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technology

TE1001 IT’S IN THE BAG – BOOKLET 1 NCEA LEVEL 1

2011/1


technology ncea level 1

Expected time to complete work This work will take you about 40 hours to complete. This topic is made up of three booklets and their accompanying journals. All your work will be recorded in the three journals. You need to complete all three journals before you can be assessed for the achievement standards. You will work towards the following standards: Achievement Standard 91047 (Version 1) Generic Technology 1.4 Undertake development to make a prototype to address a brief Level 1, Internal 6 credits Achievement Standard 91058 (Version 1) Construction and Mechanical Technologies 1.21 Implement basic procedures using textile materials to make a specified product Level 1, Internal 6 credits In this booklet you will focus on these learning outcomes: •• developing skills in construction •• testing and evaluating for fitness for purpose •• applying safe sewing room practices •• investigating current practices and processes to develop a prototype •• following a set of techniques to make a product that meets specifications. You will continue to work towards these standards in booklets TE1002 and TE1003.

Copyright © 2011 Board of Trustees of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu, Private Bag 39992, Wellington Mail Centre, Lower Hutt 5045, New Zealand. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu.

© te ah o o te k u ra p ou n am u


contents 1

Investigation

2

Sewing skills

3

Testing for quality

4

Bag techniques

5

Construct a drawstring bag

6

Fitness for purpose

7

Evaluation

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how to do the work When you see:

1A

Complete the activity.

Talk to someone about your work.

Turn to your journal.

Take photos.

Included in this pack: •• a journal TE1001J •• a bag pattern TE1001A You will need: •• a sewing machine •• a digital camera •• pieces of different fabric and old clothes as a source of fabric •• 1m calico fabric or coloured cotton •• 80cm cord or ribbon for drawstring bag •• Your own sewing kit containing –– pins –– needles –– threads –– scissors –– quick unpick –– safety pin. Resource overview Supervisor requirement: You will need a person to act as your supervisor/consultant. They will be able to give you feedback and take photos of you working. Diagrams: Fabric right side

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Fabric wrong side

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investigation learning outcome

Investigate current practices and processes to develop a prototype.

learning intention

In this lesson you will: •• investigate bag design and use.

introduction

istock

istock

From the earliest times, people have made carriers to take things from place to place.

Today people have a range of bags for different purposes. They may have: •• shopping bags •• school bags •• beach bags •• holiday bags.

© te ah o o t e k ur a p o un a m u

istock bigstock

bigstock

bigstock

istock

bigstock

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investigation

We use bags today: •• to make it easy to carry a lot of things at once

Open top – easy to load. Strong fabric.

•• to keep things safe

istock

Wide handles – comfortable to carry.

Flat base for standing.

Bright colour – easy to find. istock

Secure fastening.

Strong fabric to protect contents.

•• to store things.

bigstock

Expanding size.

Secure fastening.

Turn to your journal.

1A

Investigate and sketch the bags your family use. 6

TE1001

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sewing skills learning outcome

Apply safe sewing room practices. Develop skills in construction.

learning intentions In this lesson you will: •• set up a safe work area

•• use a sewing machine to practise basic sewing techniques.

equipment

Thread

Needles

Dressmaking scissors Snips

Thread

istock

2

Tape measure

You will need: •• a sewing machine •• your sewing kit •• scrap fabric.

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sewing skills

sewing safely

You need to follow safe work practices when you are sewing to keep you and your family safe with electrical and sharp equipment in the sewing area.

bigstock

personal safety

Turn to your journal.

2A

Check how safe your work area is. Ask your supervisor to check it too.

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sewing skills

ready to sew

Ask your supervisor to take photos of you while you are sewing. These are threading instructions for a Bernina machine. 12

Setting up the sewing computer

Winding the bobbin

Winding the bobbin power switch on • place empty bobbin on spindle • turn

• following

the direction of the arrow take thread through the rear guide and round the pre-tension stud • wind the thread two to three times around the empty bobbin and cut off any excess thread on the thread cutter • press the engaging lever against the bobbin • press the foot control • the motor will stop automatically when the bobbin is full • remove the bobbin

thread cutter • cut the thread on the thread cutter

BERNINA NEW ZEALAND

Note: When winding the bobbin on the vertical spool holder (p. 15), it may be necessary to adjust the speed.

033644.50.04_1009_B215_EN

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Setting up the sewing computer

Inserting the bobbin

Insert the bobbin Insert the bobbin so that the thread runs clockwise.

Pull the thread counter clockwise into the slot.

Pull the thread to the left under the spring until ...

... it lies in the T-shaped slit at the end of the spring. The bobbin must turn clockwise when thread is pulled.

changing the needle Removing the needle the needle power switch to «0» • lower the presser foot • loosen the needle clamp screw • pull the needle down to remove • raise

Inserting the needle • flat side of needle to the back • insert the needle as far as it will go • tighten the needle clamp screw

BERNINA NEW ZEALAND

• turn

please refer to the safety instruction!

033644.50.04_1009_B215_EN

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sewing skills

Setting up the sewing computer

13

Bobbin case

A

to insert the bobbin case the bobbin case latch • the finger on the case should point upwards • insert so that it clicks into place • hold

Bobbin thread cutter the bobbin case • take the thread over cutter A • thread is cut • close the bobbin cover • insert

please refer to the safety instruction!

Note: the bobbin thread does not have to be brought up as the loose end is just the right length to start sewing.

BERNINA NEW ZEALAND

to remove the bobbin case • raise the needle • turn power switch to «0» • open the bobbin cover • grasp the latch of the bobbin case • remove case

033644.50.04_1009_B215_EN

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Setting up the sewing computer

threading the upper thread c

A

D

B

E

please refer to the safety instruction!

033644.50.04_1009_B215_EN

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BERNINA NEW ZEALAND

Attaching the thread spool • raise the needle and the presser foot • switch the power off • attach the foam pad • place spool on pin (thread unwinds clockwise) • attach the appropriate spool disc - diameter of spool disc is disc size. There must be no clearance between the disc and the spool • take thread through rear guide A • then into slit of upper thread tension • pull thread down to the right of the take-up cover to B • take thread up to the left of the cover to c in the direction of the arrow, placing it in the take-up level • take thread down and through guides D and E


sewing skills

Setting up the sewing computer

19

thread tension 3 A

5

the basic setting • is indicated when the red line on the tension adjustment wheel is in line with the marking A • the tension does not need adjusting for normal sewing work • for special sewing work, the tension can be adjusted to suit the fabric

the tension is factory set for the best results. metrosene 100/2 (Arova mettler, switzerland) is used to set both the upper and lower thread tension.

perfect stitch formation the stitch formation is in the fabric

for example:

If other sewing or embroidery threads are used, the tension may need adjusting to suit the fabric and chosen stitch.

tension upper thread tension too tight the lower thread is pulled more to the right side of the fabric • to reduce the upper thread tension turn tension adjustment wheel to 3–1 •

Metallic thread

approx. 3

Monofilament

approx. 2–4

upper thread tension too loose the upper thread is pulled more to the wrong side of the fabric • to increase the upper thread tension turn tension adjustment wheel to 5–10

BERNINA NEW ZEALAND

033644.50.04_1009_B215_EN

threading the machine

Start by threading up the sewing machine. Check the machine stitch and tension by sewing on scrap fabric. Consult your supervisor if you need help with this. The machine should be set: •• to do a medium sized-straight stitch. The thread tension: •• should look the same on both sides of the fabric. Make sure the machine is sewing well before you start the sewing trials.

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sewing skills

sewing trials

Read each section. Look at the pictures, then do the activity.

straight stitch

bigstock

As you sew, use the lines on the stitch plate. To sew a straight seam, put the edge of your fabric against a line with the bulk of your fabric to the left of the needle.

Sew several lines of stitching on scrap fabric until you can sew straight lines. Check tension and stitch length.

zig-zag stitch

Set the dials to zig-zag stitch. Practise zig-zag on the edge of the fabric.

Fabric right side 12

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Fabric wrong side Š te ah o o te k u ra p ou n amu


sewing skills

sewing a plain seam

Use your own scrap fabric. Find some firm fabric, not too thick. Cut out two pieces of fabric 10 cm x 10 cm. Put the two pieces together so that you will sew on double fabric. The two edges must be exactly together. Pin the fabric together with the pins at right angles to the seam edge. Use the guide line on the stitch plate to sew a straight seam. Leave the pins in the fabric. Sew over them.

wrong side

Sew: •• machine sew 1.5 cm from the edge – which line will this be on the stitch plate? •• reverse at beginning and end to stop sewing coming undone •• trim off thread ends.

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sewing skills

finishing the seam

To reduce bulk, trim the seam to 1 cm wide. Set the machine to wide zig-zag stitch. Sew: •• zig-zag right on the edge – needle goes on and off the fabric •• reverse at the beginning and end – to stop sewing coming undone •• trim off thread ends. Press the seam to one side with an iron or your fingers.

wrong side

This is your first trial seam. Do another one. Practise until you can sew accurately. You will need at least two extra seams for testing in the next section.

Turn to your journal.

2B

Pin in your most accurate sewing trial. Evaluate. Complete the reflection and the checkpoint.

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3

testing for quality learning outcome

Test and evaluate for fitness for purpose.

learning intention

In this lesson you will: •• apply testing techniques to sewing samples.

why test?

Testing is a step in the development of a product. By testing you can be sure of a good quality product. Have photos taken of you doing the tests.

seam strength test

Use one of your seam trials. Hold the fabric on both sides of the seam. Pull as hard as you can. If your seam holds together, it is strong and well finished and likely to be useful for bag making. If the stitching starts to come undone you will need to check that you are reversing strongly at the beginning and end.

Turn to your journal.

3A

Record the results. Attach the test sample and the photo.

seam finish test

Use another seam trial to test the zig-zag finishing. Pull at the zig-zag edge. Does the edge pull away, fray out or come undone? If not, it is well done. If it does pull off or fray out, you will need to zig-zag over again. Does the stitching come undone? You will need to reverse at the ends.

Turn to your journal.

3B

Record the results. Attach the test sample and the photo. Complete the reflections and checkpoint.

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4

bag techniques learning outcome

Investigate current practices and processes to develop a prototype.

learning intention

In this lesson you will: •• identify techniques used in bag design. Most bags are sewn together. A range of techniques is used to: •• join the bag sections together •• make them able to be fastened and carried.

Handles – topstitched for appearance.

Seams – to join the pieces together.

Sewing – a zip fastening technique.

Topstitching – to attach pocket.

Turn to your journal.

4A

Identify construction techniques.

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construct a drawstring bag learning outcome

Follow a set of techniques to make a product that meets specification.

learning intention

In this lesson you will: •• follow a brief to construct a drawstring bag.

introduction

The brief gives a clear plan of what you are going to do. It shows the exact requirements you need. Briefs are used by designers, engineers, architects and other people to guide the development of a project. Examples of jobs that would have a brief are:

istock

Architects

An architect would be given a brief to design a specific building.

Fashion designers

istock

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A fashion designer could be given a brief to design an outfit for a special occasion. © te ah o o t e k ur a p o un a m u

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construct a drawstring bag

Here is the brief you will follow.

the brief conceptual statement Construct a drawstring bag to hold small items .

specifications Your bag must: •• have a purpose •• be made following a given pattern •• be accurately sewn •• be neatly finished.

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construct a drawstring bag

work plans

When you sew you follow a series of steps. These steps can be shown in a work plan. Following a plan helps you to be efficient. Task

Estimate time for each task

1. Collect fabric, pattern and equipment.

Time you took

Being efficient means being productive with little waste of time, resources, energy, etc.

2. Lay pattern on fabric. Pin. Cut out. 3. Follow the instructions to make the bag in the order given. 4. Pin and sew bag. 5. Trim seams and zig-zag, or overlock. 6. Make casing at top edge. Thread cord. 7. Iron, turn to right side. 8. Test bag for fit and finish. 9. Evaluate

When you make your bag, you will follow this work order. Turn to your journal.

5A

List the uses you have for a small bag. Get ready for sewing by: •• setting up equipment •• checking safety •• collecting resources •• planning time.

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construct a drawstring bag

safety Turn to your journal.

5B

Re-check your sewing area for safety. Add any hazards that you can see in your work area to the checklist.

collect resources

You need: •• coloured bag fabric (60 cm x 30 cm) or use the calico •• matching thread •• 1 m cord •• the bag pattern TE1001A.

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istock

construct a drawstring bag

You will also use: •• the sewing machine •• your sewing equipment •• an iron and ironing board or table. Turn to your journal.

5C

Estimate the time needed to make the bag.

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construct a drawstring bag

construct the bag

Using your fabric and the bag pattern: 1. Pin the pattern towards one side of the fabric with the straight grain arrow parallel to the long edge. Cut out. 2. Take the pattern off the fabric.

3. Fold the bag in half, with the right sides of the fabric together, so that the short sides are at the top. Pin sides together.

4. On one side: –– reverse at start and finish –– sew 1.5 cm seam down one side. 22

Remember to put the edge of the fabric on the 1.5 guideline, with the bulk of the fabric to the left of the needle. TE1001

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construct a drawstring bag

5. On the other side you need to leave a gap for the drawstring:

5 cm 2 cm gap

5 cm 2 cm gap

Stitch 1.5 cm seam Fold.

–– Start at the top, stitch 5 cm down. Stop. Remember to reverse at the start and finish. –– Measure a 2 cm gap and sew the rest of the seam. –– Reverse at start and finish. 6. Trim the seam edges up to 1 cm. 7. Zig-zag the edges to finish – not over the gap.

2 cm gap

Zig-zag

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construct a drawstring bag

8. To make the casing for the drawstring, turn under 1 cm around the top edge. Press with an iron or your fingers. Turn 1 cm.

9. Turn under another 3 cm. Pin and stitch close to the bottom edge of the casing. 10. Sew again close to the top edge.

Stitch close to the top edge.

Stitch close to the bottom edge.

11. Press with an iron. Turn the bag right-side out. 12. Use a safety pin to thread the cord through casing. Safety pin

Knot cord.

Thread cord into opening.

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construct a drawstring bag

istock

13. Tie ends of the cord together.

Turn to your journal.

5D

Complete the work plan by recording how long each task took.

5E

Stick in the photos of making the bag and the finished bag.

5F

Evaluate your construction skills.

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6

fitness for purpose learning outcome Test for fitness for purpose.

learning intention

In this lesson you will learn to: •• test and trial for fitness for purpose.

performance test your bag

Collect together the items you planned to put in your bag. Put them in the bag. Take a photo of your bag holding the items. Does your bag hold all it is supposed to hold? Does the drawstring pull up smoothly? Are the seams strong enough?

Turn to your journal.

6A

Record the results with comments.

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7

evaluation learning outcome

Evaluate for fitness for purpose.

learning intention

In this lesson you will learn to: •• evaluate the bag against the brief.

evaluation against the brief Turn to your journal.

7A

Evaluate your bag against the brief. Complete the reflection and the checkpoint.

When you have finished your work in the journal: •• complete the self-assessment at the back •• fix your trials and activities securely •• fill in the cover sheet on the back •• send your journal to Te Kura, The Correspondence School along with your drawstring bag.

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acknowledgements Every effort has been made to acknowledge and contact copyright holders. Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu apologises for any omissions and welcomes more accurate information. Photos Cover: Red School Back Pack, www.istockphoto.com, #7053891; Beach items, www.istockphoto.com, #5911327 Middle East purses, www.istockphoto.com, #7915025 Groceries in canvas tote, www.istockphoto.com, #8222156 Traditional Japanese bag, www.istockphoto.com, #2512624 Architects, www.istockphoto.com, #6806763 Red first aid kit, www.istockphoto.com, #3833506 Knot, www.istockphoto.com, #15291616 Young female designer, www.istockphoto.com, #13881404 Sewing kit, www.istockphoto.com, #13933903 Spools of thread, www.istockphoto.com, #13630393 Bag, www.istockphoto.com, #11341422

Hiking equipment, www.bigstockphoto.com, #8147170 Beach bag, www.bigstockphoto.com, #7729135 Teen uses sewing machine, www.bigstockphoto.com, #7140277 Fallen make up case, www.bigstockphoto.com, #4118545 Hand bag, www.bigstockphoto.com, #2651923 Green, reusable shopping bag, www.bigstockphoto.com, #14341232 Sewing machine, www.bigstockphoto.com, #10844453 Illustrations Text and illustrations: ‘Threading the upper thread’; ‘Thread tension’; ‘Inserting the bobbin’; ‘Removing the bobbin case’; Bernina Manual Guide, © Bernina New Zealand, Lower Hutt, Wellington: NZ. Used by permission. All other illustrations copyrighted to Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu, Wellington, NZ.

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TE1001  

Technology NCEA level 1

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