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Inside

T H U R S D A Y

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Fiesta time

Riverside Children’s Theatre holds its annual spring theatrical celebrationPage 30

Business is booming

Beachside retailers who ‘think outside the box’ enjoying successPage 31

STAFF PHOTO

Dick Stark makes the most of a second chance at life. Story page 12

Pedal power to fight hunger

Cross country trek benefits charities to feed the needyPage 3

King and Queen

St. Edward’s holds its prom at the Vero Beach Museum of ArtPage 24

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cated; changed their own tires (he had four flats), handled personal duties, and had to find encouragement for the long ride from within themselves. The riders faced extremes in weather; climbing tortuous mountain roads and countless obstacles but Alexander faced it all with an overall optimism and says he will never forget each day of the journey. Across the country Alexander was able to preach at a few churches and urge many more to donate to his cause. His experiences and call to help can be read on his blog at TheRidetoBeatHunger.org. Alexander’s daily entries kept his supporters connected as he described some of his inner thoughts along the way.

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It is staggering to think of riding a bicycle from the Pacific to the Atlantic for most people but that is just what Reverend Scott Alexander has done. In just over a month, Alexander has completed a grueling 3,300 mile bike ride which he undertook to bring awareness to and raise donations for a cause dear to his heart--ending hunger. Known to many Vero Beach residents as the minister for the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Church, Alexander is an endurance athlete and has completed two other charity rides previously. This year’s Ride to Beat Hunger was his most challenging to date. Not only did Alexander choose to follow the organization’s set route from Costa Mesa, Cal-

ifornia, to Savannah, Georgia, he also continued the ride south all the way to Vero Beach. He traveled through ten states in a month’s time, ending his journey at Waldo’s Restaurant where he dipped his front tire symbolically in the ocean. (He had dipped his back tire in the Pacific on day one.) Alexander rode wheel to wheel with twelve riders, his new comrades, and then finished the last leg of his journey with old friends, Mark Schumann and Bill Penney who joined him in Savannah. Cheri Schumann and Karen Penney made up the support team for the final trek. It should be remembered that although organized by America by Bicycle Tours and supported by four SAG, (Support and Gear truck) people, this ride was the responsibility of each rider. They kept their bikes clean and lubri-

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BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Rev. Scott Alexander bikes cross country to raise money for those who go hungry

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A mission that went from coast to coast


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COAST TO COAST FROM PAGE 3

In New Mexico: “At times I was riding alone — as many were today — and I had time to let my heart fill with the grace and beauty of the American West...indeed our entire creation. You and I live in a glorious natural world, with so much diversity, grace and harmony, and today I

fully felt and savoured that beauty — it was like heaven on earth.” In Arizona: “Every hour we were moving through a different landscape and terrain — yesterday was unremitting desert, and today was radically different and much more stimulating. At one point, when I was riding alone, I shouted out, ‘I am so happy to be here,’ it was just so cool.”

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What was most important to Alexander in the beginning was being able to keep up with the pack. He has had a knee replacement and suffers with severe arthritis. “I was very anxious about the physical challenge,” said Alexander by phone from Georgia. “I turn 63 next week and I am the oldest rider by eight to ten years but I have been as strong as any of the others.” He says the group has been like a family who began as complete strangers and supported each other mentally as well as physically. Most days ended after an average of 110 miles around four or five o’clock when they could grab some dinner, rest and review the day. “One night there was a huge thunderstorm and we all just pulled up some chairs, kicked back and just sat companionably watching the lightning and sharing stories. A perfect end to a long day.” Alexander’s ride was a test of his physical limits but it was the cause he rode for that was in his thoughts constantly. His hope to raise $50,000 to help alleviate hunger was realized. Two organizations through the Indian River Foundation will split the proceeds, Harvest Outreach locally and Stop Hunger Now globally. There were many donors including one “Angel” which offered to match up to $10,000.

Even though Alexander’s initial goal has been met, there are still over 30,000 children in Indian River County who are uncertain about their next meal and 925 million people who face hunger in the world every day. You may still donate on Alexander’s page, theRidetoBeatHunger.com or .org to continue helping the cause. As the end of the trip came to a close, Alexander, Penney and Schumann were smiling as they rode into the drive to Waldo’s Restaurant. Over two hundred people were there to greet them. After riding through the white finish line, Alexander thanked his supporters and then took his bicycle on its final spin to the ocean, dipping his front tire in the surf to signify his journey’s end. Fellow rider Steve Schwartz flew down for the Splash Party with his wife Elana. “I flew in from New Jersey to celebrate Scott’s achievement after just having arrived home myself,” said Schwartz. “His support on the road was invaluable as was his humor and attitude. We wanted to be here for this.” “What he’s done is truly remarkable for this effort,” said Don Drinkard of Harvest Outreach. “To me, it is unimaginable and so inspiring. It truly touches my heart.” “Compared to the cause of eradicating hunger, the ride was nothing,” said Alexander.


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LOCAL NEWS

The end of the road More than 200 well wishers showed up as Scott Alexander ended his cross country bicycle trek to raise money and raise awareness for the problem of hunger right here in Indian River County and elsewhere. Alexander dipped his front tire in the Atlantic Ocean to symbollically end his journey. He started the trip in Coast Mesa, California where he dipped his back tire in the Pacific Ocean to begin his trek.

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Fellow rider Steve Schwartz and his wife Elena flew down from New Jersey to be with Scott at Waldo’s.

Patrick Jordan, founder of Harvest Outreach Austin Hunt and Chairman Don Drinkard.

Scott Alexander raises his hand in celebration on the completion of his 3,300 mile trip.

Scott Alexander in the lead, Bill Penney and Mark Schumann arrive at Waldo’s Restaurant, the end of the trip.

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

The crowd welcomes Reverend Scott Alexander at Waldo’s Splash Party.


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City has $42 million in unfunded employee obligations

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- While the Vero Beach City Council works toward covering a pension shortfall that is in the neighborhood of $33 million, there is an even larger budget burden it is facing in the form of health insurance obligations to active and retired employees. The city is on the books for about $42 million in hospitalization benefits it currently owes its workers. That figure is derived from payments it is making monthly for current employees’ health plans, retirees receiving the health benefit who pay a fee and future payments it will owe as active employees retire. And that cost will likely increase as insurance and medical costs

rise over time. What is alarming about the health insurance costs is that, unlike the pension plan which at least has $80 million held in trust funds to help allay those payments, there is no money to draw from to pay the hospitalization portion of employee benefits. Those costs are paid monthly out of the General Fund and employee contributions to the plan. The city is currently paying $4 million a year just to cover its pension obligations which is an amount equal to what the city generates each year in property taxes. The amount the city pays each year for health insurance is a number not easily realized, but to gain a sense of the payouts consider it costs about $800,000 a year to cover electric workers, $742,000

for the Police Department, and $500,000 for Public Works. The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2011 does calculate other post employee benefits which include health and life insurance. That report notes: “The actuary’s estimate for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2011, using the Investment Return Assumption, produced an unfunded obligation of $41,940,000 and a total annual required contribution of $3,798,000. The City has elected to fund the OPEB obligation on a pay-as-you-go basis.” In fact, about 80 percent of the $20.7 million General Fund is consumed by salaries, benefits and payouts for unused vacation and sick days. With revenue from property taxes stagnant or headed lower and the potential loss of the $6 million transfer from the electric fund should the city sell its power plant to Florida Power and Light, the city’s workforce will have to shrink. “What that implies is if 80 percent of the fund covers salary and benefits and 20 percent covers operating costs, then it is virtually impossible to significantly reduce services without reducing the workforce,” noted Finance Commission Chairman Peter Gorry.

Should the sale of the electric plant to FPL go through, the company has initially promised $14.4 million to assume the pension liability that would occur as workers lose their jobs with the city and either join FPL or go on to other work. Whether or not any money will be applied to health and other benefits owed workers is still being negotiated. But the sale of Vero Electric sends out another red flag in that the city would move that much closer to having fewer employees paying into the system to help cover retirees for their health insurance plan. The city currently has 452 active employees purchasing one of three health insurance options. In addition there are 254 retired employees whose health insurance is covered all or in part by the city. It becomes clear that as you have less money in the form of active employee contributions and less money coming into the General Fund in the form of property taxes and the potential loss of the electric utility revenue stream, something has got to give. The City Council, with Mayor Pilar Turner leading the charge, has begun to address these issues. She noted at the last City Council meeting that the city paid out $2 million in unused vacation and CONTINUES ON PAGE 10

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LOCAL NEWS

50M

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400

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City of Vero Beach’s Pension and Benefits Dilemma

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Amount pension plan is underfunded

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Retirees in health plan

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City's obligation for worker and retiree health insurance*

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sick pay to retiring employees in the last five years and had an additional $2.8 million compiling now. “This is not sustainable,” she said. The Council will consider at its next meeting ending the practice of rolling over large amounts of unused sick pay for city department heads and new non-union city employees. Union contracts, however, prevent such a policy from being implemented citywide at the same time. Unions require such changes in benefits to be negotiated. More than half of the city’s 452 workers are covered by unions. About 200 are represented by Teamsters Local No. 769. These employees are covered by a threeyear contract running until Sept. 30, 2013, and union Business Representative Steve Myers in March did not give any indication he was willing to reopen the contract early.


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LOCAL NEWS

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So I wrote a letter to then-Commissioner Ken Macht and recommended forming a task force to study the issue. Ken agreed and offered to chair the task force if I would become vice chairman. “Out of that meeting we formed

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 12

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River County, a situation you did not hear much about. So I attended a County Commission meeting in 1998 where budget hearings were going on and the Homeless Coalition applied for money from the county. It was a poor presentation and they were turned down.

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After a lifetime of hard work in the big city rat race, raising a family and enduring cold winters, retirement is usually the time you can look forward to living at a leisurely pace, with occasional visits from the grandkids and plenty of sunshine. However, no retiree expects to witness firsthand the most terrifying attack this country has ever known and survive to tell about it. Vero Beach retiree and philanthropist Richard A. “Dick” Stark has experienced both. But it is a third aspect of retirement that has affected him the most and serves as a life lesson for all of us. Dick Stark was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan where his father, Judson L. Stark, attended law school, the first in his family to go to college. After graduation, the family moved to Indianapolis, where his father practiced law and eventually became a judge. While in high school, Dick Stark met a young lady named Barbara Jones. They became high school sweethearts, then college sweethearts when they both attended DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. On December 7, 1941, the first “day of infamy” he was to experience, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. He was a sophomore in college. As Dick tells it, “I enlisted in the Navy, but was permitted to finish college before going in to active duty as part of the V-7 program. So I switched to Indiana University Law School and went year round, completing my undergraduate work and two years of law before being called up. “At the time, it was felt the war would last many years, so they started training a second generation of officers and I was re-

cruited to take a supply corps officer course at Harvard Business School. I finally received my commission in 1944 and Barbara and I got married. Our first child, Susan, was born two days before V-J Day in August 1945.” After the war, Stark finished law school and went to work as a Wall Street lawyer, eventually a partner of the firm Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy. During that time he and Barbara raised five children, four girls and a boy. Life was good, but then in 1980, at the age of 59, Stark had open heart surgery. Open heart surgery back in 1980 was riskier than it is today. Although he continued in his career, Stark was well aware of his health and it was always in the back of his mind. Finally, in 1990 after 42 years with his law firm, he decided it was time to retire. So he and Barbara moved to Vero Beach. Once here, Dick decided to do what he could to improve the life of others. Stark says, “I had some involvement with community service up north as time would allow, serving on the St. Francis Hospital Board and Assistant Chancellor of Long Island University, but with retirement, we became much more involved here. Ellie McCabe started a Foundation Forum to educate people about local charities and she asked me to become a part of it. Since then we have been major contributors and advocates for Indian River Medical Center (back then, Indian River Memorial Hospital), Riverside Theatre and the Museum of Art (originally Center for the Arts).” But it was a conversation with local resident and community activist, Pam Scala that changed Stark’s life. As he relates, “She told me about the homeless in Indian

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Dick Stark making the most of his second chance


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a permanent group to monitor the homeless situation. No one even knew how many homeless were in the county at that time.” That permanent group became the Treasure Coast Homeless Services Council, Inc. “The best decision we made was to hire Louise Hubbard as executive director. She had the qualifications we needed to really make a difference. The problem was we had to come up with $50,000 in order to hire her. So I went to Ellie McCabe and she wrote a check for $10,000 on the spot. I also went to Harry Walker and John Schumann, and by noon that day, we had our $50,000.” It turned out to be the best investment Dick and the other contributors ever made. “Louise became our principal fund raiser and over the past 12 years, we have received $24 million in grants, comparable to the money raised by United Way.” Most of that grant money has come through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “Louise found out how HUD determined grants and got us in on it. Indian River County wasn’t even on the radar at the time because they only worked with communities of 500,000 or more. So we joined with St. Lucie County, Martin and Okeechobee Counties to reach that number. HUD says Louise was the highest scoring grant writer in the entire United States.”

The event that changed his life forever By 2001, Dick Stark felt he had lived a good life. He turned 80 years old, a full life by any measure, he had been married to his high school sweetheart Barbara for 57 years, their five children were all

STAFF PHOTO

Dick Stark has devoted much of his time in Vero Beach to helping the homeless.

successful and although retired for 11 years, he still did business with some of his old clients, necessitating trips to New York City. “I frequently stayed at the Marriott World Trade Center and on September 10, 2001, I had finished up business and went to dinner with my partners from the firm. Our legal counsel was from North Carolina and wanted to see the Windows on the World, so we went up to the 107th floor of the World Trade Center Tower 1. It was a beautiful night with a great view of the city. We were probably among the last to ever enjoy that view.” The next morning, Stark decided to sleep in. He never heard the first plane hit, but woke up, showered, dressed and packed. He never heard the hotel evacuation alarm either because he was hard of hearing. “I didn’t become aware what was going on outside until after the second plane hit WTC Tower 2, which was only 100 feet from my fifth floor room but above my east side view.” It was only then that he saw sheets of office paper scattering in the wind and then flaming pieces of metal. “A hotel bellman banged on my door and said to follow him.

There were three other guests and we started down the inside fire escape stairway.” The following description is a combination of Stark’s firsthand account soon after the event and this interview. It was an orderly exit until they reached the third floor stairwell. “We suddenly felt a horrendous earth-shaking sound and a rush of air that knocked us backward. It was the WTC Tower 2 falling down on the Marriott Hotel.” The outside hotel wall collapsed as the rubble crashed down enveloping them in a dark cloud of dust and debris. “The five of us were trapped in the dark.” As the dust cleared they saw the horrific view. They stood on a section of stairwell completely open to a scene Stark can never forget. “There was devastation and rubble as far as the eye could see.” They could also see that they were only steps away from plunging three stories into the pile of concrete slabs and steel beams. “We only had minor cuts and bruises, but it appeared that our death was inevitable as our stairwell shifted and seemed unstable.” They were all covered in dust from

head to toe and they could not move even a step for fear of the floor collapsing. Yet, in the face of death they all remained calm. “We even introduced ourselves to each other while we awaited the inevitable.” All Dick Stark could think of was this is how he was going to die. But as the dust started to settle, an angel arose from the milieu in the form of a New York City firefighter. His name was Angel Rivera. Then three more firefighters appeared. “They said we could not get out through the hotel.” Angel Rivera told one of the others, Angel Juarbe, to find some rope so they could all rappel down to the ground. He left and the building shifted again. Stark found out later that Angel Juarbe died. His body was not recovered until months later. They looked around for another way out and saw a steel beam leaning against what was left of the hotel. It rested at a 45 degree angle from the pile of rubble. “Angel Rivera asked my name and I answered, “Dick.” He instructed us to slide down the beam backwards on our bellies, with him leading the way. I said I couldn’t do that, I was 80 years old.” The fireman ignored him though and said, “Dick, we are going down NOW!” Rivera took his hand and they both slid and lurched their way down. Then Rivera led him and the others across another narrow, horizontal beam a few feet above the rubble. From there they climbed through a quarter mile of twisted carnage, carefully avoiding any pools of water and exposed electrical cables, as they headed for an emergency vehicle. “Halfway to our goal my legs would not go any further and I could not get enough breath for my ailing heart.” Two policemen each took an


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this motivated to spend their time working for those who are less fortunate. Stark says he is slowing down and he still isn’t sure how much longer his ailing heart will hold out, but you should know that he swims 30 minutes a day and is on the treadmill 30 minutes a day, seven days a week. Clearly, he is determined to make every second count of his second chance at life.

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A renewed commitment to helping others Today, at the age of 91, Dick Stark is still making the most of his second chance at life. While he is involved in the community as he was before that life changing day in 2001, his priorities have become more sharply focused. “It is easy to donate to the hospital, the theater and the museum because we have a vested interest and benefit from them. I feel compelled to help causes from which we do not directly benefit.” No single cause is more important to Stark these days than the plight of the 800 homeless people in Indian River County. He still chairs the Treasure Coast Homeless Services Council, Inc. (TCHSC), which has served over 4,300 unduplicated individuals since 2009. “The homeless situation is very complicated today with foreclosures and unemployment adding to the problem.” That’s why he is supportive of Camp Haven, a project originated by The Source, a member of TCHSC. According to Stark, “The

Homeless Family Center can take about 20 families and the Samaritan Center about nine, but there is literally no place for homeless individuals. The Camp Haven Project would create an encampment of about 100 tents to give these people shelter. It would also provide the most precious commodity for homeless individuals, water.” Few retirees at the age of 91 are

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Surviving the aftermath It was a long time before Dick Stark could even talk about his experience. But it certainly gave him a new perspective on life. “The experience still troubles me to this day if I think about it, but I am thankful to be alive. Everything since then has become special to me – my family, my charitable efforts, just enjoying the beauty that surrounds us. I hug and kiss my family more. I feel like I am living on borrowed time and I must make the most of it.” His new perspective on life was tested again though, just a few months after 9-11. “I kept in touch with Angel Rivera and the following May, Barbara and I went up to New York to see him. We had a nice visit, but that night, Barbara suffered a stroke.” She survived the stroke and even in her weakened condition, Dick and Barbara Stark kept up their busy social and community life.

But the years took their toll and she gradually grew more frail. “She spent her last years in a wheelchair and I was her primary caregiver 24 hours a day, but it was a small price to pay for the many wonderful years we had together.” Barbara finally passed away in September last year at the age of 88. The woman he loved his entire adult life, even more so after 9-11, was gone. How did this terrible loss affect his second chance at life? “After she died, I didn’t want to go on living. Her illness had taken a great toll on me. But then my daughters came and stayed with me one weekend each until I decided that life was still worth living. I could have easily perished on 9-11, but I didn’t. How could I give up now?”

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arm and walked Stark the rest of the way. “I looked back and except for my companions and a couple of fire and policemen, there was no sign of life.” Stark was driven through and around an unending pile of rubble until they reached a dock on the Hudson River, where he and about 50 other people were ferried over to Jersey City. “We looked back and could see that WTC Tower 1 was still standing.” He later saw Tower 1 collapse, but did not see the 22-story Marriott nestled between the twin towers, also collapse. Stark was able to call Barbara and say he was safe, then walked for several hours to a point where one of his partners picked him up. It was 2:30 in the afternoon. “When I finally got in the car, safe at last, I broke down in uncontrollable sobs for the first time.”

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‘The best female poet of the 20th century’ Renowned Poet Laura Riding Jackson lived out her days in Wabasso LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

On a patch of dry grass just inside the entrance of the Environmental Learning Center, stands the humble but proud home of American poet, Laura (Riding) Jackson. Built in 1910, it is a modest, two-story, cracker-style construction of locally milled pine that was transported about 13 years ago from its original site just down the road on CR 510 in Wabasso. Now, the house is open to the public for viewing on Saturday mornings through May, maintained by the Laura Riding Jackson Foundation. In addition to hosting events at the house, the foundation partners with other organizations in providing more and higher quality literary events for the public throughout the year. How a young Jewish woman whose extensive collection of poetry, letters, essays, short stories and collaborations are maintained at Cornell University’s library, as well as at Northwestern and Vanderbilt Universities’ libraries, came to live out her days in a Wabasso

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the 1920s and ‘30s, shortly after the women’s suffrage movement obtained the vote. A graduate of Cornell University, Jackson’s poetry seized the attention of a group of modernist poets in Tennessee who published

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the magazine, “The Fugitive,” at Vanderbilt University. The magazine was the first to publish Jackson and then chose her work for the Nashville Poetry Prize in 1924, eventually leading to the publication of her first book.

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including Barbara Rich and Madeline Vara. In 1929, however, embroiled in what Deborah Baker’s only authorized biography, “In Extremis: The Life of Laura Riding,” calls a “ménage a trois” with Graves and Nicholson, Jackson was cast aside. Desperate, Jackson flung herself from a fourth story window,

count of British Army Lieutenant Colonel T.E. Lawrence, on which the 1962 film, “Lawrence of Arabia” was based. Over a 14-year period, Riding and Graves founded the Seizin Press in London and collaborated on a body of work, including a dictionary, which they never completed. During that time, Jackson also wrote under various pseudonyms,

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som and Allen Tate, Jackson’s writing (“The Quids”) was introduced to England’s poet laureate, Robert Graves, who offered her a position as his writing assistant on a commissioned project in Egypt. Among his many publications on poetry, mythology and history, Graves, who was married to Nancy Nicholson, wrote “Lawrence and the Arabs,” a World War II ac-

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“She is considered the best female poet of the 20th century,” said local realtor and long time resident, Charlotte Terry, a writer herself and president of the Laura Riding Jackson Foundation. Jackson, whose poetry can be challenging to read, lived in the Wabasso house situated on a 12-acre citrus grove for almost five decades. “She didn’t even have electricity until the last few years,” said Terry. “And that’s only because she had to.” These days, the home is listed on the Friends of the Library USA National Literary Landmark register, a national registry to publicly identify places of significant literary history, and on the Florida Literary Map, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council. It was Jackson’s second husband, Schuyler B. Jackson, a poetry critic for “Time” magazine, who transplanted Laura to the area in 1943. “He had been here before with his first wife vacationing and he remembered the beautiful canopy of grove trees in Wabasso and the quietness of it,” said Terry. After his death in 1968, his widow began signing her work Laura Jackson. At a time when women were forging their own identity, Jackson was searching for hers through a process of continual transformation. Her first marriage at Cornell to history professor Louis Gottschalk marked the beginning of that transformation with the change from her birth name, Laura Reichenthal. In 1923, Jackson published her first poems under the name Laura Riding Gottschalk. After her divorce in 1925, she dropped her ex-husband’s name, publishing for most of her life under the name Laura Riding. In 1926, through her relationship with Fugitive Poets Robert Penn Warren, John Crowe Ran-

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breaking her back and almost killing herself. Apparently unable to live without Jackson, Graves crawled out another window on a lower floor to end his life, too. Evidently, the histrionics won over Graves’ affection for Jackson. “They went to Majorca and published a magazine and the works of other writers, like Gertrude Stein,” said Terry, whose company, Cracker Tales, has produced a video documentary about Jackson. Forced to leave the country due to the Spanish Civil War, Jackson and Graves moved to Pennsylvania in 1939 at the invitation of “Time’s” critic, Schuyler Jackson, who lived on a farm with his wife, Katherine, and four children. The passion that blossomed between Laura and Schuyler sent Graves back to England and landed Katherine in an insane asylum, documented in a book written by Schuyler’s eldest daughter. “They fell madly in love,” said Terry, explaining that the coupling was met by disapproval from the community up north, so they came to Wabasso because “they didn’t know anyone.” About that same time, Laura renounced poetry and focused her efforts on philosophy and linguistics, collaborating with Schuyler on the dictionary she had begun with Graves, as well as publishing her prose and, later, short stories. “She was one of the first members of the Audubon Society,” said Terry about the early environmentalist. In addition to their writing, Laura and Schuyler supplemented their income by selling organic citrus they grew in their grove without the use of pesticides. “They lived simply,” said Terry, with no indoor plumbing even until much later when county code enforcement gently forced the issue.

Laura Riding Jackson died in 1991 at the age of 90.

After Schuyler’s death, Laura finally completed the dictionary with the assistance of a Guggenheim fellowship. The book, “A New Foundation for the Definition of Words and Supplementary Essays,” was posthumously published in 1997 by the University Press of Virginia. She also recorded readings of many of her poems at the local radio station, WTTB. The audio recordings are available online in the archives of the Harvard College Library. Toward the end of her life, “Jackson sold the acreage around her house while maintaining a life estate on the house until she died in in 1991 at the age of 90,” said Terry. That same year, Jackson received the Yale University’s Bollingen Prize for her lifetime contribution to poetry. In order to avoid demolition of the house, Jackson’s attorney Rene Vandevoorde “donated it to the Laura Riding Jackson Foundation, which raises the money to have it

preserved for the study of literature, history and philosophy,” said Terry. The foundation’s website explains that the house is “an example of a disappearing architectural style and a symbol of a more environmentally-sensitive way of life.” The foundation pays the ELC $150 a month to lease a one-acre lot for the house. The ELC, in turn, leases its 51-acre parcel from the county for one dollar a year. Last year, there were 50 visitors to the Laura Riding Jackson house. In addition to maintaining the house, the foundation, which has an annual budget of $11,000, hosts an annual poetry barbecue on the property. The first year, Sean Sexton, who sits on the foundation’s board of directors, read from his first book of poetry, “Blood Writing.” “The foundation has also partnered with the Emerson Center for the past three or four years,” said Terry, explaining that the foundation helped bring bestselling author Greg Mortenson to Vero.

Next year, they are bringing in another bestselling author, Rory Stewart, a human rights activist who was formerly on Britain’s parliament. Moreover, the foundation partners with the Teen Writers Workshop, a once- or twice-a year writing program for high school students founded by Terry with another local author, Pam Proctor. Held at the Environment Learning Center, because it has more spacious meeting rooms, as many as 100 teens attend the workshops to improve writing skills for college entrance essays or, in some cases, the students want to pursue careers telling stories and benefit from the speakers, who are all working writers. Terry and Proctor have also taken a contingent of published authors and supporters of the arts to the University of Hanoi in Vietnam, where they have on two separate occasions conducted writers workshops with college students living entirely under Communist rule. “They had never been allowed to use their imagination, so they didn’t know how,” said Proctor. The Laura Riding Jackson Foundation also started the Vero Beach Book Festival, now on hiatus due to the economy, but an event that grew in size and scope in each of its first three years, bringing bestselling authors to the area. This year, said Terry, the foundation is applying for a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to initiate a county-wide reading campaign of John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men.” Terry’s brother, John Terry, a Hollywood actor who stars in the remake of the movie, has agreed to support such a campaign in his hometown. For more information about the Laura Riding Jackson Foundation, visit them online at www.LauraRidingJackson.com or call 569-6718.


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2001 to 2005. It was his job to work with the states which had to deal with what amounted to an unfunded federal mandate to create and then administer the new testing system. With the departure of Dr. Paige, President Bush named Margaret Spellings from Texas as Secretary of Education. She had no prior experience in the education field, but had the responsibility of developing the specific testing criteria that would be imposed on the states. As in most situations when the federal government issues a mandate to the states, the actual implementation was left to individual discretion at the state level. This is one of the reasons there is such diversity in the testing from state to state. Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush awarded the contract for the development and administration of the FCAT test to NCS Pearson, a London-based mega corporation that is involved in multiple aspects of education from production of textbooks to tutoring programs for teachers. The NCS Pearson contract award in 2009 was not without some controversy because there were documented problems with the performance after receiving

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and 3.4 for 10th grade. Indian River’s average writing score was 3.3 for fourth grade; 3.3 for eighth grade and 3.3 for 10th grade. In reading, ninth- and 10thgraders both scored above the state average. Indian River’s 10thgrade reading score of 247 beat the state average of 244. Indian River’s ninth-graders averaged a 243 reading score, compared to the 240 state average. “There is now an immediate need for analysis of all the FCAT data and the school district will not have all the relevant data from Florida‘s Department of Education until the end of June,” said Terri D’Albora, assistant superintendent for curriculum “All of this data will require extensive analysis.” The genesis for the FCAT began with the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The basic premise of this legislation was to ensure accountability in the national educational process. Congress passed the legislation in a bipartisan fashion and it was signed into law by President George W. Bush. The responsibility for the implementation of this new legislation was given to President Bush appointee Dr. Roderick Paige who was Secretary of Education from

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While Indian River County students did nominally better than the state averages on the reading and writing portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), the precipitous drop in results has left parents and school officials alike to wonder if the test has any true meaning in measuring the education levels of our children. That sentiment becomes all the more germane when state officials reacted to the appalling results by lowering the standards for passing the writing test. Officials said they had not adequately prepared the schools for an increased emphasis on spelling, grammar and punctuation in addition to content of the essay. “The situation with FCAT demonstrates that it is a flawed system,” said Indian River County School Board Chairman Jeff Pegler. “The Department of Education’s decision to go back and change the scores only reduces the credibility of the whole process.”

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That decision also raises the issue of assessing whether or not teachers have been teaching to the tests. With so much time, money and emphasis placed on these annual tests, it might be instructive to consider how we find ourselves dealing with this national black eye. Dr, Fran Adams, superintendent of schools for Indian River County stated, “This is a transitional year for school districts all across Florida. We will have a need for immediate response on many new issues not the least of which is ‘common core’ which has the goal of uniform standards for children being ready for college.” The Indian River School District team of officials are also now analyzing even more mandates from the Florida Department of Education that will need input from each county. Here at home, Indian River County students did slightly better than the state averages. The state average writing score was 3.3 for fourth grade; 3.3 for eighth grade

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SCHOOLS - FCAT FROM PAGE 17

contracts in Arizona, South Carolina and Wyoming. Oklahoma terminated its contract with the company because of scoring issues. In New York, the Attorney General has launched an investigation into influence peddling by the company. The Florida contract expires at the end of 2013. In Florida the details for implementation of the contract are the responsibility of Gerard Robinson in his role as Superintendent of Education who came from the Commonwealth of Virginia in 2011. In making the career change, Mr. Robinson gained a substantial salary boost. It was Robinson’s team that developed the criteria to place added emphasis on the spelling, grammar and punctuation on the written tests. NCS Pearson and Florida have not had a smooth cooperative arrangement and in 2010 the corporation was assessed a $15 million penalty for late delivery of the FCAT results. States all across the nation have experienced similar problems with the company. As things stand now, the issue of education at the national, state and county level is fluid. President Obama has given 10 states - including Florida -- flexibility in meeting goals and objectives of the No Child Left Behind law. This is intended to give the managers of the education programs more ability to control the programs. There are many pros and cons associated with rigorous testing of students across the nation. One of the unintended consequences has been the accusation that the situation has created the environment of teaching the test. There is also the proposition that our children are more stressed because of the pressure they feel

from teachers and parents. Additionally, the standardized test provides no consideration of the differences for children with handicaps or those who might not yet be proficient in English. Unfortunately, testing is not a measurement of motivation, creativity, persistence or innate talent. Nor does testing allow for such variables as the child’s physical well being on the day of the test.

Most importantly, testing does not factor in the differences between a stable or a chaotic home life. The FCAT controversy has become more heated with each passing day. There are petitions flying across the internet for a stop FCAT movement. Also, school boards all across Florida are assessing if there may be an over reliance on high stakes standardized tests. It remains to be seen whether or

not this issue has momentum. It has, however, once again raised the issue of whether or not teacher pay can or should be linked to FCAT results. In 2011 the Florida Education Association filed a law suit challenging a bill which ties teacher salaries to the performance of their students’ test scores. It is obvious now that the issue is going to remain a focus for some time to come.

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Museum names new director of marketing and communications

Eleven Charter High students also graduate with degree from IRCS

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- For the first time ever at Indian River Charter High School, 11 students completed their associate’s degree before graduating high school. Indian River Charter High School celebrated graduation last Saturday, but 11 Charter students had already graduated a few weeks ago with associate degrees from Indian River State College. Hannah Trodglen has 63 college credits and her goal is to become a physician assistant and will continue her education at Florida State. “I was looking to save money and I ended up saving about $10,000,” said Trodglen, “Dual enrollment saves you about $500 per class.” Hannah, who is only 16, is not the only one in her family to take advantage of the partnership between IRCHS and IRSC. Her older sister graduated from both IRSC and Charter last year, with 83 college credits completed. The list of graduates are as follows: Natalie Haffield (General AA, Florida Atlantic University Harriett Wilkes Honors College), Hannah Trodglen (General AA, FSU), Madison Ware (General AA, USF PreMed), Jack Kramer (Architecture AA, University of Florida), Danielle Harris (Elementary Special Education AA, UNF), Karina Otero (General AA, UF), Jennifer Stenback (General AA, USF Pre-Med), June-Avery Barnes (General AA, Florida Southern), Sage Gallerano (Business Administration AA, Stetson University), Amber O’Dell (General AA, UCF Pre-Med), and Michael Randolphi (General AA, USF). STAFF PHOTO Last year, IRCHS had three students graduate with their AA degree. Vero Beach Museum of Art Director of Marketing and Communications Sophie Bentham Wood and museum executive director Lucinda Gedeon.

VERO BEACH -- The Vero Beach Museum of Art has announced the appointment of Sophie Bentham Wood as the Museum’s new Director of Marketing and Communications. Bentham Wood brings more than 15 years of experience in the marketing and public relations industry, as well as a bachelor’s degree in the History of Art, Design and Film from Sheffield University, UK. She was previously with the London-based agency Hill & Knowlton and McCann-Erickson Marketing and Advertising, where she was responsible for global strategic communications and campaigns across a wide range of business sectors including financial, sponsorship, leisure and retail. Clients included P&G-David Beckham, Britvic-Wimbledon sponsorship, American Express and Adidas. “We’re very excited about Sophie’s appointment as she will bring a broad range of expertise and knowledge to what is one of the most demanding roles within the Museum,” said museum executive director Lucinda Gedeon. “We recognize and understand the need to produce a high level of visibility and public awareness for the museum and what we do, especially in this ever-changing media landscape. By increasing our communication efforts at state and national levels as well as continuing to educate the community on our exhibitions and programs, she will help play a pivotal role in the museum’s ongoing success.” Commenting on her appointment, Bentham Wood said: “I am delighted to be a part of such a magnificent art institution and am looking forward to applying my professional abilities and experience with my love for the arts.”

McKee Botanical Garden seeking entries for photo contest VERO BEACH --McKee Botanical Garden is seeking entries from amateur and experienced photographers for their finest examples of McKee’s most celebrated subject - the water lily - as part of the third annual Water Lilly photo contest. Submissions are being accepted through June 13 and will be showcased for judging at McKee’s eighth annual Water Lily Celebration on June 16. Entries must be of water lilies photographed at McKee in 2011 or 2012 with film or digital cameras. Photos must measure 8” x 10” and be mounted on foamboard or other rigid board and matted. Size including matting material must be 11” x 14”. Each entry must contain one photo labeled on back with the category, contestant name, address and phone number plus a completed entry form in order to be valid. Participants may submit one photo in each of three categories: color, black and white, and manipulated. Photos will be displayed at McKee’s Water Lily Celebration on June 16 from 9 a.m. to noon in the Hall of Giants. One winner will be chosen from each of the three categories and visitors attending the event will be able to vote for a “People’s Choice” award winner. All winners will receive an annual family membership to McKee valued at $50. McKee Botanical Garden’s water lily collection is one of the largest in Florida and includes over 100 varieties of more than 200 plants. For a complete list of photo contest rules and guidelines, please visit http:// www.mckeegarden.org/events/120616.php.


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Grand Harbor charity awards $12,500 to Food Pantry INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Grand Harbor Community Outreach Program recently donated a check for $12,500 to the Food Pantry, located in the Education Wing of the First Baptist Church. Since 2009, the Grand Harbor Community Outreach Program has delivered over $43,000 in grants and outright donations to help fund the Food Pantry’s operations. “The need is tremendous,” said Grand Harbor resident Tom Mackie. “We help between 800-900 families a month, which actually equates to over 3000 people. Grand Harbor and other communities have been very supportive, not only volunteering their time, but also goods. And the need is greater in the summer as many of the citrus packing companies shut down and there are many more people out of work.” An all-volunteer endeavor, the Food Pantry has been in existence helping Indian River County residents for the past 25 years. In season, Grand Harbor volunteers comprise about 20 percent of the 40 volunteers at the Food Pantry. Since its beginning ten years ago, Grand Harbor’s Community Outreach Program has donated over $1.75 million to deserving Indian River County programs.

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The World's BEST MASSAGE CHAIR

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VERO BEACH -- Harvest Food & Outreach was awarded a $50,000 grant from the Indian River Community Foundation to expand the organization’s Community Resource and Education Program designed to offer struggling families support, education and life skills to break the cycle of poverty. Harvest Food currently offers three distinct educational programs, including: a Children’s Summer Read and Feed Program, the Passport to Prosperity Program, and Food for Thought Program. The grant will allow Harvest Food to expand the program offerings, reaching an additional 200 individuals who otherwise may not have access. The $50,000 grant was awarded by the Indian River Community Foundation through a competitive grants program designed to address time-sensitive community needs intensified by the recent economic recession, according to Executive Director Kerry Bartlett. To learn more about Harvest Food call 772-770-2665 or visit irc.harvestfoodoutreach.org.

The AABC has 12 different world series, which means 25 percent of the events will be held on the Treasure Coast this summer and for summers to come. The Sandy Koufax division is 14-and-under, the Don Mattingly division is for 17 and 18-year-olds, and Stan Musial is an alladult age division. A regional Sandy Koufax World Series qualifier will be played June 14 to 17, with the champion earning a paid spot in the World Series, taking place from July 24 to 29 at the Vero Beach Sports Village. During the qualifier, an $850 team entry fee includes four game guarantee, use of the fields, umpires, game balls, and access to batting cages prior to games. Teams will stay either on-site in the villas or at one of the area hotels.

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• Neck and Shoulder Massage • Full Body Stretch • Calf, Foot and Sole Massage

Sports Village to host Sandy Koufax division of AABC world series

Total Body Coverage

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- One of the country’s premier amateur baseball events is coming to town in June and July, when Vero Beach Sports Village plays host to the Sandy Koufax division of the American Amateur Baseball Congress World Series. This event, along with the Don Mattingly and Stan Musial AABC World Series events held in Digital Domain Park at St. Lucie West, will pump an estimated $2.6 million into the local economy according to some Treasure Coast area officials.

"Come in for a Test Drive" Perkins West Store 569-3797 4005 20th St., Vero Beach

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Community Forum

Four lessons learned on the road BY MARK SCHUMANN

As we set out early Saturday morning from our hotel along the Savannah waterfront, Scott Alexander, Bill Penney and I had nearly 400 miles of cycling ahead of us, a distance we planned to cover in four days. Along with Bill’s wife, Karen, and my wife, Cheri, Bill and I had driven up to Savannah the day before to join Scott. Scott and 11 other cyclists had just completed a 25-day, 3,300-mile ride from Costa Mesa, California to Savannah. One of the “dirty-dozen” who bicycled across the country with Scott said the next time he took a cross-country ride he was going to pick a smaller country, perhaps Luxemburg. But Scott had in mind a longer journey. In order to complete his “ride to beat hunger” in Vero Beach, Scott tacked on another four days and 400 miles, so Bill and I decided to join him for the “tailwind” stretch of his crosscountry journey. Tropical Storm Alberto was churning up the waters off the

coast and creating a strong and steady wind from the northeast. With the winds of Alberto at our backs for the first three days of our trek we averaged several miles an hour faster than we would have otherwise. Lesson one: Never take a tailwind for granted. Karen Penney and my wife, Cheri, came along to support us, as they always do – though I hope I never take that support for granted or assume it as a right. Lesson two: Don’t go it alone. Each day they scouted out a spot somewhere near the half way point where we could stop for lunch. I’ve been on many long bicycle rides, and I can tell you there is no “sag” stop quite like one set up by someone who loves you. Lesson three: Do as much as you can with the ones you love. Peddling south on Georgia Highway 17 and along A1A south of Jacksonville Beach we saw beautiful low country savannahs and marshes and undeveloped stretches of the Florida I’d never before laid eyes on. Lesson four: Slow down and take

the back roads. With good company, clear skies, a tailwind, beautiful coastal landscapes around every bend, I had the first chance in many months to shift my attention from the daily challenge of keeping all the balls in the air to instead consider what a blessing it is to be alive. It is so easy to get caught in the thick of things. We got up early Tuesday morning to watch the 3:44 a.m. launch of the SpaceX rocket, sent to resupply the International Space Station. From the second floor deck at the Casa Coquina del Mar Bed and Breakfast overlooking the Indian River in Titusville we had a perfect view of the Falcon 9 rocket as it lifted off from a launch pad at Kennedy Space Center, carrying 1,000 pounds of food, supplies and equipment. By the time we set out on our bikes Tuesday morning, the wind had shifted, as it inevitably does, so for the 85 miles from Titusville to Vero Beach we peddled into a breeze from the south. The headwind slowed us down just

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

enough that we were in no danger of making an early entrance at the end-of-ride splash party at Waldo’s. Tuesday was Scott’s 29th day in the saddle and the last leg of his long ride from Costa Mesa, California to Vero Beach. It was also Bill’s birthday. When he stepped out of his room to watch the launch, with sleepy 3 a.m. voices we sang “happy birthday” to Bill. How many people arrange to get a rocket set off to celebrate the day they arrived on the planet? The rest of the Tuesday was about Scott about his accomplishment of bicycling across the county at age 62. And most importantly, it was about creating more awareness of chronic hunger, not only in the Third World, but in our own county and in our community. More than 200 people joined Scott at Waldo’s Tuesday to watch him dip the front wheel of his bicycle in the Atlantic Ocean, marking the end of his ride. The previous evening we spoke about ways of keeping the “ride to beat hunger” going. If you would like to participate in this effort to alleviate hunger, visit ridetobeathunger.org. There you can learn more about Scott’s ride and contribute if you choose. Looking back on my bicycling adventure with Bill and Scott, I learned a few lessons I hope to never forget. Appreciate a tailwind when you have one. Don’t go it alone. Do as much as you can with the ones you love. Slow down and take the back roads.


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COMMUNITY FORUM

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To the Editor: Goodbye privacy. Hello 1984. The smart meter is here. This surveillance device Florida Power and Light is touting is about to replace your old analogue meter without your knowledge and without your permission. It will capture your personal information at every electrical power source you use under the law of “implied consent” and it is going into a global data base accessed by parties not authorized nor invited to share your personal privacy -- a process that violates federal and state laws. The Smart Meter will monitor

how long you are at your computer, when you enter the bathroom, which electrical appliances you are using in your kitchen, if you have a security system, when it is armed, when your garage door opens and closes, whether or not you are or are not at home, and the added benefit of knowing whether or not you operate a business out of your home with the consequence of that business being shut down. You will be told that this is being done to lower consumer costs. The fact is that the new smart meters will cause electrical costs to rise since the government subsidized conversion costs are astronomical.

Let us ask ourselves, ‘Why would we do that?’ Obviously, it is not to save money. But it does give government control over you. And for the countless number of analogue meter readers who will be put out of work, let’s help lengthen those unemployment lines, shall we? Through intra-day tariffs, your freedom to use certain electrical sources of your choice at peak times of need, such as when you are cooking dinner while washing clothes with the television on while using the computer could be prohibited. If you cannot be “urged” to curb your usage, then rationing could be the next step as

is currently being done in Europe and China. But do not worry. Big Government and Big Electric are here to help you. For those of you who do not care about encroaching Totalitarianism, go back to sleep. For the rest of you, protect your 4th Amendment rights and “opt out” of the smart meter. Educate yourselves. Protect your health. Access www. smartmeter.org and other Internet sites. Make an informed choice. So the question remains: “Are you smarter than a smart meter?” The answer is, only if you want to be. Phylli s Fre y Vero Beach

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Are you smarter than a smart meter?

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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School and both joined the U.S. Navy. Gene joined in 1939 and was killed while serving aboard the U.S.S. Reuben James in 1941, the first American ship sunk by a German U-boat in World War II. There is a marker honoring him on Memorial Island. David survived the war, married Madge Tillman and raised two sons, Gene and David. That Gene also died tragically in an automobile accident in 1991. We can’t leave out the Beindorfs either, but that family accomplished so much we will just have to reserve a story for them in a future issue. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

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the University of Florida. Herb Jr. went on to earn a masters degree from the University of Michigan and spent his career with the Department of Defense. He and his wife, Virginia, live in Grand Haven, Michigan. They have two children, Martha and Bill and five grandchildren. Tom Guy returned to Vero after college and worked as a pharmacist with McClure Drugs downtown and later at Indian River Memorial Hospital. The Guy and Loy families came together in 1961 when Tom and Gwen married. They had one daughter, Robyn, who lives in Seattle, but came down for the Pioneer Dinner and presented the Guy family history. Now, we can’t forget that Herbert Sr. came to Vero with his sister, Thelma, and her husband, Clyde Evans. They had two sons, Gene and David, who both graduated from Vero Beach High

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Clyde Evans. Herb intended to leave Vero and return north that same year, but he stayed, working first as an auto mechanic then later opening a MILT THOMAS paint store downtown. His future bride, Ethel Beindorf, came to Vero in 1922 from Illinois with her parents, William and Lizzie Beindorf and brother Paul. William opened Vero Machine and Supply on Old Dixie Highway with son Paul when they moved here. Herbert and Ethel married in 1924, then spent their entire lives in Vero Beach. They had two sons, Herbert, Jr., and Thomas. Herbert Jr. graduated from Vero Beach High School in 1945 as valedictorian. Tom graduated a year later. They both then graduated from

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BY MILT THOMAS

Saturday, May 12 was a big day for Alma Lee Loy. First she was one of the few people I have ever known to get an entire bridge named after her (I didn’t know George Washington although I lived near his bridge many years ago). Then to top off a thrilling day, she was the subject of the Heritage Center’s 13th annual Pioneer Family Recognition Dinner that evening. Alma Lee certainly earned every ounce of recognition she has received! But please forgive us for not writing more about Alma Lee’s family, especially her sister, Gwen and husband, Thomas Guy. Both the Loys and the Guys were honored at that dinner. So it is only fitting that we give some of the Guy family background. Herbert S. Guy arrived in Vero from Missouri in 1921 with his sister, Thelma, and her husband,

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Honoring the Guy family for their pioneering work


Social | Lifestyle

Saint Edward’s prom goes ‘Around the World’

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Students gather with parents and friends in the atrium before the prom BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Today’s proms have gone upscale and high energy and  Saint Edward’s, which was held at the Vero Beach Museum of Art, was no exception.   Black linen covered the tables and centerpieces like the Eifel Tower reflected the “Around the World” prom theme. Over 170 students walked

across the stage at the Leonhardt Auditorium before continuing on to a night of dancing and dining.   Parents proudly beamed as their children were presented by Head of Upper School Bruce Wachter. In a progressive and proactive approach to some of the partying that proms are noted for, everyone submits to a breathalyzer at the beginning of the night and

knows that they could randomly be chosen again. Rick Hartley, Dean of Schools, says the kids have to do it at all the events and it is on the form they fill out so they know to expect it. “It makes me feel so comfortable,” said parent Tara Ramsey, “to know that they are in a safe environment.   It’s a welcome change to go with the times.”

For the girls, it is all about the dress.   “I was so relieved when I tried it on and it really looked good.” said Susana Cuartes. After dinner, digital music and laser lights bounced off the ceiling and everyone hit the dance floor. Then the King, Manny Vieira, and Queen, Ridgely Gayer, were crowned to huge cheers ending the night with the final dance.


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Megan Cook pins a rose on her date, Jordan Canevari

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Tyiesha McLendon, Lonnie Scott, Anmol Patel, Lazim Dhowdhury, Myiesha McLendon, Raquan Dobson, Hannah Hussamy and Sean Barry

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Ridgely Gayer and Manny Vieira are crowned King and Queen

Dean of Schools Rick Hartley with John Petersen and Tiffany Tee

Laura Drondoski, Ariel O’Brien, Lauren Edwards and Anmol Patel

Junior classmates (“Class of 2013!”) on their way out of prom carrying souvenirs from the party


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Manny Vieira, Susana Cuartes, Lara Drondoski and Juan Santini

Bruce Wachter gives final words of advise before the students are presented to their parents in the Auditorium

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Jarret Gilson, Campbell Gunther, Paul Szapory, Wes Walton and Josh Kane

Christiana Butz, Tillery Conway, Nick Goracy and Carleigh Beatus

Meagan Carrick and Hermann Engleman

Sam Ederle, Matt Becker and Jack Tonner


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Community Calendar

Community Church, 1901 23rd St., 7 pm, Disney classics and famous classical works, free will offering. 772-469-2306. Surf Club, 4200 A1A, 11:45 am2:30 pm, $7 includes lunch at noon. 772-231-3552.

MAY 24 ! “Brides and Bayous”

JUNE 5 ! Book signing

PHOTO BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Benefit concert, VBHS Performing If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, Arts Center, 1706 16th St., 7 pm, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to students & Old Barber Bridge, folk, be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. rock & bluegrass. 772-564-5537. MAY 26 & 30 speaker Kurt Wallach, Veteran’s ! Julian Marley & the Uprising Band Council of IRC. 772-569-9533. Capt. Hiram’s Sandbar, Sebastian, ! Junior Guide Training Sessions 7 pm, Tickets begin at $15. 772- Learning to become a junior ! Freedom 5k Run/Walk 589-4345. kayak/outdoor guide. Riverview Grand Harbor Beach Club, 7 am, Park, Sebastian, ages 13-17, Flor- fun run, awards, raffles, entertainMAY 25-26 ida Outdoors. 772-202-0220. ment, refreshments, sponsored by ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS! Senior Resources. 772-469-2060. Grilled food from Hale Groves and MAY 27 JUNE 2 treats from Kilwin’s available. Com- ! Treasure Coast Chorale edy by Catherine Maloney and Al Memorial Day weekend concert, ! Annual Tropical Night Luau, Romas, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15 plus 7 pm, First Baptist Church, indoor Youth Guidance, 7-11 pm, Quail food, prices vary. 772-231-6990. “fireworks,” free will offering. 772- Valley River Club, 2345 A1A, Tickets by May 31 $75, June 1st 231-3498. MAY 26 $85. 772-770-5040. ! Theatre-Go-Round

! Indian River NOW

Monthly meeting with speaker Claudia Jimenez, 11am-1 pm at Crispers, 1335 US1. 772-299-3607. ! Cobalt Room

Annual White Party & American BBQ, 6-10 pm, Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, 3500 Ocean Dr., $20 includes buffet. 772-231-5666. THURSDAY, MAY 24

Sounds of the Seventies Dinner Show, Joey’s Bistro, Three Avenues at junction of 20th & 21st St., 4:30 pm, $45 includes dinner. 772-252-9341.

Veteran’s Memorial Island, 9 am, SATURDAY, MAY 26

Samaritan Center fundraiser, family fun, games, water slides, games, 10 am-2 pm, Riverside Park, $10/ child, under 2 free. 772-770-3039. ! Saint Paul’s Charity Car Wash

MAY 28 ! Memorial Day Celebration

FRIDAY, MAY 25

! Bounce-Tacular

Fundraiser, 9-noon, Advanced Auto Parts on SR 60, 4720 20th St., to fund mission trip. 772-231-3552.

SUNDAY, MAY 27

James Swain, Dark Magic, 6 pm, Vero Beach Book Center, 2145 Indian River Blvd., free but $24.99 autographed signed copy. 772569-2050. JUNE 8-9 ! Comedy Zone SUMMER NIGHTS!

Grilled food from Hale Groves and treats from Kilwin’s available. Mike Armstrong and Ted Denson, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15 plus food, prices vary. 772-231-6990. JUNE 8-17 ! Riverside Children’s Theatre

Winnie the Pooh Kids, Anne Morton Theatre, 1:30 & 2:30, $12/$6. 772-231-6990. JUNE 9 ! Blue Water Open

Benefits Sebastian Exchange Club, Capt. Butcher’s, 1730 Indian River Dr., Sebastian, fishing, captain’s party, $225/boat. bluewateropen.com. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

MONDAY, MAY 28

TUESDAY, MAY 29

WEDNESDAY, MAY 30

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! St. Paul’s Pool & Beach Party

Art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-2991234.

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FIRST FRIDAY ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll

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Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-5322455.

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EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association’s

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Kiwanis Club, Barber Bridge fishing Pier, kids under 12 free, 8-11 am fishing, BBQ around noon. 772-778-9711.

Downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave & 21st St. 3-6 pm. 772-480-8353.

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! Annual Take A Kid Fishing event

EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market


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Riverside Children’s Theatre welcomes summer

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The Billy Damon Family Magic Show was the highlight of the day BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Riverside Children’s Theatre’s Spring Fiesta is one of the season’s best local events whether you have a child to take to it or not.   “This is the seventeenth year we have done Spring Fiesta for the community,” said Director Linda Downey, “it’s our end of season event and welcome to summer.” From morning to afternoon the RCT offered free plays performed by some of the theatre players and professional troupes, a family magic show, face painting and a bounce house along with hot dogs and refreshments.   Kids enjoyed getting their faces painted; having balloons shaped into animals and flowers, and spent quality time with parents, grandparents and friends as guests of all ages laughed and

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

participated in a day of fun. “Everyone that came had fun,” said Don Wixon, board member who welcomed people at the front table.  “I heard nothing but great things.” The RCT offers classes and workshops throughout the year and summer camp, but it is more than a place of instruction. “It’s like a home away from Alice Riley gets “flower powered” home and the staff is like family members to the kids,” Wixon said. The staff and volunteers have made the Riverside Children’s Theatre a place where children can count on fun events, learn team building and build confidence as they perform onstage and work backstage. The Spring Fiesta provided the community an opportunity to see just how much fun the Children’s “Scooter” the Clown (Scott Serneels) Timothy O’Connor loved his big green Theatre is for young and old alike. performs for the kids snake


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past two quarters. “We aimed our efforts at bringing destination wedding parties here, along with small group meetings and we offered discount package deals during the off-season,” said Monica Smiley, director of sales and marketing for the hotel. Vero Beach Hotel and Spa also reported high first quarter sales, with January’s sales alone exceeding the past two Januarys’ sales combined. The additional business this year has helped Davidson’s business get through the lull after season ends and the start up of summer season. “When the kids get out of school, we get a lot of families here. We stay pretty busy,” said Davidson. In another out-of-the-box marketing strategy, Twirl Kids’ Boutique recently introduced a brand new line of high end clothing for children by local designer Meghan Walsh, daughter of television star John Walsh. “When we opened, we carried higher end clothing. When the economy changed, we offered a wider selection of clothing at a lower price point,” said Mary Lavin, the store’s owner.

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The Ocean Grill and Mulligan’s Beach House have co-sponsored Sunset at the Plaza, a weekly music festival and place for vendors to set up shop every Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m.

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Vero Beach has long been known for its scenery, sport and sea. What it has not been known for – except in very small circles, until now – is its night life. On any given Thursday evening, even in the offseason, Ocean Drive is packed with parked vehicles and people strolling along the sidewalks. “The side streets are even filled with cars -- it’s wild! It’s not like Vero, it’s like some other town,” said Lisa Davidson, owner of Shells N Things, an upscale gift and souvenir shop diagonally across the street from Costa d’Este Beach Resort. Davidson is a former interior decorator from Connecticut who purchased the shell shop in 2003, keeping a 35-year beachside mainstay viable. She hinks the uptick in nighttime retail traffic is from area hotels and a Thursday night music series. For the second consecutive year, the Ocean Grill and Mulligan’s Beach House have co-sponsored Sunset at the Plaza, a weekly music festival every Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m. The family friendly event lures people to Sexton Plaza with discounted food and drink, live music and the opportunity to wander through the street fair as artists and artisans display their wares. “I don’t know if it has helped restaurant business, but during season it gives people something to do while waiting for a table for an hour and a half. It also helps bar business on Thursday evenings,” said Jason Nesbit, a lunch manager at the Ocean Grill. Nesbit, who plays guitar in the band Old Barber Bridge, performs on Thursdays at the plaza with Dave Ulrick, another local guitarist, who regularly performs with the band Crooked Creek. The evening business has had a positive impact and Davidson, who has been keeping her doors open late into the evening, as well as on Sundays to take advantage of the increased foot traffic, encourages other retailers to put forth the effort. “So far, it has added 10 percent to our bottom line,” she said, pointing out that her customers are evenly distributed among year-round residents, snowbirds and tourists. Innovative tactics have also served Costa d’Este’s bottom line, with record sales reported for the

Baby Silk, the children’s division of Walsh’s Blank Silk signature line, is the first new item Lavin has added to demonstrate her confidence in the future economy. “I feel confident that we had such a good season, we can start adding back the higher end merchandise,” she said, indicating that some of her customers are ready to once again purchase at whatever cost to ensure quality and exclusivity. “We now have a mixture, we carry all price points.” Like Davidson, Lavin has been keeping the store open until 7 p.m. most nights to take advantage of the possibility for additional sales. “If I didn’t have a family, I’d be staying here around the clock,” she said. On South Beach, off the beaten track, Mark Terheggen, a restaurant consultant, menu designer and owner of M.T.’s Chophouse, is cautiously optimistic about the economy’s complete turnaround. While he said he had a “better April this year than last year (2011), the season ended very early due to an early Easter.” February and March were about the same as last year in sales; so far this May, it is trending downward, but there’s still hope thanks to reservations which filled up for Mother’s Day. Terheggen, who has a history of successful restaurants in his wake, currently bases his marketing on a seasonally fresh menu, martini nights and discounted coupons at the restaurant’s website (www.mtschophouse.com), where there is currently an offer to purchase a $100 gift certificate for $65, available through the weekend while supplies last. In previous interviews, Terheggen has told Vero Beach News Weekly that he knows moving his restaurant’s location to the central beach area would boost business, but it would also substantially increase expenses and the impending pressure to meet those expenses would interfere with his quality of life. Nonetheless, Sigrid’s of Vero, a designer clothing store for women, is taking on that challenge. While Sigrid’s will maintain a presence in the Village Shops on North AIA where it has been for about 20 years, owner Nancie Cooper is also assuming a second storefront on Ocean Drive, previously occupied by Cricket’s Shoes.

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BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Evening events on Ocean Drive draw crowds, boost business


BUSINESS

Amy Selby wins Chamber’s Hospitality Award FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Amy Selby, director of sales at Spring Hill Suites in Vero Beach, was named winner of the 2012 Hospitality Award by the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce. The award was presented at the chamber’s 2012 Tourism Accomplishments luncheon with keynote speaker Will Seccombe, the chief marketing officer for the state’s official tourism marketing corporation known as Visit Florida. While tourism grew about 5 percent statewide last year, Indian River County out-

paced that average, with tourist tax revenues up 8.3 percent and local bed tax collections this year to date up 11.63 percent, he said. Seccombe noted there are 1.029 million Floridians employed in tourism, and that last year 86 million people visited Florida. “More people visit Florida every day than live in 15 U.S. states,” Seccombe said. Chamber president Penny Chandler said her organization has been very involved with Visit Florida’s efforts for more than four years, and is now exploring ways to benefit from insider blogs, as well as the planned celebrations for

next year’s commemoration of Ponce De Leon’s arrival in Florida 500 years ago. “Some of the new viral marketing efforts like ‘Share a Little Sunshine,’ we’re one of the top counties at promoting hat, and we’re going to continue to do that,” Chandler said. “We think it’s really helped our efforts. It’s very grass roots.” In fact, Indian River County received the most referrals of any county in Florida with its involvement with the ‘Share a Little Sunshine’ campaign through ads on multiple local radio stations.

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Chris Bieber, Dan Bockhorst, Diana Walker and Andy Beindorf

Debbie Mayfield and Penny Chandler

Nicole Capp Holbrook, Sue Hunt, speaker from Visit Florida William Seccombe, Cyn Delee Dalton, Melody Ipolito, Kerry Firth, Janean Barrows and Mayra Klaptetzky Amy Behm Selby and Maureen Nicolace


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Sports

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Football was back Saturday night at the Citrus Bowl when Vero Beach lost its spring game 21-13 to one of the most storied football programs in the country: Miami Northwestern. The Fighting Indians scored both their touchdowns on turnovers, as the offense struggled to move in all but the closing minutes of the game. “Offensively, we didn’t do a bunch but to stay around and to have a shot makes it exciting,” said second-year Vero Beach Coach Lenny Jankowski. “I was very excited about what we were able to do defensively, being able to create some turnovers on that side of the ball. The outlook is very bright for us.” The Vero Beach offense committed five turnovers, including three interceptions by junior quarterback Dalton Stokes who was 18 of 27 passing for 78 yards. Stokes was under intense pressure all night by the Northwestern defense which knocked him down, it seemed, on nearly every snap. The Bulls, who like Vero Beach have a talented and senior-heavy defense, held the Fighting Indians to minus 18 yards on eight carries. “We had three offensive line starters out with injuries and I’ll be glad to have those guys back,” Jankowski said. “Dealing with injuries is part of the game, so you’ve got to live with that because it creates opportunities for other guys. I’m not going to pretend that we did a great job blocking, but I’m anxious to see what the film shows.” After University of Miami recruit JoJo Robinson started the game at quarterback for Miami Northwestern and struggled to get the offense going, Anthony Clay came into the game and started throwing right at Vero’s two AllArea cornerbacks, Dravious Wright and Sean Paul. He finished the game 16-of-27 for 232 yards and a touchdown. It was Paul, though, who got the last laugh when he returned a Clay interception 98 yards for a touchdown early in the fourth quarter to set the tone for a late comeback by the Fighting Indians. Vero Beach scored its first touch-

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

M A Y

Vero Beach closes spring football with loss

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

Junior running back Jason Pierre looks for room to run in a spring game loss to Miami Northwestern.

down on Northwestern’s first drive in the second half when defensive end Josh Ealy picked up a fumble on the Vero Beach 35-yard line and streaked 65 yards for the score. Ealy also had four tackles for a loss in the contest. Nate Pryor ran back the opening kickoff for a touchdown, only to have it negated by a holding call. So it was fitting that Vero Beach received a final opportunity to atone for its squandered early opportunity. Quarterback Ryan Hiser missed Pryor on a jump ball in the left corner of the end zone with ten seconds left after leading the Fighting Indians the length of the field in a hurry-up offense. After a completing a short pass to Pryor over the middle, Jankowski called a timeout to ensure his team received one final chance to score. The game ended when Hiser’s pass intend-

ed for Jamario Lambert was tipped away by a Northwestern defender. “The athleticism over there for Northwestern is – wow -- it is just the wow factor,” Jankowski said. “It is tough to compare, but they are as good as it gets athletically and we have some teams on our schedule that will have some athletes for sure. Dade County is known for their athleticism, and in Dade County, Northwestern is always the most athletic team and I think that kind of says it all.” Northwestern has won four FHSAA titles in football and in 2007 they were declared national champions by ESPN and USA Today. They have sent six players to University of Miami since 2004 to play football. The Bulls won boys state titles in track in 2001, 2005, 2006 and 2007. They were state runners-up in both football and track in 2008.


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Dining Cork and Tapas: small wine bar with lots of atmosphere BY MARK JOSEPH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

When you first approach Cork and Tapas, located at the Modern One building at the northwest corner of 21st Street and Indian River Boulevard, you’re greeted by a lovely patio courtyard. When the weather permits, this same quiet little corner becomes very festive at night, especially when there is live entertainment wafting through the night air. Unfortunately the weather did not allow the opportunity to relax outside this evening so we ventured inside to sample some wine and small plates of food, known as tapas. The first thing we noticed was tall white leather chairs that loomed over this very intimate space. Behind the bar, bottles of wine were neatly stacked as if signaling the main event. Since Corks specializes in wine and tapas, we thought it only fitting to settle into a comfy stool at the spectacular white onyx bar, which is truly the brilliant focal point of this room. The low lighting, together with the white and black leather furniture with dark wood accents, felt more like a wine cellar located in a beautiful Napa Valley home. We knew the moment the lady behind the bar walked over and greeted us that we were going to have great service that evening and it proved to be true. She spoke a bit about the wines and suggested a few for us to

try. After sampling several types, I decided on a glass of Lockhart, 2010, Napa. The Cabernet was dark and bold with a slight acidic taste but still very pleasant. My companion chose a nice Pinot Grigio that she enjoyed as well. Reviewing the wine list was like looking at small map of the world: choices included wines and champagnes from different regions, both domestic and international. Prices ranged from inexpensive to moderate to premium, with many wines available by the glass. Cork is the brainchild of renowned Vero Beach Chef David Rodriguez, who was also former executive chef at Costa d’Este. Perhaps the busiest chef in Vero, he also the owns and operates Tapas Latin Fusion located in Stuart. Chef Rodriguez purchased the location at the beginning of the year and after some renovations, opened it as Corks Wine and Tapas shortly thereafter. “I was looking for the perfect place in Vero and I found it here,” said Rodriguez, describing the 950 squarefoot space in the area of Miracle Mile. Chef Rodriguez, a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, spends much of his time at his Stuart restaurant, though he does make a guest appearance at Corks at least once a week in order to guarantee that everything continues to run smoothly. Cork offers Happy Hour Monday thru Friday from 4 to 6 p.m., with wine by the glass starting at $4 and bottle beers from $3 and also serving complimentary tapas. On the weekends, the atmosphere heats up con-

siderably with live music and quite often folks can be seen spilling out onto the patio late into evenings. The wine bar is about wine, of course, but also about food, though only small plates as the latter part of the name suggests. The tapas menu includes items as simple as mixed Greek olives, small salads and cheese plates, to more hearty selections such as pressed sandwiches, meatballs and flatbread pizzas. While looking over the list of tapas, the friendly lady behind the bar suggested two specials that were not on the menu, including a pressed Cuban sandwich and ham croquettes. After some consideration we decided to start with the mixed olives, then the Cork Salad, followed by the ham croquets, the meatballs and finally the flatbread pizza. The mixed olives were a combination of black and green and piled high in a pretty white heart-shaped bowl. The olives were stuffed with

garlic and pimentos and were plump and pleasing. The Cork Salad was simple greens and ripe tomatoes and small chunks of aged goat cheese topped with a nice, thick balsamic dressing. Our server was kind enough to have the salad divided into separate bowls so that we could easily share. We continued our tapas tour with the house special of ham croquets and then meatballs. The ham croquettes were four little perfectly shaped rolls of chopped ham, deepfried to a golden brown and served with a dish of red sauce. The croquettes were tasty; however due to the logistics of what I’m certain is a very small kitchen, all hot food items are most likely precooked and then reheated at the time an order was placed. Unfortunately, due to this process, the croquets were not heated thoroughly and were served slightly warm instead of piping hot. CONTINUES ON PAGE 33


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DINING

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CORKS

and tapas this side of town head to Corks, where you can settle in with a nice glass of vino, share a bite of food and forget about the outside world, if only for the evening. Tapas, wine and dessert for 2 before tip: $80.

Offering a menu directly sourced from local farmers, fisherman and artisanal purveyors.

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V E R O

Cuisines of Vero

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Cork and Tapas 2101 Indian River Blvd Suite 105 Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-226-5249 Hours: Monday-Saturday 4 p.m. til close Most major credit cards

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late Cake was a classic chocolate layer cake, moist and sinfully decadent with rich, creamy frosting. For those who know them, a single word in this description will give away the bake shop’s identity, though their name and company logo is proudly featured on the dessert menu which also included several other layer cakes and cupcakes as well. As we finished the last few crumbs we looked around to see this small wine bar quickly gathering speed; folks just arriving were discovering what we already knew: for wine

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The six meatballs were fairly large for tapas and were served with a splash of tomato sauce, melted parmesan cheese and crostini. Again as with the croquettes, the meatballs should have stayed in the oven a bit longer as well. The last item was the flatbread pizza which consisted of a simple thin pizza crust with a thin layer of sauce and cheese, garnished with fresh spinach leaves and served on a long wooden pizza peel: a nice touch. The flatbread was chewy yet crisp with

just the right amount of sauce and cheese. After dinner, and while enjoying a second glass of wine, we could not help but notice the tall layer cakes strategically placed on the counter behind the bar. According to the menu, the desserts were made by a local bakery that specializes in luscious cakes and treats. It was a bakery that we were very familiar with, so of course we had no choice but to indulge in one of the towering confections. The Ultimate Quadruple Choco-

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Obituaries Dr. Frederick H. Kalil Dr. Frederick H. Kalil, 94, died May 6, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Manchester, N.H., and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Bedford, N.H. He attended the University of New Hampshire and received his DMD from Harvard School of Dental Medicine. He was a member of the Holy Cross Church, the American and New Hampshire dental associations, and a lifetime member of the Manchester Country Club. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Madeleine Dionne Kalil of Vero Beach; sons, Frederick H. Kalil Jr. of Arlington, Mass., Peter Kalil of Newton, Mass., and Stephen Kalil of Bedford; daughter, Martha Kennedy of Rye, N.Y.; brother, John Kalil of Manchester; and six grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Our Lady of the Cedars Melkite Catholic Church, 140 Mitchell St., Manchester, NH 03103. William A. Kulow William A. Kulow, 92, died May 5, 2012. He was born in Cleveland and lived in Vero Beach since 1984, coming from Chagrin Falls, Ohio. His business career included several positions in the graphic arts industry, all in Cleveland. Survivors include his wife, Patricia; daughter, Gretchen Rhodes of Sarasota and Saugatuck, Mich.; son, Russ Kulow of New York City; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice of Indian River County, 1110 35th Place, Vero Beach, FL 32960; or Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Joseph H. “Jack’ Lawrey Joseph H. ‘Jack” Lawrey, 86, died May 8, 2012, at his home. He was born in New Albany, Ind., and lived in Vero Beach for 86 years, coming from his birth place. He served in the Marine Corps during World War II and the Korean War. He was a member of First United Methodist Church, Vero Beach. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3918, Vero Beach. He was a supporter of the Stephen’s Ministries and his Pairs and Spares Sunday school Class at First United Methodist Church. He was a graduate of Vero Beach High School Class of 1943. Survivors include his wife of 66 years Janice Lawrey of Vero Beach; daughter, Jacqueline Mathews of Moultrie, Ga.; two grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the First United Methodist Church, 1750 20th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com. Doreen Peters Montague Doreen Peters Montague passed away on May 5, 2012 after a long and brave fight against cancer at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She is survived by her husband, Charles Montague, sons Mark S. Peters (Kathleen Peters) and Jeffrey M Peters. She is also survived by her granddaughter, Melissa Peters Stone (Eric Stone) and her stepson John C. Montague (Cathleen Montague). In retirement, she volunteered at schools in Vero Beach. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made in Doreen’s memory to VNA Hospice, 901 37th Street, Vero Beach, Florida, 32960.

Shirley V. O’Connell Shirley V. O’Connell, 85, died May 9, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Montreal and lived in Vero Beach since 1991, coming from Bowie, Md. Before retirement, she worked as a loan officer for American Security & Trust in Washington, DC. She was of the Protestant faith. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach & Indian River County, Attn: Connie Cotherman, Asst. Development Director, P. O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. Mafalda Parra Mafalda Bravo Vda de Parra, 87, died May 5, 2012, at home. She was born in Santiago, Chile, and moved to Vero Beach six years ago, coming from Chile. She was of Catholic faith. Survivors include her sons, Antonio Parra of Santiago, and Cristian Parra of Vero Beach; daughters, Marcela Huling, Elena Padilla and Gabriela Collins, all of Vero Beach, and Carolina Jara of Greer, S.C.; 16 grandchildren; and 11 greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA/ Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com. Robert William Pickett Robert William Pickett, 83, of Vero Beach, died May 8, 2012 at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. Born in New York, NY, he had been a resident of Vero Beach for 19 years coming from Franklin Lakes, NJ. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach, a volunteer for Indian River Shores Pub-

lic Safety, and a mentor at Beachland Elementary School. He was also on the Board of Directors of the Indian River Neighborhood Assn., and a member of the Attainable Housing Committee of Indian River County. Survivors include his wife of 54 years, June L. Pickett of Vero Beach; son, David W. Pickett (Ambra) of Newfields, NH; daughter, Janice A. Pickett of Denver; 5 grandchildren; and 3 great- grandchildren. Contributions as a memorial may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. An online Guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Mary Louise ‘Coogie’ Hourigan Powers Mary Louise (Coogie) Hourigan Powers, 92, died May 5, 2012 at her home in Vero Beach. She married her now deceased husband Charles A. Powers Sr. in 1940. They lived on Long Island, NY where she raised her family of three children first in Great Neck and then Sands Point. Later they moved to Locust Valley, NY and finally to Vero Beach, where she has lived for more than 30 years. She is survived by her son Charles A. Powers, Jr. (Cap) and his wife Lou Rae, her daughter Pamela M. Prokop and her husband Bob, and another daughter Patricia P. Woodlock and her husband Doug. Her grandchildren by birth order are Patricia Aitken Smith, Michael Aitken, Pamela Woodlock Egleston, Charles A. Powers III, Benjamin Woodlock, Christy Powers Allen, and Gillian Prokop. Her great grandchildren are David Smith, Ned Smith, Charlotte Powers , Anne Egleston and Caitlyn Powers. She was a member of the Moorings Club of Vero Beach.


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Elinor Claire Kohl Elinor Claire Kohl, 86, died May 10, 2012, at Indian River Estates. She was born in Reno, Nev., and lived in Vero Beach since 1981, coming from New York. She was Laura Winther-Strait a member of Bent Pine Golf Club, David L. McLean Vero Beach. Survivors include her Laura Winther-Strait, 62, died Marie S. Cronin daughters, Beverly McNamara of May 5, 2012, at the VNA Hospice David L. McLean, 65, died May in Vero Beach. She was born in 9, 2012, at Indian River Medical Marie S. Cronin, 75, died May Vero Beach and Cheryl Cole of Oceanside, N.Y., and lived in Flor- Center, Vero Beach. He was born 10, 2012, at her daughter’s home Bel Air, Md.; six grandchildren; ida since 1987, residing in Sebas- in Zanesville, Ohio, and moved to in Vero Beach. She was born in and 17 great-grandchildren. A tian, Fort Myers and Vero Beach. Vero Beach 14 years ago, coming New Haven, Conn., and lived guestbook is available at www. She was the first secretary at the from Long Beach, Calif. Before on North Hutchinson Island for lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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John F. ‘Jack’ Fitzpatrick John F. “Jack” Fitzpatrick, 86, died May 10, 2012, at Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Akron, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach. He retired as a managing director and executive vice president of Firestone in 1983. Survivors include his companion, Peggy Dennis. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 39260. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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John C. Clark John C. Clark, 94, passed away on May 10, 2012. He was born in Rockwell Springs, N.Y., lived most of his life in Auburn, N.Y. and moved to Vero Beach in 1980. In the 1980’s he was in charge of the building of new schools for the School District of Indian River County. He was a lifelong member of The Knights of Columbus and The American Legion. He was a member of St. Helen’s Catholic Church. He is survived by his children and grandchildren: Cyndi, Joe, and Sean Stalheber of Vero Beach, Nancy, Howard, Matthew, and Laura Tiszenkel of New Rochelle, N.Y., Dan, Linda, Brendan, and Caitlin Coughlin of Miami, and Sharon and Howard LaPoint of Vero Beach. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to VNA/ Hospice.

13 years, coming from Wallingford, Conn. She was an active member and volunteer at Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach and also volunteered at the Homeless Family Center in Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Garrett P. Cronin of Glastonbury, Conn., Timothy S. Cronin of Wallingford, Michael J. Cronin of Vero Beach and John G. Cronin of Moodus, Conn.; daughter, Kathleen A. Maloney of Vero Beach; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Homeless Family Center, 720 Fourth St., Vero Beach, FL 32962; or Holy Cross Catholic Church, 500 Iris Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32963. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Burton David Zeiler, Jr, Burton David Zeiler, Jr., Lt. Col., USAF (Ret.) passed away May 2, 2012, at the age of 79. He is survived by Shirley, his wife of 57 years, sons Steven Zeiler (Cynthia) of Oklahoma City and James Zeiler (Karen) of Port Orange, and grandchildren Brett Zeiler and Sabrina Zeiler of Springfield, Mo. and Grant Zeiler and Hailey Zeiler of Port Orange. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to your favorite charity or to the Indian River Medical Center Foundation in his name.

William P. Denhardt Sr. William P. Denhardt Sr., 77, died May 7, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Baltimore and lived in Vero Beach, coming from Maryland. Before retiring, he was an electronics buyer for Westinghouse in Linthicum, Md., for more than 30 years. He attended St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Frances M. Denhardt of Vero Beach; daughters, Deborah A. Denhardt-Trayer of Baltimore and Sharon M. Clark of Palm Coast; sons, William P. Denhardt Jr. of Duffield, Va., Martin S. Denhardt of Martinsburg, W. Va. and Thomas L. Denhardt of Baltimore; sister, Regina Leonard of Baltimore; 13 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1155 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 329606521; 772-299-7393. A guestbook is available at www.forest-hillspalmcityflorida.com.

retirement, he was a manager for McDonald Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach. He was a member of the Moose Lodge in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 38 years, Henriette McLean of Vero Beach; daughters, Julie McLean and Krissi Smith, both of Zanesville, Amy Holder of Blacklick, Ohio, and Michelle McKinney of Vero Beach; mother, Evelyn F. McLean; brothers, Jeff McLean and Jerry McLean; sister, Vicki Dorsey, all of Roseville, Ohio; 13 grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be sent to VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960-4801. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Homer N. Willett Homer N. Willett, 88, died May 8, 2012, at Indian River Estates Medical Center. He was born in Santa Barbara, Calif., and lived in Vero Beach for nine years, coming from Leesburg. He served as a radar specialist in the Air Force during World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Shirley Willett; and sons Glynn Willett and Steve Willett. Memorial contributions may be made to ACTS Samaritan Foundation, Indian River Estates, 7730 Indian Oaks Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Vero Beach Environmental Learning Center. Survivors include her parents, Ruth and John Winther of Vero Beach; sister, Linda Winther Eggermann of Vero Beach; brother Fred Winther of Huntington, N.Y., and John Winther of Mastic Beach, N.Y.; and stepson, Jonathan Strait of Winter Park. Memorial contributions may be sent to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 22718, Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718. A guest book is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to McKee Botanical Garden, 350 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32963. An online guestbook may be viewed and signed at www.cox giffordseawinds.com.


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New home construction surges in parts of county

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HOME OF THE WEEK

Runaway Bay is the newest model home to be put on display by Palm Coast Development at the River Club. BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Approximately five years after the hammer came down hard on new home construction in Indian River County, there may be some signs that the tide has turned. And it may not be just for homes on the bottom end of the price spectrum. Although the numbers at the county and municipal building departments do not reflect an increase in the number of new single family houses built this year over last, there are residential developments – on the island and on the mainland -- that have seen a definite uptick in the market over the past few months. Palm Coast Development, a high end residential and commercial building and renovation company, has sold five new construction homes in the past 45 days. The company is responsible for the design and construction of more than 40 custom homes on the

barrier island, as well as the Orchid Island Golf and Beach Club on Ocean Drive. Of the new-home sales, four were residences in the River Club, an exclusive community of 142 homes along the Indian River Lagoon on A1A, just south of the Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge, and one was a knock down and new build in Vero Isles. The median price of Palm Coast Development’s single family homes in the River Club is $900,000, with options at prices ranges above and below that amount. “I don’t know if everyone should get excited, but it’s good news,” said Bob McNally, CEO and president Palm Coast Development, who opened a new model at River Club 30 days ago. “That’s what boosted sales, people came in,” he said. “Twenty five year houses don’t meet insurance requirements. New homes are built to the latest standards, the way you want to live.” Some of the upgraded standards in Palm Coast

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Development’s homes include widows that meet 140 miles per hour winds codes and the newest in roofing materials, and kitchen and bathroom design. Last year at this time, the company had no new home sales to report, with a total of two or three new home sales by the end of 2011. In fact, Palm Coast Development has only had ten new home sales on the island since 2005. Unfortunately, the recent spike is not evident at the county’s building department, which issues new home construction permits for houses in Vero Beach, as well as the unincorporated areas of the county. According to data, January through April last year, there were ten more new construction permits issued than this year, with 88 in 2011 and 78 in 2012. The Town of Orchid and Indian River Shores CONTINUES ON PAGE 37


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state when the market turned sour. The development’s current builder, D.R. Horton, which has offices in Melbourne, “had the foresight to see where the market was going and saw Indian River County as an opportunity,” said Mechling. The builder, which has built in Diamond Court on Indian River Boulevard, as well as Collier Club in Sebastian, is successfully targeting the $175,000 to $295,000 market.

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both have their own building departments. Last year, there were no new home construction sales in the Town of Orchid a community that is 1.1 square miles with 700 residences. So far this year, no permits have been issued for new builds. Indian River Shores reported one new home construction so far this year. Last year during the same

time frame, there was also one new home construction permit issued. Like McNally, Chuck Mechling, president of Pointe West, a community on SR 60 with 316 single family residences and 262 townhomes, is encouraged by sales so far this year, which he totals at 16. Last year, there were no new home sales to report. “We didn’t have a builder,” said Mechling, explaining that most of the big builders pulled out of the

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – May 10-May 16 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2295 Genesea Ln. Genesea 9/28/11 $2,185,000 5/14/12 $1,859,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Kimberly Hardin Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Mike Thorpe

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

149 Anchor Dr. Anchor the Moorings 2/9/12 $1,795,000 5/15/12 $1,550,000 Premier Estate Properties Kay Brown Norris & Company Lucy Hendricks

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

230 Lakeview Way The Estuary 10/28/11 $1,495,000 5/11/12 $1,225,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Bill Baysura Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Alex Lundmark

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

200 Sea Colony Dr. E Sea Colony 10/26/10 $1,295,000 5/16/12 $1,200,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Kimberly Hardin Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl David Ashcroft

Address: 3255 Meeting Way Subdivision: Windsor List Date: 12/2/11 List Price: $1,250,000 Sell Date: 5/14/12 Sell Price: $1,162,500 Listing Broker: Windsor Properties Listing Agent: Betsy Hanley Selling Broker: Windsor Properties Selling Agent: Betsy Hanley Address Subdivision List Date List Price Sell Date Sell Price 465 Ventura Pl. Marbrisa 2/10/12 $850,000 5/16/12 $700,000 203 Riverway Dr. Seagrove West 1/30/12 $695,000 5/15/12 $675,000 185 Egret Ln. Seagrove 7/26/11 $619,000 5/14/12 $585,000 211 Camelia Ct. Sea Forest Court 3/5/12 $475,000 5/15/12 $475,000 1039 Near Ocean Dr. Castaway Cove 10/3/11 $459,000 5/15/12 $430,000 8890 Orchid Island Cir. E Sea Oaks 3/13/12 $399,000 5/11/12 $385,000 3815 Silver Palm Dr. Bethel by the Sea 7/16/11 $405,000 5/16/12 $365,000 336 Greytwig Rd. Veromar 2/8/12 $399,000 5/10/12 $330,000 940 Turtle Cove Ln. Beachwalk 2/1/11 $290,000 5/10/12 $290,000 8840 Sea Oaks Way S Sea Oaks 4/5/11 $289,499 5/16/12 $275,000 891 Oyster Shell Ln. Castaway Cove 1/9/12 $250,000 5/11/12 $240,000 1825 Mooringline Dr., 2C Harbour Side East 3/7/12 $239,000 5/15/12 $220,000 200 Greytwig Rd., #208 Riverside Gardens 11/21/11 $199,000 5/16/12 $185,000

Address: 60 Mariner Beach Ln. Subdivision: Mariner Village List Date: 1/6/12 List Price: $850,000 Sell Date: 5/16/12 Sell Price: $800,000 Listing Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Listing Agent: Connie Cederholm Selling Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Selling Agent: Bebe Grady Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./S. Zeuner & M. P. Slater Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Linda Riley Norris & Company/Lucy Hendricks Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Hope Brovont Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Buzz MacWilliam Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Linda Riley Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen Norris & Company/Lucy Hendricks Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Mara McAuliffe Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Toni Gibson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl/Laura Webb Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl/Tom LaRocca Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl/Tom LaRocca Laurel Agency, Inc./Peter Robinson Norris & Company Rentals Inc./Andrew Harper Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Jim Daly Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Charlotte Terry Independence Realty of America/Sharon Winslow Independence Realty of America/Sharon Winslow Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Bebe Grady Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Bebe Grady The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Daina Bertrand Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./B. McCarthy & J. Matesic Custom Real Estate Services/Lauren Connolly Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Karen Smith

Mainland Real Estate Sales – May 10-May 16 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

Address 4795 66th Pl. 1623 Indian River Dr. 1550 Eagles Cir

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Subdivision List Date Crystal Falls Vero 2/13/12 Sebastian Village Resort 5/10/11 Fischer Lake Island Sub. 10/26/11

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2245 7th Ave. SE Riverpoint 3/26/12 $420,750 5/15/12 $410,000 Coral Shores Realty Ed Richard Coral Shores Realty Ed Richard 960 Ansley Ave. SW Ansley Park 3/1/12 $339,000 5/11/12 $330,000 RE/MAX Classic Kelly Fischer Norris & Company Beth Livers List Price Sell Date $297,000 5/15/12 $225,000 5/16/12 $225,000 5/15/12

Sell Price $290,000 $210,000 $202,500

1229 River Reach Dr. Riverwind 3/9/12 $439,000 5/16/12 $385,000 The Land Corporation of Fl Cami Kanner Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Lynn O’Malley

Address: 4820 66th Ln. Subdivision: Crystal Falls Vero List Date: 9/27/11 List Price: $319,000 Sell Date: 5/15/12 Sell Price: $303,000 Listing Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Listing Agent: Kim Cybulski Selling Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Selling Agent: Toni Gibson Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl/Claudia Johnson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl/Mary Frances Driscoll Conway & Company, Inc./John Conway Real Living Realty Unlimited/Fred Reichert Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Beverly DeShay RE/MAX Riverside/Erica Ogilvie


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