two rather unruly Doberman Pinchers. The boys riding their bikes felt that the dogs were lying in wait for them to go by, so they always rode by the Gianbruno house very fast! The street dead-ended at the Tony Martin farm. He and

his wife had two children - Dolores, and Ronald who still lives on the property. Tony grew apricots, but also did tractor work for other farmers. Across the street, the two Fawsett brothers operated the Centerville Ice Plant which distributed ice for home ice boxes before the coming of refrigerators. One longtime employee remembers the crushing of 300 pound blocks of ice that was spread over produce shipped on railroad cars by farmer Lloyd Bailey. In the summer they made "clear ice", and long-time residents remember going there to buy ice, especially when they had parties. With the development of other means of icing produce for shipment, ice dispensing machines and refrigerators, the business closed. For some time the building served as a National Guard Armory and later as a warehouse. Next to that large building lived the Torres family who were farmers. Adjoining them were Jack and Alice Gomes and their three daughters - Loretta, Eileen and Dorothy. Joe farmed, but he also worked for Graham in Newark. The Jack Silva family next door included two boys, Jack Jr. and Buddy. The family ran a dry cleaning business. Lizzie Nunes will be remembered as the nice little lady with the giant Great Dane who followed her everywhere! Her home was one of those razed to make way for construction of Oliveira School. A couple of properties were located between her home and the corner of Main St., but the owners' names are lost in time. The development of Cabrillo Park in the 50s spelled the end for Sack City. Traffic now flowed down Alder Avenue onto Coronado Drive and the "sack" was no more. Entering the street today from Fremont Boulevard, to the left is a stereo and tire store. On the right is the Shining Star Montessori School and beyond that the Alder Avenue Baptist Church and Hearts and Hands Christian PreSchool. Further up the street on the left is Oliveira School. Few of the original homes remain, and the area has largely been filled with single family homes, occasionally separated by an apartment complex.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org M. A. Rose, E. R. Janiero, L. R. Janiero, R. Rosa, 1927

Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


July 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY EMILY LOH Most college students come home for the summer to a lifeguarding or caddy job. Some work at coffee shops or restaurants, or retail. Others help out in the family business. UC Berkeley students Jason Lim and Emily Loh are back in town trying their hands at something new and challenging. They are currently in charge of their own branch of Ivy Insiders, a company that hires undergraduates at top institutions in the U.S., and gives them the means to open their own SAT-prep businesses in their hometowns. Lim, an Economics major at University of California, Berkeley and American High School alumnus was first introduced to Ivy Insiders early this year through his school’s Career Services Department. What caught Lim’s eye about Ivy Insiders was the real world marketing and teaching experience it provided. Founded in 2003 by Harvard graduates, Ivy Insiders is revolutionizing the SAT-prep class industry with its belief that the best way to cope with standardized tests is to learn from the same students who succeeded only a few years ago. On average, branch managers have scored in

the 99th percentile on the SAT, and boast an average score of 2290 on the test. “I know what it’s like to be intimidated by the SAT exam and by college admissions. I want to motivate students to higher scores as well as teach them that great scores and amazing colleges are absolutely within their reach,” says Emily Loh. Loh is currently majoring in both history and political economy at the UC Berkeley, making the Dean’s List in her very first semester while staying committed to community service and social justice. She will be teaching summer courses in Fremont in July. Prospective students can contact Emily Loh about SAT test prep summer programs at emily_loh@ivyinsiders.com.Website: www.revolutionprep.com/ivyinsiders. Editor’s Note: The Ivy Insiders Program charges a fee of $599 for a 3-week class with discount codes and financial aid scholarships for students who qualify. Throughout the summer, free practice exams are being offered with free 1-hour consultations for students who might not have the means to take the class. Classes will be held in an office space on Warm Springs Blvd in Fremont.

Pat Kite’s Garden

BY PAT KITE I plant to attract bees. Unfortunately, last month I had to kill some. I still feel very sad about this. Bumble bee adults are the big [3/4-inch] black and yellow fuzzy bees larger and plumper

couldn’t find enough space? Or maybe they just wanted a nice view? Bumble bee species or are found almost throughout the world, from sea level to high mountaintops. California has 26 native Bumble bee species. Charles Darwin wrote a quite

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

than honeybees. Bumble bees built a nest in a high crevice near my front door. Unfortunately, my granddaughter is extremely allergic to bee stings so I spoke to the bumblebees, telling them I had lovely flowers just for them, and could they just move their nest someplace else. Instead their number kept increasing. Long story short, for the first time in 40 years I hired a pest control agency. The cost: $150 for one spray, and it didn’t completely succeed. I kept ducking the loudly buzzing bees on my way toward front door. Bumble bees and I had more conversations and small wars, including a workman’s stipend to screen off the nest site. This helped. Normally, according to most texts, bumble bees construct nests at ground level. Perhaps, because my yard is so heavily planted, they

funny story about bees and their political benefits. Darwin considered Bumble bees to be patriotic British citizens. According to Darwin, who sometimes had a sense of humor, spinsters tended to keep cats. Cats control mice. Since mice tend to destroy Bumble bee nests, fewer mice meant more Bumble bee survival. A healthy Bumble bee population would continue pollinating red clover. Clover is used to feed cattle. Cattle provide beef to the military. The military defends the British Empire. Thus the continuance of the British Empire is reliant on Bumble bees. More than $10 billion of food crops are bee pollinated in the United States. Because I am normally quite fond of bees, I put in oodles of lavender. Other personal Bumble bee flowers include

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

Alyssum, Bergenia, Butterfly bush, Geraniums, Impatiens, Rosemary, Sage, and Valerian. Bumble bees help pollinate tomatoes, many vegetables, and most fruit trees. People sometimes confuse Bumble bees with the equally large Carpenter bee. Basically Carpenter bees are black with shiny areas. They are another story. I am pleased to say that wherever my Bumble bees moved to, they have done well. I now have lots of little Bumble bees and some honey bees, plus an assortment of other pollinators. This is a long-ago nursery riddle: Little bird of Paradise She works her work both neat and nice She pleases God, she pleases man She does the work that no man can The riddle’s answer? A bee Happy summer!

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CA college students brace for state budget cuts BY TERENCE CHEA ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jul 02 - California college students are bracing for higher tuition bills and fewer courses and campus services under a new state budget that once again slashes spending on higher education. The budget signed Thursday by Gov. Jerry Brown inflicts the latest blow to California's renowned higher education system, which has helped make the state an economic powerhouse and served as a model for other states and countries. Over the past three years, California's public colleges and universities have seen deep cuts in state funding that have dramatically raised the cost of attendance, forced campuses to turn away qualified students and eroded the quality of classroom instruction. Under the newly approved state budget, the 10campus University of California and 23-campus California State University will each lose at least $650 million in state funding, a cut of more than 20 percent. The two systems could each face another $100 million cut if the state takes in less revenue than expected. The 112-campus community college system will lose $400 million in state funding and fees will increase from $26 to $36 per unit. The system could lose another $72 million and raise fees to $46 per unit if revenue projections fall short. UC officials said Friday they will recommend that the Board of Regents consider raising undergraduate tuition by an additional 9.6 percent to offset the deeper-than-expected funding cut. Tuition is already set to rise 8 percent this fall to about $12,000, about three times what students paid a decade ago. In an interview with The Associated Press, UC President Mark Yudof said higher tuition will cause hardship for many students, but he sees little choice when the university faces a $1 billion budget shortfall driven by rising costs and shrinking public support. His biggest worry is losing the academic talent that has made UC one of the world's top research universities, Yudof said. UC San Diego recently lost three star scientists to Rice University, a deep-pocketed private institution in Houston. “You can't starve this university for many years without there being consequences,” Yudof said. “There's going to be a lot of pain. I don't deny that. But on my watch we're not going to see a dilution of the quality of the University of California.” The prospect of rising tuition is weighing heavily on students like Dior Sweeney, a UC Berkeley senior who works two jobs while going to school but still expects to graduate with more than $20,000 in student loans to repay. “I'm really worried about how I'm going to pay for rent, transportation and food,” said Sweeney, a liberal arts major. “It's definitely stressful, especially with the economy the way it is. So many people I know can't even get jobs with a B.A. What kind of job am I going to get to pay off all these loans?” continued on page 30

July 5, 2011

Great Mall welcomes outlet stores SUBMITTED BY SCOTT DOBROSKI Great Mall continues to add to its outlet and value retail stores. PUMA Outlet is slated to make its South Bay debut in November 2011; the Samsonite Company Store is now open. PUMA Outlet offers men, women and children’s shoes, sportswear and accessories. PUMA Outlet will be located in Neighborhood 3, across from Nike Factory Store. Samsonite Company Store offers a variety of popular luggage, backpacks, messenger bags, business cases, laptop bags and accessories. Samsonite Company Store is located in Neighborhood 3, near Crocs. Earlier this year, Joe’s Jeans, Original Penguin, Perry Ellis, Foreign Exchange, Crazy 8, Naartjie Kids, Olive Garden Italian Restaurant and Villa Fresh Italian Kitchen opened. An outlet store by Michael Kors and Eyebrow Designer 21 will open by late July. Other popular outlet and value retailers at Great Mall include Last Call by Neiman Marcus, Coach Factory Store, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, H&M, DKNY, Abercrombie & Fitch Outlet, Banana Republic Factory Store, Forever 21, 2b bebe, Hollister Outlet, BCBGMAXAZRIA, Tommy Hilfiger Company Store, St. John Outlet, Nike Factory Store, Victoria’s Secret and more. For more information on Great Mall, please call (408) 956-2033, visit www.greatmallbayarea.com or follow Great Mall on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GreatMall and Twitter at www.twitter.com/ShopGreatMall.

Go Daddy, an Internet domain registrar, is sold BY JORDAN ROBERTSON AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jul 01 - The parent company of GoDaddy.com, a top registrar of Internet domain names, has been sold to a group of private investment firms for $2.25 billion, a person familiar with the transaction told The Associated Press. Go Daddy Group Inc.'s sale to KKR, Silver Lake and Technology Crossover Ventures comes as the company expects to top $1.1 billion in revenue this year because expanding Internet use has fueled the creation of more websites and the ``domains'' needed to help find them. Go Daddy announced the sale late Friday. A person close to the transaction, who asked to remain anonymous because of not being authorized to speak publicly, told the AP the sale price. A fact sheet accompanying the release indicated that Go Daddy's revenue has grown by more than 20 percent in each of the past several years. The Go Daddy Group Inc. was founded in 1997 by Bob Parsons, who continues to serve as its CEO. The company, based in Arizona, manages more than 48 million domain names, and sells other Internet-related technologies.


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Calif. utility: pipeline pressures were too high AP WIRE SERVICE SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jul 01 - Pacific Gas & Electric Co. officials revealed this week the company had been running some of its natural gas pipelines at higher pressure levels than what is recommended by federal safety authorities because the utility had wrongly classified its transmission lines.

Guidance for out-of-state retailers with nexus SUBMITTED BY ANITA GORE The California State Board of Equalization (BOE) announced July 1, 2011, that a special notice, clarifying the obligations of outof-state retailers to register with the BOE and collect use tax on sales made to California residents has been posted on the BOE website, www.boe.ca.gov. Letters will be sent to potential out-ofstate registrants along with a questionnaire to help them determine if they need to register with the BOE. California Governor Jerry Brown signed budget trailer bill ABx1 28 into law on June 28, 2011. The law requires large outof-state retailers, who previously did not have to collect and pay use tax on sales to California customers, to register with the BOE and collect use tax. The new provisions of the law added by ABx1 28 were effective immediately upon signing. The Special Notice can be found at www.boe.ca.gov/news/pdf/l284.pdf. For more information on other taxes and fees in California, visit www.taxes.ca.gov.

The company did a system-wide study of its transmission lines to confirm whether they were correctly designated according to federal regulations in response to an order from the California Public Utilities Commission following September's deadly explosion in San Bruno, which killed eight. CPUC Executive Director Paul Clanon called the revelation a serious failure with serious safety repercussions on Friday. The federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials

Safety Administration requires utilities to perform more stringent inspections on lines that run through highly populated areas. “We hope we're nearing the end of the revelations about PG&E's poor safety efforts,'' Clanon said in a statement. “PG&E faces another investigation and more potential fines.” The company already has lowered pressure on some lines, PG&E said in its letter filed with the state on Thursday.

Benny: friend and security at Southland Mall SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG AP WIRE SERVICE SALIDA, Colo. (AP), Jun 24 - The Colorado State Parks Board approved an agreement Friday for the artist Christo to pay $550,000 to state parks to carry out his Over the River project, which would suspend 5.9 miles worth of fabric panels over parts of the Arkansas River. However, the agreement is moot if the Bureau of Land Management doesn't approve a federal permit for the project. The BLM hasn't made its decision yet. Christo's project would use heavy equipment to help erect a system of cables and anchors to hang the fabric along U.S. 50. The agreement approved by the parks board applies only to lands it manages. It says Christo's team would pay $320,000 to cover State Parks' costs related to Christo carrying out his project, plus $230,000 in recreation impact fees. Over the River, which Christo envisioned with his late wife, Jeanne-Claude, has drawn support from art lovers but frustration from some wildlife advocates and river businesses. Opponents say hordes of tourists checking out the project and the work needed to erect it could stress wildlife, choke traffic and disrupt hunting, rafting and angling business. In May, Colorado wildlife commissioners voted 9-0 in favor of sending a letter to the BLM opposing the project and urging federal officials to adopt measures to ease potential effects on bighorn sheep if they do issue a permit to Christo.

E

veryone loves Benny, Southland Mall's official security K-9. He is no ordinary dog. The four-year-old purebred German shepherd has the important job of en-

hancing security at Southland Mall and providing an additional level of comfort for customers who visit the center. Benny's partner is John Dluzak, Regional K-9 Handler for IPC International Corp, which works in conjunction with Southland Mall's security department. Dluzak is a former police officer from Colorado and was a military police officer in the United States Army. Together Benny and John underwent an intense training academy program and the two have been together working as partners since October 2010. Prior to this, Benny started his training at age 2 in Holland as a service dog. Benny's patrol includes detection sweeps where he walks through the common and service areas of the mall looking for suspicious things/persons. As an ambassador to Southland Mall, Benny attends special events such as visiting the children who are in line to see the Easter Bunny or Santa Claus. He also attends Neighbor-

hood Watch meetings at Southland Mall where the Hayward Police Department updates the community on what is going on in the city. When he isn't patrolling inside the mall, Benny rides in a marked K-9 SUV that features a builtin computer and kennel for Benny. Adored by customers, especially the kids, Benny is very outgoing and social. He loves to pose for photos with shoppers and their families, and often ends up on customers' Facebook pages. Customers are encouraged to speak with Benny and to pet him. If shoppers bring Benny a treat, they must offer him dog specific snacks like milk bones. Facts about Benny: Started working at Southland Mall in November 2010 Pure-bred German Shepherd with black and tan coloring Birthday is December 1, 2006 Weighs 80 pounds Born in Holland Likes to go to the park and chase rabbits Favorite toy is a tennis ball Has his own trading card that children collect For more information, hours, and a store directory, please call our Shopper Line at (510) 782-3527 or visit our website at www.southlandmall.com. iPhone and Android phone users can obtain daily updates on mall sales, events and restaurant information, real-time navigation of the mall, access to exclusive promotions, instant-win games and more by downloading a free application through the App Store or Android Market by searching The Club Shopping Mall Guide. Follow Southland Mall on Facebook athttp://www.facebook.com/southlandmall and Twitter athttp://twitter.com/shopsouthlandmall.


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Are you a writer?

July 5, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

Crossword Puzzle 1

2

8

3

4

5

7

9

11

12

13

16

14

15

17

19

20

24

7 8

9

1 8

10

23

6

6 4 2 5 1

B 120

18

21

25

9 1 4 6 2 4 8 3 9 7 7 6 2 4 9 4 2 7 8 5 2 5 9 2

22

26

B 119

27

28

Across 8 Conjunction / preposition (4) 9 All over (10) 10 Hard, brittle, bluish-white metallic, densest, naturally occurring element. (6) 11 Encircle (8) 12 Portend (8) 14 Avaricious (6) 16 "There was a ___ cloud over his head" (4) 17 Third most common gas in Earth's atmosphere; (5) 18 A sudden loud noise (4) 19 Article of clothing (1-5) 21 It is resistant to corrosion in its metallic form (8) 23 Pupils (8) 26 To contaminate (6) 27 Declare authoritatively (10) 28 Essential item in camping (4)

Puzzle Solutions

Down 1 Glows after illumination (10) 2 Totally (8) 3 Protective gear used in games (6) 4 Obtains (4) 5 Secondary source of energy (8) 6 Pick (6) 7 Deficiency in this mineral causes fatigue (4) 13 Opposite of day (5) 15 Condemning openly (10) 17 Soft, silvery-white radioactive metal discovered in 1899. (8) 18 Perks (8) 20 Its compound is used in salt (6) 22 Rule of __ is one of the first things learnt in photography class. (6) 24 Outer part of wheel in British English (4) 25 Fire (4)

C A L V I R N O F C N J R O A O A O L H N L D J N K I W O A L D W I G H T D E I S E N H O G L N A N E S Q M P O U S I N I E W A R R E N G H A R D I N G E C E C A Y R E G A B A N D R E W J A C K S O N A R A M T M S H E O S O K V P E O R L K

8 7 9 3 2 5 6 1 4

6 5 2 8 1 4 9 7 3

4 1 3 7 6 9 5 8 2

2 3 6 9 4 1 8 5 7

5 9 1 2 8 7 4 3 6

7 8 4 5 3 6 2 9 1

A N W D O R O E D W E R J O O W H W N I S L O S N O N N

3 4 8 1 9 2 7 6 5

1 6 5 4 7 8 3 2 9

9 2 7 6 5 3 1 4 8

Tri-City Stargazer JULY 6 – JULY 12, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: The time frame between the summer solstice (June 21) and the vernal equinox (Sep 21) is likely to be fraught with multiple “almost” disasters. This includes those of both man made and natural origin. Notice the operative word, “almost”. This suggests images of hurricanes headed toward highly populated locations that will veer just enough off course to prevent the worst from happening. It also suggests hot issues developing within and between countries that somehow return to simmer after a few weeks—at least for now. In the US, the economy may appear to be heading for total disaster and then shift to sidestep the apparent tailspin. We are living through a time of extreme change. It’s a thriller of a ride. Aries (Mar 21—Apr 20) : Your tastes lean toward the avantegarde this week. It appears that contracts and business agreements are on the table and likely to be negotiated smoothly. This is particularly so if you are purchasing a home or a car. There are go signals related to love life, partnerships, and relationships to children. Taurus (Apr 21 – May 20): A relationship or friendship that began with gusto in late April arrives at a point of evaluation. The question of commitment may always be an issue in this situation. The Bulls are careful about commitment because they mean it. Some of the other signs are not so persevering. Watch your step. Gemini (May 21—June 20): You will be rewarded through your steady commitment to strengthen and improve your body. If you are working on a new plan or a contract, things will flow easily. Aspects favor love life, fun, life with neighbors and/or roommates, and activities concerning your children.

Cancer the Crab (June 21 – July 22): Your good judgment is in one place while your heart is in another. It could be highly distracting. If possible, don't force a decision just now. You might benefit from writing a note to yourself from both points of view so you can gain a bit of clarity.

Libra (Sep 23 – Oct 22): This is an exceptionally busy week. There are favorable aspects concerning activities that involve the law, publishing, the Internet, or travel. Make sure you back up important data. Aspects suggest problems with your computer or other high tech equipment. Your life direction is highlighted now.

Leo (Jul 23 – Aug 22): You have the opportunity to assist two or more people or factions toward a well negotiated agreement. You worry about the details and yet everything will be accomplished toward the highest good. Your physical energy is on a high this week.

Scorpio (Oct 23 – Nov 21): It is imperative that you hold to proper principles in all of your activities this week. Win-wins must include everyone or you will pay your conscience later. You likely will receive money owed to you, perhaps a monetary gift, or help from others through the sharing of resources or favors.

Virgo (Aug 23 – Sep 22) : You are working quietly in the background to bring harmony between those who appear to be the leaders and those who have the financial strength. The leader type is talkative, intellectual, but can be flighty. The financier is steady, somewhat somber, and highly intelligent. Think about your life and identify these people.

Sagittarius (Nov 22 – Dec 21): You are in a favorable financial cycle this summer. Sometimes things will go your way when you are not even really trying. Whatever you do to improve your dietary and exercise habits will have long term positive effects. You may be the recipient of small gifts and favors this week.

Capricorn (Dec 22 – Jan 19): You are likely to be drawn into organizing files, drawers, closets and even the files on your computer. There will be a distinct satisfaction in cleaning up details. You’re on a roll. An important relationship asks you to search deep inside yourself for your contribution to the difficulty, own it, and confess it. Aquarius (Jan 20– Feb 18): You have fine aspects concerning your love life, partner(s), and children. Your partner is particularly talkative and this is a time to work out issues and plans in a truly positive way for both of you. A favorable outcome is projected for those involved with the

law, education, publishing, travel, or the Internet. Pisces (Feb 18 – Mar 19): Activities concerning journalism, siblings, neighbors and roommates are strongly favored. People of some power are noticing you and recommending you to others. Save some time on the docket for “play”. You deserve it. A weekend trip would be thoroughly refreshing.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


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All-Day restaurantstyle dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH We all know the old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” but perhaps a modern

tired teacher, even designed an activity packet for each book, to be completed by the students to help them enjoy and obtain a fuller understanding of what they’ve read. “Like a grandparent, my mom runs the student literacy groups, discussing the books read with groups of six to eight students, three days a week, on a rotating basis,” says Monkman. “She’s

July 5, 2011

Classroom teacher Christina Monkman

All Day Open House Tours Sunday - July 17 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM For families looking to plan ahead... instead of waiting for " Someday". Hourly Raffle Drawings and Community Resource GIFT BAGS will be provided for the FIRST 50 RSVP's. CALL to RSVP with Karishma or Roxanne to get your name on the list.

Top four classroom readers (left to right): Rachel Murray (35 books), Utkash Sharma (31 books), Matt Lin (31 books) and Kishoree Vijayanaand (32 books).

spin could be put on the expression -“522 books a year help young minds expand.” Students in Christina Monkman’s 6th grade class at Oliveira Elementary School in

taught them to learn to love to read which makes them better at everything. It’s made their writing better and opened the door to different genres of books. I’m a lucky lady.”

ure,” Singer and Monkman brought in a large cake to celebrate this special occasion. Oliveira Principal, Linda Anderson stopped by during the festivities to congratulate the students for their tremen-

Class with teacher Christina Monkman in background and volunteer Marilyn Singer seated in foreground.

Fremont demonstrated just that, by spending their last year in elementary school reading for the pure joy of it… 522 books worth! Monkman’s mother, Marilyn Singer, has been volunteering in her daughter’s classroom for 18 years, leading an extra program she developed, encouraging students to read for fun. Singer, a re-

Singer purchased many of the Newberry award winning books for the classroom, out of her own pocket, because she wanted her students to have enough variety and selection. “I’ve got an amazing life. It makes me happy,” adds Singer. To mark the culmination of the students’ year of “reading for pleas-

dous efforts and to sample a delicious slice of cake. She taught many of these students as their third grade classroom teacher. “Thank you, Mrs. Monkman and Mrs. Singer, for continuing the joy of reading in them,” said Anderson. “I love that reading is special for every kind of learning.”

Bill protecting workers and their rights advances in Assembly SUBMITTED BY TEALA SCHAFF Legislation by Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-San Leandro) that protects workers by prohibiting their misclassification as an independent contractor, an arrangement that allows employers to dodge standard labor laws, passed the Assembly Labor Committee on June 23, 2011, on a 4-2 vote. In addition to costing workers vital benefits and protections, misclassification of employees also costs the state of California an estimated $7 billion in lost payroll tax revenue. As an independent contractor, a worker is not subject to a whole host of regulations, such as minimum wage, overtime protection, workers’ compensation, family leave and unemployment. “Misclassification hurts unsuspecting employees and employers who are doing the right thing,” Corbett said. “These bad actors must be held accountable so we can adequately protect workers and provide the state the revenues it deserves.” Senate Bill 459 prohibits the willful misclassification of an employee as an independent contractor by a consultant or an employer. The bill also requires employers to provide independent contractors with information about their classification. The legislation, supported by labor groups throughout the state, goes next to the Assembly Judiciary Committee. For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett


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continued from page 1

www.stuckatprom.com and vote by the July 11 deadline. Winners will be announced on the website on or about July 13. Each member of the first place winning prom couple will receive $5,000. Second place finishers receive $3,000 each and the third place couple earns $2,000 apiece. The remaining seven couples will each be awarded $500 per person. In addition, the school that hosted a winning couples’ prom will receive the same prize amount. “This is the 11th year of the competition and in total more

than $150,000 in scholarship money has been given out,” says Teresa DeJohn, a representative of Duck® brand. Chelsey’s “duct taped” prom partner was Alexander Rohwedder, who also attended the same homeschool program as Chelsey and just completed his junior year. Designing and constructing the prom outfits was labor intensive for the duo; they spent over 400 hours creating the galaxy-themed attire, which included nearly a thousand hand-cut stars. “I started with a basic idea of a star theme and sketched out a basic design; I developed it and even made changes while in the middle of making the dress,” explains Chelsey. “I showed Alex a basic design and we worked together and made huge changes to it, so it was a team effort.” In all, the team used 40 rolls of duct tape. Part of the preparation was laying out large cuts of

cotton cloth and covering them with strips of duct tape. “There were a few other instances where other materials were used, such as our shoes and wire in the corsage and boutonniere, but we used only duct tape whenever possible,” Chelsey adds. Most students attending the prom at Sunol Valley Golf Club, knew that the couple would be wearing duct tape outfits. Chelsey says, “They were just excited to see it, since I hadn’t revealed the design. They all loved it, and we both got tons of compliments.” Throughout the whole process, Chelsey kept a blog about the experience. The URL is myducttapedress.blogspot.com. She also has a Facebook page called “Chelsey and Alexander for Stuck at Prom Duck Tape Scholarship Contest.” Chelsey and Alexander would appreciate community’s support to help them win scholarship funds from this competition. To do so, cast your vote by July 11 at www.stuckatprom.com.

Broadway West presents "The Star Spangled Girl"

Brad Monk, Melinda Marks, Greg Small, Photo by Dan Sparks

This fast moving, hilarious comedy deals with two earnest young men struggling to put out a “protest” magazine, and the all-American girl who moves in next door and manages to send both of them into a romantic tail spin. “Good, honest hilarity!” – NY Post Performance times are 8 pm on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. There are three Sunday matinees: July 24, 31 and August 7. July 24 and 31 performances begin with a continental brunch (included in price of ticket) at 12:15 pm, and the show begins at 1 pm. The August 7 performance starts at 1 pm with theme-based refreshments during intermission (included in price of ticket). Regular ticket prices are $23 general and $18 for Students, Seniors and TBA members. Thursday, July 21, August 4 and 11 performances are $15 for everyone, with a bargain Thursday held on July 28 - all tickets $10. Sunday performances and Opening night are $23 for everyone. All ticket prices include refreshments. Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218, or check our website at www.broadwaywest.org.


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July 5, 2011

SUBMITTED BY RAY PULVER

T

hey rehearse and train up to 12 hours a day and travel over 5,000 miles across the country in caravans of buses, trucks and support vehicles. For six weeks, these athletes, artists and performers are viewed and judged by thousands of spectators in high school, college and professional stadiums throughout the United States. Music can move the souls of mankind; the sight, sound and precise beat of drum corps music can be found at the emotional epitome of the human pulse. The Santa Clara Vanguard Drum & Bugle Corps a nonprofit youth activity with far-reaching artistic, educational and organizational influence will host the California State Open competition at Fremont’s Tak Memorial Stadium on Saturday evening, July 9, beginning at 5 p.m. This will be an evening of spectacular performances featuring some of the country’s most talented musicians and performance ensembles from California and Washington. Tickets are available at local outlets including Suju’s Coffee and Mission Coffee in Fremont and The Bookend in Newark. Additional information is available at www.scvanguard .org.

BY JESSICA NOËL WAYMIRE

O

besity is a nationwide epidemic. Longer workdays, less outdoor time, and oversized meals all contribute to the rise in obesity among adults and children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “In 2009, only Colorado and the District of Columbia had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%.” Excess body weight puts one’s health at risk, increasing the likelihood of developing heart disease and diabetes. Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley wants to raise awareness of these health risks with its 13th annual Run to the Lake on Sunday, July 10th. The Run first began in 1988 and was intended to benefit the Center’s cardiology programs. Unfortunate cutbacks resulted in the race being discontinued in the early 1990s until George Bischalaney, running enthusiast, became Eden’s CEO in 1998 and the program was brought back. The Run to the Lake has since become a tradition in the community, with more participants each year. The Run to the Lake has something for everyone. In addition to the 5K walk/run and 10K run, there will be a 50-yard dash for children, age three to eight. Prizes will be given for the first three finalists in the 5K and 10K for each age group, as well as the overall top finishers. Runners, walkers, and wheelchairs are welcome on the 5K course, while the 10K course is reserved for runners only. A disposable timing chip placed on the participant’s shoe will track race time. All children participating in the 50-yard dash will receive a tshirt, finisher’s ribbon, and goody bag. Registration is $30 for adults and $15 for children. Save $5 by registering online by 11 p.m. July 7. Courses start at Eden Medical Center and head down to the shores of Lake Chabot; 5K (paved) and 10K (paved and trails) races begin at 8 a.m. The children’s dash will be held in the parking lot at 9:30 a.m. Eden Medical Center will host a free Health Expo on race day from 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. open to all, offering health screening, refreshments, product samples, and disposal of expired medication and mercury thermometers. Screenings include body fat analysis, blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. The Expo is intended to educate the public on proper healthcare and prevention.

Wendy Gorton is one race participant who is especially grateful for the staff and services of Eden Medical Center. Ten years ago, Gorton came down with an ear infection. At the time she was more focused on taking care of two very ill parents than attending to her own medical condition. In spite of taking antibiotics, her conditioned wors-

ened and she suddenly came down with a terrible headache and lost her vision. Gorton was convulsing when she arrived at Eden Medical. Doctors diagnosed her with bacterial meningitis and did not expect her to survive. She was in a comma for her 40th birthday. Miraculously, Gorton did recover, though it has taken a

tremendous amount of work to regain all of her abilities. Eight months after her diagnosis, she could barely push the pedals of a bicycle. Today, she walks two to three miles a day and bikes ten miles each week. Gorton decided to do the Run to the Lake this year to show her appreciation for Eden Medical staff giving her ten more years with her children. Have you been given a new lease on life? Or are you looking for motivation to take better care of yourself? Come to the Health Expo and join over 2,000 community members making a commitment to better health. Your

loved ones will be glad you did. For registration and more information, please go to www.edenmedcenter.org. Run to the Lake Sunday, July 10 5K/10K at 8:00 a.m. Kids’ Dash at 9:30 a.m. Health Expo from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. 20103 Lake Chabot Drive, Castro Valley (510) 727-2744 www.edenmedcenter.org Registration $25/30 for adults; $10/15 for children


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Real world challenges inspire students ARTICLE AND PHOTO SUBMITTED BY JENNA SIMENIC Propped on one table, a wireless 3-D robotic arm was displayed. One day, it might assist emergency

organizations were on hand to judge the projects and award winners in multiple categories, including the coveted “Judges Choice” for best overall project in a degree program. Judges Choice winners included: Game & Simulation Programming: Team Pants

Students Robert Martin,William Caceres and Mauro Ortega demonstrate their “Wireless 3D Robotic Arm” project for an industry judge at DeVry University’s Spring Senior Student Technology and Business Innovation Fair.

workers in dangerous conditions similar to the nuclear plant meltdown earlier this year in Fukushima in Japan. Another display featured a computer screen with a virtual instrument panel wirelessly controlling a variety of conditions in aquariums, whether in a child’s bedroom or mega tourist attraction like the Monterey Bay Aquarium. These were two of nearly two dozen student projects showcased at DeVry University’s Spring Senior Student Technology and Business Innovation Fair held June 16 in Fremont. The projects were a culmination of senior students’ studies in degree programs including Biomedical Engineering Technology, Electronic Engineering Technology, Computer Information Systems, Game and Simulation Programming, and Business Administration. Representatives from local area businesses and

Up Aggression, with Gregory Reese, Ronald Colombo, Devona Poole, Kevin Kasson and Jonathan Denno. Biomedical Engineering Technology: Lung Capacity, Blood Pressure and Heart Beat Rate Monitoring System, designed by Chris Weinberger, David Gonzalez and Oscar Lizarraga. Computer Information Systems: Team Prodigy Dezign, with Dominique Rafael, Shannon Jimmy and Brian Santo Domingo. Electronic Engineering Technology & Computer Engineering Technology: Wireless Aquarium Management System, designed by Juan Mercado, Humberto Lopez and Jose Ambriz. Business Administration: Team Miss Innovators, with Trista Wheat, Rosa Gonzalez, Marisa Miranda and Carolina Villarreal.

Trucks' toll hike waiver expires SUBMITTED BY JOHN GOODWIN The Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) reminds drivers of big-rig trucks and other vehicles or combinations with more than two axles that their one-year exemption from the 2010 toll increase on the region’s toll bridges has now expired. The first step in the two-phase toll increase for multi-axle vehicles took effect at 12 a.m. on July 1, 2011, and will remain in place through June 30, 2012. During this period, the toll for three-axle vehicles or combinations on the region’s seven state-owned toll bridges will increase to $10.50 from the current $6. Tolls for four-axle vehicles will rise to $14 from $8.25; tolls for five-axle vehicles will climb to $18 from $11.25; tolls for six-axle rigs will go to $21 from $12 and tolls for vehicles with seven or more axles will increase to $24.25 from the current $13.50. On the Golden Gate Bridge, toll rates for customers who pay cash will be set at $13 for three axles; $18 for four axles; $22 for five axles; $27 for six-axles; and $31 for vehicles with seven or more axles. Discounted tolls for customers who pay their tolls with FasTrak will be set at $11.25 for three axles; $15 for four axles; $18.75 for five axles; $22.50 for six axles; and $26.25 for vehicles with seven or more axles. Beginning July 2012, tolls for vehicles or combinations with three or more axles will be fully indexed at $5 per axles, or $15 for three-axle vehicles; $20 for four axles; $25 for five axles; $30 for six axles; and $35 for rigs with seven or more axles. The fully indexed toll rate on the Golden Gate Bridge will be $6 times the number of axles, with a $5-per-axle rate for FasTrak customers. BATA approved the two-step increase in tolls for multi-axle vehicles on the state-owned bridges in January 2010 as part of a comprehensive toll increase package to finance seismic retrofits of the Antioch and Dumbarton bridges, to help offset the increased cost of debt financing resulting from financial market turmoil that began in 2007 and to counter revenue losses caused by a decline in toll-paying traffic on the bridges since FY 2003-04. BATA encourages all motorists, including drivers of big-rig trucks and recreational vehicles, to take advantage of the FasTrak electronic toll collection program to make toll payment easier and more convenient. FasTrak can be used in all lanes at all Bay Area toll plazas. FasTrak toll tags are available at Costco, Safeway and Walgreens stores throughout the Bay Area. Customers can also enroll in the FasTrak program online at 511.org; by calling 511 and asking for “FasTrak” at the first prompt; or in person at the FasTrak customer service center at 475 The Embarcadero in San Francisco. For more information, visit www.mtc.ca.gov and http://bata.mtc.ca.gov/tolls/index.htm

Bill to improve gas pipeline safety advances in Assembly SUBMITTED BY ANDREW LAMAR Legislation by Senate Majority Leader Ellen Corbett (D-San Leandro) to improve emergency response to gas pipeline problems and help avoid disasters similar to the devastating gas explosion in San Bruno in September 2010 cleared the Assembly Utilities and Commerce Committee on June 27, 2011. Senate Bill 44 directs the California Public Utilities Commission, in consultation with the Office of Emergency Services, the State Fire Marshal and the California Fire Chiefs Association, to adopt stricter emergency response standards for natural gas operators. By improving communication and coordination, the bill helps minimize loss of life and damage to property caused by gas pipeline emergencies. “We’ve learned a lot since the San Bruno disaster about how to better manage gas pipelines and respond to trouble,” Corbett said. “We know it’s critical for California’s

first responders to have all the tools and coordination they need to respond quickly, if and when something goes wrong with a gas pipeline. SB 44 raises first-response standards for natural gas operators so first responders can be as effective as possible.” Many of the East Bay’s gas pipelines run along the Hayward fault and are vulnerable to rupture in an earthquake. Among other things, SB 44 mandates that natural gas operators utilize emergency shutdown and pressure reduction whenever necessary; maintain contact with fire, police and other relevant officials; provide maps to fire officials of where pipelines are located. The bill, which has already passed the Senate, moves next to the Assembly Appropriations Committee. Sen. Corbett is chairwoman of the Senate Select Committee on Earthquake and Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery. For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett

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PHOTS BY WILLIAM MANCEBO

T

he final countdown has begun for those who have yet to experience the Alameda County Fair. Sunday, July 10 will be the last opportunity to see the pink blur of All-Alaskan Pig Races, get dizzy on carnival rides, sample a fried candy bar, make new friends in the petting zoo, get rough with live roller derby, and the other 94 ways to play. At the race track, the first 1,000 people who enter Win, Place & Show on Friday, July 8 will get a free Secretariat ball cap, and golfers shouldn’t miss the chance to win $10,000 in the Putting Contest with the final round on Saturday, July 9. Post times are 1:15 p.m. with races ending around 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. (No racing on Wednesday.) Fiesta Hispana closes the diverse cultural offerings of Festival Square on July 9 and 10. Sabor de Las Americas will include a Day of the Dead photo exhibit, cooking demonstrations, Fuego Nuevo Ballet Folklorico delivering a celebration of Veracruz, a variety of Latin music, and a Tamale Tasting Contest on Sunday with the sounds of Mariachi San Jose. Experience an old-fashioned auction on Sunday, July 10 as The Annual Youth Livestock.

Kids in 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA) will auction off over 400 quality animals including rabbit, hogs, beef, lamb, and goat to complete their yearlong projects; bidding starts at 8:30 a.m. The concert series winds down with We The Kings, Wednesday, July 6; Sanctus Real, Thursday, July 7; Survivor, Friday, July 8; The Whispers, Saturday, July 9; and country favorite Tracy Lawrence closes the series on Sunday, July 10. Don’t forget to take advantage of special discount admission days: 99 cent Wacky Wednesdays with 99 cent admission before 3 p.m. and $3 after 3 p.m., seniors free Thursdays (62 and older), and kids free Fridays (ages 12 and under).

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The fair still beckons; don’t miss out on the fun! Alameda County Fair Through July 10 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. (Wed and Thu) 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. (Fri – Sun) Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (925) 426-7600 www.alamedacountyfair.com Admission: $10 ages 13 - 61; $6 ages 6 - 12; children under 6 free Parking: $8 general; $15 preferred; $20 VIP Carnival rides: $25 unlimited wristband (Mon. – Fri.), $28 unlimited wristband (Sat. and Sun.) Pre-purchase tickets online for a discount

July 5, 2011


July 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

6201 Lafayette Ave., Newark www.relayforlife.org

38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont www.scvanguard .org

1 - 4 p.m.

Saturday - Sunday, Jul 9 - 10

Saturday, Jul 9 - Sunday, Jul 10

Eight classes for high school arts students

Library Book Sale

Summerfest

Jan's Art Studio 38215 Fremont Blvd., Fremont nncybntn@comcast.net

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Noon - 3 p.m. (Sun)

10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Tuesdays - Thursdays, Jul 5 Aug 4

Art Classes $R

Fremont Friends of the Library

Microbrews, wine, music, arts & crafts, food, car show

Old Main Library/Teen Center 39770 Sailway Dr., Fremont (510) 494-1103

NewPark Mall 510-744-1000 www.newarksummerfest.com

Danceable Dixieland music

Saturday, July 9

Saturday - Sunday, Jul 9 - 10

Swiss Park 5911 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 657-0243

Rock the Night

Russell City Blues Festival $

7 p.m. – 11 p.m.

11 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Variety show

Celebrate the music, history, culture of the former Russell City

Wednesday, Jul 6

Mission Gold Jazz Band

7 - 9 p.m.

Wednesday, Jul 6

Algebra & Geometry Tutoring

2 - 4 p.m. Key concepts of high school algebra and geometry

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Wednesday, Jul 6

Finding Affordable Housing

6 p.m. Information and Q&A

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7980 Wednesday, Jul 6

Social/Ballroom Dance $R

7 p.m. Couples, six week dance class

Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5329 Thursday, Jul 7

Concert Series

6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Performance by East Bay Mudd, playing R&B hits

Fremont Central Park 40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy. Fremont (510) 494-4327 Fridays, Jul 8

Ballroom/Social Dance Classes $R

7 p.m. Six weeks class, couples only

Fremont Adult School 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 793-6465 Friday, Jul 8

Science for Youth Lecture

2 - 3 p.m. Tornados

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Friday, Jul 8

Sing-A-Long

7 - 8 p.m. Songs from Americana, Broadway and movies

Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont (510) 797-3305 Friday, Jul 8 -Sunday, July 10

Open Studios

10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mission Trails Artists

Denise Oyama Miller’s studio 270 Tordo Ct., Fremont Cindy Sullivan’s studio 1423 Deschutes Pl., Fremont Friday - Sunday, Jul 8 - 10

Beauty and the Beast $

7:30 p.m. 2 p.m. (Sun.) Live performance by StarStuck Theatre

A prayer centered church of spiritually bonded friends

Gary Soren Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-1319 Friday, Jul 8

Music for Minors II

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM A positive path for spiritual living

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

11:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Songs and stretch with Ms. Patricia

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421 Saturday, July 9 – 10

Relay for Life

10 a.m. (Sat) – 10 a.m. (Sun) Newark Jr. High School

St. Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello Street, Union City 510.471.7766 www.saintannecatholic.org

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward www.HighSierraTickets.com Saturday, Jul 9

Saturday, Jul 9

Shark Encounters $

Skills of the Past $R

9:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m.

4 - 4:30 p.m.

Touch, feed, talk to a shark and make a craft to take home

Create a berry picking basket from marsh plant

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd. Fremont (888) 327-2757

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 Saturday, Jul 9

Saturday, Jul 9

Tri-City Documentaries

Martial Arts event and black belt testing $

1:30 p.m.

1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

FLOW, for love of water

Support Save the Children - tornado and tsunami victims

Niles Congregational Church 255 H ST., Fremont (510) 651-9480 Saturday, Jul 9

Santa Clara Vanguard Drum & Bugle Corps $

5 p.m. Bands from California and Washington

Washington High School Tak Memorial Stadium

Santa Clara Convention Center 5001 Great America Pkwy, Santa Clara (510) 659-9920 www.jsw.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

Saturday, Jul 9

Sunday, Jul 10

Thursday, Jul 14

Solar Meeting

11 a.m. & 1 p.m.

Eucalyptus: Trees from Down Under $

Children’s Concert with Wiley Rankin

Use group buying power for solar energy

1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

11:30 a.m. & 12:45 p.m.

First Christian Church Meeting Room 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont solar4fremont@gmail.com

Learn and explore the history of these trees

For preschool and elementary-aged children

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Sunday, Jul 10

Continuing Events:

Saturday, Jul 9

McConaghy House birthday celebration $

Niles Town Plaza Summer Concert

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Traditional games, make birthday cards, enjoy cupcakes

McConaghy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org Adults, $5; Students/seniors, $3; Children/HAHS members free Saturday - Sunday, Jul 9 - 10

Annual Bazaar

11 a.m. - 7 p.m.

1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Through July 10

Charles Wheal Blues Band & The Barbary Ghosts

Alameda County Fair $

37592 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.niles.org

Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 471-2581

and

11 a.m. – 10 p.m. 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (925) 426-7600 www.alamedacountyfair.com

Sunday, Jul 10

Taste of the Refuge

Monday-Friday, through Jul 28

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Tuscany and the Cinque Terre

Discover which plants are edible or have medicinal uses

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275

Japanese style food, games and dancing

Exhibits

Artworks in watercolor, photography and oil

John O'Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787

Monday, Jul 11

Saturday, Jul 9

Basic Land Navigation R

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Learn the basics of map and compass reading

Sunol Regional Wilderness 1895 Geary Rd., Sunol (888) 544-3249

Eagles Auxiliary Luncheon $

Art of the Blues

Noon

June 8 – July 16

Proceeds goes to the Lew Reed Spinal Cord Fund

Tuesday, Jul 12

Sun Art Gallery: 1015 E St., Hayward Wed, Thurs, Sat: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Friday: Noon - 6 p.m. (510) 581-4050 www.wix.com/artoftheblues/site

Traffic Skills 101 Classroom Workshop R

Art of the Blues

Eagles Hall 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 785-8174

6 - 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Jul 9

Basics of safe cycling,

Jewelry Making for Teens

Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 845-7433

1 - 3 p.m. Presented by Jewel of the Nile Jewelry

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464

Tuesday, Jul 12

ABCs of Native Plant Gardening

7 - 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Jul 10

Choose a place in your garden for native plants

Run to the Lake $

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

5K/10K at 8:00 a.m. Kids’ Dash at 9:30 a.m. Health Expo from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m.

20103 Lake Chabot Drive, Castro Valley (510) 727-2744 www.edenmedcenter.org

Tuesday, Jul 12

American Red Cross Blood Drive

June 8 – July 16 Cinema Place Gallery 1061 B Street, Hayward Wed – Sun: Noon - 4 p.m. Thurs, Fri, Sat: Noon - 9 p.m. (510) 538-2787 www.wix.com/artoftheblues/site Tuesdays - Fridays, through Aug 26

Past Tents: The Way We Camped

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 2 - 7:30 p.m. (Thurs.) Camping in California - late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

HAHS Gallery 22392 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

2 - 7 p.m. Sunday, Jul 10

Give blood

Car Wash Fundraiser

InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (800) 733-2767

8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Support St. Elizabeth Teen Group at World Youth Day in Spain

St. Elizabeth Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas (408) 258-6536

An evening of spectacular performances! Some of the country’s most talented musicians and performance ensembles representing California and Washington compete in this Drum Corps International Competition.

Saturday, July 9 – 5:00 p.m. Fremont’s Tak Fudenna Memorial Stadium 38442 Fremont Boulevard, Fremont Tickets: $15.00 advance - $18.00 at gate Group rates available

Tickets available at these local outlets: Suju’s Coffee – 3602 Thorton Avenue - Fremont Mission Coffee – 151 Washington Blvd. – Fremont The BookEnd – 5678 Thornton Avenue - Newark

Information: www.scvanguard.org Telephone: 408-727-5532 X 1


July 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Mixed media, drawing, painting, collage, sculpture Sun Gallery 1015 E St., Hayward (510) 581-4050 www.sungallery.org (registration forms)

SUBMITTED BY LORNA VELUZ St. Anne Parish Church in Union City is celebrating it’s 38th year at its summer festival set for Saturday, July 23 and Sunday, July 24, "Living out our Faith Through the Years." This year, St. Anne, has two kick-off events: “Rock the Night,” a variety show on July 9, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. and “St. Anne Band Extravaganza 2011” scheduled for Saturday, July 16 from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m. featuring 10 local bands. Rock the Night Saturday, July 9 - 7 p.m. – 11 p.m. St. Anne Catholic Church 32223 Cabello Street, Union City (510) 471-7766 www.saintannecatholic.org

This weekend, the Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church in Union City invites everyone to take a quick trip to Japan without the time or expense of air travel. Sounds of Taiko Drums will reverberate throughout the grounds of the church in contrast to delicate and intricate displays of Bonsai plant cultivation. Visitors can visit a calligraphy booth to see their name inscribed in Japanese and browse through a boutique and bookstore. Don’t worry about entertaining the kids; this is a family affair complete with a wide selection of games and plenty of food - American and Japanese -

including hot dogs, Teriyaki burgers, corn-on-the-cob, chicken Teriyaki, gyoza, udou, sushi, manju and much more. Don’t miss this annual celebration; you will find the words, "Domo arigato” (thank you) on your lips as you leave. Japanese Bazaar Saturday, July 9 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Sunday, July 10 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado-Niles Rd. Union City (510) 471-2581 www.sacbc.org Free Admission

John F. Kennedy - Class of 1991 - 20 Yr. Reunion Saturday, July 30, 7:30p - 11:30p W Silicon Valley Hotel, 8200 Gateway Blvd., Newark Details at: www.jfk91reunion.weebly.com Hope to see you there! Relay For Life Newark

Saturday, July 9 – Sunday, July 10

10 a.m. to 10 a.m. Newark Junior High School 6201 Lafayette Ave., Newark www.relayforlife.org/newarkca Relay For Life Union City

Join in the fight against cancer by taking part in the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life events happening throughout the summer. Celebrate survivors, remember those lost, and help raise funds for research and treatments to create a cancer-free world.

Saturday, August 27 – Sunday, August 28

10 a.m. to 10 a.m. James Logan High School 2801 Hop Ranch Rd., Union City www.relayforlife.org/unioncityca

Come along to the Big Apple! New York City! All kids 4 years to 6th grade are invited to join us for VBS 2011! August 1 - 5, 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ASL interpreted Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Drive Fremont Register today: 510-490-0446 or www.msccfremont.org Cost: $15 per child/ $45 per family

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SUBMITTED BY CHRISTINE BENDER Want to dabble in art and see if your may be a future or futuristic Michelangelo, Picasso or DaVinci? Your chance is now and Sun Gallery is the place! Check out Art Camps at Sun Gallery this summer to exercise your creative talents and have a lot of fun in the process. Sign up for a week or just drop in for a day of interesting activities. Sun Gallery Art Camps July 4 to Aug 19 - 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Kids ages 6-12 One week of camp ($225) or drop-in for one day ($45) Bring a lunch - we provide snacks See website for registration form Summer Gallery Hours Wednesday - Saturday: 11-5 Sun Gallery is currently looking for curatorial interns, publicity interns, and general volunteers to make the Sun a success. Get Involved!


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

Tri-City Voice has even more local recreational, high school, college and professional sports coverage on the Web. Check out www.tricityvoice.com/sports for daily updates on scores, schedules of events, photos slide shows, and much more. Follow TCV Sports on Twitter at twitter.com/TCVSports

BY BIFF JONES Little League District 45 All Stars, composed of players from Castro Valley, Hayward, San Leandro, San Lorenzo and Union City, competed in the Sectional 3 Big League Division (16-19 year olds) double-elimination tournament June 25-28 at Sequoia High School in Redwood City and ran away with the title. Other districts competing were D14 (Fremont, Newark), D52 (Redwood City, Peninsula) and D57 (Danville, Dublin, Livermore, San Ramon, Pleasanton). Opening game on Saturday, June 25, saw D57 defeat D14, 64. This was followed by D45 clobbering host D52, 11-0, in a game called in the bottom of the fifth because of the 10-run mercy rule. A walk off grand slam home run by D45's Dillion Perreira triggered the mercy rule. In an elimination loser's bracket action game on Sunday, D52 eliminated D14, 9-5, and the following winner's bracket

game that day saw D45 defeat D57. Loser's bracket elimination game continued Monday with D57 annihilating D52, 20-2. Tuesday it was undefeated D45 taking on once-beaten D57. D45 needed to defeat D57 once to move on while D57 had to beat D45 twice to advance. Section 3 ended with a hard fought 5-4 win by D45. D45 is comprised of a number of James Logan High School baseball players. Logan won the 2011 North Coast Section (NCS) Division I high school baseball championship this past spring. D45 now moves on to the California Division 2 (Nor Cal Championship) Tournament in Benicia, July 6-12, against five other Nor Cal section champions in another double-elimination format. Should D45 prevail, they move onto the Western Regional Tournament in Bremerton, Wash., July 16-22. That winner plays in the Big League World Series in Easley, S.C., from July 27-Aug. 3. Little League All Star double-

elimination play continues in District 59 (Gilroy, Milpitas, San Jose) in five divisions. Seniors (15-16 year olds), Juniors (1314), Majors (11-12), Minors (1011 and 9-10). In Senior play last week Milpitas Little League took on Spartan LL of San Jose at Mt. Pleasant High School (MPHS) in San Jose in a winners bracket game on Friday, July 1 with Milpitas winning 11-10. Milpitas next plays Friday, July 8, at Milpitas Sports Complex (MSC) against Berryessa LL of San Jose. Loser of that game plays in an elimination game on Saturday, July 9, at MPHS while winner plays in the championship game Sunday, July 10, against Saturday winner, also at MPHS. A winner-take-all game, if necessary, is Monday, July 11, at MPHS. All game times are 5:30 p.m. except Saturday, 10 a.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. For all results and schedules go to the TCV Sports website, http://sports.tricityvoice.com. D59 Juniors saw Milpitas de-

UCN gets revenge on UCA BY NICK ZAMBRANO

home field advantage because their game is being held on their home diamond. UCA and the loser of that game will play in Castro Valley. After a deep run last year that saw them reach In other D45 senior action, Hayward leagues the Western Regionals, the Union City American Mt. Eden Little League and Treeview Little League Senior All-Stars were poised to make another repeat run. However this time around, the journey back to squared up in their opening round back on June 28. The seniors from Mt. Eden didn’t play nice and the Western Regionals won’t be as smooth as last sent their counterparts from Treeview to the loser’s year. After the weird string of weather earlier last week bracket with a 7-0 thumping. With the impressive victory, Mt. Eden will face off against Castro Valley delayed their first game in the District 45 tournaNational on July 5. The winner of that game will ment for two days, UCA then get the winner of finally had a chance to the UCN/SLZ game on play some ball on June July 8. 30. In a rematch of last Moving to the season’s District 45 younger Junior Division, championship game, they the eight team tournasquared off against rival ment has already it’s fair Union City National. share of casualties. HowAfter a year of licking ever, one of the local their wounds, the boys teams still stands unfrom UCN finally got touched. Since June 25, their redemption in the the Mt. Eden Juniors form of a 5-0 shut out. have made work of Since the rules say a Union City National, team must lose two 21-10 and Ashland, 18games before they are 10. The two wins have truly eliminated from earned them a mini vatournament play, Union cation as they will not City American has been have to play until July 5 designated to the loser’s against San Lorenzo bracket. From here on American. out, UCA will now have The aforementioned their backs against the Union City National wall. After losing to UCN, drew Castro Valley City National pitching came up big against cross-town rival Union All-Stars are still standCity American, sending UCA to the losers bracket with a 5-0 ing, albeit on one leg. American as their next shutout win on June 30 (photo by Mike Heightchew). After getting handled by combatant. CVA came Mt. Eden, UCN reinto that July 1 contest bounded quickly. They were pitted against rival fresh off a high scoring shoot-out loss with San Lorenzo American, 14-10. Whatever offensive surge Union City American, who lost to the All-Stars from Castro Valley American, 15-10 on June 25. they had against SLZ wasn’t enough as UCA deUCN kept UCA off the board again and ousted molished them, 17-7. them with a 23-0 smashing. With that win, they With CVA out of the way, UCA will wait until will await the loser of the CVA/San Leandro game July 6 before they get another chance to climb out for a July 6 do-or-die game. of the hole that they are in. They will face the loser For the complete schedule of D45 All Stars, and of the July 5 game between Union City National and San Lorenzo American. Both games are set for a to keep track of all the scores, log onto the Tri-City Voice Sports website, http://sports.tricityvoice.com. 5:30 first pitch but Union City National will have

Mt. Eden Majors, UCA Minors playing solid ball BY GIOVANNI ALBANESE JR. Through the first week of play in the District 45 (Union City, Hayward, Castro Valley, San Leandro, San Lorenzo), a number of local clubs are still in prime position to claim the Little League Baseball All Star Tournament titles

in the Major (11-13) and Minor (9-10 and 10-11) levels. In the Majors, Mt. Eden Little League All Stars from Hayward remain unbeaten in the doubleelimination tournament. They have advanced through three rounds, winning in a variety of ways. Opening up against Union

City National Little League on June 25, the boys from Mt. Eden out-pitched those from UCN and advanced with a 1-0 win. In their next contest, a June 26 bout with Castro Valley National, the Mt. Eden bats woke up to the tune of eight runs in an 8-2 victory. And in round three, June 30 against San Lorenzo American, both the bats and pitching were on their A games, blowing out their opponent, 9-0. Mt. Eden next will take on Castro Valley American on Thursday, July 7, 6 p.m. at Union City American Little

feat Berryessa on Tuesday, June 28, and will play Alum Rock LL of San Jose July 5 at MPHS. Loser goes to elimination game against Gilroy LL July 6 at MSC while the winner plays Evergreen Valley LL on Friday, July 8, at MPHS. Wednesday winner plays Berryessa Thursday, July 7 at Quimby Oaks Middle School in San Jose in another elimination game. Saturday, July 9, has an elimination game and Tuesday, July 12, is the championship game. Both those games are at MSC. All game times are 5:30 p.m. except Saturday, 11:30 a.m., and Tuesday, July 12, 6:30 p.m. Majors action had Milpitas losing to North Valley LL of San Jose last Tuesday, Jun 28. Milpitas next plays East Ridge LL of San Jose in an elimination game Tuesday, July 5, at Ben Painter Elementary School in San Jose. If Milpitas Majors loses again, season over; if they defeat East Ridge they will play again on Friday, July 8, at Reid-Hillview Airport baseball fields in San Jose

and continue playing every day through July 13 at Reid-Hillview, except at Ben Painter on Sunday, as long as the keep winning. All games are 5:30 p.m. except Saturday, 11 a.m. and Sunday, 1 p.m. Minors 11 (10-11 year olds) Milpitas defeated Berryessa last Monday and Gilroy 1 last Wednesday. They continue winner's bracket action at Anderson Field, home to Oak Ridge LL in San Jose. Check http://sports.tricityvoice.com for the times and dates. Minors 10 (9-10) Milpitas defeated East Hills LL and Oak Grove LL, both of San Jose, last Tuesday and Thursday respectively, and will play a winner's bracket game this Wednesday, July 6, 5:30 p.m. at MSC against Gilroy 2. If Milpitas loses Wednesday, they play again on Friday, July 8, 5:30 p.m. and if they win, they play Saturday, July 9, 11 a.m. Games will continue daily through Monday, July 11, as long as they keep winning. All games at Flickinger Park in San Jose.

D14 Minor and Junior All Star recap BY GARY VAN DEN HEUVEL It’s three down, one to go for the Niles-Centerville Little League (NCLL) Junior All-Stars, who only need one more win to bring home the Division 14 Junior All-Star Tournament crown. Niles got by their first-round opponent Centerville American LL by a 6-3 score (June 25), on the strength of a four-run seventh inning. After two hit batsmen, Brian Knight singled in a run, Kyle Emory reached on an infield error, and Nick Lawrence cleared the bags with a three-run homer. Niles’ June 27 adversary was Mission San Jose LL, who’d battered Warm Springs 19-8 in their first round match-up at Newark Memorial High School. NCLL benefited from a shaky defensive first inning by MSJ, and led 8-1 after one inning. MSJ made this game an exciting contest by rallying from a 13-3 deficit, avoiding the 10-run rule with five runs in the fifth inning. But by game’s end, Niles-Centerville had hung on for a 16-13 victory in a game nearly called due to darkness. Tony Chavez had a stellar game in NCLL’s 12-0 semifinal smoking of Centerville National LL, who’d beaten Fremont American (8-0) and Newark National (10-4) in their first two rounds. Chavez pitched a complete game shutout (five innings before the 10-run rule ended it), and drove in NCLL’s first two runs with a bases-loaded double in a six-run second inning. Niles salted the game away with five more in the third, the big blast being a two-run double off the bat of Emory. Niles-Centerville should be well-rested for the final, which will be played July 8 at 5:30 p.m. at Gomes Elementary School. With the tournament’s double-elimination format, Niles would have to be beaten twice (the “what-if?” game will be played the following day, if necessary) to get knocked out of the tournament. Centerville National’s loss to NCLL dropped them into a loser’s bracket semifinal against Mission San Jose LL (July 6), who rebounded from their loss to Niles by beating Fremont American 2-1 and Centerville American 13-9. In the 10-11 Minors All-Star Championships, Warm Springs Little League (WSLL) brought plenty of lumber to beat Niles-Centerville 1211, before putting a 23-3 hurting on Newark National LL (June 30). This game was close for the first two innings, with Warm Springs leading 5-3, their big blast coming on a two-run inside-the-park home run (a shot that nearly left the field at Gomes School) by Justin Pickney. The floodgates opened in the third inning – 14 walks, 6 hits, and some miscues in the field produced a 14-run inning for Warm Springs. John Dutra had the big blast of the inning, a 2-run triple. Warm Spring’s July 7 semi-final opponent will be Newark American LL, who edged Mission San Jose 3-0. The loser’s bracket in the doubleelimination tourney begins July 5 at 5:30 PM at Warm Springs Elementary School, pitting Mission against Niles. Newark National will be waiting for the winner of that match (July 7 at Newark Memorial High School). The final will be played July 11, at 5:30 at Warm Springs, with the “what-if” game played on July 12 at the same site, if necessary. League with the winner advancing to the D45 Major All Star Championship. Both Treeview and Union City American won their first-round games of the Major All Stars Tournament before losing in the second round. Treeview had an opening round bye before advancing with a 7-0 win over Ashland Little League. Treeview was then sent to the losers bracket with a 2-1 loss to Castro Valley American. UCA beat Tennyson American 6-5 in the opening round before falling to San Lorenzo American 5-2 in the next round. Tennyson American followed

up its loss to UCA with a win over Union City National, 7-5. They will next play San Leandro in the second round of the losers bracket on July 5 with the winner to take on Treeview on July 8. Union City American, after its loss to San Lorenzo American, lost its losers bracket match to Castro Valley National, 16-0 and was eliminated from the tourney. Because of the heavy participation at the young age of the Minors level, the All Star tournaments are broken into two sepacontinued on page


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Mt. Eden Majors, UCA Minors playing solid ball, continued from page 24 rate age groups, 9-10 and 10-11. In the 9-10 age group, no local club remains in the winners bracket, but a number are still alive in the losers bracket. In the 10-11 age group, Union City American remains unbeaten, while UCN, Treeview and Hayward West National are still hanging on in the losers bracket. Both Union City teams made it to the winners bracket semifinals before falling. UCN received a first-round bye before beating Ashland -- who advanced after clubbing Hayward West National 21-3 in the opening round -- 12-9. UCN was upended by Castro Valley American 6-1 in the next game, dropping to the losers bracket. Union City American took out Treeview 19-2 and Mt. Eden 9-8 in its first two games to advance to the winners bracket semifinals before being sent to the losers bracket with a 25-0 loss to San Lorenzo American. San

Lorenzo American got to that point by beating Tennyson American (a 8-7 winner over Castro Valley National in the first round) by an 18-1 margin. UCN awaits the winner of the Treeview-San Lorenzo National winner; UCA, on the other side of the losers bracket, is waiting to take on the winner of San Leandro and Mt. Eden. Both elimination games are on July 5 before Union City teams take on the winners July 8. Union City American Minors 10-11 has won three games to advance to the D45 Minors 10-11 All Star Tournament. On June 25, UCA topped Treeview 11-1 before going on to shutout Mt. Eden 100 on June 26. Against rival Union City National, UCA had a tough time, but edged out their foe in a 2-1 pitchers’ duel to advance to the winners bracket final, where they’ll take on San Leandro July 7 at 6 p.m. on the Tennyson American

Little League field. Union City National, before being sent to the losers bracket, sent Tennyson American there with a 6-5 win on June 25. Tennyson American was eliminated two days later with a 6-4 loss to Treeview. Treeview next will take on Castro Valley American looking to stay alive in losers bracket play. Game time is 6 p.m. on July 5, with the winner to take on Union City National on July 8. On the other side of the losers bracket, Hayward West National remains alive after they beat Mt. Eden 5-2 in the first round of the losers bracket on June 27. Hayward West National will next meet up with San Lorenzo American on July 5, with the winner to take on Castro Valley National. For all D45 results and upcoming games, log onto the TriCity Voice Sports website, http://sports.tricityvoice.com.

MSJLL Majors continue to pound the baseball

Page 25

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SUBMITTED BY ED HUGO After what started out as a hard fought contest, Mission San Jose Little League eventually pulled away from Centerville National Little League, 12-1, in the second round of the District 14 Major (11-13 year olds) All Stars Tournament played at Warm Springs on Monday, June 27. Mission's offense got off to a quick start when Mike Pyle stepped to the plate with two out in the first inning and hit a long home run driving in Brett Hansen and Kyle Dean for a 3-0 lead. After the quick start, the Mission bats were slowed by pitchers Ryan Gibson and Jesse Perez, as they were supported by a solid Centerville National defense around the diamond. Eventually Mission broke through racking up a total of 19 hits and scoring in double digits for the second game in a row. Kyle Dean, Mark Gaffey and Kevin Zhangzou all had four hits, while Ryan King, Mike Pyle and Mark Hu each added a pair. Dean and

MSJLL's Mike Pyle delivers a pitch on the way to complete game victory as centerfielder Brett Hansen looks on.

Zhangzou also counted a homer among their hits for Mission. Boosted by his early homerun, Pyle had a strong outing on the mound for Mission, allowing just one run on three hits as he pitched a complete game. Centerville National’s All Stars, who had scored 11 runs in their previous win, were baffled by Pyle’s mixture of an effective fastball and a dazzling curveball as he struck out 12 batters and walked only two. Centerville National's first serious threat came in the third inning, but ended with two runners stranded on base. They finally

MSJLL Juniors fall but battle back SUBMITTED BY DUSTIN CHIANG After a tough loss to NilesCenterville Little League (NCLL) on Monday, Mission San Jose Little League (MSJLL) rebounded with two hard-fought elimination bracket victories to stay in contention in the California District 14 Junior All-Star competition. MSJLL fell behind 8-0 early against NCLL in the second round of All Star play. With no letdown, Mission San Jose came back slowly throughout the game, aided by three-hit efforts

from Austin King and Jagvir Tamber as well as three runs scored by Hanson Wang. Their comeback fell short, however, and they fell 16-13 to move to the elimination bracket. After unexpected June rain made play impossible on Tuesday, June 28, MSJLL entered a nailbiting pitchers’ duel on Wednesday evening. Mission sent Dustin Chiang to the mound to battle against Ryan Briscoe of Fremont American Little League. Both pitchers were extremely tough to crack, and Briscoe threw a complete game, allowing just two runs. Chiang came out with the

scored in the top of the fifth when, with two out and a 1-2 count, Jordan Frierson stroked a double to the base of the centerfield fence that scored the fleet Carlos Fernandez from second base. Both teams remain alive in the double elimination tournament. Centerville National advanced another day with a 4-0 win over Warm Springs on Wednesday, June 29. They will next play another elimination game match on Tuesday, July 5. Mission San Jose will play Niles-Centerville on Tuesday, July 5, at 5:30 at Marshall School on Curtis Street in Fremont. edge, however, allowing just one run while striking out seven over 5 2/3 innings pitched. Tamber and King of MSJLL followed Chiang on the mound and were lights out, closing out a 2-1 victory for Mission. With a tough elimination bracket schedule, MSJLL played again the following night against a very tough team from Centerville American Little League. Sam Lowrey tossed 5-plus excellent innings for MSJLL, and Tamber came in to pitch yet again, getting the final six outs of the game. King silenced a late seventh-inning rally by CALL with a leaping catch in left field, after which he fired a bullet to second base to double off the runner who had been on second. MSJLL now advances to the final game of the elimination bracket on July 6 at Vallejo Mill Elementary at 5:30 pm against Centerville National Little League.

Warriors to host basketball camp SUBMITTED BY BEN K. CHEN Oakland-based NBA team, the Golden State Warriors, announced that Warriors Basketball Camp will hold a five-day session at Silliman Activity Center in Newark beginning Monday, July 11. The weeklong camp, running Monday, July 11, through Friday, July 15, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., will focus on individual skill development, the importance of fundamentals and the development of a healthy team attitude for boys and girls, ages 7-15, of all skill levels and abilities. The staff at Warriors Basketball Camp is made up of current high school and college coaches, as well as current and former local college players. Most sessions of Warriors Basketball Camp also fea-

ture appearances by current and former Warriors players and coaches. Recently, appearances have been made by Warriors players Andris Biedrins, Stephen Curry, Charles Jenkins, Jeremy Lin, Klay Thompson, Jeremy Tyler, Ekpe Udoh and Reggie Williams. Additionally, recent appearances have been made by Warriors legends Nate Thurmond, Al Attles and Jim Barnett. Warriors Basketball Camp Silliman Activity Center, Newark Monday, July 11, through Friday, July 15, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For boys and girls, ages 7-15 Cost: $295 (includes two tickets to a Warriors 2011-12 regular season game) Contact: www.warriors.com and 510-986-5310

www.pachecobrothers.com


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.ci.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council

Proclaimed July 2011 as Parks and Recreation Month

Fremont City Council June 28, 2011

Public Hearings Issued a conditional use permit to Tri-Cities League of Volunteers (LOV) for Circus Vargas in the NewPark Mall parking lot from July 21 to 25. Application fee waived. Demolition of an existing commercial building (former Cattlemen’s Restaurant) and construction of two new structures at 35000 Newark Blvd.; hearing continued to July 14. Approved diagram and levied annual assessment for FY 201112 for Landscaping and Lighting Districts No. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17. (3 YES votes, 2 RECUSED for Landscaping and Lighting District No. 17 in which Mayor Smith and Councilman Huezo own properties).

Consent: Approve final map of Lunare Development, LLC for public and private streets at the northeast corner of the intersection of Fremont Boulevard and Blacow Road in the Irvington District. Approve Slurry Seal contract with Bond Blacktop, Inc. for $795,556 to provide preventive maintenance for 115 street segments covering approximately 380,000 yards of pavement surface. Bid alternates will add 35 residential street segments. Sufficient funds are available for all work submitted. Approve contract with Falcon Fuels, Inc. as City’s primary vendor for purchase and delivery of a minimum of 200,000 gallons of fuel (approximately 2/3 of the City’s annual fuel consumption) for a one-year term and renewal for up to two one-year terms. Bid by Falcon was $941,653.74. Remainder of fuel requirements is subject to competitive bids. Authorize change of City Council meeting schedule to the first, second and third Tuesday of each month effective after the August Council recess. Special meetings to accommodate unusual circumstances or necessary additional sessions will be “widely noticed to the public.” Ceremonial: Honor Police Officer Mike Laing for 30 years service Other Business: Consider alternatives for a change to provisions for the Affordable Housing Ordinance which requires 15% of units to be available at affordable rents or purchase cost (or an in-lieu fee). Changes will allow developers to acquire affordable units – low and very low income - including “short-sale” off-site after issuance of a building permit if a security deposit is in place. Approve FY 2010/11 signal priority list and allocate funds for traffic improvement projects including intersection improvements at Blacow Road/Fremont Boulevard; Blacow Road/Omar Street-Robin Street; Blacow Road/Boone Drive; Fremont Boulevard/Enea Court. Signalized intersections are controlled by the City (161) and Caltrans (47). Staff was asked to study of new ranking system of signals and traffic calming. Light replacement alternatives were discussed as well as the issue of Scott Creek Road traffic. No new traffic signals are proposed. Appropriate $840,000 from FY 2009/10 and FY 2010/11 and $365,000 from FY 2011/12. Mayor Bob Wasserman Aye Vice Mayor Suzanne Lee Chan Aye Anu Natarajan Aye Bill Harrison Aye Dominic Dutra Aye

Newark City Council Newark City Council June 23, 2011 Presentations and Proclamations Commendation for Betty Gentry who has taught tap, ballet, acrobatics and contemporary dance, plus a ballet program for more advanced students, for the City of Newark since 1963 and is retiring after 48 years. Councilmembers Apodaca and Huezo are former students. Gentry has her own reserved parking space at the Silliman Center where a dance studio is named after her.

Consent Established the amount of property tax revenue ($8.381M) necessary to support city departments for FY2011-12. Established FY2011-12 Appropriations Limit of $263,152,701. Called and gave notice of General Municipal Election for Tuesday, November 8, 2011. Authorized Mayor to sign Lease Agreement with Alameda County for lease of Newark Library facility for a year. Annual rent of facility will remain at $1. Monthly janitorial services will cost $2,864.75. Authorized Mayor to sign a Lease Agreement with Viola Blythe Community Service Center of Newark, Inc. for lease of Ash St. facility as a food and clothing distribution center. Approved Compensation and Benefits Plans for the Confidential Employee Group, City Officials, Management, Supervisory, and Professional Employee Group. Amended the 2010-12 Biennial Budget and Capital Improvement Plan for FY2011-12 Capital Budget Rollover ($7,541,700). Authorized the City Manager to allocate unassigned fund balances to a specific purpose, as necessary. Authorized an agreement with HF&H Consultants, LLC for technical assistance for recycling efforts. Authorized a three-year cooperation agreement with Alameda County for participation in the Alameda County Urban County Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program for FY2011-12. Non-Consent Authorized Police Department to participate in a consolidated dispatch study in partnership with Fremont and Union City utilizing the services of DELTAWRX Management Consultants; authorized City Manager to reimburse Fremont $17,500, for Newark’s share of costs associated with study. Abandoned portion of Mowry School Rd. right-of-way, north of John Muir Dr. and set July 28, 2011 for public hearing. First Draft Maps of California Electoral Districts: Primary change to Newark is greater association with San Jose and less with Central and Eastern Alameda County. District boundaries not split. Mayor mentioned the maps were interesting; wanted Tri-Cities to stay together. Newark has to be whole. Councilman Nagy said that historically Fremont, Union City and Newark have been together; makes geographical sense. According to Councilmember Apodaca, Newark would be better represented if the city were part of a Tri-City area within a single Congressional District.

Araf Aziz, Citizens Redistricting Commission, said that 50-70 people would attend a meeting on June 25 to discuss district boundaries and keep both Fremont and Newark intact. Aziz hoped to have a letter signed by the Mayor agreeing with the proposed draft of the Congressional District maps. Fremont would be at the southern boundary; Hayward, San Lorenzo, San Leandro, San Ramon in the north, with part of Dublin. Meetings will be held on June 27 and 28 in San Francisco. After public comments are received, the Commission will release another draft of the District maps in July. August 15, 2011, is the deadline for final approval of new Districts. Council Matters Appointed Kathleen Vennemeyer to Industrial Development Authority for three years. Oral Communications Councilmember Huezo wished Newark citizens safe and sane July 4 celebrations. Mayor David Smith -Yes Vice Mayor Luis Freitas - Yes Ana Apodaca - Yes Alan Nagy - Yes Alberto Huezo - Yes

Union City City Council City of Union City June 28, 2011 Consent: Authorize a contractual agreement for a feasibility study for a consolidated Dispatch Center for Fremont, Newark and Union City. Cost to Union City for the study will be $17,500. Appropriate two Federal Transit Administration grant funds in the amount of $6,359,970 and Redevelopment Agency 2011 Bond Proceeds in the amount of $1,810,983; award the contract to Joseph J. Albanese of Santa Clara, CA in the amount of $ 5,640,168 for the East Plaza Improvement Project. Total project cost including utilities and contingency funding estimated at $7,340,168. Award contract for station playground and promenade to Blossom Valley Landscape of San Jose, CA in the amount of $1,479,030. The pedestrian promenade is the central spine of the Station District linking housing, retail, job centers, and the Union City Intermodal Station. Union City Redevelopment Agency 2011 Bond Proceeds will be the funding source for the project. Total project cost estimated at $1,800,000. Authorize payment repair for Whipple Road between Amaral Street and the bridge over BART (2) Central Avenue between Alvarado-Niles Road and Whipple Road (3) Dowe Avenue between Alvarado-Niles Road and Atlantic Street (4) Decoto Road near Alvarado-Niles Road. Award project to Galedridge Construction, Inc. of Alviso, California in the amount of $349,650. Authorize Redevelopment Agency to fund the Rental Assistance Fund at Tropics Mobile Home Park in the amount of $200,000 a year for ten years. Redevelopment Agency Board authorize a contract amendment with ROMA Design Group to provide Construction Support Services for BART Phase 2. The BART Phase 2 Construction Support contract is not to exceed $1,189,000 which includes a $108,000 contingency. The BART Phase 1 Construction Support contract was for $2,195,143.

Terminate the Amended and Restated Exclusive Negotiating Agreement with Barry Swenson Builder. Issue a Request for Qualifications for a new market-rate developer to construct a minimum of 187 residential units with floor retail on Block 3. Approve pavement rehabilitation on Dyer Street. The project is funded through the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)/Alameda County Congestion Management Agency Block Grant of $861,000 and Measure B funds. Mayor Green asked whether this would be done prior to the new school year. No definitive answer. Public Hearings: Adopt a resolution to use Bridge District surplus funds for neighborhood street improvements. Each district surplus must be used for improvements within that district although some districts overlap and may allow use within both districts affected. Public comments reflected need for sidewalk, curb, gutter improvements at specific locations. City Manager Reports: Resolution to adopt the FY 2011/12 and 2012/13 Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Plan for FY 2011-12 through 2015-16. State budget and redevelopment considerations may require adjustments but budget needs approval prior to July 1. Operating Budget is set at $74,424,340 in FY 2011-12 and $76,063,448 in FY 2012; capital outlay budget of $798,344 in FY 2011-12 and $2,437,344 in FY 2012-13; Capital Improvements Projects (CIP) budget of $28,093,684 in FY 2011-12; $22,184,314 in FY 2012-13; $9,615,714 in FY 2013-14; $2,099,714 in FY 2014-15; $5,144,714 in FY 2015-16 Appoint two additional community members to the Measure AA Sales Tax Oversight Committee. Currently, Carol Dutra Vernaci, Richard Valle and Harpal Mann have been appointed. Adopt a resolution to support the Development Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act currently under consideration by the U.S. Congress. Mayor Mark GreenAye (Voted No to protest Measure WW items) Vice Mayor Jim Navarro Aye Councilmember Emily Duncan Aye Councilmember Lorrin EllisAye Councilmember Pat Gacoscos Aye

Hayward City Council Hayward City Council June 28, 2011 Consent Approval of minutes of June 14 Special City Council/Redevelopment Agency (RDA)/Housing Authority meeting held over to July 12, 2011, pending correction. Preliminarily approved engineer’s report and levy assessments for FY 2012 for Consolidated Landscaping and Lighting District No. 96-1, Zones 1-13, and set public hearing for July 26, 2011. Preliminarily approved engineer’s report and levy assessment for FY 2012 for Maintenance District No. 1, adopted resolution of intent, and scheduled public hearing for July 26, 2011. Preliminarily approved engineer’s report and levy assessment for FY 2012 for Maintenance District No. 2, adopted resolution of intent, and scheduled public hearing for July 26, 2011. Adopted three resolutions for paying and reporting values of employer-paid member contribu-

tions for City of Hayward employee bargaining groups to California Public Employees Retirement System. Entered into a three-year agreement with Wells Fargo Insurance Services, USA, Inc. for group insurance broker and advisory services and inclusion of the City of Hayward with the Wells Fargo Municipality Pool for Delta dental coverage. The contract will save $49,929, in total. Authorized RDA Executive Director to negotiate and execute contract with TRC Solutions, Inc. and to appropriate $62,000 for additional Phase II Investigation of the Residual Burbank School site (353 B St.) and to prepare a Removal Action Completion report. Elected Councilwoman Barbara Halliday as Mayor Pro Tempore. Authorized inter-fund transfer and assignment of First-Time Homebuyer Down Payment Assistance Program loans ($2.261M in outstanding loans) from the City of Hayward to the Housing Authority which will now control the loan agreements and associated funding for the Program. Approved RDA budget transfer of $450,000 to Capital Improvement Program budget, Street System Improvement Fund, for Transportation for Livable Communities grant matching funds for the South Hayward BART Transit-Oriented Development Project. Public Hearing Considered annual levy ($55,000) for the Downtown Business Improvement Area (DBIA) for calendar year 2012. The RDA will also allocate $55,000 to the DBIA whose total budget allocation will be $110,000. Request to change zoning from Medium Density Residential to Planned Development and to sub-divide the property [353 B St. at the southwest corner of B St. and Myrtle St, east of Burbank Elementary School] to construct 57 detached, single-family homes. Urban Dynamic (applicant); City of Hayward (owner). Continued to July 12, 2011. Legislative Business Agreement for purchase and sale of real property (353 B St.) between the City of Hayward and Urban Dynamic, LLC for the construction of 57 detached, single-family homes. Continued to July 12, 2011. Public Comment Jim Drake continues to remark on safety of the Route 238 Corridor Improvement Project. His ultimate concern is the extent of the city’s liability along the project’s route. He has met with Bob Bauman, Director of Public Works, of whom he asked three questions. 1) Contractually, is the city requiring Top Grade Construction to comply with Caltrans safety criteria for open-cut, center trenches, etc? YES. 2) Contractually, is the city free of any and all liability, including legal fees incurred in the city’s defense, any and all claims and judgments relating to safety of the Corridor? YES. 3) Is the city responsible for any tires, rims, alignments due to potholes, sunken trenches in the contract area? NO; Top Grade is responsible. Councilman Marvin Peixoto attended the Alameda County Board of Supervisor’s redistricting public hearing on June 28 to advocate keeping Hayward intact within a supervisorial district. Boundaries delineated by “Map E” do keep Hayward, and Pleasanton, intact and will be adopted on July 12. continued on page 27


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Page 27

It’s done, but is it?

WILLIAM MARSHAK The great State of California through our esteemed representatives – Republicans AND Democrats has done it again… a budget filled with political rhetoric and tricks that creates more controversy and legal wrangling than solutions. The political wasteland of Sacramento is in shambles but at least our hard-working representatives can get paid. I have spent sleepless nights worrying about our underpaid, overworked public overlords. Now, I can rest easy. Sadly, this travesty is just a warm-up for the political havoc soon to be unleashed at the Federal level. With budgets ratified by councils and boards to meet a fiscal year deadline, dependence on what may be non-existent Redevelopment Agency contracts and agreements means it will be time to go back to the drawing boards. The threat of lawsuits and more uncertainty is waiting and as a consequence, most jurisdictions are probably not much better off now than before a continued from page 26

Nicholas Vigil thanked Council for funding the Hayward Municipal Band. Mayor Michael Sweeney – Yes Barbara Halliday – Yes Olden Henson – Yes Marvin Peixoto – Yes Bill Quirk – Yes Mark Salinas – Yes Francisco Zermeño - Yes

Milpitas City Council Milpitas City Council June 21, 2011 Presentations Promoting Lifelong Partnerships and Awareness in Your Community (PLAY) awards were presented to Milpitasinfo.com, Blush Organic Frozen Yogurt, Pete’s Coffee and Tea, Subway Prismatic, The Milpitas Post, Walgreens and Headway Technologies for sponsoring food, refreshments and supplies at various city events. Recognized Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Volunteers for assisting seniors and citizens with tax return preparations at Milpitas Public Library for 2010 Tax Season North Valley Christian Fellowship recognized for their donations to Japan Tsunami relief efforts. Consent Authorized advertisement for bid proposals for complete sound wall removal and replacement of approximately 240 ft. along Del Rio Court; estimated project cost is $150,000. Approved amendment to agreement with Sugimura Finney Architects for minor modifications to the recycled water main at the Great Mall Parkway median, to incorporate increased requirements of the new State General Construction storm water permit and omit landscape that would be removed from the BART expan-

budget was sent to the Governor and signed. The only thing that seems certain is that redevelopment agencies, at best, will remain under a cloud of uncertainty. Existing project funding will continue but new and creative sleight-of-hand transactions are risky and probably untenable. It is clear that the State is intent on dipping into the redevelopment pot of gold and State representatives who profess allegiance to their local constituencies are enveloped by different priorities and perspectives once they arrive in Sacramento. Extortion is the name of the new redevelopment game as cities are asked to choose the loss of the golden goose or pay protection money. School districts are placed in the middle as some recovered redevelopment funds are earmarked for them. In the midst of this budget turmoil, redistricting is slicing and dicing our communities into an unrecognizable landscape of partitions that rip historical and traditional spheres of influence apart. In the name of numerical “fairness,” the Tri-Cities, their environs and representatives find themselves in strange configurations that bear little resemblance to common purpose. Fremont and its traditional neighbors will become Balkanized and political representatives will have little sense of home territory or place. The nonsensical and ambivalent nature of legislative will at almost all levels of government is reminiscent of the adventures of Alice in Wonderland, written by Lewis Carroll almost 150 years ago. When Alice speaks of a world she would create it resonates with current political reality: “If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary-wise; what it is it wouldn't be, and what it wouldn't be, it would. You see?”

sion. Cost of the amendment is $55,645, bringing the total agreement amount to $686,337. Approved an agreement with David J. Powers and Associates, Inc. in the amount of $100,000 to provide environmental services for the Montague Expressway Widening Project to add a fourth lane in each direction. Approved agreement with Shalleck Collaborative, Inc. in the amount of $100,000 for design services to replace and/or upgrade audio visual systems located in Council Chambers, conference rooms and audio visual control room. Approved budget appropriation of $57,500 from the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority Community Design and Transportation Planning Grant for the Milpitas Climate Action Plan (CAP), with city funding of $42,500, for a total of $100,000. The CAP will develop emissionreduction measures in response to AB 32 and SB 375. Approved plans and specification and authorized bid proposals for the Alviso Adobe renovation which will rebuild three existing outbuildings, construct a new public restroom, onsite parking, landscaping, new park benches and picnic areas in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Estimated cost for the work is $2.5M. Renewed contract for excess worker’s compensation insurance with insurance broker, Brown & Brown of California, in the amount of $109,976 for FY 2011-12; cost is based on the city’s payroll. Authorized amendment number two of the contract with Universal Building Services. The annual cost of city-wide janitorial services increases by $17,492, for an annual amount of $191,300. The contract will run from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012. Approved consultancy agreement with Kimley-Horn and Associates for engineering and design plans, in the amount of $85,000, to relocate existing storm drain pipe at Capitol Avenue and connect to storm drain system at Piper Road.

It seems, not much has changed in political circles since then. Alice, in conversation with the Duchess is given this advice: “Be what you would seem to be -- or, if you'd like it put more simply -- Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.” Within this maelstrom comes a reality of political life. The only protection for cities from madness is to request and hope for help from other politicians farther up the food chain, but expect none. Each municipality must live within a limited budget focused on basic services; employees, especially department heads and executives, should expect significant and drastic reductions; the bottom tier can least afford the axe. As political will strengthens in local councils and rational decisions are made, the electorate will separate sanity from lunacy and rally to local funding initiatives. Trust is the legal tender of politics – clear, concise and honest decisions with a minimum of inconsequential chatter are the small change that builds a solid portfolio. Inane comments and verbosity for its own sake is the currency of spendthrifts. Councilmembers would be wise to study recordings of council meetings and honestly evaluate their behavior. Political capital is hard to gather, don’t waste it.

Approved an agreement with XO Communications to upgrade and replace fiber optic cables and conduits between City Hall and the Public Works building for $107,750. New lease agreement of $72,694.65 will be provided for parts and labor as deemed necessary by city staff; the city’s fiber optic network is valued at $180,444.65. Authorized agreement with Compass Group USA, Inc. to cater for the Senior Center Nutrition Program in the amount of $71,044 for FY 2011-12, and with New Orient Restaurant in the amounts of $32,367 for FY 2010-11 and $34,992 for FY 2011-12. The Senior Nutrition Program is a joint initiative between Milpitas and Santa Clara County; each contributes $86,475 (totaling $173,489). Approved contract with Valley Oil Company for gasoline and fuel for an annual amount of $600,000; the contract is valid from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013 with three one-year options to renew through June 30, 2016. Received PG&E progress report; pipelines are monitored around the clock; there are annual leak surveys and quarterly on-ground inspections. Operating pressure has been reduced in pipes similar to those that exploded in San Bruno in Septem-

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach GOVERNMENT Simon Wong SPORTS Giovanni Albanese Jr. SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Pahoua Sayaovang Patricia Cragin BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

William Marshak PUBLISHER ber 2010. PG&E tests the strength of pipe with water instead of gas and replaces failed lines with a section of pipe of the necessary strength. Hydrostatic Pressure Tests for Milpitas will occur in July 2011. Six automatic, or remotely operated shutoff valves, will be installed on current manual valves throughout the city. For more information, visit www.pge.com/gassystem. Redevelopment Agency Approved a $20,000 contract with the Milpitas Chamber of Commerce for business retention efforts. Creation of Foreign Trade Zones will provide space for duty-free receipt of overseas equipment, or products, and the EB5 Program to provide foreign investment for construction and infrastructure projects to generate and maintain jobs for the first quarter of FY 2011. Public Forum Robert Marini discussed the city’s calculation of fees for the recently approved water and sewer rate increases. Mayor Jose Esteves - Yes Vice Mayor Pete McHugh Absent Debbie Giordano - Yes Armando Gomez, Jr. - Yes Althea Polanski - Absent

REPORTERS Julie Grabowski Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Rajeswari Ramanathan Alyson Whitaker WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for (1) the City of Union City, (2) the City of Fremont, (3) the County of Alameda, and (4) the State of California.

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39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES BUSINESS NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: June 2, 2011 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: Slight Edge Corporation The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 37365 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536-3743 Type of license(s) applied for: 20 Off-Sale Beer And Wine 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2125885# NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: JUNE 14, 2011 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: RANJEET S CHHABRA JATINDER SINGH The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 37436 & 37440 FREMONT BLVD FREMONT, CA 94536-3705 Type of License(s) Applied for: 21 - OFF-SALE GENERAL Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 1515 CLAY ST, STE 2208, OAKLAND, CA 94612 (510) 622-4970 LA1021095 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2123687#

CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. HG11579508 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Christina C Nusom for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Christina C Nusom filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Javier Rogelio Camacho to Javier Rogelio Camacho-Nusom The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 08/08/2011, Time: 8:45, Dept.: 514 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri City Voice Date: June 08, 2011 C. DON CLAY Judge of the Superior Court 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2122003# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG11578262 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Jeff Khan for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Jeff Khan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Jeff Khan to Jeff Isaac Khan The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 08/18/2011, Time: 2:30 PM, Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Whats Happenings Tri City Voice Date: May 31, 2011 RICHARD O. KELLER Judge of the Superior Court 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2121760# ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG11578551 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Hong Zhao for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Hong Zhao filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Brian David Drinkwater to Brian David Zhao The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: October 6, 2011, Time: 2:30 p.m., Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Tri-City Voice Date: June 2, 2011 Richard O. Keller Judge of the Superior Court 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2116863#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 453221 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: FPGA Central, 39997 Cedar Blvd., Suite 253, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Universal Tech Media Corporation, California, 39997 Cedar Blvd., Suite 253, Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 4/1/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Krati Rungta, Treasurer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 23, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 7/5, 7/12, 7/19, 7/26/11 CNS-2130631# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 453338 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

The Law Offices of Rupinder (Ruby) Kang, 4685 Hampshire Way, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Rupinder Kaur Kang, 4685 Hampshire Way, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rupinder Kang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 27, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 7/5, 7/12, 7/19, 7/26/11 CNS-2130595# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 452499 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Brilliant Minds Academy, 194 Francisco Lane, Suite 212, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda 327 Jamie Ct., San Ramon, Contra Costa, CA 94582 Praveen Gupta, 327 Jamie Ct., San Ramon, CA 94582 Binita Agarwal, 327 Jamie Ct., San Ramon, CA 94582 This business is conducted by Husband and wife The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 02/01/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Praveen Gupta This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 6, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2126317#

NAME STATEMENT File No. 452217 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: The American Hemodialysis Academy, 6253-D Joaquin Murieta, Ave., Newark, CA 94560,County of Alameda Ismael V. Corpuz, 6253-D Joaquin Murieta, Ave., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ismael V. Corpuz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on May 27, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2117992#

Manager’s change order or amendment authority; provide procedures that will allow for flexibility in procurement processes when justified; delegate authority to allow specification by brand name; define certain contracts as exempt from competitive procurement and clarify use of the sole source, piggybacking and “idle act” exceptions to competitive procurement; establish protest procedures; and require departments when requested by the finance director to provide reports on the contracts they procure and manage.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 451840 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DISCOTECA MEXICO 40919 FREMONT BLVD, FREMONT CA, 94538, County of ALAMEDA RAMON RAMIREZ RAMIREZ 1834 DACTON WAY UNION CITY CA, 94587 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1996 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ RAMON RAMIREZ RAMIREZ This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on MAY 17,2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2117326#

The Ordinance was adopted at a regular meeting of the City of Fremont City Council held June 28, 2011, by the following vote, to wit:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 452827 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: One Mom, 42140 Trenouth St., #29, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Julie M. Ramirez, 42140 Trenouth St., #29, Fremont, CA 94538. Paul L. Mitchell, Jr., 42140 Trenouth St., #29, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Julie M. Ramirez, wife Owner Paul L. Mitchell, Jr., husband co-owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 14, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 452589 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Robert & Lily International, LLC, 38350 Fremont Blvd., Suite 202C, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Robert & Lily International, LLC, California, 38350 Fremont Blvd., Suite 202C, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Robert G. Zhang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 08, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11

CNS-2125890#

CNS-2117286#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 452826 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Mamaws Jardin, 41240 Trenouth Street #29, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda. Julie M. Ramirez, 41240 Trenouth Street #29, Fremont, CA 94538. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on June 1, 2011. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Julie M. Ramirez, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 14, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2125888# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 452715 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Newark Auto Body Sales Repair, 37643 Timber St., Unit C, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda. Aziz Raufi, 37643 Timber St., Unit C, Newark, CA 94560. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6-9-11. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Aziz Raufi This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2122227# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 422642-43 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: (1) Newark Auto Body Sales And Repair, (2) Best Car Sales, 37643 Timber St., Unit C/M, Newark, CA 94560. The fictitious business name statement for the Partnership was filed on 3/04/09 in the County of Alameda. Anisa Nomair, 37643 Timber St., Unit C/M, Newark, CA 94560. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/ Anisa Nomair This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on June 9, 2011. 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2122226# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

GOVERNMENT CITY OF FREMONT PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of Fremont City Council will hold a public hearing to consider the following proposal. Said public hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. , Tuesday, July 19, 2011, Council Chambers, 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg. A, Fremont, CA, at which time all interested parties may attend and be heard: VILLA D’ESTE PLANNED DISTRICT MAJOR AMENDMENT (PLN2011-00161) Public Hearing (Published Noticed) to Consider Planning Commission Recommendation to Introduce an Ordinance Adopting a Planned District Major Amendment to P-2005-80 (Villa D’este) Amending Conditions of Approval Related to Building and Site Design Modifications for the Remaining 126 attached Units Located at the Southeast Quadrant of Ardenwood Boulevard and Paseo Padre Parkway in Northern Plain Planning Area (PLN2011-00161) MOWRY/GUARDINO LENNAR PD – VACANT LOT AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE INTERSECTION OF MOWRY AVENUE & GUARDINO DRIVE Public Hearing (Published Notice) to Consider Planning Commission’s recommendation to introduce an ordinance adopting a Precise Planned District (P-2011-154), a Private Street, a Preliminary Grading Plan, and Tentative Tract Map 8076 for a 16-Unit Duet Development on a Vacant 0.99-Acre Parcel (PLN2011-00154) CENTER THEATER CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT AMENDMENT APPEAL – 37411 FREMONT BOULEVARD – PLN2011-00093 Public Hearing (Published Notice) to Consider a First-Party Appeal of a Planning Commission Denial Due to Lack of Majority Vote for a Conditional Use Permit Amendment to PLN200300085 to Expand the Allowable Uses to Include a Concert Hall, Banquet Facility, Dinner Theater, and Other Assembly Uses and Events Where a Performing Arts Theater and Move Theater are Currently Permitted in the Centerville Planning Area If you challenge any decision of the City Council in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 7/5/11 CNS-2131352# CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF PROPOSED ORDINANCE [per Government Code Section 36933(c)(1)] As Introduced June 21, 2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT Amending various provisions of the purchasing code as set forth in title II, chapter 9, SECTIONS 2-9100 THROUGH 2-9800 OF THE Fremont Municipal Code On June 21, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance Amending various provisions of the purchasing code as set forth in Title II, Chapter 9, Sections 2-9100 through 29800 of the Fremont Municipal Code. The purpose of the proposed ordinance is to update the City’s purchasing code to be more clear, to more closely reflect administrative practice, to reduce administrative burden, and to provide procedures where needed. These changes will make the city’s contracting procedures more clear, flexible, and efficient. The proposed ordinance is not intended as a comprehensive revision and the basic structure and requirements for competitive procurement are not proposed to be changed. City Manager authority to award and execute contracts is proposed to remain at the same dollar threshold ($100,000) in most instances, but will be measured per contract and not per contractor per fiscal year. Other proposed modifications will: clarify the City

A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is posted in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Ave, Fremont, and is available for review upon request. The second reading for adoption is currently scheduled for July 12, 2011, at 7:00 pm, at City Hall, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Fremont. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 7/5/11 CNS-2131339#

Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 22nd DAY OFJuly 2011at or after 11: 15ampursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Thornton U-Haul, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Monica Swenson B138 5/12/2011 Michael Martinez B159 5/02/2011 Boris Oak B188 5/10/2011 Jenna Meeks B329 5/01/2011 Robin Beecher C118 5/17/2001 Jeff Biggs C129 5/04/2011 Paul Uribes C144 4/30/2011 Steven Mendes C229 5/01/2011 Luis Reyes C249 4/21/2011 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2131262#

CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 07-2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT AMENDING THE PRECISE PLAN FOR PDISTRICT 2009-9 FOR PROPERTY LOCATED AT 3651 WALNUT AVENUE On June 14, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance Amending the Precise Plan for P-District 2009-9 from Property Located at 3651 Walnut Avenue.

AYES: Mayor Wasserman, Vice Mayor Chan, Councilmembers: Natarajan and Harrison NOES: None

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 22nd DAY OF July 2011at or after11:15am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: Grimmer U-Haul, 44511 Grimmer Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Melissa Costello 257U 5/10/2011 Claudio Parra 330 5/20/2011 Toni Grenesco 333 3/16/2011 Melissa Costello 335 5/10/2011 Cesar Rodelas 346 3/21/2011 Petra Lozano 348 4/09/2011 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2131256#

ABSENT: None ABSTAINED: Councilmember Dutra A certified copy of the full text of Ordinance No. 07-2011 as adopted is available for review upon request in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 7/5/11 CNS-2131333# CITY OF FREMONT SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCE NO. 06-2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FREMONT REZONING PROPERTY LOCATED LOCATED ALONG NILES BOULEVARD DESIGNATED AS APN 507-0828-005-00 & 507-0828-006-00 FROM COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL DISTRICT, HISTORIC OVERLAY DISTRICT (C-C)(HOD) TO PLANNED DISTRICT HISTORIC OVERLAY DISTRICT (P-2011-232)(HOD) On June 14, 2011, the Fremont City Council introduced the above Ordinance Rezoning Property Located along Niles Boulevard Designated as APN 507-0828-005-00 & APN 507-0828-006-00 from Community Commercial District, Historic Overlay District (C-C)(HOD) to Planned District Historic Overlay District (P-2011-232)(HOD). The Ordinance was adopted at a regular meeting of the City of Fremont City Council held June 28, 2011, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Mayor Wasserman, Vice Mayor Chan, Councilmembers: Natarajan, Harrison and Dutra NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAINED: None A certified copy of the full text of Ordinance No. 06-2011 as adopted is available for review upon request in the office of the City Clerk, 3300 Capitol Avenue, Building A, Fremont. DAWN G. ABRAHAMSON CITY CLERK 7/5/11 CNS-2131331# NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS PROJECT RE-BID: Due to a pending protest of the Centerville Ballfield Synthetic Turf Project PWC 8717 that opened on June 16, 2011, the City of Fremont has elected to reject all bids. The action to reject is tentatively on the July 19, 2011 Council Agenda. Sealed bids will be received in the Office of Purchasing Services at 3300 Capitol Ave., Bldg B, Fremont, California, up to the hour of 2:00 PM on July 28, 2011, at which time they will be opened and read out loud in said building for: THE RE-BID OF: CENTERVILLE BALLFIELD CONVERSION, PWC8717 Plans, special provisions and standard proposal forms to be used for bidding on this project can be obtained for a non-refundable fee at ARC/ Peninsula Digital located at 44846 Osgood Road, Fremont, CA 94539 or 599 Fairchild Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043, or through Planwell at www.peninsuladigital.com, Phone (510) 490-7411, Fax (510) 657-7248. No partial sets will be issued, cost is non-refundable. Call to confirm availability of copies before coming to pick up documents. For more information on this project, contact the City of Fremont Purchasing Department at (510) 494-4620. CORINA CAMPBELL PURCHASING MANAGER CITY OF FREMONT 7/5/11 CNS-2130467#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARIA ANGELICA DE LA FUENTE CASE NO. FP11581341 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Maria Angelica De La Fuente A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Clyde Hacker in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Clyde Hacker be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 07/26/2011 at 10:30 AM in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Timothy J. Gavin, TIMOTHY J GAVIN, 39300 Civic Center Drive, Suite 310, Fremont, CA 94538, Telephone: (510) 248-4769 6/24, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2123837#

TRUSTEE SALES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 11012335 Loan No. 0153914569 Title Order No. 110169369CABFI APN 4830044100 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED July 21, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 25, 2011, at 12:30 PM, at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on August 1, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006294338 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, CA, executed by: MIRANDA BEASLEY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 31348 SANTA MARIA DRIVE, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining unpaid balance of the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust (together with any modifications thereto). The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $576,843.17 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. DATE: 06/30/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, TRUSTEE 3075 Prospect Park Dr., Ste 100 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 Rozalyn Tudor Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 ASAP# 4033894 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011, 07/19/2011 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2130551# Trustee Sale No. 449721CA Loan No. 0021438130 Title Order No. 783343 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07-14-2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 07-26-2011 at 12:00 PM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07-25-2005, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 2005314043, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: JOSE CONCEPCION PEREZ AND MARTINA PEREZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.,(MERS), SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER,RESMAE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, IT’S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE FALLON STREET EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON ST. , OAKLAND, CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $284,553.06 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 4109 URANUS DRIVE UNION CITY, CA 94587-4046 APN Number: 483-0102-148-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 07-01-2011 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee CASIMIR NUNEZ, ASSISTANT SECRETARY CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: (714) 730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com P852428 7/5, 7/12, 07/19/2011 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2130030#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 09-0272-CA Loan No. 505633-8 Title Order No. 4016315 APN: 901-0193-141 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 09-26-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO


July 5, 2011

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PUBLIC NOTICES PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 08-02-2011 at 12: 30 P.M., ROBERT E. WEISS INCORPORATED as the duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded 09-29-2006, book , page , instrument 2006369150 of official records in the office of the recorder of ALAMEDA county, California, executed by: BEATRIZ ADRIANA BUENROSTRO, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN AND DAVID C RUIZ, AN UNMARRIED MAN AS TENANTS IN COMMON, as Trustor, BANKUNITED, FSB, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION SALE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Place of sale: THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust in the property situated in said county, California describing the land therein: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6446 BUENA VISTA DRIVE, UNIT A NEWARK, CA 94560 The undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said not(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust, to wit: Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $430,962.80 (estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a Written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said notice of default and election to sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: June 27, 2011 ROBERT E. WEISS INCORPORATED, As Trustee ATTN: FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 920 VILLAGE OAKS DRIVE COVINA CA 91724 (626)967-4302 FOR SALE INFORMATION: www.lpsasap.com or (714) 730-2727 CRIS A KLINGERMAN, ESQ. WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 4031837 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011, 07/19/2011 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2129027# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100009131 Title Order No. 10-8-044024 APN No. 486 -0056-104 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/04/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by ABNER MANALANG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 05/04/2005 and recorded 05/11/05, as Instrument No. 2005195811, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/19/2011 at 12:00PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, Alameda, CA at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2233 SHERMAN DRIVE, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $710,322.95. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office. DATED: 04/29/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.104233 6/28, 7/05, 7/12/2011 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2128053# Trustee Sale No. 438637CA Loan No. 0702714205 Title Order No. 208225 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/29/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 7-19-2011 at 12:00 PM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 08-092005, Book , Page , Instrument 2005337920, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, executed by: BENJAMIN BENITEZ AND SUSAN BENITEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE FALLON ST EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON ST. OAKLAND, CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $507,023.56 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 418 RIVIERA DRIVE UNION CITY, CA 94587 APN Number: 087-0037-060-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 6/22/2011 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee JAMES TOLLIEVER, ASSISTANT SECRETARY CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: (714) 730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com P850508 6/28, 7/5, 07/12/2011 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2126795#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 110026338 Title Order No. 11-0020847 Investor/ Insurer No. 163944112 APN No. 092A-0718-028 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JOSE A MARTINEZ, AND ESTHER MARTINEZ,HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, dated 02/27/2007 and recorded 03/07/07, as Instrument No. 2007096815, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/26/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 36387 DARVON ST, NEWARK, CA, 945602615. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $698,056.38. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 07/02/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4021229 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011, 07/19/2011 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11

ALAMEDA County, State of California. Executed by: CYNTHIA ACHACOSO, A SINGLE PERSON,. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) At the Fallon Street emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, CA. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 0870111-014. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 35580 MONTERRA TERRACE # 102, UNION CITY, CA 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $392,564.95. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s Trustee. The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporations a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or The timeframe for giving Notice of Sale specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Date: 06/21/11, First American Title Insurance Company First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC 3 First American Way, Santa Ana, CA 92707 Original document signed by Authorized Agent, Chet Sconyers -- FOR TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916) 939-0772. First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC May be Acting as a Debt Collector Attempting to Collect a Debt. Any Information obtained may be used for that purpose. NPP0183856 06/28/11, 07/05/11, 07/12/11 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2126267#

CNS-2126533#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100024904 Title Order No. 10-8-101771 APN No. 087-0337-013 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/20/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by KESAR SINGH, A MARRIED MAN, AND GURPREET KAUR, A MARRIED WOMAN, AS JOINT TENANTS, dated 11/20/2006 and recorded 11/30/06, as Instrument No. 2006440521, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/12/2011 at 12:00PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, Alameda, CA at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1022 CHALCEDONY TERRACE, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $630,017.66. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office. DATED: 05/20/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.100020 6/21, 6/28, 7/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2123570#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 110026230 Title Order No. 11-0020806 Investor/ Insurer No. 120507777 APN No. 543-0424-058 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/25/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by TONG SUN KIM, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 10/25/2005 and recorded 11/01/05, as Instrument No. 2005470190, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/26/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4874 MENDOTA STREET, UNION CITY, CA, 945875554. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $663,557.01. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 07/02/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4021223 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011, 07/19/2011 7/5, 7/12, 7/19/11 CNS-2126531# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 090150853 Title Order No. 09-8-453514 Investor/ Insurer No. 158248750 APN No. 087-0337-039 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/09/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SHABNAM BIBI, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, dated 04/09/2007 and recorded 04/17/07, as Instrument No. 2007145275, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/19/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 35117 11TH STREET, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $587,086.44. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 01/09/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4028888 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2126355# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TSG No.: 5193624 TS No.: CA1100225702 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN:087-0111-014 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/23/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 18, 2011 at 12:00 PM, First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 02/28/07, as Instrument No. 2007088455, in book , page , of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder of

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 110022851 Title Order No. 11-0018510 Investor/ Insurer No. 138029888 APN No. 092A-0940-017 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/23/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by STEVEN JAURIGUI, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 05/23/2006 and recorded 05/31/06, as Instrument No. 2006212785, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/19/2011 at 12: 30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 5867 MAYHEWS LANDING RD, NEWARK, CA, 945603126. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $715,815.15. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 06/25/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By:-- Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4016973 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11 CNS-2123558# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 110015881 Title Order No. 11-0011695 Investor/ Insurer No. 149283428 APN No. 087-0095-147 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/22/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of

Trust executed by ALFREDO GUTIERREZ AND SOFIA GUTIERREZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, dated 02/22/2007 and recorded 03/01/07, as Instrument No. 2007089824, in Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/19/2011 at 12: 30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2211 GROUSE WAY, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $477,467.22. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 06/25/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4015482 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011 6/28, 7/5, 7/12/11

or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE FALLON STREET EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON ST. , OAKLAND, CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $699,538.63 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 31388 SAN DIEGO CT UNION CITY, CA 94587 APN Number: 483-0046-019-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 6/16/2011 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee BRANDON ROYES, ASSISTANT SECRETARY CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: (714) 730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com P847889 6/21, 6/28, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11

CNS-2123557#

CNS-2121456#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20110015000450 Title Order No.: 110034302 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/03/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/10/2004 as Instrument No. 2004502495 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: WILFREDO D. ESTABILLO AND JEAN V. ESTABILLO, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/ CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 07/11/2011 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 32621 MUIRWOOD DRIVE, UNION CITY, CALIFORNIA 94587 APN#: 483-0109-017 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $562,244.60. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 06/17/2011NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 4023446 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2122453#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 090140173 Title Order No. 09-8-419421 Investor/ Insurer No. 145665901 APN No. 087-0336-011 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/03/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by LEO HSIAO, A SINGLE MAN, dated 10/03/2006 and recorded 10/31/06, as Instrument No. 2006406603, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/12/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1030 AQUAMARINE TERRACE, UNION CITY, CA, 945871487. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $612,036.32. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 12/18/2009 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4022157 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 11-00891-3 CA Loan No. 0159490358 Title Order No. 110133066-CA-MAI APN 483-0100-089 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 4, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 11, 2011, at 12:30 PM, at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on April 12, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007140466 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, CA, executed by: VIJAY JOHN & ASHA P JOHN HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 32428 JOYCE WAY, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining unpaid balance of the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust (together with any modifications thereto). The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $558,723.79 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. DATE: June 21, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, TRUSTEE 135 Main Street, Suite 1900 San Francisco, CA 94105 415247-2450 Stephanie Alonzo Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 ASAP# 4023807 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2122451# Trustee Sale No. 248546CA Loan No. 3010047821 Title Order No. 754303 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 8/10/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 7/12/2011 at 12:00 PM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 08/17/2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 2006315766, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: CORALIA A AYALEW AND FASSIL AYALEW, WIFE AND HUSBAND AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state

CNS-2121239# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No.: 2009-4194-C Title Order No. : 4330285 APN: 475-0153-065 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A NOTICE OF DELINQUENT ASSESSMENT DATED 01/22/10 UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 12, 2011 at 12: 00 PM., ANGIUS & TERRY COLLECTIONS LLC As the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Notice of Delinquent Assessment, recorded on 01/26/10 as Document No. 2010017922 Book page of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, property owned by: RICHARD G. SCHUMANN AND HYO SUN SCHUMANN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state.) at: AT THE FALLON STREET EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON ST., OAKLAND, CA all right, title and interest under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment in the property situated in said County, describing the land therein: APN: 4750153-065 As more fully described on the above referenced Assessment Lien The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2612 TEAL LANE, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum due under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment, with interest thereon, as provided in said notice, advances, if any, estimated fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee, to-wit: $13,295.21 Estimated Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The claimant, DEVONSHIRE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Please be advised that this property being sold is subject to a ninety (90) day right of redemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 1367.4(c)(4). DATE: 06/12/11 Angius & Terry Collections LLC 1451 River Park Drive, Suite 125, Sacramento, CA 95815 Please call (916) 939-0772 for sales information. Ericka Bates, Trustee’s Sale Officer NPP0183062 06/21/ 11, 06/28/11, 07/05/11 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2120864# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 090156091 Title Order No. 09-8-473660 Investor/ Insurer No. 149043838 APN No. 092A-0612-088 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/20/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by RICARDO VILLA CHAVEZ, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 12/20/2006 and recorded 01/04/07, as Instrument No. 2007003534, in Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/12/2011 at 12: 30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6517 PICARDY PLACE, NEWARK, CA, 94560. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $453,142.69. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 01/20/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4020930 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2120442# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100134803 Title Order No. 10-8-480348 Investor/ Insurer No. N/A APN No. 092A-1105-043 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/20/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by NICOMEDES MORALES, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 03/20/2006 and recorded 03/30/06, as Instrument No. 2006123043, in

Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/12/2011 at 12: 30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6031 AMADOR PLACE, NEWARK, CA, 94560. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $669,050.04. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 01/14/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4021386 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2120441# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100134182 Title Order No. 10-8-478034 Investor/ Insurer No. 1704421730 APN No. 901-0193-178 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/06/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT

MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by BRUCE R WRIGHT, dated 06/06/2007 and recorded 06/12/07, as Instrument No. 2007218999, in Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/14/2011 at 9:00AM, Hilton Newark Fremont 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark, CA 94560 Grand Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6324 BUENA VISTA DRIVE B, NEWARK, CA, 94560. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $287,017.89. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 01/19/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# FNMA4013794 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11

CNS-2120249# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No WC238488-C Loan No 0045467818 Insurer No. 67818 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 04/03/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made; but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: JEFFREY W THOMAS, AN UNMARRIED MAN Recorded 04/10/2007 as Instrument No. 2007138077 in Book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, Date of Sale: 07/18/2011 at 12:30 P.M. Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Property Address is purported to be: 31306 SAN ANDREAS DR UNION CITY, CA 94587 APN#: 483-0043-026-00 The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is $532,574.70, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses, and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. Date: 06/14/2011 Executive Trustee Services, LLC dba ETS Services, LLC 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, CA 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 lleanna Petersen, TRUSTEE SALE OFFICER ASAP# 4020823 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2120247# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 110016461 Title Order No. 11-0012986 Investor/ Insurer No. 240501650 APN No. 543-0438-201 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/25/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE

PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by CHONG NAN MUN AND MONTY YOUNG MUN, WIFE AND HUSBAND, dated 09/25/2006 and recorded 10/02/06, as Instrument No. 2006370248, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 07/12/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4306 PALMDALE STREET, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $683,948.04. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 06/19/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By:-- Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 4009056 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011 6/21, 6/28, 7/5/11 CNS-2119604#

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CA college students brace for state budget cuts California State University students are also bracing for another tuition hike - on top of a previously approved 10 percent increase that will bring in-state tuition to $4,884, more than three times what CSU charged 10 years ago. When it meets July 12, the CSU Board of Trustees will vote on raising tuition by an additional 10 to 15 percent this fall, said university spokesman Mike Uhlenkamp. Campuses may also have to reduce their teaching staffs and turn away more students to save money. Sadaf Malik, a biology student at San Francisco State University, said she and her father are working as many hours as they can to pay for her school bills. She has been taking summer classes at a local community college because she wasn't able to get the courses she needs to graduate at SF State. “I'm paying more for a poorer quality of education and fewer classes,” said Malik, 20, who hopes to go to medical school. “It seems every year I'm getting less and less for my money.” The state budget cuts means California's community colleges, which serve 2.75 million students, will be reducing course offerings despite record demand from high school graduates, returning war veterans and unemployed workers trying to learn new skills, said Dan Troy, the system's vice chancellor for fiscal policy. “The state has to get real about its priorities,” Troy said. “If we're serious about ensuring a bright economic future, funding higher education is a huge part of that.'' Democrats blamed Republicans for the deep cuts to higher education and other public services because they refused to support the governor's proposal to extend temporary increases to the sales, vehicle and income taxes the Legislature approved two years ago. “Yes, you may have a little bit more money in your pocket, but at the same time, look at the impact on access for young people throughout California to be able to get a higher education,” said Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, DSacramento. Republicans fault Democrats for their unwillingness to go against union-controlled education spending, roll back public employee pensions and make colleges more efficient. “The Democrats have never offered any reform on any level of the education spectrum,” said Assemblyman Jeff Miller, R-Corona, a member of the Assembly higher education committee. William Tierney, director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis at the University of Southern California, said the budget cuts to colleges and universities could have a lasting impact on California's economy and future. Without a major expansion of higher education, Tierney said, “We're going to have an uneducated work force. The jobs will go elsewhere. Clearly an uneducated work force doesn't generate as much tax revenue.” Associated Press Writers Don Thompson and Adam Weintraub in Sacramento contributed to this report

Health begins where we live, work, learn and play SUBMITTED BY GWENDOLYN MITCHELL AND LAUREL ANDERSON The Santa Clara County Public Health Department’s “Health and Social Inequity in Santa Clara County” report examines many socio-economic factors and their effect on health. They include: race and ethnicity, income, education, employment, immigration, housing, access to health care and neighborhood conditions. Using existing local and national data, the report shows that social determinants can have a powerful influence on an individual’s health and well-being. Evidence shows an individual’s health can be attributed only in part to medical care or genes. Social determinants, such as where we live, work, learn and play are major factors affecting health. However, choices and opportunities in these key areas of life are limited by status or privilege. “As local policy makers, we must serve all our residents’ needs. The county’s diversity is a great asset but must be taken into account when providing social services and health services,” said President Dave Cortese, Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors. “The Health and Social Inequity Report highlights the differences that result when governments take the one-size-fits-all approach. It’s a call to action to explore and advance policy solutions to reduce or eliminate health inequities.” While Santa Clara County is a healthy, wealthy and educated county on the whole, closer examination of the data reveals social and health inequities exist among certain racial/ethnic groups and low-income residents. For example, better educated and more affluent residents report better health and lower rates of chronic disease; recent immigrants enjoy better health than American-born residents and other immigrants who have lived here for more than five years; less-educated, less-affluent residents are more likely to be without health insurance; low-income residents tend to have higher rates of obesity and smoking; higher percentages of African-American and Hispanic residents live in poor neighborhoods compared to the general public; students in school districts with higher poverty rates are at greater risk of low academic achievement; children in low-income families are more likely to suffer poor health, affecting their academic performance and ability to eventually earn a decent wage. “The time is right to address social inequities to prevent premature death and disease,” said Dan Peddycord, Director of the Santa Clara County Public Health Department. “As our nation adopts a comprehensive health reform strategy that supports investment in prevention, we must look at local policies and practices to help level the field so everyone has equal opportunities for good health. It’s an important public health strategy and is the right thing to do.” In Santa Clara County, as in so many other counties across the U.S., healthcare costs are rising rapidly. Currently, the bulk of expenditure is for treatment and other direct services rather than prevention. These services focus on the individual and do not address the underlying environmental conditions or causes. The report is part of a growing effort among public health professionals to address social inequities as a way to improve public health. The Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative (BARHII), a collaboration of local health departments in the Bay Area, has developed a framework for understanding and measuring health inequities, which takes into account the complex and inter-related factors

that influence the health of a community. The BARHII model shows how social factors like racism, immigration status, institutional power and neighborhood conditions contribute to health. These social factors are considered “upstream” factors. “Downstream” factors include genetics, direct medical services and individual risk behaviors like smoking. Upstream factors have a major influence downstream. For example, racism or discrimination may limit a person’s opportunities so they end up in a neighborhood with more crime and few places to exercise safely or buy healthy food, making it more difficult to avoid chronic diseases like diabetes. Using existing data and the BARHII model as a framework, the report examines eight social determinants of health: race/ethnicity, education, income, employment, immigration, housing, access to health care and neighborhood conditions. A growing body of evidence shows that differences in health outcomes among racial groups are due to the differences in lived experiences rather than genetic differences. The primary reason is believed to be a long history of racial discrimination and inequality in the U.S. How groups of people are perceived and treated in society is associated with their socio-economic status or class; those with a lower socio-economic status tend to suffer poorer health. On the other hand, those with more education and higher incomes tend to enjoy better health outcomes. However, while some neighboring counties see wide gaps in life expectancy based on income, this is not so for Santa Clara County. For example, in some other counties, life expectancy is 81 years for those in high-income neighborhoods compared to 69 years for those in low-income neighborhoods but in Santa Clara County, the gap is only three years, 82 compared to 79 years. While Santa Clara County has a narrower life-expectancy gap between rich and poor, action is needed before the gap starts to widen. The report provides some explanations for the smaller gap, including healthier immigrants, integrated neighborhoods and racial/ethnic diversity. Another explanation is the Latino paradox, which shows that more recent Latino immigrants are healthier than the average population despite their generally low socio-economic status. However, these advantages may be lost over the years as these populations integrate culturally in the United States. Despite the smaller gap in life expectancy, the report also identifies rising rates of chronic diseases and related risk factors among county residents, various racial/ethnic groups and immigrant population. As immigrants spend more time in the U.S., their health tends to decline as they lose protective factors such as healthier diets. In addition, children of immigrants tend to fare worse than their parents and grandparents when it comes to their health. Such alarming trends heighten the need for action. The report is intended to start a community-wide dialog about social inequities and how community conditions can be changed for the better. To do that, public policy makers, business and community leaders, nonprofit organizations, institutions and others in the community need to embrace the notion that good health starts in our neighborhoods, schools and workplaces. The report was developed by the Public Health Department in collaboration with The Health Trust and other diverse stakeholders from multiple sectors. For a copy of the report, visit www.sccphd.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

L

Special Life Events

Marriage

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge

important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat

mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at

Obituaries

low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published bi-weekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the

Greater Tri-City Area.

Obituaries

Robert Harold Nielsen RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 15, 1927 – June 24, 2011

Rita A. Abat RESIDENT OF NEWARK June 20, 1947 – June 26, 2011

Donald P. Castle RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 16, 1941 – June 27, 2011

Mohammed Khalif RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO May 17, 1956 – June 22, 2011

Mabelle Scarano RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 17, 1926 – June 24, 2011

Douglas A. Russell RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 21, 1934 – June 26, 2011

Masura Hatsushi RESIDENT OF FREMONT April 20, 1935 – June 27, 2011

Lydia A. Azevedo RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 13, 1929 – June 28, 2011

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

FD1007

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Special Life Events

Hajime is a perfect 10?

I

n mathematics, the number 100 can also be expressed as 10x10, 10squared or 10?, but in life, that score, however expressed, is achieved by just a few hardy souls. Hajime (Yamamoto) Ota will join those rarified ranks on July 25, 2011 as friends and family gather to celebrate her birth 100 years ago in Walalua, Oahu (Hawaii). Childhood wasn’t easy for Hajime as she and her sister and two brothers lost their parents when Hajime was only seven years old. Leaving her sister in the care of another family in Hawaii, Hajime and her two brothers were raised in Japan by her father’s parents. Hajime left Japan by ship on June 19, 1933, bound for the United States to marry Hichizo Ota. They married on August 19, 1933 in Clarksburg, California and started a family that eventually included five children – three daughters and two sons. Hajime is now grandmother to 11, greatgrandmother of 22 and great-greatgrandmother of two. A resident of Union City for the past 55 years, Hajime has lived with

one of her daughters for the past 46 years and helped raise her granddaughters after Hichizo passed away. Active in body and mind, Hajime has a wide variety of interests and hobbies including working in her vegetable garden, needlepoint, knitting, sewing, crocheting and other crafts. As master of her garden, she continues to pickle cucumbers and ume (Japanese plums) and, until age 95, prepared traditional New Years meals for her family. An avid reader and fan of Sumo wrestling, friends make sure Hajime is well stocked with books written in Japanese and recorded Sumo matches. Hajime enjoys exercise classes, church services and Senior Center activities. Every year, Hajime helps at the annual bazaar at the Southern Alameda County Buddhist Church (SACBC). O-tanjoubi omedetou gozaimasu, Hajime

ROP students win top honors SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE AYALA

Seven students from the Eden Area Regional Occupational Program, Hayward, traveled to Kansas City, Missouri, on June 22, 2011 to participate in the 47th annual SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference (NLCS) where they excelled in the Crime Scene Investigation, Criminal Justice and Culinary Arts competitions to place third, fifth and twelfth, respectively, out of more than 5,600 students who were gold medalists in the state championships. In the Crime Scene Investigation competition, Team F consisting of Travis Escorcio (Post Secondary), Allyson McKeever (Castro Valley High School), and Jessica Miranda (Post Secondary) received bronze medals for their expertise. The three-person team was required to correctly process a crime scene where they had to search, collect and remove evidence and prepare a report of their analysis. The Criminal Justice team finished in fifth place by competing in both a written examination and practical exercises to evaluate the contestants' knowledge on the U.S. Constitutional Law and being an entrylevel law enforcement position. This team consisted of Omar Pacheco (Tennyson High School), Perla Robles (Castro Valley High School), and Edgar Valdiosera (Castro Valley High School). Zachary Dyer (Royal Sunset High School) placed twelfth in the nation when he showcased his knowledge and skills in the Culinary Arts contest by preparing and presenting a four-course menu. The competition assesses students’ skills, not only in food quality and flavor, but also cooking techniques, organization, creative presentation and sanitation food safety. The SkillsUSA Championships is a national-level championship for public high school and college/post-secondary technical students enrolled in career and technical education programs where they compete in over 94 hands-on skill and leadership contests. More than 15,000 students, teachers and business partners from across the country participated in the week-long event. SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled work force. For more information about this competition, contact John Taylor at jtaylor@edenrop.org. For more about Eden Area ROP, visit www.edenrop.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

July 5, 2011

BY SIMON WONG

M

embers of the Historic Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association (Prospect Hill) met with Hayward Planning Manager Richard Patenaude for an overview of the city’s Historic Preservation Program to consider designation of their neighborhood as an “historic district.” “The rationale for a Historic Preservation Program is that historic Hayward continues to look like Hayward and maintain our unique character rather than resemble every other community across the state or country,” explained Patenaude. Council approved an historical resources survey, the associated inventory of historically and architecturally significant buildings in the city, incentive programs and the goals and objectives for historic preservation on June 1, 2010. The survey identifies the types of historic properties within the City of Hayward, neighborhoods or potential historic districts, areas devoid of historic resources, properties that do not warrant more attention and potentially significant individual buildings or areas that merit further evaluation. Of the approximate 2,500 properties built before 1946, just over 800 have a medium-to-high level of integrity. About 1,000 have low integrity. In the Downtown area and centre of Hayward, pre-1959 construction was considered. A structure is said to have integrity if it retains enough of its original fabric/appearance, and character-defining, architectural features to convey its historical importance. Upper B Street, Prospect and lower B Street (aka Street Car District) neighborhoods were quickly identified as historic districts, before other parts of the city which will be revisited for closer inspection, because of their high concentration of sites of interest and the likelihood of change in a short period. A site or structure’s inclusion on the list does not mean automatic, official designation as an historic building. The program is voluntary; owners should apply for such a designation for their property, otherwise the building’s status remains unchanged. Designation can be removed, if property owners subsequently change their mind. Ownership of an historic property brings benefits and obligations. Designation as an historic district could prevent unwanted change. Potentially, fees to the city might be waived in exchange for designation. Many such properties do not meet modern zoning requirements so the opportunity exists to develop special zoning regulations to protect their character and that of the neighborhood. A building permit for alterations to an older property typically requires upgrades to current standards. The California Historic Building Code, however, allows alternative improvement methods, if they do not impact health and safety; for instance, new decks have higher railings than those on old homes which, according to the state Historic Building Code, can retain the shorter height. Under the Mills Act 1972, an historic property may qualify for up to 60 percent property tax relief, annually, if the owner enters into a contract with the city to renovate and maintain the property’s historical and architectural character for at least 10 years. Each year, Mills Act contracts, including the associated benefits and obligations, are renewed automatically and transfer to all subsequent owners during the contract period. Local governments participate in the Mills Act program because they recognize the economic benefits of conserving resources and reinvestment and the importance of historic preservation in revitalizing older areas, tourism, civic pride, sense of place, quality of life and continuity with the community’s past. Owners of historic properties can also qualify for federal tax credits. A 10 percent tax credit is available for properties built before 1937. A 20 percent tax credit can be applied to improvements that meet national preservation standards. Additionally, studies indicate historic districts often have higher property values; such neighborhoods are considered desirable and property owners are committed to maintenance. “If Prospect Hill does not become an ‘historic district,’ individuals can still seek ‘historic’ designation for their own property to access the benefits,” clarified Patenaude. The city can work with historic districts and property owners to devise mutually acceptable guidelines, with flexibility for change, to prevent loss of historic character and properties falling into a state of disrepair, such as the types of project the city would review. Minor projects and general maintenance are not subject to public hearings unless they materially alter the building’s character. This also applies to historic commercial buildings. Most cities do not look at interior alterations. The City of Hayward is also working on general design guidelines for infill development to ensure it is in keeping with surrounding structures and the character of the area. “We must credit Prospect Hill residents Frank Goulart and Julie Machado for their passion. They've invested in

and restored several historic properties, including the Linekin Building on Main Street, and are the catalyst and continuing advocates for the neighborhood’s potential designation as an historic district. Their idea gained momentum when Council adopted amendments to the Historic Preservation Ordinance in 2010. The historic resources survey was commissioned while Greg Jones was Hayward City Manager; he succeeded Frank as president of the Historic Prospect Hill Neighborhood Association and both have engaged the city to determine the realities of being an historic district and how they might affect property owners,” explained Prospect Hill resident and former Councilwoman Anna Laveria May. The neighborhood association will establish a committee, with which Patenaude will work closely, for detailed consideration of the matter. If Prospect Hill decides to become an historic district, approximately 200 properties will be researched and documented in readiness for Planning Commission hearings. Prospect Hill’s provisional boundaries, as per the historic resources survey, are Mission Boulevard, San Lorenzo Creek, a section of Foothill Boulevard and A Street. A clearer idea of which properties might be within the city’s first historic district will emerge as talks progress. For more information, contact Richard Patenaude, Planning Manager, 777 B Street, Hayward, CA 94541-5007, call (510) 583-4213 or email richard.patenaude@hayward-ca.gov. Download a copy of the City of Hayward Historic Preservation Ordinance at http://tinyurl.com/3pbykv3.


July 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

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Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477

Monday, July 11 2:30 – 3:15 p.m. Independent School, 21201 Independent School Rd, Castro Valley 3:35 – 4:00 p.m. Baywood Ct. 21966 Dolores St., Castro Valley 5:15 – 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Cir., Fremont

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Kaiser Professionals join SEIU SUBMITTED BY ELIZABETH BRENNAN A group of 500 information technology professionals at Kaiser facilities across California said “yes” to Service Employees International Union, United Healthcare Workers – West (SEIU-UHW) on Thurs., June 30. The election, certified Thursday afternoon by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), was conducted by a “card check” or sign-up. 57 percent of employees signed cards stating they wish to be represented by the union.

Tuesday, July 12 2:45 – 3:15 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:35 – 4:20 p.m. Parkmont School, 2601 Parkside Dr, Fremont 5:25 – 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. & McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 – 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., Fremont Wednesday, July 13 1:15 – 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 4:30 – 5:10 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:25 – 5:50 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, July 14 1:10 – 1:40 p.m. Falcon Dr. & Merganser Dr., Fremont Tuesday, July 5 2:50 – 3:20 p.m. Schilling School, 36901 Spruce St., Newark 3:30 – 4:00 p.m. Ash St. & Wells Ave.,

Newark 4:50 – 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., Union City 5:40 – 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, July 6 2:45 – 3:20 p.m. Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, Fremont 3:30 – 4:20 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 5:20 – 5:50 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:00 – 6:30 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, July 7 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. Century Village Apartments, 41299 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Lane, Fremont 4:30 – 5:15 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 – 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Union City Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, July 13 2:00 – 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 – 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park, 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

This is the second in a series of six weekly challenges that focuses on unique community “wonders.” Fremont challenges will be posted each Monday at WonderopolisChallenge.org. Families are encouraged to register and begin as soon as possible but can do so any time within the six-week period.

The National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) has chosen Fremont as a summer Wonderopolis® encouraging families to explore their own neighborhoods, finding wonder-ful places that often escape notice during the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

Participating families who successfully complete at least three of the six weekly challenges will be entered to win a five-day allexpense paid trip to Washington, D.C. To be eligible, the winning family must be available to travel between Aug. 21 and 28. In addition, Wonderopolis® posts a national “Wonder of the Day®” at its website. Wonderopolis® can be found on Twitter and Facebook; a video is posted on YouTube and vimeo.

Fremont Wonder #3: “How Did Fremont Get Its Name?” Fremont is a city full of history and natural beauty. Let’s explore how it got its name! Happy Fourth of July, Fremont! Did you celebrate with your fellow citizens at the annual 4th of July Parade? This week’s Wonderopolis Fremont Challenge is learning about and appreciating the history of Fremont. Choose one of the following challenges for your family to complete, and then share your experience. • Make your own flag for Fremont! What does Fremont mean to you? If you were to design a new flag for Fremont, what would it look like? Why would you choose the colors you choose? What images best represent the city?

SUBMITTED BY SANDI PANTAGES

T

he 1400 sq. ft. room was empty on the morning of May 20, 2011, as 18 Niles Rotarians and family members arrived at the New Orleans Mission near downtown New Orleans, LA. On the day before, the room had been painted by Rotarians from Missouri and Kansas, including the District Governor and Past District Governors, who had envisioned the New Orleans Mission Library project several years ago, as a post-Katrina rehabilitation project. Rotarians from the Rotary Club of New Orleans-Riverbend, LA had been spending their weekends in the spring rehabilitating space in the New Orleans Mission that would become the Mission Library – repairing a Katrina-

damaged roof and existing lighting, installing new fluorescent fixtures, priming walls and ceiling, and more. Niles Rotarians began their work in earnest on May 20. Bookcases and tables needed to be assembled and carried up stairs into the library. Sofas, chairs, and area rugs were installed. Curtains and wall hangings were ironed and hung. Finally, a few hundred boxes of books were carried into the library room. Niles Rotary had previously purchased a box of new books for the library – books on job search and skills, résumé writing, and books for children and teens. Hundreds of books had been donated by libraries in Missouri and Rotarians in Pennsylvania. With bookcases and furni-

July 5, 2011

• Visit one of Fremont’s many Historic Attractions. From Ardenwood Historic Farm and Centerville Pioneer Cemetery to Mission San José and Cemetery and Shinn Historical Park and Arboretum, Fremont offers many chances to relive its rich history. NOTE: Some Historic Attractions may have admission fees. Please check with the site you choose for any applicable fees before heading out on your adventure! • Did you attend the 4th of July Parade? How many flags do you see? See who can count the most flags. What was your favorite part of the parade? How many people do you think attended the parade? Watch the news to see how many people they estimate watched the parade.

ture in place, Niles Rotarians completed the project by unpacking, arranging, and shelving the books. By the time Rotary International President Ray Klinginsmith arrived for an afternoon ribbon cutting and reception, the empty room from that morning had been transformed into the New Orleans Mission Library, ready for its resident users. During the day, Niles Rotarians learned about the New Orleans Mission and its work. In addition to providing overnight housing and meals for the homeless in New Orleans, Mission staff and volunteers help their clients with financial planning, learning how to save money, how to find jobs, and stabilize their lives… to end their cycle of homelessness. The new library at the Mission will provide a source of support as well as a comfortable place for reading and study. According to the Mission director, the library project volunteers were part of the “marathon of Katrina recovery, who left their thumbprint on the city’s recovery.” The Mission Library project was developed by Niles Rotarian and Community Services Director Chuck Canada, who read about the project and selected it as a service opportunity for Rotarians attending the Rotary International convention in New Orleans in May. Canada, a former City of Fremont Parks and Recreation manager, knew the value of a library for clients of a homeless mission. He convinced nearly 20 Niles Rotarians to join the work project. Those participating in the Mission Library project included: Chuck Canada, Kimberly Hartz Foster, Carol Smith, Sandi & Dick Pantages, Sandra & Daren Young, Lisa Lorenz, Merna and Gary Morse, Mary Lynn Pelican, Gary Basrai, Bob Hagg, Manuel Franco, Randy & Christina Hees, Dan and Linda Smith, Jeff Falk, Beth Booth, Rosemary Ashley.


July 5, 2011

BY SIMON WONG The City of Hayward’s Volunteer Open House on June 30, 2011, was attended by many residents and business people interested in learning more about, or applying for vacancies on, the city’s 17 boards, commissions, committees and task force. ‘What makes the perfect volunteer?’ has no definitive answer. Each body consists of people with different backgrounds, occupations, experiences and knowledge. This diverse range of perspectives and ideas, hopefully, represents the community and is essential for devising sensible and equitable solutions to complex problems that affect Hayward’s citizens. Seriousness and the willingness to devote time are desirable. “I work as the IT Director for the Peninsula Library System and also sit on

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

the California Library Board, so I felt I might be able to bring some relevant experience to the City of Hayward’s Library Commission,” said Monica Schultz who has served three years of her four-year term as a Library Commissioner. “I live in Hayward and wanted to do something.” Schultz finds her service rewarding. Apart from her regular day job, much of her spare time is spent on unremunerated, volunteer activities which are often more fulfilling than receipt of a pay check. “Serving on the Library Commission entails a monthly meeting, lasting between two and three hours, and advocacy for library services before Council when such matters appear on Council’s agenda. Any additional time and involvement within the community is up to the individual,” she added.

“Since becoming involved with the city, I find the public tends to hold you to higher standards. Eyes are on you. You can find yourself reported by the media at any time and you’re also representing the Commission to which you’ve been appointed. “I strongly encourage people to consider becoming a Hayward commissioner, board, committee or task force member. One feels like an integral part of the city, making a difference. If somebody dislikes something, rather than complain and rely on others to remedy the issue, that person can effect change for the entire community through service,” Schultz concluded. Each board, commission, committee and task force has its own workloads and some meet more frequently than others but, ultimately, each exists for the good of the City of Hayward and its residents. Appointees serve in an advisory capacity to City Council and must reside within the city limits and be registered voters. The City of Hayward invites applications from individuals for the following boards, commissions, committees and task force: Citizens Advisory Commission (1 vacancy); Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board (2 vacancies); Human Services Commission (2 vacancies); Keep Hayward Clean and Green Task Force (KHCG) (4 vacancies); Library Commission (1 vacancy); Personnel & Af-

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firmative Action Commission (1 vacancy). Currently, there are no openings for the Planning Commission and Council Economic Development Committee. Applicants for the Downtown Business Improvement Area Advisory Board need not live in Hayward; however, they must own a business in the Downtown Business Improvement Area of Hayward and pay assessments. Should vacancies arise on the Council Economic Development Committee, applicants must reside in Hayward, own/operate a business in Hayward, be senior management at a corporate business in Hayward or be formally affiliated with and represent another entity or agency concerned with economic development in the city. Some of the commissions/committees/task force members may need to file a disclosure Statement of Economic Interests, Form 700. Interviews with the City Council are scheduled for Tuesday, July 19, 2011. Applicants will be notified when interview times are confirmed. Applications are available from the Office of the City Clerk, 777 B Street, Hayward, CA 94541, by calling (510) 583-4400 or by visiting www.haywardca.gov. The deadline for submitting applications is 5:00 p.m. on Friday, July 8, 2011.

Grave concerns over loss of law enforcement capabilities SUBMITTED BY THE OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL State Attorney General Kamala D. Harris has joined California law enforcement leaders in expressing serious concerns over the passage on June 28, 2011, of $71M in cuts to the Division of Law Enforcement budget as part of California's budget bill. The budget cuts curtail the state Department of Justice's (DOJ) ability to fight gang violence and the flow of drugs, guns and human beings across the border. The cuts are likely to eliminate 55 state-led task forces that coordinate the re-

sponse to the growing gang problem. The Bureau of Investigation and Intelligence and Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement might also have to be eliminated, including the investigative capacities of the newly-formed Mortgage Fraud Strike Force. In total, several hundred agents, investigators and other law enforcement positions will be lost, including the ability to prosecute cases like these. In the Central Valley, a DOJ-led task force recently helped arrest 101 gang leaders and members who terrorized two counties. In the Bay Area, agents arrested another 30 gang members and seized more than 100 pounds of methamphetamine

Modified light rail schedules improve passenger service SUBMITTED BY SANTA CLARA VALLEY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY Starting July 11, 2011, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) will implement quarterly service changes to further improve system on-time performance, reliability and passenger connectivity to Caltrain and other public transit systems. There will be major modifications to all light rail schedules and many bus schedules; customers are encouraged to plan ahead for the changes. The July service changes will adjust run times on the Mountain View to Winchester light rail line and shorter transfer times at the key transfer point in north San Jose, the Tasman Light Rail Station. Also, the three afternoon Commuter Express trains that operate from Baypointe Light Rail Station to south San Jose will leave approximately 10 minutes later than before. Changes to bus operations include the addition of Saturday service on Line 37, between the Capitol Light Rail Station and the Winchester Transit Center. New trips will be added on Express Route 102 that runs from South San Jose to Palo Alto, and Express Route 181 that services the Fremont BART Station. Earlier this year, the proposed Transit Service Plan was discussed in six community meetings held throughout the county. The plan was developed using customer feedback and in line with the VTA Board of Directors’ adopted policies that guide the development and implementation of new transit services, as well as the refinement of existing services. All service change information can be found on the VTA website at www.vta.org/nbs/index.html or by calling VTA’s Customer Service Center. The VTA Trip Planner powered by Google will also have the latest schedule information when the service change takes place on Monday, July 11, 2011. For more information on service changes or for a customized journey plan, contact VTA Customer Service at (408) 321-2300; for the hearing impaired only call (408) 321-2330. Sign-up to receive VTA email updates at www.vta.org. Find VTA on Facebook at “SCVTA,” Twitter at “SantaclaraVTA” and YouTube at www.youtube.com/scvta.

destined for the streets. In San Diego, they arrested three suspects sent from Mexico on a murder-for-hire contract targeting an entire family. In Los Angeles, two task forces slated for elimination - LA IMPACT and LA CLEAR - have played a vital role in the policing of gangs. Throughout the state, the Mortgage Fraud Strike Force has opened investigations into criminal and consumer fraud. These investigations range from foreclosure scams, affecting large numbers of victims, to multi-million dollar corporate fraud. Public safety is a basic right of all people and a core function of government. For that reason, Harris calls on Governor

Brown and the Legislature to immediately restore adequate funding to California law enforcement. The California Police Chiefs Association, California District Attorneys Association, California Narcotic Officers' Association, San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis, Imperial County District Attorney Gilbert G. Otero, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, East Palo Alto Police Chief Ronald L. Davis and Arvin Police Chief Tommy W. Tunson join Harris in expressing their grave concerns. For more information, visit http://oag.ca.go


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SUSAN HELMER Fourteen award-winning artists will display original art and gift items at two popular East Bay studio sites during the Mission Trails Artists Open Studios Friday-Sunday, July 8 - 10. The public is invited to visit Denise Oyama Miller’s studio to see exhibits by seven popular

artists who will display watercolor and oil paintings, colorful art quilts, ceramic tile wall murals and mosaic bird baths, gorgeously painted gourds, masterful wood-turned pieces, Japanese inspired prints, hand-made rugs, hand-made paper, jewelry, and exquisitely designed wearable art. At Cindy Sullivan’s artist studio, seven talented artists will display a variety of stunning pastels, watercolor and oil landscapes and seascapes, silk paintings, colored pencil, mixed media, photography, and fabulous jewelry. Several of the artists are known as Artists 7 and have exhibited widely at city and community galleries throughout the Bay Area since 2000. This is a great opportunity to meet local artists who have exhibited in galleries and juried shows across the United States. The event is free and open to the public. Items range from large and small art pieces to very affordable gift items.

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

trio of adventurers are about to complete a journey tracing the footsteps of eighteenth and nineteenth century travelers in “Alta California” along the El Camino Real. Ron “Butch” Briery of Eagle Point, OR and Beppe Sala of Italy have walked every mile, part of a plan conceived in 2008 when they met while hiking in Santiago, Spain. Butch’s wife, Sandy, joined the boys – Butch, age 65; Beppe, age 62 - for the first 200 miles beginning March 3, 2011 at San Diego de Alcala, then left to be with her grandchildren during Spring Break. She since rejoined the duo for the final portion of the journey scheduled to conclude at Mission San Francisco de Solano in Sonoma on Monday evening, April 25th. For Sala, the trek is a spiritual experience similar to an earlier European pilgrimage he completed on Camino de Santiago also known as “The Way of St James.” Next year Sala plans to embark on another

Open Studios Friday, Jul 8 -Sunday, July 10 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mission Trails Artists Denise Oyama Miller’s studio 270 Tordo Ct., Fremont Cindy Sullivan’s studio 1423 Deschutes Pl., Fremont

Spanish Franciscan Order, approximately 30 miles distant from one another, were constructed as a string of religious sanctuaries and fortifications within a day’s horseback ride. El Camino Real (The Royal Road) was initially constructed in Las Californias to connect the missions, presidios and settlements along a route between Baja California Sur and Alta California. While some mission personnel have greeted the hikers enthusiastically, others are marginally aware of their ambitious project. None, however, remember a similar journey in the recent past. It seems that time and progressive changes to the route have discouraged continuous passage although mapping options on the internet made planning each day’s

Butch, Sandy and Beppe pose in front of Mission San Jose before continuing their walking tour of all 21 California Missions Fourth grade students from St. Bede School (Hayward) cheer the travelers on to their next destination, Mission Delores in San Francisco

pilgrimage from Rome to Jerusalem. Although Briery views the current journey in more of a historical context, both value slower travel as a way in which landscape and traveler can interact on a personal and elemental plane; as Sala puts it, “slower and without hurry.” Each day’s hike of approximately 15-20 miles ended with shelter at a mission or camping somewhere in-between. Missions, constructed by the

passage a bit easier. With little fanfare, Butch, Sandy and Bepe arrived at Mission San José de Guadalupe in Fremont, the eighteenth mission on their list, Wednesday, April 20. After a brief respite and tour of the site, they bid farewell as a group of visiting fourth grade students from St. Bede School in Hayward cheered them on. Briery has been writing a guide so others can duplicate either all or part of the 21-mission expedition. He hopes to publish it soon “so others can do it too.” Butch can be contacted at: rdbriery@yahoo.com

July 5, 2011

TCV 2011-07-05  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper

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