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Vero Beach N E W S W E E K LY T H U R S D A Y



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Realtors say the stunning waterfront views from the condominiums at Royal Palm Pointe, not to mention an ideal central location, are the best in Indian River County. Home

U.S. veterans gather at the river Property values headed down; island fares better Local

 Memorial Day observanceInside

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Local News

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N E W S W E E K L Y

In Indian River Shores the taxable value of real property -- the amount left over after the tax appraiser's estimation of market value minus available exemptions -- saw just a 0.6 percent drop from the year before. Nolte's initial estimate is that the real property in this small but affluent enclave is $2.49 billion dollars. The relatively small drop in property values in Indian River Shores was in line with reports from barrier island real estate agents that many of

B E A C H

is available and thus what tax rate, known as millage, must be set – and all property owners must pay – when deciding on their 2011-2012 fiscal budgets. “Historically what used to happen, they did their budget, we did the tax roll, you apply one to the other and come up with the millage rate,” he said. “Now most of them are saying we don't want to raise the millage rate so that would equate having to do with 6.2 percent less money if they don't want to change the rate.”

V E R O

Indian River County Property Appraiser David Nolte has put together initial estimates for the upcoming budget season and as expected property values across the county continue to decline. However, some communities fared better than others. Generally barrier island residents will see minimal to slight decreases in their property values, while some mainland areas will be hit with another round of

double digit decreases. "These numbers are subject to change," Nolte said. "These are required estimates I must provide the taxing authorities in the county. But in general this should give everyone a very good idea of what they are looking at in terms of revenue when figuring their budgets." The figures Nolte is handing out to the 18 municipalities and taxing authorities are important because it is the property tax value that will help determine how much revenue

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Property appraiser sees another steep drop in values; island homes fare better


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LOCAL NEWS

PROPERTY APPRAISER FROM PAGE 3

the higher end homes are beginning to hold their value. "They say everything in real estate is location, location, location," Nolte said. "The overall numbers indicate values are dropping, but they haven't dropped equally in all areas. If you are on the river, if you are on the ocean, if you are on a golf course, your value because of your location makes for a different market than the middle of Vero Beach or the middle of Sebastian or the middle of Fellsmere." In fact, Nolte noted that because his estimates cover all of Indian River Shores, there are some communities where their property values may have actually increased over the year before. In Orchid the taxable value dropped a bit more -- 2.6 percent -with homes and other property there being estimated to have a taxable

value of $445 million. Nolte's property value estimates cover all types residential entities and commercial and industrial establishments as well as vacant land. Overall the county will see a 6.2 percent drop in the taxable value of its general fund for a total taxable value of $13.26 billion. That is a larger drop than County Administrator Joe Baird had asked his departments, agencies and the constitutional officers to expect when they recently began deliberations for next year. Baird had asked those officials to figure initially on a 5 percent reduction in their budget allotments. The city of Vero Beach fared slightly better than the county with a 4.5 percent drop in taxable property value as estimated by the appraiser's office. But the city is also facing a further budget hit because of the projected drop in the 2010 census. The city should be receiving proportionally less money from the state because according to the latest cen-

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sus figures its population declined by 8.5 percent from 17,705 in 2000 to 15,220 in 2010. By far the communities that took the biggest hit were Fellsmere and Sebastian, both of which saw double digit drops in their taxable property values. Fellsmere's taxable property value fell 13.6 percent for an estimated total taxable value of $100 million. Sebastian took a 10.8 percent hit and saw its taxable property after adjustments to be worth $880 million. The school district will also have less revenue to work with on top of the budget cuts that came down from the state. Nolte has estimated the district is facing a 6.1 percent drop in taxable property value from which it can generate revenue. Nolte also noted that while local governments would have to reduce their budgets by the estimated decrease in property values his office has estimated, there is a further factor government officials must consider if they are not to raise the out of pocket payment of county taxpayers to the government. Because of the rapid increase in home values during the recent real estate boom Nolte is required by law

to figure in a 1.5 percent increase in many homesteaded properties values regardless if their residences were determined to have decreased overall. Because the way the Save Our Homes law was written, the most Nolte's office can increase the taxable value of homesteaded properties is 1.5 percent a year, even though in the boom times it may have increased much more. This has caused a discrepancy where the fair market value of homesteaded property was far greater than the assessed value. However, Nolte is required by law to reach parity between the fair market value and the assessed value, meaning that in down times even if your home's value has decreased, but it is still above the fair market value, your assessed taxable property value could increase, meaning your tax bill will go up. "Many homeowners are going to see their value of their residences go up 1.5 percent, so if the governing authorities don't change anything and match their budget reductions to the drop in property values, a lot of homesteaded homeowners are still going to see a 1.5 percent tax increase in their property values."

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N E W S W E E K L Y

Two members of the Vero Beach City Council believe members of city staff, especially water-sewer Director Robert Bolton, are failing to provide information they’ve requested repeatedly. “I believe in water and sewer, that is the case,” said Vice Mayor Pilar Turner, one of four council members newly elected in November. At that time, Turner asked for a 10-year projection of the system’s finances. “That was Nov. 16. I never received any information.” Council Member Tracy Carroll agrees. “I have made no secrecy of the fact that I am very upset and concerned with (water-sewer Director Robert Bolton’s) behavior,” she said. She believes he is trying to protect his job, and those of his

employees, as Indian River County commissioners make a bid to buy the city’s water-sewer system. “He’s like a mother hen protecting his chicks.” Members said they do understand someone trying to protect their job. “But when you have a problem, you have to face it,” Turner said. Council member Brian Heady added, “In the public sector you don’t protect your job to the detriment of the public you serve.” Mayor Jay Kramer said, “I certainly have never been denied information.” Council member Craig Fletcher could not be reached for comment. Bolton said, “I work for (Interim City Manager Monte Falls),” who is on vacation and could not be reached. “I’d prefer I have a chance to talk with him before I give any response.”

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B E A C H

BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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V E R O

City staff stonewalling?

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The city would be better off financially if its water-sewer customers who live outside the city limits were no longer served by Vero Beach, said water-sewer Director Robert Bolton in a memo guaranteed to generate robust debate at next Tuesday’s City Council meeting. Asked to project the water-sewer system’s finances through 2023, Bolton provided extensive data that, he said, shows “the Inside City Limits Scenario is more appealing than the Existing System. The Inside City Limits Scenario will generate more surplus cash over the term and provide a

larger percentage of rate revenue.” Under this scenario, water-sewer customers in Indian River Shores, South Beach and unincorporated county areas would leave the Vero Beach system and presumably join the Indian River County system. Vice Mayor Pilar Turner immediately questioned two assumptions that make the scenario work: the county paying $18 million for the pipelines (“That’s absurd; that’s not going to happen.”) and a $5 million expense reduction in a single year, 2017. “A $5 million reduction in expenses which nowhere is explained,” Turner said. “I can prove anything I want if I don’t have to justify the numbers.”

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BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Veterans, admirers gather at the river to remember BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Col. Martin Zickert began the Memorial Island Sanctuary Memorial Day ceremonies by pointing out that Indian River County has as many as 20,000 veterans living in within its borders. That is one in seven people. The veterans who were at the tribute were asked to stand with their

fellow veterans to be honored by everyone who attended. The guest speaker was Col. Peter B. Peterson, who spoke about a liberal government system that has recently ruled that protesters were legally allowed when they rallied at the funerals of soldiers. His words touched many attending who showed their support with applause.

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Special guests on the stage were State Rep. Debbie Mayfield; county commissioners, City Council members and the Memorial Island Sanctuary Committee. Memorial Day, Veteran’s Day, and even the Fourth of July are the days that we bring out our flags for a remembrance of the soldiers who have helped keep our country free but there are many who are still fighting. Chaplain (Capt.) Richard Flick reminded everyone that there were still over 150,000 soldiers currently “in harm’s way.” He prayed for their safety and for the country to keep the needs of our nation and these soldiers in our own prayers.

The Memorial Day celebration had a newer look and an earlier time this year to make it easier for everyone to see the special guests and speakers by being on a raised and covered platform. And being held one hour earlier so it was a touch cooler. Firefighters and coolers of water were on hand to be sure that no one had any problems due to the hot sun. Only one person had to be treated for heat related problems. All in all it was a very special day of memorials and many were dressed to celebrate the occasion in red, white and blue colors and flags or the uniforms of their past service.

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Daniel Glotzer, M.D., FACS Board Certified General Surgeon Fellow of the American College of Surgeons Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Daniel Glotzer and his office provide modern, comprehensive care for your routine and complex surgical problems in collaboration with colleagues in other surgical and medical specialties at Indian River Medical Center. Daniel Glotzer, M.D.

Prior to joining IRMC in early 2011, Dr. Glotzer was a partner in a multispecialty group in Jamestown, NY, where he held the position of Chief of Surgery at WCA Hospital and Westfield Memorial Hospital. Dr. Glotzer also served as WCA Hospital’s Cancer Liaison Physician for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

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After completing his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, Dr. Glotzer went on to complete a fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at Saint Vincent’s Hospital in Erie, Pa. Dr. Glotzer specializes in the following areas: • Breast surgery • Colonoscopy and polypectomy for colorectal disease • Gastrointestinal surgery (stomach, small bowel, colon and rectal surgery) • Melanoma, pancreas, endocrine, thyroid surgery • Minimally invasive hernia repair, gallbladder and colon surgery Now accepting new patients. Call 772.563.4741 to schedule an appointment.

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The Right Care Right Here Colonel Peter B. Petersen, US Army retired, gives the main address.


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Mack Dent salutes during the presentation of colors

Bagpiper Michael Hyde is reflected in the memorial for the POW’s & MIA’s as he solemnly plays before the ceremony.

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Charter High School graduates: “We’re starting our lives now” VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The 2011 graduating class from Indian River Charter High School gathered last weekend at the Vero Beach Performing Arts Center to honor 128 students, most of whom will be heading to colleges around the country next year. “We know what (graduating) means, but I don’t think it’s hit most of us yet,” said valedictorian Rachel Rendon, who will be attending Florida State University in the fall to study biology. “We’re starting our lives now.” As is tradition for the school, for nearly an hour The following is a list of the graduates: Kirstie Meghan Altman Stephanie Yolanda Arizpe Alexandria Leigh Aulick Andrea Shaylynn Bailey Nadine Marie Balbi Evan Raymer Basham Ashley Kaila Baskinger Alexandra Michelle Bigay Taylor Kay Black Megan Frances Boyle Kailey Faith Bradbury Ganga Devi Carina Braun Kaley Briana Brunner Michael Ralph Burzynski Nancy Jocqueline Carvajal Kathryn Gianna Casano Jonathan Taylor Checchi Michael Thomas Chiong Evan Arturo Cisneros Jeremy Matthew Clark Erika Clay Olivier Coq Marlon Dean Dayes Joshua Michael De Well

students filed through a line of faculty and staff members to say their final goodbyes. “It gets harder and harder to let them go,” said Debbie Harrick, senior class adviser for the school, after seeing off the final graduates. “They had a tremendous bond with each other. They were there for each other through thick and thin.” Of the 128 graduates that appeared before a packed house of friends and family, 47 percent were qualified for the the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program and 90 percent were accepted into their

Alan Avelar Delapaz Jimmy Vete Derisse Caroline Mae Director Sinead Down Molly Anne Dunn Brandon Dupuis Emily Jean Eriksen Mark Allen Fadden Jonathon Feigen Jade Marissa Flores Laurence Ellis Flowers Rebecca Christine Foley Taylor Leanne Gates Joseph Giampietro Benjamin Gillis Matthew Ryan Gold Victoria Elizabeth Gonzales Moriah Katherine Gunther Travis Conner Hall Jenna Kaitlyn Hanlon Aleesa Anne Heinz Mariana Fatima Higgins Sarah Michelle Howard Sebastian Taylor Howell Kasim Amin Hussain Shuruk Hussein

Tyler Keron Jenkins Dearrah Michelle Jones Kristen Marie Kaiser Robert Joseph Kalin Jr. Joshua James Karman Elizabeth Tremaine Kenney Derek Richard Knight Sydney Lynn Koestoyo Kendall Nicole Kramer Sarah Nicole Latham Daniela Alexandra Lendl Ashley Erin Levy Lilyanna Ivon Lopez AnnaLee Carroll Lyles Raymond Edwin Macht IV Jessica Anne Marcellaro Nicole Ashley Martin Jessica Rene Mastej Samantha Aryn McCloud Mandy Lynn McElhaney Devon Paul McMann Rylan Koa Mermer Justin Rocco Metz James Monnerville-Frankel Christopher John Moore Briana Lynn Morgan

first choice of schools after graduation. Many students will continue their studies at Indian River State College where the class as a whole earned 1,200 credits. Among the schools students will be attending in the fall are Cornell College, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Purdue University, University of Central Florida, Florida State University, and University of Florida,. The event was as emotional for faculty at the school as it was for the students receiving their diplomas. “We see the promise in (the students),” said Harrick while holding back tears, “and it invigorates the staff.”

Holden James Nagle Dallas Logan Nanney Mary Elizabeth Nethery Aidan O’Grady Elizabeth Leonor Olson Casey Aldena Opper Alexis Justine Velez-Otero Jack Kelly Paige Joshua Guy Pearman Tatiana Penagos Jewelonda Keyon Price Kenneth Joseph Randolfi Maya David Ratsey Mark Andrew Rector Jr. Rachel Nicole Rendon Spencer Alliot Rendon Thomas Royce Retaleato Thomas Lance Riddell Keely Marie Riggs Jeremy Joshua Rodriguez Ana Lourdes Rojas Darinique Ramona Rolle Jordan Ashley Rymer Antoinette Maria Sabga Shannon Sabia Taylor Marie Schlitt

Mary Jean Schofield Kasandra Marie Seymour Ashley Michelle Smiarowski Caricea Mary Smith Brandon Lee Smith Jennifer Ashley Stiles Heather Kathleen Stokes Amelia Jane Strazzulla Megan Rose Sullivan Tevon Jaymezz Swindell Kiya Renee Terry Jared Morton Thomas Ryan Thompson Jared Cory Thornton Kandace Brooke Trodglen Long Phi Truong Nicole Taylor Turnage Christopher Eric Vanderlaan Benjamin James Vold Brittany Mae Walker Kristin Kylie Webb Leigh Anne Wilson Skye Lynn Wyatt Rachel Lynn Young Elizabeth Cindy Zamora Yinuo Zhu Kymberli Bryanne Zuckert


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CONTINUES ON PAGE 10

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It’s Memorial Day, and Ernie Heaton has something serious to say about the two wars in which America is embroiled. Clear-eyed and sharp, with a handsome smile at 88, Heaton has standing to talk about war. He is one of the last two known survivors of a horrific torpedo attack on the troop ship Dorchester in February 1943. Wearing an Air Force cap on in the dining room at his home, Horizon Bay in Vero Beach, his heroism brings complete strangers to the table to introduce themselves and thank him and his good friend, Larry Wapnick, for serving the nation. Heaton worries about the men and women now serving our nation at war. “The big thing right now is they’re fighting a war but they don’t know who they’re fighting,” Heaton said, his voice rising. “They don’t know who they’re fighting or who’ll be shooting at them next or when a bomb will go off on the side of the highway. “Another thing too is this thing of coming home and going back for the second, third time, making that kind of a trip. It doesn’t make sense to me.” And then the talk turns to the evening of Feb. 2, 1943. The U.S.A.T. Dorchester was crowded to capacity, carrying 902 service men, merchant seamen and civilian workers. The vessel had been converted into an Army transport ship. The Dorchester was moving toward an American base in Greenland. Hans J. Danielsen, the ship’s captain, was concerned and cautious. German U-boats were constantly prowling these vital sea lanes, and several ships had already been blasted and sunk. The Dorchester was now only 150 miles from its destination, but the captain ordered the men to sleep in their clothing and keep life jackets on. Many soldiers sleeping deep in the ship’s hold disregarded the order because of the en-

gine’s heat. Others ignored it because the life jackets were uncomfortable. On Feb. 3, at 12:55 a.m., the German submarine U-223 spotted the Dorchester and fired three torpedoes. The one that hit was decisive--and deadly. Danielsen, alerted that the Dorchester was sinking, gave the order to abandon ship. In less than 20 minutes, the Dorchester would slip beneath the surface. The Coast Guard Cutter Comanche saw the flash of the explosion. It responded and then rescued 97 survivors. The CGC Escanaba circled the Dorchester, rescuing an additional 132 survivors. Eventually, Heaton was found. “I was floating amid the debris and dozens of dead bodies were floating up, along with huge amounts of oil and grease,” Heaton said. “I was saturated in it.” That coating of oil and grease is what doctors credited with Heaton’s survival over nine hours in water temperatures that can cause hypothermia and death in less than an hour. Men had jumped from the ship into lifeboats, over-crowding them to the point of capsizing, according to eyewitnesses. Other rafts drifted away before soldiers could get in them. Through the pandemonium, according to those present, four Army chaplains brought hope in despair and light in darkness. Those chaplains were Lt. George L. Fox, Methodist; Lt. Alexander D. Goode, Jewish; Lt. John P. Washington, Roman Catholic; and Lt. Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed. The four chaplains tried to calm the frightened, tend the wounded and guide the disoriented toward safety. “Witnesses of that terrible night remember hearing the four men offer prayers for the dying and encouragement for those who would live,” says Wyatt R. Fox, son of Rev. Fox. None of the four survived.

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Ernie Heaton recalls war horror, worries about U.S. troops

STAFF PHOTO

Larry Wapnick, left, and Ernie Heaton on Memorial Day.

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N E W S W E E K L Y

Two members of the Vero Beach City Council believe members of city staff, especially water-sewer Director Robert Bolton, are failing to provide information they’ve requested repeatedly. “I believe in water and sewer, that is the case,” said Vice Mayor Pilar Turner, one of four council members newly elected in November. At that time, Turner asked for a 10-year projection of the system’s finances. “That was Nov. 16. I never received any information.” Council Member Tracy Carroll agrees. “I have made no secrecy of the fact that I am very upset and concerned with (water-sewer Director Robert Bolton’s) behavior,” she said. She believes he is trying to protect his job, and those of his

employees, as Indian River County commissioners make a bid to buy the city’s water-sewer system. “He’s like a mother hen protecting his chicks.” Members said they do understand someone trying to protect their job. “But when you have a problem, you have to face it,” Turner said. Council member Brian Heady added, “In the public sector you don’t protect your job to the detriment of the public you serve.” Mayor Jay Kramer said, “I certainly have never been denied information.” Council member Craig Fletcher could not be reached for comment. Bolton said, “I work for (Interim City Manager Monte Falls),” who is on vacation and could not be reached. “I’d prefer I have a chance to talk with him before I give any response.”

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BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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City staff stonewalling?

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The city would be better off financially if its water-sewer customers who live outside the city limits were no longer served by Vero Beach, said water-sewer Director Robert Bolton in a memo guaranteed to generate robust debate at next Tuesday’s City Council meeting. Asked to project the water-sewer system’s finances through 2023, Bolton provided extensive data that, he said, shows “the Inside City Limits Scenario is more appealing than the Existing System. The Inside City Limits Scenario will generate more surplus cash over the term and provide a

larger percentage of rate revenue.” Under this scenario, water-sewer customers in Indian River Shores, South Beach and unincorporated county areas would leave the Vero Beach system and presumably join the Indian River County system. Vice Mayor Pilar Turner immediately questioned two assumptions that make the scenario work: the county paying $18 million for the pipelines (“That’s absurd; that’s not going to happen.”) and a $5 million expense reduction in a single year, 2017. “A $5 million reduction in expenses which nowhere is explained,” Turner said. “I can prove anything I want if I don’t have to justify the numbers.”

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Utility chief says city needs no outside customers

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LOCAL NEWS

Four Chaplains monument planned for Sebastian VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

World War II veteran Ernie Heaton   started working six years ago on a monument to honor the four U.S. Army chaplains who died in the 1943 sinking of the USAT Dorchester in the Atlantic Ocean. “We’ve raised $35,000, but we need more.” said Heaton, 87, who is one of two known living survivors of the German torpedo attack on Feb. 6, 1943. “I don’t want to get this part-way done. Once I start it, I want to complete it. The monument will be built on a 50-square-foot site near Sebastian Riverview Park, adjacent to the Veterans Memorial along Indian River Drive. Through the past several years, the design has changed from a glass monument to one created from four pieces of granite fused into one. A massive limestone rock, about 10 feet long, has been donated as the base, which will be placed in a a reflecting pool and be

topped by an eternal flame. There will also be a brick walkway and seating. Four Chaplains memorials already exist in Virginia, New York and Arizona. Larry Wapnick, president of the Four Chaplains Monument Committee, said the memorial will honor the heroic efforts of the four chaplains who represented the Roman Catholic, Jewish, Methodist and Dutch Reformed faiths, and died after giving up their life jackets to servicemen on the sinking ship. The interfaith sacrifice of the four clergymen  should be remembered and honored, Wapnick said. Financial donations to the Four Chaplains Monument can be sent to RBC Bank, 13035 U.S. 1, Sebastian, FL 32958. Checks should be made payable to the Four Chaplains Monument Committee. For more information: Contact Larry Wapnick, president of the Four Chaplains Monument Committee, at 772-532-8749.

STAFF PHOTOS cutline

STAFF PHOTO

The limestone boulder that will form the base of the monument.

HEATON FROM PAGE 9

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Ernie Heaton remembers seeing the four chaplains on the bridge of the ship before the torpedo struck. Through an odd coincidence – he ran into the four officers and saluted them on a street corner in Massachusetts well before the Dorchester sailed – Heaton felt connected to them. The connection has deepened over the decades. He and Wapnick have traveled thousands of miles to tell the story of the four chaplains as having an underlying meaning of the power of “Interfaith in Action,” people of different faiths setting aside their differences to help others in need. Today, ask Heaton how he’s feeling, and he’ll tell you without complaining, “I’ve got problems that developed from what I went through.” He recently had a lung operation and is now cancer-free. But, “I’m in a process right now of possibly losing my left foot. They think possibly they can save it and they’re trying to save it.”


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Editorial

Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island.

misinformed, misguided, or incompetent. It remains a fundamental reality that if one is to comprehend a fuller truth than might be grasped from a single vantage point, then one needs to be open to seeing truth in the round, which requires listening, really listening, to differing points of view. We find less than convincing Mayor Kramer’s assertion that the city can profitably operate its water and sewer services with a smaller customer base. And yet, we would hardly suggest that his opinion and those of others who hold this point of view are to be summarily dismissed. The questions facing the city are not only whether to divest itself of its utilities, but how to do so in a way that best serves the interests of city’s taxpayers, and its customers living outside the city. Should the city ultimately sell its electric utility to FPL, and consolidate its water and sewer system with the County, it then faces the challenge of adjusting to significantly reduced revenues. With a new city manager soon to be onboard, perhaps it’s time to slow the process down long enough to discover where competence might lead us.

Mark Schumann Publisher 978-2246 mark.schumann@scripps.com

Martine Fecteau Account Executive 696-2004 martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com

Michael Crook Managing Editor 978-2238 michael.crook@scripps.com

Carrie Scent Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Ian Love Lead Writer 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com

Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Highway 1, Vero Beach, Florida, 32960 To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004, or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

N E W S W E E K L Y

“Doing good by doing right.”

seeking outside advice have some much of their own advice to give. There are those who are sure that they are sure what is best for the city. They are certain, not only that the city should sell its utilities, but that is should sell now, and at the prices that have been initially offered. Well, we would offer that in complex matters such as these, absolute certainty may be a sign that one has not fully considered the issues, or thought carefully about how they will be resolved. Once when a board of directors faced a particularly difficult and game-changing decision, the chairman asked each member of the board individually to offer their opinion. As they went around the board table, each and every member gave their unqualified support. “Well, then,” the chairman said, “It’s unanimous. Since we are all in agreement, I’d suggest we table this decision until we understand it better.” What concerns us about the tone of the current debate is the inability of some to make any allowance at all in their thinking for competing narratives. Closedmindedness does nothing to broaden the discussion, or to deepen the learning that might be possible if those from different camps would quit assuming that those who disagree with their point of view are

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beyond the competence of a small city government, it belies a lack of historical perspective to suggest that the city has not for decades been well-served by its electric and water and utility employees. Understandably, there is a good deal of frustration with the city for its mismanagement of the electric utilities. A number of poor decisions have led to ridiculously high rates. Deals made with the Florida Municipal Power Authority, and more recently with the Orlando Utility Commission, have not exactly been textbook models in skillful negotiation. Having said that, what’s done is done. Clearly there is reason to be leery of those who would attempt to derail progress, either in the interest of their own job protection, in the case of city staff, or because they are averse to change. Still, if the city is to move forward making wiser choices than it has in the past, O'Connor and the members of Council would do well to move carefully, and deliberately, asking pointed question, insisting on complete information, clarifying relevant issues, avoiding obvious distractions, and where necessary, seeking guidance from well-qualified consultants. We find it more than a little ironic that some who criticize the City Council for

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When Jim O'Connor, current city manager of Winchester, Virginia, assumes his new duties as the city manager of Vero Beach in late July, he will face several pressing issues, all of which will call on the depth of his experience in municipal government. Though O'Connor is well qualified for the job, the fact is that he has bravely assumed an assignment that will require the very best he has to offer, as a communicator, administrator, negotiator, facilitator, and consensus builder. The city’s leaders face difficult choices, as they seeks to either shore up the financial stability of the city’s electric, and water and sewer utilities, or to patiently and skillfully negotiate the sale of these valuable assets. Not only will O'Connor have the task of helping the Council frame the most important questions in ways that will lead to well informed, prudent choices, but he is being called to facilitate this process in an atmosphere at least partially soured by a pervasive notion that the loudest and most determined voices are the ones with the strongest and most compelling arguments. While wise and deliberate debate may well lead to the conclusion that the complexities of operating utilities are now

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City’s challenges will test competence of new manager


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COMMUNITY FORUM

Mutual support furthers health, well being of our nation On December 16, 1773, a band of outraged citizens of Boston boarded three British ships which were loaded with tea, and threw the cargo into the harbor. The protest, which remains an iconic (and much interpreted) event of American history, was about taxation, specifically about The Tea Act passed by the British Parliament in 1773, which required those in the American colonies (who were not represented in England’s parliament) to pay a tax whenever they purchased British tea. But this act of civil disobedience was not -- as some Americans like to suggest today -- a protest about taxation itself, it was rather a protest about taxation without representation. The Boston protesters believed The Tea Act violated their right to be taxed only by elected representatives…they were not questioning the right of government to tax them to produce revenues for the common good. In the year 1630, my great, great,

great, great, great, great, great, great grandparents – impoverished Puritans by the name of John and Sarah Read – landed in Salem, Massachusetts, with John Winthrop’s Great Fleet, and heard him preach the famous sermon SCOTT ALEXANDER “A Model of Christian Charity,” which was perhaps the first American expression of the ideal social contract citizens should have with one another. In the sermon, Winthrop envisioned that, together, those early settlers would build a shining “City upon a hill” of mutuality where  “We must be knit together in this work…we must entertain each other in brotherly affection…we must be willing to abridge ourselves of our superfluities, for the supply of other’s

necessities…we must delight in each other, make other’s conditions our own; rejoice together, mourn together, labor and suffer together, always having before our eyes our commission and community in the work, as members of the same body.” This is the perhaps the original American vision for a healthy and humane and moral society – a society of mutuality and connection…and a society where the disadvantaged were protected. Today --nearly 300 years later -- many who claim the mantle of “The Tea Party” (and assume they represent the ideals of the nation’s founders) decry taxation as the pernicious tool of oppressive, intrusive, excessive government.  As a birthright American, I see it far differently. Like Winthrop – who became the first Governor of Massachusetts -- I believe that we as citizens must belong to one another, and must provide for one another’s basic human needs, often through taxation.   Rugged individual-

ism and social indifference has no place in a compassionate nation. Taxation -- and the programs for the common good it provides – are the means by which we, as a civilized people, ensure that ours is a healthy and humane society. Yes, we can debate the particulars of American taxation, specifically who shall pay how much for the benefit of whom.  But no one should view taxation as some inherently bad thing. When we pay our taxes – justly established by our elected representatives -- we as citizens are compassionately investing in one another, and furthering the health and well-being of the nation. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years.  He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

What’s happening to the art of conversation? BY MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

If you drop a frog in a bucket of hot water the frog will leap to safety. But set that same frog in a container full of room temperature water, then gradually apply heat, and sadly the frog will remain in the water until the rising heat kills him. George Barna describes this phenomenon in his 1984 book, “The Frog In the Kettle.” In a book primarily written for leaders, Barna draws parallels with the many ways individuals and organizations slowly become acclimated to patterns of behavior that are far afield from what they might have hoped for, or intended. Since the publication of “The Frog In the Kettle” over twenty years ago, much of Barna’s work has been in helping organizations be more purposeful, both in steering a steady course, and in fulfilling worthwhile goals.

One of Barna’s central points is that without a clear awareness of how our choices are affecting who we are becoming, we may someday discover that either by neglect, or by simple inattention, we have allowed ourselves to settle for standards once considered unacceptable. This past week I had an opportunity to disconnect from my work long enough to enjoy a honeymoon with my wife, Cheri. For nearly a week Cheri and I were more or less cut off from the incessant stream of email, and voice messages, and texts that punctuate daily life. Receiving and responding to so much written communication often leaves me feeling like a sandpiper that has spent his brief time in the sun darting from point to point with no visible evidence of progress. A week away from work was just long enough for calmness, centeredness,

and focus to begin to seem normal. Then it was, as they say, back to reality. Once I began catching up on email, there they were, the crucially important messages, such as “LOL,” and “What do you think?,” and “Thanks,” and “Sorry,” and “Maybe next time,” and on, and on, and on. One stream of email relating to a simple matter, after everyone on the distribution list had a chance to chime in, made up no less than 20 entries in my in box. How could we get to the point where this level of over communication could possible seem normal? Perhaps it happened gradually, as we got used to receiving 50 email a day, then a 100, then 200. Where will it end? If I could draw anything more artful that stick figures, I’d create an editorial cartoon to illustrate my point. In one panel I would picture a factory in China full of workers actually producing things of value.

In the second panel I would depict a large office full of American “workers” staring at their computer monitors, tapping out messages on their keyboards, messages sent off to the “cloud,” only to return to a neighbor in an adjacent cubicle. How did we get to the point where spending so much of our time writing to each other seems normal? If this trend continues, what will happen to the art of conversation, and where will the day have gone? Quite honestly, I’m finding myself challenged to see any meaningful distinction between the growing addiction to video games among children, and the tendency we adults have of deluding ourselves into thinking that time spent at our computers is necessarily work. My email address is printed on the opposite page, as is my office phone number. Please feel free to call me!


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Famous ‘girl-next-door’ brings out her latest book

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

CONTINUES ON PAGE 14

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Leslie McGuirk, author and owner of McGuirk’s Quirks Design Company, is more than meets the eye. She looks like an approachable beach girl-next-door but her work and international reach is astounding and proves her amazing savvy as a very astute marketer and business woman. On May 26th, she held a book signing of her latest work at the Laughing Dog Gallery, which is owned by her friend, Susie Wilber. Wilber guided her on the design and guided her as she developed the book. When it was complete she was pleased to open her gallery to present the book. Born in Bronxville, N.Y., McGuirk grew up not really knowing she would have a career as an artist or writer and had never been encouraged to go in that direction. It was at Sarah Lawrence College where she studied under famous novelist Allan Gurganus, (The Oldest Living Confederate Tells All), that she found a mentor and supporter whose belief in her talent made her feel like it was the right path for her future. Only three years out of college and McGuirk opened her own design company. PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON Jennifer O’Connell and Pat Nick have their books autographed by Leslie McGuirk

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Susan Lewis with Laughing Dog Gallery owners Jeff and Susie Wilber enjoying the Kilwin’s Chocolates by owner Julie Denning.

Cynthia Hurst, Cynthia Gabenbauer, Pat Marquis and Kitty Elder look through McGuirk’s newest book and some of her past works.

Fans Peter Elder, Allola McGraw, Marvin Graham and Cathy Paris came all the way from Canada and Hobe Sound to see Leslie McGuirk.

Ryan Gragg, Ginger Atwood and David Wagner peruse the art at the Gallery as they visit with the author.

MCGUIRK

ing and humorous coffee table book that produces much conversation and smiles and took over ten years to finalize. McGuirk has been walking beaches and collecting rocks that form the letters of the alphabet and in which she sees the shapes of animals, faces, art and the things that make up our world. Her hardest letter to find was the letter “K” which she keeps guarded at home and when it was finally found, completed her collection. Each page of “If Rocks Could Sing” exhibits the collection consecutively with an object which partners with the letter. She says, “The Rocks truly were “speaking” to me....the ocean has an alphabet and a story to tell, and I guess I am a translator. This is the first book I did not draw. This book was created by the sea...I just pulled it all together.” McGuirk friend and energy healer, Joe Petroski, came to the Laughing

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Her adorable designs caught the attention of Bonwit Teller in New York and Galleries Lafayette in Paris, where she sold self-illustrated greeting cards, fridge magnets and her own line of illustrated t-shirts. McGuirk had been doing research for an environmental group called Earthwatch and began designing tshirts for them with eco-friendly themes and causes. When Glamour Magazine featured an article about her work, an upscale department store, Takashimaya, with stores in Paris, New York and Tokyo, offered her the opportunity in 1993 for her own label. “The World of Leslie McGuirk” line has a huge following of fans in Japan and her “Tucker the Dog” stuffed toy and illustrated merchandise are the

canine equivalent of “Miss Kitty” overseas. “Tucker” has also been made into a cartoon television show in the U.K. and is being developed for the first animated “lift the flap” book by a multimedia company from Canada for iPad and other digital media. So what does a well known author, who has sold over two million books worldwide; textile decorator featured at Tokyo Disneyland; creativity speaker with a successful workshop program, environmentalist who has taught language to dolphins in Hawaii and measured the effects of global warming in Trinidad and Tobago, and helped preserve a bird sanctuary in Mallorca, Spain do in her spare time? Well, let’s just say she “communicates with nature”...and then, of course, she writes a book about it. The book is her newest release, “If Rocks Could Sing.” It is a fascinat-

Dog Gallery book signing. He said that throughout time human beings have collected rocks and the ones they collect are based on the memories of what is familiar to them as they grew up. What is prevalent in the relationship McGuirk holds with her rocks relates to her artistic eye. She meticulously pays attention to the smallest detail. Getting up close and personal to find what is hidden among the sand and shells on the beach takes a creative soul to see what many others don’t see. She uses this innate knowledge she carries in her illustrations, her children’s books and to give workshops called “The Quest for Inspiration” which helps train others to find new ways to create and “notice the little things.” McGuirk’s next book signing will be held at the Vero Beach Book Center on July 21, and her work may be viewed at www.LeslieMcGuirk.com.


BY CHRISTINA TASCON

B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

Bartenders Alex Serkedakis, Nick Tzimenatos and Mike Henry with Dining Room Mgr. Theo Potgetie, Asst. Gen. Mgr. Matt Thomas, and Exec. Sous Chef Brad Willits

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Dina Zasadynski, Lara Fiorelli, Daniel & Angela Tappen, Cindy Goetz, Paul Conti (who originally brought the “White Party” idea to the Hotel), Cassandra Conti and Susy Bryan enjoying the night

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known as “the goddesses”

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White Parties have been hot every summer from South Hampton to South Beach. The Vero Beach Hotel & Spa infused their upscale style into its own version of the White Party this year. Paul Conti, who is an entrepreneur from New York and associated with the Vero Beach hotel through his high-end wedding cake business, had attended many White Parties in Long Island. He brought the idea to the hotel’s marketing director, Laura Melillo, and she thought the idea would be perfect to kick off the summer. Guests were attired in flowing white

dresses and white linen suits to enjoy red, white and blue tropical drinks and a sumptuous buffet in a night dubbed “Underneath the Stars.” Deejay Ed Meade spun out reggae and high energy music with some soft sounds thrown in for the guests to sway to in the ocean breezes. The Vero Beach Hotel & Spa is known for its luxurious accommodations with perfect style. Approximately 200 guests danced and partied the night away from the pool to the romantic bonfire outside of the chic Cobalt Room. The Vero Beach Hotel & Spa is located at 3500 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach. Beth Powell, Jill Jaynes and Lanette Lyons make up part of a group of fantastic women 772-231-5666.

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Quarterback Tim Tebow visits Master’s Academy

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Tim Tebow towered over almost everyone at his interview-style format evening at the Master’s Academy, but his stature is not just one of height. His values and conviction hold him up higher than most others in his field and the controversy that has surrounded him over his religious beliefs make him an easy target. In addition to being voted a Heisman Trophy winner in only his sophomore year and numerous other accolades and awards, Tebow stirred controversy when he painted Bible scripture on his face at the University of Florida. It was noted that over 2 million people Googled the verses. On May 28, Tebow shared stories of his career and his faith to over 800 fans. In his down-to-earth, humorous way he told about his life; his Tim Tebow Foundation; his missionary work and how he made his choices through his faith. Tebow talked about the “platform” with which he had been blessed through his celebrity. He spoke of his wish to lead by example and show young men that God had a plan for each of them and to take advantage of the talents they had. When asked by Academy Coach Don Weston if he might consider being a coach one day and joked that he could do that at Master’s Academy if the NFL lockout continues, Tebow jokingly asked “Do you need a quarterback?” There were many moments of laughter, but it was one audience member’s question that made him momentarily speechless. One little girl quietly asked him who was his favorite team, the Gators or his new team, the Broncos. After much laughter at this difficult spot, he diplomatically chose both. Coach Weston gave him a short word association quiz. Football? “Best time of my life.”

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Shawn Marchetti, Becky Temple and Jennifer Langdon representing sponsor George E. Warren Corp pose with the Tim Tebow poster of his scripture writings painted on his face which caused such controversy at U of F.

“Getting Their Colors On” are Shay Scott with her son Langston, Tori Krause, Madison Mor- Tim Tebow offers a few words about his football career and his faith in an interview gan, Halle Morgan, and Lauren Bowen. styled format at Master’s Academy


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Writing your book? “Hardest thing.” University of Florida? “ A Dream.” Girl? “ Non-existent.” (Big laugh.) Master’s Academy? “Exciting.” Don Weston? (Big pause.) Weston jokes, “I was hoping you were going to say BFF,” to which Tebow responds, “Nice tie.” (Another big laugh.) God? Tebow responds “My life.” What is especially relevant to having Tim Tebow speak at Master’s Academy now is that many of the students are gearing up to play varsity football this year for the first time. When the students return in the fall, they will be able to cheer on their new Varsity tackle football team, The Patriots. Coach Weston and a team of parents explored the possibility of having a tackle football team at Master’s and found a high level of interest in the prospect. Weston said that he “feels the same about football as the academic courses,” it was another opportunity “to show their Christian-like character.” Weston hoped the students listening to Tebow would be inspired to play football this season but more importantly, might show them how to bring their Christian attitude on to the field as well.

Sponsors for Guardian Metals Jennifer Malone and Chip Watson with President of the Gator Club Mandy Robinson and Pres-Elect Richard Giessert wait for the Meet & Greet.

Masters Academy is a Christian school affiliated with First Church of God with a priority on academic excellence. It’s located at 1105 58th Avenue. Visit www.mastersvb.org for more information.

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s?;=uoD;O?;TKDGOD; Enrich your summer at Vero Beach Museum Art School BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

If you’ve got a creative streak, or even if you wonder if you might, there’s a cool way to add art to your life in a hands-on way: Vero Beach Museum Art School classes. The Museum Art School offers a wide selection of studio arts and humanities classes and weekend workshops for people of all ages and skill levels. The Museum’s studio facilities are state-of-the-art, including drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics studios and working foundry. Last year the Museum Art School had over 2,000 students of all ages, from its intensive Master Artist Workshops to the exciting Summer Art Camp program. The summer classes start June 7 or 8, and meet one night a week through Aug. 9 or 10. “During the summer all of our classes are at night because of summer art camp during the day,” said Ellyn Giordano, art school registrar. People with a wide range of abilities attend the classes, she said. “We serve 1,500 students a year in the

ulty are accomplished artists and instructors.” And there’s plenty of encouragement and support. “People sometimes get intimidated,” by the idea of creating art, Giordano said. “Creativity is a muscle -- you must flex it. Everybody has creative ability.” Faculty members include Aric Attas, who has taught photography, art, web design and history of photography at Trinity College, Hartford Art School, and Tunxis Community College; Walford Campbell, who served as the head of Ceramics at Solden Hill House in England, and taught at Edna Manley College in Kingston, Jamaica, Walford’s focus is on surface decoration and larger sculptural forms; and Deborah Gooch, who has shown her artwork in numerous galleries and competitions; PHOTO PROVIDED A Museum Art School student works on a painting in one of and many more accomplished artists. The summer Museum Art School schedule is the school’s many classes available online at http://www.verobeachmuseum. adult art classes,” Giordano said. “Usually org/index.cfm?method=ArtSchool_main. they have a positive experience and we have Call (772) 231-0707, ext.116 for more informaa lot of people who repeat classes. Our fac- tion.

Painter chooses city walls for his canvases VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Forrest DeBlois loves painting large figures on giant pieces of paper and then using wheat paste to temporarily glue them onto the sides of buildings. Brick walls, forgotten walls, stucco walls, they all offer equal fascination for this local artist who was born in Vero Beach. Convinced that public spaces are important and overlooked parts of the human environment, DeBlois, a muralist and figurative painter, specializing in detailed, site-specific indoor and outdoor paintings, is passionate about opening people’s eyes

to the outside places that they pass by all the time and may have forgotten about or grown too accustomed to notice. According to Forrest: “I am trying to change the context of the urban landscape, hopefully to the benefit of those who inhabit it.” The images that are beginning to appear in the Downtown, Dine and Design District are hopefully going to promote, engage and challenge the public to appreciate and look at art in new ways. DeBlois’ work can be seen on the Hibiscus Building across from Pocahontas Park and on Gallery 14’s outside wall at 1911 14th Ave.


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It’s hurricane season for a talented team of boys ages 12 and under – 6th graders – who continue to blow away the competition on their way to the United States Specialty Sports Association National Basketball Tournament July1-4 in Cocoa Beach. How fitting, then, that this team, coached by Todd Wood, calls itself the Vero Beach Hurricanes. The Hurricanes recently went undefeated and captured first place in the Brevard Bulls Space Coast Classic May 15. The Hurricanes have won three other championships this season: the Slamfest Holiday Jam in Fort Lauderdale, the FBVA Slam Jam in Orlando, and Battle at the Beach in Daytona. The Vero Beach Hurricanes are currently ranked third in the nation out of 146 teams in their division, according to the USSSA power rankings. Wood said he did not expect the team to be so successful during their inaugural season. “I knew we had athletic and intelligent kids on and off the court, but I didn’t think that we would be one of the top teams in the nation in only our first year together in USSSA basketball.” Wood, who recruits only boys in Indian River County for this private basketball club, put the Vero Beach Hurricanes team together last summer “Many of our players had played in the Indian River County Recreation Department’s basketball program, but they were always on different teams,” Wood said. “I decided to take these players who had played against each other for years and put them together on the same team because eventually they would end up playing together in high school.” Wood has sized up the level of competition in USSSA, and it’s fierce. Plenty of teams look outside of their communities for players --- something that the Hurricanes organization does not do.

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Boys’ basketball team powers its way to third in nation

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Members of the Vero Beach Hurricanes, a sixth-grade basketball club, wear medals from winning a recent competition.

“Many teams recruit players from other counties to play on their team. I feel that if I am fortunate enough to use local practice facilities, then it’s my obligation to share them with only local kids. I am extremely proud of the fact that all of our players come from Indian River County,” Wood said. It’s a diverse group that represents Indian River County well. Among the players, Thomas Bockhorst attends St. Ed’s Lower School.   Willie Cummerford attends Master’s Academy. Daniel Bacon is home-schooled. Wayne and Jarez Parks attend Sebastian River Middle School.

EJ Davis and Alfonso Wynn are at Oslo Middle School, while Zack Tench, Harrison Wood and Martin Walker attend Gifford Middle School, Wood said. The Hurricanes boast an impressive record of 30 wins and three losses and are currently preparing for the Southeast Regional Championships in St. Lucie County this weekend and the state and national tournaments in June and July. “It’s been an incredible run so far. We have great players, parents, and coaches and we love traveling all over the state representing our wonderful community,” Coach Wood said.

Wood said he’s probably not the only person to be surprised by the competitive quality of the Hurricanes. “When we began participating in these tournaments in larger cities like Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, I’m sure teams saw ‘Vero Beach’ on the schedule and didn’t think much of us or even knew where Vero Beach was,” Wood said. “Well they all know who we are and where we are now.” The Vero Beach Hurricanes is a nonprofit organization. If you would like to contribute to the team, please contact Coach Wood at 772-713-6742


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c:? dOKMLRC?= Penny Chandler making business work in Indian River County BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Indian River County Chamber of Commerce President Penny Chandler was at a crossroads in 1995. She was living in Annapolis, Md., heading up that capital city’s chamber of commerce. Her daughter had just married and graduated college and Chandler was looking for a new challenge. She decided to apply for the job in Vero Beach even though she admits at the time she didn’t know a single person in the state of Florida. “I knew I wanted to be near water after all that time I spent on Chesapeake,” said Chandler. “So water was an issue. At the time they were doing a national search and I saw Vero Beach, and even though I had never heard of it, well, it met at least one of my criteria.” While Chandler was looking for a new adventure, the county chamber of commerce was going through its own change in direction. “After the first interview, I wasn’t sure I wanted the job,” said Chandler, who has been working with chambers of commerce since 1981. “This was a chamber that was going to be a turnaround. The board had decided they wanted a different kind of an organization, they wanted a more open philosophy.” Chandler was brought in to replace J.B. Norton, the former longtime head of the local chamber of commerce. “I think J.B. had been in place since the 1950s,” said Bill Curtis, who has served as chairman of the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors during Chandler’s tenure. “He was an old-fashioned chamber guy that focused on tourism more than anything else, but wasn’t doing a lot to help businesses or generate economic development.” The search committee was able to sway Chandler and in the fall of 1995 she moved down with her dog and her cat and set about promoting Indian River County as a place that is not only nice to visit, but

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Indian River County Chamber of Commerce President Penny Chandler at work.

where one could conduct business as well. “What sold me was the people I met on the search committee and the members of the board of directors were really passionate about what they wanted to see and the advocacy for the business community,” she said. Chandler set about changing the culture and the direction of the organization and making it able to compete with all other communities that were working to bring jobs to their area. “Penny came to Vero Beach about the

same time I moved back here for the second time,” Curtis said. “We were within a couple of weeks of each other. We went out to lunch and Penny told me what she was trying to do and I told her I want to be a part of that so I signed up to work with her.” Chandler has been gaining support and supporters ever since. She and her staff have worked tirelessly building bridges to make Indian River County a better place for existing businesses and to attract new businesses to set up shop.

“It’s taken a while, but I believe everyone understands now the impact the business community has on the economic well-being and the sustainability of the community in which they live,” she said. “It takes a combination of resources that keeps a community sustainable. While seasonal jobs are important, no community depends on its lowest-paying jobs to sustain it. And you can’t sell your community if all you have to brag about is low wages.” The Chamber has targeted smallersized businesses with 25 to 50 workers to help build the economic diversification everyone sees as vital since the recent economic recession left the local economy with up to 15 percent unemployment. There have also been some major successes, such as the community-wide year-long effort to keep Piper from moving elsewhere to build its PiperJet; the selection by CVS to build its distribution center just west of 1-95 -- despite some pointed objections within the community -- and most recently the decision by INEOS New Planet BioEnergy to build its ethanol producing plant to Indian River County. The test plant currently under construction on west Oslo Road will be designed to take waste product from the nearby landfill and turn it into ethanol, which will be used as an additive for gasoline. “It is great news for our county to have the INEOS corporate headquarters located here in Indian River County,” she said. “They plan to use it as a demonstration project and will bring people from all over the world. They will be staying here, eating here. It puts Indian River on the map as a place where this new alternative fuel is being developed.” For its work on the project the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce, Indian River County Commission and Enterprise Florida earned the Community Impact Award from Trade and Industry Magazine.


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cierge. “The view is what people probably notice the most,” she said. “When I would bring people up one of the next

things they would mention is the size.” The Royal Palm Pointe condominiums were the focal point of a redevelopment effort in the area east of In-

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Among the amenities are a heated pool, temperature controlled garage, and concierge service.

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The 18 units that make up the three-building complex offer a balcony river view that spans from bridge to bridge.

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Situated on the Indian River just minutes from beachside dining and shopping are 18 condominium residences offering arguably the best waterfront views in all of Indian River County. The three-building, three-story complex offers two units per floor, each accessible by private elevator. And each offers over 3,500 square feet of living space plus that southerly view of the Intracoastal Waterway. “I just can’t think of a more convenient place for someone to be,” said Jane Schwiering of Norris & Company, who has one of the units listed for sale. “And you certainly will never get tired of the view. It is ever-changing with boats going by and the sea life.” Indeed the condos are just walking distance from shopping and both casual and fine dining and it takes just minutes to cross the bridge to take advantage of the island’s many shopping and dining offerings. Pat Holm has her No. 7 unit for sale. She bought originally as an investment, but ended up moving in for an extended stay while overseeing the remodeling of her island home. “I am an original tenant of this condo,” Holm said. “I had originally bought it as an investment and then when I decided to remodel my home I ended up living here for three years. I was in an exercise club with Don Proctor and he told me about this project he was working on. Proctor builds wonderful, strong buildings.” While the view is one of the most stunning attractions, Holm notes it is not the only thing. While visitors are taken aback by the outside scenery, the next thing they notice is the spacious living area with three bedrooms, island kitchen, and open layout perfect for both casual and formal entertaining. Among the amenities offered owners are a heated pool and spa and a con-

dian River Boulevard. A group of Vero Beach investors purchased the riverfront property when the Chart House restaurant closed its doors. After surviving the 2004 hurricanes the units went up for sale in 2006. “The location was selected because of the incredible views,” said Fred Peters, one of the developers in the project. “When they made the corporate decision to close the restaurant a small group of Vero Beach investors purchased it. We knew there were few locations like that on the river so there was uniqueness to it.” Peters said 16 of the 18 units sold out almost immediately and the other two remain available for purchase. “Royal Palm Boulevard from east of Indian River Boulevard was redeveloped in the hope that the surrounding property owners would redevelop their properties,” Peters said. “We were probably the first ones in there to do a redevelopment on the street and we had a very successful project, we still do have a couple of beautiful units that are still available.” Holm says there is a vibrant lifestyle connected with the condominium and surrounding businesses. “I have grandchildren and they liked to go to the fountains, we just walked to them,” she said. “We also used the restaurants down there. The views all around are spectacular and there is always a breeze.” As much as the location, lifestyle and amenities make the Royal Palm Pointe condominiums an attractive option, sellers and buyers will always eventually get back to what makes it special -- that spectacular view. “You see so many different things depending on the time of the year,” Holm said. “There is a lot of activity going down that river between barges and boats. And the wildlife, we see porpoises and birds and everything else you can imagine, it’s wonderful.”

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Favorite culinary vices found at Publix I recently came across a new food-related word. It’s “ORTHOREXIA,” and it’s used to describe an upand-coming rich-folks’ psychiatric condition where a person has an unhealthy obsession with eating only healthful or correct food. The problem for these folks, naturally, is that they miss out on the fifth food group – junk food. For all my many faults, I’m fairly confident that I’m not orthorexic. To wit: let’s take a walk through my go-to grocery store, the Publix on Miracle Mile, and let me share some of my favorite culinary vices. Skyline Chili. This you’ll find in the frozen section near the corn dogs. It’s a Cincinnati-style chili, which means the meat is finely ground, and it’s seasoned with cinnamon, among other things. This stuff is not intended to eat straight. Instead, you nuke it and serve it over spaghetti, and then garnish the lot with chopped onion, grated cheddar or parmesan cheese, and all the hot sauce you want. It makes a perfect, effortless Tuesday night dinner for the kids (and me). White Mountain Bread. If the Publix bakery should be famous for anything, it is this bread – light as air, but with a wonderful chew to the crust. The stuff is such a celebration of bleached while flour that it’s even dusted with the stuff to drive home the point. Make sure you ask the staff to slice the bread for you on their machine, because there is no way you cut this stuff at home

without crushing it. Try a fresh tomato sandwich with mayo and lots of black pepper. “El Ebro” brand Galician Bean Soup. Here’s one I’ll bet you’ve never even looked at. It’s soft white beans and potatoes swimming in a dull brown sauce, studded with fatback, smoked pork and chorizo. Absolutely delicious. You’ll find it hidden in the canned goods isle. By the beans, not the soups.

NICK THOMAS

Boar’s Head Mortadella. If there is one thing that separates Publix from the high-minded organic stores such as Whole Foods, is that Publix has no compunction about selling delicious deli meats, regardless of whether they contain nitrates. And mortadella is one of the crowned princes of preserved meats. An Italian forbearer to our bologna, mortadella is a similar but more bulbous tubular meat, highlighted by chunks of white pork fat and pistachios. Exemplary. And very nice on White Mountain Bread, with a bit of Coleman’s hot mustard.

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Swanson’s Chicken Pot Pies. To me, this is the ultimate junk comfort food. I subsisted on these things in college, and I still treat myself to a few from time to time. Still just around a buck a piece, the tin pie pan has now been replaced by a high-tech, microwavable vessel, but the goopy, doughy vibe is just the same. I plop them out, still frozen, into a wide bowl, cover the works with a paper towel, and set the microwave for five minutes. Once the frost has been overcome, I stir the works together, and nuke it for another two minutes, until it is molten. A guilty delight. Publix is truly one of the things that makes living in Vero so wonderful. I’ve lived in bigger cities. I’ve had access to much more variety. But I honestly never feel short changed. The next time you walk in to Publix, drink in the scene. Is it even decent to have this much variety and quality at our fingertips? Look at the staff. Why are they so happy? The answer is simple. They are treated with respect. With over 1,000 stores, and over 140,000 employees, Forbes magazine has ranked Publix as one of the top 100 companies to work for. One big reason why is that this huge corporation is entirely employee owed. You work there, you’re an owner. Nick Thomas is a lawyer and certified family mediator. Reach him at nthomaslaw@comcast. net.

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Community Calendar

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To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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Business Association, or online at www. VeroBeachOBA.com. June 13-August 5: Summer Art Camp at the Vero Beach Museum of Art. In the studios of the Museum Art School. Children ages 4-6 spend a week or more in a creative, childcentered environment to explore new ideas, develop skills, and build self-esteem through art. Summer Art Camp provides a choice of 65 morning and afternoon classes in eight week-long sessions offered by expert instructors. For more information, call Museum Art School Registrar Ellyn Giordano at 772-231-0707 x116 or e-mail her at egiordano@verobeachmuseum.org. June 16: Liberty Forum of Indian River County presents a free Constitution Forum Discussion that is held on the third Thursday of every month. This is for anyone who wishes to be reintroduced to the Constitution of the United States.Classes are held at the Vero Beach Recreation Center, 2266 14th Avenue 6:30-7:30pm. Non-partisan and intended solely as an educational program. The presenters of this

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Caribbean as far south as South America, the Gulf of Mexico, and have been spotted up the Atlantic Seaboard as far north as Long Island and continue to reproduce at an alarming rate. Bob Hickerson, Maria Andreu & Pamela Schofield. Off season lectures are presented monthly on a Wednesday. An opportunity to meet the speaker, appetizer buffet and cash bar follow the presentation. The lectures are open to the public, free of charge and reservations are not required. For more information please call 772-242-2506. Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at FAU 5600 US 1 North, Fort Pierce, FL 34946 June 11: Vero Beach Theatre Guild Genie Awards, 6-9pm, Elks Lodge 1350 26th Street Vero Beach. June 11: The Oceanside Business Association Sunset Saturday Night Concert Series presents a Beach Blanket Sock Hop with music by the Beach Cruisers. On Saturday, June 11th, from 6:30-9:30pm at Humiston Park on Ocean Drive in Vero Beach, FL. Our featured charity is our local Youth Guidance program. For more information: facebook us at Oceanside

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STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

class do not represent any political party or political movement. June 18: The Seventh Annual Waterlily Celebration at McKee Botanical Garden. McKee Botanical Garden is at 350 US Highway 1 in Vero Beach.  Hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday 10am-5pm and Sunday noon-5pm.  Garden is closed Mondays Admission is $9 adults, $8 seniors, $5 children 3-12 and free to members and children under three. For more information call 772-794-0601 or visit www.mckeegarden.org. June 18: The Democratic Women’s Club of Indian River County will hold a potluck luncheon beginning at 11:30am Saturday, June 18, 2011 at the Indian River County Main Library in the Multi-Purpose Room. The featured guest speaker will be Rev. Denny Hart of the Indian River NAACP. For more information, contact Linda MacDonald at 772-234-3473 or linmacd@gmail.com. June 18: Vero Beach Book Center event at 11am: “Donuts with Dad” Father’s Day Celebration with Miss Julie and special guest author and illustrator Ethan Long presenting My Dad, My Hero in the Children’s Store. Stories and Refreshments too. Every Sunday: Join us at the Sunday Market every week from 9am-2pm in historic downtown Vero Beach at the corner of 14th Avenue & 21st Street. Vendor information: Booth rental fee is $25 per week. To register or for more information, contact Eric Hessler by email: eric@mainstreetverobeach.org or call the Main Street office at 772-480-8353

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Through June 11: The Vero Beach Museum of Art presents “Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection.” (Admission to general exhibitions and education wing exhibitions is free. For some special exhibitions, a variable admission fee will apply. Members and young people 17 years of age and under attend all exhibitions free of charge. Donations are welcome.) 772-231-0707 Through July 14: Indian River County Courthouse Vero Beach Art Club Member Exhibition, 2000 16th Street, Vero Beach Monday-Friday 9am-5pm. June 3-4: The 7th Annual Offshore Big 3 Fishing Tournament to benefit Hibiscus Children’s Center will be held Friday and Saturday, June 3 and 4 at the Ft. Pierce City Marina. The tournament will again coincide with the downtown festivities of Friday Fest and the popular Saturday morning Farmers Market. Anglers must bring their catch by boat to the Ft. Pierce City Marina. Weighin begins at 3pm and ends at 5pm. For information about the tournament, call Angela Astrup at 772-978-9313 x313 June 4: Join us for a fun-filled night of dancing, tropical cuisine and islandstyle rhythms from Gypsy Lane. Saturday June 4th, 2011, 7-11pm Tickets: $60 before June 1st ($70 thereafter) Proceeds to provide summer camp scholarships and year round programming for the children of Youth Guidance. 772-770-5040 June 8: Lionfish, A Perfect Invader? The lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific region has managed to accomplish what no other previous marine species has ever been able to … they have now established themselves throughout the


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Obituaries

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Robert Gerber Retired Army Col. Robert M. Gerber, 90, died May 22, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Moore, Okla. Survivors include his daughter, Kathy Gerber Tangney of Fort Pierce; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and two greatgreat-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 30 years, Grace V. Parry Gerber; and one son, Glenn Robert Gerber. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 5011 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory of Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at strunkfuneralhome.com.

Herbert Holin Herbert Frederick Holin, 72, died May 22, 2011, at his home. He was born in Riverside, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Plantation. He was a member of the Indian River Club and attended Our Savior Lutheran Church. Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Carolyn; sons, Matthew Holin of Westfield, Wis., and Andrew Holin of Sun Prairie, Wis.; daughter, Marnie Gaskell of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the Building Fund at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1850 6th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by CoxGifford-Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Frank A. Lampe III Frank A. Lampe III, 65, died May 24, 2011, at his home. He was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 26 years, coming from Ohio. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War. He was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Gloria; son, Brian Lampe of Tampa; mother, Mary Jane Lampe of Boca Raton; sister, Cheryl Case of Dayton,

Ohio; and brothers, Kari Lampe of Troy, Ohio, and Jack Lampe of Cleveland. He is preceded in death by his son, Boyd Dominic; and father, Frank A. Lampe II. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Helen Catholic Church, 2085 Tallahassee Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960 Arrangements are with Cox-GiffordSeawinds Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Loy Schasane Loy Schasane, 75, died May 24, 2011, at her home. She was born in Zion, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach since 1955, coming from Illinois. She worked at the Powder Puff/Studio 19 Salon for more than 30 years. Survivors include her husband of 58 years, Joe Schasane of Vero Beach; son, Wayne Schasane of Vero Beach; daughters, Florinda Mazzarella and Cheryl Monroe, both of Vero Beach; sister, Karen Schmucker of Vero Beach. She was preceded in death by her brother, Jack Robinson; and sister, Yolanda Schasane. Memorial contributions may be made to Calvary Chapel Mission Fund, 941 18th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Thomas S. Lowther Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Ralph Stokes Ralph E. Stokes, 90, died May 20, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Cleveland and lived in Vero Beach for 13 years, coming from Oklahoma City. Survivors include his daughter, Sallie Kaible of Long Island, N.Y.; sons, Ralph E. Stokes III of Oklahoma City, David L. Stokes of Vero Beach and Keith D. Stokes of Long Island, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 300, Jacksonville, FL 32256. Arrangements are by Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Walter Stugis Walter C. Stugis, 94, died May 24, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Rochester, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for nine years coming from Weed, NM. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his son, Walter Stugis of Hastings-onHudson, N.Y.; daughters, Gerry Nogelo of Vero Beach and Elaine Wright of Weed; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 65 years, Lillian Stugis. Memorial contributions may be made to the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, 34 Washington St., Suite 300, Wellsley Hills, MA 02481. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Peter White Peter Joseph White, 100, died May 20, 2011, at his home. He was born in Newfoundland, Canada, and lived in Vero Beach for 11 years, coming from South Weymouth, Mass. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 70 years, Rita M. White of Vero Beach; daughter, Ellie Turner of Vero Beach; one grandchild; and four great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at strunkfuneralhome.com.

Frances T. Branan Frances T. Branan, 85, died May 24, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Atlanta and lived in Vero Beach for 61 years. She was a member of First Baptist Church for more than 40 years and charter member of Immanuel Baptist Church. Survivors include her sons, Rick Branan of Clemson, S.C.,

Mike Branan of Kissimmee and Ron of Vicksburg, Miss.; daughter, MaryFrances Womack of Vero Beach. She was preceded in death by her husband, Sam; and brother, Paul Thomas. Memorial contributions may be made to Florida Baptist Retirement Center, 1006 33rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Lowther Funeral Home is handling the arrangements. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Nancy Curnin Nancy E. Curnin, 75, died May 23, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Glen Cove, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for five years, coming from Atlanta. She was a member of the Community Church in Vero Beach, Orchid Island Golf and Beach Club and Indian River Medical Center Auxiliary Pink Ladies. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Peter J. Curnin of Vero Beach; sons, Peter C. Curnin, Jay T. Curnin and Jeffrey A. Curnin, all of Atlanta; brother, Charles Luyster of Huntington, N.Y.; sister, Esther Glover of Long Island, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to the Indian River Medical Center Auxiliary Pink Ladies, 1000 36th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by CoxGifford-Seawinds Funeral Home in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Eleanor Ferrara Eleanor Ferrara, 96, died May 24, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Washington, Pa. and lived in Vero Beach for 21 years, coming from Stamford, Conn. Before retirement, she was a seamstress. She was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, Gary Ferrara of Vero Beach; daughter, Dorothy Scully of Woodbury, Conn. She was preceded in death by her husband of 55 years, Carmine Ferrara. Arrangements are with Cox Gifford Seawinds Funeral Home, Vero Beach.


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OBITUARIES

Michael Carlton

Donald Nelson

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N E W S W E E K L Y

Service Directory

B E A C H

William D. Thompson, 89, died May 24, 2011, at his home. He was born in Edgewood, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from Darien, Conn. Survivors include his wife, Anne Thompson of Vero Beach. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Margaret Thompson; and second wife, Mimi Coleman. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

V E R O

Dr. Robert V. Radin, 83, died May 27, 2011, at his home. He was a life-

Elizabeth “Libby” V. Brungard, 77, died May 28, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Lock Haven, Pa., and lived in Vero

William Thompson

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Robert Radin

Elizabeth Brungard

Beach since 1985. Survivors include her husband of 58 years, James Sr. Memorial contributions may be made to The American Diabetes Association. A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. June 4 at Sebastian Christian Church, Sebastian. Arrangements are by Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory, Sebastian.

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Donald Jay Nelson, 75, died May 25, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Evanston, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach for 31 years, coming from his birthplace. He was a volunteer for the Elks Lodge in Vero Beach and former member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Valentine Nelson of Vero Beach; son, Marc Nelson of Vero Beach. Arrangements are with Strunk Funeral Home in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

long resident of Vero Beach. He practiced medicine in Vero Beach since the early 1970s. Survivors include his sons, Richard Radin of Apopka and Stephen Radin of Nebraska; daughters, Suzanne Runge of Vero Beach and Stefanie Young and Janet Haun, both of Nebraska; brother, Benjamin Radin of South Carolina; sister, Maxine Case of Nebraska. He was preceded in death by his wife, Frances Radin. Memorial contributions may be made to the Unity Center, 950 43rd Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960-6140. Strunk Funeral Home, Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Michael H. Carlton, 96, died May 21, 2011, at his home. He was born in Athens, Ga., and lived in Vero Beach for 58 years coming from Orlando. He was a charter member of the First Presbyterian Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 68 years, Edith Scarboro Carlton of Vero Beach; sons, Robert Carlton of Vero Beach, Donald Carlton of Fort Pierce and Lee Carlton of Vero Beach; daughter, Ann CarltonSinnott of Fort Pierce. Memorial contributions may be made to the First Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach, 520 Royal Palm Blvd., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory in Vero Beach. A guestbook is

available at www.coxgiffordseawinds. com.

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A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.


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Real Estate

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – May 19-May 25

Address 1616 Ocean Drive, #209 601 Iris Lane 702 Banyan Road 2165 Galleon Drive, #G3 5400 Highway A1A, #C5

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

10601 Charleston Drive Windsor 1/20/2010 $2,999,000 5/25/2011 $2,700,000 Windsor Properties Windsor Properties

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

103 Spring Line Drive Anchor the Moorings 11/3/2009 $1,195,000 5/23/2011 $1,025,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. The Moorings Realty Sales Co.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

805 Starboard Drive Moorings 11/8/2010 $695,000 5/23/2011 $600,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. The Moorings Realty Sales Co.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

2245 Southwinds Blvd. N, #204 Southwinds 5/2/2010 $525,000 5/24/2011 $470,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. The Moorings Realty Sales Co.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

110 Lob Lolly Reach Shores 12/11/2010 $450,000 5/23/2011 $455,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

1616 Ocean Drive, #203 Sea Cove 3/20/2011 $349,900 5/20/2011 $305,000 Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

604 Eugenia Road Veromar 11/1/2010 $300,000 5/19/2011 $300,000 Norris & Company Palm Pointe Realty

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

1607 Redbay Circle Sea Oaks 9/10/2010 $299,000 5/20/2011 $280,000 Norris & Company Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl.

Subdivision Sea Cove River Oaks Estates Vero Beach Estates Windward Condo Vista Del Mar

List Date 3/6/2011 4/19/2010 3/9/2011 6/10/2010 5/2/2011

List Price $299,000 $310,000 $249,900 $189,900 $85,000

Sell Date 5/19/2011 5/25/2011 5/20/2011 5/20/2011 5/20/2011

Sell Price $275,000 $275,000 $210,000 $182,500 $80,000

Listing Broker Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. RE/MAX Premier Prop Showcase Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc.

Selling Broker Billero & Billero Properties Re/Max Beach & Beyond Norris & Company Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Mainland Real Estate Sales – May 19-May 25 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker: Address 877 22nd Place

Subdivision Linwood

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

7825 1st Street SW Indian River Farms 10/25/2010 $309,000 5/20/2011 $272,000 RE/MAX Premier Prop Showcase Peters Cook & Co. List Date 2/22/2011

List Price $234,000

Sell Date 5/23/2011

Sell Price $200,000

Listing Broker Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

773 Hampton Woods Lane SW Indian River Club 8/16/2010 $299,000 5/24/2011 $282,000 Norris & Company

Selling Broker Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.


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s?;=uoD;O?;TKDGOD; Enrich your summer at Vero Beach Museum Art School BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

If you’ve got a creative streak, or even if you wonder if you might, there’s a cool way to add art to your life in a hands-on way: Vero Beach Museum Art School classes. The Museum Art School offers a wide selection of studio arts and humanities classes and weekend workshops for people of all ages and skill levels. The Museum’s studio facilities are state-of-the-art, including drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics studios and working foundry. Last year the Museum Art School had over 2,000 students of all ages, from its intensive Master Artist Workshops to the exciting Summer Art Camp program. The summer classes start June 7 or 8, and meet one night a week through Aug. 9 or 10. “During the summer all of our classes are at night because of summer art camp during the day,” said Ellyn Giordano, art school registrar. People with a wide range of abilities attend the classes, she said. “We serve 1,500 students a year in the

ulty are accomplished artists and instructors.” And there’s plenty of encouragement and support. “People sometimes get intimidated,” by the idea of creating art, Giordano said. “Creativity is a muscle -- you must flex it. Everybody has creative ability.” Faculty members include Aric Attas, who has taught photography, art, web design and history of photography at Trinity College, Hartford Art School, and Tunxis Community College; Walford Campbell, who served as the head of Ceramics at Solden Hill House in England, and taught at Edna Manley College in Kingston, Jamaica, Walford’s focus is on surface decoration and larger sculptural forms; and Deborah Gooch, who has shown her artwork in numerous galleries and competitions; PHOTO PROVIDED A Museum Art School student works on a painting in one of and many more accomplished artists. The summer Museum Art School schedule is the school’s many classes available online at http://www.verobeachmuseum. adult art classes,” Giordano said. “Usually org/index.cfm?method=ArtSchool_main. they have a positive experience and we have Call (772) 231-0707, ext.116 for more informaa lot of people who repeat classes. Our fac- tion.

Painter chooses city walls for his canvases VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Forrest DeBlois loves painting large figures on giant pieces of paper and then using wheat paste to temporarily glue them onto the sides of buildings. Brick walls, forgotten walls, stucco walls, they all offer equal fascination for this local artist who was born in Vero Beach. Convinced that public spaces are important and overlooked parts of the human environment, DeBlois, a muralist and figurative painter, specializing in detailed, site-specific indoor and outdoor paintings, is passionate about opening people’s eyes

to the outside places that they pass by all the time and may have forgotten about or grown too accustomed to notice. According to Forrest: “I am trying to change the context of the urban landscape, hopefully to the benefit of those who inhabit it.” The images that are beginning to appear in the Downtown, Dine and Design District are hopefully going to promote, engage and challenge the public to appreciate and look at art in new ways. DeBlois’ work can be seen on the Hibiscus Building across from Pocahontas Park and on Gallery 14’s outside wall at 1911 14th Ave.


Vero Beach News Weekly