Issuu on Google+

E whakahono ana i ngā ākonga o Te Kura me ō rātou whānau, hapori hoki Connecting Te Kura students, whānau and their community

HŌNGONGOI 10 Putanga 05 JULY 10 Issue 05

Shoot first, sleep later Sebastian creates a film in 48 hours Outdoor adventures Te Kura student lends a hand at Outdoor Pursuits Centre camp Make the most of mid-year reports Adele’s tips for supervisors


Ko Tā Mike Kōrero Matariki ki tua o ngā whetu Matariki– search beyond the stars This proverb encourages all of us to seek excellence in our work during the year ahead. From www.matarikifestival.org.nz

TĒnĀ koutou katoa, NgĀ mihi nui ki a tatou i te wa o Matariki National Standards This year the government has introduced National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics for students in Years 1–8. The standards describe what New Zealand children are expected to be able to do in these subjects each year. The standards aim to provide signposts that give teachers, children, parents, families and whānau a clear idea of where children are at in their learning and what they have to do next. Your student’s 2010 mid-year report is the first time we have reported against the standards. At this stage, we are reporting the standards at which your child is working. At the end of the year, we will report again on their progress since the mid-year report and detail the standards they have achieved. You should receive a letter with your child’s report explaining the National Standards and how they affect your student. However, if you would like more information about the new National Standards you can visit the Ministry of Education website at www.minedu.govt.nz/Parents. If you would like to see the standards, go to www.nzcurriculum.tki.org. nz/National-Standards. For more information about your child’s achievement, please contact your child’s teacher.

Matariki – A celebration I te wā o Matariki, ka whakanui tātou i tō tātou mana motuhake i tēnei ao. He manaaki i te whenua e noho nei tātou i runga, he mīharo ki tō tātou whaea, ki a Papatūānuku. I te roanga atu o Matariki, ka ako tātou i ngā āhuatanga ō rātou mā kua hoki ki te kāinga tūturu. Ko ngā mahi me ngā kōrero o mua. Ko ō tātou heke. Ko ō tātou wheinga. Ko Matariki te tohu o te tupu. I te wā o Matariki, he mahara atawhai ki ngā taonga kei a tātou inaianei, hei koha atu hoki a taihoa. He whakanui hoki i te tikanga, i te reo, i te wairua me te iwi. Ko Matariki tō Aotearoa tau hou.  During Matariki we celebrate our unique place in the world. We give respect to the whenua on which we live, and admiration to our mother earth Papatūānuku. Throughout Matariki we learn about those who came before us. Our history. Our family. Our bones. Matariki signals growth. It’s a time of change. During Matariki we acknowledge what we have and what we have to give. It’s a celebration of culture, language, spirit and people. Matariki is our Aotearoa Pacific New Year. Naku noa, na Mike Hollings Chief Executive


04

13

06

14

Ngā Iharangi Contents Whārangi 4 Whārangi 6–7 Whārangi 13 Whārangi 14 Whārangi 15

Shoot first, sleep later Sebastian creates a film in 48 hours Pathways at Te Kura Career education that makes a difference Outdoor adventures Central North Te Kura student lends a hand at Outdoor Pursuits Centre camp Ngā Pitopito Kōrero a Te Kura Te Kura News Make the most of mid-year reports Adele’s tips for supervisors Te Wiki o te Reo Māori (Māori Language Week) will be held from 26 July to 1 August this year. To help celebrate, we have translated some of the main sections of Link Up into Māori. We also invite you to try the Kimi Kupu – Word Search on the back page of the magazine. This puzzle will help you test your knowledge of ‘Te Mahi Kai’ – the language of food, which is the theme of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.


Eye on Media Studies – students speak out Media Studies students at Te Kura get the chance to write news stories, take photos and design and produce their own media products such as films or magazines. In this issue of Te Hono, two Media Studies students, Sebastian and Maria, share their work.

Sebastian Beyrer Year 12 student Sebastian Beyrer recently took part in the V48 HOURS 2010 Furious Filmmaking competition. Sebastian and his team had one weekend to make a short film between one and seven minutes long. They entered the musical or dance genre with a film titled Disc O Beat. Sebastian explains how he got his start behind the camera. How did you get into filmmaking? When I was 12, I went to a filmmaking workshop during the holidays. Ever since then, I’ve been really interested in the whole idea. My family got a camera and I’ve been making films ever since. Sebastian while working on his film ‘Disc O Beat’.

Two days to make a film by Sebastian Beyrer V48 HOURS Furious Filmmaking was back for yet another year of mayhem! Hundreds of teams from all over the country converged on the main centres to commence a weekend of movie-making craziness. The competition, the brainchild of Anthony Timpson, noted film critic and movie buff, has been steadily growing since it began several years ago, with over six hundred teams competing last year. Teams must write, shoot and edit a film in 48 hours. Each film needs

What was the V48 filmmaking experience like? I invited some friends to act, while I wrote the script, filmed and edited it. We shot in my garage and on an abandoned property near my house. Shooting was from about 10 am till 10 pm. We all had a really great time. How did you cope with the no-sleeping conditions? I drank a lot of energy drinks! In 48 hours, I managed seven hours of sleep. By the end I was ready to crash. What do you think you’ll do next? I would definitely like to continue doing filmmaking. I find broadcasting and journalism very interesting as well, and am trying to get as much experience as I can.

to include three random elements: in years past, these have been a character, a line of dialogue, and an object. Each team is given a random genre. After the shoot weekend, the films are screened in several heats for each city. The top films are screened in a public cinema, where the best is judged and put forward to the national competition. There are plenty of prizes along the way, including Best Teen Film and Best Bad Film. The competition is a fantastic part of our country’s film culture, fostering our Kiwi creativity. This year’s event was better than ever!

You can see Sebastian’s film on YouTube – search on ‘Beyrerboy Disc O Beat’. Want to give the furious filmmaking a try? See the V48 Hours website for details: www.v48hours.co.nz/2010. Pg. 4


Maria Stevenson Even though Maria Stevenson has always been good at writing, she has still learned a few things from her Media Studies course. For a recent assignment, the Year 12 student wrote about a school trip to the Wellington Holocaust Research and Education Centre. ‘I learned a lot from planning the story and figuring out which photos to use,’ says Maria. Her story and some of her creative writing work helped to earn her a Just Write Scholarship sponsored by Global Focus Aotearoa. Maria is one of 10 New Zealand

students who will take part in a year-long journalism internship. She will attend writing workshops and will get a chance to write about global issues for youth publications such as Tearaway magazine. ‘I hope this experience will help me better my skills, learn about the media industry and add to my portfolio,’ Maria says. Maria currently attends He Huarahi Tamariki (School for Teenage Parents) and her son is due in September. ‘It’s given me more motivation to focus on my career and think about my child’s future,’ she says. Maria will begin her journalism internship in July.

Eye-opening experience for HHT history students By Maria Stevenson Students researching the Second World War from He Huarahi Tamariki were treated to a moving experience while visiting the Wellington Holocaust Research and Education Centre in March. The group had the opportunity to speak with Tova Dovrat, a volunteer at the Holocaust Centre and a Holocaust survivor. ‘I wanted to give the group my personal experience,’ said Tova. ‘I wanted to tell the story about my parents as an example of what really happened to people during the Holocaust.’ ‘Tova gave an interesting perspective of a child during the Holocaust,’ said Sarah, an adult visiting with the students. ‘I thought it was a great way to display information; it gave me a fantastic insight.’

The group also had a look at the record documents and photographs available at the centre. ‘I liked the biography books available about the Jews and what they went through,’ said Karma, a student at He Huarahi Tamariki. The group also saw part of Moriah College in Wellington. ‘I found it outstanding that there’s an actual Jewish school,’ said Karma. The group learned about Moriah College and its challenge to collect 1.5 million buttons – one for each child who was a victim of the Holocaust. When the students from He Huarahi Tamariki returned to school, they decided to make a contribution to the Moriah College button collection as a sign of their gratitude towards the centre and the impact that the experience had on the students. Making a contribution: Monique Te Ruki, HHT History student, with HHT button collection for children who died in the Holocaust.

Pg. 5


Curriculum profile Pathways at Te Kura: Career education that makes a difference The Pathways team – Back row: Adam Whauwhau, Bill Thomas, Sue Muers, Rachel Sherry Front row: Andrea Taylor, Jocelyn Anton, Jo Barnsdale, Natasha Hartley.

In each issue of Te Hono, we profile the curriculum areas available to students at Te Kura. In this issue, we speak to Curriculum Leader, Pathways Education, Jocelyn Anton, and Careers and Pathways teacher, Southern region, Sue Muers. What is Pathways Education at Te Kura? Pathways Education includes learning modules that help prepare students for moving from school to work or on to further training. We offer a range of courses such as career planning, CV writing, job search skills, interview skills and work experience, plus financial skills and personal wellbeing. How do Pathways Education staff support students? Career Education Facilitators (CEFs) are career education experts who work with Te Kura staff to support students. They keep up to date with the latest career education resources, local career events and new courses and build career-related networks that benefit students. Discussions between learning advisors and students are also an important part of the process. Learning advisors get to know their students’ interests and families, as well as career and life plans. This helps them support students to make better decisions, set goals and be aware of courses and opportunities they could get involved in.

Pg. 6

What can students learn at each level? Junior students (Years 9–10) can take part in some short courses or they can attend career events. Senior students (Years 11–13) can discuss which learning modules might be right for them. They could link between Pathways and STAR courses such as childcare, beauty therapy or carpentry, or a Gateway course in their area of interest. How can parents and supervisors help their students make career decisions? Attending career events with your student or finding relaxed times to discuss their interests and future plans, such as when you are driving them to sport, are important ways to support career awareness. Where can students get more information on Pathways courses? Talk to your learning advisor or liaison teacher for more information about the Pathways learning modules, or for short courses that may interest you, check Blackboard for STAR courses on offer. What other resources can help? Check out the Career Services website run by the New Zealand government. On the website you can use CareerQuest which is a fun tool to help identify interests. Go to www.careers.govt.nz and create your ‘My Career Space’ account. It’s a great way to keep all of your career planning information in one place.


Are you experienced? Te Kura students test their passions Sam Brown Year 12 student Sam Brown says taking part in a welding course last year was a real eye-opener to a possible career. Sam’s best friend’s dad is a welder, so having an inside view of the job sparked his interest. ‘I like that there are a lot of skills to learn in welding, and there are definitely a lot of jobs,’ says Sam. During a catch up with Nick Bates, his liaison teacher at Te Kura, Sam learned there was a short course in welding where he could get some hands-on experience and see if welding might be for him. ‘Nick has a lot of connections through the school – he always seems to know about courses for things you are interested in,’ says Sam. Sam took part in a two-day course through the polytechnic on the campus of

Otago University. ‘The first day was theory and the second day was practical. We made some boxes from welding tools, welded straight lines and saw some more complicated welding tools in action. ‘The teacher was really supportive and said that I had potential in welding. He showed me some advanced welding techniques and told me about more courses I could take.’ As a result, Sam says welding is now one of his top three goals, as well as achieving NCEA Levels 2 and 3 and going to university or polytechnic for further training. ‘Before I took the welding course, I was one of those people who didn’t know what I wanted. My advice to other students is to have a go at something – try a short course and get some experience and eventually you’ll run into your passion.’

Briar Mills

Briar is also a part-time promotional model for Impact Models.

Year 13 student Briar Mills may need a few lives to fit in all the things she’d like to do. ‘At some point I would like to be a personal trainer, a registered nurse, and a qualified barista because I have a passion for coffee,’ says Briar. ‘I have a diverse personality – I grew up in the country and don’t mind working outside and getting my hands dirty but I can also scrub up and be fashionable too – I have a creative side.’ To help narrow her choices, Briar has taken Skills for Job Seeker courses at Te Kura and in 2008, she also took part in a three-month Gateway programme to gain some practical experience at Zanadoo Hair Dezine in New Plymouth. ‘I have always loved the feel of hair and I like being artistic, so I wanted to get some insight into hair dressing,’ Briar says. But for now Briar is set on following in her brother’s footsteps of joining the army. ‘When I was 10 and saw my brother in his

uniform going off to cadets on Wednesday nights – that was it. I was hooked.’ Briar ended up joining the cadet force too, and for the past six years she’s been testing out the military life. ‘The cadet force is a youth organisation that gives you a taste of what the army is like. You do drills and field exercises and learn how to handle yourself in a variety of situations.’ Briar will start training as an army firefighter in January, but there is still one more hurdle to clear. ‘Although I am strong and athletic, my running needs to be up to par for the September selection,’ she explains. Briar says support from Te Kura is helping her meet the challenge. ‘My learning advisor at Te Kura, Ken Allan, and I touch base every two weeks. He has helped me set goals; for example, I have to run the New Zealand army 2.4 kilometer run in under 11:50. It’s exciting making plans that are going to help me get where I want to be.’ Pg. 7


Te mahi a ngā ākonga

A journey to the outer planets By Grace Davison, Year 10 It is the year 2078. My name is Grace Davison. I am 15 years old and I am aboard NASA’s newest space shuttle. NASA’s plan for this journey is to fly past all four outer planets using their gravity to pull us through to the next planet just like Voyager 1 (1977). I am the first non-astronaut to be on a shuttle that is travelling at the speed of light. When we lift off the ground and shoot up into the pale blue sky, my stomach is left far behind me. And, wow – soon we pass Mars. It’s like being in a car where things just flash past your window. Now we are about to enter the asteroid belt. Huge lumps of rock fly past – some of which must be at least 500 km across. We pass through these rather quickly but soon we slow down and ahead are the first of the gas planets. There’s Jupiter. It is huge. It is at least three times the size of earth – I feel so insignificant! We speed up again and zoom through black emptiness until another planet not quite as big as the last comes into view – Saturn. Its amazing rings are everything I’d imagined them to be ... and more. I know they are made of small lumps of rocks and ice about the size of bricks, but those lumps put together look so pretty. Soon we are approaching the last two planets – Uranus and Neptune. These are my two favourite planets – I can’t wait to see them. They end up looking similar – lovely blue and green with a look of absolute smoothness about them; I suppose this is because they are made mostly of gasses. The space shuttle slows to a stop and people amble off to the sleeping quarters. I stay a little longer watching the photographers taking pictures and admiring the blue planet before I too go off to bed content and thrilled to have seen the outer planets all in one day.

Hudson Ross, Year 2 ‘Rainland’ drawing for science inquiry theme – weather watch. Art is Hudson’s passion.

Pg. 8

Jethro Newlands, Year 6

Raph Beazley, Year 13


Alex Stephens, Year 2, Going places.

STUDENT WORK

Cruize Ross, Year 5

Megan Park, Year 4 Different methods of communication Megan uses with her family.

Pg. 9


Horse of the Year Northern region student rides to success

Catherine and her horse, Sky Dancer.

Catherine competing in the Horse of the Year competition in March this year.

Ponies are 16-year-old student Catherine Gibson’s passion. From riding her first pony at age two, Catherine soon became actively involved in her local Helensville Pony Club, and later entered the World of Horse competitions. This year the Year 12 student’s dedication and hard work have paid off as she has qualified for the prestigious Horse of the Year competition held in Hastings. To qualify, she needed to obtain 20 Show Hunter points gained from her top placings at various shows held between October 2009 and March 2010. Show Hunter competitions look at the rider and the pony’s style over a course of eight to 10 bar jumps. Catherine gained three third placings, including one in the title class ‘Pony Show Hunter of the Year’.

Pg. 10

Catherine also competed in Show Jumping and Registered Pinto Classes, gaining seven more placings including two firsts and one second. This year Catherine made the decision to transfer to Te Kura to combine study with furthering her competitive riding career. ‘I love the flexibility that studying with Te Kura gives me to be able to work my ponies and continue with my academic study,’ says Catherine. With the support of Te Kura, Catherine is currently exploring possibilities for gaining work experience connected with horses, with the hope that her passion, her study and an authentic learning opportunity may come together to provide a future career pathway.


Lanoi presents leadership programme for students

‘Presenting my work at such a significant and unique event was a great opportunity,’ says Lanoi.

Northern region English teacher, Lanoi Maloiy, gave a presentation at the First International Responsible Leadership conference held at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, in May. The conference was the first of its kind held in Africa and drew academics and practitioners from Africa, Europe,

America and Australasia. The delegates discussed ways to support and develop the next generation of responsible leaders. Lanoi presented a leadership programme for Kenyan secondary school students that focuses on developing a leadership mindset through critical thinking and ethical decision-making. During the proposed four-day workshop, students explore their personal values and integrity, and work on goal setting. ‘This leadership course will work towards creating Kenyan leaders who are effective and promote social responsibility in their community,’ Lanoi explains. Lanoi worked together with Dr Paul McDonald of the Victoria University Management School to write the conference paper. ‘As a teacher at Te Kura, I aim to promote a sense of social consciousness among my students,’ says Lanoi.

For more information about the programme, contact lanoi.maloiy@ tekura.school.nz.

Welcome back, Pania Pania Whauwhau has seen Te Kura from all sides. The Hamilton staff member talks about her ongoing relationship with Te Kura and what she hopes to achieve in her new role.

Ko te Amorangi ki mua, ko te hāpai ō ki muri Te tūturutanga mahi pono, o te Māori mana motuhake.

I am a descendent of Waikato/ Maniapoto, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Whakaue. However Waikato Tainui, H-town Tūturu is my stomping ground and my place of belonging. In Term 2, I started a new job and am on a new pathway here at Te Kura, but while it is a different role for me, I’m not new to the school. In 1994, I started at Te Kura when I was a student/teenage mum. I was lucky that my mother and aunt were secondary school teachers at the time to support me through my studies.

In 1997, I helped a Year 13 student with her correspondence work as a teacher aide. I also helped my 14-year-old son work through his business course. I had to remember that in that situation I was his supervisor, not Mama or teacher. Now I am a kaiako teaching science at Te Kura. From this perspective I am much more appreciative of what Te Kura has to offer for our Māori students and how their full potential may be better realised through distance education. I am also much more appreciative of what our school does and how much work actually goes into looking after one student at a time. I see great potential for my husband (Adam Whauwhau – Te Reo teacher and Careers Education Facilitator) and I here at Te Kura to help improve the literacy of our students and raise Māori achievement throughout Aotearoa. I just want to help our tamariki find their mana motuhake tino rangatiratanga! Mauri ora.

Pg. 11


Pitopito Kōrero ā-Rohe – regional news Te Raki: Northern Region Free tutorials: Boost your exam-taking IQ Northern

If you are a Northern region student and you intend to sit NCEA external exams at the end of the year, this is for you. Central North

Central South

For general enquiries please call 0800 65 99 88. Address: Level 6, 124 Vincent Street, Auckland 1010.

Do you need help: • using a range of study strategies? • handling exam stress? • knowing where to find exam preparation resources? • knowing what type of exam questions to expect in your subjects? • analysing exam questions? • knowing what is expected for Achieved/Merit/Excellence? If your answer is ‘Yes’, be sure to register for a FREE exam tutorial. Tutorials will be offered in the Northern region in the first two weeks of Term 4 in preparation for the NCEA exams, which start on 11 November.

These one-day tutorials are essential for Level 1 students who are sitting exams for the first time, and will also benefit Level 2 and Level 3 students. A range of venues will be available, from Whangarei to South Auckland, depending upon enrolment numbers. So keep an eye out in July for emails and a letter giving details about tutorial dates and venues, and send in your registration form. If you are a student outside the Northern region, contact your learning advisor for information on support for students sitting exams in your area.

Te Tonga: Southern Region Catherine sets sail for leadership adventure Year 13 student Catherine Davidson talks about her 10-day trip aboard The Spirit of New Zealand, a 45 metre topsail schooner. She and 39 other young people sailed from the Hauraki Gulf to Great Barrier Island in March. I didn’t know anyone else on the ship because they chose only one person per school. But we soon got to know each other because you have to work to keep the ship going and you have to do kitchen duty together. Climbing up to the top of the mast was a highlight. I also enjoyed going on the yard swing, sitting on the bowsprit, seeing the lovely scenery and making friends. Even the 6.45 am wake up calls for our exercise and daily morning swim weren’t too bad. Sometimes I had to be in charge and tell or show people what to do so we could get things done, like our daily cleaning and sailing. I learned that even though I’m shy, Pg. 12

I can be a leader when I have to. One adventurous thing that happened on the ship was when we attended a Mayday call. Luckily everyone on the vessel with the hole in it was safe. I realised how important it is to stay quiet and out of the way while attending a Mayday call. My learning advisor suggested I sign up for this trip and I’m glad I did. I would definitely recommend it – you learn about teamwork, leadership and it is heaps of fun.

Southern

For general enquiries please call 0800 65 99 88. Address: Suite 4C, 193 Cashel Street, Christchurch 8011.

Interested in being a trainee? The Spirit of New Zealand Trust youth development programme is for young people aged 15 to 18. They run between 25 and 30 voyages a year. Talk to your learning advisor or read more about the programme on the Spirit of New Zealand website: www.spiritofadventure. org.nz/.


Te Puku o Te Ika Whānui: Central North Region Crystal’s outdoor adventures at OPC When Crystal Cunningham set off to the Outdoor Pursuits Centre (OPC) camp in Turangi, she didn’t realise she’d have the chance to put her volunteer experience to good use. In addition to studying with Te Kura, the Year 11 student also volunteers at the Riding for the Disabled centre in Gisborne, where she helps people who have intellectual or physical disabilities to interact with and ride horses. In May, Crystal attended the five-day OPC leadership and adventure camp. 20 North Island Te Kura students learned teamwork skills through adventure sports such as rock climbing, abseiling and tramping over rough terrain through the STAR-funded programme. One student on the camp was visually impaired, and it soon became apparent that her carer wouldn’t be able to assist her with the physically demanding activities. The student’s carer from the Royal New Zealand Foundation for the Blind, Barbara

Mockford, says Crystal stepped in to help without hesitation. ‘One afternoon when we were caving, Crystal took leadership of my student’s requirements, telling her about all the things she should be aware of. She directed others to help too. I was truly humbled and heartened by Crystal’s actions, care, unselfishness and thoughtfulness,’ says Barbara. Now, as part of her coursework at Te Kura, Crystal is taking her skills to the next level – she was recently accepted onto an Equine Studies Gateway course and will learn equine coaching in an authentic learning experience at the Riding for the Disabled centre. ‘I think I would like a career in equine teacher aiding that will have me working with kids and horses,’ says Crystal.

Northern

Central North

Central South

For general enquiries please call 0800 65 99 88. Address: 169 London Street, Hamilton 3204.

Crystal gives rock climbing a try at OPC.

Northern

Te Ūpoko o Te Ika Whānui: Central South Region Brooke Leaver: Netball star in the making ‘I love netball,’ says Year 11 student Brooke Leaver. ‘I like how it’s a team sport and you can’t win all by yourself. You really get to know the other people on your team and learn how to work together.’ In May the Tū Toa student was a member of the New Zealand Secondary Schools netball team, winners of the 2010 International Schoolgirls Netball Challenge, in which they beat Australia in the final. Brooke says that, although they beat the Aussies in the end, it was a real nailbiter. ‘We started pulling ahead in the last quarter and only won by three points – it was very exciting.’ Brooke is committed to attending university in the future, but she also hopes to play for a franchise. That might seem an unlikely dream for some, but for Brooke it’s just following in the family’s footsteps. ‘Both of my parents have represented

New Zealand in sport. My dad played Black Sticks hockey and my mother played for the Silver Ferns.’ But despite her natural talent, Brooke has had to put in the hard yards to be a champion. ‘I have netball practice from 8–9 in the morning, school work from 10–3 and then another netball training session from 3–5. We have school netball competitions on the weekends, so there is always something on,’ she explains. Combining academic and sporting success hasn’t always been easy for Brooke. By the age of 15, Brooke had attended 11 schools before finding the right fit at Tū Toa and Te Kura. She says distance learning through Te Kura has been a big help. ‘My correspondence programme has allowed me to work in a way where I can manage myself. It allows me to do the subjects that I want, when I want. Also the teachers are able to answer my questions when I need the answers, which helps keep me on track.’

Central North

Central South

For general enquiries please call 0800 65 99 88. Address: 11 Portland Crescent, Thorndon, Wellington 6011.

Pg. 13


Ngā Pitopito Kōrero a Te Kura – Te Kura news Real life, authentic learning for years 11–13 Te Kura is developing a new approach to learning that focuses on students’ passions and goals for life beyond school, and uses these as the basis for a personalised learning plan that uses authentic, real life learning experiences to help students achieve. Authentic Learning offers students the chance to learn by working alongside adults doing the things they love. Project Leader Jen McCutcheon says research shows that we learn best when the learning is relevant and we have a passion for what we are doing. ‘Real life learning experiences, for example through an internship or Gateway placement, help students gain the knowledge and skills to go on to further study or to a job in their area of interest.’ While the approach is in the early stages of its development, there are already students working in this way – like Central North region student Crystal Cunningham (featured on page 13), who has a Gateway placement focused on her love for working with horses and her volunteer work at the Another student working in this way is Chris Scheib. His passion is cycling – including mountain biking, off-road riding and cross-country riding. Through a Gateway placement at a bike shop, Chris was able to work with other bikers talking, selling, repairing and advising about bikes.

Pg. 14

Riding for the Disabled centre. Under our Authentic Learning approach, students and their learning advisors will work together to identify the student’s interests and any opportunities that their community offers to learn through an internship or a placement through the Gateway programme. These could be in a local business, voluntary or community organisation, sports club or marae. As part of the internship or placement, students will be supported by a mentor who is an expert in that area of work. Want to know more? Talk with your Te Kura learning advisor to see if our Authentic Learning approach is right for you, or visit our website at www.tekura. school.nz.


Making mid-year reports work for you Adele Harris is the Supervisor Support Advisor for Te Kura. In her role, she advises supervisors of full-time students from early childhood to Year 13 with any issues that are not specifically teaching-related, such as helping to motivate students. In this issue of Te Hono, Adele discusses how to make good use of the next two terms. Mid-year reports have been received and now is a good time to plan for the second half of the school year. Supporting younger students • Have another look at your student’s report. Remember, they are written using the new National Standards, so they have a different format to previous reports. Find out more about National Standards on the Ministry of Education website at www.minedu. govt.nz/Parents. • If you haven’t already done so, contact your student’s teacher or learning advisor to discuss how you can help your student at home. • Have a planning session with your student during ‘school time’. If you haven’t already, make a timetable that includes short breaks, opportunities for physical activities and games, and reading time. • Make a ‘fidget box’ with fun learning activities for those times when unexpected visitors drop by or that phone call takes longer than expected.

2010 NCEA payment and registration reminder Students studying NCEA courses should have received their personalised 2010 NCEA Payment and Registration form by now. (If you have achieved standards this year, you must pay your NCEA fee.) Have you completed and sent it back to us with your 2010 NCEA payment? If not, or if you need help, please contact Jennifer Hardiman or Jo Parmenter in the Qualifications team, or your learning advisor on 0800 65 99 88.

Supporting older students Te Kura encourages independent learning. Older students should be in regular phone or email contact with their learning advisors. This does not mean that supervisors have a lesser role. You still need to: • ensure your student sets and maintains regular study times • check and supervise the return of regular work • make sure your student is returning work across all of their subject areas. If your student is in Years 11–13 and doing NCEA, they may be doing a mix of internal and external standards. There will be some changes soon that impact on students working towards NCEA Level 1, and you should have received a letter about this from Te Kura. If you haven’t, contact your student’s learning advisor or find out more about NCEA on www.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea. Remember, all students, no matter what their year level need your support … and you do make a difference.

Te Kura green coming your way This year we updated our school logo with our new name and colours. Now we have new posting bags and boxes, but you will see a mix of the old and new boxes as we use up our stock.

Pg. 15


Whakanuia Te Wiki o te Reo Māorii

Celebrate Māori Language Week – 26 July to 1 August 2010 This year the theme of Te Wiki o te Reo MĀori is ‘Te Mahi Kai’ – The Language of Food.

Te Mahi Kai – Kimi Kupu (Word Search) Can you find the 20 words that relate to gathering, preparing, serving or taking part in a meal? Circle each letter of the word when you find it. Words may be forward, backward and diagonal. You may use a letter twice if the words intersect. kai – food

manuhiri – guests or visitors

hangi – earth oven

toa hokomaha – supermarket

karakia – prayer or blessing

kanga – corn

tepu – table

mahinga kai – garden 

ringawera – kitchen hand or worker

purini – pudding

hua rakau – fruit

hakari – feast

tina – dinner

huihui – chicken

whakaritenga – organising and catering an event hianga – fishing rewena – traditional Maori bread

manaakitanga – hospitality

koha – contribution

mataitai – fish and seafood

Once you have found all 20 words, the remaining letters will spell out a secret phrase in te reo. Hint: the message has five words and 15 letters. The first word has been done for you. To check your answer, go to our school’s Facebook page. You don’t need to be a member of Facebook to view the page. You can access our Facebook page from the homepage of our website at www.tekura.school.nz. You can also check the next issue of Link Up – Term 4 – for the answer. Note: For the purposes of the word search, all macrons have been removed from the Māori words in the table and the word search.

Kia waimarie! Good luck! w

h

a

e

i

a

t

i

a

t

a

m

h

i

a

n

g

a

n

i

r

k

a

a

a

u

i

e

m

i

r

a

a

n

a

n

k

a

a

a

r

a

n

i

a

h

i

u

a

k

i

u

k

e

k

a

o

u

k

h

r

a

p

a

w

a

k

k

k

p

a

i

i

r

h

e

n

i

g

i

i

e

r

r

t

a

r

g

t

t

e

n

g

t

a

i

e

u

a

a

t

i

n

a

i

n

k

k

n

h

n

a

i

u

h

i

u

h

a

i

g

g

r

i

n

g

a

w

e

r

a

h

a

h

a

m

o

k

o

h

a

o

t

m


Te Kura Link Up -