Page 1

Disney’s Aladdin Jr. at Milpitas’ Rainbow Theater

Little Women, the Broadway Musical

Among Friends

Page 32 Page 16 Page 34

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

BY WILLIAM MARSHAK

I

n a “State of the City” address hosted by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce May 30, Fremont Mayor Bob Wasserman was hopeful but blunt

working climate is the “new norm,” Wasserman was clear that adjustments must be made especially in light of recent developments including closure of NUMMI, the apparent end of redevelopment agencies and purchase of strategic property around the old NUMMI site by Union Pacific Railroad. New programs and services

www.tricityvoice.com

have been removed from consideration in next year’s budget and less costly alternatives to current delivery models are being studied. Noting that City staff is a “great group” and have worked hard to shoulder an increasing burden, irrefutable City finances lead to the inescapable conclusion that current compensation cannot be supported. “The pen-

April 5, 2011

sion system has become unaffordable and our health care liabilities are more than we can handle,” said Wasserman. “We simply must find ways to make the City sustainable.” The gloom and doom scenario brightened a bit as the mayor noted arrival of Tesla

Vol. 10 No. 27

Motors at the old NUMMI facility with plans to begin manufacturing the Model S Sedan in 2012 as well as the presence of a strong nucleus of energy-related industries in “a thriving clean technology cluster.” Fremont was highlighted in a video, “Clean, Green and Ready for the Future,” at the 2010 Conference of the International City and County Management Association held in San Jose. continued on page 34

about the challenges facing the fourth largest city in the Bay Area. Noting that a difficult

BY EMMA VICTORIA G. BLANCO It’s Idol season. And while you can catch the American Idol spectacle on television, you may want to consider getting off the couch and watching local talent perform at a local venue. This year, Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD) is proud to present its fifth “Hayward Idol” on Saturday, April 9 at the Douglas Morrison Theater. Auditions, open to anyone under the age of 18, were held in March at Hayward's Douglas Morrisson Theatre. Twenty-seven

contestants competed to be one of only ten finalists by singing an a cappella song. Mike Maine, Recreation Coordinator with HARD, is directing Hayward Idol for the third year. “I'm looking forward to a great show with ten evenly-skilled participants vying for the title of Hayward Idol,” he said. Those “evenly skilled” finalists will be returning to Douglas Morrison Theater on April 9 for the ultimate title of “Hayward Idol” and the community is invited to watch. Each finalist must sing two songs. Judges will critique contestants on overall presentation and technical skill. This year’s panel of local judges includes choir singer Charlette Hudson, jewelry maker Laura Stull, and band member Connie Gaxiola. The top three finalists will receive a combination of MP3 players and iTune cards, and the winner will earn the coveted title of Hayward Idol Champion. Maine is also hoping for one extra special performance. “We are attempting to have last year’s winner come back and sing one song [while] the judges’ scores are tallied,” he said. continued on page 17

AP PHOTO

E

very spring season, high school juniors and seniors eagerly look forward to a major transition in their lives. Seniors reflect on past school days and what lies ahead- college, full-time careers, etc. while juniors anticipate the fun and excitement of advancement to their final year at high school. One of the rites of passage is the “Prom,” shortened from the word promenade. Fall Festival: See Page 4

INDEX Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 15

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Life Cornerstones . . . . . . . . . 37 Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

I

n 2010, more than 157,000 Californians were newly diagnosed with cancer. Although the disease used to be thought of as an automatic death sentence, the number of Americans who survive cancer today is growing, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). In the Tri-City area, the Washington Radiation Oncology Center (ROC) has provided advanced, individualized, effective cancer treatment for more than 25 years. The Center has leading-edge technology and a staff of board-certified radiation oncologists specially trained in the using radiation therapy to treat cancer. Over time, it has made important advancements in technology and built a skilled staff of radiation therapy specialists so that Tri-City residents now have easy access to many of the latest cancer treatments without leaving their community. Treatment advances bring benefits, challenges Over the last 20 years, there have been numerous advancements in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, and this has resulted in longer life expectancy and better quality of life for many patients. At the same time, the use of state-of-the art technologies and techniques has presented

April 5, 2011

or parts of the tumor, with minimal exposure to nearby normal tissue and critical organs. “We are very experienced in the application of IMRT, which is difficult to apply correctly,” says Dr. Bastasch, who trained at Baylor College of Medicine, the first radiation oncology center in the U.S. to use IMRT to treat cancer. “It is a very complicated process requiring intensive coordination beOne important component of Washington Hospital’s Community Cancer Program is the Washtween the radiation oncoloington Radiation Oncology Center. (Above, right) Dr. Michael Bastasch, is a board certified radiation oncologist that specializes in new radiation therapy treatments. Furthering its reputation gist and the medical as a top provider for cancer care, Washington Hospital’s Community Cancer Program is one radiation physicist.” of only four programs in California to receive an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Washington Hospital Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACS). has also made an investment in developing an elecadded challenges for physicians nel, Washington Hospital is offertronic medical record (EMR), and other care providers because ing excellent treatment for a which is designed to support the planning and administration range of different cancers right more accurate, timely communiof these therapies is far more here in our community.” cation among all the appropriate complex. For example, the Center procare providers. “Today, all aspects of cancer vides Intensity-Modulated Radia“EMR is an extremely potent care require close coordination tion Therapy (IMRT), which component of patient care,” exinvolving a team of specialists, in- reduces recovery time, side effects plains Dr. Bastasch. “It makes cluding a radiation oncologist, and complications associated care more seamless because informedical radiation physicist, with conventional radiation thermation is known quickly and dosimetrist, radiation therapist apy. With IMRT, a computeruniversally within the Hospital.” and radiation therapy nurse,” controlled linear accelerator The team approach, states Michael Bastasch, M.D., a delivers precise doses of radiation close to home board-certified radiation oncolothat conform closely to the target Communication and teamgist at the Center. “Thanks to our cancer site. Higher doses of radiawork are keys to excellence in team of highly qualified persontion can be focused on the tumor

cancer care. At Washington Hospital, a multidisciplinary group of cancer specialists and care providers called a Tumor Board convenes to review all aspects of a patient’s treatment, including oncology, chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. Tumor boards are also a practice at large medical institutions. At Washington Hospital, because programs and personnel are well coordinated and work in close proximity, it is easier for the necessary specialists to gather and collaborate as a team. All perspectives are considered in developing the most effective care plan, and this approach has been shown to result in better outcomes for patients. Radiation therapy often requires cancer patients to make frequent trips to and from the treatment center. In addition, physicians and care providers communicate and coordinate more effectively when they already work together in the same community. For these reasons, it makes sense for patients to get all aspects of their treatment close to home. The advanced services and skilled team at Washington’s ROC make this possible for TriCity residents. continued on page 7

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

04/05/11

04/06/11

04/07/11

04/08/11

04/09/11

04/10/11

04/11/11

Eating Out with Diabetes

Maintaining Heart Health with Diabetes

Sepsis: Treatment of a Top 10 Killer

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Washington Women's Center: Cancer Genetic Counseling

Alzheimer's Disease Research Update

Washington Women's Center: Circulation 101 for Women - Part 1: Varicose Veins

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All Men's Health Fair Panel Discussion Women's Health Conference: Complimentary Therapy: Art,Yoga and Meditation

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011 Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Latest Principles for Wound Care

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

Washington Women's Center: Arthritis Exercise Program

George Mark Children's House - A New Way Home (Late Start)

Healthy Aging and Longevity (Late Start)

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Voices InHealth: Demystifying the Radiation Oncology Center

Disaster Preparedness Surgical Interventions for Sleep Apnea

Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

Have You Recently Lost Health Care Coverage? Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care

Skin Care and Prevention of Skin Cancer

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

Personal Emergency Preparedness Training & Learn Inside Washington Hospital: How to Access Patient Safety Community Services Quickly and Easily Insurance Information for People with Diabetes (Late Start)

Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Women's Health Conference: Digestive Disorders

Your Concerns InHealth: Vitamin Supplements

Your Concerns InHealth: Measles Resurgence

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

Hip Pain in the Young and Middle-Aged Adult

Men's Health Fair: Heart Healthy Livings

Cough or Shortness of Breath, What to Do About It

Fitting Physical Activity Into Your Day

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War?

Osteoporosis and What to do to Prevent it

Tips to Making Your Golden Years Healthier

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care

Inside Washington Hospital: Advances in Cardiac Care

InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Part 1

Kidney Disease Nutrition for People with Kidney Disease

InHealth Special Report: Caring for an Older Adult: The Patient Protection and Everything You Need to Affordable Care Act Know about Caregiving Part 2

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

InHealth Special Report: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Part 3

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

10:00 PM 10:00 AM

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

Voices InHealth: Bras for Body & Soul (Late Start)

Voices InHealth: Decisions in Cardiac Care Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting March 9, 2011

Planning Your California Advance Health Directive: Now is the Time

YDo You Suffer From Anxiety or Depression? (Late Start)

Management of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Community Based Senior Supportive Services World Kidney Day

Diabetes Health Fair 2010: Diabetes and the Kidneys

Reach Your Goal: Quit Smoking

How to Prevent a Heart Voices InHealth: Controversies in Screening Attack & Healthy Washington's Community Are You at Risk for Mammography Robotic Assisted Take the Steps: What You Nutrition for Your Heart Cancer Program Diabetes? - Learn the Surgery for Menstrual Should Know About Foot Signs Issues Care (Late Start) (Late Start) Prostate Enlargements and Cancer Minimally Invasive Hip (Late Start) Inside Washington HosReplacement Diabetes Health Fair 2010: pital: The Green Team Voices InHealth: Nursing Influenza and Other Con(Late Start) Learn How Exercise Can Excellence - Journey to tagious Respiratory ConHelp Diabetes Voices InHealth: Nursing Magnet Status ditions Men's Health Fair: Stroke (Late Start) Excellence - Journey to and Interventions Used Magnet Status

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

Diabetes and Your Hormones (Late Start)


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Women’s Center Class Offers Effective Techniques for Combating Stress Physical, mental, or emotional strain or tension—otherwise known as stress—is a common malady, and its sources are endless. Money, relationships, health, work… Worries over any of these issues can cause stress levels to build up.

At an upcoming stress management class at the Washington Women’s Center, you will learn how to successfully manage stress by changing the way you respond to it. A registered nurse will explain how to make time for relaxation, learning healthier coping strategies and how to better understand stress. The free class will take place on Wednesday, April 13 from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Women’s Center Conference Room located at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont.

While stress may be natural and, at times, inevitable, trouble begins when we ignore the signs overload, waiting until stress begins to negatively impact our day-to-day lives. And often we do just that. But stress can be managed— quite effectively, too, according to Washington Women’s Center Clinical Coordinator Kathy Hesser, R.N. You just have to be able to recognize the signs of excess stress and go about choosing healthy alternatives to reduce its impact. Next Wednesday, April 13, from 7 to 8 p.m., Hesser, in conjunction with a certified music therapist, will present a “Stress Management for Women” class at the Women’s Center. “I’ve seen the issue of stress coming up a lot in all the classes we do,” Hesser says. “Women are seeking out ways to deal with their stress and ways to counteract it, be happier, get better sleep and deal with issues like growing older or living with a diagnosis like breast cancer or diabetes.” Hesser points out that reactions to stress can create a vicious cycle, if we’re not careful. “We all find that when we’re getting overly tired and suffering from poor time management, we tend to fall back on coping mechanisms, whether it involves overeating, drinking coffee, drinking, smoking or even drug abuse,” she explains. “These behaviors can all be signs of stress. Some are fairly mild, but these things can be underlying signs of unmanaged stress. Look at how you’re feeling. Are you having upper back pain? Do you grind your teeth? Do you find yourself always tense?” So, the question, Hesser says, is: what do you do about it? “Sometimes the first step is to increase your body awareness and how you’re holding your body,” she points out. “Look at your posture and how your body changes in response to certain people. Can you learn to take a breath and step back and not let outside influences change how you’re holding your body—rather than letting outside influences control you? Often I talk with women at the center who are dealing with things like chronic pain or diabetes, and it can cause a loss of sensation and an alteration in how you see things.” During the class, Hesser will spend some time explaining how stress affects physiological functions, how to better understand the different manifestations of stress,

and what happens when the body is under stress over an extended period of time. The class, however, will not be one-sided. “I don’t like to lecture,” according to Hesser. “Instead, I prefer to put things out there and get people’s responses. I’ll throw a question out there to the audience and that makes it more interesting and keeps things focused on our participants.” Plus, women who attend the talk should walk away with some concrete techniques to effectively manage stress, she says. “Julie, our music therapist, is going to talk about music and yoga as ways to help you destress, and she’ll give some helpful strategies for how to incorporate these things into your routine,” Hesser says. “Then, toward the end of the class, we’ll have a relaxation session using music and breathing to help reduce stress.” Stress affects almost everyone, and women of all ages can benefit from attending, she adds. “We have had women attend classes to support their moms, and we’ve had women in their late-70s come to classes,” she says. “Every single one of them has participated fully when we’ve had restorative yoga practices at the end of class, and afterwards everyone has said, ‘Wow! I feel so good right now.’” The best part of coming in for a one-hour evening class, Hesser says, is that it gives a great preview of some of the center’s popular which are tailored to women’s unique needs. “I think that’s the fun part about these little hour-long classes is that they introduce people in a small way to our other programs,” she says. “For instance, you come in for the stress management class and get a little sample of our yoga program. It’s easy to see in five minutes how you can feel better by incorporating something like yoga into your weekly routine. Often women who come to the Women’s Center for classes tell Hesser about their needs and what they would like to see in the future. This, she says, helps match community members with helpful services and programs. “Recently someone came for a massage,” Hesser says. “It turns out that she was leader at a church for women’s cancer support group. She said how much she loved the Women’s Center and she wanted to do a tour and have me talk to her group. I said, ‘Sure, of course!’ Every one of the women who came for the tour was a cancer survivor, and every one of them found a class or program that she could benefit from.” And that’s what the center is all about—meeting women’s needs, she says. Don’t stress! To learn effective techniques for managing stress, join Hesser for the Washington Women’s Center’s upcoming “Stress Management for Women” class, part of the center’s free Evening Lecture Series for Women. The class will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 13, in the Women’s Center Conference Room. The Washington Women’s Center is located at 2500 Mowry Avenue, Suite 150 in Fremont. For more information about programs and services at the Washington Women’s Center, call (866) 608-1301 or (510) 608-1301. To register for classes, call (800) 963-7070 or go online at www.whhs.com/womenscenter.

Page 3

Not all knee pain is created pain and swelling, compressing doesn’t show significant damage equal. the knee with an elastic bandage that explains the extent of the knee Sometimes knee pain can be or sleeve and elevating the knee pain. For example, an X-ray caused by an acute injury, such as much as possible. wouldn’t show a tear to the ligaas a tear to one of the ligaments “A person who has moderate ments or cartilage in the knee. The that connect the shinbone to the knee pain that persists for several cause and severity of the knee thighbone, or damage to the car- days or worsens should seek an problem will dictate the proper tilage that acts as a “shock abevaluation of the problem by a course of treatment.” sorber” for the knee. In other cases, knee pain stems from an overuse injury or an infection that causes inflammation and swelling. And then there is knee pain that results from an underlying chronic medical condition, such as arthritis. Not all knee pain treatment options are equally effective, either. “Getting an accurate diagnosis of the cause of knee pain is key to determining the most effective course of treatment,” says Dr. If you or a family member is living with chronic knee pain, please join John T. Dearborn, M.D., (left) John Dearborn, ortho- and Alexander Sah, M.D., for a comprehensive seminar highlighting leading-edge treatment options in knee replacement surgery. The free seminar will be held on Friday, April 15, from 2 to 4 p.m. at pedic surgeon and the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium located at 2500 Mowry Ave. in Fremont.To register, visit medical director of www.whhs.com or call (800) 963-7070. To learn more about Washington Hospital’s Center for Washington Hospital’s Joint Replacement, visit www.whhs.com/joint Center for Joint Replacement. To help people in the commu- physician,” Dr. Dearborn adNon-Surgical nity learn about the causes and vises. Other indications that you Treatment Options treatment options for knee probshould call a doctor include: “Most knee problems will lems, Washington Hospital is • An inability to bear weight on heal with non-surgical treatsponsoring a free Health & Wellthe knee. ments,” says Dr. Sah. “Someness seminar featuring presenta• Severe pain, even when not times it may simply entail tions by Dr. Dearborn and his bearing weight. modifying the patient’s physical colleague at the Center for Joint • The knee buckles, clicks or activities to avoid high-impact Replacement, orthopedic surgeon locks. exercises such as jogging and Dr. Alexander Sah. The seminar • The knee is deformed or missubstitute swimming or biking is scheduled for Friday, April 15 shapen. instead. Losing weight may also from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Conrad E. • A fever accompanied by redhelp, since extra weight can put Anderson, M.D. Auditorium at ness, warmth or significant additional strain on the knee.” the Washington West Building, swelling around the knee. Dr. Sah notes that physical 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. • Pain, swelling, numbness, tintherapy to strengthen the musMany cases of knee pain gling or a bluish discoloration in cles around the knee and to imcaused by overexertion or strain the calf below the knee. prove balance is beneficial for can be treated at home by taking “Taking an X-ray to look for many patients, as are knee braces ibuprofen to reduce pain and bone fractures and cartilage loss that can help support and proswelling and by following the due to arthritis is usually the first tect the joint. “RICE” method of resting the step in evaluating knee problems,” continued on page 7 knee to avoid aggravating the Dr. Dearborn explains. “An MRI pain, icing the knee to reduce might also be necessary if an X-ray


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

Auto Review

BEYOND TRANSPARENCY

D

on’t let the transparency of your automobile’s windshield lead you to think that it is no more than a piece of glass. A windshield is, in fact, a very important functional element that plays an important role in preserving a vehicle’s safety and integrity. Not only is it designed to withstand impact without shattering, it supports a considerable percentage of the roof’s weight and helps preserve vehicle rigidity. From a safety standpoint, the windshield must hold together during a crash and help disperse crash forces away from vehicle occupants. These technical wonders also contain embedded antennae, non-glare coatings, shade bands, and even rain sensors, which makes their replacement an important job from both a material and procedural standpoint.

If you have any questions about your car's windshield, or about any aspect of auto maintenance, please call BAY STAR AUTO CARE for an appointment today. We know that a windshield is more than just a window on the road -- it's one of the most important safety features in your car, so we will check your windshield to make sure it's safe for you and your whole family. We can also provide the regular maintenance that will catch small things -like a cracked windshield -- before they become big problems. We also provide emissions checks. HINT: In some cases, it may be possible to repair a damaged windshield with a resin-based bonding agent that restores the integrity of the glass.

Kia Optima, part of a great story BY STEVE SCHAEFER

K

ia was founded in Seoul, Korea in 1944 as a manufacturer of steel tubing and bicycle parts. After introducing their own bicycle in 1951, they moved on to motor scooters

Japanese vehicles. The center console has angled cupholders (the right one forward from the left), which places seat heating and cooling controls for both seats on the right side of the car. In the Japanese market, right-hand-drive model, that would probably make

rear combination lights, its own grille design, a rear lip spoiler, sculpted side sills, aero wiper blades, black front brake calipers and 18-inch black machined finish alloy wheels with P225/45R18 tires. Inside, Optima LX with auto-

more sense. Optimas come with one of three four-cylinder engines. The base engine is a 2.4-liter, 200horsepower mill. A more powerful 2.0-liter turbocharged engine offers 274 horsepower. This is Kia’s first turbo model sold in the U.S. A Hybrid version of the

matic transmission features cruise control and an active system for optimal fuel efficient driving. The EX adds more, including push button-start ignition with smart key, dual-zone automatic air conditioning, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob and an eight-way power driver's seat.

Optima arrives soon, combining a 2.4-liter 166-horsepower gas engine with a 40.2-horsepower electric motor. Three models fill out the nonHybrid range, from the LX base car to the EX luxury model to the SX sporty car. My Satin Metal test car was an EX. The LX gets the

EX Turbo adds wood interior trim with metal accents. SX comes with black leather woven seat trim, black interior trim with carbon insert film, steering wheel paddle shifters, metal pedals and lighted metal door scuff plates. Driving the Optima is more like luxury cruising than you might expect. It’s smooth and silent, with firm German-style seats and very well positioned armrests for maximum comfort. Prices range from $19,690 for the LX with manual transmission to $26,690 for the SX. Various options can push the prices up further. My EX tester would set you back a mere $23,190.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

in 1957, motorcycles in 1961 and built Korea’s first truck, the K-360, in 1962. In 1974, they began manufacturing vehicles from Peugeot and Fiat. Kia only began selling cars in the U.S. in 1994, but they’ve seen increases in market share every year since. Sephia, the first Kia sold here, accounted for 12,163 units in 1994. The Sportage compact SUV arrived in 1996, and in 1997, Kia sold 100,000 cars. In 1999 Hyundai, the other Korean automotive manufacturer, purchased Kia. Numerous awards and success stories have since added luster to the brand. The first Optima sedan arrived in 2000. Kia went over the half-million total sales mark, too, with 160,606 vehicles moved that year. The new Optima represents another step. This time, the company has built a car that looks and feels a lot like a Lexus. Kia sales in 2010 totaled 356,268. How did they do it? The original Sephia was nothing special—just inexpensive, at

$8,495. But like the Japanese manufacturers before them, the Koreans carefully and systematically worked on improving everything about their cars. Every new model was better than the last. The Spectra was nicer than the Sephia. The Forte is much more stylish than the Spectra. And today’s Optima is a world away from its competent but unremarkable predecessor. The Optima gets a whole new look this year, with energetic, sweeping side sculpting and a new take on the Kia tabbed grille. Cut lines between body panels are unusual. The rear side windows reference Lexus IS but in details, the car goes its own way. My Satin Metal test car had the optional panoramic sunroof, so a dark panel ran from front to back in an uninterrupted line—a dramatic “all glass” look. Optima’s interior offers beautifully proportioned dash and doors with the look and feel of premium

2.4-liter standard engine, but you can order the turbo in the EX Turbo and SX models. A six-speed manual transmission is available in the LX only; otherwise you get a six-speed automatic with Sportmatic clutchless gear selection. Fuel economy is good for a 3,200 – 3,400 pound midsize sedan. EPA gives the 2.4-liter 24 City, 35 Highway; the 2.0-liter turbo is right behind, at 22/34. The Hybrid model is expected to get 40 mpg Highway. EPA’s Green Vehicle Guide gives the automaticequipped Optima green ratings of 6 for both Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution. On the outside, Optima LX features dual chrome-tipped exhausts and 16-inch steel wheels and tires. EX adds fog lights, heated outside mirrors and 17inch alloy wheels and tires; EX Turbo adds a unique grille. The sports-oriented SX brings autoleveling HID headlights, LED

Steve Schaefer’s first car memories are of riding in his father’s Austin-Healey with the top down to get ice cream on a summer afternoon. He was four. As a teenager, Steve rode his bike to car dealers’ back lots to catch a glimpse of the new models when they first rolled off the truck. A founding member and currently vice president of the Western Automotive Journalists, he has been testing and writing about cars since 1992. Contact him at sdsauto@sbcglobal.net.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 5


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 7

continued from page 2

“Moreover, if a patient needs to be hospitalized, it is better when care is being provided locally,” adds Dr. Bastasch. “This avoids the risk of interruptions in therapy and supports fast, accurate communication between care providers.” Recognized for excellence Having a well-coordinated program also means physicians, administration and staff in the Washington Hospital Healthcare System work together to meet national standards equivalent to the premier cancer centers around the country. Last year, the Cancer Care Program received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. The Hospital is also one of only four in California to be designated a Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Program by the American Cancer Society.

“As a Radiation Oncology Center and a cancer care program, we don’t need to be big to fly far,” Dr. Bastasch continues. “Here, we’re all about community cancer treatment, and our patients experience a level of care that is equivalent to the best in the nation.”

Learn More About Cancer Care To learn more about the treatment services offered at the Washington Radiation Oncology Center, call (510) 796-7212. To learn more about the Community Cancer Program at Washington Hospital, visit www.whhs.com/cancer.

continued from page 3

Another non-surgical treatment option for knees damaged by arthritis is injections of steroids or hyaluronic acid. “Steroid injections in the knee can help reduce inflammation caused by arthritis and provide pain relief that lasts a month or longer,” Dr. Dearborn says. “Hyaluronic acid is a component of the normal lubricating fluid found in healthy joints, and injecting it into damaged knees may ease pain and provide cushioning for the joint. The relief can last for about three months, and the injections can be done two or three times a year.” Arthroscopic Surgery and Partial or Total Knee Replacement Sometimes the only treatment option is surgery. But once again, the type of surgery employed depends on the cause of the problem. “In cases where a patient has an acute cartilage or ligament tear but an otherwise healthy knee, arthroscopic surgery to repair the damaged joint can readily remedy the problem,” Dr. Dearborn explains. “On the other hand, if the patient has a dramatic loss of cartilage due to arthritis, and bone is wearing on bone, arthroscopic surgery wouldn’t help because it simply can’t bring cartilage back. In cases like that, the patient may be a candidate for either partial or total knee replacement.” Dr. Dearborn, who performs over 600 minimally invasive total knee replacement surgeries each year, notes that the choice between partial and total knee replacement again depends on the patient’s specific diagnosis. “There are three areas of the knee that need to be evaluated – both sides of the knee

and under the kneecap,” he says. “Total replacement would be indicated if the patient’s cartilage is badly damaged on both sides of the knee and under the kneecap or on one side of the knee and under the kneecap. Partial replacement would be an option for patients who have damage on only one part of the knee.” The advantages of partial knee replacement can be substantial for patients whose arthritis has affected only one part of the knee. “Partial knee replacement is less invasive, and the ligaments in the center of the knee are not removed, unlike in a total knee replacement,” says Dr. Sah. “Because the ligaments are left intact, the joint feels more like a ‘natural knee.’ It’s a good option especially for younger patients in their 40s, 50s and 60s whose arthritis has not spread throughout the knee.” With the addition of Dr. Sah to the staff in 2008, the Center for Joint Replacement has been performing more and more partial knee replacement surgeries. “Dr. Sah’s presence has really enhanced our ability to perform partial knee replacements because he completed his fellowship in joint replacement at Rush Hospital in Chicago where they did a high volume of those surgeries,” Dr. Dearborn says. For his part, Dr. Sah considers working at the Center for Joint Replacement to be a “great privilege.” He explains: “I was born at Washington Hospital. Also, my father was an ear, nose and throat (ENT) physician at the hospital for 30 years, and he now volunteers there along with my mother. I have a special connection to Fremont, and it feels good to give something back to the hospital and the community.”

Center for Joint Replacement Ranked #1 in California by HealthGrades

HealthGrades, a leading, nationwide health care ratings, information, and advisory services company has named Washington Hospital’s Center for Joint Replacement (CJR) as the number one joint replacement program in California. CJR has now been ranked among the top 10 in California for six years in a row and has been ranked among the top five percent in the nation for five years in a row. “We are delivering this high level of care in a personal way,” says Dr. John Dearborn. “When we get rated number one in California, I think our entire patient care team – from myself to the nurses and therapy staff is doing a great job.” HealthGrades uses proprietary, objective provider ratings and expert advisory services, to compile its ratings. HealthGrades produces its ranking and ratings in a report released annually. To learn more about the Center for Joint Replacement, visit www.whhs.com/joint.

Letter to the Editor

Newark's Red Light Cameras The California State Department of Finance estimated Newark's population at 44,380 as of January 2010. In the little more than four years since Newark activated its Red Light Camera program it has issued 35,550 tickets and is on track in about 12 months time to have achieved the dubious distinction of having issued the equivalent of at least one ticket for every man, woman, and child living in the city. Over 80% of tickets were for illegal right turns. The old contract will expire in about 6 weeks and the City Council will be asked to ratify a new multi-year contract in in about 3 weeks. A full review of the Red Light Camera program is needed. Ask for it. Roger Jones, Fremont

www.skinlaseressentials.com


Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Fremont Crime News SUBMITTED BY DETECTIVE BILL VETERAN, FREMONT PD Assault on Police Officer: On Wednesday, March 30, Officer Bobbitt and Sergeant Severance arrested Safi Bahram at his residence on Sundale Drive. He is a suspect in an assault with a deadly weapon on police officers and auto-theft. Auto-theft: Police have arrested a black male adult for autotheft. The incident happened on Friday, March 15 on Cushing Road. The suspect was seen fleeing the scene in a gray Chevy Blazer. Two hours later, Officer Manrique spotted a similar vehicle driven by a subject matching the suspect’s description. Residential Burglary Police arrested a man for residential burglary on Monday, March 28 at Sundale Arms Apartments. A

Union City Crime News COURTESY OF UNION CITY PD Child endangerment: Police arrested a woman on Thursday night, March 24 for Child Endangerment. She left her naked two-year-old walking between lanes of traffic on Union City Boulevard near Jean Drive in cold wet weather. When Police arrived the juvenile was seated in a witness’s car. The mother had an outstanding warrant as a parolee-at-large. The victim and her three siblings were taken into protective custody and turned over to Child Protective Services. Attempted assault: Fremont Police are looking for a suspect who attempted to run over a Fremont police officer. Pursuit of the suspect's vehicle ended in the area of Decoto Road near the Avalon Apartments. The Suspect abandoned the vehicle, fled on foot and managed to escape. Fremont police are actively investigating this incident. Mayhem at mortuary: On Friday, March 25, Police responded to the Chapel of the Chimes Cemetery and Funeral Home on Mission Boulevard to investigate an in progress fight. Two male subjects were found lying on the grass in front of the mortuary, one of them bleeding from his hand and the other with blood on his face. It was determined that the suspect approached a family mourning the loss of a family member and accused them of stalking him. The suspect attacked the victim’s teenage daughter who was defended by the victim, her father. During the ensuing fight, the suspect hit the victim with a plastic bag which contained three full cans of soda and bit off the tip of one of the victim’s fingers. The suspect was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon and mayhem. Prior to being transported to jail, the suspect was taken to a local

witness called Police as he spotted the suspect climbing through a window of an apartment; officers located an adult male suspect inside. Two suspects arrested for stealing Ipod Two suspects robbed a victim of his Ipod at gunpoint at Harvey Park. A witness informed police of a suspect’s residence and after a short chase, he was taken into custody. Sgt. Lopes found a loaded handgun stashed in bushes in front of the house. The second suspect was also arrested. Shooting A woman was taken to a local hospital after being shot. She has since been released. The shooting took place on Saturday, March 26 at Diamond Palace. No other injuries were reported. According to witnesses, the suspect was involved in an altercation at a wedding. Police have found several bullet casings in the parking lot. The case is under investigation.

hospital for a medical condition. The victim received treatment for his injuries at a local hospital. Supermarket side show: As officers were leaving the scene of the prior incident at the cemetery, a subject spun doughnut in a “side show” around the parking lot of Mexico Super Market across the street. Witnesses fled in fear of being struck. When he noticed Police approaching, the suspect driver parked his vehicle and ran into the store. The driver was cited, and his vehicle towed. DUI: Police arrested a man on Saturday, March 26 for driving while under the influence of alcohol. The suspect’s vehicle struck another vehicle coming to a stop at a red light at Dyer Street and Alvarado-Niles Road. Narcotics arrest: Early Tuesday morning, March 29, officers responded to the Wal*Mart parking lot located at 30600 Dyer Street to investigate a report of an intoxicated subject. Officers located the subject near his vehicle and determined that he could not care for his safety and arrested him. During a search of the subject, prescription pills were found; subsequently additional narcotics and a large sum of currency were found in the subject’s vehicle. The suspect was arrested for possession of narcotics for sale, and possession of stolen property. On Wednesday, March 30, officers from the Community Policing and Problem Solving Unit (COPPS) were patrolling the area of the Tropics Mobile Home Park when they saw a group of suspicious people gathered around a vehicle with an open trunk. Officers arrested the suspects when .5 grams of methamphetamine was found. Missing teen found: Early Thursday morning, March 31, Police handled a report of a missing 14-year-old with Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism. The teen left his residence after an argument with his mother. A thorough area check was conducted with assistance of a California Highway Patrol helicopter, East Bay Regional Parks District Police and Fremont Police. Following extensive efforts from authorities, the missing juvenile returned home and was sent to a local hospital for evaluation.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Burglary suspects caught in the act SUBMITTED BY SERGEANT DARYL SEQUEIRA, MILPITAS PD PHOTOS COURTESY OF MILPITAS PD Three suspects believed responsible for several residential burglaries were taken into custody Friday, March 25, the same day they attempted three burglaries in Milpitas. Nine-

Linh Nguyen

suspects were booked into Santa Clara County Main Jail for multiple charges including attempted burglary; possessing stolen property; possessing a loaded weapon; prowling, and conspiracy. Linh Nguyen who had an outstanding warrant for his arrest under his true name, gave false information about Billy Nguyen

teen year-old Fremont resident Billy Nguyen; 18-year-old, Fremont resident Linh Nguyen and 18-year-old, Newark resident Thong Hoang approached a house on Meadowland Drive at about 11:39 a.m. and while one of the suspects knocked on the front door, another suspect began looking at the house and its windows. The burglary was foiled when the resident called police. The suspects fled the area in a black 2003 Acura Sedan. At about 11:53 a.m. a watchful resident from Aaron Park Drive reported three similarly described males with a similar vehicle knocking on the front door and asking for a person who did not live at the home. The suspects left the resident reported the matter to police. Later a police officer in the area spotted the vehicle parked on Tramway Drive and saw one of the suspects approaching yet another house at Santa Rita Drive. The officer detained all three suspects. Police identified the suspects as being involved in all the incidents. A subsequent search of the vehicle revealed a loaded handgun, previously reported stolen from a residential burglary in Hayward. All three

Cop assaulted while chasing suspect SUBMITTED BY LT. ROGER KEENER, HAYWARD PD Hayward Police are looking for a suspect in connection with a residential burglary on Leeward Street. Two other suspects involved in the burglary have been arrested. The incident happened on Wednesday morning, March 30, at about 9:33 a.m. when a resident called Police saying that she could hear someone moving items within the house. The woman locked herself in a bedroom until police arrived. A police officer's car collided with the suspect's car during a chase at Leeward Street. Both vehicles became inoperable and the suspects fled. Hayward Police, Hayward K-9, K9 from BART PD and CHP helicopter and Special Response Unit (SWAT) conducted an extensive search. One of the suspects was found hiding in a shed near a residence on Darwin Street while another was arrested from a residence on Darwin Street. The third suspect is still at large. Both suspects were booked for assaulting a police officer and residential burglary. “The investigation will now focus on determining if these suspects are responsible for any other criminal acts within Hayward or in the jurisdiction of our allied agencies as well as determining the identity of the outstanding suspect,” said Lt. Roger Keener, Hayward PD. The Hayward Police officer who was assaulted was treated for minor injuries at a local hospital and released. The identity of the suspects is not being released at this time; they are both adults and residents of Hayward and Oakland.

Thong Hoang

his identity during the investigation. He was also booked for giving false information to a police officer and driving without a license. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation should call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400.

Police and Community Education Seminar Milpitas citizens will get a rare chance to view the inner workings of their police department. Police and Community Education seminar (P.A.C.E.S.) program, also known as Citizen's Academy, provides community members with an understanding of how the department operates. “The program will be taught by instructors from within the department and participants will have opportunities to ask questions and participate in discussions,” said Officer Asim Qureshi, Milpitas PD. This free, once a week course runs for six weeks on consecutive Wednesday nights. Topics covered include Community Oriented Policing; arrest and control procedures; gangs; high risk vehicle stops; arrest warrant process; police canine; police S.W.A.T. Team; crime prevention and other areas of interest. Through a series of lectures and staged scenarios, citizens will be provided with hands-on training similar to the actual police academy. Officer Qureshi says that space is limited so an early application is encouraged. Applicants must live or work in the City of Milpitas. Police and Community Education Seminar (P.A.C.E.S.) Wednesdays, April 13 through May 18 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Milpitas Police department 1275 North Milpitas Blvd, Milpitas (408) 586-2529 www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

History

‘That Union City of Mine’ BY MYRLA RAYMUNDO Do you know that Union City has an official song? On May 20, 1991, the song “That Union City of Mine” was unanimously adopted by the City Council of Union City as the of-

ficial song for Union City. Written and produced by Steve King Stewart and Byron Allred, the song was recorded in May and June 1991 at Music Annex, in Menlo Park, California. The song was mastered at

With that Union City of Mine And we’ll be together in the sunny California weather And maybe forever, I’ll be holding your hand in mine Come and have a look around, the people and the places There’s so much I’d like to see Just ask anyone in town

Those old familiar place Are waiting for you and for me Best of all Near the city hall Is a park with a lazy lagoon

And whether it’s Whipple Road, Alvarado-Niles, Mission Boulevard or Decoto Road From the home on the hillside to the shoreline at bayside You’ll feel right at home Now you can hear the breeze that brings on winter showers Telling you things will be fine

The morning sun is so bright and o’er the bay at twilight in that Union City of Mine Well, I’m the kind of guy who’s finally found a home in that Union City of Mine

Music Annex with engineering by Tom Carr. Band members were: Keyboards – Byron Allred Guitar – Jessi Gresso Bass – Ned Doherty Drums – Roger Thompson Back-up Vocals – Sweet Sensations Horns arranged by Wayne Wallace Lead Vocal – Steve King Steward Here it is… That Union City of Mine Well, I’m the kind of guy that likes to roam around some and baby I’ve been around But now I’m in a town where no one’s ever lonesome and, oh, won’t you look at what I’ve found Why, there’s rows and rows of gladiolus reaching up to the sky With smiles on faces from so many places Let me show you why Meet me at the park near Union City station Sunday, quarter to nine We’ll walk along the boulevard And you will fall in love

And in the summer I’m told Hills of green turn to gold Under a sky of blue Now you can hear the breeze that brings on winter showers Telling you things will be fine The morning sun so bright and o’er the bay at twilight is that Union City of Mine And we’ll be together in the sunny California weather And maybe forever I’ll be holding your hand in mine

MYRLA RAYMUNDO, MBA

There are children hard at play Most anywhere you wander Music of their laughter fills the air And here is where we’ll stay from now to ever after If you will only tell me that you care

Myrla Raymundo is the founder of the Union City Historical Museum in Union City. For the past 16 years, Myrla has served as President of the Friends of the Union City Library. She is the author of the book “Union City Through the Years..”


April 5, 2011

P

repare your taste buds for a unique and beneficial dining experience with Kidango’s 16th Annual Taster’s Showcase. The fundraiser combines incredible food with the opportunity to support the vital programs of Kidango, a nonprofit child development agency with 41 centers throughout Alameda and Santa Clara Counties which provide care, education, and support services for kids and families. Whether your tastes run toward Italy or Mexico, vegetarian entrees, fine wines or delicious deserts, Taster’s Showcase has you covered with over 25 vendors offering up their best. This year’s participants include BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse, Extreme Pizza, Papillon, Spin-A-Yarn Restaurant, Trader Joe’s, Super Suppers, Gelato Classico, Federicos Tapas and Wine Bar, Chouinard Vineyards, JD LaVie! Specialty Wines,Vida y Vino Wine Bistro, and Westover Vineyards Winery. Professional chef, caterer and culinary educator Mary Chamberlin heads a panel of expert judges that will award honors in 12 food cate-

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 11

gories, and a people’s choice award will be given to the best red and white wine. In addition to the tantalizing selection of great local food, attendees will receive an event wine glass and be entered into a raffle for 12 dining certificates for two. There will also be the excitement of live and silent auctions featuring items such as themed gift baskets and gift cards, theatre and sporting event tickets, a cabin stay in Tahoe, and a yacht package. Perk up your Sunday afternoon with Taster’s Showcase and enjoy a bounty of culinary delights while helping to give kids a strong foundation for a successful future. 16th Annual Taster’s Showcase Sunday, April 17 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Fremont Marriott 46100 Landing Parkway, Fremont (510) 897-6912 www.tastersshowcase.org Tickets: $35 in advance, $45 at the door

www.farahghatala.com

BY ELÉNA MARTINA The Third Annual Vintage Fashion Show and Tea will present incredible fashions and high tea in one unique and elegant celebration. This year, beaded gowns from the 20th Century take center stage in the ballroom of the Historic Ygnacio Peralta House, built in 1860 and the last surviving brick Victorian home in San Leandro. The San Leandro Library and Alta Mira Club are hosting this delightful occasion that offers a spread of assorted sandwiches such as cucumber, salmon, crab, shrimp, and egg salad, along with orange pekoe tea, coffee and desserts, as well as homemade cookies. Deborah Rush, a “fashionista” in California and Nevada for the last 20 years, will use models from the Key Club International of San Leandro High School to present rare and beautiful dresses from her private collection. Ms. Rush’s collection of elegant vintage beaded gowns spans over 200 years and consists of over 500 outfits with a museum quality look. The show will include piano music and historic commentaries from Shirley Burgett, a writer, author, and fashion history lecturer. She is currently the local history editor for Gentry Magazine. A home tour will also be offered. According to San Leandro librarian Mary Lee Barr, all attendees should come wearing their best church attire as if celebrating Easter, and if anyone does not own a fancy hat, one will be provided at the entrance. Seating is limited, so please be sure to purchase your ticket soon. Tickets are $25 per person and

can be purchased with check or cash at the Information Desk at San Leandro Main Library, located at 300 Estudillo Avenue, or by calling (510) 351-4164. For more information contact Mary Lee Barr at (510) 577-3986 or mbarr@ci.san-leandro.ca.us. Vintage Fashion Show and Tea Saturday, April 9 12:30 p.m. Alta Mira Club House 561 Lafayette Ave., San Leandro (510) 577-3986 Tickets: $25


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

Google founder hopes to prove he's ready to be CEO BY MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Apr 01 - Google co-founder Larry Page is known for his vision, passion and intelligence. Yet there is a fair amount of concern that Page's other known traits - his aloofness, rebellious streak and affinity for pursuing wacky ideas - might lead the company astray. Page takes over as CEO on Monday as fast-rising rivals and tougher regulators threaten Google's growth. Investors used to Google Inc.'s consistency in exceeding financial targets worry that new leadership will bring more emphasis on long-term projects that take years to pay off. And many people still aren't sure he has enough management skills to steer the Internet's most powerful company. Page already has learned that smarts alone won't make him a great leader. Although Page impressed Google's early investors with his ingenuity, they still insisted that he step down in 2001 as Google's first CEO. He turned over the job to Eric Schmidt, a veteran executive who began

BY MAE ANDERSON AP RETAIL WRITER NEW YORK (AP), Apr 01 Several bidders are set to duke it out for Blockbuster Inc. at a bankruptcy auction in New York on Monday. They reportedly include Dish Network Corp. and billionaire investor Carl Icahn. The movie-rental chain has received several bids other than the opening bid of $290 million from a group of debtholders made in February. Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy protection in September. Dish and Icahn have each submitted a bid, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday, citing anonymous sources familiar with the matter. Dish Network declined to comment. Icahn could not immediately be reached for comment. Jay Indyke, attorney for the committee of unsecured creditors, says several bids had come in but did not specify who they are from. Icahn has been expected to make a bid. He was part of the group of debtholders that provided Blockbuster financing to operate while in bankruptcy in September. Everyone in that group, except for Icahn, made

working in Silicon Valley in the early 1980s while Page was still in grammar school. Page's admirers say that at 38, he is more mature and less apt to be chronically late to meetings or tune out of conversations that don't stimulate his intellect habits that he fell into during his first stint as CEO. “There are parts of being CEO that don't fit Larry's personality,” said Craig Silverstein, the first employee that Page and Google's other founder, Sergey Brin, hired when they started the company in 1998. “You wear a lot of different hats when you're CEO. Some of them are very interesting to Larry and some of them, presumably, are less interesting.” True to his taciturn form, Page hasn't said much publicly since Google made its stunning announcement in January that he will replace Schmidt as CEO. Google said Page wasn't available for an interview. Page, though, has left little doubt about his top priority: to dissolve the bureaucracy and complacency that accompanied the company's rapid transformation into a 21st-century empire. Google

is expected to end the year with more than 30,000 employees and $35 billion in annual revenue. In Page's mind, the 13-yearold company needs to return to thinking and acting like a feisty startup. Rising Internet stars such as Facebook, Twitter and Groupon, all less than 8 years old, are developing products that could challenge Google and make its dominance of Internet search less lucrative. Page has drawn comparisons to two high-tech geniuses who are even more accomplished: Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates and Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs. Like those two pioneers in personal technology, Page invented and cultivated a product that changed the world. But Page has yet to match them in this respect: as CEOs, Gates and Jobs brought out the best in the companies that they created, delighting stockholders as their investments soared. Page doesn't fit the CEO mold, even by the standards of Silicon Valley's free-wheeling culture. He dropped out of graduate

an opening bid in February, known as a “stalking horse” bid, to buy Blockbuster for $290 million. Blockbuster used to dominate the U.S. movie rental business. But it lost money for years as that business declined because customers shifted to Netflix Inc., video on demand and DVD rental kiosks. Prospective bidders are either after Blockbuster's assets, such as its name, kiosks and movie-download service, or the money they can make from liquidating the brand, analysts said. “The prospective bidders would have to believe that they can generate sufficient cash to provide payback plus a return on their investment,” said Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter. “I am skeptical that a sale will occur at a price higher than was offered a few weeks ago.” When it filed for bankruptcy protection in September it was down to 3,000 stores, less than a third of the peak of 9,100 in 2004. In December, the chain said it planned to close 182 more in the next few months. Following the auction, a sale approval hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

continued on page 39

Fed names banks that drew loans during crisis BY JEANNINE AVERSA AND DEREK KRAVITZ AP ECONOMICS WRITERS WASHINGTON (AP), Mar 31 - For the first time in its 98-year history, the Federal Reserve on Thursday identified banks that borrowed from its oldest lending program. The Fed was compelled to name the banks that drew emergency loans during the financial crisis after the Supreme Court rejected a bid continued on page 39


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY MARCY GORDON AP BUSINESS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), Mar 29 - Federal regulators are proposing to exempt certain mortgages from new rules aimed at getting banks to take on more risk when they package and sell mortgage investments. Critics say the proposal could hurt low- and moderate-income borrowers by limiting their access to mortgages. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Federal Reserve

voted Tuesday to advance the proposal. It would define an exemption to rules required by the new financial regulatory law. Under those rules, banks must hold at least 5 percent of the mortgage securities on their books. But lawmakers left it to regulators to define that exemption. Under the definition regulators have proposed, banks wouldn't have to have so-called ``skin in the game'' for mortgage securities that contain loans for which buyers made at least a 20 percent down payment.

For banks to qualify for the exemption, they would also have to collect information from borrowers showing proof of income, credit history and ability to make payments. The new rule is designed to deter the kind of loans that helped cause the 2008 financial crisis. Ahead of the crisis, banks packaged and sold bundles of risky mortgages that offered teaser rates that increased after only a few years. Once the interest rates on the mortgages spiked, many borrowers ended up de-

Page 13

faulting. As a result, the value of securities that contained those mortgages plummeted. Experts say banks had very little of their own money invested in those mortgage securities, and that led them to take greater risks that contributed to the financial crisis. The proposal has been awaited by Wall Street, which is looking to revive the market for mortgage securities. It has remained weak since the financial crisis, largely because investors are unsure about the quality of the loans. Other federal regulatory agencies are expected to back the proposal in the coming weeks. It could be adopted later this year. FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair said the mortgages that qualify for exemption ``will be a small slice'' of the mortgage securities market overall. Bair said many people have expressed concern that the re-

quirements for exempting mortgages could reduce the availability of mortgages for low- and moderate-income borrowers. “We take these concerns very seriously and want to make sure they are fully addressed,” she said before the vote. The FDIC is seeking comments on the possible impact of the mortgage requirements on low- and moderate-income borrowers during the 60-day public comment period on the proposed rule. The FDIC also voted to advance rules requiring financial institutions with $50 billion or more in assets to submit a plan detailing how they would wind down their operations if they experienced severe distress or failed. About 125 companies would be subject to the requirement. AP Economics Writer Jeannine Aversa contributed to this report.

AP WIRE SERVICE RENO, Nev. (AP), Apr 01 - A California investment company has completed the purchase of the largest hotel-casino in northern Nevada. KTVN-TV reported Friday that the Meruelo Group completed its acquisition of the Grand Sierra Resort and Casino in Reno. Terms of the deal were not announced. The Downey, Calif.-based company has said key investments will be made to upgrade rooms and suites, and improve the casino design and gambling options. The Meruelo Group announced its plans to buy the Grand Sierra in February. The 145-acre property with 2,000 rooms was the world's largest hotel-casino when it opened as the MGM Grand in 1978. Since 2008, it had been owned by a subsidiary of JPMorgan Chase & Co. The Meruelo Group owns five construction and engineering firms in the southwest U.S., and many restaurants in California. --Information from: KTVN-TV, http://www.ktnv.com

BY SANDRA CHEREB ASSOCIATED PRESS CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP), Apr 01 - Frustration over tough land use regulations fueled criticism against California and Lake Tahoe regulators Friday as Nevada lawmakers considered a proposal to withdraw from a decades-old compact governing the scenic basin that straddles both states. Under SB271, Nevada would secede from the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, a bi-state agency created in 1969, and assume regulatory duties for lands in the Tahoe Basin within the state's boundaries.

Sen. John Lee, D-North Las Vegas, said the regulatory structure of the TRPA has been taken over by California and litigation from environmental groups. He said his bill is "the only arrow I have in my quiver" to try bring change. Republican co-sponsors called TRPA a “bloated bureaucracy” and an "obstructionist organization," that takes years to decide if a homeowner can cut up a dead tree or pave a driveway. “We are suffocating from regulation,” said Mike Young, an Incline Village resident and president of the Nevada Association of Realtors. He said Nevada is being held “captive”

by California's influence on the bistate regulatory board, calling the neighboring state "the big bully in the school lunch room." Critics of TRPA also cited lawsuits by environmental groups and a regional plan that hasn't been updated since 1987 for hamstringing property owners and adding to frustration of businesses and homeowners. Other backers of the measure said if Nevada withdrew, it could then begin discussion on how to revamp the agency. continued on page 38


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

STORY AND PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY KATHLEEN CAINE For the first time in several years, Horner Junior High students were excited to host a champion debate tournament on March 26, which included schools from Fremont Unified School District. As part of the East Bay Debate League, students from Horner Junior High, as well as Hopkins Junior

to provide the students, their coaches and supporters with everything they needed for a successful debate. The school was fortunate to receive donations from several local vendors including McDonalds, Subway Sandwiches, Starbucks, Raley’s, Safeway and the Grocery Outlet. “Debate clubs offer an important opportunity for our students,” commented Lara York, FUSD School Board Trustee, who observed the students’ excitement

Rohit Dilip, 7th grader at Horner Junior High, accepts his speaker award from Patty Forster, East Bay Debate League.

High, represented the district, taking part in four separate debates. “The topics are surprisingly complex,” remarked May Chan, Assistant Coach for the Horner team. “Over the past year, students have debated everything from the school’s role in disciplining for cyber-bullying to term limits for Supreme Court justices. It’s been exciting to watch them grow in both confidence and ability.” There were 56 teams competing, with 168 students representing ten bay area schools. In spite of the cold and rainy day, Horner Junior High rallied

as they announced the first topic of the day and raced off to prepare notes. “Members learn critical thinking skills, improve their public speaking and master communication strategies that will help them become excellent citizens.” Both of the Fremont schools are in their first year with the Middle School Debate League (MSDL) program and did remarkably well; each is sending a team to compete at Nationals in Claremont, California in April. We wish them much success.

Movie

King’s Speech PG-13 opens April 1 BY MONA SHAH The family-friendly version of the Academy Award-winning historical drama about King George VI, “The King’s Speech” PG-13, will open on 1,000 screens nationwide on April 1; the only version available in theatres. One of the year's most celebrated films, “The King’s Speech” won several Oscars; for Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and Actor. Releasing the movie in the PG-13 version enables those to whom it speaks most directly - young people troubled by stuttering, bullying and similar trials - to see it. The emotional impact of stuttering that was illuminated by “The King’s Speech” continues to be a topic of conversation with recent statements by Vice President Joseph Biden about his own struggles with stammering. The release of “The King’s Speech” PG-13 offers families nationwide access to a positive story about stuttering and overcoming obstacles and social stigmas.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

1

2 4

5

6

6

B 109

Crossword Puzzle 7

8

9 8

9

10

2 3 6

7

3

9 8 5 2 1 3 6

11 12

13

14

15

16

17

1

18

5

19 20

3

21 22

23

24

4

25 26

4 9

27

4 2 8

6

28 29

30

31

B 108

32

1

I

T

2

3

S A

7

33

E

35

E

Puzzle Solutions

36

D

U

X

I

8

C

Down 1 Grassy fields (7) 2 Hung on the chimney (9,8) 3 La casa=the house, e.g. (14) 4 Modus operandi (6) 5 Bucolic (5) 6 Place to find keys (10) 7 Mary Poppins, e.g. (5) 9 Distinguishing character traits (15) 12 College days (12) 16 "___ Cried" (1962 hit) (3)

17 Checker, perhaps (4) 19 Every year (6) 23 Ahnold (8) 25 Taken in (7) 28 Custodian's collection (4) 30 Angler's hope (4) 31 "Pumping ___" (4) 32 "___ It Romantic?" (4)

T

S A

N

P

L

A

18

C

I

C O N

A

S

23

R

A

A 32

R

28

T W E

A E

P

E

E

R R

E

P

19

E M E E

R

T

O U

7 5 2 8 3 1 6 9 4

T

E

R

5

E M B

E

T

S

6 8 9 5 4 2 1 7 3

I

A

3 1 4 7 6 9 5 8 2

E E

S

E

P L

T

N

Y

S

L

O C

T

A

T

I

N

1 7 3 2 9 5 8 4 6

D

I

8 2 5 4 7 6 9 3 1

G

P

C

V

E

R

S

U

E 30

D

H

E

E

C

31

K

A

I

Y

D

S

5 4 1 9 2 3 7 6 8

U S

T

35

2 3 8 6 5 7 4 1 9

U G

O

I 33

L A

26

I T

S 24

L A

T 20

B I

N G

I

N G

4 9 6 3 1 8 2 5 7

A D

O N

K N

S

I

T

T

N G

N G

S T

R

15

I

P

A

I

T S

6

A

L

H O U

O 29

C

I

N T

R

S

T

N

12

S

S A

I

M S

C S

R

N

O

E 34

P

H P

R V

I 25

F E

C

E

C

16

S H

E 11

A U

O

21

I C

10

O N

N

H

22

B

I

O

N

27

9

14

T

O

27 ____ in shining armor, plural (7) 29 Duties (16) 33 Open wide (4) 34 Delivered (4) 35 Father's father (11) 36 Big ___ Conference (3)

A

A

E

S

U

T R

4

D

C 17

Across 4 Itching leads to (10) 8 Italian, e.g. (6) 10 Tall, happy, blue, small, e.g. (12) 11 Victorian, for one (3) 12 "... happily ___ after" (4) 13 Cart part (5) 14 All ___ (3) 15 ___ green (3) 16 Things in common (12) 18 "Dig in!" (3) 19 ___ Wednesday (3) 20 "I had no ___!" (4) 21 "You have no manners!" e.g. (9) 22 Advocate (4) 24 Bridle parts (4) 25 Parenthesis, essentially (3) 26 In person (4)

N

R

L 13

34

E

I

X

9 6 7 1 8 4 3 2 5

Tri-City Stargazer APRIL 6 – APRIL 12, 2011 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Mars, the god of war to the ancients, has just moved into the sign of Aries. It adds even more weight to the veritable hailstorm of planets that has already been in that territory. Aries is the sign that starts the annual vernal equinox and is considered the beginning of the zodiac. Given the planetary arrangements present, we have a serious setup that promises a lot of drama. “War” in any or all of its versions is prominent. It is explosive. This is “take no prisoners” type of energy. All of this has been developing since Jan. 1. We cannot control what is happening on the globe, but we can certainly contain ourselves within our relationships. Don’t allow this setup to create an unnecessary destructive drama in your life if you can help it. Mars energy used well fights on behalf of others or a valuable principle. Aries the Ram: (Mar 20—Apr 19) This is not the best week for mechanical objects. Breakage or failures are highly possible. Your reflexes are strung too tightly so make an effort to relax muscles and concentrate on steady, but consistent forward motion. This is the advice whether driving the car or running a mile. Keep yourself as grounded as possible. Taurus: (Apr 21 – May 20) You are going through a major “worry wart” period. Roughly 95% of what we worry about never happens. But we can certainly use a lot of energy imagining how the lions and tigers may get loose and roam the streets. Rest/sleep may be elusive during this period. Use all the best sleep suggestions that you can find. Don’t get into worrying over it. This will pass within a few weeks. Gemini: (May 21 – Jun 20) Mercury has been retrograding in the Twins’ territory that concerns friends, organizations, and community contacts. You may be having difficulty bringing things to fruition or conclusion in any of these areas. You may feel a strong need to reconnect to people that you have not seen in awhile. This will be good for you. Cancer: (Jun 21 – Jul 20) Sudden changes in career may rock your world view. This is also occurring in any area where you

make a social contribution. Your crab side feels a major need to break through a shell that has become cramped. You are drawn into a political fray and you know this needs to happen. Leo: (Jul 21 – Aug 20) Major changes are happening in the areas of the law, publishing, education, the church, the Internet, and/or travel. Most of these are favorable. You are called upon to announce what you know, to give a speech, or to teach others. Those with children or grandchildren have reason to be proud. Some may be interested in a new love. Virgo: (Aug 21 – Sep 20) Mercury, your ruling planet, is retrograding in the territory of taxes, debt, and joint resources. You will likely experience a need to go back and review financial history. Some may be hesitating over whether or not to become re-involved with a previous lover. Probably you won’t resist, but the desire may become a moot point in May. Libra: (Sep 21 – Oct 20) It probably seems as though everyone around you is flipping into outer space, losing control, and ridden with major anxiety. Meanwhile it falls to you to be the one who remains calm and steady. Fortunately with Saturn currently in your sign, you have the capacity to hold firm. Others need you to do

you now are writing, traveling frequently on short distances, or starting a new course of study. You have been freed from required tasks so you can focus on new things in your life. It is possible you are adding a new roommate or a new car.

Pisces: (Feb 21 – Mar 20) There are many possibilities for making increased money. It seems as though they have just begun to occur in the most recent weeks. Some of them come from areas that are new to you. This is also a period of rapid learning, which includes the need to learn quite a lot in a short period of time. Much of this is enlivening.

this cosmically “assigned” job. Scorpio: (Oct 21 – Nov 20) You may be in the middle of a major controversy. In fact, it is probable that you are among the leaders in a controversy at your job, school, or normal daily habitat. The main danger here is that you could become ungrounded and lose track of your good sense. Stand still, deep breathe, and sense the ground under your feet several times per day. Sagittarius: (Nov 21 – Dec 20) There may be fresh news about a new child/grandchild entering the family. Some of you are thoroughly involved in a new love affair. Just don’t move in together while Mercury is retrograding. Hold off until May. Many good things are happening and you feel joyous and optimistic. Capricorn: (Dec 21 – Jan 20) It may seem to you that issues concerning home, family and property have grown to the point of being out of control. It is, as the adage says, like herding cats. Attempt to take one problem at a time, do what you can do, and then move on to the next. Don’t allow the panic of others to overtake you. Aquarius: (Jan 21 – Feb 20) Your world has taken on a new vibrancy and color. Areas that may excite

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com

Faith Ringgold School


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

American Federation of Teachers launches ‘See a Bully, Stop a Bully: Make a Difference’ All-Day restaurantstyle dining services, a fabulous cafe and room service on request serve residents who are on the go or those ready to relax at the end of the day. The richly appointed common areas, library, game room, and patio complete the total living experience.

Annual Diabetic Seminar Wednesday, April 13th 11:00 - 1:00 Come and learn healthy lifestyle tips, diabetic friendly snacks, and alternatives as well as a snap shot of the plentitude of services represented in our Diabetic Management Program.

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA LEONOR GARZA The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has launched its new national “See a Bully, Stop a Bully: Make a Difference” campaign to combat bullying. As part of the campaign, the AFT created blue wristbands and posters featuring the campaign slogan, “See a Bully—Stop a Bully,” which will be distributed widely in schools across the country. “When students see their teachers or anyone wearing the blue wristband, it will serve as a signal to students that they are

Theatre

not alone, that school is a safe haven, and that they can turn to and depend on their educators to deal with bullying or harassment,” said AFT President Randi Weingarten. “Schools should be places where students feel safe and can thrive without the fear of taunts or humiliation. It is time to stop excusing bullying as ‘kids will be kids.’” “See a Bully, Stop a Bully: Make a Difference” is aimed at raising awareness and providing resources and training to educators, students, parents and others. The AFT will be bolstering the educator training it has provided

for years to combat bullying in schools, and will work with others to ensure that schools are safe environments for students and staff. AFT also will be partnering with GLAAD (Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) on a bilingual, youth-focused public service announcement campaign called “Amplify Yourself!” which will touch on various issues including bullying based on sexuality or gender identity. “Bullying has become a constant reality for our children in this age of the Internet. We must do all we can to work together as parents, school officials, school staff, community leaders, nonprofit and private groups, and especially other students, to make it clear that we will not tolerate bullying and will do everything we can to prevent it,” Weingarten said. For more information about the campaign or how to order the wristbands or posters, visit www.aft.org/bullying.

Little Women the Broadway Musical

DIRECTED BY TROY RIVER Based on Louisa May Alcott's own family experiences (and novel), “Little Women,” follows the adventures of Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March as they grow up in Civil War America. The beloved story of the March sisters is timeless and deals with issues as relevant today as when they were written. Now, this wonderful narrative has been brought to life as an exhilarating new musical filled with

glorious music, dancing and heart. “Little Women” embodies the complete theatrical experience, guaranteeing a night filled with laughter, tears, and a lifting of the spirit. This powerful score soars with the sounds of personal discovery, heartache and hope -- the sounds of a young America finding its voice. Old-fashioned in the best possible way, Little Women makes a good complement to Wicked for those trying to entice a younger audience to the delights of the musical theater. --Elisabeth Vincentelli Little Women Thursday, April 7 3 p.m. (half-price) April 8, 9, 14, 15, 16 7 p.m. Theatre 70 American High School Theater 70 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 796-1776 ext 57702 Students and seniors $10, General Admission $12

State Commander and State President come to dinner BY SIMON WONG Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) State Commander Denis Wells and State President of the Ladies Auxiliary VFW (LAVFW) Judy Jones were guests of honor at a recent dinner hosted by VFW District 14 Castro Valley Post 9601. Wells, who served in Vietnam for 19 months with 843 Helicopter Air Rescue and as a US Air Force firefighter for 21 years, has been involved with veterans’ organizations since 1985. He is keen to ensure veterans, who are serving, retired or have returned to civilian life, and their families and members of the Reserve or National Guard receive the services and the benefits due to them. “To become a VFW member, a serviceman must have served in a foreign conflict. The organization will try and assist veterans who cannot join VFW as long as they have been discharged honorably. Typically, the applicant’s background is considered to see if another services organization might provide more assistance, such as the American Legion,” explained Wells. “We strongly recommend joining to keep abreast of veterans’ affairs.” VFW has foundations at state and national levels which are chartered to provide services to servicemen and their families. The Military Assistance Program helps fund Farewell and Welcome Home gatherings for units worldwide. Operation Uplink provides servicemen with free, pre-paid phone cards. Unmet Needs offers a one-time

hardship grant up to $2,500 to servicemen and their families. The organization is deeply involved with the community and youth, funding scholarship programs such as The Voice of Democracy, Patriot Pen and Scout of the Year. VFW also works closely with the Boy Scouts of America, America Supports You and America's Promise-The Alliance for Youth and partners with the National Rifle Association, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, International Association of Firefighters and the Salvation Army. VFW's citizenship education program covers American history, the nation’s traditions and institutions and promotes patriotism. VFW District 14 Castro Valley Post 9601 is raising funds for a veterans’ memorial at Castro Valley Community Park, 18988 Lake Chabot Road. Groundbreaking and construction will not begin until the $80,000 target is reached. Dedication is planned for November 11, 2011, Veterans’ Day. “When we hear of a memorial, such as the Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial, we encourage people to support it. VFW often makes a donation but we are also careful not to supplant local support,” explained Wells. “The Castro Valley Veterans’ Memorial is beautifully designed and we look forward to its Dedication.” To donate and for more information about the Veterans of Foreign Wars, visit www.vfwca.org, about the Ladies Auxiliary VFW, visit www.lavfwca.org, about the VFW National Home for Children, visit www.vfwnationalhome.org and about the Veterans Memorial Museum, visit www.legionofvalor.com/museum.php. For more information about the Castro Valley Veterans' Memorial, to request a commemorative brick, Service Stone name engraving or simply to make a donation, visit www.CVVM.info. Alternatively, contact Bob Pirone at (510) 418-6311 and RobertPirone@sbcglobal.net. For those who do not wish to order or donate online, either download an order form at www.CVVM.info or contact Bob Pirone for a form and mail checks (payable to "VFW Post 9601-CVVM") to CVVM, 22237 Queen Street, Castro Valley, CA 94546.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE continued from page 1

Tickets are required to watch the finals at $10 each. They can be purchased on the day of the event or during the theater’s normal box office hours: Tuesday-Friday from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Asked about what he thinks is the best part of Hayward Idol, Maine replied, “It provides an opportunity for young up-and-coming singers to perform on a professional stage in front of their family, friends and the community.”

Hayward Idol Saturday, April 9 7 p.m. Douglas Morrisson Theatre 22311 N. Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777 www.dmtonline.org Tickets: $10

Treasures from my studio SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS The Fremont Art Association is pleased to announce its second quarter showcase featuring prominent watercolor artist and teacher, Janice Schafir. Her art is known for wonderful blend of color and whimsy and a sense of joy. Schafir began art career by taking lessons locally with the City of Fremont recreation program in drawing, color mixing, and watercolor painting. The spontaneity of watercolor attracted her, as her personality welcomes unplanned challenges in life; sometimes happy, sometimes sad, but never dull. She has continued as an impressionistic painter, excited by the unexpected effects of watercolor transparency. She also enjoys working with opacity and collage. Schafir loves teaching, “I truly believe that we can create our own happiness— mine has been enriched because of my love for teaching and fascination with the new and unexpected. I found this spontaneity in painting transparent watercolor. I am always trying a new technique or style but realize from my experience that I must still follow the rules of composition and design.” Paintings exhibited in the showcase incorporate many of these various techniques. An artist reception will be held on Sunday, April 10 at the FAA Gallery with music by Jules Goldberg and light refreshments. To learn more about Jan Schafir, visit her website: www.jansartstudios.com Showcase Artist Saturday, April 9 – Monday, May 2, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Artist Reception Sunday, April 10, 1:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. The Fremont Art Association Gallery 37659 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.FremontArtAssociation.org Free

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Imaginary Railway

O

ne of the most intimate human experiences even amidst personal turmoil is imagination. Through this portal, anyone can be any thing at any place at almost any time. Some difficult moments, especially during childhood can be confusing; trying to fit in, discovering

strengths and acknowledging weaknesses. Imagination is that bit of human existence that can travel beyond physical limits and grant alternatives that otherwise appear beyond reach. At times, imagination and, in this case, the Imaginary Railway can be a lifeline to happiness, excitement and self-esteem that may be challenged in the “real” world. Andrew Aiton escaped difficult circumstances during his youth by building a railway in his back yard. Free of known physical restraints, the Imaginary Railway led to adventures and happiness. Inhabitants of planet Zeta, who use the railway take all shapes and forms, some pleasant, others neutral while still others wear frowns and appear vaguely hostile. Tracks lead across a variety of landscapes, even beyond Zeta, to outer space. The Imaginary Railway is not all sweetness and light; caves and a

threatening monster can initiate conversations about a child’s world filled with a plethora of emotions and perceptions. However, by the last page of the colorful book, passengers do find their way to “Home, sweet home.” As creator and illustrator of the Imaginary Railway, Aiton is able to translate personal childhood hopes and fears in a non-threatening manner, allowing children to express their interpretation of the world around them. The Imaginary Railway was written by Aiton as an 18-year old struggling with the trials and tribulations of high school, Now 22, as an illustration student at Academy of Art University, Aiton has started his own publishing business. Those who ride the Imaginary Railway are in for the ride of their young life, traversing cityscape, farmland and forest environments inhabited by bookworms and parrots where books grow on trees, and even outer space. For children (and parents) who want to hear the whole story and join Andrew Aiton for a ride on the Imaginary Railway, the Fremont Main Library will furnish a free ticket for a reading and book signing by the author on Saturday, April 9th. All aboard! The Imaginary Railway Saturday, April 9, 10:30 a.m. Reading, book sale and signing 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401 www.imaginaryrailway.com

April 5, 2011


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

Pat Kite’s Garden

BY PAT KITE Occasionally I can give birth to a strawberry. Many calamities come between garden planting and picking. Sometimes I purchase a six-pack in which three out of six plants promptly drop dead. Two more wait a while, and then shrivel overnight. Other times the garden snails and slugs hold a class reunion abutting my strawberry patch. The mollusk’s that are not enjoying romantic breeding dances apparently have munched green leaves instead. Optimism persists when just one strawberry plant survives, albeit somewhat ragged. Giving up my environmental angst for a bit, I douse with so-called “safe” snail bait. Then every day I go to my little segment of yard sunlight and praise strawberry plant growth, demeanor and personality. After several weeks, I get about five little greenish strawberries. One falls off for no reason. Another grows and turns pink-beige. Unfortunately it

never changes color. This leaves three. They expand. I get so excited! They turn pink. They turn rose pink. One red berry disappears, perhaps a snack for a raccoon or a visiting skunk. This leaves two. The one closest to the ground develops potholes with black spots inside. But one strawberry survives. It is simply lovely. Nice and firm. Big. I apologize to the plant and say praises. Then I pick and eat… slowly. One homegrown garden strawberry, warm from the sun, is savored in several small bites. This makes me happy. In a sometimes-difficult world, it is amazing what can make you happy. Today’s strawberries originated as a very tiny wild strawberry, usually found in open fields. Often called fraises des bois, it is extremely fragrant and flavorful. Found through the world, our Native Americans crushed and mixed them with meal to make bread. In 1712, a ship’s captain found some strawberries “as large as walnuts” in Chile. These were crossbred with wild berries, creating the ancestor of

today’s large Frageria strawberry. When planting, remember strawberries need sun, good drainage, and rather rich soil. Place about 10-inches apart. The plant crown should be at soil level. Buried crowns will rot and exposed roots will dry out quickly. Fertilize when growth begins. Water regularly, but avoid soggy soil. Once picked, strawberries will not ripen any further. Purchased or plucked strawberries will last three days in the refrigerator. Do not wash, or take off their little green cap until ready to use. Best is to eat the same day you obtain. What kind? There are ample strawberry varieties now. Everbearers are best purchase this time of year. It is best to buy from a local nursery which usually imports what grows well in your area. I once asked my 93-year-old mother-in-law what was a favorite memory of her Lithuanian childhood. “Going out into the fields and picking wild strawberries,” she said with a soft smile. So many memories in the gardens of our minds.

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 or Caryl Gentile: 557-9246 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

SUBMITTED BY SHIRLEY NG Kidango, a nonprofit child development agency with 41 centers in Alameda and Santa Clara counties, announced that well-known chef, caterer, and culinary author Mary Chamberlin will be a judge at its annual food and beverage filled fundraiser Taster’s Showcase. The Carmel, CA based Mary Chamberlin’s achievements and titles (past and present) include: member of the prestigious James Beard Foundation, Advisory Board Member of the Culinary Center of Monterey, Chair and Member of the Board of the American Institute of Wine & Food Monterey Bay Chapter, National Vice Chair of the American Institute of Wine & Food, founder of the Central Coast Chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier International and Agent for Michel Escoffier and the Foundation Auguste Escoffier and the Escoffier Museum of Culinary Arts in Villeneuve-Loubet in the South of France. She has also studied at Cordon Bleu and La Varenne, and become proficient in a range of cuisines, including Cantonese, European and American. Her work embodies a lifetime passion for the world’s finest foods. She is the author of “The Traveling Soup Pot,” a collection of soup recipes from 20 countries, with a forward by the legendary Chef Michel Escoffier. Additionally, Mary has owned and operated Mission Gourmet Cooking School, bringing chefs from all over the world to teach their style of cuisine. She presently teaches part time at home in her award-winning professional kitchen. “Mary’s extensive knowledge of food and her commitment to culinary education and excellence makes her the perfect judge for Taster’s Showcase,” said Kidango Executive Director Paul Miller. “We are

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

very honored with her support and generosity of time at Taster’s Showcase in helping Kidango raise much needed funds for our child development programs.” Taster’s Showcase attendees will spend the afternoon enjoying food from some of the best local restaurants and caterers, sipping fine wines and other beverages, and enjoying the fun of a live auction, silent auction, and a drawing, all to raise funds for Kidango’s mission of inspiring children, empowering families, and building strong communities. A wide variety of food and beverage categories will be represented at Taster’s Showcase, from vegetarian entrees to gelato desserts and coffee to red wine. In addition to Mary Chamberlin, other culinary experts will serve as judges as well, reviewing and awarding prizes to participants’ food and table presentations. Taster’s Showcase is on Sunday, April 17 at the Marriott Fremont, located at 46100 Landing Parkway, just off highway 880. Doors will open at 1 p.m. and the festivities will continue until 4 p.m. This year, you too can support Kidango’s work by purchasing event tickets, making an in-kind donation for the auctions/drawing or being an event sponsor. Tickets are $35 in advance or $45 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased on-line at www.tastersshowcase.org , calling (510) 897-6913, or in person or by mail at: Kidango Administrative Office Attn: Taster’s Showcase Tickets 44000 Old Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538 Please visit the Kidango website at http://www.kidango.org/. For more information on Kidango please contact Marc Baker at (510) 8976913 or at mbaker@kidango.org.

www.pachecobrothers.com


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Wednesday, Apr 6

Saturday, Apr 9

Saturday, Apr 9

A Guide to Disaster Preparedness

Movie Night $

Composting Garden Chefs $

7:30 p.m.

Noon - 1 p.m.

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Presentation by American Red Cross

Down to the Sea in Ships, International News and Fluttering Hearts

Make a tasty concoction using fresh vegetables

Hayward Main Library 835 C St., Hayward (510) 881-7941

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 494-1411

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

Saturday, Apr 9 Thursday, Apr 7

Native Grasses for Residential Gardens

7 p.m. California native grasses that work best

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171 Thur.-Sat, Apr 7 - 16

Little Women $

3 p.m. (Thurs., Apr 7) 7 p.m. (Apr. 8, 9, 14-16) Musical directed by Troy River

American High School 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-1830 Friday, Apr 8

Buster Keaton's 1925 film ‘Seven Chances’ $

8 p.m. Renowned organist Jerry Nagano

Jackson Theater, Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Friday, Apr 8

Night Sky Party $

8 - 9:30 p.m. Learn about constellations and view them

Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Blvd., Alviso (408) 262-5513 Saturday, Apr 9

A Trip Back in Time

10:30 a.m. - Noon Stroll trails with docent Ray Studer

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Saturday, Apr 9

Mothers of Multiples Spring Sale

9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Children's gear, furniture, equipment and more

Holy Redeemer Church 3560 Cedar Blvd., Newark www.tricitymoms.org Saturday, April 9

Yard Sale for Grad Night

8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Clothing, furniture, household goods, books and more

American High School (Location 1) 36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Washington High School (Location 2) 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont Saturday, Apr 9

Family Bird Walk R

2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Create field guides and use them

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Saturday, Apr 9

Super Flea Market $

8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Supporting Ohlone College programs

Ohlone College Parking Lots E 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285 Saturday, Apr 9

Plein Air Paint Out $R

A prayer centered church of spiritually bonded friends

Unity of Fremont Sunday 10:00 AM A positive path for spiritual living

36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont

www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

6:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. (Early Birds) 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. (Regular Session) Capture light, shadow and colors

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3215

Meet the Author

10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Author Andrew Aiton of Children’s Book, "The Imaginary Railroad"

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1401 Saturday, Apr 9

Spring Cleaning

10 a.m. House cleaning 1880s style with activities

McConaughy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

Saturday, Apr 9

Leaf Hunt $

11 a.m. - Noon Decide what leaf goes with which tree

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Saturday, Apr 9

Gift Exchange of Dance

2 - 3:30 p.m. Alaskan dance and slide show

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

Saturday, Apr 9

Saturday, Apr 9

Saturday, Apr 9

Easter Bunny

The Story of Wikileaks

Book Signing

Noon - 3 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1 p.m.

Meet the Easter Bunny, enjoy balloon twisting and face painting

Movie and discussion

Pablo Michaels, author of "Catnip, Rosemary, Rage and Time"

Fremont Hub 39261 Fremont Hub, Fremont www.thefremonthub.com

Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont (510) 651-9480

The Book Shop 1007 B St., Hayward (510) 538-3943 Saturday, Apr 9

Twitter Talk R

12:30 - 2 p.m. Learn how to use Twitter

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 x20 Saturday, Apr 9

Passport Day in the USA 2011

10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Application and information

Milpitas City Hall 455 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3000 Sunday, Apr 10

Six Plant Parts $

11 - 11:30 a.m. Learn parts of a plant through song and dance

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797 Sunday, Apr 10

Nature Yoga R

10 - 11:30 a.m. Coming Friday, May 13th Sapo featuring Richard Bean Ticket info call 510-491-6420

Yoga outdoor, bring mat and towel

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 Monday, Apr 11

Hayward Eagles Auxiliary Luncheon $

Noon Proceeds benefit cancer fund

Eagles Hall 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 785-8174 Tuesday, Apr 12

Parenting with Purpose

7 - 8 p.m. Raising your child bilingually

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171 Tuesday, Apr 12

Citizenship Preparation Classes

6 - 9 p.m. Prepare for the citizenship test

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 Tuesday, Apr 12

Circumnavigating the Bay Area Ridge Trail by Bicycle

7 - 8:30 p.m. Slide show and stories

REI Fremont 43962 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 651-0305 Wednesday, Apr 13

Mission Gold Jazz Band

7 - 9 p.m. Danceable Dixieland music

Swiss Park 5911 Mowry Ave., Newark (510) 657-0243 Wednesday, Apr 13

Wildlife conservation

Subscribe

5:30 - 7 p.m. Conservation plans for the Refuge

Don Edwards Visitor Center 1 Marshlands Rd., Fremont (510) 792-4275 x145 Thursday, Apr 14

Presentation by NOVA Career Advisor

7 p.m. Develop a professional brand

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171


April 5, 2011 Continuing Events:

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Exhibits

Thursdays through Apr 16

and

Sundays,

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest $ 8 p.m. 1 p.m. (Sun.) Adapted from the novel by Ken Kesey

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 Saturday, through Apr 16

Free Tax Preparation Service

1 - 4 p.m. Must earn less than $49,000 in 2010 to qualify

Mondays and Wednesdays, through Apr. 18

Sundays - Saturdays, through May 31

Free Tax Prep at Fremont FRC

Artwork on Display

4 p.m. - 8 p.m. 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (Fridays) For th-ose who made less than $49,000 Family Resource Center 39155 Liberty St., Fremont (510) 574-2020

Library Hours

Thursdays through May 7

Saturdays,

Winter Members Show

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Photography, paintings, ceramics, greeting cards

Page 23

SoulfulArt by artist Brenda Price

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171 Tuesdays, through Jun 7

Union City Parent Project $R

6:15 - 9:15 p.m. For parents of kids 10 years and older

Location to be announced (510) 675-5217 www.parentproject.com

Green Shutter Gallery 22654 Main St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

BY JULIE GRABOWSKI

S

pring has sprung and hearts are longing for fun and sunny getaways. But that exotic little escape might be closer than you think. The Tri-Cities Women’s Club offers a reviving dose of Mexicana with their 26th annual Spring Fling. While fashion shows have been the highlight of all past events, this year’s theme “Mexican Rhythms” breaks the mold, offering cultural dances from Grupo Folklorico Santa Paula, with accompanying tasty Mexican dishes prepared by the hosting Hilton Hotel. The Tri-Cities Women’s Club is a nonprofit social and philanthropic group that has been enjoying each other’s company and serving the community since 1962. Over 100 members strong, they meet on the third Tuesday of every month at the Fremont Elks Lodge where they play cards and games in the morning followed by a luncheon and business meeting. Special programs are also offered several times a year with guest speakers or entertainment, and members participate in several smaller groups such as book group,

Professional brand for a more effective job search SUBMITTED BY MELANIE MCINERNEY Your strengths and uniqueness are your brand. On Thursday, April 14 at 7 p.m., the Milpitas Library presents Marianne Adoradio, Career Advisor with the NOVA job center, who will lead an interactive presentation on developing a professional brand and how to leverage it for a job search. During this program participants will look at what sets a brand apart and how to apply it to a resume, cover letter and preparation for interviews. This program is free and open to all adults. The Milpitas Library is located at 160 N. Main Street. For directions or more information call (408) 262-1171 ext. 3616.

bridge, and mini-tour groups traveling mostly in the Bay Area. The Spring Fling is their one annual fundraiser, held to benefit a charity within the community. Potential candidates are presented at the business meeting and members cast ballots to choose from nominated groups. This year’s proceeds will go to Abode Services, a homeless shelter in Fremont whose various programs are dedicated to creating stability and independence for low-income and homeless individuals in Alameda County. Other projects conducted throughout the year include preparing Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets for families along with Christmas presents, collecting layette items for expectant mothers, and sending contributions to local organizations like Tri City League of Volunteers (LOV) and George Mark Children’s House in San Leandro, which provides comfort and care to children with life-limiting illnesses and their families. These endeavors are made possible by donations from club members and local merchants. The Spring Fling is first and foremost a benefit, with its pri-

mary purpose to support Abode, but it also has the added bonus of being “a very nice social affair,” according to Tri-Cities Women’s Club President Lucy Oliver. “It’s considered the social highlight of our year.” Attendees will enjoy good company, colorful entertainment, and the opportunity to win wonderful raffle and door prizes. Don’t miss this opportunity for a fun local escape while supporting a worthy cause. Tickets are $45 and purchasing in advance is recommended, as only a limited quantity will be available at the door. To purchase tickets call Betty Nylander at (510) 797-9957 or Pat Goodwin at (510) 793-6329. For more information on The TriCities Women’s Club or to join, please contact Marilyn Prows at (510) 793-6830.

Tri-Cities Women’s Club Annual Spring Fling Saturday, April 9 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Hilton Newark/Fremont 39900 Balentine Dr., Newark (510) 797-9957 (510) 793-6329 Tickets: $45

Subscribe


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

Tri-City Voice has even more local recreational, high school, college and professional sports coverage on the Web. Check out www.tricityvoice.com/sports for daily updates on scores, schedules of events, photos slide shows, and much more. Follow TCV Sports on Twitter at twitter.com/TCVSports

BY GIOVANNI ABANESE JR. Heading into the week of play, the Milpitas High School Lady Trojans softball team was sporting a two-game win streak. After a pair of games in the beginning of the week, they were able double that streak to four with wins over Lynbrook High on the road and Cupertino High at home. Against Lynbrook, a 7-6 win on Monday, March 28, the Trojans trailed 6-3 heading into its final at bat. Pressure did not mount, however, and Milpitas plated four runs to get the win. Tiana Teixeira was the offensive star, driving in five runs; Alexis Pommier drove in the remaining two runs. Marie Mosqueda pitched all seven innings to earn the victory. Two days later, at home on Wednesday, March 30, against Cupertino, the Trojans’ bats were at it again, plating double-digit runs in a 10-6 win. Again, in a tight ballgame, tied at 6-6 heading into the bottom of the sixth, Milpitas plated four runs to break it open. Teixeira, on 4-for4 hitting, had three RBIs; Jackie Castro matched Teixeira’s efforts with three RBIs of her own. Pommier had the other RBI.

SUBMITTED BY JUNE HEATON Leaving a week of torrential rain in the San Francisco Bay

Mosqueda was on the hill again and got the win in her four-inning effort. Milpitas took its four-game streak into the weekend play at the Wilcox High tournament. However, on the opening day of the tourney, the Lady Trojans couldn’t keep it rolling. They fought valiantly in their Friday, April 1, match, but lost in a pitchers’ duel to Aragon High, 21. In two contests on Saturday, finishing up their Wilcox Tourney appearance, the Lady Trojans split their games, losing 3-1 to Oak Grove and defeating Mountain View, 6-5. Milpitas’ baseball team dropped its first game of the week on Monday to Monta Vista High School, 7-0, before taking on Lynbrook High in a homeand-home series. In the first game, at Milpitas on March 29, the Trojans pulled out a 7-6 win. Like the softball team, the Trojans plated four late (in the sixth) to ensure victory. Two days later at Lynbrook High, the Trojans … . On the links, the Trojans golf team went 2-1 this week, getting beat by Saratoga High on Tuesday, March 29, by a 216-227 count, and topping Wilcox and Monta Vista high at home on the

The sunny SoCal weather was a welcome change for the team as they went up against Cypress Elite Blue, bright and early Saturday morning, March 26. MVU

Summitpointe Golf Course, 219285 and 216-254 respectively. Meanwhile, on the tennis court, the Trojans topped Santa Clara High at home, 7-0, on March 29; lost to Cupertino on March 30, 7-0; and edged out Fremont (Sunnyvale), 4-3, on March 31. In other sporting news, California School for the Deaf diamond sports had no success this past week. Softball was downed 15-3 on Monday, March 28, by College Prep at home and again a day later, 3-1, at home to Redwood Christian; baseball lost its only game of the week on the road to St. Elizabeth on Tuesday, 7-6. Fremont Christian High School baseball lost its first of three games during the week, a 31 home loss to San Francisco Waldorf on Tuesday, March 29. Their other scores, vs. Gateway and Emery high schools, were not available at press. Fremont Christian’s softball team’s bats were swinging a hot stick over the weekend, clubbing Bentley High in consecutive days, 15-4 on the road on Thursday, March 31, and 11-1 on April 1. For a complete rundown of scores, of all prep sports, log onto the Tri-City Voice Sports website at http://sports.tricityvoice.com.

Heaton. Heaton skirted through the Cypress defense to slide a goal past a shocked goalie. Defenders Priscilla Rodriguez, Kelly Castonogia and Kelsey McLauren kept Elite’s retaliation in check until a flying shot over the defense would even the score. Shortly after, Cypress received a gift in the form of an accidental MVU own goal, put them ahead again. Midfielders Megan Massone, Melissa Urena and Katie Lovejoy fought hard to gain back MVU’s lead, stealing many balls from Elite and passing them forward. Things would even up when Urena passed to Ravenscroft who ran the ball down to the corner and crossed to an awaiting Heaton who popped the ball over the goalie’s head. Two minutes later, MVU would seal the deal with a lovely pass from Waing Noe to Shaina Charles who’s

MVU goalkeeper Jessica Espinosa dives for a save against Arsenal FC Platinum.

Subscribe

Area, Mission Valley United 93 girls Black, a travel soccer team, headed south for the Nomads Coaches Showcase Tournament in San Diego.

struck early with a well-placed ball from Sarah Hardin to Megan Ravenscroft who quickly headed the ball to approaching Melissa

cross would find Ravenscroft to make the final score 3-2. continued on page 25


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

MVU continued from page 24 MVU regrouped for their next match against Oregon’s WSM Fusion. Fusion would be first to score off a free kick and MVU had their work cut out for them. Midfielders Lesly Correa and Jaime Turrentine kept the ball nicely in the middle of the field and defense would stop any further scores from Fusion. In the second half, Noe and Turrentine moved move the ball up the field for many attempts on goal until Turrentine would sail the ball into the corner of the box to tie the score. With minutes left in the game MVU’s Amanda Santillan trapped a high passed Fusion ball and sent it to Lovejoy who popped up to header the ball into the box. But Fusion’s goalie would deflect Lovejoy’s would-be goal and lose possession in front of MVU’s Kimber Lohman who rushed in to finish the shot for a final score of 2–1. Arsenal FC Platinum was next up for MVU on Sunday, March 27. In the first minute of the game, MVU’s Espinosa punted the ball down the field to an awaiting Ravenscroft who would head the ball over an out of the box goalie. As the goalie collided with her own player, Ravenscroft dribbled the ball the rest of the way in for the first score of the game. Arsenal was not to be taken lightly, and came back with a

goal off a corner just minutes later. Another corner for Arsenal gave the team its second chance to pull ahead. But Espinosa would interfere with that attempt by knocking the ball to safety. In the process, an errant hand from MVU tipped the ball in its path and forced a penalty. Espinosa batted the rocketed shot out, but Arsenal was poised to capitalize on the deflection and shot on Espinosa again, who, still getting to her feet, would rob another goal from Arsenal with her second diving save. MVU would leave their third game with a 1–1 draw. Quarterfinals matched up MVU with the home team Nomads. The teams were evenly matched with both taking shots and excellent defense. The game was physical as both teams knew that the win would mean advancing. Noe, Rodriguez, Massone and Charles made passes with brute strength to Heaton, Lovejoy and Ravenscroft. But Nomads found each attempt at a goal and defended the shots from an MVU advantage. The back-and-forth sparing made for a nail biting game with Espinosa, Moya, Correa, Santiallan, Castongia and McLaurin defeating Nomad’s offensive strikes. Second half found more of the same. Lohman, Turrentine and

Urena continued to try and get the ball into the box. At this point the game could have been anyone’s and things were getting even more physical. MVU kept their cool and moved the ball up to Nomad’s box where Turrentine was fouled trying to set up a shot. With a free kick from 20 yards out, Heaton would make the only score of the game and advance MVU into the semifinals. In the semifinals, MVU took on Exile Black. A show of force from the start, Exiles proved to be another physical team. Unfortunately for them their tactics would not detour MVU. Having been up against teams that use force to intimidate, MVU were determined to play clean and not draw any fouls that would advance Exile. A strong run into MVU’s half would force corner kick that Exile would capitalize on and take the lead. In the second half, MVU’s Turrentine would score off an assist from Hardin to end the game in a tie and force going into PKs. But netted shots from Massone and Ravenscroft would not be enough for MVU, and Exiles would come away the victors. MVU remained undefeated in regulation play and brings home a showcased semifinal victory to add to their list of accomplishments this season.

East Bay softball bounces back BY JEFF WEISINGER

BY GIOVANNI ALBANESE JR.

After the Renegades pushed their win streak to a season-high five games after an impressive 16-3 demolition of the Gavilan Rams, and a solid 8-0 performance at Skyline on Thursday, Ohlone took a step back, falling to Cañada 7-3 on Saturday. In Tuesday’s 13-run win over Gavilan, right hander Ryan Devencenzi notched his first win of the season, pitching five innings, allowing three runs on just four hits with seven strikeouts and two walks. Sophomores Cody Wilson, Joel DePorte and Brandon Arata threw a combined hitless four innings with DePorte tossing a strikeout and Arata striking out two. Sophomore Ryan Tella went 3-for-3 with two RBI’s and three runs scored. Offensively the Renegades dominated the Rams, taking the early 8-0 lead after just the third inning and added in a five run fifth inning to push the lead to 13-3. Ohlone looked strong offensively during the week, outscoring opponents a combined 31-6 while winning two of the three games. The defending state champs will take on De Anza at Ohlone on Tuesday. Baseball: Chabot 6, West Valley 7 A 12-5 win over Monterey Peninsula, followed by a 4-3 win over Mission College could not translate over into the Glads narrow 7-6 loss against West Valley on Friday, pushing their record down to 16-7 on the season. The one-run loss ended Chabot’s win streak at nine games, as the Gladiators have won 10 of the last 12 dating back to their March 1 win over Skyline. In Friday’s loss, Chabot went through six different pitchers, with just Corey Elliot pitching more than an inning as he threw two innings, allowing two runs on three hits with a pair of strikeouts. Sophomore Kyle Gallegos kept the Gladiators alive at the plate, going 2-for-5 with a pair of RBI’s and a run scored. The Vikings trailed Chabot 6-5 going into the seventh inning until Trevor Marino tied the game at 6-6 after his RBI-single to left field. West Valley took the go-ahead lead as Scott Fluery scored on a wild pitch in the eighth inning.

After losing both ends of a doubleheader at San Francisco State over the weekend, the Cal State University-East Bay Lady Pioneers softball team returned to SF State on Wednesday, March 30, and eked out a couple wins to split the fourgame series. In game one on Wednesday, an eight-inning 4-3 extra inning East Bay triumph, Talia Ferrari went the full eight, allowing three runs (two earned) and eight hits while striking out four. With the score tied at 2-2 heading into the eighth, East Bay plated two runs on a Breezy Johnson two-out, two-run single scoring Sara Holdridge and Devin Salmones. Ferrari allowed one run in the bottom of the eighth, but cut the rally short for SF State to give East Bay the one-run victory. East Bay’s pitchers went two-for-two in regard to its pitchers throwing complete games. In game two, it was Kelly Lowe’s turn to hurl a gem. Lowe threw seven innings, allowing a single run on five hits, striking out two and walking two along the way. East Bay won the contest 4-1. All four Lady Pioneer runs were driven in by the top three batters of the lineup, Kassandra Winger (3-4, RBI), Jamie Yaller (0-2, BB, RBI) an Emily Montanez (1-4, 2 RBIs). Johnson had another solid game at the plate, going 3-4, scoring twice. With the Lady Pioneers picking up steam heading into the weekend’s Mizuno’s Tournament of Champions in Turlock, they kept it going with a pair of one-run victories -- 2-1 to open the tourney vs. Notre Dame de Namur; 1-0 against Chaminade in game two -- in the first day of the tournament on Friday, April 1. East Bay was trailing 1-0 to Namur before Taylor Neumann and Mishka Hamor knocked in runs to give the Lady Pioneers the lead they would not surrender. Ferrari got the victory on the mound, allowing one run on two hits in her complete-game performance. Against Chaminade, it was another pitchers’ duel with East Bay’s Lauren Zweigle outperforming Chaminade’s Kelly Korras. Both pitchers threw complete games: Korras throwing six innings (CSUEB served as the home team for the contest), allowing the one run on five hits while striking out three and not walking a batter; Zweigle pitched seven innings, scattering five hits while striking out six and walking one. Neumann had the only RBI of the game, a second-inning homer off Korras. East Bay’s momentum came to a halt on the second day of the Mizuno Tourney, losing in their first game of the day, 2-1, to Hawaii Hilo. CSUEB followed up its pitchers’ duel loss with a blowout loss by the relentless slugging of Central Washington. It wasn’t a contest, with Central Washington walking away with a 18-1 win. In the third and final match of the day, East Bay played in another pitchers’ duel and was on the short end of a 2-1 loss. Ferrari, Lowe and Heidi McCallister were tagged with the losses for the three games respectively. On the men’s side of the diamond, the Pioneers baseball team won its four-game series with San Francisco State after splitting a doubleheader on Tuesday, March 29, in Hayward. (This four-game series was a continuation from the doubleheader on March 22, altered from rainy weather.) continued on page 26

Page 25


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

East Bay softball bounces back continued from page 25

BY SIDA LU Tennis On March 28, Mission San Jose faced off against James Logan in a tennis match. The Warriors tennis team showed its dominance in a 70 sweep of the Colts, winning all three of the doubles matches and all four of the singles matches. Volleyball The defending Mission Valley Athletic League champion Mission San Jose Warriors visited Moreau Catholic on March 29. The Warriors cruised to another easy 3-0 victory behind Zaki Sarwary’s nine kills, Jeffrey Kanemitsu’s 20 assists and Alvin Zhou’s nine digs. The Mariners were unable to put up much of a fight, losing the three games by a combined margin of 34. This dropped Moreau to 65 on the season and 0-2 in league play while the Warriors remained undefeated in league and are 8-3 overall. The Colts hosted the Kennedy Titans on March 29 as well, winning in three straight games by a combined margin of 28 points. Setter Andrew Cecere of Kennedy did his best to keep his team afloat, registering 17 assists but the Titans fell short and dropped to 8-4 while the Colts became 11-7. The very next day, Kennedy hosted Concord’s Ygnacio Valley High in a non-league bout. Ygnacio Valley was not able to keep up with the Titans, however, and were blown out in three straight games. Trevor Campbell of Kennedy had 12 digs and Cecere had 19 assists in the winning effort. Golf On March 30, the Mariners golf team played a league match against Arroyo at the Skywest golf course. Moreau would end up winning by 12 strokes, 246 to 258 for Arroyo. Brandon Villiados of Arroyo shot a 46 with Moreau’s Ed Surya’s 47 close behind. Track and Field MVAL pole-vaulters headed to the Granada Invitational relays on April 2 . Mission San Jose’s pairing of Kyaw Win and Ethan Plaza jumped 21 feet, with Win achieving a personal best of 11 feet.

BY BIFF JONES Softball Ohlone Renegades softball team will probably have to win their remaining regular season games (7) to get at least a share of the Coast Conference North (CCN) softball title for 2011. Coach Donna Runyon charges are trying to win the title for the ninth straight year. Ohlone took a major hit last Saturday, April 2 when they dropped a tough 9-8 extra inning (8) game at first place College of San Mateo Bulldogs. Renegades jumped out to a 20 lead in the first inning on walks to right fielder and lead off hitter Brittany Hillman, and to shortstop Kaley Marden. They were then doubled home by third baseman Stefanie Hatley. Unfortunately, Hatley was tagged out between second and third or she could have scored when first baseman, Lauren Ermitano followed with another double. Teams would go quietly over their next 2 innings of at bats before CSM tied it 2-2 in the bottom of the third when they strung together 4 consecutive singles after 2 were out. Top of the sixth with 1 out, Ohlone put together 7 hits and a hit batsman to plate 6 runs, high lighted by a Hatley 3 run home run. Again the Renegades could have tallied more when they could not get home runners from second and third with only 1 out. However, Dogs would come right back in the bottom of the sixth with a 4 run outburst and again most of the damage coming after 2 outs, to cut the deficit to 8-6.

Bottom of the seventh saw Ohlone still holding a 2 run lead but CSM was not dead as they closed the gap to 1 run on 3 straight hits with 1 out. They then tied the game at 8-8 on a suicide squeeze bunt. Renegades finally got out of the inning on a ground ball double play and sent it into the extra innings. After Ohlone went 1,2,3 in top of the eighth, the Bulldogs got a lead off, walk off home run in the bottom half to end the contest. TCV, April 2011 Female Athlete of the Month, Jessica Varady, took the loss and dropped her record to 17-4. Hatley ended up going 2-4 with 5 RBIs while Ermitano was 3-4 including 2 doubles. CSM is now 10-1 in CCN while Ohlone drops to 9-2. Two teams will meet again, next time at Ohlone, in the last regular season game of the year on April 26 at 3 p.m. Earlier last week Ohlone had home wins over Hartnell College of Salinas, 2-0 and Monterey Peninsula College, 8-0 and a road win against Gavilan College of Gilroy, 12-1, all from Coast Conference South. Varady got the wins against Hartnell and Gavilan while Ermitano received the win over MPC. Gavilan and MPC games were both called after 5 innings because of the 8 run mercy rule. In the Hartnell game, Hillman went 2-3 with a double. MPC contest saw Ermitano go 33 with 3 doubles and 3 RBIs; Hatley 2-4 with a double; Sara Raguso 2-4, a double; and Shelby Fowler a triple. Against Gavilan, continued on page 31

Game one, taken by East Bay 4-3, Bryce Miller was on the mound and notched his third win of the season (3-4), going six and two-thirds, allowing three runs (one earned) on six hits. Johnny Volk pitched two d a third hitless innings to earn his first save of the year. Charlie Sharrer was the offensive star for East Bay, going 2-4 with three RBIs coming on a three-run homer in the third; Jared Berrier had the other RBI for CSUEB. In game two, SF State’s bats were hot, running away with an 8-5 win. East Bay plated two in the eighth, one in the ninth, but couldn’t string more hits to keep

the rally going. Zach Aguirre had a rough outing on the mound, going just two innings, allowing four runs on three hits while being tagged for the loss. Scott Shields had two RBIs for the Pioneers and Andrew Woolfe contributed an RBI on 3-5 hitting. East Bay’s losing streak extended to two games on Friday, April 1, with a pounding from Cal Poly Pomona on the road, 19-3. Aguirre was tagged with the loss, only going an inning and allowing five runs on three hits. A day later, East Bay continued its series with Pomona, losing the first game of a doubleheader, 14-1. East Bay got back on track

in the second game with Pomona, shutting them down in a 3-0 victory. In the pool, East Bay’s water polo team was in Seaside for a pair of games on Saturday, April 2. In the first of two, East Bay topped Concordia 11-6. In their final match of the weekend, against Cal State Monterey Bay, the Lady Pioneers followed up their five-goal win with an eightgoal win, topping their CSU counterpart, 14-6. For a complete list of CSUEB scores, log onto the TCV Sports website, http://sports.tricityvoice.com.

MVAL softball update BY NICK ZAMBRANO PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW JAMES LOGAN 3, IRVINGTON 1 Raeann Garza did it again in the Lady Colts’ Mission Valley Athletic League opener. Against the Lady Vikings from Irvington High, the sophomore went the complete distance, compiling nine strikeouts and no walks. In all of Logan’s five games this season, Garza has gone the distance in every contest. Aside from the closely contested game with Monte Vista, she has only given up one earned run per contest, while surrendering a mere two walks. Her ERA on the year also stands at an admirable 1.60. Garza’s efforts on the mound are very much a reflection of her teammates’ efforts at the dish. Against the Lady Vikings, juniors Jasmine Reed and Marissa Perez went a combined 6-8 with a double, two runs scored and a RBI between them. Reed - a

two-sport student-athlete - leads Logan in most offensive categories, including batting average (.462), hits (six) and runs scored (four). On Irvington’s side of the diamond, Kendra Campbell also went the complete seven but allowed 10 hits and three earned runs. The senior was also

Irvington’s strongest punch at the plate going 2-3 with a double and Irvington’s lone run scored. The Lady Vikings were able to rebound from the loss to Logan and defeated Berkeley High 6-4 on April 1. Irvington is 2-1 in their last three games and are now 5-5, 0-1 for the 2011 campaign, they will have another tough battle at hand when they face the offensive-minded Newark Memorial Lady Cougars on April 12. Logan remains dominant in MVAL play having not lost since the MVAL Championship in 2009 to Newark Memorial. They are now 2-0 this season with their other win coming against Washington on Mar. 29 and are now 4-1 overall. On deck for them is an away contest against John F. Kennedy on April 7. NEWARK MEMORIAL 0, PINOLE VALLEY 3 The Lady Cougars saw their impressive winning streak all the way to the Standley Cup Tournament

in Hayward where it was ended by the Spartans from Pinole Valley. After beating Petaluma High 3-0, Newark was matched with Pinole, who had scored a combined 30 runs in their prior two games and hold a seven game winning streak of their own. It is the first time since the 2010 MVAL playoffs that the Lady Cougars have bested by a shut out. However, they have been on the winning end of five shut outs thus far. That includes their first two games of the SCT where they beat Tennyson 10-0 and aforementioned Petaluma. However, before the SCT, the Lady Cougars did notch their first MVAL win of the 2011 season when they beat American 5-1 on Mar. 29. Newark (9-1, 1-0) will attempt to bounce back from the Pinole game when they play Mission San Jose at home on April 5, first pitch is set for 3:45 p.m. JOHN F. KENNEDY 0, WASHINGTON 5 The Washington Lady Huskies have found the winner’s circle again in a big way. Since their MVAL

opening loss to James Logan on Mar. 29, Washington have been winners of three of their last five games, including this shutout of rival John F. Kennedy. Their other wins came at the disposal of Los Lomas (15-1) and Moreau Catholic (2-1) during the Standley Cup Tournament. In spite of those hard earned victories, the Lady Huskies hit the skids when they lost their next two games; a 6-1 handling by Alameda and a revenge win from Moreau, 11-0. In an attempt to dust the dirt off the uniforms, Washington will play Fremont Boulevard rival American High on April 5. They now sit at 7-6, 1-1 for the season. For the Lady Titans, it’s now two losses in their last three contests. Their last win came at home against a Mills High team back on Mar. 15. In each of Kennedy’s four losses this year - they are 2-4, 0-1 this season - they have given up five runs or more in each game. Offensively, the Lady Titans have only mustered 2.5 runs a game this season. It won’t get any easier for the young, Kennedy team as they will take on the defending MVAL champs, James Logan in their next contest scheduled for April 7. BISHOP O’DOWD 2, AMERICAN 5 American recovered from two straight losses with this win against Bishop O’Dowd. In their previous two games, the Lady Eagles have tasted defeat at the hands of Alameda and fellow MVAL team Newark Memorial. A winning streak can be in the cards for American if they can pull out another victory against Washington on April 5.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 27

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman

‘A Year of Adjustment’

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Mona Shah EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach GOVERNMENT Simon Wong

ets. The mayor said, “For the first time in the history of the City, we will be looking at ‘take-backs.’ We simply must find ways to make the City sustainable.”

WILLIAM MARSHAK

A

t all levels of government, the operative word, whether buried in political rhetoric or openly uttered, is “adjustment.” Mayor Wasserman used the phrase “A Year of Adjustment” to characterize the present circumstances of Fremont in his State of the City presentation last week. There is little wiggle room left for cities, counties, states and federal government to escape the results of years of wanton neglect. Spending shrinking dollars on expanding needs has not made sense for a long time, but the rule of political success has been to promise everything and fix nothing. At this point, that process has run its course; funds are no longer available, even using smoke and mirrors, to continue spending what doesn’t exist. The gap between “wants” and “needs” has become too large for short term fixes. Borrowing from the future and hocus-pocus shifting of dollars from one fund to another can no longer be sustained. It is time to take a close, objective look at budgets to see what and how government services can be saved. In this season of “State of the City” presentations by city mayors, a common theme is likely to emerge… “sustainability.” Although the term is repeated ad nauseum by environmental activists, it is a relevant and critical component of city operations. In his State of the City address, Mayor Wasserman was clear about the impact of an objective “strategic sustainability study” currently underway by an independent and hopefully objective consultant. Qualified, outside observation is essential to this review since there are many entrenched personal and financial interests in government budg-

In City Councils meetings, Fremont City Manager Fred Diaz has noted that when discussing budget problems, “Everything is on the table.” It remains to be seen whether this spirit of sacrifice includes weighted changes for supervisory management earning well over $100,000 in salary and benefits. The mayor said that generous promises of pensions and health care are now “more than we can handle.” This problem is the result of compensation reviews subject only to comparisons with other cities who also spent beyond their means. As employee bargaining units demanded more and more, management floated above them, inflating their own compensation. Why would those outside bargaining groups limit or criticize compensation packages when concessions resulted in personal gain? A citizen advisory review board would make this process more transparent and act as a brake when a quest for “the best and brightest” gets out of hand. Mayor Wasserman warned that along with internal adjustments, “There will be some external ones as well.” We citizens cannot expect all the bells and whistles of a premium government plan on a severely limited budget. Prioritization means that some “critical” services will not be met by government coffers. It may be up to citizens and/or the private business sector, in coordination with local government, to decide what is most important and provide planning, infrastructure and maintenance of these services. The results will be painful and strain our social fabric, but a more measured and practical approach is necessary. Through all of this, we will hopefully remember that our “free” society depends on a strong social contract with fellow citizens extending beyond personal gain. This is what sets us apart from other societies who struggle to achieve the basic rights and privileges found here.

perity through unrealistic home valuation, Wall Street greed without government control and a public unable or unwilling to acknowledge, as in the Hans Christian Andersen tale, The Emperor’s New Clothes, that growth of the economy, just as the Emperor’s clothes, was illusionary. In the fable, it took the unsophisticated view of a child to break the spell and shout, “"But he isn't wearing anything at all!" This observation galvanized citizens, but did not mean however, that suddenly the child was capable of governing a country. We must acknowledge that a period of “adjustment” is not only the result of relatively recent actions but many others in the past that relied on a lack of common sense coupled with willingness to believe that empty political promises of plenty without cost is possible. Now is the time to take forceful, measured and rational steps to correct this problem, avoiding overreaction and foolish destruction of the existing municipal structure. Mayor Wasserman concluded his report saying, “We know that we have to do some unpleasant things to make the City sustainable. We cannot continue to have our sole accomplishment for a year be a balanced budget with no reserves, no ability to improve the city, and only an ability to “hang on.” We need to get past that, and we will.” I agree.

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Both public and private sectors of our economy fueled an unstable bubble of pros-

PROTECTIVE SERVICES Meenu Gupta SPORTS Giovanni Albanese Jr. SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Jeff Weisinger Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Pahoua Sayaovang Patricia Cragin BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua CARTOONS Angelo Lopez STARR TEAM J. D. Wolfe REPORTERS Julie Grabowski Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel Susana Nunez Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Rajeswari Ramanathan Joe Samagond Shavon Walker Alyson Whitaker INTERN Alissa Gwynn WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

Letter to the Editor

Niles Canyon tree removal protests: the right questions? For your readers who have expressed themselves regarding this project, I wonder if they ever thought perhaps that they are not asking the right questions in this struggle to protect their trees. By that I mean, the ‘Big Picture' of why the relationship between citizens and their democratically elected government is so fragile and blindsided. We vote, we pay taxes and at the end of the day, we want someone to listen to us when we speak up. Never mind that the hounds of war eat our taxes and our sons and daughters and,

in that process, kill a lot more innocent folk who owe us no debt, do us no harm and upon whom, when we do not kill them instantly, shower their land, their trees, their children with depleted uranium of bombs sent to them so that their tyrants wither and die. We cannot deserve freedom nor an environmental blessing nor hope nor love of nature while we sit silently and rain such plagues on the bereft and humble people in our path. How can we ask goodness for ourselves when we unleash destruction

upon them and generations to come? Once I saw a bumper sticker which said, “My karma ran over my dogma.” We need desperately for that to happen to us as a country, as a nation, as a people. Then perhaps we can export real freedom, real love of life not only for and from ourselves, but for all mankind. LB Rainwater Fremont

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for (1) the City of Union City, (2) the City of Fremont, (3) the County of Alameda, and (4) the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher. Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES BULK SALES NOTICE OF BULK SALE (subject to Com. C. 6106.2) The following definitions and designations shall apply in this Notice without regard to number or gender: SELLER: Henry Stamm 29440 Union City Blvd., Union City, CA 94587 BUYER: Russell Industries, Inc. 29440 Union City Blvd., Union City, CA 94587 BUSINESS: TECH FASTENERS 29440 Union City Blvd., Union City, CA 94587 DATE OF CONSUMMATION: April 21, 2011 LAST DAY TO FILE CLAIMS: April 20, 2011 ESCROW HOLDER: WILLIAM H. DUNN, Attorney at Law, 1350 Dell Avenue, Suite 204, Campbell, CA 95008 Notice is hereby given that Seller intends to make a bulk sale of the assets of the above described Business to Buyer including all stock in trade, furniture, and equipment used in said Business, to be consummated at the office of the Escrow Holder at the time of consummation or thereafter. Creditors of the Seller may file claims with the Escrow Holder on or before the last day to file claims stated above. This sale is subject to California Commercial Code 6106.2. Seller has used the following other business names and addresses within the last three years so far as known to Buyer: None Russell Industries, Inc. BY: WILLIAM H. DUNN Agent for Buyer 4/5/11 CNS-2075461#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 449795 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Elite Real Estate Properties, 39680 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Wentworth Enterprises, Inc., 39680 Mission Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539; California Corporation This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1997. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ George L. Duarte, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 29, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/11 CNS-2074590# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 449445 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Evolution Embroidery, 30009 Ahern Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Joel Gonzalez, 31953 Potsdam St., Hayward, CA 94544 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 6-1-2005. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Joel Gonzalez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 21, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/11 CNS-2074249# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 449299 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AAA Affordable Plumbing & Water Heaters, 699 Dartmore Ln., Unit 371, Hayward, CA 94544, County of Alameda. Lesley A. Salage, 699 Dartmore Ln. Unit 371, Hayward, CA 94544. Sabrina J. Salage, 699 Dartmore Ln., Unit 371, Hayward, CA 94544. This business is conducted by husband and wife. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07-28-08. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Lesley A. Salage This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 16, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2066177# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 449276 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Peaceful Path To Joy, 35685 Embassy Common, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda, P.O. Box 14425, Fremont, CA 94539 James B. Freer, 35685 Embassy Common, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ James B. Freer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 16, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2065249# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 448709 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Kupkakes, 4591 Piper St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Tracey Perry, 35510 Monterra Terr #101, Union

City, CA 94587 Moesa Moore, 4591 Piper St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a General partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 3/1/11 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tracey Perry This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 01, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2064849# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 449006 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fancyperfumebottles.com, 38725 Lexington St. #221, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Rahela J. Qari, 38725 Lexington Sst. #221, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rahela J. Qari, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on March 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2061080#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900861 for Cal/ OSHA §5199 Medical Services, Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 10:00 a.m. – Castro Valley Library, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Chabot Room, Castro Valley, CA NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900861 for Cal/OSHA §5199 Medical Services, Thursday , April 14, 2011, 2:00 p.m. – General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on May 5, 2011 County Contact : Jennifer Chan Ngo (510) 208-9604 or via email: jennifer.ngo@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 4/5/11 CNS-2073828#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MATTIE M. WILSON CASE NO. FP11566277 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Mattie M. Wilson A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Edward C. Cortez in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Edward C. Cortez be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 05/09/2011 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept. 201 located at Berkeley Courthouse, 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Regis J. Amann, Regis J. Amann Law Office, 1328 Decoto Road #100, Union City, CA 94587, Telephone: (510) 471-7786 3/25, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2068165#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given pursuant to the rental agreement and Ca. Business & Professions Code 21700 through 21716 & any other applicable Ca. Statutes, that Mobile Mini, Inc., will sell at public auction to the highest bidder, at 44580 Old Warm Springs Blvd , Fremont CA ., at 10:00 A.M., on the18th to satisfy our lien, the property belonging to the following persons. Ann Marie Dawson: BS15TZS0027: Mattress set, recliner, sofa, pool table, dresser, TV boxes and misc. items. If you would like to resolve the outstanding balance, please contact me immediately at 480-8946311 ext.100308 or 800-288-5669 ext. 100308. Ann Chamberlin ext. 308 Credit/Collections Department on-site 104 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2074413#

TRUSTEE SALES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7104.13788 Title Order No. 4223110 MIN No. 100241010018397329 APN 483-0073-200 YOU

ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/09/06. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): Kailash Kumar, a married woman as her sole and separate property Recorded: 06/20/06, as Instrument No. 2006236508,of Official Records of Alameda County, California. Date of Sale: 04/25/11 at 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street., Oakland, CA The purported property address is: 32040 PALOMA COURT, UNION CITY, CA 94587 Assessors Parcel No. 483-0073-200 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $534,920.68. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. Date: March 31, 2011 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Julian Ojeda, Authorized Signatory 505 N. Tustin Avenue, Suite 243, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com Automated Sales Line: 714-277-4845 Reinstatement and Pay-Off Requests: (866) 387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE FEI # 1002.189087 04/05, 04/12, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2075234# Trustee Sale No. CA08002156-10-1 . Title Order No. 100660876-CA-LPI Loan No. 3000075408 APN 543-0394-051 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/13/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 5/2/2011 at 12:00 PM, At the Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St. Oakland, CA MTC Financial Inc., dba Trustee Corps, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on 01/22/2007 as Instrument No. 2007033947 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, CA, executed by: Maria Amanda Aranzeas, an unmarried woman, as Trustor, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a subsidiary of Indymac Bank, F.S.B., as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4134 Sabio Court, Fremont, CA 94536 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $434,276.60 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATE: 4/5/2011 MTC Financial Inc dba Trustee Corps TS No. CA08002156-10-1 . 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Clarisa Gastelum, Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS IS A DEBT COLLECTOR. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P819697 4/5, 4/12, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2075193# Trustee Sale No. 428918CA Loan No. 5303567811 Title Order No. 602114462 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/6/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 4/26/2011 at 12:00 PM CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 02/10/2006, Book , Page , Instrument 2006053454 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, executed by: Richard Carter a single man, as Trustor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) Solely As Nominee For Lender Suntrust Mortgage, Inc., it’s successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: At the Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St. Oakland, CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $741,589.05 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 3217 San Luces Way, Union City, CA 94587 APN Number: 4830041-038-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. Date: 3/31/2011 California Reconveyance Company, as Trustee Brandon Royes, Assistant Secretary California Reconveyance Company is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: (714) 730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com P819148 4/5, 4/12, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2074896# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20100177900664 Title Order No.: 100375238 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/10/2006. UNLESS

YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/16/2006 as Instrument No. 2006426602 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: DONALD E. MORTENSEN AND LEONILA L. MORTENSEN AS TRUSTEES OF THE MORTENSEN 2005 TRUST, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 04/25/2011 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4163 QUEEN ANNE DRIVE, UNION CITY, CALIFORNIA 94587 APN#: 483-0098-094-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $405,626.10. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/31/2011 NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3955277 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2074491# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee’s Sale No. 05-FWA-105202 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/8/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 26, 2011, at 12:30 PM, AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, in the City of OAKLAND, County of ALAMEDA, State of CALIFORNIA, REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under that certain Deed of Trust executed by MARIANO P. CASTILLO AND RUBY T. CASTILLO, TRUSTEES OF THE MARIANO P. CASTILLO AND RUBY TIONGSON CASTILLO REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JANUARY 31, 2002, as Trustors, recorded on 11/15/2007, as Instrument No. 2007395295, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA, under the power of sale therein contained, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, for cash, or cashier’s check (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States) without warranty express or implied as to title, use, possession or encumbrances, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it as such Trustee, in and to the following described property situated in the aforesaid County and State, to-wit: TAX PARCEL NO. 543 -0438-076 From information which the Trustee deems reliable, but for which Trustee makes no representation or warranty, the street address or other common designation of the above described property is purported to be 4379 HOLT STREET , UNION CITY, CA 94587. Said property is being sold for the purpose of paying the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, including fees and expenses of sale. The total amount of the unpaid principal balance, interest thereon, together with reasonably estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee’s Sale is $604,719.80. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c), the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrowers) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one or more of the following methods: by telephone, by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting or the borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent and that the compliance with Civil Code Section 2923.5 was made at least thirty (30) days prior to the date of this Notice of Sale. The mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: it has obtained a final or temporary order of exemption and said order is current and valid as of the date of the Notice and the time frame set forth in California Civil Code 2923.54 does not apply or California Civil Code 2923.54 does not cover this loan. Dated: 4/5/2011 REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, Trustee By: MARILEE HAKKINEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT Agent for Trustee: AGENCY SALES AND POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 Telephone Number: (800) 5422550 Sale Information: (714) 730-2727 or http: //www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3949820 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2074352# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 09-510270 INC Title Order No. 090533954CA-DCI APN 092A-0511-072-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07/25/05. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04/25/11 at 12:30 p.m., Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 07/29/05 in Instrument No. 2005324527 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: Jean Ton Nguyen and Leon H. Nguyen, wife and husband, as Trustor, OneWest Bank FSB, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 35998 BETTENCOURT STREET, NEWARK, CA 94560 The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $588,655.42 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Requirements of SB1137 have been met pursuant to the Notice of Sale Declaration of record. DATE: 3/28/11 Robbie Weaver Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corporation c/o 4665 MacArthur Court, Suite 250 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Phone: (800) 731-0850 or (602) 222-5711 Fax: (847)627-8803 www.aztectrustee.com For Trustee’s Sale Information Call 714-730-2727 http://www.lpsasap.com ASAP# 3955789 04/05/ 2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2074230# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 080050869 Title Order No. 08-8-191711 Investor/ Insurer No. APN No. 483-0113-107 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/10/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE

PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JATINDER HOTHI, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 10/10/ 2005 and recorded 10/19/05, as Instrument No. 2005450350, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 05/03/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3725 DAWN CIRCLE, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $618,109.40. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 08/22/2008 RECONTRUST COMPANY 1757 TAPO CANYON ROAD, SVW-88 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 3954729 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2073986# Trustee Sale No.: 20100134004827 Title Order No.: 609586 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 5/14/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDex West, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 05/22/2007 as Instrument No. 2007194947 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California. Executed By: Manuel Cabral and Elvira Cabral, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). Date of Sale: 4/25/2011 Time of Sale: 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St. Oakland, CA Street Address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 32979 PULASKI DRIVE, Union City, CA 94587 APN#: 087-0092-031-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $400,973.89. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. For Trustee Sale Information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing 17501 Irvine Blvd., Suite One Tustin, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDex West, LLC as Trustee Dated: 3/30/2011 NDex West, LLC may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P818852 4/5, 4/12, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2073870# Trustee Sale No.: 20100159900359 Title Order No.: 100074683 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/2/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDex West, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/09/2007 as Instrument No. 2007391489 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California. Executed By: Manuel A. Sanchez and Gladys Sanchez, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). Date of Sale: 4/25/2011 Time of Sale: 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St. Oakland, CA Street Address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1440-1442 H ST, Union City, CA 94587 APN#: 486-0045-059-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $543,840.30. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. For Trustee Sale Information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing 17501 Irvine Blvd., Suite One Tustin, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDex West, LLC as Trustee Dated: 3/30/2011 NDex West, LLC may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P818879 4/5, 4/12, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2073869# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20100015012208 Title Order No.: 100761951 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/30/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/02/2006 as Instrument No. 2006411486 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MIKE BLANCO AND MARGARITA BLANCO, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 04/25/2011 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 37219 WALNUT ST, NEWARK, CALIFORNIA 94560 APN#: 092-0136-011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 29

PUBLIC NOTICES estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $441,559.00. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/29/2011 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 ASAP# 3947867 04/ 05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2071948# T.S. No.: 2010-07479 Loan No.: 705828424 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/6/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: RUFINO VILLARUZ AND CONSTANCIO VILLARUZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 7/21/2006 as Instrument No. 2006282671 in book---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, Date of Sale: 4/25/2011 at 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the steps of the county courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, California. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $674,880.57 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 33017 Carrara Terrace Union City, CA 94587 A.P.N.: 475-0061-066 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. Date: 3/ 25/2011 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 960-8299 Robin Pape, Trustee Sale Assistant 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11

4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2071299# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 10031595 Loan No. 0143965549 Title Order No. 100685762CABFI APN 092A235308300 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 15, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 18, 2011, at 12:30 PM, at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on April 27, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005166033 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, CA, executed by: ERNESTO REYNOSO, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Trustor, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (MERS), as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6297 MARGUERITE DRIVE, NEWARK, CA 94560 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining unpaid balance of the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust (together with any modifications thereto). The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $409,632.30 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. DATE: 03/21/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, TRUSTEE 3075 Prospect Park Dr., Ste 100 Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 Rozalyn Tudor Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727ASAP# 3951259 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2070715#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 129103902 APN: 483-0073-056 TRA: 15-009 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx7534 REF: Singh, Kuldip IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED August 23, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 25, 2011, at 12: 00pm, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded August 30, 2005, as Inst. No. 2005371800 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, executed by Kuldip Singh, A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank At the steps to the entrance of the county courthouse 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4212 Apollo Circle Union City CA 94587 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $427,716.82. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. For sales information: Mon-Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm (619) 590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: March 24, 2011. (R-375535 04/05/11, 04/12/11, 04/19/11) 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/11 CNS-2071822#

Trustee Sale No. CA05002508-10-1 . Title Order No. 100593353-CA-LPI Loan No. 9000541707 APN 501-1828-240-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED August 7, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 25, 2011, at 12:00 PM, at the Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St. Oakland, CA, MTC Financial Inc., dba Trustee Corps, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on August 17, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006316144 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, CA , executed by: Mahmood S Samimifar & Ghamar Valadkhani, husband & wife, as Trustor, in favor of First Horizon Home Loan Corporation as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3395 Foxtail Terrace, Fremont, CA 94536 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest theron, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $343,711.10 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATE: March 29, 2011 MTC Financial Inc dba Trustee Corps TS No. CA05002508-10-1 . 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Clarisa Gastelum, Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS IS A DEBT COLLECTOR. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P815858 3/29, 4/5, 04/12/2011 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2069426#

Trustee Sale No.: 20110169800047 Title Order No.: 110001821 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/ 25/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDex West, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/30/2008 as Instrument No. 2008145045 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California. Executed By: Segaran Logeswaran, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). Date of Sale: 04/25/2011 Time of Sale: 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon St. emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, CA. Street Address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 38626 Country Terrace, Fremont, California 94536 APN#: 501-1592-074 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $226,149.26. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. For Trustee Sale Information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing, Inc. 17501 Irvine Blvd., Suite One Tustin, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDex West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/30/2011 NDex West, L.L.C. may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P815249 4/5, 4/12, 04/19/2011

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee’s Sale No. CA-MOR-108656 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/13/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 18, 2011, at 12:30 PM, AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, in the City of OAKLAND, County of ALAMEDA, State of CALIFORNIA, ASSET FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under that certain Deed of Trust executed by ROLANDO MAGTALAS AND MARIA LUISA MAGTALAS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustors, recorded on 10/22/2004, as Instrument No. 2004474726, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA, under the power of sale therein contained, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount fat the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Property is being sold “as is - where is”. TAX PARCEL NO. 092A0932-006 From information which the Trustee deems reliable, but for which Trustee makes no representation or warranty, the street address or other common designation of the above described property is purported to be 6084 FAIR AVENUE, NEWARK, CA 94560. Said property is being sold for the purpose of paying the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, including fees and expenses of sale. The total amount of the unpaid principal balance, interest thereon, together

CNS-2071922#

with reasonably estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee’s Sale is $417,486.72. WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. SALE INFORMATION LINE: 714-730-2727 or www.fidelityasap.com Dated: 3/21/2011 ASSET FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., AS TRUSTEE By: Georgina Rodriguez, Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3949319 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2069383# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS #: CA-09313431-CL Order #: 090657113-CA-LPO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/29/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JOJO CAYABYAB AND CHARLIE CAYABYAB HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 12/7/2006 as Instrument No. 2006448465 in book xxx, page xxx of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 4/25/2011 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $638,604.28 The purported property address is: 5919 WOODBINE PL NEWARK, CA 94560 Assessor’s Parcel No. 092A-2593-033-00 092A-2593-033 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to Aurora Loan Services LLC 10350 Park Meadows Dr. Littleton CO 80124 Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 . If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: 619645-7711 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3948808 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2068854# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 10CA00897-1 Order No. 100528568 APN: 483-0047-041 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/01/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 11, 2011 at 12:00 PM, RSM&A Foreclosure Services, as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded November 7, 2006 as Document Number: 2006415272 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, executed by: OSCAR G. CRUZ AND ROSALIE A. CRUZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for MortgageIt, Inc., as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state) at the following location: the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: Legal description as more fully described in said deed of trust. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3239 SANTA ROSA WAY, UNION CITY, CA 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $645,005.63 (Estimated*) *Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 12/03/2010 RSM&A Foreclosures Services 15165 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 330 Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 805-804-5616 For specific information on sales including bid amounts call (714) 277-4845. Kimberly Karas, Authorized Agent of RSM&A Foreclosures Services FEI # 1045.00859 03/22, 03/29, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2067453# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 080077083 Title Order No. 08-8-289907 Investor/ Insurer No. 146452170 APN No. 087-0092-022 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/26/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by ALEXANDER M. LISING, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 10/26/2006 and recorded 11/02/06, as Instrument No. 2006409655, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 04/19/2011 at 12: 30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 241 TEDDY DRIVE, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses

and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $614,333.44. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 10/30/2008 RECONTRUST COMPANY 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., SV2-202 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 9274399 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 3945899 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2066742# T.S. No. 10-12011 APN: 507-0823-060-00 Loan No. 0225525 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/5/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: AVERIL B. WATAN, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: LAW OFFICES OF LES ZIEVEDeed of Trust recorded12/14/2006 as Instrument No. 2006455965 in book --, page-- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, Date of Sale:4/12/2011 at 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the front Fallon St emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse 1225 Fallon Street Oakland, CA Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $327,817.80 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 38780 TYSON LANE #112 C FREMONT, CA 94536 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 507-0823-060-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The provisions of California Civil Code §2923.52 do not apply because: The loan was made, purchased or serviced by a California state or local public housing agency or authority, including state or local house finance agencies established under Division 21 (commencing with Section 50000) of the Health and Safety Code and Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 980) of Division 4 of the Military and Veterans Code. The loan is collateral for securities purchased by a California state or local public housing agency or authority, including state or local house finance agencies established under Division 21 (commencing with Section 50000) of the Health and Safety Code and Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 980) of Division 4 of the Military and Veterans Code. Dated: 3/17/2011 Law Offices of Les Zieve, as Trustee 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 Automated Sale Information Line: (714) 848-9272 or www.elitepostandpub.com For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 Christine O’Brien, Trustee Sale OfficerTHIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. EPP 6307. 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2066597# Trustee Sale No.: 20090187419611 Title Order No.: 281610 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/ 22/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDex West, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 02/28/2006 as Instrument No. 2006073481 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California. Executed By: Cuong Duc Pham and Tram Hong Pham, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). Date of Sale: 04/11/2011 Time of Sale: 12:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon St. emergency exit to the Alameda County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, CA. Street Address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4134 Asimuth Cir, Union City, California 94587 APN#: 4830102107 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $485,698.59. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. For Trustee Sale Information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing, Inc. 17501 Irvine Blvd., Suite One Tustin, CA 92780 714573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDex West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/18/2011 NDex West, L.L.C. may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P814369 3/22, 3/29, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2066468# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS #: CA-09269974-BL Order #: 090253446-CA-MAI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/24/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): LEILANI M. ONOFRE AND ELFEGO V. ONOFRE, WIFE AND HUSBAND Recorded: 1/31/2006 as Instrument No. 2006032001 in book xxx, page xxx of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 4/15/2011 at 12: 30 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance

to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $518,774.77 The purported property address is: 219 D Street Union City, CA 94587 Assessor’s Parcel No. 486-0003-025-02 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to Litton Loan Servicing LP 4828 Loop Central Drive Houston TX 77081 Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 . If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: 3/21/2011 Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: (800) 247-9727 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3945585 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2066257# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. 09-512471 INC Title Order No. 090806124CA-DCI APN 543-0468-029-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/01/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04/11/11 at 12:30 p.m., Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 02/13/07 in Instrument No. 2007069271 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: Richard Endrina and Gail Endrina, Husband and Wife, as Trustor, Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2007-A5, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007E under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated March 1, 2007, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), at the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 4493 NILAND STREET, UNION CITY, CA 94587 The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $878,401.56 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Requirements of SB1137 have been met pursuant to the Notice of Sale Declaration of record. DATE: 3/16/11 Robbie Weaver Assistant Secretary & Assistant Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corporation c/o 4665 MacArthur Court, Suite 250 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Phone: (800) 731-0850 or (602) 222-5711 Fax: (847)627-8803 www.aztectrustee.com For Trustee’s Sale Information Call 714-730-2727 http://www.lpsasap.com ASAP# 3945141 03/22/ 2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2065997# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS #: CA-10387928-CL Order #: 100563946-CA-LPI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/24/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): FRANK HIFAI , AN UNMARRIED MAN Recorded: 11/3/ 2005 as Instrument No. 2005474865 in book xxx, page xxx of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California; Date of Sale: 4/15/2011 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $684,858.97 The purported property address is: 1152 SILVER ST UNION CITY, CA 94587 Assessor’s Parcel No. 087-0334-095 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to Aurora Loan Services LLC 10350 Park Meadows Dr. Littleton CO 80124 Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] The mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 . If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: 3/21/2011 Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com Reinstatement Line: 619645-7711 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3945420 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2065984# Trustee Sale No. 812-059117 Loan No. 9040204588 Title Order No. 4492189 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 0415-2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04-11-2011 at 12: 00 PM, PLM LENDER SERVICES, INC. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 04-24-2003, Instrument 2003239417, and as modified by the Modification of Deed of Trust recorded on 07-22-2009, Book , Page , Instrument 2009234439 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County, California, executed by: MARIETA M MANZANA AND RAYMUNDO MANZANA, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Trustor, DOWNEY SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, F.A., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction the trustor’s interest in the property described below, to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. The sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE FALLON ST EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $172,340.85 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 4916 LOWRY RD , UNION CITY, CA 94587 APN Number: 543-0427-108 The

undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 03-15-2011 FOR TRUSTEE’S SALES INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL (714) 573-1965, OR VISIT WEBSITE: www.priorityposting.com PLM LENDER SERVICES, INC., AS TRUSTEE PLM Lender Services, Inc. 46 N. Second Street Campbell, CA 95008 (408)-370-4030 ELIZABETH GODBEY, VICE PRESIDENT PLM LENDER SERVICES, INC. IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P813431 3/22, 3/29, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2065853# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No: H521735 CA Unit Code: H Loan No: 0022816516/BROCK Investor No: 671017862 AP #1: 486-0092-051 POWER DEFAULT SERVICES, INC., as duly appointed Trustee under the following described Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (in the forms which are lawful tender in the United States) and/or the cashier’s, certified or other checks specified in Civil Code Section 2924h (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Service Company) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property hereinafter described: Trustor: EWANIE BROCK Recorded February 8, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007065375 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County; CALIFORNIA , pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded December 28, 2010 as Instr. No. 2010-390062 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of ALAMEDA County CALIFORNIA. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED JANUARY 29, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 2567 BING CRT, UNION CITY, CA 94587-4907 “(If a street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness).” Said Sale of property will be made in “as is” condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Said sale will be held on: APRIL 18,

2011, AT 12:00 P.M. *AT THE FALLON STREET EMERGENCY EXIT OF THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1225 FALLON STREET OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA At the time of the initial publication of this notice, the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above described Deed of Trust and estimated costs, expenses, and advances is $391,166.49. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Date: March 29, 2011 POWER DEFAULT SERVICES, INC. as said Trustee, as Authorized Agent for the Beneficiary KIMBERLY THORNE, ASSISTANT SECRETARY T.D. SERVICE COMPANY 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210, P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com. TAC# 931396 PUB: 03/29/11, 04/05/11, 04/12/11 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/11 CNS-2065550# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20100015007199 Title Order No.: 100443973 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/20/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 06/28/2007 as Instrument No. 2007240188 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of ALAMEDA County, State of CALIFORNIA.

EXECUTED BY: MAUREEN WILKS, TRUSTEE OF THE MAUREEN WILKS TRUST DATED 12-15-2003, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 04/11/2011 TIME OF SALE: 12:30 PM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE FALLON STREET ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2180 FARROL AVE, UNION CITY, CALIFORNIA 94587 APN#: 429-0028-022 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $591,353.24. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES & POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/15/2011 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 ASAP# 3935616 03/ 22/2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2065500# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 100164034 Title Order No. 10-0007450 Investor/ Insurer No. 142736456 APN No. 087-0334-025 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/01/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE

OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.” Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by BNMALIHA QUDUS, dated 12/01/2006 and recorded 12/08/06, as Instrument No. 2006450009, in Book -, Page -), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Alameda County, State of California, will sell on 04/19/2011 at 12:30PM, At the Fallon Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 1225 Fallon Street, Oakland, CA 94612 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 35983 BRONZE STREET, UNION CITY, CA, 94587. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,178,427.84. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’AS IS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 03/22/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ASAP# 3932292 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011, 04/05/2011 3/22, 3/29, 4/5/11 CNS-2065225#

Fremont Unified School District Board meeting BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH PHOTO COURTESY OF GAIL MINAMOTO The following are highlights from the Fremont Unified School District Board meeting held on March 23, 2011. Community Leadership/ Superintendent’s Report: Fremont Schools Superintendent James Morris announced that Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) selected Sherea Westra, a second-grade teacher at Niles Elementary School as his 2011 - 20th Assembly District Woman of the Year. Bill Stephens, the Assistant Superintendent for Business, determined that some of the district’s bonds could be refinanced, resulting in a savings to the district and taxpayers. The Dana Raimondi Math Program/Math Science Nucleus was recognized for partnering with Fremont Unified School District (FUSD), to help low income students excel at math. “We are assisting under-performing kids at the elementary levels. We care and are concerned about them,” said Raimondi. Ceremonial Items: The Board passed resolutions in honor of “Week of Public School Administrators and Managers” (May 2 – 6) and “April as Volunteer Appreciation Month.” Superintendent Morris recognized a group of talented students from Centerville Junior High School who won numerous awards at the Musical Theatre Competitions of America, held recently in Southern California. Retirement of Bill Stephens: A special resolution recognizing “Lifelong Service to Public Education,” was presented to Assistant Superintendent of Business, Bill Stephens. He is retiring, after a distinguished career, of which the last six years were spent at FUSD. Superintendent Morris spoke of Stephens’ incredible financial knowledge, loyalty and integrity, expressing that he will be missed.

Bill Stephens, Assistant Superintendent of Business, retired March 25.

Board President Bryan Gebhardt concurred, “You certainly brought consistency and stability to the district. And, your advice and collaborative style always came with integrity and a sense of humor.” Trustee Larry Sweeney discussed Stephens’ financial savvy. “You came aboard when there was financial confusion and did a fantastic job explaining everything. The district has had excellent audits [because of your efforts] and you have inspired your staff. Your seat will be very, very difficult to fill.” Trustee Lara York added, “To get respect you have to give respect. You give respect to everyone you come into contact with.” Bill Stephens responded, “I’ve been very fortunate to have had a very enjoyable career. The capstone of my educational career has been Fremont, because of the people I’ve met. The Board, Staff, superlative teachers, students and community all work very hard to make this a

high performing district.” Public Hearing on Measure K: Board Trustees had the opportunity to receive suggestions and ideas from the public on the spending plan for Measure K funds, to encourage transparency and participation. Superintendent Morris stated, “We want to hear how the voters want the money spent to give the Board and Committee ideas.” Several Niles Elementary parents and teachers talked about using the funds to bring K-3 class sizes back down to a 20:1 ratio, as these young students need the most attention. Others mentioned the need to keep the school libraries open to serve Fremont’s students. Carl Bullard, a Washington High School teacher made his viewpoint known by saying, “I am teaching 33 students in a tiny classroom, a room built for 20. Class size is a K-12 issue.” President of the Fremont Unified Teachers Association

AP WIRE SERVICE FORT MILL, S.C. (AP), Mar 21 - Drivers near the South Carolina-North Carolina state line have been warned to be on the lookout for zombies, hunters and tanks. The Herald of Rock Hill reports that one of the electronic signs, which normally flash messages about construction or crashes, read “Zombies Ahead” on Sunday. Another flashed “Watch for Hunters,” while a sign on the other side of the road said “Be alert for Tanks.”

(FUDTA), Brannin Dorsey spoke about how many young students miss out on receiving one-on-one time with their teacher, when there are too many students crowded into a classroom. “Every child is important. Every child deserves attention and instruction from their teacher – every single day, to reach their potential,” said Dorsey. Updated Special Education Procedural Handbook: Deborah Sims, Assistant Superintendent of Instruction related that it’s been a while since revisions to this manual have taken place. This is the beginning of the first phase to review and make recommendations in order to ensure compliance with policies and procedures. The handbook is important in order to assist school personnel to understand and teach with practices that are consistent with Federal, State and District requirements, when dealing with students with special needs. Financial Advisory Committee Status Report: This committee advises and makes recommendations on financial matters to the Board. Information presented showed that Fremont students perform academically better than other students, even while receiving less money per student, from the state. Additionally, FUSD, which has had a positive certification for over 25 years, is a financially sound school district as verified by the Alameda County Office of Education (ACOE) and the State of California. Update on District Demographic Study: Superintendent Morris explained that many factors contribute to Fremont’s demographics. Some of these include: birthrate, economy, construction, trends, immigration patterns, environmental issues, and school board policies. FUSD’s consulting demographer prepared an update to present to the Board, as per request. There have been no significant major shifts in the contributing

factors previously mentioned. 2010 enrollment was 32,384, which is a 5 percent increase over the previous year (+176 students). The enrollment for 2011 increased by 281 students or 0.9 percent. The projection for 2015 is now 33,067 for an increase of 1.9 percent or 631 students. The question of school/facilities capacity and program capacity needs to be looked into further. Acquisition of more property could be a solution; however, in this time of economic uncertainty and budget deficits, it might prove difficult to accomplish. Annual Report on Assignment of Attendance Areas: The Board’s new policies on the process of evaluating new housing developments, for assignment to an attendance area, utilize the demographer’s findings as a helpful component. Currently, several elementary schools are dealing with overcrowding or have new housing developments proposed within their areas: Ardenwood, Leitch/Warm Springs and Parkmont. Recommendations, made by the Staff, were presented to the Board in the Annual Report. In time reserved for Public Comment on this agenda item, Mark Robson, of Robson Homes thanked the Board for, “considering this issue and looking into it.” Fremont parent Hiu Ng, stated, “Some developments are where we already have significant overcrowding in our schools.” Trustee Lara York posed a question regarding capacity at the Secondary School level. She asked Therese Gain, Director of Facilities/Operations at the district, about the planning process for new developments and how to proceed with public comment. The Annual Reports were accepted. However, per Trustee York, the proposed Assignment Areas for the new developments were not voted on as the Board has asked for additional information from the Staff for the April 13 meeting.

The signs are on Highway 160 near Fort Mill, S.C. Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Billy Elder says someone apparently tampered with the signs sometime before 4 a.m. Sunday. So far, there have been no reports of the undead or tanks. Hackers pulled similar pranks in 2009, using road signs to warn of zombies in Collinsville, Ill., and Austin, Texas.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

HAAL diamond update BY GARY VAN DEN HEUVEL After a week of rainy, cold weather which held up play, the Hayward Area Athletic League (HAAL) baseball and softball teams were able to resume their respective seasons. The delay halted the momentum of Moreau Catholic High School’s baseball team, which started the season with 5 wins, but last week came back to earth with 2 losses. The Mariners’ first defeat of the season was a 5-4 loss to Valley Christian-Dublin. Richard L’Heureux (3 for 4), Brian Hickel (a double in 2 at-bats and 2 RBI), and Daniel Aguirre (2 for 3, a run scored) starred for Moreau in the tough loss. Moreau’s next outing was no better – a 7-0 loss to Arroyo High School in their first HAAL game. The Mount Eden Monarchs are currently sitting pretty, with a 2-0 HAAL record following a 5-4 win over Hayward High School (Mt. Eden’s first league win came 2 weeks ago, also against Hayward). The Monarchs were led by David Contreras (3 for 4, 2 RBI and a run), Raul Lugo (3 for 4, 2 RBI and 2 runs), and Gary Boyd (2 for 3, 2 runs) in their win. Christian Scott drove in 2 runs on 2 hits for the Farmers. Tennyson High School began their league play with an 8-3 loss to Bishop O’Dowd. The Lancers led the game 3-2 until the 5th inning, when O’Dowd took the lead and then blew the game wide open with 6 runs. At week’s end, O’Dowd leads the HAAL with a 4-0 record, followed by Mt. Eden at 2-0, and Arroyo (3-1). Moreau’s softball team won 1 of 2 games. The Mariners squashed Las Lomas 15-4 in the Standley Cup Tournament Black Division game held in Hayward. Shelby Long contributed 2 hits, 1 RBI and 2 runs scored. Kyralyn Kawasaki delivered a hit, drove in a run and scored 3 in the win. The Mariners’ next opponent in the tourney was league rival Arroyo, who prevailed 93. Karina Sanchez had 2 RBI in the loss.

MVAL baseball moves into conference play BY KEVIN YIN The weather hasn’t been the only thing heating up in Fremont as baseball teams of the Mission Valley Athletic League emerged from the recent stretch of rain ready to play ball. The week of Monday, March 28, to Sunday, April 3, saw the beginning of conference play for MVAL baseball, giving competitors and observers alike a better feel for the pecking order. Right now, that order is headed by Logan. After going 5-1 in non-conference play, the Colts opened their MVAL schedule with a solid test in the form of Washington on March 30. Logan edged the Huskies, 21, with senior pitcher Brandon Yau allowing just three hits while pitching a complete game. Senior outfielder Jason Puckett provided the scoring punch for the Colts, going 3-for-3 with an RBI. Logan followed that win up with a 3-2 victory over Irvington, putting their season record at 7-1, 2-0 in MVAL play. However, Logan wasn’t the only team to win its first two MVAL games. Mission San Jose annihilated Kennedy, 8-0, in the conference opener for both teams on March 30. Senior pitcher Matt Imhof went all seven innings, throwing seven strikeouts for the Spartans, and also batted 2-for3. Imhof is now 3-0 on the season. Then, on April 1, Mission thumped American, 10-3. Mission’s season record stands at 6-2, 2-0 in league play. Washington rebounded from their close loss to Logan by outscoring Kennedy, 10-6, on April 1. Senior Jarrett Costa and junior Beau Lawrence led the way for the Huskies with each going 2-for-3, including three RBIs for Lawrence and two for Costa. Washington’s overall record is now 6-3. Kennedy started the season promisingly, winning its first six games, usually in lopsided fashion, but has now lost four straight by a combined score of 31-10. The Titans will have a good shot to turn things around on Wednesday, April 6, when they face Irvington. Irvington is just 1-4-1 on the season thus far. Newark Memorial and American opened MVAL play against each other on March 30, with the Eagles coming out on top, 5-3. American’s senior catcher Steven Kay had a huge game, going 2-for-3 with three RBIs, including a two-run homer in the fifth that ended up providing the margin of victory for the Eagles. Newark catcher Alex Poole also went yard with solo shot in the first inning. American is now 3-5 overall, 1-1 in league play. Newark is 5-3, 0-1.

continued from page 26

Fowler was 3-3, including a double and 3 RBIs; Marden 2-3 with 2 doubles; and Candice Christiansen 2-3 and 3 RBIs. Next up for Ohlone is at San Jose City College (CCS), Tuesday, April 5, then CCN home games to both Foothill College of Los Altos Hills, 7th and Mission College of Santa Clara, 12th. All games at 3. Also last week, Chabot College Gladiators (CCN) had 2 home games, defeating Gavilan in a make up game, 8-0 (5 inn mercy rule) then losing to SJCC, 8-6. Against Gavilan, sophomore southpaw, Cheyanne Bennett got her 5th win of the year while going 2-4 with a double and 3 RBIs. Desiree Ramos was 2-3 with a double and 3 runs scored while Amanda O'Conner had a home run with 2 RBIs and 2 runs scored. Against San Jose, Bennett took the loss to drop her to 5-9. O'Conner went 4-4 with another home run and a double while Taylor Cruz and Mychal Anders each had a double. Gladiators are now 6-5 in CCN and 11-14 overall. Next home game for Chabot is City College of San Francisco, Thur., April 7, 3 p.m. Women's Tennis Last Tuesday, March 29, Chabot traveled to Mission and won easily 9-0. Chabot scores in singles, No.1-No.6 and doubles, No.1-No.2 are as follows: Namrata Sher 6-1 6-1; Andrea Poljakovic 6-1 6-1; Lauren Kane 6-0 6-0; Michaela Holgate 6-0 6-0; Morgan Davis 6-1 6-0; Monica Lomas default; Sher/Poljakovic 6-0 6-2; Lomas/Davis 60 6-1; No.3 default. Thursday Chabot defeated Santa Rosa College 5-4 and Friday they won over Foothill 7-2, both at home. Next match is Tuesday, April 5 at home against Cabrillo College of Aptos at 2 p.m. Women's Track & Field Chabot participated in the Johnny Mathis Invitational at San Francisco State University last Saturday, April 2. Best performances turned in by Chabot women were: 100m dash, Kioyoko Orange (James Logan High grad) 17th 13.27sec; Javelin, Christine Hadfield (Washington High grad) 3rd 103-0m Nor Cal Qualifying Mark (NCQM); Discus, Titjiana Pitts 8th 108-1m NCQM; and Discus, Katie Anderson 10th 95-11m. Next home meet Friday, April 22, Last Chance Qualifier.

Page 31


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY MONA SHAH

W

omen artists and friends Barbara Nagel and Michelle Smith collaborate for a joint showing of their art this month. While each woman’s résumé is extensive individually, the combination will offer a feast for the visual arts connoisseur. Nagel has a unique representational style and a strong sense of color and design. Her paintings of California reflect a love of its historical landmarks, sea and landscapes and the State's natural diversity; a never-ending source of creative inspiration. She also

enjoys painting florals, still life and abstract art. Primarily a watercolorist, Nagel also works in Prismacolor Pencil and Pastel. Although self-taught, she continues to enhance her skills through attending workshops with outstanding watercolor artists. In addition to her fine art, this artist has created beautiful and vibrant watercolor illustrations of Signs of the Zodiac. A uniquely different interpretation of each sign masterfully incorporates a human or partial human figure as part of each symbol. Michelle Smith always had a proclivity for all things creative. From drawing, coloring and clay

April 5, 2011

as a child to sewing, sketching and painting as an adult this love of art lead her to a career in Graphic Design. It was a fun job where she was able to draw and be creative every day, but much to her disappointment, this would not last. Smith was born with a congenital heart defect, which caused a progressive lung disease called Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Although she was essentially asymptomatic most of her life, about five years into her career,

the disease began to worsen. She was becoming short of breath, fatigued easily, and could no longer continue to work. A few months into forced “retirement”, Michelle serendipitously came upon a watercolor instruction book while at a bookstore. This was the beginning of her passion for watercolor painting. She painted and practiced as her energy would allow, bought more books and practiced some more. Her style varies from representational to realistic. She enjoys painting a variety of subjects, especially animals and florals, how-

Plans for the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge SUBMITTED BY WINNIE CHAN What do you think about more fishing access along Alviso Slough or Coyote Creek? Do you have an interest in native plant communities and their threats from invasive weeds? Are you interested in how endangered species around the Bay are being protected? Are you a photographer looking for more outdoor opportunities? The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has developed three alternatives for a 15-year comprehensive conservation plan to guide management of the 30,000-acre Don Ed-

wards San Francisco Bay (DESFB) National Wildlife Refuge. Find out more about how these alternatives will affect the Refuge’s wildlife management, habitat management, and public uses at one of the public meetings listed below and share your comments on the alternatives. For more details about the alternatives, visit www.fws.gov/desfbay and view “Announcements” to the right of the webpage. For comments, more information or to join the Refuge’s mailing list, contact Winnie Chan, Refuge Planner, SF Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex at (510) 792-4275 x145 or sfbaynwrc@fws.gov

Conservation Planning Meeting Wednesday, April 13 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. DESFB National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters Auditorium 2 Marshland Road, Fremont (510) 792-4275 x145 sfbaynwrc@fws.gov Conservation Planning Meeting Tuesday, April 19 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. DESFB Environmental Education Center 1751 Grand Boulevard Alviso, San Jose (510) 792-4275 x145 sfbaynwrc@fws.gov

ever, the subject matter isn’t as important to her as lighting, shadow and color. Even quite ordinary subjects can become interesting and beautiful with dramatic light and shadows, and intensely saturated color. Among Friends Through April Artist Reception Sunday, April 10 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mission Coffee 151 Washington Boulevard, Fremont (510) 623-6920 Free

The Easter Bunny SUBMITTED BY MIMI GOC Come and enjoy some Easter fun at the Fremont Hub! Children and families of the Fremont Community are invited to enjoy balloon twisting and face painting from noon to 3 p.m., and the Easter Bunny will be hopping around the shops in the Main Courtyard in front of Hobby Town. Come meet the Easter Bunny and if you bring your camera, you may even be able to take a snapshot with him! For more information, visit www.thefremonthub.com or go to our facebook page. Easter Bunny at Fremont Hub Saturday, April 9 Noon – 3 p.m. Fremont Hub Mowry Ave. and Fremont Blvd., Fremont www.thefremonthub.com


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Classifieds Deadline: Noon Wednesdays (510) 494-1999 | www.tricityvoice.com

Page 33

CLASSIFIEDS

What’s It Worth? APPRAISAL SERVICES

Estates - Probate Jewelry, Fine Art & Collectibles CERTIFIED

MUSEUM SPECIALIST Preferred Rates for Seniors and Veterans” norm2@earthlink.net

510-582-5954 LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL A BUSINESS? We have been matching buyers and sellers for 29 plus years

For a FREE and NO OBLIGATION consultation Call me TODAY! BTI GROUP- SALES & ACQUISITIONS Tashie Zaheer CELL: 510-750-3297 • Branded Gas Station with Real Estate • Convenience Store • Orange Julius/ dairy Queen And many more…………..

Garden Apartments

Change of name: Old Name Surname: Mohamed Sulthan Given Name/s: Ahamed Kabeer

SAVE $1,200 - Move In $850 Jr 1 Br w/spec FREMONT’S BEST HOUSING VALUE Water, Garbage, Carport included

New Name Surname: Kabeer Given Name/s: Ahamed

Swim Pool/ Rec Room/Laundry Close shopping & Fwy Gated Security Walk to Bart/HUB 1 & 2 Bedroom No Sec 8/Pets

$1,150,000 $85,000 $86,000

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Technical Writer: E & E Co., Ltd. dba JLA Home in Fremont, CA. Develop, write and edit technical reports. Bachelor degree req’d.

Sr. Production Manager: E & E Co., Ltd. dba JLA Home in Fremont , CA. Textiles market research & analysis. Experience req’d.

Mail resume to Executive Asst. 45875 Northport Loop E, Fremont , CA 94538 or e-mail: hrdept@jlahome.com

Mail resume to Executive Asst. 45875 Northport Loop E, Fremont , CA 94538 or e-mail: hrdept@jlahome.com

HASTINGS TERRACE/EAST APTS 510-793-2535, 510-792-4983

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

HELP WANTED Axygen, Inc. in Union City, CA, seeks IT Site Leader II to allocate IT resources and capabilities to achieve desired business results. Responsibilities include monitoring unit compliance with IT- and HR-related legal and regulatory guidelines; aligning IT business processes to global company business processes; achieving IT budgetary objectives in support of business financial goals while maintaining appropriate levels of service delivery; and establishing and driving the business IT project portfolio and managing its alignment to organizational objectives. Position requires Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Information Management or related field plus five years of experience in an IT leadership role, which must have included experience within a manufacturing environment. In lieu of Bachelor’s degree, any suitable combination of education, training or experience will be considered acceptable for equivalency purposes [3 years of relevant experience = 1 year of education]. Experience must include analyzing business processes and developing manufacturing execution systems using data acquisition tools and MES application software; overseeing deployment, maintenance and business requirements definition of ERP systems such as PeopleSoft, Sage or SAP; and managing IT projects from requirements definition through execution. Involves domestic travel (approx. 20%). Send resume describing qualifications to the attention of Ms. Lindsay Casbeer at careers@corning.com or by mail to Ms. Lindsay Casbeer, MP-HQ01-E04, Corning, NY 14831. Please reference "IT Site Leader II” in e mail or cover letter.

Are you a writer? Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480

BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE Alameda County Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 Tuesday, Apr 5 2:30 - 3:25 p.m. Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., Fremont 3:45 - 4:15 p.m. California School for the Deaf 39350 Gallaudet Dr, Fremont 5:25 - 6:10 p.m. Booster Park, Gable Dr. and McDuff Ave., Fremont 6:25 - 6:55 p.m. Camellia Dr. and Camellia Court, Fremont Wednesday, Apr 6 1:00 - 1:45 p.m. Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., San Lorenzo 4:30 - 5:10 p.m. Palomares Hills HOA Clubhouse, 6811 Villareal Dr., Castro Valley 5:25 - 5:50 p.m. Lomond Way & Greenridge Rd., Castro Valley Thursday, Apr 7 2:45 - 3:40 p.m. Bay School 2001 Bockman Rd, San Lorenzo 4:05 - 4:40 p.m. Falcon Dr. and Merganser Dr., Fremont 5:20 - 5:50 p.m. Los Robles Apts, 32300 Almaden Blvd., Union City 6:05 - 6:35 p.m. Mission Gateway Apts., 33215 Mission Blvd., Union City Monday, Apr 11 2:00 - 2:45 p.m. Pioneer School, Blythe St. and Jean Dr., Union City 3:00 - 3:30 p.m. Alvarado Elementary, Fredi St. & Smith St., Union City 4:15 - 5:00 p.m. Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., Union City 5:15 - 6:45 p.m. Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd & maybird Cir. Fremont

Tuesday, Apr 12 2:15 - 3:15 p.m. Schilling School, 36901 Spruce St., Newark 3:25 - 4:00 p.m. Ash St. & Wells Ave., Newark 4:50 - 5:30 p.m. Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr. Union City 5:40 - 6:20 p.m. Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, Union City Wednesday, Apr 13 2:15 - 3:00 p.m. Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 9th St, Union City 3:45 - 4:30 p.m. Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., Fremont 5:15 - 5:50 p.m. Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., Fremont 6:00 - 6:30 p.m. Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St., Fremont Thursday, Apr 14 1:45 - 2:15 p.m. Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd, Newark 2:45 - 3:30 p.m. Ardenwood School, 33955 Emilia Lane, Fremont 4:30 - 5:15 p.m. Weibel School, 45135 South Grimmer Blvd., Fremont 5:50 - 6:20 p.m. Contempo Homes, 4190 Gemini Dr., Union City Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information about the Bookmobile call (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, Apr 6 2:00 - 2:20 p.m. Pioneer Park 60 Wilson Way, Milpitas 2:30 - 2:55 p.m. Friendly Village Park 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas 3:20 - 4:00 p.m. Foothill School 1991 Landess Ave, Milpitas


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

April 5, 2011

continued from page 1

Decreasing violent crime statistics for the City of Fremont offer a positive perspective of an increasingly diverse population and Wasserman cited another bright spot, the financial health of Fremont’s Waterpark that has maintained a positive cash flow. Pacific Commons has shown strong growth as Any Mountain opened in time for ski season and KIA/Nissan dealership opened its doors as well. Nordstrom Rack just joined the cluster of big box stores and a 16-screen the-

ater, Target store, and Toys R Us and Babies R Us are under construction. Among future prospects of Fremont growth are plans for development of “Downtown/Midtown” and a Fremont Boulevard corridor as part of the “Character Element” of the new Fremont General Plan for 2030. The mayor noted goals for Fremont’s future include significant emission reductions, a ban of plastic bags and Styrofoam containers, recycling of demolition and construction de-

bris and stringent green building standards. He spoke about transportation changes including extension of BART under Central Park and Lake Elizabeth with eventual connections to San Jose. Service to the new Warm Springs Station should operational by mid-year 2015. Mayor Wasserman concluded his remarks saying that though “topsy-turvy” with “heartbreaking disappointments,” this year of adjustment is a time to “hang on” and promised, “We will!”

BY MONA SHAH

BY EMMA VICTORIA G. BLANCO Milpitas’ popular Rainbow Theater (RT) was established 30 years ago and has since been the city’s premiere children’s community theater. Theater productions are performed primarily by children; its mission is to “provide a forum for youth to build selfesteem through positive theatrical experience and to present quality, family-oriented entertainment for the community.” RT’s current presentation of Disney’s Aladdin Jr. is a true testament to the theater’s mission. The children, or rather, budding thespians, deliver memorable performances.

From the time we wake up until the time we close our eyes at night, we are immersed in color. It pervades our physical world, affecting emotions and moods. Thus, it is important to give color more than a passing glance. A new exhibit by Artists 7, “Colorful Beginnings,” uses color as visual language linking artists to viewers. Evoking a deep emotion within us, color can be stunning and powerful or soothing and serene. Formed in 2000, Artists 7 is a multimedia women’s art group. Born out of friendships formed through the Fremont Art Association, the group began with a series of Open Studio weekends and now exhibits in area museums, wineries and art galleries. Members work in oil, acrylic, photography, watercolor, pastel, colored pencil, jewelry and collage. All are award-winning

artists. Artist 7 represented by Cindy Sullivan, Jean Bidwell, Kathy Ries, Denise Oyama Miller, M. Barta Atkins, Susan Helmer, and Marcia Ritz. An artist reception will be held at the John O'Lague Galleria on April 8. The reception is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Hayward Arts Council at (510) 538-2787. Artist 7: "Colorful Beginnings" Through May 27 Mon-Fri 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Artist Reception Friday, April 8 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. John O'Lague Galleria Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 538-2787

Their enthusiasm is contagious and their passion for the show is solidly evident. Aladdin Jr. is an adaptation from the Disney favorite and it is aimed specifically toward the younger audience. With the exception of Abu (Aladdin’s mischievous pet monkey) and Raja (Jasmine’s pet tiger) from the original movie, the majority of the cast is quite intact. Though slightly modified, the storyline, as well as the songs are still familiar. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself singing along. It is a musical, after all. Leading roles are performed charmingly by Chris Bungubung, as Aladdin, and Lauren Alvear, as Jasmine. Together, they gave an impressive rendition of “A Whole New World.” Cortney Hyde delivers a fine performance as the boisterous Genie. Rachel Renteria is funny as Jafar’s molting feathered sidekick, Iago. Finally, eight-year-old Alyssa McDonnell delights as a lithe Magic Carpet. Come see Aladdin Jr. at the Rainbow Theater and not only will you find yourself entertained by talented young thespians, you will also be showing your support for a landmark theater that is beloved by its community. Disney’s Aladdin Jr. Friday, April 8, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 9, 2:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Milpitas Community Center Auditorium 457 E. Calaveras Blvd (408) 586-2774

$8 General Admission (ages 13-49) $6 Children/Senior Admission Tickets may be purchased at the Milpitas Community Center Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m

Newark Educational Foundation needs help in a hurry SUBMITTED BY COLLEEN GANAYE Schools all over the country have been slammed by all the budget cuts over these past few year and none more so than those in our own area. The Newark Educational Foundation recently decided to go directly to the principals on Newark Memorial High School and Newark Junior High, to find the real needs of these schools. The list is long… especially at the junior high. Principal Catherine Ward-Mikes had each department create a wish list, prioritized by need. At the top of every department head’s list was copier paper, one of the most basic of needs in the classroom. Often, teachers have had to purchase basic supplies out of their own pockets this year as budget cuts have been extremely deep. When the Foundation heard about this, members, all volunteers, voted to get the needed supply of copier paper, as soon as

(Left to Right:) Newark Educational Foundation Board members, Carsten Lunde, Sean Nand, Bobby Deo, Colleen Ganaye, Newark Schools Superintendant Kevin Harrigan and Principal Catherine Ward-Mikes of Newark Jr. High.

possible. Within a week, Staples in Fremont stepped up offering a special price break and delivered 30 cases of the paper to the grateful school. Many other items are needed such as projector bulbs, batteries, supplemental books for the stu-

dents, new computers, projectors and the list goes on. In the past, the Newark Educational Foundation fundraising has been to help music departments in the elementary schools. In these tough economic times, fundraising efforts have been

more challenging than ever. With such drastic cuts, the Foundation has decided to provide a broader scope of support. The Foundation is looking for parents, teachers and concerned citizens interested in donating time to help raise funds. If you

would like to join the efforts to help Newark schools or are interested in donating to help provide some of the wish list classroom items, please visit www.newarkeducationalfoundation.org.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

L

Special Life Events

Marriage

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge

important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat

mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Due to space limitations, only a brief announcement is possible without charge. Those who decide to publish more extensive information and/or a picture may do so at

low prevailing rates – as low as $35 - on this page. Although every attempt will be made to include announcements in a timely manner, since TCV is published bi-weekly, submissions received after Friday of the week preceding a distribution date may not be published until a later issue.

Obituaries Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the

Greater Tri-City Area.

Obituaries

Margaret M. McEnery Lylah Pearl Johnson

RESIDENT OF FREMONT July 12, 1920 – March 18, 2011

RESIDENT OF SAN LEANDRO June 10, 2002 – March 11, 2011

Rose Mary Johnson

Selina M. Boyd

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 16, 1930 – March 18, 2011

RESIDENT OF NEWARK : June 12, 1927 – March 29, 2011

Frank M. DeMartini

Marie A. Zacche RESIDENT OF GRASS VALLEY May 7, 1923 – March 29, 2011

Durward D. Berry RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 23, 1918 – March 31, 2011

Cathy Chin RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 12, 1922 – April 1, 2011

Marvin R. Hudson

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 25, 1928 – March 22, 2011

Mariya Yelevich RESIDENT OF NEWARK September 8, 1922 – March 24, 2011

Ida B. Clark RESIDENT OF NEWARK December 28, 1922– March 24, 2011

Gaelann Roth RESIDENT OF NEWARK July 18, 1941– March 24, 2011

RESIDENT OF NEWARK May 5, 1931 – April 1, 2011

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

SUBMITTED BY MARVIN BOWERMAN

H

ayward La Honda Music Camp celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2011 and looks forward to welcoming students in grades 6-12 to a challenging and fun experience devoted to developing fine musicianship. Camp highlights include Band (concert band and wind ensemble), Full Orchestra and String Orchestra, Ensembles (all combinations), Jazz Bands (five levels), Jazz Improvisation (three levels), Jazz Piano, Jazz Arrangement, Music Theory (three levels), Vocal Music (allcamp chorus, jazz choir), Master Classes (all instruments), Conducting, Composition and Latin Jazz. Participants will have the opportunity of studying under music directors from the most successful colleges, universities and schools in the Bay Area. The residential camp runs from July 23 to July 30, 2011. “Hayward La Honda Music Camp changed my life. I first attended two years after I started playing the oboe and it was the first opportunity I had for one-on-one oboe lessons. I learned to make reeds at this camp. These opportunities helped me enter college as a music major. This camp offers many different opportunities for the young musician. Hayward La Honda was the first chance I had to sing in a choir, take a jazz improvisation class and play in an orchestra. Every ambition I had was encouraged. Being in an atmosphere where I was surrounded by people with like interests and passions made my teen years such an enjoyable time,” reflects a former participant. Recreational activities will include arts and crafts, swimming, equestrianism, canoeing, softball, archery, climbing tower, dances and hiking. Enrolment options: early online tuition paid in full by May 1 ($685); regular online tuition paid in full after May 1 ($720); all paper applications due by May 1 ($720); sibling discount ($25) and Honor Band or Honor Orchestra Discount ($65). For more information or to fund camp scholarships, call (510) 537-4871, email LaHondaMusicCamp@yahoo.com or visit www.LaHondaMusicCamp.org

Are you a writer? Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.

Subscribe


Page 36

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Are you a writer?

April 5, 2011

Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY MONA SHAH

SUBMITTED BY SAMU TIUMALU The Milpitas Youth Advisory Commission is seeking performers, singers, dancers, anyone looking to showcase their talent to audition for the Milpitas’ Got Talent Show scheduled for Friday, May 13. The winner(s) of the show will receive a $100 prize. Auditions will take place on Saturday, April 30 starting at 1 p.m. at the Milpitas Teen Center. Acts are limited to 5 minutes and what is audition must be performed on the day of the show. Acts must be Milpitas residents (unless if in a band, at least half of the members must be

Milpitas residents). Please make sure to bring your own instrumental backing track. No profanity allowed. For more information, or to schedule your audition, contact the Milpitas Teen Center during business hours (Monday-Friday from 2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.) at (408) 586-3296 or by email at stiumalu@ci.milpitas.ca.gov. Milpitas’ Got Talent Auditions Saturday, April 30 1 p.m. Teen Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3296

BY: RICH CORDIVARI

A

ccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics more than two million Americans are impacted by workplace violence annually. Behavior indicators often exhibited in the workplace have been linked to workplace violence situations. According to a 2004 USA Today analysis of 224 instances of fatal workplace violence situations, the attacker left behind clear warning signs. Workplace violence is attributed to a broad range of behaviors falling along a spectrum that, due to their nature and/or severity, significantly affect the workplace, generate a concern for personal safety and can result in physical injury or even death. While every situation and set of circumstances is unique, there are some warning signs that are commonly exhibited by individuals in need of assistance. If you are feeling uncomfortable in any situation with a co-worker, or noticing these warning signs, you should notify a manager or someone in a position of authority within your organization. Remember that just because someone exhibits one of these behaviors does not necessarily mean they are prone to display an act of violence. It is when someone has a noticeable change in behavior, if these behaviors are observed in combination or if the behavior is displayed constantly that you should consider telling someone about the situation.

The winter 2011 Children’s Repertory Theatre Company performs Monica Flory’s adaptation of “The Jungle Book” at the Niles Veterans Memorial Building on April 2 and 3. Under the direction of Caitlin Dissinger and Kristin Schmitz, actors recreate a traditional classic, an adaptation of the “The Jungle Book,” by Monica Flory. The Children’s Little Theatre actors perform Karma Wilson’s “The Bear Snores On” prior to

SUBMITTED BY SACHIE JOHNS The Fremont Art Association (FAA) is pleased to announce master color printer and awardwinning photographer, Cooksey Talbott as its guest photographer on Wednesday, April 6. Talbott

• Excessive tardiness or absences – An employee who consistently leaves their workday early without authorization, or presents numerous excuses for shortening the work day, should set off an alarm. This is a significant sign if an individual is typically prompt and committed to a full work day. • Increased need for supervision – Generally, an employee requires less supervision as he or she becomes more proficient at their work. An employee who exhibits an increased need for supervision, or with whom the supervisor must spend an inordinate amount of time, may be an individual who is signaling a need for help. Managers should be alert to such a change and consider offering professional intervention if needed. • Lack of performance – If an employee who is normally efficient and productive experiences a sudden or sustained drop in performance, there is reason for concern. This is actually a classic warning sign of dissatisfaction and the manager should meet with the employee immediately to determine a mutually beneficial course of action. • Change in work habits – As in the case of reduced productivity, an employee exhibiting inconsistent work habits may be in need of intervention. If you think about your peers at work, they are typi-

Page 37

each Jungle Book performance. As part of the Fremont Repertory Theater, children participate in 11 weeks of rehearsals culminating in two performances. Participants learn costuming, staging, projecting, stage presence and much more while having fun learning their lines and meeting new friends. Classes are held at the Fremont Community Center. For more information about the Children’s Repertory Theatre performance or program, please contact the City’s Parks and Recreation Department at (510)

494-4300 or visit www.fremont.gov. Doors open 1/2 hour before show time. These shows are for all ages.

will present a lecture to help you understand JPEGs, dpi, megapixels, resolution, color profiles and all of the other confusing features of the digital landscape. Learn how to achieve good reproductions and build an on-line community around you and your work using social media and digital photographs – this is the future of selling art. Talbott will cover important details, which will provide high quality images for newspapers, juries and the plethora of on-line services used to publicize, display and sell artwork. Examine the media pipeline from the creation of JPEG copies of your work to publicity and distribution as Giclée (process of making fine art prints from a

digital source using ink-jet printing), Print-on-Demand and EBooks, Novelties, and in E-Commerce websites. Cooksey Talbott is a local photographer and master color printer with a strong on-line presence and an in-depth knowledge of digital photography and computer science. For more information, call (510) 742-0548 or visit www.cookseytalbottgallery.com. Artwork Promotion Lecture Wednesday, April 6 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fremont Art Association Gallery 37659 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0905 www.FremontArtAssociation.org Free

The Jungle Book Saturday, April 2 7 p.m. Sunday, April 3 4 p.m. Niles Veterans Memorial Building 37154 Second St., Fremont (510) 494-4300 Tickets www.RegeRec.com Tickets: $9

cally quite consistent in their work habits. If habits change, the manager has reason to suspect the individual is in need of assistance and action should be taken.

out in the workplace and it’s important that every organization have some methodology in place to identify and assist victims of drug or alcohol abuse.

• Inability to concentrate – If an employee is suddenly unable to concentrate, this may indicate that they are distracted and in trouble. A manager should be notified to try and encourage the employee to seek assistance.

• Not taking responsibility for their actions – A person who uses excuses and blames others is a classic behavioral warning sign that is easy to identify but just as often ignored by managers. A worker who engages in this behavior is typically signaling for assistance and may require counseling.

• Signs of stress – If an employee who has traditionally adhered to safety procedures is suddenly involved in accidents or safety violations, stress, a significant contributor to workplace violence, may be indicated. • Change in attitude – A sustained change in behavior is often an indication of an employee in difficulty. People are typically quite familiar with the personalities of their peers and are often quick to notice significant changes. Your work environment should be managed in such a way as to ensure trust and open communication. • Weapons fascination – A classic behavioral warning sign is someone who is fascinated with weapons. This should be easily recognized and reported. • Drugs and Alcohol – Watch for changes in the person’s mood or character when drugs and alcohol are used. Often people who have substance abuse problems act

Remember that these are only a few of the possible warning signs of workplace violence. As with any work related issue, you should report unusual behavior to a manager or someone who has the authority to take action. For more information on Workplace Violence Awareness, visit www.AlliedBarton.com/WorkplaceViolence.

Rich Cordivari is the Vice President of Learning & Development at AlliedBarton Security Services, provider of highly trained security personnel to many industries including higher education, commercial real estate, healthcare, residential communities, chemical/petrochemical, government, manufacturing and distribution, financial institutions, and shopping centers.

Mother Nature's gone glam in an enchanted forest AP WIRE SERVICE BY SAMANTHA CRITCHELL AP FASHION WRITER NEW YORK (AP), Feb 12 Looking for Mother Nature? She's got her glam on in an enchanted forest. Designers at New York Fashion Week have foraged enough texture and nature-inspired embellishment (think leaves and bark) to keep the party going through fall.

Jill Stuart let fly a bold print of owls with open wings. There were foxes and wolves, too, and faux fawn fur on her runway Saturday. Prabal Gurung told a fairytale with eyelash feathers on whites and grays. There was a darker chapter or two in his black-slash leggings and black lace-up leather glovettes. Feathers showed up in Jason Wu's opulent, Versailles-inspired collection, sewn on one by one, some burned at the tip for even more affect. He painted the hair

of his models with gold leaf and hid their faces behind lace. The deep woods were on the mind of Luca Luca creative director Raul Melgoza, in his feminine sheers with tough, barklike fabrics. It's Mother Nature to the rescue, perhaps, but the dark storm has mostly passed. “I think people want to dress up,” Wu told The Associated Press in an interview Saturday. “People are feeling optimistic right now.”

JILL STUART The oversized owl print that opened her show steered her in a more adult, sophisticated direction than the black-and-white rock princess that was her signature for several seasons. Stuart said backstage that she envisioned an enchanted forest. With that came more color, longer lengths and chicer shapes. “I am loving color right now. People need it,” she said. She gravitated toward navy, teal, or-

ange and the shade of a fine red wine that looked best in a trenchcoat topping a metallic-knit tweed sweater dress. A drop-waist orange dress with the top half made of leather and the bottom done in suede pleats was an example of how Stuart added the right amount of interest to a clean silhouette. She added, “And I'm loving right now anything just above the continued on page 38


Page 38

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

continued from page 13

Joanne Marchetta, TRPA executive director, acknowledged the frustration of critics but said it would be wrong to dissolve the agency that has made great strides to protect the famous Lake Tahoe. "I've heard the accounts, those who say they've had a bad experience with TRPA's permitting process, and I'm here to say I understand," she said. The biggest problem, she said, is "two states with what at times

can be profoundly different philosophies." California, she said, emphasizes environmental protection and a few weeks ago questioned TRPA's environmental commitment. Nevada on the other hand is about free enterprise and private property rights. "Each state wants to control its own destiny," she said. Marchetta said the state-tostate conflicts are erupting at an unfortunate time because scien-

tists have "never had a better understanding" of the environmental challenges that need fixing. She said while the 1986 regional plan focused on residential growth to curb the degradation of Tahoe, the TRPA is now targeting the redevelopment of older developments - using more environmentally sound building practices - to reduce runoff that deposits silt into Tahoe's waters and at the same time promote economic renewal.

“We can keep Tahoe both blue and alive for the people who live there,” she said. Leo Drozdoff, director of the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, said Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval was neutral on the bill. But Drozdoff warned of “unintended consequences” should the bill pass, such as court-imposed moratorium on building or new regulations. Federal funding for ongoing environmental projects with the basin could also be jeopardized. He said Sandoval has committed to a dialogue with Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown, and recommended legislative leadership from both states do the same. “We know these efforts have been initiated in the past with poor results,” Drozdoff said, but added that if the overture is re-

continued from page 1

Mission San Jose High School Junior Prom Saturday, April 9, 7 p.m. to midnight Palm Event Center, Pleasanton Senior Ball Saturday, May 28 7 p.m. to midnight Academy of Science, San Francisco Traditions vary throughout the country (and world), but the sentiment is pretty much the same, juvenile students are becoming adults and “coming out” as a different and more responsible segment of society. This gathering is, for many, their first traditional formal event. Attention to invitations, attendance, attire and protocol can be stressful for this rite of passage but is also the basis for lasting lifetime memories. Proms or “promenades” are the result of over a century of formal parties and debutante balls designed to display the social skills of young adults. The formal dinner/dance was an exercise in discipline, fashion and deportment for young men and women, often of college age. Formality and the accompanying high price tag of attendance at high school proms was not always as prevalent as it is today. Although boys wore coats and ties and girls their best gowns, many “proms” took place in high school gymnasiums with crepe paper streamers and amateur bands or recorded music. Over time, these affairs have evolved to become expensive and ultra-fashionable events held in exclusive venues, attended by students in tuxedos and designer gowns. Stretch limousines, lavish, haute cuisine meals have also become part of the prom scene. Some continue celebrating after the prom at all-night parties.

Prom fashions 2011 BY ALISSA GWYNN AND AISHWARYA THAKUR Prom season has arrived! With limousine rentals, hair and makeup appointments, and beautiful venues, prom is easily the most anticipated event of a student's years in high school. Are you ready to make your night magical? Read on for fashion tips and different celebrity-inspired “looks” that will help you look and feel your best on prom night. Elegant/ Classical Beauty/ Updos If you have always dreamed of being a princess and idolized Disney beauties, then an elegant and glamorous dress is what you are looking for. An a-line dress has a very classic design and can be carried off by nearly all body shapes. A sweetheart neckline adds beauty and uniqueness to the dress. Or, if you’re looking to party in glamour, then a dress in a metallic color is the way to go. Look for a waist that is accentuated just under the bust for a more flattering figure. Another option is to take a chance with a ruffled mermaid skirt. The skirt is not only fun, but in the right colors, it will add sophistication to your outfit. Also “in” this season are dresses with a shorter skirt in the front and a longer skirt cascading down the back. These dresses have the perfect balance of ease as well as elegance and will be a definite eye-catcher amidst all the cocktail or ball gowns. Choosing a hairstyle to match your

dress will accentuate the beauty of your dress; updos will make you feel more put together as well as stylish. Braids and twists have been the talk of the town this season, and there’s no reason not to apply this to prom hairstyles. A loose chignon with wispy strands framing the face gives a relaxed look, but a headband adds extra embellishment. Fun/Daring For those of you with a streak of “diva” inside, a flirty and bold dress is the way to go. Think big: bright colors, pretty prints, and dramatic makeup will make you stand out in the crowd. Just be sure not to overdo it, lest you wind up standing out in a not-so-good way. Stick to one eye-popping element whether it is your dress, lipstick, or jewelry. Some girls like prom because it allows them to dress up and be someone else for the night. Don't be afraid to play up the “costume” aspect of it all! Transform into an old Hollywood movie star for the night with red lipstick and waves. Or wear a fun hairpiece (usually made of feathers, netting, or beads) that matches your dress. Wear something you wouldn't normally wear; after all, this is prom night! For Guys A tux is a must for guys with beautiful girls hanging off their arms. The most important part of the tux is probably the vest. The girl—unless she’s forcing you to match your outfit with hers—will feel very special if you volunteer to match your vest and tie with hers. However, if her dress is a bright pink color, and you don’t wish to be sporting that look, then match your outfit with something that complements that color, such as a champagne, black, or silver color. Area high school proms are set for this month and next; a list of prom events is shown below:

FREMONT American High School Senior ball Saturday, June 4 7 p.m. to midnight Bently Reserve, Fremont Irvington High School Junior Prom Saturday, April 16 8 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland Hills Senior Ball Saturday, May 14 8 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. Regency Center, San Francisco Kennedy High School Junior Prom/Senior Ball Saturday, May 14 7 p.m. to midnight Palm Event Center, Pleasanton

April 5, 2011

Washington High School Junior Prom Saturday, April 2 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Palm Event Center, Pleasanton Senior Ball Saturday, May 21 7:30 p.m. to midnight Academy of Science Golden Gate Park

NEWARK Newark Memorial High School Junior Prom/Senior Ball Saturday, June 4, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. San Francisco Galleria, San Francisco

MILPITAS Milpitas High School Junior Prom Friday, April 22 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Senior Ball Saturday, May 15 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Treasure Island, San Francisco

HAYWARD Hayward High School Prom Saturday, May 21 7 p.m. to midnight Hotel Nikko, San Francisco Moreau Junior Prom Friday, April 15 6:30 p.m. – 11 p.m. Corinthians Event Center, San Jose Senior Ball Friday, May 13 8 p.m. – midnight Galleria, San Francisco

UNION CITY Conley Caraballo High School Junior Prom Saturday, April 30 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Pavilion, Logan High Senior Ball Saturday, June 4 8 p.m. - midnight Former Gift Center, San Francisco James Logan High School Junior Prom Saturday, April 30 8 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. Pavilion, Logan High Senior Prom Saturday, June 4 8 p.m. - midnight Former Gift Center, San Francisco

buffed, it “would certainly shape Nevada's next steps.” He also recommended the removal of TRPA in matters involving residential properties, saying such issues would be better handled by local governments. Rochelle Nason, executive director of the League to Save Lake Tahoe, fielded tough questioning from Nevada senators and denied her agency was against development. “We have a clear set of rules,” she said, adding there would be less litigation if developers stayed without those bounds and didn't seek waivers. No action was taken by the Senate Government Affairs Committee, though Lee said it would be discussed further in work sessions. bbb

Mother Nature's gone glam in an enchanted forest continued from page 37 knee or below it at mid-calf.” Stuart experimented with prints, small- and largescale owls, foxes and wolves, among her favorite critters. There was a long vest that mimicked the fur of a fawn worn with a clean navy sweater and navy skirt. A shorter version of the vest went over an oatmeal elbow-patch sweater and trousers. PRABAL GURUNG His newest collection was a fairy tale gone awry, starring a princess ready to shed her perfect image. But there was still a happy ending, with the rising star showing a maturity in his message - and a greater taste for glamour. Karlie Kloss opened the show in a draped red party dress with one shoulder purposely placed down the arm. Her lace-up leather glovettes emphasized a rebellious spirit. “Prabal is excited by this woman jilted at the altar,” observed stylist Mary Alice Stephenson. “She is dripping in glamour and money, and there's no better time to show it. ... This collection feels complicated - in a good way.” There was contrast between tough leather dresses with laser cuts and delicate crepe bias-cut gowns. Some looks hugged the body, while others drifted away effortlessly. A bustier dress with grosgrain ribbon straps and eyelashlike feathers on the skirt offered something for the flirt and the vixen, while the sheer chiffon robe over a sheath dress touched with lace was just sexy. Carolina Herrera sat in the front row to show her support of the industry's young talent, and especially Gurung. “He has his own ideas. He knows where he wants to go,” she said. EDUN A dressed-up Edun debuted on the catwalk in a fall collection dubbed “Storytellers and Liars.” Stylists, editors and retailers went bright and early to the dark, cavernous warehouse across from the Hudson River to see ladylike printed-scarf looks offset by leather, fair isle sweaters and chunky-rib knits, and elongated turtlenecks with slim, long-line trousers. The brand was founded by Bono and his wife Ali Hewson in an effort to bring a steady, sustainable manufacturing industry to Africa. The creative reins of Edun now belong to Sharon Wachoub. Wachoub said in her notes that she wanted to explore “storytelling as it changes over time in various cultures. When a story is passed down through generations, it becomes a reflection of the teller and develops a new meaning that can be seen as real or fantasy.” The tale of this collection is full of nocturnal creatures. They wear a cropped quilted bomber with a stripe-print scuba zip-up shirt, and smart leather shirtdresses. A fringe crochet skirt is paired with a raw-edge leather skirt and a chunky sweater coat. It's a long way from the glorified T-shirts and jeans Edun started with at its launch in 2005. This season, there was a smoldering palette of shades of black, with some blue, green and purple. REBECCA TAYLOR She chose a palette of deep blue, magenta and wine for her flirty flower-print dresses. The New Zealand-born designer used shearling, cashmere and alpaca to showcase her flouncy feminine look. Taylor said backstage that she found inspiration in the '70s club scene. She paired a dove gray hand-knit cable sweater with an electric blue wrap skirt. The blue, she said, was inspired by “being in Times Square during storms.” Taylor embellished skirts and dresses with sparkly glitter flowers in silver and blue. Another wine-colored dress had a halter neckline and tiered ruffles with lace sides. Actresses Michelle Trachtenberg and Garcelle Beauvais sat in the front row. Trachtenberg said Taylor's designs are what “you want to wear on a date.” “She's the epitome of girlie glam and elegance,”she said.


April 5, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Google founder hopes to prove he's ready to be CEO continued from page 12

school at Stanford to start Google and doesn't have a business degree. Science and technology, though, seems to be in his DNA even though he grew up in Michigan, where automobiles rule. His late father, Carl, was a computer scientist and pioneer in artificial intelligence, and his mother taught computer programming. Page began working on personal computers when he was just 6 years old in 1979, when home computers were a rarity. The geeky impulses carried into his adulthood, leading him to once build an inkjet printer out of Legos. Page relishes challenging the status quo and encourages his employees to do so, too. Those who know Page suspect he picked up the anti-establishment mindset as a boy who attended Montessori schools, which discourage structured curricula and encourage independent activities. Page has wanted to control his own destiny - and legacy - since reading a biography of the inventor Nikola Tesla before he was even in high school. Tesla wasn't rewarded or widely recognized for his breakthroughs in X-ray, wireless communications and electricity. Page didn't want that to happen to him as an entrepreneur. For that reason, Page embraced the chance to be Google's CEO when the company started in a rented garage not far from the company's current headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. It also helps explain why he and Brin created a separate class of stock with greater voting power so they and Schmidt could remain in charge after the company went public in 2004. Page's stake in Google has made him one of the world's wealthiest people with an estimated fortune of $20 billion. Although the contours of his personality and background are known quantities, Page remains an enigmatic figure on Wall Street. To some, he remains best

known for uncompromising idealism, reflected in his embrace of his company's "Don't Be Evil" motto and his pledge to never cater to investors' desire for ever-rising quarterly earnings at the expense of long-term investments. Page already raised concerns by pushing Google into renewable energy and robotic cars. Those who know him say he has discussed even more far-flung projects behind closed doors. “Sometimes his ideas are just way out there and you're kind of like, ‘Wow, that came out of left field,’” said Ethan Anderson, a former Google product manager who now runs Redbeacon, a startup that operates a search engine for finding neighborhood businesses. Uncertainty about whether Page will be as interested as Schmidt in appeasing Wall Street has contributed to a 6 percent drop in Google's stock price since the CEO change was announced Jan. 20. The technology-driven Nasdaq index has added 3 percent during that time. BGC Financial analyst Colin Gillis doesn't believe it's a coincidence that Google revealed it would hire more than 6,200 employees this year - a 25 percent boost, and the most in its history less than a week after it announced Page's comeback as CEO. “Don't be surprised if Google's spending goes up, even it means its earnings per share might go down,” Gillis said. Page's supporters believe Google's current market value of about $190 billion will climb even higher under his leadership. That would mirror what happened after Jobs finally got his chance to run Apple in 1997 after a decade in exile. Since then, Apple has brought out the iconic iPod, iPhone and iPad devices and created more than $300 billion in shareholder wealth. But the returns of company founders haven't always been tri-

umphant. Consider Yahoo Inc. cofounder Jerry Yang's second stint as CEO from June 2007 to January 2009. Yahoo's stock fell 56 percent during that period, larger than the 41 percent drop for Nasdaq. Unlike the rest of the Nasdaq, Yahoo shares aren't close to rebounding to their June 2007 levels. Hoping to smooth the transition to a new CEO, Google is keeping Schmidt, 55, in a prominent role as executive chairman and chief liaison with lawmakers and regulators around the world. That's an important job as Google faces growing scrutiny over its ambitions to use its dominance in search to enter new markets. Brin, 37, intends to focus on long-term projects, leaving Page to manage Google's daily operations. “I am quite convinced that this change will result in faster decision-making, better success for the business and ultimately greater value for the shareholders,” Schmidt told The Associated Press after Google announced its shakeup in January. In the past, the three made key decisions by committee, though Schmidt was the one responsible as CEO. Schmidt guided Google through an uninterrupted stretch of prosperity that has topped the performances of other technology trailblazers, including Apple and Microsoft, at similar stages of their corporate lives. Page is better prepared to be CEO after a decade as Schmidt's apprentice, said Douglas Merrill, who worked with both executives before leaving Google in 2008 as vice president of engineering. "Larry has grown over time," Merrill said. "He has learned how to make projects work. He has learned how to make sure things happen on time and in a predictable fashion. Larry is a sort of a learning machine." AP Technology Writer Rachel Metz in San Francisco contributed to this report.

Put on your athletic shoes and start walking! On Wednesday, April 7, the American Heart Association (AHA) is hosting National Start! Walking Day, an initiative to encourage everyone to simply get up and move. According to the AHA, two-thirds of the U.S. population is overweight or obese and that the “Start!” initiative provides a simple solution. AHA is challenging all Americans to get up and walk for 30 minutes during the day. They’ve teamed up with boxing star Laila Ali (daughter of Muhammad Ali) to help spread the word about how easy and fulfilling walking can be, as well as the numerous benefits it can have on heart health and overall well-being. For more information about Start! Walking Day, visit http://www.startwalkingnow.org/ To find a route (search over 420,000 routes) in your town, visit http://www.usatf.org/routes/

Offices of the City Clerk in Hayward and Milpitas are joining the U.S. Department of State to celebrate Passport Day in the USA 2011, a national passport acceptance and outreach event. The cities of Hayward and Milpitas will provide passport information to U.S. citizens and accept passport applications on Saturday, April 9, 2011, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Fremont, Newark and Union City residents should continue to visit their local Post Office for passport services. U.S. citizens must present a valid passport book when entering or re-entering the United States by air. U.S. citizens entering the United States from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda at land borders and sea ports of entry must present a passport book, passport card, or other travel documents approved by the U.S. government. Information on the cost and how to apply for a U.S. passport is available at www.travel.state.gov. U.S. citizens may also obtain passport information

by phone, in English and Spanish, by calling the National Passport Information Center toll-free at 1-877-487-2778. For more information about the Hayward Main Library event, call (510) 583-4400; for the Milpitas City Hall Lobby event, call (408) 586-3000. Passport Day in the USA 2011 Saturday, April 9, 2011 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Hayward Main Library 835 C Street, Hayward (510) 583-4400 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Milpitas City Hall Lobby 455 East Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3000

Page 39

Fed names banks that drew loans during crisis continued from page 12

by major banks to keep that information secret. It's the latest sign of how the Fed is becoming more transparent - either by choice or by force. The central bank lent up to $110 billion through its emergency “discount window” at the height of the crisis. After Lehman Brothers collapsed in September 2008, banks turned to the Fed as a lender of last resort because their credit had frozen up. The Fed argued then that naming those banks could have stirred a panic, leading to a run on those banks and defeating the program's purpose. The documents released Thursday showed that a range of large and small institutions borrowed from the program from August 2007 through March 2010. Most of the lending took place in the two-month stretch between September and October 2008. The specific program that the banks drew from has been redacted from the documents, but the data points to most of the loans being through the “discount window.” In many cases, those loans were paid back the following day. Some of the biggest loans were drawn by the nation's largest banks. For example, U.S. Bank took out an overnight loan of $3.35 billion on Sept. 10, Wachovia borrowed $29 billion on Oct. 6, and Morgan Stanley drew more than $3 billion on Oct. 9. But foreign banks also relied heavily on the emergency lending program. On one day in late October, Dexia, a Belgian-based European bank, and Depfa, a German subsidiary headquartered in Dublin, each drew about $25 billion in overnight loans. That represented about half of the money that was borrowed by 44 banks that day. The documents also show that the Arab Banking Corporation took out loans from the discount window during the financial crisis. The central bank of Libya owns a large stake in that bank, according to the bank's web site. Smaller institutions also drew from the discount window. The Bank of Yazoo City in Mississippi averaged $11.7 million in borrowing in September 2008, $15.2 million in October, and $11 million in November. Griffin Norquist, president and CEO of the Bank of Yazoo City, said the figures are comparable with loans drawn in other years. But he acknowledged the climate in 2008 was quite different. “A collapsed Lehman Brothers is just not something a person with a $250 million bank expects to pick up the paper and read about,” said Norquist. “When the big tree falls, it will hurt the little tree.” The Fed's emergency lending program couldn't help every bank survive. Washington Mutual Bank took out short-term, mostly overnight loans in the week leading up to its failure, the largest of any U.S. bank in history. One day before collapsing, Washington Mutual took out a $2 billion overnight loan, the documents show. It took out another one-day $2 billion loan the next day. JPMorgan Chase ended up buying the bank. “It's a huge cultural shock for the Fed to have to make disclosures about its lending,” said Mark Williams, a former Fed bank examiner, who now teaches at Boston University. “The Fed needed to step into the 21st Century.” Few loans are being made now because most banks are in much better health. And both the financial industry and the economy have strengthened. Bloomberg L.P. had sued the Fed, seeking details about the Fed's discount window lending as well as other Fed loans made dur-

ing the crisis. A similar lawsuit was later filed by News Corp.'s Fox News Network LLC. Other news organizations, including The Associated Press, filed legal briefs in support. The Fed had said that some of the information being sought was made public in December. At that time, the Fed revealed details about its crisis lending - except those involving commercial banks that borrowed from the discount window. Most of the Fed's crisis-era lending - more than $3 trillion came through those other programs. Fed documents showed it gave trillions in emergency aid to U.S. and foreign banks as well as other companies. The disclosures were required under the financial overhaul law enacted last year. Under the new law, the Fed beginning in late 2012 must provide information on any commercial banks that draw emergency loans from its discount window. Those details will remain secret, though, for about two years after the borrowing occurs. A number of lawmakers, led by Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, pushed to open up the Fed after complaining that it had operated in secret for most of its history. Sanders on Thursday called the Fed discount-window lending “welfare for the rich and powerful.” He said the disclosures are “lifting another veil of secrecy at the Fed. The Fed had earned a reputation for being one of the most mysterious institutions in Washington. It wasn't until 1994 that the Fed started to release a statement when it changed its key interest rate. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, who ran the central bank for 18-plus year, was famous for being inscrutable. Chairman Ben Bernanke promised changes when he took over in 2006, and he made a few early on. But the criticism intensified two years into his tenure. Many Americans were angered by the Fed's role in bailing out Wall Street. And lawmakers in recent months have questioned Bernanke's decision to launch a second round of Treasury bond buying, worried that it will unleash inflation. Bernanke and his colleagues appeared to take note. Last fall, they held an unusual videoconference, in part to discuss ways to improve communications with the public. And last week, the Fed took an unprecedented step toward answering its critics. It announced that Bernanke would start holding news conferences four times a year. Bernanke's first will be April 27. A news conference gives Bernanke an opportunity to control the Fed's message. But it could also backfire. There are already disagreements within the Fed about record-low interest rates and its $600 billion Treasury bond-purchase program. “The laundry is going to be a little more public now. Bernanke runs the risk of creating confusion, especially if the inflation hawks on the Fed become more vocal,” said Ken Thomas, a lecturer in finance at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. “The move toward greater openness has got to be painful for the Fed,'' Thomas said. ``This is an institution that has been shrouded in secrecy for decades, and all of a sudden it is having to make disclosures about lending, and Bernanke will be holding press conferences.'' AP Business Writer Eileen AJ Connelly contributed from New York to this report.


Page 40

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE

E

ach year the Ohlone College Foundation hosts a Citizen of the Year Luncheon to honor a group, organization, or individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the community providing important services and contributing significantly to the progress or improvement of our community. This year, the Foundation Board has chosen to honor the six Rotary Clubs of the Tri-Cities as the 2011 Citizen of the Year. The Citizen of the Year Champagne Luncheon is the last major social event before summer for community members in Fremont, Newark, and Union City. Held on Saturday, June 4, 2011 at the beautiful Ohlone College Newark Center on Cherry Street in Newark, the luncheon highlights the many accomplishments of the service-minded individuals of local Rotary clubs. Rotary Clubs are part of an international service organization comprised of business and professional leaders, with individual clubs located all over the world. Each club is organized and chartered separately to serve in its community as well as to contribute to the international mission of Rotary. The stated purpose of Rotary International is to provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill in the community. There are 33,976 clubs and over 1.22 million members worldwide. The Rotary Club of Fremont Warm Springs Sunrise (FWSS) is the result of merging two clubs, both founded by Stan Allen: the Rotary Club of Warm Springs in 1988 and the Fremont Sunrise Rotary Club in 1990. Since both clubs met in the early morning, they merged to bolster their membership in summer 2010. Their slogan is “Rotary Shines for the Benefit of Mankind.” For many years the FWSS Rotary has been involved in contributing to public school education as part of their community service and fundraising efforts. The Club provides encyclopedias and dictionaries to elementary schools in their area of Fremont. They are currently working on a project to raise funds for a computer lab for Horner Junior High School. They sponsor two high school Rotary Interact clubs at Irvington and Kennedy High Schools. Each year the FWSS Rotary provides scholarships to high school student heading on to college or university. Partnering with the Parent Teacher Organizations (PTO) for James Leach and Warm Spring elementary Schools FWSS helped to supplement unfunded program needs for the two schools. They assisted in raising approximately $80,000 for needed projects such as paving and landscaping student social areas to create safer and more attractive school grounds. Other Key Projects Include: • Provide Christmas stipend for “Families at Risk”, coordinating with school principals for designation families. • Supply a stipend for “Children at Risk” to address specific needs as determined by the principals. • Award Scholarships for High School Students for college, based on a combination of scholastic ability and need. • Furnish food for SAVE for Thanksgiving Dinner for the homeless and needy families during difficult economic times. • Sponsor the Christmas Tree Lighting at the Warm Springs Plaza Shopping Center with Warm Springs Business Community Association; approximately 3000 attendees • Sponsor the Warm Springs Little League; e.g., purchased a score board at one of their fields • Chartered Warm Springs Boy Scout Troop 103 with continued the association over the years; purchased Scout Trailer for outings • Coordinate with juvenile court system to place “Children at Risk” in foster care homes • Fund Projects for YMCA, Girl Scouts, Relay for Life, Cancer Walk, One Child Foundation, Project Independence, Youth Exchange, Group Study Exchange and many more. This article is one of a six part series describing the often unrecognized accomplishments of each of these clubs, leading up to the Citizen of the Year Luncheon held at the Ohlone College Newark Center on Saturday, June 4, at noon.

April 5, 2011

TCV 2011-04-05  

Tri-City Voice Newspaper

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you