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Summertime fun The Comedy Zone at Riverside Theatre has become a‘date night’destinationPage 20

World War II heroes remembered The second installment of our tribute to local fallen veteransPage 9

PHOTO BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Christmas in July begins Love Doctors toy charity drive. Story page 17

NewhomeforAudubonvolunteers

Aides serve as‘environmental ambassadors’Page 4

Picture perfect How to get just the right shot of your favorite little leaguer or soccer starPage 23

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county officials have introduced a budget that doesn’t seek to recover those dollars through a “roll back,” rate, which adjusts the millage rate to recover the same amount of revenue as the year before. Instead, the county anticipates collecting $3.4 million less in ad valorem taxes in the next fiscal year. “That’s another $6 million left in the pockets of the people who actually earned it,” Solari told the Press Journal after the budget workshop. Of the $252 million budget, the $69.4 million derived from property taxes represents 27 percent of the total revenue. This year the ad valorem portion was $72.8 million. Taxpayers in the unincorporated areas will pay $6.25 per $1,000 of assessed taxable value, a drop from this year’s rate of $6.31.

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the local tax levy or a 4.7 percent drop. This represents a cumulative drop of more than $25 million since the 2009-10 fiscal year. “Under the proposed budget, Indian River County taxpayers will pay less property taxes to county government in 2012 than the current year,” Baird wrote in a budget workbook summary. Like much of the nation, Indian River County has been troubled by decreasing property tax values, having lost about $103 million since the 2006 fiscal year. Budget Director Jason Brown said property values in the county were down 3.6 percent over the past year. Ad valorem, or property taxes, are derived from the total assessed value, but faced with the continuing drop in property values,

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY – The austere times that Indian River County has endured the last few years have resulted in sharp cuts to the county budget and a significant number of layoffs. County commissioners introduced a proposed 2012-2013 budget this month that shaves costs and decreases property taxes, a result achieved in part by cutting nine jobs – five of them through attrition and four from layoffs. The net effect will be to trim $620,426 in payroll expenses. The elimination of one of the jobs in the proposed 2012-2013 budget could impact the county’s efforts to educate the community about measures that can be taken to protect the health of the Indian River lagoon. One of the jobs eliminated last week was that of county storm water education coordinator Diane Wilson. County Commissioner Bob Solari said he is working with Commissioner Peter O’Bryan to develop some new storm water education initiatives and both commissioners plan to champion that cause and work to improve education about fertilizer use and the health of the lagoon. Solari said he expects O’Bryan to discuss the matter at an upcoming meeting. One approach under consideration is to have information inserted in utility bills. “The commissioners will have to work a little harder at pushing the education to other areas,” Solari said. “I believe education is the best way to go.” Solari said he still believes storm water education and informing the community about best environmental practices to reduce the levels of nitrogen and phosphates

entering the lagoon are important. “Unfortunately we lost Miss Wilson so we’ll have to do what we’ve done in other areas and try to do more with less,” Solari said. Sebastian and Vero Beach have both adopted ordinances which requires training for commercial applicators and places restrictions on fertilizer use near the water and urges caution about blowing grass clippings on the streets and sidewalks near the lagoon. County Commissioners rejected the idea of adopting a similar measure in February. At the time Solari said he opposed the added regulation on ideological grounds, saying too many regulations dull the intellect of the individual and undermine a democratic society. Solari cited research from Dr. Edie Widder of the Ocean Research and Conservation Association where a pilot program between the two bridges in Vero Beach showed a sharp reduction of pollutants in areas adjacent to the Vero Beach County Club which uses “best management” practices. County Administrator Joe Baird told the commissioners the job cuts came from varied areas – golf course operations, human resources, library staff, lifeguard staff, engineering and transportation. In the Parks Department one ranger position was downgraded to maintenance worker, with a $29,100 pay cut. The Human Resources Director position was cut at a savings of $101,064. The Board of County Commissioner’s office eliminated one full-time assistant position, replacing it with a part-time position for a cut of $38,678 annually. County residents will face a lighter tax burden in the upcoming budget compared to this year with a $3.4 million decrease in

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BY J.G. WALLACE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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County budget will eliminate nine jobs to meet goals


LOCAL NEWS

Audubon Society center will train band of volunteers

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Artist’s rendition of the classroom-office complex the Pelican Island Audubon Society will build next to the Oslo Riverfront Conservation area. BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -The Pelican Island Audubon Society is not your grandmother’s bird watching group. The 1,000-member strong organization is involved with conservation and environmental education efforts of all sorts that brings with it wins and losses and makes some friends, and others enemies, depending on which side of a particular matter you might stake a position. The society works on a shoestring budget of about $40,000

a year and relies on volunteers to staff its many projects from classrooms to canoe trips on the Indian River Lagoon. It also has worked with the County Commission and municipal city councils to pass environmentally friendly ordinances to preserve and protect wild life. The group took a major step forward this month when County Commissioners voted 3-2 (with commissioners Wesley Davis and Peter O’Bryan dissenting) to allow a special zoning exception to build a 2,596-square-foot classroomoffice complex on an acre of land

purchased from the University of Florida Foundation. Construction should begin before the end of the year on the structure which will be located next to the 440-acre Oslo Riverfront Conservation Area (ORCA) near Oslo Road. The main emphasis will be the classrooms which will train volunteers to help with both public and private conservation efforts in the county. “We set up initially to train volunteers for the Oslo Road Conservation Area,” said Pelican Island Audubon Society President Richard Baker. “We had been do-

ing it in collaboration with and in the boathouse at the University of Florida’s Medical Entomology Laboratory next to ORCA, but we thought this is such an important effort we needed our own facility.” The training, coordinated by Janice Broda, consists of six threehour classes over six weeks where volunteers learn about plants and wildlife. Half the class is a lecture -- often with guest speakers -- and half are tours along the ORCA trails so volunteers can gain firsthand knowledge. CONTINUES ON PAGE 6


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AUDUBON FROM PAGE 4

“One of the unique things about ORCA is that it has about seven or eight different habitats,” said Baker, a professor emeritus in medical entomology at the University of Florida. “It has probably the most diverse habitats of any of the conservation areas in Indian River County.”

The training is important since the volunteers serve in many ways as the county’s environmental ambassadors by conducting tours on many of the conservation areas the county has purchased over the years. “The county has one or maybe two people managing all the conservation land,” Baker said. “That is why they need volunteers bad-

Your Personal ‘Family Doctor’ Now Accepting New Patients

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Asha Shah, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Board certified in family medicine, Dr. Asha Shah joined the medical staff of Indian River Medical Center in 2010. Dr. Shah completed her family practice residency training at St. Clare’s Hospital in Schenectady, NY, and internal medicine externship at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, NY. Prior to joining IRMC, she practiced family medicine in Troy, NY. Asha Shah, M.D.

Dr. Shah provides personal, comprehensive medical care for: • Children, adults and seniors • Chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity • Women’s health, pap smears, annual female check-ups • Physicals, disease prevention, health promotion • Blood work, EKGs and X-Rays Dr. Shah’s office is located next door to IRMC’s Urgent Care Center in the Pointe West Medical Suites building. Pointe West is located on Route 60, between 74th and 82nd Avenues, west of Indian River Mall. Most insurance accepted. Now accepting new patients. Call 772.564.7828 to schedule an appointment. 1960 Pointe West Drive, Suite 101 | Vero Beach, FL | 772.564.7828

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ly. If you look at the way Brevard handles its program, it has a lot of staff and spends a lot of money in doing that. Indian River County has decided not to go that route so they need the volunteers to help them out.” The Pelican Island Audubon Society was a charter member of the IRC Land Acquisition Advisory Committee and helped in obtaining two county bonds (in 1992 for $26 million and in 2004 for $50 million) to purchase environmentally important land. With matching funds the county raised $136 million for buying conservation, agriculture and historical lands which has led to the purchase of 35 parcels involving more than 9,700 acres in the county. Among the services the volunteers provide in addition to serving as guides is keeping trails clear, removing exotic plants and in Baker’s words “being the eyes and ears” for the public on matters about the land. Baker also envisions expanding educational efforts to teach children early on about being good stewards of the environment. “We have lost two generations to television,” he said. “A lot of children spend just 15 minutes a day outside walking to and getting out of their cars.” One of the society’s newest projects will be providing vegetable gardens in four-foot by fourfoot containers for Indian River County school children. The program will begin at the newly built Vero Beach Elementary School, but plans are to expand throughout the county. The new office-classroom complex will be comprised of two buildings with a picnic area separating the two. One building will house the classroom and the other will provide office space for

Audubon and ORCA offices. Baker ran into some opposition for the complex because it will require cutting down some oak trees to build the structure. In fact, the group had to meet the stiff county tree and landscaping ordinances it helped to write. And true to the Audubon’s role these days, the complex will be staffed by volunteers. The Society has received about $100,000 in pro bono services from Carter Associates, Inc.; architect Richard Bialosky; Coastal Tech; AM Engineering; lead consultant Amy Thoma, and Robin Pelensky in drawing up the plans. It has raised $270,000 in donations toward toward the buildings, but still needs about $150,000 more to complete the construction, landscaping and furnishings. The society has had a long and storied career in Indian River County. It was started in 1961 as the Indian River Preservation League by local citrus growers, commercial fishermen, sportsmen and concerned citizens who mobilized to stop a dredge and fill housing project adjacent to the Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge. In 1964 the group became a chapter of Florida Audubon, one of 500 chapters and centers within the National Audubon Society. Among its ongoing activities are offering college environmental scholarships, monthly speakers in both Sebastian and Vero Beach, birding and pontoon boat trips and sponsoring the Press-Journal “Bird Photo of the Month” that provides natural history information. Among its achievements has been leading the fight to pass a night time beach ordinance to protect sea turtle hatchlings in Vero Beach and Indian River Shores. The ordinance prohib-


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couraging the cities and county to CITY BUDGET pass a strong fertilizer ordinance FROM PAGE 3 for slow-release nitrogen and no phosphorous since nitrogen and phosphorous-based fertilizers run off into the lagoon and are, in Baker’s words, “killing it.” But Baker stresses the group’s advocacy takes each issue on a case-by-case basis and will partner with former opponents if the cause is right. The Pelican Island Audubon Society has been supportive of many county efforts on behalf of their lands preservation, water issues, and facilitating the community’s quality of life. “We want to get people interested in nature and get them out to see it firsthand,” Baker said. To find out more information about the Pelican Island Audubon Society visit their website at www. pelicanislandaudubon.org or call (772) 567-3520.

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its lighting on the beach at night during nesting season because the turtles become disoriented and move toward the light rather than the ocean. Another community contribution was being one of the driving forces behind the Environmental Learning Center to help get children out into nature and educate the community. It also helped organize the first U.S. coastal cleanup in 1986 and was recognized by the U.S. Department of Interior for its efforts. This effort led to 90 other countries and hundreds of other communities following suit, and Keep Indian River Beautiful continues the program to this today. The work of the society has led to being recognized in 2005 and 2011 by the state organization as the best chapter in Florida. Being such strong advocates for the environment has led to en-


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LOCAL NEWS

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Indian River County has spent about $136 million to purchase these 35 parcels of environmentally or historically important land totaling about 9,700 acres.


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Honoring the sacrifice of WW II veterans lost in battle

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Presents

V E R O B E A C H

MEET YOUR LOCAL CANDIDATES!

N E W S W E E K L Y

CONTINUES ON PAGE 10

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December 7, 1941 will always be remembered as the day we entered World War II. Had the Japanese not attacked Pearl Harbor, it is difficult to say when America would have officially declared war on the Axis powers. As quickly as the Japanese conquered most of the West Pacific, though, it was probably only a matter of time before the United States intervened. According to Indian River Genealogical Society President, Col. Anthony Young, Ret., about one-third of the 40 Indian River County WWII veterans killed in combat served in the Pacific Theater of Operations. For some perspective, more than twice as many local men died in the Pacific in WWII than in all of WWI. “What happened in the Second World War is very much a part of the fabric of Vero Beach,” Young said. “Quite a bit of what we have is from personal accounts from families who are still in town. We have a lot of information on some, and only a little on others. We couldn’t have done all this five years ago; I have references from at least a dozen databases.” Connecting the names of the men who are honored at Veterans Memorial Island Sanctuary to their respective stories has been a labor of love for Young, who is a veteran of both Gulf wars. Under his direction, and with lots of help from the community, the data gathered on Indian River County’s WWII veterans reads like a movie script. “PFC James Powers Loudermilk

was in the Fourth Marine Division, which fought in the battle of Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima,” Young said. “After participating in all those invasions, he was killed on day one of Iwo Jima in 1945. His division lost 1,800 Marines and sustained 9,000 casualties in a month of battle. The Japanese, in comparison, lost 22,000 men on that island and surrendered just 44. It was a battle of inches.” Loudermilk was his family’s first son, Young found out after interviewing William Loudermilk, James’ uncle. Ellis Loudermilk, James’ half-brother, went on to give his life in the Vietnam War in 1967. “One of the things I’ve learned while doing research on these veterans is that sometimes, one leads to another,” Young said. “If I wouldn’t have found Loudermilk’s account, I wouldn’t have found Sgt. Charles Madison Blair’s account. I looked at Blair’s date of death and it was July 7, 1944, and I saw the second and fourth Marine division were both active at the time. He died the day before, or during, the final bonzai attack by the Japanese forces at Saipan. Our artillery had taken out all of their utilities and it was their last-gasp attack. They picked up what remained of their weapons and committed to a full frontal assault on American forces.” Putting history with the data provided by a database is one way Young has conducted his research, but first-hand accounts from other veterans have been a vital -- if not rare -- resource as he’s put together the stories of the local veterans of the Pacific Theater of

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VBN remembers our fallen heroes

August 1, 2012, 4 PM – 5:45 PM Pocahontas Park and Heritage Center in Downtown Vero Beach 4 PM – 7:30 PM – Meet the Candidates 6 PM – 7:15 PM – Candidate Speeches Get the opportunity to meet your local candidates and hear them speak. Candidates will have booths with hand out materials and will be available to talk. Candidates will also speak in the Heritage Center.

This event is free and open to the public. Participating Candidates: • Sheriff’s Race- Candidates Deryl Loar and Bill McMullen. • Supervisor of Elections- Leslie Swan and Sandi Harpring • Tax Collector- Candidates Carole Jean Jordan and Thomas Lowther • Property Appraiser- Candidates Thomas Andrew Dehn and David Nolte • County Commissioner, Dist. 5- Candidate Brian Heady • County Commissioner, Dist. 3- Candidates Bea Gardner and Tim Zorc • Congress, Dist. 8- Candidates Bill Posey and Richard Gillmor. Sponsored by:

For more information about this event contact

Penny Chandler at the Chamber 772-567-3491. TCN2730573


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WWII FROM PAGE 9

Operations from WWII. “Robert Lee Hurst was an Air Force private from Wabasso who was sent to the Philippines at the beginning of the war,” Young said. “It was there where the Japanese overran 50,000 of our forces. He survived the Bataan Death March, but he died of malaria while imprisoned at Cabanatuan. The Army Rangers who liberated the camp were told stories by the surviving POW’s of the men who didn’t make it.” Young had the opportunity to view some of his letters to home, courtesy of Hurst’s niece, Barbara, as well as accounts from surviving POW’s like Abby Abraham, who published two books on his experiences with Hurst’s unit during the Bataan Death March. Hurst and the rest of the men who died on or as a result of the Bataan Death March are remembered at the Cabanatuan American Memorial in the Philippines. Joe Hill was another POW who died at the hands of the Japanese. He was shot down as a P-40 pilot in the 18th Fighter Group. “Hill was held on the island of New Britain in a prison camp named Rabaul,” Young said. “He is one of four veterans on the

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Henry Morgan was aboard the USS Quincy when the ship was sunk at the Battle of Savo Island in the Pacific Ocean.

Memorial Island who had been POW’s. His body was recovered and he’s buried at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis.” Barbour Graves Wilhoit, the only WWII Naval aviator at Memorial Island, was another pilot who was lost in the Pacific. The Graves family has memorialized Wilhoit in stained glass at Trinity Episcopal Church in Vero Beach. “He was a member of the Graves family here in town, and he was a young man who went to college, got his wings and became a flight instructor,” Young said. “The Press Journal documents his death on July 24, 1945, saying his fighter plane crashed in the Pacific. It was right after VJ Day; shortly before the Japanese surrender.” QUALITY RESORT WEAR 3143 Ocean Drive Vero Beach

The Navy threw most of its weight into the Pacific after Pearl Harbor in order to contend with the various Japanese strongholds throughout the ocean’s numerous island chains. Henry Morgan, a Vero Beach High School graduate, began his service on the USS Quincy in the Atlantic in 1939, a destroyer that was sunk near the Solomon Islands by the Japanese. “He was killed during training when the crew was preparing to move out to New Zealand,” Young said. “This ship was one of the destroyers that protected the Marines as they went ashore.” Jimmy Doles of Wabasso was a hard one for Young and his organization to track down. After much research, they realized there was a spelling disconnect that happened some 50 years ago.

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“Originally, when we went to research it, we were looking for Jimmy Does,” Young said. “We went back through newspapers and graves sites, and we discovered the individual we were looking for was actually Jimmy Doles. He handled chemicals in Hawaii and he was killed in an explosion there.” Clifford Barnwell of Gifford, like Doles, was an African-American enlisted man who died working with chemicals in Hawaii. “There were black combat elements in Europe, but the majority of the support organizations (in both theaters of operations) were run by black men,” Young said. “Once you are in battle, you could be purple and it doesn’t matter. Serving in the army and being of equal stature; it was hard coming back to the segregated United States of that time for those soldiers.”

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LOCAL NEWS

Health care provider on cutting edge of records transfers

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BY J.G. WALLACE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- It’s a frightening scenario. You’re far from your home in Vero Beach at a meeting in Jacksonville. A sudden storm squall snarls traffic and you’re unable to stop in time, striking the back of a stalled semi-trailer. In a strange city, in an unfamiliar hospital, you are being rushed into surgery by a doctor with no knowledge of your medical history.  He doesn’t know about the blood thinners you take, or an allergy to penicillin or your pacemaker. Now imagine that a new program developed by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration and Harris Healthcare solutions that is being pioneered in Indian River County by Treasure Coast Community Health, Inc. that can provide the doctor with your detailed health records in a digitally secure format.  That is just one potential benefit from the new Florida Health Information Exchange program that TCCH launched about a month ago, becoming the first health care provider in the county to adopt the system. Sherry de Cuba, TCCH’s Chief Information Officer, said she be-

lieves the system will soon be mandated by the state, and joining in at the onset made sense for a community health provider that prides itself in innovation. de Cuba said TCCH will initially be using the system in-house to share information between doctors and other staff, but she believes they will soon be able to send information and communicate with external specialists as more providers switch over to the system. “Every specialist that we have we’re trying to approach them to get on Direct Secure Messaging and stop the faxes and be in touch with the right person to get the patient’s information,” de Cuba said. “It’s kind of a first step.” de Cuba said once more providers are using the system the patient lookup service would allow doctors in another location to have full access to a patient’s records, as in the case of the hypothetical car accident. “It’s the kind of thing that can make a difference when it comes to survival. The understanding of it has a lot of different perspectives,” de Cuba said. “I know we are just starting to get momentum.” de Cuba said she recently at-

tended a health information management conference in Orlando and Harris Corporation made a presentation on the system that was well received. “Eventually I think it will be a requirement,” de Cuba said. “From a state perspective they are providing a lot of tools and information.” Harris representatives have met with other providers and area hospitals and are actively promoting the new DSM system across the state. “Given our size, for us to be so progressive and to take on this challenge now is really remarkable when some of the larger institutions around haven’t even broached it,” said Steve Dorrance, executive director of TCCH. “I didn’t so much look at it from a technical point of view, but from a patient point of view.” Dorrance said he was impressed with the Health Information Exchange’s potential to share patient records in a critical care situation. “That is hugely important from a patient’s point of view,” he said. de Cuba said as more providers join the system it will become more fluid and functional, to the point where it will even make it easier for a patient who moves within the state to transfer their

medical records to a new provider.  “Instead of having to pay for your records or wait for your records to get there your doctor could (contact) your new doctor and (send) your records from before,” de Cuba said. “For the patient it makes for a better continuity of care.” The system is secure and limited to health care providers with a National Provider Identification, or NPI code. DSM is a secure email program that allows providers to send and receive messages and attachments containing a patient’s clinical data. The service does not require providers to purchase special software or pay a fee. DSM is designed to speed up the transfer of patient information via a web-based interface, ensure the receipt of a sent message via a “read receipt,” and is designed to shift the dependence on faxes, telephone calls, and mail. Harris Corp. intends to implement a statewide Health Information Exchange network that will improve the delivery and coordination of health care. Their goal is to improve patient care by using health information technology in concert with providing access to critical patient medical information at the point of care.

LET ME RENT YOUR PROPERTIES! SUSAN BELMONT POWELL REALTOR® Rental Specialist

DAVID WALSH &ASSOC! REAL ESTATE 800 20th Place, Suite 5, Vero Beach, FL 32960 · Office (772)234-3450 · verorents.com


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PRESENTED BY

NOMINATION DEADLINE:

AUGUST 14, 2012

tcpalm.com/healthcarechampions FACEBOOK.COM/HEALTHCARECHAMPIONS

N E W S W E E K L Y

Honoring those committed to healing and helping.

B E A C H

! Emergency Medical Services Award ! Advancement in Health Care Research Award ! Innovation in Health Care Award ! Quality of Care Lifetime Achievement Award ! Community Outreach Award ! Physician’s Excellence in Health Care Award ! Non-physician’s Excellence in Health Care Award ! Administrative Excellence Award

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Award categories are:

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16 Finalists will be recognized at our awards luncheon and eight will take home Health Care Champion awards.

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For the third year in a row, Health Care Champions will recognize health care leaders, professionals, volunteers, organizations and many more for their dedication to excellence in the health care field. Your nominations will be carefully reviewed by a panel of distinguished judges made up of the Treasure Coast’s health care leaders and CEO’s.

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Treasure Coast Newspapers and Seacoast National Bank are giving YOU, the community, the opportunity to nominate your “champion” for this year’s Health Care Champions Awards.

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND NOMINATE YOUR CHAMPION


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City, County take different approach to rentals Earlier this month the Indian River County Commission adopted a relaxed interpretation of land use regulations that will allow for short-term rentals as short as a day in residential areas. Owners of single-family homes in the unincorporated areas of the county, such as in the south barrier island, need only get a state license and collect tourist taxes in order to rent their homes out as short-term vacation rentals. Previously considered to be a commercial use of property, short-term rentals (those of less than 30 days) have been the exclusive right of hotels and motels. The county’s more lenient approach to regulating rentals will not affect neighborhoods within the city limits of Vero Beach where restrictions on short-terms rentals remain in force. Now, with the County Commission’s recent “clarification” of the ordinances, a resident in the Moorings could wake up some day to find half a dozen or more cars belonging to a family of 15 parked in a neighboring driveway and on the street.

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Though city ordinances do not allow for short-term rentals in a residential area, this was the experience of neighbors in a beachside community last summer when City Councilwoman Tracy Carroll rented her home on Seagrape Drive for a week to a family of 15. Opponents of allowing shortterm rentals argue they will have a negative impact on neighborhoods. The issue has again been raised for clarification, just as it was last summer, when a city resident complained that Carroll and her husband were advertising and offering for short-term rental homes they own at 906 Seagrape Drive and at 422 Live Oak Road. Randy Fryar, who lives near the Carroll home on Seagrape Drive, wrote, in a letter to Planning Director Tim McGarry, “The real slap in the face is that Councilmember Tracy Carroll was sent a memo by Department Correspondence June 24, 2011. She defies the law and proceeds, not caring for the property values in our community.” In the June 24, 2011 letter from

McGarry to Carroll which Fryar cited in his most recent complaint, McGarry wrote, “The use of a residential building to provide temporary, short-term lodging to the transient public in a manner similar to hotels, motels, vacation rentals, bed and breakfast, and guest houses or lodges, clearly exhibits commercial characteristics thereby restricting such uses to commercial districts and excluding such uses from the City’s residential districts.” The issues here are about policy, process and following the rule of law. Streamlined and limited government can be good, but not when it means gutting rules intended to protect family residences and neighborhoods. Instead of fulfilling this responsibility, the County Commission seems more committed to catering to a few real estate speculators. If county residents living in the Moorings and other unincorporated areas want a government that is as committed to preserving domestic tranquility as it is in protecting individual property rights, then this is a policy debate to be

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

had within the halls of county government. Residents of the City of Vero Beach live under and are expected to abide by city ordinances that do not allow for short-term rentals of residential property. But, of course, ordinances can be changed, most of them by a simple majority vote of the five-person City Council. If the property owners of Vero Beach want to petition the City Council for a change in ordinances governing residential rentals, that is their right. In the mean time, it remains everyone’s right to expect that city ordinances will be respected, especially by members of the City Council. The different approaches the city and county are taking on shortterm rentals also raises the question of what city residents might lose if the city were to be dis-incorporated and absorbed by the county, as some have suggested. If city residents want to “keep Vero Vero” they might do well to think twice about putting their destiny in anyone’s hands other than their own.

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.


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COMMUNITY FORUM

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For someone who so despises government, describing it as a “nebulous collective,” it is in a way ironic that Solari wants to continue serving on the County Commission. Both of his opponents have raised legitimate questions about inconsistencies in Solari’s positions. For example, as a way of temporarily restoring the beaches, Solari supported mining thousands of dump truck loads of sand west of town and hauling them to the beach. The plan, touted as better for local sand miners and trucking businesses, turned out to be more expensive and certainly more intrusive. And yet, when he had an opportunity to support “local preference” in bidding for government contracts, Solari served up a 20-minute lecture on how protectionism led to the Great Depression. As with the current recession, the Great Depression was cause by irresponsible speculation on Wall Street, not by local governments giving preference to local businesses in the bidding of contracts. While Solari appears ready to

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an expanded social contract in which the collective commitment to equal opportunity and equal justice was balanced against individual liberties. Hypothetically, if a certain county commissioner were to leave his central beach home and was late for the start of a commission meeting, should he be at “liberty” to race across the bridge in his car at whatever speed will get him to his designated parking space in time to scurry inside just as the meeting is called to order? Speed limits are not an exercise in tyranny. The requirement that we all observe designated speed limits is a reasonable compromise in order to greatly reduce the number of traffic accidents that would otherwise occur if we were all left to drive at whatever speeds we individually and voluntarily determine to be “safe and reasonable.” Similarly, given that what is applied to local yards and golf courses eventually drains into the Indian River Lagoon, it is hardly an exercise of tyranny to limit the kinds of fertilizer we are allowed by law to put on our yards.

advocate spending tens of millions to reverse the flow of drainage canals as a way of saving the Lagoon, he steadfastly refuses to support an ordinance restricting the use of phosphorous-based fertilizers. Further, he is dismissive of a plan to allow clean, oxygenated seawater to flow into the Lagoon near Bethel Creek. How Solari can be for smaller government, while refusing to explore less expensive means of protecting the Lagoon is more than a little ironic. Here is a question I have wondered lately: If the average homeowner had to choose between adhering to fertilizer restrictions or paying millions of dollars in taxes to reverse the flow of the canals, I suspect many would gladly surrender the “liberty” to throw what they want on their yards in exchange for the “liberty” of keeping more of their hard-earned money. While Solari was completely comfortable spending over $12 million for a conservation easement on ranch land that isn’t likely to catch the eye of developers for decades, he proved more than eager to “streamline” government by shutting down voluntary boards that have traditionally afforded many concerned and interested citizens the “liberty” to participate in local government. So much for “liberty.” Solari’s political philosophy seems to be an eclectic blend of the thinking of the ancient GrecoRoman philosophers with a fundamentalist reading of the Federalist Papers. If hearing more about this would be fascinating to you, just attend a county commission meeting. There you will almost surely be treated to one of Commissioner Solari’s frequent mini-lectures on political philosophy.

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In early May students from the Sebastian River Middle School presented to the Indian River County Commission the results of their science project studying the causes of the Indian River Lagoon’s ill health. The students also identified possible strategies for reviving the Lagoon, one of the nation’s most vital eco-systems. Following the presentation, all of the commissioners except one politely praised the students for their thoughtful presentations, and thanked them for their efforts. As he is often given to doing, Vice-Chairman Bob Solari donned his philosophy professor persona, and delivered a mini-lecture in which he suggested to the students it would be an act of totalitarianism to pass an ordinance restricting the use of phosphorous-based fertilizers. I’m not making this up! You can see it for yourself by going to the website ircgov.org. There you will find a recording of the May 1 meeting of the Indian River County Commission. Solari’s exchange with the students comes about 15 minutes into the meeting. Solari claims his opponents are without principles, while he alone has a moral compass steering him on a steady course in defense of liberty. This begs the question of what exactly it is Solari means by “liberty.” “Liberty” was the guiding principle of the French Revolution, but it wasn’t long before liberty had degenerated into anarchy, and heads were rolling. American historian James MacGreagor Burnes, in a excellent two-volume series, explains how the “Vineyard of Liberty,” became a “Workshop of Democracy,” as Americans gradually entered into

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BY MARK SCHUMANN

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Taking liberties with liberty


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COMMUNITY FORUM

Let’s celebrate all that makes us alike BY REV. SCOTT ALEXANDER

It is a wonderful thing when science and religion speak with one clear and consistent voice. Such is the case with human genetic science, and all the many religions around the world which seek to affirm the oneness and connectedness of the human family. The scientists who recently mapped the entire DNA code for our species found that all human beings share an amazing 99.9 percent of the genetic markers. What this scientifically means is that all the many physical and racial differences that exist between human persons can be accounted for by no more than one one-thousandth of the genetic code. Science has now given us perhaps one of the greatest truths about ourselves: we human beings are overwhelmingly and irretriev-

ably alike. This fact -- that we human beings are vastly more alike than we are different -- fascinates me from a scientific perspective and inspires me from REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER a theological one. My personal faith tradition, Unitarian Universalism, has always been one which theologically and ethically emphasized the oneness and interrelatedness of the human family. And this religious impulse – to understand humanity as one – lies at the center of many of the world’s faiths. British theologian and writer Karen Armstrong – who has spent her career in the field of comparative religion – believes that as we move into the

complicated human future on this planet, an ethic of human oneness and compassion must animate all of us. In her 2008 Charter for Compassion, Armstrong states, “The principle of compassion lies at the heart of all religious, ethical and spiritual traditions, calling us always to treat all others as we wish to be treated ourselves. Compassion impels us to work tirelessly to alleviate the suffering of our fellow creatures, to dethrone ourselves from the center of our world… and to honor the inviolable sanctity of every single human being, treating everybody, without exception, with absolute justice, equity, and respect.” Yet sadly in our world today, human beings still find so many ways to angrily focus on our differences, rather than celebrate our commonality. Here on the Treasure

Coast, for example, you regularly hear people complaining about people who look, act, speak, or think differently than themselves. The many intolerances directed at these simple human differences are a tragedy in the American experience, and are sadly found elsewhere in the world as well. Karen Armstrong is profoundly right. If humanity is ever to create a global culture worth having, human beings everywhere must increasingly see, celebrate, and respect the powerful (and I would say holy) commonality and oneness that exists between us -- every one of us. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

Honoring Olympians murdered in the ‘Munich Massacre’ BY RABBI MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ

I love the Olympics and what the Games represent:  sportsmanship, camaraderie, cooperation.  The Olympic flag specifically has five rings with colors so that every flag of every country is represented.  I am always in awe how the Olympic Games bring together so many different cultures and history. As you watch the various sports you see powerhouses and tiny teams, established traditions and newly formed units. For me there is a coolness and excitement in getting to see sports that rarely are on display.  The Olympic Games are a real treat every four years. Yet as this year’s Olympics open it is hard not to think about the Israeli Olympic team on this the 40th anniversary of the

Munich Massacre of 1972. The 1972 summer Olympics in Munich was supposed to be a redemptive event. In the shadow of Hitler’s Nazi driven games in Ber- RABBI MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ lin in 1936, the return of the games to Germany was to be a showcase of a modern, inclusive, free, and democratic country.  Sadly, in the midst of this celebration of international sports -- cooperation through competition -- heinous violence became the central story. Palestinian terrorists attacked the Olympic village, targeting the Israeli team. In the wake of the

failed rescue attempt, 11 members of the Israeli delegation died.  Regardless of one’s opinion on the nature and dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, there is no room to rationalize the murder of these athletes at the Olympics, which is supposed to epitomize international cooperation and be above political conflict. In the wake of the attack there has been much controversy about how to honor and remember these 11 men and this event.  For 40 years many have argued over the when, what, how and why to honor or not honor these men.  Yet, through it all I am surprised to see how many articles do not even print the names of the Israeli athletes killed during the Munich Games of 1972. 

Acts of memory can be simple and powerful, just as is the Olympics medal ceremony.  As these games are set to begin, I know what I will be doing.  I will stand in silence and say these names: Yossef Gutfreund, Moshe Weinberg, Yossef Romano, Kehat Shorr, Amitzur Shapira, Andre Spitzer, Yakov Springer, Eliezer Halfin,  Mark Slavin, David Berger and Ze’ev Friedman. I remember, I do not forget. I long for a world where every life is precious and we could actually work out our differences on a sports field. Rabbi Michael Birnholz has served Temple Beth Shalom in Vero Beach since 2002. One of his goals is bringing Jewish values and wisdom to the wider community.


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Social | Lifestyle

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Children Benefit from a Christmas in July at Waldo’s

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The “Love Doctors” have been organizing toy drives since 1994 and have gone from bringing in $2,900 per year to over $180,000. Waldo’s contribution to that drive now tops 10 percent of that total and includes hundreds of donated toys. A seriously sarcastic Rich Dickerson along with local Vero Beach resident Glenn Curtis make up the “Love Doctors” duo on their irreverent South Florida REAL Radio 94.3 talk show. What both take seriously are the “Love Doctors” Charities. Lee Olsen and Joe Smith at Waldo’s Restaurant do their part by making the Waldo’s Christmas in July bigger and better each year to help local children. “We have a soft spot for charities which help children,” said

Smith. “We’ve been involved with the “Love Doctors” for years and not just for Christmas in July; it’s a year-round thing. Something just touches our hearts when it comes to these kids.” This year they expanded the event to include Saturday and Sunday. Saturday they held the Karen McKloskey Memorial Golf Tournament at Sandridge Golf Club and Sunday they began with a Poker Run/Pub Crawl which blossoms each year into a huge toy drive bash with the band Smoking Man rocking the crowd. “We’ve got a lot of people in need,” said Curtis, known on the radio as ‘Dr. Glenn.’ “They made us very successful so this our way of giving back.” At least 1,200 people showed up to party and estimates were that $18,000 would be raised. CONTINUES ON PAGE 18

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CHRISTMAS AT WALDOS FROM PAGE 17

Joe Smith with Bud Girls Danielle Hulton & Jamie Long with Lee Olsen far right Love Doctors Glenn Curtis and Rich Dickerson

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Front: MJ Vereen, Tammy Marks & Carolyn Danigian and Back: Ben Martin, Terri May and Ben Albrecht

Aubrey Baker dances to the music of Smoking Man poolside

Michele & Wes Garcia with Anne Marie Rossmell man the front as visitors dropped toys for the kids all weekend long


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Spaghetti Dinner, 4-7 pm Elks Grand Ballroom, 1350 26th St., $8/$5 for kids under 12, to buy school supplies for underprivileged kids. 772-562-8450.

JULY 27 & 28 ! In the Ruff Golf Tournament

AUGUST 16 ! Fabulous 50’s Party

STAFF PHOTO

Grilled food from Hale Groves If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, and treats from Kilwin’s avail- please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to able. CeeJay and Chris Cope, 7:30 be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices AUGUST 2-4 the Sea, 7:30 pm, local musicians vary. 772-231-6990. & Mission Chamber Orchestra of ! “The Jacksons” JULY 27-29 Aerial Antics youth Circus, Recrea- Rome, hosted by Cultural Coun! Summer Stage tion Dept. Performing Arts gymnas- cil. 772-770-4857. At Riverside Children’s Theatre, tic performances, 7 pm, St. Edward’s AUGUST 10 & 11 Little Shop of Horrors, Anne Mor- School, $5-$6. 772-567-2144. ton Theatre, 6280 Riverside Dr., ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS! AUGUST 3 $6-$9/$12-$18. 772-231-6990. Grilled food from Hale Groves ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll and treats from Kilwin’s available. JULY 27, AUGUST 3 & 10 In Historic Mainstreet art district, Mary Asher and Tim Kidd, 7:30 art galleries and businesses offer & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices ! Sunset Boat Tour Cruise Indian River’s native man- open house receptions. Free. 772- vary. 772-231-6990. grove coves with Capt. Chop, Ft. 299-1234. ! Tennis Marathon Benefit Pierce City Marina, $15-$20, resJungle Club, Ages 6+, $15, 7 am-7 AUGUST 5 & 19 ervations. 772-464-4445. pm, benefits Harvest Food & the ! Dancing in the Streets JULY 28 & 29 Songs of the 60s, Theatre-Go- Source. 772-321-7800. ! Tour deTurtles Migration Marathon Round, Joey’s Bistro, 2075 Indian AUGUST 11 Barrier Island Center, 8385 South River Blvd., 4 pm, $45. 772-252! Call of the Champions Hwy. A1A, (just north of Se- 9341. Music of the Olympics, Space bastian Inlet, $20/$35, Saturday Coast Symphony Orchestra, 7 pm, cocktails & hors d’oeuvres 6 pm; AUGUST 8 $20, Trinity Episcopal Church, Sunday 8 am for Sea Turtle Re- ! Symphony of the America’s lease. 321-723-3556. Summerfest Concert, Christ by 2365 Pine Ave. 855-252-7276. FRIDAY, JULY 27

SATURDAY, JULY 28

SUNDAY, JULY 29

AUGUST 17-19 ! Antiques and Vintage Show

At Indian River Fairgrounds & Expo Center, 7955 58th Ave., Fri noon-5 pm, Sat 9 am-5 pm & Sun 9 am-4 pm. floridaantiqueshows. com. AUGUST 18 ! Hole-in-One Golf Tournament

Harbor Chase, benefits Alzheimer & Parkinson Association, $100, includes fees & lunch. 772-7787727. AUGUST 23 ! Rock’N Blues Fest

Johnny Winter Band, Edgar Winter Band, Rick Derringer & Kim Simmonds, Sunrise Theatre, 117 South 2nd St., Fort Pierce, 7 pm, $49. 772-461-4775. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

MONDAY, JULY 30

TUESDAY, JULY 31

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1

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! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS!

Mulligan’s, 5-8 pm, family fun, dress in 50’s garb, Rock n’ Roll SpongeBob, 10% sales to go to Epilepsy Foundation. EpilepsyFLA. org.

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Benefits HALO Rescue and Stray No More, Cocktail party 27th at 6:30 pm, Tournament 28th at 8 am, Indian River Club. 772-3609294.

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Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-5322455.

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AUGUST 12 ! “Elk’s for Kids”

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EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association

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Chili Cookoff, VB Power Squadron Station, 5 pm, $10, call if you want to bring chili for contest. 772-567-9000/772-978-1701.

3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave & 21st St. 772-480-8353.

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! Youth Sailing Foundation

EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

THURSDAY, JULY 26

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Community Calendar


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Summertime Comedy Zone a night out of fun

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Arts | Entertainment

Carl ‘Cee-Jay’ Jones will be performing July 27 and 28 BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- The curtains at Riverside Theatre are mostly closed for the summer season but the Waxlax Stage is kicking it into high gear this year for their Comedy Zone Summer Nights! Theatre-goers may be familiar with the comedy shows that Riverside has been presenting for the last five years but they have added music and food this summer to enhance the “night out” experience. If you have never been to any of Riverside’s Comedy Zone shows it really is quite a treat. Tables are intimately set around the room and offer convenient cocktail service and a close up connection to

Attendees enjoy a cocktail at the bar before the show

the comedians. The room is like many traditional comedy nightclubs, but is much cleaner and offers friendlier service than many which serve as bars as well as a comedy stage. When exploring ways to make the show into a full night of enjoyment for their guests, Riverside Theatre Managing Director Jon Moses sought something they had not offered before. To celebrate the Comedy Zone’s fifth anniversary, Riverside officials decided to offer a menu including food and dessert choices an hour before each show began so people could come and relax. They set up tables inside and outside and added strolling musicians who performed acoustic guitar

and sometimes sang. “We’re always looking for ways to improve our events and the experience people have at the theatre,” said Moses. “So in trying to make the experience more complete, I reached out to two local businesses that we’re already working with here.” Kilwin’s scrumptious sweets have had a place at Riverside’s show openings throughout the year but for the summer comedy shows they have added a wider variety of desserts. Their specialty is their biggest seller. “The Vero Beach Twist,” is a chocolate covered pretzel filled with caramel and sprinkled with sea salt. “We have a lot of fun being there,” said Julie Denning, who

PHOTOS PROVIDED

is co-owner of Kilwin’s with her husband Jef. “Lots of our regular customers visit us and we also get to meet the people who don’t know Kilwin’s yet and introduce them to what we have at the shop.” Hale Groves also came on board to offer Jimbo’s famous Steak Burgers, boneless jerk chicken and other tasty items. “We have a really great relationship with the Riverside and everyone over there is such a great bunch -- we love partnering with them,” said Jim Carroll, one of Hale Groves River Market’s kitchen managers. Guests may pick up their selections on the way in or have a waiter deliver them to their table inside. CONTINUES ON PAGE 21


ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

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Adding music each night made the events even more special and created a “date night” atmosphere. “Someone doesn’t even have to buy a ticket to the Comedy Zone to enjoy drinks, food or listen to the music,” said Moses. “One can do all three without seeing the comedians. It’s a way of putting Riverside Theatre foremost in people’s minds when it comes to entertainment.” Denning agrees. “The last shows were sold out,” said Denning. “When a couple said that they were disappointed that they could not get tickets, I told them that it wasn’t a total loss because they could at least have something to eat, a drink and listen to the music. They wound up staying for an hour.” Most importantly for all, the new venture is an all-around success and is a unique way for locals and visitors to enjoy a night out in the summer. Lisa and Ron Davidson own the beachside boutique Shells & Things. During the winter season it is hard for the busy proprietors to get out to see a show but in the summer they are able to take a small breather. Not only are they able to close a little earlier but the shows are an hour later with 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. performances. “They offer quick, good food and the comedians put on a great show,” said Ron Davidson. “We had such a good time and we enjoyed spending time with our friends too.” Amy Selby, sales director at Springhill Suites, made the hotel a year-round sponsor and

Approximately 600 guests attend the Comedy Zone each weekend the show is on stage

gives tickets to clients. “Jon Moses and the staff are like family and a real class act,” said Selby. “We want visitors to experience Riverside so they can get to know it and tell others.” “I think Riverside is creating a hidden secret of Vero for people to enjoy and bring their friends,” added Carroll. The next comedy show is set for July 27 and 28 and will star CeeJay Jones and Chris Cope. If you want tickets, you might consider picking them up in advance because chances are, it will be another sell-out.


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Superior Auto Service

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- Pat Rice of JPR Images was once you. He was an amateur photographer who had just bought his first digital SLR camera back in 2004 to take on vacation with him to Alaska. He decided then he was going take his hobby to the next level. “I started taking pictures at Vero Beach High School girls’ basketball games for a friend of mine,” Rice said. “At this point in time, the Press Journal didn’t have anyone shooting those games so I would send my pictures into Mike Graham, the sports editor.” Graham took a look at his pictures, and was impressed with Rice’s work. The Press Journal started printing Rice’s shots, and after some PHOTOS BY PAT RICE constructive input from GraFreezing the players, the ball, and capturing faces are all elements of a success- ham to go along with hundreds more submitted phoful sports picture according to Scripps freelance photographer Pat Rice. tos, Rice’s pictures were on par with the paid material the paper was using. Within a year Graham told Rice the Family Owned and Operated paper needed to start paying him for his work. “Old Fashioned Service” We Specialize in Mechanical “I went to the Internet foRestoration of Classic Cars, including: Imports & Domestics Mercedes Benz rums and learned how to Rolls Royce Superior Auto Service employs shoot sports,” Rice said. “If I ASE Master Mechanics to provide Muscle Cars diagnostic and repair services on go out and I get bad pictures all American, European & Asian now, it frustrates me because vehicles. We install premium and I know it isn’t my equipment original equipment parts only! -- it is my lack of knowledge. Owner Bill Marion, a certified ASE Master Mechanic, has been That’s why I am constantly repairing vehicles in Vero Beach trying to improve.” since 1987 at the same location. He maintains that moms and 1212 23rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32960 (772) 569-1410 www.verobeach.com dads don’t need to buy pro-

fessional photography equipment to take great pictures of their kids playing sports. Depending on what a neophyte photographer wants to shoot, improving the quality of their pictures could simply be a matter of adjusting their cameras or putting themselves in the right position to get a memory-saving shot. “If you are a parent shooting during daylight, I think you can shoot with a point and shoot camera,” Rice said. “The biggest drawback people have now, is not knowing how to use their equipment. A lot of people don’t understand or don’t pay attention to their shutter speed. Having a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action they are shooting is key. And if they don’t have enough daylight, then they usually can’t do that.” The camera’s aperture (the light coming through the lens), the shutter speed (which acts like the pupil of an eye for the camera), and the ISO setting (which controls how sensitive the camera is to light) are all things that can be controlled. By learning how to adjust a camera to control these things, parents can improve their photography dramatically. For daylight sports photography, the ISO setting must be lower and aperture set higher. At night, the ISO setting must be raised higher, aperture brought lower, and

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Sports Sports parents can easily learn to shoot like the pros

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SPORTS

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BE PREPARED When the Threat of Severe

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Weather First Strikes.

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LIFE-SAVING ALERTS

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Not all great sports pictures are action shots. Candid pictures like the one above are a great way to preserve the emotion of a memory Rice says.

SPORTS FROM PAGE 23

the shutter speed must be fast enough to freeze the action. Getting in good position is another key, no matter if you are shooting softball, soccer or surfing. If your equipment is limited to shooting nonaction at night, wait for candid moments between players and coaches to take pictures. “You’ll see people’s sports photos and they’ll just show the backs of the players,” Rice said. “Working for the paper has helped me out, because I know what they want. Generally, they want to see faces and they want to see a ball in the scene. I have come to realize that each picture should tell a story. “A digital SLR is going to be better than other options because it allows you to change lenses,” Rice said. “You can get a 70-300mm lens without really spending a whole bunch. If it is a Saturday morning on the soccer field, that lens will do fine.”

Shooting indoor sports or under stadium lights with a digital SLR camera, however, will raise the cost of photography. “The kids and ball move too fast, and it is such a challenge to freeze all the action without using a distracting flash,” Rice said. “You have to at least get a 50mm f/1.8 lens, which is right around $100, if you want to freeze the action. Even better is the 85mm f/1.8, which is about $360 new. People need to realize that the trick to shooting sports indoors or at night is having a fast aperture lens -- fast glass as we call it. It isn’t cheap, but you can do it without spending a fortune, though.” Rice’s unpublished pictures can be found jprimages.com, where pictures of most of the local high school sports teams can be found along with shots of the marching band, high school symphony orchestra, and ballet and graduation ceremonies.

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Sarah (Sally) Elizabeth Burba Williams Sarah (Sally) Elizabeth Burba Williams died July 11, 2012. In lieu of flowers contributions may be sent to VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, Florida 32960, or Saint Alban’s Episcopal Church, 333 South Drexel Ave., Bexley, Ohio, 43209. Visit www. schoedinger.com to share memories or extend condolences.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Thomas E. Vanderheiden Thomas E. Vanderheiden, 74, died July 13, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House. He was born in Valentine, Neb., and lived in Vero Beach, coming from Colorado. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice House at VNA Hospice House, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

B E A C H

Gaylon M. Lawrence Gaylon M. Lawrence, 78, of Vero Beach died July 10, 2012, at the Baptist East Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. Memorial contributions may be sent to: The Gaylon M. Lawrence

rial contributions may be made to the Humane Society or the Rotary Charities Foundation.

V E R O

John Knoeppel John Knoeppel, 75, died July 13, 2012, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in New York City and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from New York. Memorial contributions may be made to the Veteran’s Victory Center, 6200 20th St., Suite 160, Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

J. Robert Malone J. Robert Malone, 87, died July 8, 2012 at his home in Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to Order of Malta, AmeriFrank ‘Burt’ Lewis Jr. can Association, P.O. Box 10023, Frank “Burt” Lewis Jr., 72, died Uniondale, NY 11555- 0023. An July 12, 2012, at his home. He was online guestbook is available at born in Philadelphia and lived in www.strunkfuneralhome.com. Vero Beach for four years, comSarah Clement Fisher Richards ing from Ocean City, N.J. Memorial contributions may be made Sarah Clement Fisher Richards, to North Treasure Coast Chap- 98, died July 8, 2012, at Grace Reter of American Red Cross, 2506 habilitation Center of Vero Beach. 17th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. She was born in Winston-Salem, A guestbook is available at www. N.C., and lived in Vero Beach lowtherfuneralhome.com. for 11 years, coming from Silver Spring, Md., and Washington, Robert L. Ozment D.C. Memorial contributions may Robert L. Ozment, 68, died July be made to the Humane Society 10, 2012, at his home in Vero of Vero Beach and Indian River Beach. He was born in Kokomo, County, 6230 77th St., Vero Beach, Ind., and lived in Vero Beach for FL 32967. A guestbook is available 15 years, coming from his birth- at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com. place. Memorial contributions James Waddell Nugent may be made to Treasure Coast Hospice, 1201 S.E. Indian St., StuJames Waddell Nugent died on art, FL 34997, www.TCHospice. July 6, 2012 at his home in Vero org, 772-403-4500. Beach. In lieu of flowers, memo-

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Scholarship Fund for Piggott, Arkansas High School c/o Piggott, Arkansas State Bank Attn: Paula P.O. Box 307 Piggott, AR 72454.

Pierce, Jr. and wife Eve, of Wayne, Pa., J. Peter Pierce and wife Karen of Villanova, Pa., Michael Pierce and wife Kathleen of John’s Island, Vero Beach, and Christopher Pierce of Lancaster, Pa.,; four daughters, Kathryn Cox of Havertown, Pa., Molly Pierce of Haverford, Pa.,, Barbara Quinn of Haverford and Constance Buckley of Havertown; 26 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren, three step-daughters and two stepgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA & Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960 or the Sacred Heart Church, 1739 Ferry Avenue, Camden, NJ 08104. An online guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com

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Donald Ray James Donald Ray James, 78, died July 8, 2012, at home. He was born in Heilman, Ind., and lived in Fort Pierce since 1978, coming from Boonville, Ind., before moving to Vero Beach 10 years ago. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Charity and helping others was a priority in his life. He was an outstanding philanthropist and founded the Leo and Peggy Pierce Family Foundation in 1997. His foundation has helped hundreds of charitable organizations in the Philadelphia area as well as Vero Beach. He was recognized as Philanthropist of the Year in Vero Beach mainly as a result of his generosity to the VNA Hospice House Endowment. St. John’s University has been an on-going recipient with the establishment of the Leo W. and Marjorie L. Pierce Scholarship Endowment Fund and the Pierce Residence House. Surviving are his beloved wife Betty of eight years; four sons, Leo W.

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1, 1997 the company was taken public on the New York Stock Exchange. He retired as Chairman of the Board in Fe b r u a r y of 2000 at the age of 82. He was active with many civic and social groups. He was a member of The Cynwyd Club and served as president and was a member of the John’s Island Club where he served as a director and tennis chairman.

J U L Y

Leo W. Pierce, Sr. Leo W. Pierce, Sr., 93, of Vero Beach, Florida died July 14, 2012 at his home under hospice care and surrounded by his family. He was born Sept. 27, 1918 in Brooklyn, NY, the son of John and Kathryn Pierce. Prior to moving to Vero Beach in 1984, he was a long time resident of Wynnewood, Pa., where he raised his large family. He had several jobs leading up to the founding of his company, Pierce Leahy Archives in 1969. He was always proud it was a family business that involved most of his children and that it became one of the largest record storage businesses in the country. He served as CEO for many years and on July

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Obituaries


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Real Estate

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – July 12-July 18

Address 1180 Reef Rd., #A19 560 Short Rd. 5690 Hwy. A1A, #103N 415 Holly Rd. 4601 Hwy. A1A, #508 2129 Via Fuentes 2135 Windward Way, #308 5100 Hwy. A1A, #40D

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Subdivision List Date Billows 12/1/11 Porpoise Point 4/30/12 Victoria Condo 1/10/12 Bethel by the Sea 8/1/11 Riverwalk 3/26/12 River Mews Condo 5/23/12 Harbor Inn 4/5/12 Pebble Beach Villas 4/23/12

1576 Smugglers Cove Smugglers Cove 3/30/11 $3,750,000 7/16/12 $3,050,000 Premier Estate Properties Clark French Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Terry Thompson 700 Lantana Ln. Ocean Corp. 4/24/12 $599,000 7/12/12 $565,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Elizabeth Sorensen Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Helen Ederer 2041 Indian Summer Ln. Seasons 2/14/11 $510,000 7/13/12 $473,500 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Nancy Hardy & Sally Lurie Palm Pointe Realty Jerrie Connelly List Price Sell Date Sell Price $369,000 7/12/12 $355,000 $339,000 7/17/12 $315,000 $349,000 7/16/12 $300,000 $275,000 7/13/12 $273,800 $228,500 7/12/12 $228,500 $215,000 7/12/12 $202,000 $220,000 7/17/12 $195,000 $169,900 7/16/12 $161,500

21 White Jewel Ct. S Address: Ocean Pearl Subdivision: 4/11/12 List Date: $679,000 List Price: 7/16/12 Sell Date: $640,000 Sell Price: Listing Broker: Daley & Company Real Estate Sally Daley Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Daley & Company Sally Daley Selling Agent: Address: 906 Jasmine Ln. Subdivision: Ocean Corp. List Date: 3/25/12 List Price: $525,000 Sell Date: 7/18/12 Sell Price: $500,000 Listing Broker: Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Listing Agent: Roger Smith Selling Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Selling Agent: Sally Baskin Address: 950 Beach Rd., #291 Subdivision: John’s Island List Date: 2/1/12 List Price: $550,000 Sell Date: 7/18/12 Sell Price: $450,000 Listing Broker: Cliff Norris Real Estate Listing Agent: Cliff Norris, Jr. Selling Broker: NMLS Selling Agent: NMLS AGENT Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Kathy Nystrom Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Kathy Nystrom Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Dustin Haynes Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl./Claudia Pascal Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Hope & Glen Brovont Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Hope Brovont Cliff Norris Real Estate/Meg Norris Norris & Company/Stacy Katz Norris & Company/Lucy Hendricks Norris & Company/Lillian Ellis The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Bevin Mugford Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./R. Curry & K. Casalino Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./R. Curry & K. Casalino

Mainland Real Estate Sales – July 12-July 18 Address: 9536 Riverside Dr. Subdivision: Pelican Pointe List Date: 10/21/10 List Price: $599,000 Sell Date: 7/13/12 Sell Price: $585,000 Listing Broker: Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Listing Agent: Kimberly Hardin Selling Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Selling Agent: Sam Robbins 1219 River Reach Dr. Address: Riverwind Subdivision: 1/26/12 List Date: $424,900 List Price: 7/18/12 Sell Date: $390,000 Sell Price: Listing Broker: Norris & Company Cheryl Burge Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB Maxine Hazen Selling Agent: Address Subdivision List Date List Price Sell Date Sell Price 4685 Hamilton Ct. Hamilton Island at OH 1/24/12 $399,000 7/12/12 $350,000 4415 5th Pl. Arbor Trace 6/5/12 $375,000 7/12/12 $345,000 935 St. James Ln. St. James Island/OH 12/6/10 $350,000 7/16/12 $340,000 6420 12th St. Indian River Farms 5/11/12 $299,000 7/16/12 $299,000 1679 Victoria Cir. Victoria Island/GH 9/13/11 $289,900 7/16/12 $274,000 5408 Barbados Sq. Isles at Waterway Village 2/29/12 $279,900 7/18/12 $265,000 3356 Westford Cir. SW Millstone Landing 1/8/11 $259,000 7/18/12 $259,000 6816 49th St. Indian River Farms 5/17/12 $275,000 7/18/12 $220,000 3030 18th St. Indian River Farms 2/28/12 $200,000 7/16/12 $200,100

Address: 5840 Clubhouse Dr. Subdivision: Bent Pine List Date: 4/10/12 List Price: $545,000 Sell Date: 7/12/12 Sell Price: $475,000 Listing Broker: Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Listing Agent: Claudia Pascal Selling Broker: Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Selling Agent: Claudia Pascal Address: 3555 Lucia Dr. Subdivision: Hobart Landing List Date: 9/16/10 List Price: $355,000 Sell Date: 7/12/12 Sell Price: $360,000 Listing Broker: Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt IP Listing Agent: Ginny Mitchell Selling Broker: Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Selling Agent: Vance Brinkerhoff Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Jim Knapp Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Diane De Francisci RE/MAX Classic/Kelly Fischer RE/MAX Classic/Kelly Fischer Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Jim Knapp Grand Harbor Real Estate/Lynn Arzt Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Diane De Francisci Daley & Company Real Estate/Cheryl Michel Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sally Baskin Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./S. Zeuner & M. P. Slater Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Joe Kovaleski Real Living All Florida Realty/Bob Lewis Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Reynolds Team Ray’s Real Estate Services Inc./Deborah Ray Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB/Wendy Browning Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Nancy Marrero Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sharon Raphaeli


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Vero Beach Newsweekly - Vol. 2, Issue 17