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T H U R S D A Y



A U G U S T

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New course record at Bent Pine Finishing in the dark, Tommy Gibson flirts with a round in the 50s Page 22

This photo, “How to Save a Life,” was taken by local photographer Ivan Pena.

Cultural Council seeks new path

 Group withdraws request for county moneyPage 3

Will City Council really raise taxes?  Page 5

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gCQTH dO8= Cultural Council withdraws request for county money

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BY IAN LOVE

CONTINUES ON PAGE 4

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ists and organizations of all stripes in Indian River County. Its budget last year was $196,000 with 49 percent of its money coming from the county in the form of a Tourism Development Council grant of $60,000 and $36,410 from the county’s general fund. This year the TDC provided $36,325 to the council, far below the $75,000 it had requested. Executive Director Susan McGarry said the council then submitted a request for an additional $34,600 from the general fund, but it became apparent there was little enthusiasm on the Board of County Commissioners to grant the money. “We felt there was not support, given the county’s economic circumstances to defend providing funds

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were saying there were Sunshine violations, and those people don’t want to pursue it in public,” Solari said. “After meeting with board members and the executive director it seems like they are going in a direction that would put more distance between the Cultural Council and the county and it looks like the Sunshine question to some degree will take care of itself.” “They seem to be undergoing a number of changes and this letter from July is part of that set of changes,” said County Commissioner and the government liaison to the council, Bob Solari. “It will put more distance between the county and the Cultural Council.” The Cultural Council helps promote cultural activities and local art-

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leaving with board members Dennis Bartholomew, Rebecca Rickey and Penny Chandler all leaving at or near the time of Kelly’s departure. Kelly is out of town and was unavailable for comment. Among the concerns of some board members were charges of secret meetings that may have included the topic of Kelly’s employment that would have been in violation of the Sunshine Law. Since the Cultural Council accepts money from the county, its meetings are governed by Florida’s Sunshine Laws and proper notice must be given whenever board members meet to discuss Cultural Council business. “I have discussed the issue with our attorney and with some people who

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In a major blow to is bottom line, the Cultural Council of Indian River County last month withdrew its request for $34,600 in funding from the county for the next fiscal year. The change of direction in its funding strategy comes just months after the departure of its former executive director and half a dozen board members last March. Some of those departures came after charges surfaced of secret meetings and possible Sunshine Law violations. With six members leaving the board and the departure of previous Executive Director Mary Jayne Kelly, the council has gone through quite an upheaval. A split had clearly developed on the board over Kelly’s

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY


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CULTURAL COUNCIL FROM PAGE 3

to non-essential services,” McGarry said. “(Commissioner Solari) explained to us the county already had to make cuts to programs and agencies dealing with the needs of children and health-related issues. He said public art and culture and the activities of our organization would be seen in a different light than human service type of needs. So taking that into consideration, the board felt that opinion was probably shared by the other commissioners and the prudent thing to do was to withdraw our request.” Council Board Chairman Barbara Hoffman said the group had known for a year that its funding from the county could be a problem. “It became apparent after discussions with Bob Solari and information from others in government that

it was going to be very difficult for them to support the Cultural Council in this type of economy,” Hoffman said. “The strongest message sent was last year when the County chose not to consider us a quasi non-profit anymore. A quasi not-for-profit provides services that if it didn’t exist, the county would have to provide the service in some way. When the county pulled that designation it became apparent that they would not continue to be supportive of the Cultural Council.” Hoffman said the Council is considering all its options and would have a funding plan in place in the next 30 to 45 days. “In the last several months there has been a lot of cost-cutting and working on new business models and ways of finding funding,” said board member Karl Steene. The Council has spent the last few months looking to re-define its mis-

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LOCAL NEWS sion as it works out its funding issues. It has held focus groups, talking to its 130 members and organizations to better serve and promote the arts in Indian River County. “In the past we have provided marketing activities with things like the Cultural Events Planner and helped market and promote cultural organizations,” said Board Chairman Hoffman. “We will continue to do those things, but we are expanding and moving into areas of providing greater support and attention to culture throughout Indian River County. We will be adding activities and programs that will help strengthen organizations to help build their internal structure.” But all of that will have to take place on a limited budget. McGarry notes that state funding for the arts that might have been available in the past has “pretty much dried up” and that council has no

plans at the moment to apply for grants from national foundations. That means the money raised by the organization will come from local or regional sources. Among the sources it has are membership dues, fund-raising events such as the Summerfest 2011 (see coverage starting on page 17) and the annual community event planner. “We have the same challenges out there that every non-profit has,” board member Steene said. “Even the biggest names are looking for funding to support their core missions. Really, there is no other voice for the arts in Indian River County. The theater supports itself, the museum supports itself, the opera supports itself, the two symphonies support themselves, but nobody really advocates for all of the arts and that is good for the whole county.”

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This week’s cover photo is called “How to Save a Life” taken by local photographer Ivan Pena. The photograph will be part of Island Images’ Gallery of Hope High Dynamic Range Photography Exhibit. The High Dynamic Range exhibit uses color and black and white photographic interpretations with over 20 images by eight photographers. These images will be the gallery’s featured exhibit from Aug. 5 to Aug. 24. The gallery is located at 2036 14th Avenue, Suite 101, in the Historic Theater Plaza in downtown Vero Beach.

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Ante up (or not) Officials at the county appraiser’s office and City Hall are likely to receive phone calls from citizens concerned with HEADY the proposed tax rate. “Once we all get the TRIM notices, I think we’re going to hear from them. But I think we’ll end up back at the rollback rate,” said Turner. Heady, who made the motion to set a proposed higher millage, believes the council needed flexibility in setting a final budget and tax rate. “It took me a while to get a second and third vote (on his motion), but I’m not shy about doing the right thing,” Heady said. As ad valorem taxes and other revenues needed to run government continue to dwindle, officials must decide whether to pare budgets by reducing or eliminat-

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The Vero Beach City Council last week voted for a whopping 38 percent tax hike even council members said they ultimately couldn’t support when the final vote comes around. Vice Mayor Pilar Turner, Councilwoman Tracy Carroll and Councilman Brian Heady on July 27 voted to set a tentative tax TURNER rate of about $2.67 per $1,000 property valuation. Mayor Jay Kramer didn’t favor the tentative tax rate and preferred to set a rollback rate as the highest millage limit and try to finalize a lower rate if feasible. Councilman Craig Fletcher did not attend the meeting. The present millage rate is about $1.94. If the proposed tax rate were adopted, the city taxes for a home valued at $200,000 with a $50,000 homestead exemption would increase from about $291 to about $400. However, since property values have declined about 4.3 percent this year, according to the county’s property appraiser’s estimates, the actual increase would be less. The vote came following more than a week of public budget hearings and a requirement to set a tentative millage by Aug. 4 for the coming fiscal year. Once a tentative millage is set, it can be lowered but not raised. City council will conduct its first public meeting to begin finalizing its budget and tax rate on Sept. 8 and set the final rate at a Sept. 20 hearing. Initially set-

ting the tax rate high gives the council funding options while finalizing the budget. By that time, the tax rate may be set at a rollback rate of about $2.03 which is 4.6 percent higher than the present rate, but offset by almost equally declining property values. A rollback rate is a millage rate that raises the same revenue as the previous year. Taxpayers receiving their Truth in Millage (TRIM) notices from the property appraiser’s office in about two weeks may misinterpret the proposed tax rate and not realize that the final tax rate is likely to be lower.

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FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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A U G U S T

City contends it will cut back on proposed tax increase

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CITY BUDGET FROM PAGE 5

ing staff and services or raise taxes to keep the same levels of service. Heady does not favor cutting employees and believes the city needs to annually fund benefits such as vacation and sick day pay earned by city workers.

“I’m tired of politicians giving things out without putting it in the budget and paying for it,” he said. “They’ve been running up the SOLARI citizens’ credit card and I’m tired of kicking that

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can down the road. I’ve been saying for two years let’s pay for the benefits earned in the year they’re earned. That money needs to go into a lock box to pay those benefits.” He also proposed percentage pay cuts for all city workers including his own stipend as councilman. The proposed budget calls for a five percent pay cut for city staffers earning $70,000 or more as well as elimination of auto allowances. “Then everyone is sharing the pain and you give employees a chance to decrease the budget. My method gives employees at the bottom a chance for some management and problem-solving opportunities by engaging them in a discussion about what they need and what they don’t,” Heady said. Resident input and their preferences are vital to the process, council members agreed. “For example, are people willing to pay a premium to use the (LeiKRAMER sure Square) pool?” asked council member Turner. “Are those who complain about proposed cutbacks even residents? Yet without a total reorganization of the city government we’re at the (upper) limit of services. “I prefer that citizens see the cost of government in their tax rate because the utilities (and the revenue they produce into the operating budget) allowed government to grow without the taxes going up.”

Seeking fiscal discipline Kramer’s priority is to set a tax rate that doesn’t burden already financially-strapped residents and was asked if he believed that council would approve a rollback rate. “I hope so. I’d like to see a roll-

back rate minus a percentage or two to support our local people. But it will be tough. “Finances are really tough on people and it’s not fair to pull more money out of taxpayers’ pockets. We want to make sure we show some discipline on our taxing authority and tighten our belts,” Kramer said. County Commission Chairman Bob Solari, a former city councilman who lives within city boundaries, credited council members for the difficult task they are tackling to complete the budget and tax rate, but offered some “elder statesman” advice for recently elected council members. “As a city resident, I wish they had stuck to the same millage rate. For many on the city council, this is their first budget process. It is very difficult to understand the numbers and it takes a couple of cycles to get a decent handle on things. “I believe the city council is trying hard to get a handle on these things, but it’s like the first time you play in a football game – there are a lot of things you don’t know regardless of how much you practice.” “No matter how smart they are, the first time they go through the budget process and how diligent they are, it probably is not going to CARROLL be their best shot,” Solari said. In addition to eliminating car allowances to save $30,000, the council members and staff did, however, propose a five percent pay cut for city staffers making $70,000 a year and more annually – a savings of $140,000. “We’re doing our best to achieve fiscal responsibility,” Turner said. “All of us on this council love our city.”


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Budget 2010-11

Proposed Budget 2011-12

A U G U S T

City General Fund Expenses

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Public Works and Transportation $2,530,586 12.4%

Total General Fund Budget = $20,397,442

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An earlier version of the city’s proposed budget slashed nearly $500,000 from the police department budget. Last week, nearly half of that proposed cut was restored through funds available from a decrease in Public Works spending; increasing parking violation fees and decreasing general fund contributions to the recreation fund. A total of four officers have recently left the department and those positions will not be filled. However, the additional $250,000 restored to the police

Police $6,663,127 32.7%

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Facts and figures

department budget will eliminate the need to lay off four additional officers when the new fiscal year begins on Oct. 1 About one-third of the city’s $21 million operating funds are derived from transfers from the electric fund, water and sewer fund, marina and solid waste fund. Property tax revenue adds about 20 percent to city coffers although that amount has fallen as real estate values declined. Another 20 percent of general fund revenue comes from utility and miscellaneous taxes. Intergovernmental Revenue comprised of money the city collects from the state and county for sales and other taxes is expected to add about $1.6 million. The proposed new budget is expected to add an additional $3 million from the charges for services category in which the city collects fees from various utilities to provide administrative oversight.

Culture and Recreation $3,392,530 16.6%

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The proposed budget is based on a rollback rate of $2.03336. That’s what the budget is. The higher, proposed millage is if people want (expanded) services and are willing to pay. “We still intend to go to the rollback. This is the first time we’ve done a budget using actuals (real cost comparisons),” Turner said.

General Government $5,702,971 28.0%

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Total General Fund Budget = $20,222,000

Debt Service $724,110 3.5% NonDepartmental $1,384,118 6.8%

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Debt Service General Government $727,000 $6,029,000 3.6% 29.8% NonDepartmental $954,000 Culture and 4.7% Recreation Police $2,901,000 $7,012,000 14.3% 34.7% Public Works and Transportation $2,598,000 12.9%


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Some city workers unionize to preserve benefits BY BARBARA YORESH FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Faced with what they perceive as threats to their employment and benefits package, a group of city clerical, administrative and technical workers voted last month to seek union representation with the Teamsters Local Union 769. That election is awaiting certifica-

tion from the state’s Public Employees Relations Commission (PERC) in Tallahassee, according to Steve Myers, Local 769 business agent. Once certified by PERC as a bargaining unit, the union will remit a letter to the city “demanding to bargain for this group of employees and begin the bargaining process,” Myers said.

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The city workers involved total 70 although not everyone cast a vote in the final tally of 41-5 to unionize. The union presently represents 217 blue collar employees and had received several calls from other city employees wanting to become part of a collective bargaining unit. According to city Human Resources Director Robert Anderson, employees are presently represented by the Police Benevolent Association for police department employees and the Teamsters Local Union 769. The employees who recently voted to become part of a bargaining unit will be covered under a separate agreement than the one currently in force for labor trade employees. With the exception of employees working at the city’s marina, human resources department, city clerk’s office, city attorney’s office or the city manager’s office, the new bargaining unit employees work in every other city department, Anderson said. The decision to seek union representation was prompted by some council members’ concerns about employee health benefit and other costs and the need to pare the budget, according to Myers. He noted that the current union had already made modifications to the city’s pension plan contributions 1 ½ years ago. “This came about from city council’s attack on workers in the form of wanting to eliminate or delete current benefits and a take-it-or-leave-it sick and vacation time,” Myers said. “We’re dealing with a bargaining unit that hadn’t received raises in three years and who have received health insurance increases for three years. And for the past two years they have taken furlough days. They’ve sacrificed enough.” Vero Beach Newsweekly was unable to get one of the new unionized employees to speak on the record. The impetus from the workers, Myers said, was “negative comments about city employees or benefits coming from (Councilwoman) Tracy Carroll and (Vice Mayor) Pilar Turner.” “They were driving the issues and

some council members were saying things (regarding employees) are going to be the way we want them to be. “Clearly, one of the problems I see is the overstepping of the city charter by trying to run every department from the dais,” Myers said. “It’s the first time I’ve seen it to this magnitude. I hear directives being given to department heads and the city attorney standing by and not saying you’re overstepping your bounds and this needs to go through the city manager.” Council members Turner and Carroll were contacted for comment, but as of press time were unavailable to speak to Vero Beach Newsweekly. Councilman Brian Heady thinks the major problem has been previous council’s tendency to “give things (benefits) out without putting it in the budget and paying for it. Look at sick pay and look at the budget and show me where the line item for it is. It’s not there and it’s running up the citizens’ credit card. “Let’s pay for (fund) benefits earned in the year that they’re earned. That money needs to go in a lock box to pay those benefits but they don’t want to do that. We have to reduce the underfunded benefits that past councils allow to accumulate,” Heady said. He does not favor laying off any city employees but does endorse a dialogue with rank-and-file workers as well as department heads to identify cost-cutting ideas. “I think employees have an idea where we can cut and we should engage them in a discussion about what they need and don’t need,” Heady said. The vote by city employees to be represented by the union hinders any efforts by council to change the employee benefit package. Other unionized employees are covered by a contract ratified on Oct. 1, 2010 between the city and Teamsters Local Union #769 and which is in effect until Sept. 30, 2013. Once PERC certifies the election results, the newly unionized employees’ benefits would remain as is until a separate collective bargaining contract for them is negotiated and approved.


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Looking for work Rachel Tall has been out of work since March and has taken to the streets, literally, in search of a job. She has been out on U.S. 1 near McKee Botanical Gardens with this sign looking for work. Tall has been an administrative secretary, Webmaster for the Humane Society and is familiar with most graphic design and business software programs. Tall says with so much emphasis on online applications she wants potential employers to see her in person. She thinks if she can get a one-on-one interview, she can prove she is worth hiring. Anyone out there willing to give a chance to someone who obviously is willing to put herself out there for a job?

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To learn more about how you can put the Vero Beach Newsweekly to work for your business call Martine Fecteau at 772.696.2004 or Mark Schumann at 772.696.5233.

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Community Forum Why Vero Beach should not be part of Amtrak Project BY BOB SOLARI CHAIRMAN OF INDIAN RIVER COUNTY COMMISSION

“…a decent Respect to the Opinions of Mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the Separation.” So writes Thomas Jefferson in the opening paragraph of the Declaration of Independence. He then goes on to list the grievances against his sovereign George III, which led to the American Revolution. Few events or issues rise to the level of importance as our founding, but my recent request to have our Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) consider rescinding a previous resolution in support of the proposed Amtrak /Florida East Coast (FEC) Corridor Project resulted in a response significant enough to warrant a further discussion. It is easy to understand the attraction that a passenger train running through Vero Beach would have for many of our citizens. Trains bring us back to an earlier time, a time, which for many was somehow better and simpler. Many are emotionally connected with trains and believe that having the ability to once again experience a ride on the rails would be a good thing. The emotional pull is real and easy to understand. However, as an elected official, I believe that I should at least try to make decisions

based on the best information available at the time of the decision. And the information presented to date does not support the project. Before discussing why I am against then Amtrak project let’s be clear about what the Amtrak project is not. It is not high-speed rail. The Amtrak line would be more like “ordinary passenger rail, which operates at average speeds between 50 mph and 85 mph.” The Amtrak Project is not a commuter train, which might help get people from one county to work in another. It is a conventional passenger train with limited service. If you wanted to go to Miami for the day, you would have a choice of one train in the morning and one chance to return at night. There are four main reasons for not supporting the Amtrak proposal. The first is there has been no investmentgrade financial plan presented to any elected board, which has voted for the project. The limited financial information available is more likely to cloud, rather than clarify, the financial aspects of the project. One instance of this; I asked the Florida Department of Transportation a fairly clear question about the subsidy for the service. The response: “The related subsidy cost defined by Amtrak to correlate with a 23 percent cost recovery percentage is

“Doing good by doing right.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Highway 1, Vero Beach, Florida, 32960 To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

similar to the farebox return for most major transit systems in Florida.” One would have to have access to a different document to know that farebox return included what a passenger paid for food and drink on the train. Beyond the financial specifics of the Amtrak plan it is important to put it in the proper economic context: The United States is going broke. This is the summer of the debt ceiling crisis. America is in debt to the tune of $14.5 trillion and is on course to increase that debt by another $2 trillion by the end of 2012. America has too much debt and the one certainty is that Amtrak will add to it. The third reason for being against the Amtrak project is that it is inconsistent with our residents’ clear and oft voiced desire to be an ultra low-density county. Rail projects are often about more intense redevelopment. According to Amtrak documents the project “…promotes more geographically concentrated real estate development or re-development, which is more environmentally sustainable in the long run.” When I asked: “What would be the density per acre appropriate for the core area of the Amtrak/Florida East Coast corridor for downtown Vero Beach?” I was told the appropriate minimum density would be “10 to 15

units per acre.” In the Original Town area, this would be an increase from the present three to four units per acre. The fourth reason for being against Amtrak is because I am very much for our successful GoLine bus system. In the past year the GoLine has had about 840,000 riders. Many of these are elderly who cannot drive, people without other transportation and students. The system has seen a significant increase in ridership in the past years. It is a very efficient system. The next years will bring with it battles for scarce resources. With limited transportation dollars in the future, my fear is that Amtrak will end up taking away dollars from our successful local system. Amtrak is a want for a few daily passengers; GoLine is a need for thousands of our residents. If the private sector wishes to come and bring passenger rail down the east coast of Florida risking their own money while doing so, I am all for it. But to add to the national debt, which is already unsustainable is not only fiscally foolhardy it is immoral. Washington is waking up to the problems that incontinent spending has caused. It is time for all elected officials in Indian River County to support those who are trying to address the problem and stop supporting those who are simply working to increase its size and scope.

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 mark.schumann@scripps.com

Lisa Rymer, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com

Milt Thomas, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Scott Alexander, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Siobhan Fitzpatrick, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Michael Birnholtz, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Nick Thomas, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com Barbara Yoresh, Contributor 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com Martine Fecteau, Account Executive 696-2004 martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com Carrie Scent, Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com Marsha Damerow, Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com


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MARK SCHUMANN

The barrier island weekly claimed to be “a bit embarrassed” recently when it made a request for donations, which it says it needs to do a better job. Well, more power to them if they get that gambit to work, but we’re sticking with a formula that we think better serves the community. Our marketplace is more vibrant, and businesses more successful if large numbers of people see their advertising, and we maximize the number of people seeing their advertising through a commitment to journalism that makes this community better. Every newspaper’s business model has been challenged by the Internet; ours is no exception, but we haven’t had to resort to passing the hat looking for handouts because we focus on what the community wants from local journalists -- watchdogs of the government, advocates for the community, chroniclers of our daily lives. No gossip, no cheap shots, no broken promises. We’d rather give back to your community than take from it. While 32963 is asking for dona-

tions, Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers and the Press Journal annually make tens of thousands of dollars in cash contributions to local non-profit agencies. Organizations receiving our support in the past few years include the Literacy Service of Indian River County, Children’s Home Society, Special Equestrians, Indian River County Leadership Foundation (Alma Lee Loy Building), United Way of Indian River County, Learning Alliance, Riverside Theatre, Saint Edward’s School, and the Indian River Medical Center Foundation. In 2011 the Press Journal made $38,500 in cash donations locally. Last year alone Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers gave non-profit agencies more than $345,000 in free advertising and sponsorships. Just to be clear, while the Press Journal is giving back to our community, the barrier island weekly is asking for donations. More than 150 Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers employees and independent contractors live and/or work in Indian River County. Many Press Journal staffers have lived here

for decades. Some of them are lifelong residents of our community, and are involved in countless avenues of service. We live here, work here, and serve here. This brings up yet another irony about 32963’s recent donation scheme. It is a bit odd that a for-profit newspaper would liken itself to nonprofit public radio. The two organizations are dissimilar in significant ways. Public radio is recognized as a qualified non-profit, to which listeners can make tax-deductible donations. The barrier island weekly, in contrast, is simply a business, established and operated with the intent of earning a profit. Secondly, public radio makes every effort to distinguish fact from opinion, while the editors and reporters at the barrier island weekly appear incapable of separating the two. While 32963 claims to be offering responsible community journalism, it has, in fact, published DUI booking photos that were not directly relevant to the arrest being reported. In what can only be seen as an attempt to at-

tract readers, over a number of weeks 32963 sensationalized what may well have been a tragic hit-and-run accident, and called into question the role of the Sheriff ’s Office in the investigation. Many staffers at Vero Beach City Hall no longer return phone calls from 32963 reporters because they don’t think they will be treated fairly, or quoted accurately. The editors of the barrier island weekly know sensationalism when they see it. They published a half-page picture of a local resident giving the finger to one of their photographers, and made fun of a business person whose event did not turn out any better than its own failed effort in the northern Palm Beaches. These are not the kinds of editorial judgments typically made by the journalists at public radio. Asking for donations, and sensationalizing stories in order to titillate readers are strategies we do not embrace. If 32963’s strategy works, then you have another media option. If not, we’ll still be here reporting on and analyzing the events that matter most to Vero Beach and Indian River County.

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wash, if not a joke. It is time to begin imagining how the city’s riverfront property north, and perhaps south of the bridge, might be transformed into something of beauty. When “Big Blue” finally does come down, control of the property would revert back to the city. Perhaps a well-planned river front park can enhance recreation opportunities, and enrich enjoyment of Vero Beach’s natural beauty. The answers have yet to come, but we think it is time to start exploring the possibilities.

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half a century has passed, and the city has grown, and the economic advantages of selling the city’s electric utility become clearer with each passing day. For example, this coming year city residents will pay some $4 million more for electricity than they would as customers of FPL. The city’s customers who are outside the city limits will pay a $5 million premium for city-supplied electricity. This cost differential makes the annual transfer from the electric fund to the general fund pretty much a

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Should Florida Power & Light successfully negotiate a purchase of Vero Beach’s electric utility, company officials envision dismantling the power plant, likely within five years. Down would come the shiny white fuel storage tanks, the silver smoke stacks, the tall cooling towers, and the huge blue steel-sided building, all now “gracing” the west bank of the Indian River Lagoon. When the power plant was built in the early 1960’s, the site was considered south of town. But


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Learn to accept the ever changeable winds of life BY REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER

I am an avid distance cyclist. Next April, I am going to embark on my third, rigorous cross America charity bicycle trip – 3,000 miles from Los Angeles, California to Savannah, Georgia, over 29 days, 120 miles a day -- to raise money to combat hunger both here on the Treasure Coast and worldwide. What I have learned on my first two cross-country excursions is that – of all the unknowns and challenges on such a trip --- it is THE WIND (and where it blows from) that is the most unpredictable and vexing. Some days, the wind is perfect, 10-20 miles per hour right at your back -- that’s called a tailwind and it makes for effortless and fun cycling. Other days, the wind is difficult, 10-

20 mph right in your face -- that’s called a headwind, and it makes for strenuous and demanding cycling. And still other days the wind is changeable or sideways , forcing the cyclist to pay at- REVEREND tention lest he or she SCOTT ALEXANDER be blown off road or off course. Wind on any cross country trip is a fickle and fluid thing, and there is just no knowing ahead of time how the winds are “going to blow for you.” And so it is, of course, with life itself. Despite our best efforts at controlling or managing all the variables

of our existence, there is no successful predicting how “the winds” of any particular day are going to blow for you. Some days, you just find yourself facing a stiff headwind of circumstance, where every step you take requires effort and courage. Other days, you just sail through your appointed rounds, as if the gods themselves purposefully put the wind at your back, making life an effortless joy. And still other days, you find yourself buffeted back and forth by variable and changeable winds where you never know one minute to the next how things are going to work out. One emotional key to successfully navigating life “for the long haul” is to fully expect and accept life’s ever changeable winds, and not demand

something of life which it cannot deliver -- that being steady and favorable winds all the time. To live is to face – with grace and fortitude – the inevitable “head-wind days” and “side-wind days,” when circumstances just aren’t going to exactly go your way. So when your luck is good, ride those tailwinds! And when your luck is less-than-perfect and the wind is coming at you, put your head down, and know that tomorrow is another day, with fresh winds a-blowing. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

Anthony case calls for the need to understand justice system BY MILT THOMAS

The Casey Anthony trial in Orlando ended several weeks ago and for the three people who might not know, she was found “not guilty” of murdering her daughter. The verdict was poorly received by TV audiences and the lynch mob waiting for her outside Orange County courthouse. So maybe we need to understand better why those jurors, or any jurors, make the decisions they do. Many of us have served on juries, but if you haven’t, it’s like watching NBC’s Law and Order without the commercials and unfortunately, without the editing. But I was involved in one case locally that helped illustrate how jurors sometimes think. The case involved a curio cabinet. That’s right, a jury trial over a curio cabinet. The cabinet did not assault anyone, it wasn’t smoking pot, it wasn’t parked illegally in a dining room, but it did have a few scratches. That precipitated a klaxon call for justice. The seller (defendant) offered to exchange the cabinet, but the buyer (plaintiff ) demanded a refund. So, it became a legal matter. After a five

hour trial, the sixperson jury received instructions and began deliberating. Basically, we were charged with determining whether the seller followed store policy regard- MILT THOMAS ing merchandise returns. We received a copy of the policy as evidence. We read it and immediately decided the store acted within its policy. Case solved in ten minutes. However, when I say “we” I mean the two jurors under age 50. The other four elderly women did not agree. They were determined to punish the seller for treating a customer so poorly. The debate lasted three hours, but the four senior vigilantes held firm and it appeared we would end up with a hung jury in a trial over a curio cabinet. Resolution of this dilemma provided some insight into our jury system and may have also factored in to the Casey Anthony trial. In my case, as the clock inched toward dinner time, the four crusty crusaders started to get fidgety,

whispering among themselves. Finally, one of them told us she needed to get home and fix dinner for her husband. The other three also said their husbands were waiting to be fed and they needed to go home. So, in order to end deliberations quickly, they all agreed that the seller acted in accordance with store policy. After the verdict was read I held my breath as the plaintiff ’s attorney asked to poll the jurors, but they all agreed and then promptly rushed home to fix dinner. Now, the courts in Indian River County are always backlogged and if you add up the costs associated with this trial – lawyers, a judge, court reporter, bailiff, etc. – one has to ask whether justice was served. Or just meat loaf and mashed potatoes? Getting back to the Casey Anthony trial, jurors had been bused in from Sarasota because there were no impartial juror prospects in Orlando. They were sequestered in a motel every night for six weeks, unable to speak with their families at all or other jurors about the trial and not allowed to watch television or read a

newspaper. Yet, after being presented with a mind-numbing array of scientific data and hundreds of exhibits, they were able to render a verdict in two days without questioning a single piece of evidence. Either these jurors had brilliant legal minds and photographic memories or they were so tired of six weeks in a motel room that they agreed to whatever would get them out of Orlando the fastest. After the trial, they quickly filed out of court, hopped on a bus and high tailed it back to Sarasota. So, next time you hear the verdict in any trial, you can speculate whether it is the result of conscientious lawyers, police work and jury deliberation or because some old guy waited for his dinner, twelve jurors grew bored sitting in motel rooms or somebody made up a catchy rhyme about a glove that didn’t fit. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/ author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.


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For a few moments guests at the Midsummer Medley Choral Society dinner were too mesmerized to eat as two talented artists performed Puccini, Gershwin and Schubert. Even dessert stood with spoons abandoned as Emilio Rutllant and Danya Etter performed their individual musical pieces. Rutllant and Etter are the talented musicians who were lucky enough to be past recipients of scholarships by the Vero Beach Choral Society.  Both graduated from Stetson University and have plans to use their passion for music as a path to their future careers.   Rutllant is an amazing flutist and performed two highly technical

pieces, one was the Sonata Per Arpegione by Schubert and the other was a special request by his former music teacher.   Jane Weise (his former teacher) and her husband Duane came especially to ask Rutllant if he could play a special piece for them, The Great Train Race by Ian Clarke.   This was a very difficult and intricate performance which is supposed to imitate the sound of a fast moving train. Rutllant had to play the flute simultaneously as he hummed into the instrument at the same time increasing the speed of the individually blown notes.   The result was fun, unique and showed off the amazing talent he has which should make his career as an Board Member Emily Sherwood, Board Secretary Rosemarie Gagliardi and MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 16 Treasurer Kathleen Wildfleur.

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orchestral performer and Collegiate Music Professor assured of success. Etter, who has a voice so pure and strong she did not need to use a microphone in the soaring Great Hall, sang Summertime by Gershwin and an emotional rendition of O Mio Babbino Caro by Puccini. Etter’s plans include teaching mu-

sic at Alla Patta Flats School in Port St. Lucie.  Loren Smith, the President of the Choral Society, said that was an excellent example of the benefit of the scholarships.   Smith said that the Choral Society’s intention is to take gifted musicians and raise them up and give them the opportunity to create more talented artists for the world.   He said that it was “exactly why we think it is so important to bring music to our students.”

He also added that “Musical knowledge has proven to raise interest in school and students who study music are known to have higher scores in science and math and other technical classes.” The Choral Society has been awarding scholarships for 26 years and their goal this year is to raise approximately $200,000 to be able to provide at least one more scholarship each year.   The VBCS does not just pay a one-time sum to the student,

but continues the gift each of the four years the student is in school.   The night’s dinner was completely prepared by Deborah Borfitz, their Publicity Chair to the over 90 guests.   Members of the Board and VBCS volunteers helped cook, serve, and clean up to minimize costs so all of the money could go to the fund. If you wish to donate to the Vero Beach Choral Society, email info@ verobeachchoralsociety.org or call 772-569-8165.

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New Assistant Choir Director Jason Hobratschk with pianist Joane Knott of the Choral Society.

Donna & Horace Lindsay with Carolyn Lindsay, Lindsay Powell & Michael Lindsay in front.

Flutist Emilio Rutllant in middle between Duane Weise and Emilio's proud mu- Dave Jenner and Diane Walker (standing) with Ashley Goodman and Alyssa Bantz (seated). sic teacher Jane Weise.


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One said that she thought maybe he was cute, but she played the violin at school and was “awed” by the musician’s talent. A pretty impressive review from a teenaged girl. Guests enjoyed a rare opportunity to visit with the artists at a private meet and greet in the Great Hall before the performance and then moved to the main chapel for the concert. The meet and greet along with

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supreme artistry of the symphony of the America’s.” Many of the orchestra’s artists are young with incredible talent and were an inspiration for the younger members of the audience. Parents brought their children to hear the music and were pleasantly surprised to watch them be just as engaged as they were by the performance. The Concertmaster and lead Violinist Laszlo Pap had a few of the young female fans “wowed” by his Hollywood looks.

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With music ranging from light and energetic to hauntingly moving, the internationally acclaimed Reményi Ede Chamber Orchestra from Hungary treated guests to a virtuoso performance last week at Trinity Episcopal Church. The Orchestra, currently on a tour across America and celebrating its 20th anniversary, was invited by the Cultural Council of Indian River County. In Europe, the Orchestra which

is from Miskolc, Hungary, is well known having worked with the famed Boys Choir of Zurich. The evening concert included beautifully performed pieces by Mozart, Vivaldi, Tchaikovsky and other well-known composers. Maestro and Artistic Director Dr. James Brooks-Bruzzese wanted to bring his orchestra to the United States for young people to experience the music and grandeur of the symphony. His goal is to have a wide variety of people of all ages hear “the

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Symphony in top form in concert hosted by Cultural Council

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The Remenyi Ede Chamber Orchestra


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the event was one of the fundraisers that the Cultural Council of Indian River County puts on to raise awareness of its activities and to help bring in much needed financial support. Susan McGarry, the Council’s Executive Director, said that she was encouraged by the attendance for the event. “The perception is that there is nothing to do here in the sumJohn Meikle joins radio hosts Lisa and Leo Desmond CCIRC Volunteer Barbara Hector with her grandaughter mer, but we have tonight’s perSkylar Lucas and Executive Director Susan McGarry formance and there are so many events going on,” she said. The Cultural Council has been in Indian River County for over sixteen years and is a key organization to support art, music and cultural happenings in Indian River County. The CCIRC also keeps the public aware of happenings in Indian River County with its annual Events Planner. Call 772-770-4857 for information on programs and events. Ann Brown, Nancy Richards, Barbara and Bob Lipton

Violinist Marian Myszko, Joe Docher, Violinist Dorottya Szabados and Cellist Angelika Beres


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Costa d’Este Resort ments to the county. “They had some trouble last year, but it was their first year. They got the kinks out,” she says, adding open lines of communication with complex officials has enabled her properties to flourish regardless of the season. Aside from baseball, sporting events that generate revenue for area businesses range from golf tournaments at Sandridge, Quail Valley and Pointe West; national soccer tournaments at the fairgrounds; swimming events at North County Aquatic Complex and the Treasure Coast Police and Fire Games, which lasted for a week over Father’s Day this year at different venues in the tri-county area. The county pays the Treasure Coast Sports Commission about $112,000 a year from its tourist tax fund to attract tournaments to the area. As the summer winds down and students prepare to return to school, cost-cutting measures and innovative marketing help keep profits in line.

The Caribbean Court Hotel closes Maison Martinique, an exclusive French restaurant located on the property, for the month of August. However, Havana Nights, the hotel’s piano bar and restaurant, remains open seven nights a week. Jackson says her team will spend the month aggressively pursuing bookings for corporate retreats and team building sessions with businesses across the state and beyond. An event planning internship at the four-star resort may also attract young people from far and wide. A Mardi-Gras-style event is also being planned, including a parade, floats and regatta. “We are excited about the opportunities to show off this amazing community,” says Jackson, who has scheduled back-to-back meetings with a slew of agencies intent on generating new avenues of income for area businesses. “We know that when people discover Vero Beach, they will just fall in love.”

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Despite the searing summer heat, which traditionally keeps tourists away from Vero Beach, weddings and sports have become important money makers for local hotels. And with that success, visitors are bringing in much- needed tourist dollars to the rest of the community as well. A monthly report released by the tourism board of Indian River County shows that in May, tourist taxes were up 20.8 percent over last year. The tourist tax is a 2.5 percent levy charged to area hotels based on room revenue. Although June’s data won’t be available until later this month, marketing and sales managers at some of the area’s beach front hotels say they are sold out every weekend, with occupancy rates during the week ranging from 50 to 70 percent. “No matter what the economy, people are still getting married,” says Jennifer Bates, area sales manager for Holiday Inn Oceanside. Bates, who also manages the Hampton Inn and Country Inn Suites in Vero Beach, has worked closely with the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce for the past few years to direct the flow of matrimonial money this way. The chamber receives between $300,000 and $400,000 annually in part from the county’s tourist tax revenue to promote area tourism. The current focus is to define Vero as an ideal destination wedding location with a price tag to fit every wallet. Costa d’Este Resort, an oceanfront hotel owned by Emilio and Gloria Estefan, estimates that half of its business is wedding related. Vero Beach Hotel and Spa says it has at least one wedding booked every weekend, even in the summer months. “People are getting married on

Thursday nights just to get on the property,” says Lisa Jackson, director of sales and catering at Vero Beach Hotel and Spa. Jackson, who is a wedding planner herself, is going after a big dollar demographic by touting the hotel as an allinclusive luxury destination for brides. She works with area florists, hair and makeup stylists, and even jet and boat charter companies to ensure that every detail of a wedding is perfect. “A bride is a onetime deal, but the hotel is a year-round client,” explains Jackson of her strategy to work directly with vendors in creating wedding packages. Last year’s oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico caused a spike in sales, says Cynthia Johnson of the Caribbean Court Hotel, an 18-room boutique hotel located on South Beach. This year, however, “sales have held tight,” she says, with a lot of bookings from Florida residents, many of them from right here in Vero. With discretionary income diminished by the current recession, the concept of a ‘“staycation” offers area residents seeking rest an opportunity for relaxation right in their own backyard. “Just get in the car and you’re a world away,” says Monica Smiley, director of sales and marketing at Costa. “The number one wedding destination used to be Hawaii. Now, it’s Florida.” Nonetheless, the Holiday Inn and its sister properties are not putting all of their eggs in the wedding basket. Sporting events at area venues have helped bolster sales over the past year, says Bates, who sees a marked decline in summer weddings beginning in mid July. Bates says area hotels should have a vested interest in the success of the Vero Beach Sports Village, which, she maintains, has done an excellent job at attracting sports baseball tourna-

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Community Calendar Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Located in the parking lot just south of Humiston Park on Ocean Drive. www.VeroBeachOBA. com, 772-532-2455. Every Sunday: Farmer’s Market from 9 am-2 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. Contact Eric Hessler by email: eric@ mainstreetverobeach.org or call the Main Street office. Aug 3-6: 37th Annual Aerial Antics Circus at Saint Edward’s School. Youth circus perform “A Jungle Circus” with aerial acrobatics, dance acts & gymnastics. Vero Beach Recreation Dept.’s performing arts students. 7 pm, tickets $5 adults/$4 children & seniors. 772-567-2144 or visit recreation page at www.covb.org Aug 4: Mulligans Beach House will be holding a special Summer Sports Party to benefit Big Brothers & Big Sisters. 5-8 pm. Kids eat free. 20 percent of proceeds go to charity plus lots of fun for the kids and more. 772-600-7377. Aug 4: “High Dynamic Range” Photography Exhibit, 7-9 pm, Gallery of Hope Studio, 2036 14th Ave. Suite 1, Downtown Vero in the Historic Florida Theatre Building. www. galleryofhope.org, 772-643-6994. Aug 6: Fundraiser to Mail Cookies to our Soldiers Overseas. Dinner/ dance at the Elk’s Lodge, 1350 26th St to raise money for the postage to mail out 29 cartons of cookies to the soldiers. 6-10 pm. Tickets $15, RSVP to 772-562-8450. Aug 7: Space Coast Symphony will be performing Film Music Spectacular of famous movie scores at the Community Church, 1901 23rd St., 3 pm. Children are free, adults $20. 321-5368580, www.SpaceCoastSymphony.org. THURSDAY, AUGUST 4

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If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. Aug 11: Sebastian Relay for Life Kickoff Rally. Oculina Bank, 13600 US1, Sebastian. 6-8 pm RSVP by Aug 9th. 772-453-7475. Aug 12: Manuscript Madness by WritebyNight. Have your writing work reviewed and advised on by professional writers. Held at Cabin Fever Art Studio, 6-9 pm, 2050 53rd Ave. Resister at www.writebynight. net or call 512-322-5242. Aug 12: Mainstreet Vero Beach is holding “Sip of the City” at the Kilted Mermaid. Pairing the perfect wine to the best cheese. 5-6:30 pm, Vero’s newest wine bar will offer drink and food specials. www.mainstreetverobeach.org, 772-569-5533. Aug 13: Free Concert on Ocean Drive. Oceanside Business Association Summer Concert Series. Music by Dave & the Wave. 6:30-9:30 pm in front of Humiston Park. Proceeds

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benefit Habitat for Humanity. Special Giveaway prize by Costa d’Este. Food, refreshments, vendors. No coolers. 772-532-7983. Aug 13: Back to School Expo at Indian River Mall during Tax Free Weekend. Fashion Show, 30 vendors, give-a-ways and more. 6200 20th St, 772-770-6255. Aug 13: Beach Blanket Bingo Summer Costume Party at the Vero Beach Museum of Art. 6:30-10 pm featuring a retro 60’s band. Tickets $50. 772231-0707 x111. Aug 16: Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Film Series and Ice Cream Social “Bears in Our National Parks” & “The Man Who Walks with Bears” Ice Cream Social 2:30-3 pm. Film 3-5 pm. Film is free and open to the public. Ice Cream Social Cost: Members $3; Non members $5, 772242-2559.

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Aug 17: “Palette 2 Palate” hosted by Main Street Vero Beach. Progressive dinner event beginning with champagne at Gallery 14 to appetizers at Tea & Chi and Greenhouse Cafe followed by the main course at the French Quarter. Finishes with dessert at the Kilted Mermaid. Tickets $50. RSVP to 772-480-8353 or email info@mainstreetverobeach.org. Aug 17: “Night of Movies & Mayhem,” Majestic Theatre offers the classic movie, “Caddyshack” with a trivia contest and movie related costume contest for prizes to benefit the United Way. 7 pm, tickets $15-$25. Tickets may be bought online at www.majesticvero.com of at the box office. Aug 19-20: “In the Ruff Golf Tournament” to benefit H.A.L.O. Rescue and Stray No More, a no-kill animal shelter. Friday 6:30 pm cocktail reception and entertainment by “The Dog Bones.” Saturday Golf tournament at 8 am followed by a barbecue. $100 per player. Kim Kern at 772-360-9294/ Linda Kline at 882-321-0961. Aug 20-21: Special Olympics Aquatic Area Games held at the North County Aquatic Center on CR 512 in Sebastian. 8 am-2 pm, 772-581-7665 x204, concession stand open, free admittance. Volunteers needed. Aug 24: Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Ocean Science Lecture Series.“We Hardly Knew Ye: The Decline of Atlantic Sawfishes” by Florida Museum of Natural History’s biologist George Burgess. Meet the speaker, appetizer buffet and cash bar follow the presentation. Lecture open & free to the public, reservations not required. 7 pm, 5600 US 1 North, Ft. Pierce, 772-242-2506. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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Pam and Bill Proctor with Mr. Jie Min Wang, (second from right) president of Shanghai Overseas Affairs Services Center and staff in Shangahi. The group hosted the Proctors’ trip to China to speak to Chinese students because of the country’s one-child policy. While there are families that are exempt from having only one child, the nation continues to control overpopulation by limiting the number of offspring. With only a single progeny, parents with the means to provide a top notch education do whatever it takes to help that child become successful. “An American education is the ticket to success in a global economy,” says Proctor. “There is a drive to fuel the economic aspirations of the people. The vast majority of Chinese students come here to study business.” In fact, more and more Chinese students are attending high school in the U.S. as a way of ensuring admission into an American university. Proctor says there are currently about a dozen Chinese students attending St. Ed’s living with host families in Vero Beach. At John Carroll High School in Fort Pierce, there are between 20 and 30 Chinese students. “If it’s happening here,” says Proctor, “it’s happening across America.”

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When Vero Beach author and college entrance consultant, Pam Proctor, wrote “The College Hook: Packaging Yourself to Win the College Admissions Game,” she never dreamed it would be published in Chinese. For years, Proctor has helped area students gain admission to the nation’s top universities. Now, she is lending her insight, experience and know-how to Chinese students set on higher education here in the United States. Proctor, who has written 11 nonfiction books and runs College Applications Consultants out of her home on the barrier island, recently returned from Shanghai for the launch of her book. Published in the U.S in 2007, “The College Hook” hit bookstores in China last month. Accompanied by her husband, Bill Proctor, also a writer, the couple lectured 100 Chinese high school students and their parents about how to “hook” U.S. college admissions officers with their grades, their SAT test scores and a dynamic essay. “American students better watch out because they’re going to be knocking at the door,” says Pam Proctor, who thinks China’s success in a global economy depends on the education of its youth. Proctor is recognized as an expert at the college admissions process and is frequently cited in national publications, such as U.S. News and World Reports’ annual issue, “100 Best Schools” and Newsweek’s “How to Get into College.” As a college consultant, she works with individual students from across the country, as well as internationally, helping them transform their activities, hobbies and interests into compelling reasons to be admitted into the universities of

their choosing. “The essay needs to leap off the page of a college application and grab the attention of admissions officers,” says Proctor. A graduate of Mount Holyoke, Proctor earned a master’s degree in government from Claremont College in California. Later, she was a senior editor at Parade magazine. Her career as a college consultant was inspired by her son, Mike, who graduated from St. Edward’s School in 1998 and went to Amherst College. “I realized during this process with Mike that the whole ball game had changed in college admissions and that the competition had ratcheted up enormously,” she says. As she was pondering the idea of starting her own company, friends approached her about helping their children complete their college applications. In 1999, Proctor established her College Admissions Consultants, Inc. and immediately began working with students from Sebastian River High School’s International Baccalaureate program. In 2000, Proctor co-founded the Teen Writers Workshops with Charlotte Terry, another Vero Beach writer and business woman. Backed by the Laura Riding Jackson Foundation, the workshops are conducted throughout the school year at the Environmental Learning Center and feature accomplished writers from a range of genres. Although many attendees of Proctor’s lecture spoke English, translation was provided by Mai Xu, who also spent the last several years translating “The College Hook.” The two women met in 2007 at a convention in Austin, Texas, where Proctor was promoting her book. With limited spots in China’s tops schools, “the pressure to succeed is enormous,” says Proctor, in part

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Shooting in the dark, Tommy Gibson cards record 61 at Bent Pine BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Tommy Gibson, an assistant pro at Bent Pine Golf Club, fired a course record 11-under-par 61 on his home course earlier this month, finishing in the dark a round he had to be coaxed into playing. With that finish, Gibson, 22, eclipsed the previous mark of 9-under 63 he had shared with former Bent Pine member and PGA professional Kenny Perry and local golfer Mike Muller. Gibson admits if it had been left up to him, he wouldn’t even have played the evening round. His game had been in some turmoil and he just wanted to go home after finishing work at the Bent Pine Golf Club pro shop. “I had no intention of playing golf,” Gibson said. “My buddy was in town from North Carolina and I had just gotten off work. My friend, Ryan Sullivan, had been hitting balls for like three hours.  Our other buddy, Jason Goodendorf, who is a local pro here, stopped by and wanted to play nine holes. Jason persuaded Ryan to play so I said I’ll play too. “The thing is, I hadn’t been hitting the ball too well, so I didn’t really want to play. I had been putting really well so I just decided to play nine holes,” Gibson said. That was all the trio would probably have time for as it was about 6:15 p.m., when they finally reached the first tee. What transpired was a round that most golfers could only dream. It was so dark by the end of the round that Gibson was guessing at his distance on the last couple of holes. Gibson, whose goal is to reach the PGA Tour by age 25, went 10-under-par through the first 11 holes at the Joe Lee-designed 6,779-yard course off 58th Ave-

His father is Tom Gibson, who currently is the professional at Sandpiper Golf Club at Club Med in Port St. Lucie. When he reviews his recordbreaking round, Gibson says he did not have high expectations even after opening up with three straight birdies. “We had played the day before and Jason birdied three straight and when we got to the fourth hole we asked him how many holes he had birdied in a row. He said , ‘something like nine,’ and then he parred the (par-5) fourth hole,” Gibson remembered. “So when I birdied the third hole, I said to Jason, ‘ I am going to birdie the fourth hole, like you didn’t do yesterday,’ just kidding around with him.” Which is exactly what Gibson did. “I basically nailed my drive, hit it short of the green, hit a 60-yard shot to about four feet and hit a sidewinder for my fourth par,” he said. Gibson collected another birdie on No. 5 and then sank a 20-footer for birdie on the par-3 sixth hole and remembers, “I am just thinking this is a crazy round.” “We get to No.7 and my friends are just laughing now, because I am basically making everything I am looking at,” he said. “At No. 7 I had a wedge in and left myself about 30 feet and that is when I think, well here is where the birdie run is going to stop, I hit and terrible wedge shot, but then I make the 30-footer. “Now I am thinking nothing can go wrong.” STAFF PHOTO He did run into some trouble, Tommy Gibson currently is playing on the eGolf Tour and will seek his PGA if you can call it that, on No. 8 card at qualifying school in the fall. and hit his second bunker shot to within an inch and got an up-andnue. In going 10-under he needed actly why the stars aligned for him down par. just 10 putts. that round, but he does have a ped“We get to No. 9 and I told the Gibson says he doesn’t know ex- igree that might have helped him. guys, ‘If I birdie this hole I am play-


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ing the back (nine) and if I par it we will just stop.’ It was getting late,” he said.”So we tee it up and I hit a good drive and I hit it to about 15 feet and made a downhiller that snaked in.” So with that birdie the round was extended, but light was fading. To insure that he could get his round in, Ryan and Jason stopped playing. “When we got to 10, it was about 8 o’clock, so I am thinking there is no way I am going to finish,” Gibson said. “So they told me, we are just going to watch, so you can play.” He dropped to 10-under through 11 holes and “so now, after 11 we are thinking 59. We get to 12 and that is where I made my first bogey, I missed the green to the left, chipped to about seven feet and left it short.” With darkness descending, Gibson said he wanted to pack it in at that point, but his friend Sullivan, talked him into continuing. “He said, ‘Tommy, you have six holes left. You can birdie every one of these.’” That wasn’t to be, as Gibson collected a birdie on No. 14 and parred the rest of the way. It got so dark on the last two holes, Gibson said he was guessing where his shots landed because he could not make out the flight of the ball. When asked if he thinks the conditions prevented him from reaching the fabled round in the 50s, Gibson takes an either-or approach. “It was getting dark so you don’t have enough time to process your thoughts because you are playing so fast,” he said. “Obviously, with golf being such a mental game, the more you think the more you can mess up. So in a way, I think, if I had more time I could have shot a 59 easy, but at the same time, I could have had more time and thought about the shots and shot a 65. “It was just kind of weird the way it happened.” And if you think it was a fluke, the next time Gibson played at his home course, even though he bogeyed the last hole, he finished with a 65 for a two- Tommy Gibson with his father Tom Gibson, a PGA Professional at Club Med in Port St. Lucie. The elder Gibson has round total of 18-under 126. taught former LPGA No. 1 ranked player Christie Kerr.


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Obituaries Morgan Victor Hunter Morgan Victor Hunter, 83, died July 18 at VNA Hospice House after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Morgan was born in Elk City, Okla., to Victor and Esther Hunter. He served in the army in the Korean War as a sergeant for two years, receiving the Combat Infantry Badge and the Bronze Star. After graduating from the University of Oklahoma, he started his career with General Electric in Schenectady, NY. He met his wife Martha there as she was part of the GE training program as well. They were married in Cleveland, in 1954. Morgan had a varied and successful career. After GE, he moved to Proctor & Gamble where he rose through the ranks to be Vice President of the Coffee Division. From there he became a Senior Vice President at American Cyanamid, President of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and President and COO of Scott Paper Company. The last ten years of his career were with Marketing Corporation of America in Westport, Conn,. as the Vice Chairman of Development and a Managing Partner. After retiring and moving to Vero Beach, Morgan began a second career working with his good friend and protege, Ronald Blaylock, as he started up his investment banking company in New York City. Morgan commuted from Vero Beach to NYC for a number of years before retiring fully. He is survived by his loving wife of 56 years, Martha Hunter of Vero Beach; son, David Hunter of Gloucester, Mass.; daughters, Beth Hunter of Lexington, Ky., and Susan Hunter of New York; and two grandchildren, Nicole and Rachel Hunter. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Vero Beach Humane Society, 6230 77th Street, PO Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961; the Alzheimer’s Association P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011; or the VNA Hospice,

VNA & Hospice Foundation 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Lillian Josephine Allen Lillian Josephine Allen, 96, died July 27, 2011, at Palm Gardens of Vero Beach. She was born in Glen Cove, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for more than 20 years. Before retirement, she was a legal secretary. She was a member of the National Secretary’s Association. She was preceded in death by her husband, George Allen. She is survived by her daughters, Virginia Wargo-Pitzner of Little Egg Harbor, N.J., and Anne Robinson of Schomberg, Canada. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Willie R. Brown Deacon Willie R. Brown, 75, died July 25, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Tennille, Ga., and lived in Indian River County for 60 years, coming from Homestead. Before retirement, he worked for the Indian River Exchange Packing House for 60 years. He was a member of New Prospect Baptist Church, where he served as a deacon. Survivors include his wife, Karen Faye Brown of Vero Beach; sons, Travis Norris and Jamie Brown, both of Vero Beach; brother, James Hagans of Vero Beach; sisters, Mary E. Darrisaw, Annie Williams and the Rev. Hattie Pearl Hagans, all of Vero Beach, Ernestine Miller of Macon, Ga., and Gloria Hunter of Dorchester, Mass.; and two grandchildren. Levada Cobb Levada Cobb, 82, died July 24, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. She was born in Panama City and lived in Vero Beach for 70 years, coming from her birthplace. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her daughter, Patty Vaughn of Vero Beach; sons, Terry and Kenny Cobb, both of Vero Beach; brothers, Malcolm and Royal Murphy, both of Panama City;

five grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Buren; and sister, Earline.

Josephine Mary Cimino Josephine Mary Cimino, 96, died July 23, 2011. She was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 28 years, coming Enfield, Conn. Survivors include her daughter, Becky Cockerham of Fort Pierce; son, Carmin Cimino of Waterford, Conn.; and eight grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 70 years, Francis Andrew Cimino, in 2008.

son, Milton Crandall Jr. of Roanoke, Va.; caregiver/nephew, J. Emory Crandall; sisters, Louise Bare and Betty Forman; seven grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren.

Mark R. Collins Mark R. Collins, 50, died July 25, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Glenview, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach since 1973, coming from his birthplace. He was vice president of Sebastian Business Supply and founder and owner of Choice Vending Co. He was a graduate of Vero Beach High School, Class of 1978 and attended Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville. Survivors include his parents, John and Linda Collins of Vero Beach; brothers, Clay Collins of Vero Beach and Todd Collins of Jacksonville; and sister, Laura Pyne of Panama City. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA of Indian River County, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Sidney H. Greer Sidney H. Greer, 74, died July 24, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in White Plains, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 40 years, coming from Chappaqua, N.Y. He was an Army veteran. Before retirement, he was a paralegal. He was a member of the Rotary Club of Vero Beach, the Vero Beach Yacht Club and the Hundred Club of Vero Beach. He served on the board of the Vero Heritage Center and on the Vero Beach Airport Commission. He was captain for the Vero Beach Police Auxiliary. He was a member of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America. He was a graduate of Avon Old Farms Prep School in Connecticut and attended the University of Richmond. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Joan Greer of Vero Beach; son, Richard Greer of Tallahassee; daughter, Alison Moody of Vero Beach; sister, Diana Palmer of Winston-Salem, N.C.; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Milton Rhoda ‘Billy’ Crandall Milton Rhoda “Billy” Crandall, 98, died July 23, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Berwyn, Md., and lived in Vero Beach, coming from Atlanta. Before retirement, he worked for the federal government and at the Naval Torpedo Factory in Alexandria, Va., during World War II. Survivors include his wife of 76 years, Lena Bilyard Crandall; daughters, Jean Marie Stephenson of Georgia, Joni Hendrick of California and Vero Beach, and Diane McClung of Vero Beach;

Albert R. Miller Jr. Albert R. Miller Jr., 85, died July 15, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Pavo, Ga., and was a lifetime resident of Wabasso. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Before retirement, he was employed as a bridge attendant by Indian River County at the Old Wabasso Bridge for many years. Survivors include his brother, Randolph Miller of Vero Beach; and sisters, Anita Miller Smith of Sebastian and Sarah Eason of Dunedin. He was preceded in death by his brother, Frank. Memo-


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James Allen ‘Tim’Waite James Allen “Tim” Waite, 78, died July 26, 2011, at University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, Ky. He was born in Bellefonte, Pa., and lived in Florida since 1980 and in Vero Beach since 2008. He had a career in banking and retired from the Florida Department of Transportation. He was a graduate of Penn State University. Survivors include his wife, Jo Ann Elizabeth Rodenbeck Waite; daughters, Caroline Williams and Katharine “Katie” Waite; son, Brian Waite; sisters, Caroline Hutchinson and Madelyn Rial; and five grandchildren.

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Kathryn ‘Kitty’Williams Karst Kathryn “Kitty” Williams Karst passed away July 27, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. A resident of Vero Beach since 1953, Kitty was born in Bradenton, on Oct. 7, 1922. Her family later moved to Apopka and Orlando, where she was an honors graduate from Orlando High School in 1940. She met her future husband Arthur “Art” Karst at at USO dance. Art and Kitty married in 1946, and later moved with their children to Vero Beach in 1953. Kitty was a homemaker and actively involved in several organizations she enjoyed, including the Garden Club, PEO philanthropy, and Sunday School class at First United Methodist Church. She greatly enjoyed playing golf and tennis, the ocean, and boating with her family and friends, and plays at the Riverside Theater and Vero Beach Theater Guild. She will be remembered for her

Thomas Paton Knapp II Thomas Paton Knapp II, 90, died July 24, 2011 at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Blue Point, New York and lived in Vero Beach for 33 years, coming from Remsenburg, New York. He served as a Lieutenant in the US Navy during World War II. He earned his undergraduate degree from Princeton University and his master’s degree from Columbia University. He was a stock analyst and partner with Tweedy, Browne Corporation from 1957-1989. Tom was a member of The Sayville Yacht Club, Princeton Club in Manhattan, Quantuck Beach Club Westhampton Beach, New York, Westhampton Yacht Club, John’s Island Club, Grand Harbor Club, Moorings Club and Quail River Club. Survivors include his wife of 38 years Virginia M. Knapp of Vero Beach and Remsenburg, sons, Gideon Knapp (Sherry), Jonathan Knapp (Debbie), Shepard Knapp, all of Vero Beach, David Schmitt of Colorado Springs, Colo., daughters, Jane Whelhan (Christopher) of The United Kingdom, Jessie Knapp Mendelsohn (Mark) of Vero Beach, Margie Knapp of Vero Beach, step-sons Russell (Christine) Weisenbacher of Manorville, New York and Justin Weisenbacher of Jupiter Island as well as

Christopher Lee Stanton Christopher Lee Stanton, 37, died July 27, 2011, at his home. He was born in Elmira, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 17 years, coming from his birthplace. He was the owner of Natural Nature Lawn Care in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 10 years, Kathleen Nicole Stanton of Vero Beach; sons, Cody Stanton, Caleb Stanton and Collen Stanton, all of Vero Beach, Christopher L. Stanton Jr. and Christopher M. Owens Stanton, all of Elmira; daughters, Ciearra Stanton of Vero Beach and Courtney M. Stanton of Elmira; brother, Earl “Sonny” Stanton, Jr. of Maryland; and sisters, Charlene Edmister of Sebastian, Wanda Leisenring of Fort Pierce and Felicia Bailey of Greensboro, S.C. Memorial contributions may be made to the Chris Stanton Memorial Fund at any Seacoast National Bank, 6030 20th St., Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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Thomas Edward‘Tom’Williamson Thomas Edward “Tom” Williamson, 67, died July 3, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. He was born in Paterson, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach. He was an Army veteran of the Vietnam War. Before retirement, he was employed by Piper Aircraft in Vero Beach as a wingman. He was a member of the Eagles, the American Legion and VFW posts in Vero Beach. Survivors include his daugh-

Concetta “Connie” Genzardi Concetta “Connie” Genzardi, 87, died July 27, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. She was born in Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from New City, N.Y. She worked for the Clarkstown school district in New York for many years. Survivors include her son, Joseph Genzardi of New City; and three grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 50 years, Alfred Genzardi; and sisters, Mary Lipuma and Millie Lipuma.

many grandchildren and many greatgrandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Humanists of The Treasure Coast , 1550 NE Ocean Blvd. Suite F301 Stuart, Fl. 34996 or VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane Vero Beach, Florida 32960. A guestbook may be signed at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Gerald ‘Jerry’Wegner Gerald “Jerry” Wegner, 87, died July 23, 2011, at his home. He was born in Kenosha, Wis., and lived in Vero Beach for 31 years, coming from Lake Forest, Ill. He was a plumber with H.T. Stringer in Lake Forest. He served with the Navy’s VPB 117 Blue Raiders Squadron in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He was a member of the American Legion Post 264 in Lake Forest and was a past commander. He was a past president of the Vero Beach Angler Club and a member of the Harbor Branch Associates. He was a member of the Treasure Coast Rock and Gem Society, serving as treasurer for 10 years and teaching silver smith classes for 25 years. He also was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Mary J. Wegner; son, Gerald Sterling Wegner of Dublin, Ohio; and two grandchildren.

Rosemary Taylor Rosemary Taylor, 93, died July 24, 2011, at Atlantic Health Care Center in Vero Beach. She was a resident of Vero Beach for 70 years, coming from Mississippi. Survivors include her sister, Mary Hudson of Dumas, Alaska. Arrangements are by Cox Gifford Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach.

generosity, hospitality, quick wit, and engaging personality. Kitty was predeceased by her husband Art and brother Jack Williams. She will be missed greatly by her surviving children, Arthur, Jr. (Anita), Jacelyn Prichard (Alan), Janice Karst, and Sharon Oescher (Jim), grandchildren Kelly (Lofton) Fairchild, Katy (Justin) Faires, Bekah (Tony) Conti, Claire Karst, McKenzie Oescher, and Jay ( Angela) Spear; great grandchildren Elise and Laine Fairchild, Caroline Faires, Olivia and Anna Spear; and sister Barbara Aldinger of Orlando. In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions in honor of Kathryn Karst may be made to VNA Hospice or the First United Methodist Church in Vero Beach.

4 ,

Alfredo Torres Alfredo Torres, 90, died July 23, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Colombia and lived in Vero Beach for 12 years, coming from New York. Before retirement, he was a maintenance man in New York. He was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church. Survivors include his sister, Blanca Martinez of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

ters, Dianna Cross of Vero Beach, Marscha C. Pizzino of Kernersville, N.C., and Lorrie Cross of Sebastian; and one grandchild.

A U G U S T

rial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.


26 2 0 1 1

!

Real Estate 950 Lantern Lane Moorings 5/23/2011 $549,000 7/22/2011 $525,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

1602 Camino Del Rio E Indian Bay 1/31/2011 $529,000 7/26/2011 $492,500 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

11 S. White Jewel Court Ocean Pearl 7/8/2010 $530,000 7/21/2011 $485,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

221 Amy Ann Lane Emerald Cove 10/26/2010 $450,000 7/25/2011 $440,199 RealHome Services & Solutions Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

550 Camelia Lane Vero Beach Estates 12/21/2010 $430,000 7/21/2011 $377,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

1715 Ocean Drive, #2B Crown House Condo 5/1/2010 $275,000 7/27/2011 $235,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Billero & Billero

V E R O

!

A U G U S T

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

B E A C H

4 ,

Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – July 21-July 27

Mainland Real Estate Sales – July 21-July 27 Address 2021 Cordova Avenue

Subdivision McAnsh Park

List Date 7/8/2011

!

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Health Care

HEROES

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Do you know a healthcare professional who deserves special recognition? Here is your chance to nominate them to be recognized by the community and their healthcare peers. A panel of judges made up of CEOs and professionals from major Treasure Coast hospitals will select the finalists from your nominations. Sixteen finalists will be selected with the eight winners being honored at the awards luncheon on Friday, September 30 at the Port St. Lucie Civic Center.

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