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legal studies

LG617 Basic employment rights ncea level 1

2011/2


legal studies ncea level 1

Expected time to complete work This work will take you about 12 hours to complete. You will work towards the following standard: Unit Standard 1978 (Version 6) Identify and describe basic employment rights and responsibilities, and sources of information and assistance Level 1, Internal 3 credits In this booklet you will focus on these learning outcomes: •• identifying types of employment agreements •• identifying and describing matters for inclusion in an employment agreement •• describing rights and responsibilities in an employment relationship •• identifying sources of information and assistance for employees. All the work for this standard is in this booklet.

Copyright © 2011 Board of Trustees of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu, Private Bag 39992, Wellington Mail Centre, Lower Hutt 5045, New Zealand. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu.

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contents 1

The employment relationship

2

Negotiating an agreement

3

What’s in an agreement?

4

Other inclusions

5

Rights and responsibilities

6

Help with agreements

7

Help with problems

8

Answer guide

Glossary

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how to do the work When you see

Check the answer guide.

Your teacher will assess this work.

1a

Complete the activity.

You will need: •• pen, pencil, paper, ruler. Resource overview Each lesson should take about one hour. Write your answers to the self-marked activities on your own paper or in the spaces, where provided. At the end of each lesson, mark your practice work using the Answer guide. The answers give you essential feedback. Use them to help you learn. Always: •• ensure you have attempted all activities on your own before referring to the Answer guide •• check your answers carefully after you finish each activity •• add any corrections or amendments in a different colour •• try to work out why any of your answers are wrong •• study any reasons given for an answer. Phone or email your teacher if you would like to discuss your work. When you have finished the booklet, complete the teacher-marked work and send the booklet back to your teacher. It will be returned to you after it is marked. Use the glossary at the end of the booklet to revise key terms.

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The employment relationship In this booklet you will look at: •• the basic purpose of employment agreements •• what should be in an employment agreement •• where to go for help with employment agreements. When you buy something there is an exchange. You pay your money and you receive goods in exchange. The idea of exchange is central to all contracts. People enter into contracts all the time – they buy cars, they post letters, they hire tradespeople. The employment relationship is also based on a contract between the employer and the employee. Typically, an employment contract is an agreement between two parties to exchange work and wages. To work effectively in the long term, the employment relationship must be based on fairness and trust. The relationship will not work if one party misuses a position of relative power. All employment relationships are governed by the Employment Relations Act 2000 which refers to employment contracts as ‘employment agreements’. The minimum requirements of this Act apply to all employment situations, even if work conditions have not been discussed.

Employment agreements

The main purpose of employment agreements is to promote good employment relationships between employers and employees. There are two types of employment agreement you can enter – collective or individual.

Collective agreements

A collective agreement covers two or more employees who are union members. A collective agreement has no upper limit on the number of people who can be part of it. Only registered unions and employees can bargain for collective agreements. Collective agreements must be in writing and: •• make clear who is covered by the agreement •• have formal start and finish dates; that is, all collective agreements must have an expiry date – after which a new agreement has to be negotiated •• indicate services available to sort out employment problems.

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The employment relationship

Individual agreements

These are agreements between one employee and one employer. Individual agreements must be in writing and include: •• the names of the employer and the employee •• a description of the work •• an indication of where the employee will work •• an indication of work hours •• wage rate or salary level •• services available to sort out potential problems. Individual agreements don’t have to have a formal start and finish date, but these can be included. An individual agreement can just start when you start the job and then finish when you leave. 1a

1. Give two differences between an individual agreement and a collective agreement. 2. Both collective and individual agreements must be in writing. Why do you think this is the case? Check the answer guide.

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Negotiating an agreement Entering an agreement

When you are offered a job your employer must tell you: •• whether or not there is a collective agreement in the workplace •• that you can join the union and the collective agreement if there is one •• that you can negotiate your own individual agreement. If there is a collective agreement covering your workplace you can join the union and be covered by the conditions in that agreement. You don’t have to join the collective agreement – you can negotiate your own individual agreement.

Negotiating an agreement

Collective agreements

Employees will often belong to a trade union which will negotiate a collective agreement for its members. As a member you don’t take part in the actual bargaining – the union does this for you.

Individual agreements

An employee and an employer can work out an agreement between themselves. In this situation an employer would probably give you a draft agreement to look at. You would then either agree to that or ask the employer to make changes.

Representation

You can get other people to help negotiate your agreement. If you are a young person you can get an adult to help you negotiate. When an employer offers you a job they must give you a copy of the individual employment agreement and advise you that you can get advice on the agreement.

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Negotiating an agreement

If you are older and applying for an important position you may get a lawyer who specialises in employment law or an industrial negotiator to negotiate your agreement. All agreements must be negotiated in ‘good faith’. That is, employers and employees must deal with each other openly and honestly.

Fair bargaining

The employer and employee must bargain in a fair way. Unfair employment agreements can be cancelled and the employee given compensation. 2a

1. Suggest two ways an individual employment agreement could be negotiated. 2. Who are the parties in a collective agreement? 3. Suggest a way a collective agreement would be negotiated. 4. Which type of agreement do you think is easier to negotiate? Why? Check the answer guide.

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What’s in an agreement? Employment agreements can include anything the parties like as long as it is lawful. However, there are a number of minimum legal requirements that must be in all employment agreements. These minimum requirements apply to all employees whether they have been included in the employment agreement or not. Employers and employees cannot agree to do away with any of these, but they can agree to better provisions. The minimum requirements cover the following issues: •• minimum wages •• annual leave •• statutory and public holidays •• special leave •• parental leave •• leave for defence volunteers.

Minimum wages

The government sets the minimum wage rates that all employees over the age of 16 are to be paid. This rate is regularly reviewed. By law, employers must pay at least the minimum wage. Since April 2013, there is a Starting Out wage for young people aged 16 to 19 to be paid 80 percent of the adult minimum wage. This is for the first six months of their employment after which they must get the adult minimum wage. There is no minimum wage for employees under 16. This minimum wage also applies to employees who are paid by commission or piece rate. It applies to all types of jobs including home workers.

Payment of wages

Your employment agreement should also include: •• how often your wages will be paid: for example, weekly, fortnightly •• which day of the week your wages will be paid. It may be important for you to have enough time to get to the bank before the weekend. Most employees have the right to be paid in cash or by cheque; however, these days most people are paid by direct credit to a bank account.

Deductions from wages

Generally employers should not make deductions from their employees’ wages except in some circumstances, for example tax, child support or student loan repayments. But you can agree to your employer making deductions, for example, for union fees or medical insurance schemes. © te ah o o t e k ur a p o un a m u

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What’s in an agreement?

Equality Equal pay

Male and female employees must be paid the same wage for the same job.

Equal opportunity

Employers cannot discriminate in hiring and firing, training opportunities or promotions on the grounds of sex, colour, race, ethnic group, disability, marital or family status, religion, age, political beliefs or sexual orientation. 3a

1. Why do you think the law states minimum working conditions? 2. Contact the Department of Labour on their 0800 number or refer to www.dol.govt.nz or www.ers.govt.nz

What is the current minimum wage rate for employees: a. under 16 years? b. 16 years and over? c. What is the Starting Out wage introduced in April 2013?

3. What is the minimum wage you are entitled to? 4. Your employer won’t give you a promotion because you have three children and he is worried you might have too much time off looking after them. Is this legal? Why/why not? Check the answer guide.

Leave

Your employment agreement must give you the minimum number of holidays and other types of leave employees are entitled to.

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What’s in an agreement?

Annual leave

All employees, whether they are full-time or part-time, temporary, permanent or casual, are entitled to paid annual leave (holidays). Since April 2007, an employee is entitled to four weeks paid annual holidays. The leave can be taken at any time agreed between the employer and the employee. Employees must be given the opportunity to take at least two of the four weeks leave in a continuous period, if they wish to do so. You must also be allowed to take your leave when it is due, but if for some reason you can’t, you do not lose the leave.

Holiday pay

You should be paid your holiday pay before your holiday starts and the amount should either be: •• your normal weekly pay or •• an average of your weekly earnings. If you leave the job before you take any holidays you are entitled to be paid any holiday pay due.

Sick leave

After six months employment employees are allowed five days sick leave a year. These days can be carried forward if not used and can be accumulated up to 20 days at least. Sick leave can be used when the employee, their spouse or a person who depends on them is sick or injured.

Bereavement leave

An employee is allowed up to three days bereavement leave for the death of a spouse, de facto spouse, parent, child, brother, sister, grandparent, parent-in-law or grandchild. (Before the Holidays Act 2003, sick leave and bereavement leave were lumped together under a special leave allowance.)

Parental leave

Paid parental leave is available for 13 weeks. Up to 12 months unpaid leave is allowed on the birth or adoption of a baby. This leave can be shared by both partners. To qualify for this type of leave you must have worked at least 10 hours a week for 12 months, for the same employer.

Defence volunteer leave

If you do volunteer training in the armed forces, for example the army, you can have unpaid leave to do this training.

Public holidays

You are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays per year when these days fall on a day you would normally work. These public holidays include, among others, Waitangi Day, Anzac Day, Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Labour Day.

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What’s in an agreement?

The observance of these days can vary depending on the employment contract. The Holidays Act 2003, which came into force in April 2004, requires employers to pay staff time-and-a-half plus a day off in lieu, for each public holiday they work. 3b

1. Do the following situations meet the minimum requirements for an employment agreement? a. Marie, aged 20, is offered a job which pays $230 for a 40-hour week. b. Cath’s employment agreement allows her to have five days sick leave a year. c. Cath’s agreement says she cannot use those five days to look after a sick family member. 2. In the section on public holidays, five of the 11 were mentioned. Can you think of two other public holidays that are allowed? Check the answer guide.

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Other inclusions So far you have been looking at what must be included in an employment agreement. In addition to these minimum legal requirements there are a range of other matters that employees and employers may want to include in the employment agreement. Employment agreements typically include clauses on: •• wages •• hours of work •• job description •• performance and conduct •• ending the agreement.

Wages Pay rates

The employer and employee might want to negotiate: •• the pay rate if it is more than the minimum •• how wages will be calculated, for example, salary, commission, piece rate.

Pay review

Employees may want the amount they are paid to be reviewed at regular intervals. This can be negotiated with the employer. You may also want to agree on what criteria the review will be based.

Pay deductions

You might want to include in your agreement any deductions you would like your employer to make from your wages. Legally your employer can only deduct tax, child support and student loan repayments. But you might like to voluntarily have your union fees or medical insurance payments deducted, too.

Hours of work and breaks

Apart from matters relating to pay there are other things employers and employees can consider when they are negotiating the contract. Some workplaces set out specific hours to be worked, for example, 9.00 am to 5.00 pm. Others allow a range of options. You may be required to be at work 40 hours per week but you can work these hours any time between 7.00 am and 6.00 pm each day. So you may wish to negotiate: •• hours worked each day •• starting and finishing times •• which days of the week you will work •• when any rest breaks should be taken and for how long, for example, 15 minutes for morning tea and 30 minutes for lunch.

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Other inclusions

Job description

You may wish to negotiate the general duties you will be required to do. If you make an employment contract to mow someone’s lawns, the job would probably also include clearing away the lawn clippings, trimming the edges and perhaps cleaning the mower. You should be clear about what you have to do right from the start.

Performance and conduct

Some jobs have to be done to a particular standard. For example, an employer might require a typist to be able to type at so many words per minute. The required rate could be negotiated and included in the agreement.

Other employers may require that employees have a general standard of conduct. For example, in a job that requires a lot of public contact, the employer might want the employee to always be positive and friendly towards the customers. This requirement could be included in a contract. 4a

Stephen is a waiter in a downtown restaurant. 1. Suggest the days of the week and the hours of the day that would most likely be in his contract. 2. Suggest a specific standard of performance he might have to achieve. 3. What general standard of conduct might be in his contract? Check the answer guide.

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Other inclusions

Ending the job

Employment agreements can also include provisions for ending the job. In fact many problems can be avoided if employers and employees agree at the beginning how the job will end. Some of the things that can be considered in relation to ending the agreement include resignation, retirement, dismissal and redundancy.

Resignation

Generally employees can resign at any time. The employer and employee should agree as to how much notice needs to be given if the employee decides to leave or is dismissed. Both should also consider what will happen if the notice is not given. For example, wages could be paid to a dismissed employee instead of having them work out the notice.

Retirement

There is no set age at which employees must retire. However, employees might want to negotiate a retirement age and some sort of retirement payment.

Dismissal

The employment agreement can also include: •• circumstances that would result in a dismissal •• what steps should be taken before an employee is dismissed. There must be a good reason for any dismissal and the dismissal must be carried out fairly. Employees should be told if there is any problem with their performance and be given an opportunity to improve. If not, the employee may be able to take a personal grievance against the employer.

Redundancy

Redundancy is when the job an employee does is no longer available or when the employer genuinely can’t afford to employ that person any more. You may wish to negotiate some redundancy payment should this happen to your job.

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Rights and responsibilities Employee rights

The Employment Relations Act gives employees certain minimum rights. You have already looked at some of these in relation to employment agreements. There are a few other rights that the Employment Relations Act and other legislation gives you. These are: •• you have the right to belong or not belong to a union •• you have the right to have someone else help negotiate your agreement

•• you are entitled to a copy of your employment agreement •• if you are dismissed you are entitled to get a written statement explaining why you were dismissed •• if you think the dismissal is unjustified you can contact the Employment Relations Service for help •• you can use the Employment Relations Service for help with any other problems you may have with your employer •• you have the right to a safe workplace •• you cannot be discriminated against by race, gender, ethnic origin, marital or family status, age, religion or ethical beliefs

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Rights and responsibilities

•• you have the right to be free of unwanted or offensive sexual behaviour.

Employee responsibilities

As an employee, you have certain responsibilities you must meet. These include: •• doing the work you have been employed to do •• keeping to the employment agreement you signed; for example, if you agreed that your hours will be 9am to 4pm, these are the hours you must work •• obeying lawful and reasonable orders •• taking care of the employer’s property •• serving honestly and faithfully.

Fair treatment

Both employers and employees must treat each other fairly. The concept of ‘fair’ in law is based on ‘what a reasonable person would do’. 5a

Are these statements true or false? 1. Your employment agreement can require you to be a member of a union. 2. Your employer has to give you a copy of your employment agreement. 3. Mere can refuse to mop the floors even though she agreed to do this in her original agreement. 4. Mere’s boss can change her work hours to 10am to 4pm instead of 9am to 3pm if he wants to. Check the answer guide. © te ah o o t e k ur a p o un a m u

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Help with agreements Employers and employees will sometimes need help when negotiating an employment agreement. There are several places they can go to get help.

Employment Relations Service

The Department of Labour’s Employment Relations Service can provide information about rights and responsibilities. You have looked at some of these rights and responsibilities in this booklet, but if you need any further information about negotiating an agreement you can contact the Employment Relations Service. Both employers and employees can contact this service for advice and information. Service provided: advice and information only, it won’t actually negotiate your agreement for you. Contact details: •• phone: 0800 800 863 •• email: info@ers.dol.govt.nz •• website: www.ers.dol.govt.nz Cost: this service is provided free.

Employers’ associations

There are employers’ associations in all regions. Business NZ (formed from a merger of the New Zealand Employers Federation and the New Zealand Manufacturers Federation) is the main organisation available to give information and advice to employers. Service provided: advice and information only, it won’t actually negotiate an agreement. Contact details for all regions: •• www.businessnz.org.nz •• local phone numbers are listed in the telephone book. Cost: employers pay a fee to belong to Business NZ.

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Help with agreements

Unions

Most workplaces will have at least one union that is available to help employees. If you join the union you will join a collective agreement that the union has already negotiated with the employer. Service provided: negotiate agreements for members. Their services are not available to non-union members. Contact details: The Council of Trade Unions (CTU) keeps a list of all unions, so you can find a suitable union to join by ringing 04 385 1334 or by looking at their website www.union.org.nz under ‘Find a union’. Cost: members pay a fee to belong to the union.

Advice centres

There are a variety of advice centres such as community law centres and Citizens Advice Bureaux.

Service provided: information about employment agreements, they don’t negotiate agreements. Contact details: local phone numbers in phone book. Cost: community advice centres are free.

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Help with agreements

Lawyers and other professionals

A variety of employment professionals, such as lawyers, management consultants, accountants and employment relations advisors can also help you.

Service provided: depends on the professional, but can negotiate agreements. Contact details: phone book (the Yellow Pages). Cost: fees charged by professional – can be expensive. 6a

1. You have been offered a job in a café but don’t feel confident enough to negotiate your own agreement. a. Name two places that could help you. b. For each place say how you would contact it. c. For each place say how much you would have to pay. 2. You have been offered a job in a café and want to negotiate your own agreement. a. Which organisation could give some information about your rights? b. How much does this service cost? Check the answer guide.

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Help with problems Sometimes employers and employees will have problems in the employment relationship. The employee may not be carrying out their duties properly and the employer wants to dismiss them, or the employee thinks they are being treated unfairly or discriminated against.

Firstly, employees and employers should try to solve any problems they may have themselves. If they can’t, there are organisations that can help. The Employment Relations Service and the Employment Relations Authority are specialist bodies which help sort out problems between employers and employees.

Self-help

You may be able to sort out the problem without going to the Employment Relations Service or Employment Relations Authority.

Talk to each other

Employers and employees should try to sort out any problems by talking to each other. Remember that you will want to continue working together so it is best to solve problems without taking them any further. However, if you can’t solve the problem yourselves ask for advice. Employees could contact their union, a community law centre, Citizens Advice Bureau, an industrial relations consultant or a lawyer. Employers could contact Business NZ, a consultant or a lawyer. Both employers and employees can contact the Employment Relations Service for advice.

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Help with problems

Employment Relations Service

If the employer and the employee can’t reach an agreement themselves they can contact the Employment Relations Service. The Employment Relations Service is run by a government department – the Department of Labour. The Employment Relations Service can provide: •• information about rights and obligations •• help with employment problems •• mediation services.

Information

The Employment Relations Service provides information about employer and employee rights and obligations. Often when people have the correct information they can then come to an agreement.

Mediation

However, if the employer and the employee still can’t come to an agreement and solve the problem, the Employment Relations Service will recommend mediation. Mediation is when the employer and employee get together with an impartial person to discuss the problem. The mediator helps the parties negotiate and compromise to reach a solution which is satisfactory to everyone concerned. There is no cost to use the Employment Relations Service mediators.

If the employer and the employee reach an agreement through mediation the decision is binding on both parties. The decision cannot be appealed to the Employment Authority or the Employment Court.

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Help with problems

You may want a representative such as a lawyer or union official to help you in the mediation process. The cost of this would depend on the type of representative you chose. For example, if you are a member of a union then the union provides you with this type of help at no extra cost other than your union fee. You have to pay a lawyer whatever fee they charge. 7a

1. What is the Employment Relations Service? 2. Give two ways the Employment Relations Service helps to resolve employment problems. 3. In your own words, explain mediation. Check the answer guide.

Employment Relations Authority

If mediation can’t solve the problem then it can be taken to the Employment Relations Authority. The Employment Relations Authority is an investigative body that operates in an informal way. It looks into the facts of the case and can make a decision which is binding on both parties. It does this by: •• calling for evidence from the parties or other people •• holding investigation meetings •• interviewing the parties or other people. It can tell the parties to try mediation. Again, the service provided by the Employment Relations Authority is free but employers and employees would have to pay for any representatives they use.

Employment Court

If the employer or employee is unhappy with the Employment Authority’s decision they can take their case to the Employment Court for a full hearing.

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Help with problems

Anyone who has a case that needs to go to the Employment Court needs to use an expert such as an employment lawyer. The Employment Court works in much the same way as the other courts in the judicial system. The following table summarises what to do with an employment problem. The dispute procedures are intended to be accessible and low-cost, but eventually may become more formal and include lawyers.

Resolving an employment problem 1. Employee or employer checks the facts and clarifies that there is a problem. 2. Employee and employer try to resolve problem themselves. 3. If not resolved they get outside help, such as from a union. 4. If problem still not resolved either party can apply to the Employment Relations Service for mediation. 5. If mediation cannot solve the problem then it can go to the Employment Relations Authority for investigation and a decision. 7b

1. a What is the Employment Relations Authority? b. How can it help with employment problems? c. How much does it cost to use the Employment Relations Service? 2. Are the following statements true or false? a. An agreement made through mediation can be challenged in the Employment Court. b. Agreements made in mediation are binding on both employers and employees. c. If you don’t agree with a decision made by the Employment Relations Authority you can take the case to the Employment Court. Check the answer guide.

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Answer guide 1. The employment relationship 1a

1. Two differences from:

• Individual agreements are between one employer and one employee. • Collective agreements have many parties. • Collective agreements must have formal start and finish dates. 2. Agreements must be in writing because it is easier to prove what has been agreed to if it is written down.

2. negotiating an agreement 2a

1. An individual employment contract could be negotiated (any two of these): • between the employer and the employee • between bargaining agents of the employer and the employee • between a bargaining agent and the employee or employer themselves. 2. The parties in a collective agreement can be one or more employers and the employees from one or more workplaces. 3. The most likely way for a collective agreement to be negotiated is between the bargaining agents of the employees and the employers. 4. An individual agreement is likely to be easier to negotiate because there are fewer parties involved.

3. what’s in an agreement? 3a

1. Minimum employment conditions are needed so employers can’t exploit employees and so that people are treated fairly and equally no matter who they work for. 2. a. There is no minimum wage rate for under 16 year olds.

b. The current minimum wage rate. In April 2011, the minimum wage rate was $12.75 per hour.

c. The Starting Out wage is for young people aged 16 to 19 to be paid 80 percent of the adult minimum wage. This is for the first six months of their employment after which they must get the adult minimum wage.

3. This will be your own answer. 4. No, it is not legal. Under the Human Rights Act employers are not allowed to discriminate on the grounds of family status. 3b

1. a. No. Less.

b. The same.

c. No. Less.

2. The other six days are: Boxing Day, the day after New Year, Queen’s Birthday, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Anniversary Day (of your province).

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Answer guide

4. other inclusions 4a

1. He would most likely have to work lunch times, evenings and weekends. 2. These are some suggestions. You may have thought of others: • to take orders promptly • to deliver meals promptly • to serve meals correctly. 3. To be polite and courteous to customers at all times.

5a

5. rights and responsibilities 1. False. 2. True. 3. False. 4. False.

6a

6. help with agreements

1. a. You could get help from a union, or you could get a lawyer or other employment professional.

b. You would contact the union through the Council of Trade Unions.

You would contact the other professionals through finding their number in the phone book.

c. The union would have a fee to join. The other professionals would also charge fees, usually more than a union.

2. a. The Employment Relations Service would give you that information.

7a

b. The service is free.

7. help with problems

1. The Employment Relations Service is a government service which provides: • information about employment rights and obligations • help to resolve employment problems • mediation services. 2. The Employment Relations Service can offer advice or it can arrange mediation. 3. Mediation: getting the parties to talk to each other and to try and solve the problem themselves.

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Answer guide

7b

1. a. The Employment Relations Authority is a government agency that gives advice on and helps with employment relationships.

b. It gives advice on employment law and it offers mediation services.

c. It’s free to use the Employment Relations Service, but you may have to pay for any representatives (such as unions or lawyers) you use.

2. a. False. b. True. c. True.

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glossary bargaining agent the person who negotiates an employment contract on behalf of one of the parties Business NZ a national body which coordinates employers’ actions and views on the employment relationship contract

an agreement between two or more parties

employee

a person employed to work for pay

employment agreement

the employment contract between an employer and an employee

Employment Court

a court which deals with employment matters

Employment Relations a government agency which makes decisions on employment Authority problems Employment Relations Service

a government service which gives advice on employment problems

good faith the obligation of employers and employees to deal with each other honestly and openly minimum wage

a wage set by law which is the minimum payable to an employee

statutory holidays

public holidays, such as Christmas Day

trade union an organisation of employees which has the purpose of improving and maintaining their working conditions

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acknowledgements Every effort has been made to acknowledge and contact copyright holders. Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu apologises for any omissions and welcomes more accurate information. Photo Cover: © iStock 4585171 Thanks To Nicholas Wong (a former Convenor of the Young Lawyers’ Committee) for his help in the development of this course.

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self assessment

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Fill in the rubric by ticking the boxes you think apply for your work. This is an opportunity for you to reflect on your achievement in this topic and think about what you need to do next. It will also help your teacher. Write a comment if you want to give your teacher more feedback about your work or to ask any questions. Fill in your name and ID number. Student name: Not yet attempted

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I can identify types of employment agreement. I can identify matters for inclusion in an employment agreement. I can identify rights and responsibilities in an employment relationship. I can identify sources of information and assistance for employees. Please place your comments in the relevant boxes below. Student comment I can identify types of employment agreement. I can identify matters for inclusion in an employment agreement. I can identify rights and responsibilities in an employment relationship. I can identify sources of information and assistance for employees. Any further student comments

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