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Sheriff’s race heating up Deploying manpower a focal point between Deryl Loar and Bill McMullenPage 8

Celebrating Cinco de Mayo Mexican heritage on display at annual fundraiser for St. Francis ManorPage 21

PHOTO BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Music lovers enjoy the annual May Pops concert at Windsor. Story page 18

Building a better local economy

 How we grow will determine our futurePage 10

A joyous vision of life Janvier Miller’s paintings alternate between realism and bold impressionismPage 23

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V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

Right Top: Captain Don Smith’s memo explaining additional information was added to the second set of daily line ups. Right Bottom: A daily line ups from February on which Captain Don Smith listed officers available to respond to calls.

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY – Recent reporting about Sheriff ’s Office protection of the barrier island has led to allegations a captain altered and falsified documents. But the stories have also raised questions about what constitute an altered document. In its May 3 edition, Vero Beach 32963 quoted Barbara Petersen, head of a Florida-based group promoting open records laws and First Amendment rights, saying Captain Don Smith’s actions were “outrageous and should be censured,” and that he may have violated Florida law. This week Petersen, president of the First Amendment Foundation, explained her assessment was based on representations a reporter made that Smith had altered public documents. Smith says he wanted to provide the reporter a full picture of her request to find out how many officers were available to cover the barrier island in the month of February, so he included other officers not listed on the documents in that initial request. Petersen says in that case the additions to records should be considered a second set of public documents. “Adding information to a second set of documents with full disclosure of how and why they differ from the first set is not altering the public record,” Petersen said. “What you have, then, are not altered documents, but another

set of records, a second set of documents. Describing them otherwise is not an open-records question, but a question of journalistic ethics,” Petersen added. The deputy, with the backing of his superiors, disputes the characterization that any documents were altered or falsified. The issue flared up three weeks ago when a clerk in the Sheriff ’s Office records department filled a public records request for all the daily line up sheets for February. According to Chief Deputy Bud Spencer, because daily logs are used to inform dispatch which officers are assigned to patrol specific zones do not also list other officers on duty, such as the K-9 units, traffic patrol, crime prevention and ranch and grove officers, all of whom are on patrol and available to respond to calls, or to back up other deputies. The daily line up sheets amount to a schedule for deputies assigned to patrol any of one or more of 11 patrol zones in the county. These schedules are entered into a computer aided dispatch (CAD) system before the start of each shift. Once a shift begins, any lastminute changes to a deputy’s work schedule are also entered in the computer. However, the line up sheets are not then corrected to reflect late changes in the schedule. Realizing the daily line up sheets alone did not give a full and accurate picture of how many deputies were available to respond to calls, Smith

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BY MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Sheriff supports captain in ‘altered’ document flap

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LOCAL NEWS

Beachland traffic issues won’t be solved this year BY STEPHANIE LABAFF

M A Y ! N E W S W E E K L Y B E A C H V E R O

VERO BEACH – With the school year coming to a close this month, Beachland Elementary is no closer to resolving the traffic problems during drop-off and pick-up times that has riled many parents and homeowners. The Indian River County School Board met as recently as this week to discuss the matter, but the round table led to no firm answers. In fact, there were more questions. The Tuesday meeting did bring out that the board is willing to look into the possibility of preserving the wooded area that lies at the north end of Beachland Elementary School. However, Chairman Jeff Pegler wants to settle the issue of re-routing traffic around the school before making any rul-

ings regarding the undeveloped, wooded area on school grounds. Among the issues to be resolved on that front are who has clear title to the property and liability concerns if the Board were to decide to turn the woods into a preserve to maintain its current condition. With such a short amount of time left in the academic calendar, there aren’t any plans to resolve the traffic congestion issue before school lets out for the summer. School Board representatives had pitched a revised traffic plan at a community meeting on April 25, but were unable to build a consensus regarding the re-routing of cars and buses around Beachland Elementary. The April 25 meeting was in response to a meeting in March in which a plan had been put forth

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to solve the regular traffic jams that occur during the school year that was summarily shot down by Central Beach residents. That plan would have led to the removal of three trees in an oak hammock on the 25-acre property. The most recent plan proposal would have routed traffic down Date Palm Road, then along Mockingbird Drive and into the current K-1 parent pickup area. The old Sharks Cove entrance would have been converted into the new bus loop. Residents at that meeting, however, voiced concern that the School Board chose to route the traffic through neighborhoods that weren’t designed to handle such heavy traffic. Complicating these issues are many the Beachland parents asking for a smaller student population. “The school was built to house 200 children in 1957,” said Beachland Principal Carol Wilson. “There are now 600 students at-

tending Beachland Elementary. The infrastructure of the school was not intended to handle that many students.” Board member Karen Disney-Brombach said during the round table meeting, “In a 2006 School Board workshop it was recommended that both Beachland and Vero Beach Elementary Schools would not be among the schools required to accommodate 700 students.” Six buses transport children to and from Beachland Elementary. The current bus loading area can only house two buses at a time, leaving the other four buses blocking traffic on Mockingbird Drive. With only two buses being loaded at a time, dismissal for the bus riders often drags into teacher’s planning time. Of Beachland’s approximately 600 students about half live on the barrier island. Only about 40 students ride their bikes or walk to school. This leaves over 550 children that either ride the bus or are car riders.

SHERIFF

if the barrier island is covered, I can tell you an examination of the facts will reveal that it is,” said Sheriff Deryl Loar. “Does that mean we have a deputy parked at Wabasso Beach, or at Round Island Park 24 hours a day, seven days a week? Let me tell you up front we do not. But to assert that the barrier island is not protected is to ignore the fact that officers sometimes cover more than one zone, and often cover for each other.” According to Loar, every uniformed deputy is available to respond to calls. Loar said he is confident Captain Smith acted properly when he gave the island weekly’s reporter a second set of daily line up sheets which included additional information, along with a written explanation.

FROM PAGE 3

said he prepared a second set of line up sheets, along with an email explicitly explaining the additions. “I understood the reporter was interested in knowing what coverage the Sheriff ’s Office provided at all times of the day and night during February,” Smith said, further explaining why he provided the reporter with a second set of daily logs that listed all deputies available to respond to calls. Chief Deputy Spencer and Sheriff’s Office general counsel Jim Harpring both maintain Smith’s decision to provide a second set of daily line up sheets with additional information is one they support. “If the intention behind the records request is to determine


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LOCAL NEWS NEWS ANALYSIS

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Sources close to negotiations with the Florida Municipal Power Agency and the

BY MARK SCHUMANN

Orlando Utility Commission are beginning to question if the ultimate cost of settling the city’s bond obligations and resolving its contractual commitments will far

General Surgery for routine and complex surgical problems

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

FPL has offered $100 million, but city may need much more to break even on the deal

M A Y

Vero Electric obligations may total $190 million

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Daniel Glotzer, M.D., FACS

V E R O

Board Certified General Surgeon Fellow of the American College of Surgeons Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Daniel Glotzer provides modern, comprehensive care for your routine and complex surgical problems in collaboration with colleagues in other surgical and medical specialties at Indian River Medical Center. Daniel Glotzer, M.D.

Prior to joining IRMC in early 2011, Dr. Glotzer was a partner in a multispecialty group in Jamestown, NY, where he held the position of Chief of Surgery at WCA Hospital and Westfield Memorial Hospital. Dr. Glotzer also served as WCA Hospital’s Cancer Liaison Physician for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. After completing his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, Dr. Glotzer went on to complete a fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at Saint Vincent’s Hospital in Erie, Pa. Dr. Glotzer specializes in the following areas: • Breast surgery • Colonoscopy and polypectomy for colorectal disease • Gastrointestinal surgery (stomach, small bowel, colon and rectal surgery) • Melanoma, pancreas, endocrine, thyroid surgery • Minimally invasive hernia repair, gallbladder and colon surgery Now accepting new patients.

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exceed the $100 million Florida Power & Light has offered to pay for Vero Electric. Legal restrictions on the sale of power from municipalities to investor-owned utilities, the city’s bond indebtedness, as well as the cost of resolving power contracts with FMPA and OUC are all stumbling blocks to a sale. The likely costs of resolving these issues are coming into clearer focus, and are looming larger than many had expected. Sources familiar with the numbers, and the negotiations, think the city’s costs may well exceed FPL’s offer by $50 million or more. FPL has offered to pay approximately $100 million for Vero Electric. Unfortunately for the city its obligations to bondholders, FMPA and OUC appear to be adding up to more than $150 million, possibly closer to $190 million. To illustrate how the numbers have escalated, one utility activist maintained last fall the city could resolve its commitment to OUC for perhaps $5 million. It now appears the cost to resolve the OUC contracts will be closer to $24 million. In one widely circulated financial model, investment earnings from the anticipated proceeds of a sale were projected to be sufficient to offset the $6 million the city now transfers from the electric fund to the general fund. Early financial models that led many to conclude a sale of Vero Electric could get the city out of the power business, out of debt and out of trouble with unhappy customers wanting lower rates all

appear to have greatly underestimated the complexities and costs of resolving the city’s commitments to FMPA, OUC and bondholders. Two terms likely to be mentioned often in the coming months are “private use” and “contingent liabilities.” When officials speak of working through the private use issue they are referring to Internal Revenue Service restrictions on the sale of municipal power to investorowned private utilities. Because municipal utilities and consortiums of municipalities such as FMPA fund capital investment in power plants and transmission systems through tax-free bonds, the IRS limits the sale of their power to investor-owned utilities to more than ten percent of total output. The IRS “private use” restriction narrows the market for the city’s fractional share of FMPA’s ownership in the Stanton I and Stanton II coal-fired generators operated by the Orlando Utility Commission. If and when the city is able to find a buyer for its share of FMPA’s power generating capacity, that buyer will also be assuming Vero Beach’s obligation to pay off a portion of FMPA’s bond indebtedness. The city, however, will remain liable for that debt, should the buyer default. Whether the city could make good on the bonds after it has sold the utility system is an issue FMPA’s bond underwriters will question. Beyond complex issues involvCONTINUES ON PAGE 11


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Sheriff ’s Office race heating up ahead of August vote Loar, McMullen offer contrasting views of how to run the department BY MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- With responsibility for public safety and control over a budget that dwarfs spending by all other constitutional offices combined, the office of Sheriff is a coveted job, and one that arguably confers more power than any other elected position in the county. The August 14 Republican primary is now three months away. Contributions to incumbent Der-

yl Loar and challenger Bill McMullen are mounting. As the race heats up, supporters are taking to busy street corners, waving placards and flashing smiles to passing motorists. Loar has so far raised $148,848 for his re-election bid. Contributors to Bill McMullen’s campaign have given $86,632 to date to help fund the lieutenant’s second run for Sheriff. Loar and McMullen, along with Rick Campbell and Ed Glaser,

faced off in the 2008 Republication primary election, with Loar receiving 38.8 percent of the votes cast, to McMullen’s 25.4 percent. In the 2008 election, retiring Sheriff Roy Raymond gave a “coendorsement” to Loar and McMullen. Now Raymond is supporting McMullen. According to campaign finance reports, he has contributed $500 to McMullen’s campaign. In making their case to voters,

Loar and McMullen both cite crime statistics, Sheriff ’s Office spending and differences over how to staff patrol zones. While McMullen contends the Sheriff ’s Department can be run more “efficiently and effectively,” Loar points to nearly $6 million in spending cuts made since he took office. McMullen’s supporters say the Indian River County Commission, and not Loar, deserve credit for reducing the Sheriff ’s Office

Indian River County Sheriff’s Department Budget

10000,000

$37,273,000

$39,164,966

$42,893,629

$44,084,801

$43,802,959

$42,148,777

$38,130,725

$33,424,712

$28,536,866

20,000,000

$27,835,448

30,000,000

$32,021,432

40,000,000

$40,924,118

2012/2013 Proposed Budget

50,000,000

$25,786,017

V E R O

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2000/2001 2001/2002 2002/2003 2003/2004 2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013


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tin County, Sheriff Robert Crowder uses 8-hour shifts, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., 3 p.m. to 11 p.m., and 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Deputies working afternoon and evening shifts rotate every week, while assignments to the night shift are permanent. St. Lucie County Sheriff Ken Mascara also assigns the deputies in the patrol division to 8-hour shifts. Brevard County’s Sheriff Office uses a combination of three eighthour and two ten-hour shifts for all its precincts except the Cape Canaveral zone, where the deputies work 12-hour shifts. Beyond their differences over how best to schedule patrols, judging from their campaign web sites, Loar and McMullen have differing assessments of crime rates in the county. While McMullen’s campaign web

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while cutting the over all expenses by more than $6 million,” Loar said. According to Loar, staff cuts have been made mostly through attrition. In several instances, though, employees nearing retirement were offered buyouts. Loar says many patrol officers are opposed to 10-hour shifts because they now have to work one more day per pay period, and because they are earning, on average, $400 less in overtime pay every two weeks. “This affects their income and their pension contributions. And I understand that. But is just not possible to adjust for declining property tax revenues without eliminating unnecessary overtime,” Loar said. Sheriffs in neighboring counties use different strategies for scheduling their patrol officers. In Mar-

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think 12-hour shifts make more sense. Retired Sheriff Raymond agrees. But Loar is adamant 10-hour shifts enabled the department to drastically reduce overtime expense, and more importantly, allowed his team flexibility in deploying more deputies during times when there are typically more calls for service. “Under the old system they had as many officers patrolling Sunday morning as they did Friday and Saturday night. That is not the most efficient or effective way to provide protection for the county,” Loar said. When Loar took office in January 2009, deputies in the patrol division worked seven 12-hour shifts every 14-day pay period. “They scheduled a minimum of six hours of overtime in every pay period. That doesn’t make sense for the department, and it’s not fair to taxpayers,” Loar said. McMullen maintains that 12hour shifts make perfect sense. He has pledged to return to them if elected. According to claims made on McMullen’s campaign web site, the move to10-hour shifts has made necessary the hiring of 19 additional patrol officers, at a total cost of $2 million a year. Sheriff ’s Office employee rosters dated December 30, 2008 and May 3, 2012 tell a different story. Since December 2008, total Sheriff ’s Office employment is down from 535 to 501, yet eight more deputies are working in the uniform law enforcement division. There are four fewer deputies working in administrative positions in the division, with twelve more assigned to patrol. “We have reduced total employment, while increasing the number of deputies on the road, and we have accomplished that

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budget. They say the Commission has pressed Loar to make additional cuts from his initial budget requests. According to County Administrator Joe Baird, Loar this year submitted a budget meeting the 3 percent reduction asked for by the Commission, and is the first Sheriff in his memory to ever comply with the Commission’s initial target numbers. Among the cost reductions Loar takes credit for is the $750,000 decrease in overtime pay in the uniform law enforcement division. Deputies in this division, also known as the patrol division, are responsible for patrolling neighborhoods and commercial areas, traffic, as well as ranches and groves. The K-9 unit is also part of this department. While Loar touts cuts in overtime pay for the patrol division, McMullen and his supporters counter that the savings have come at too high a price, putting neighborhoods and deputies in danger. McMullen says the move from 12-hour to 10-hour shifts leaves many patrol zones without an officer specifically assigned to each zone around the clock. McMullen’s supporters, including many deputies in the patrol division, say the move to 10-hour shifts caused hardship for them and their families. More importantly, they say, 10-hour shifts often require deputies to cover more than one zone. With 11 patrol zones sometimes patrolled by as few as eight deputies, response times are inevitably increased, the deputies contend. Just as importantly, they say, delayed response times translate into greater danger for them when they need backup. Retiring County Commissioner Gary Wheeler instituted 12-hour patrol shifts when he was Sheriff. Wheeler says he continues to


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Bridging the two economies of Indian River County Final installment of series looking at how to sustain and improve our local economy BY MILT THOMAS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

This series on Indian River County’s economic development has explained the two economies of Indian River County, one with a superb quality of life, great beaches, golf courses, polo clubs, fishing and boating. The other economy is one people do not like to talk about when describing our quality of life – 25 percent poverty rate, 67 percent of babies born on Medicaid, homeless families and chronic high unemployment. We discussed how these problems came about as a result of deficiencies in our local economy, how those problems must be addressed and what our community leaders are doing about them. Like most of south Florida, the first settlers were homesteaders who came here by boat to farm their land. Henry Flagler’s railroad brought more settlers and in the early 1900s, the town of Vero was dredged out of soggy wetlands. Sebastian was a fishing village and the rest of what would become Indian River County became farmland, primarily vegetables. Eventually cattle, citrus and sugar cane (Fellsmere) became the dominant forms of agriculture. A small colony of wealthy winter residents thrived on the barrier island even though it was only accessible by boat. The colony was known as Riomar. Economic development back then consisted of farming and land sales until the boom became a bust with the Great Depression. People continued to arrive though, anxious to start a new life. In 1925, the first wooden bridge from mainland Vero to the barrier island opened and we became

known as Vero Beach. That year, Indian River County was created by the state Legislature. Tourists were coming by car as well as train now, so most businesses were stores, restaurants and motels that catered either to tourists, residents or farmers. While Vero Beach and Indian River County grew throughout the Depression, the primary economic drivers did not change. People moved here and opened businesses that sold to the people who already lived here. That changed with World War II, when the Vero Beach airport became a training center for Navy pilots. After the war, the barracks that housed service men and women became the spring training home to the Brooklyn Dodgers. That brought more residents and the businesses that served them. Then in 1957, Piper Aircraft came to town and grew into a major manufacturing center that by the 1980s employed up to 3,000 well paid workers. It was the only manufacturer of its size (to this day), but a number of smaller companies opened up, usually after the CEO came here on vacation and then moved the company here. It seemed as though prosperity was assured for Indian River County. However, while the population doubled many times over, the majority of businesses still catered to residents, agriculture and tourism. Many residents went back north during the summer, which was typically a slow time for citrus and tourism as well. Unemployment reached up to 40 percent in some county demographic areas. It was clear the local economy needed diversification, but with

residential growth coming primarily from retirees and wealthy residents, there was little interest in attracting light manufacturing or other quality wage employers. Indian River County became known at the state level as off limits to any prospective relocating companies. That began to change in the late 1990s. Since this series began several months ago, Indian River County’s unemployment rate has improved as it does every year at the height of tourist and citrus season. And just like every year, it will start rising in May and creep higher until next year’s tourist and citrus season. Other signs point to an improving job picture, but unless we address the underlying problem – a seasonal economy that generates low wage jobs – this cycle will continue well into the future and the problems it causes will only become worse. Just last week, William C. Fruth, president of Palm City-based Policom Corp, presented the results of an economic study of Martin County. His message to community leaders there was no different that what he has shown in studies here over the past 15 years – the economy will not improve unless it adds high wage jobs at a faster rate than it has in the past. Our quality of life resume – beaches, golf courses, weather, boating and a laid back lifestyle – is second to none for residents who have the money to enjoy it. And Indian River County is a great place to raise a family, but not if both parents must work at low paying jobs that barely pay for life’s necessities. The Indian River County Chamber of Commerce, our state sanc-

tioned economic development agency, works with county government and community leaders to attract targeted companies with those high paying jobs, but it is a difficult task. Years ago, the attitude was that we do not need any type of incentive or other encouragement to attract those target companies because our quality of life was all we needed. That attitude has fortunately changed due to reality. Companies don’t often relocate so they can have warm weather, beaches and golf year round – they relocate because they can reduce their operating costs to stay competitive in an increasingly competitive business environment. They want to know how relocating in Indian River County will reduce their operating costs, does it offer turnkey buildings that suit their needs and do we have skilled labor, modern communications and excellent transportation to and from the markets where they do their business. And by the way, do the citizens of Indian River County really want them to come here? Our competition for those target companies includes other Florida communities and other states that are hungry for good jobs and will do anything to get them. They know what Indian River County has only recently discovered – that these companies enhance the economic well-being of a community so we all benefit. Indian River County now competes well in the economic development sweepstakes considering our small relative size and tight budget. With a sustained effort targeting high wage employers, some day the two economies of Indian River County will be one.


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Editor’s Note: Vero Beach Newsweekly attempted to interview Bill McMullen for this story. Over the course of 10 days he was unavailable for comment.

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fies for the race on June 8. Florida state statutes require deputies to step down at qualifying time if they are in a race with the incumbent sheriff.

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Loar added, “I am eager to debate my opponent. If for some reason he is uncomfortable debating me while he is an employee of the Sheriff ’s Office, after he resigns on June 8, I certainly hope he will agree to several debates.” In compliance with the state’s Resign-to-Run law McMullen will be required to resign from the Sheriff ’s Office when he quali-

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Loar contends anyone focusing on the larger picture would acknowledge the impact high unemployment and lower wages have on the crime rate, especially crimes such as burglaries and robberies. “The simple fact is when unemployment goes up, crime goes up with it. And when the employment pictures improves crime goes down,” Loar said.

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site promises to address “a growing crime problem,” Loar points to uniform crime reports issued by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. According to FDLE, overall crime in Indian River County was down 6.1 percent in 2011, up 4.7 percent in 2010 and down 6 percent in 2009.

FMPA, OUC and the city’s bondholders could all be expected to lobby the PSL on behalf of the city in order to protect their interests. An option Kramer raised as recently as last fall is a voluntary, partial sale. The city could sell to FPL its customer base outside the city limits. Kramer says he still thinks a partial sale is worth considering. Kramer thinks that if the price were fair, such a sale would enable the city to pay off $50 million debt on the system, and would reduce its total power demand enough that the power plant on the Indian River Lagoon could be decommissioned. “A partial sale would allow us to optimize the system,” Kramer said.

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SHERIFF RACE

Whether the PSC has the legal standing to force the city to relinquish 22,000 customers and the transmission system it has built and maintained in those areas is a question Councilman Jay Kramer sees as far from clear. “The PSC’s role is not to serve as an arbitrator,” he said. Kramer is openly dismissive of the notion the PSC would be willing to unilaterally re-draw service boundaries in a way that would leave the city unable to meet debt obligations it took on, in part, to serve the 22,000 customers in question. Forcing the city to relinquish two-thirds of its customers to FPL could leave the city unable to fulfill its debt obligations, and would amount to forcing Vero Electric into bankruptcy, he said.

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ing contingent liabilities and private use restrictions, the numbers don’t appear to be adding up in the city’s favor. And there seems to be no willingness on the part of the City Council to borrow tens of millions of dollars to fund something like a “short sale.” “Vero Beach is not going to short sell the electric utility.  We have to receive sufficient cash to pay all the direct obligations and we want to have a residual balance left over,” said Councilman Richard Winger. Winger is not alone in his view. None of his fellow council members have expressed a willingness to borrow the money that would be needed to sell the electric system at a loss.

Even if the political will existed to put the city further in debt, some question if bond issuers would be willing to finance the deal. Without an electric system, the city would no longer be enabled to service additional utilityrelated debt, unless it raised taxes drastically. Mayor Pilar Turner says a failure to sell the system will leave the city in a precarious position. If the city cannot make a deal work with FPL, Turner believes the city’s 22,000 electric customers located outside the city limits will, through the Indian River County Commission, petition the Florida Public Service Commission to redraw the city’s and FPL’s service boundaries, thus enabling them to become customers of FPL.

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VERO ELECTRIC FROM PAGE 6


COMMUNITY NEWS

Donor pledges $10,000 to aid ‘Ride to Beat Hunger’

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PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

In all 50 teams and sponsors helped to raise $90,000 during the Relay for Life of Indian River County.

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Relay for Life draws over 3,000 participants PHOTO SUPPLIED

Rev. Scott Alexender will end his month-long “Ride to Beat Hunger” on May 22 at the Driftwood Resort.

VERO BEACH -- An anonymous donor has stepped up and will match dollar for dollar up to $10,000 donations made to support Rev. Scott Alexander’s “The Ride to Beat Hunger” cross-country bicycle journey. “We will reach our goal of $50,000 if we can match this generous donation,” said Don Croteau, chairman of the ride. “It was Scott’s dream to find an “angel” such as this generous donor, and its perfect timing now that Scott has officially launched his ride.” Alexander, minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, has embarked on a demanding month-long, 3,300 mile bike ride across America to

beat hunger. The Ride began on April 22 from Costa Mesa, Calif., and will end at a welcome home rally at Waldo’s inside the historic Driftwood Resort on Vero’s beach Tuesday, May 22 at 5:30 p.m. The money raised will be split evenly between the Harvest Food and Outreach Center of Vero Beach and Stop Hunger Now. Donations can be made out to Indian River Community Foundation for “The Ride to Beat Hunger” and can be sent to P.O. Box 650126, Vero Beach, FL 32965 or call Don Croteau at 772-7785249. For those interested in following Alexander’s journey, visit his daily blog on www.theridetobeathunger.org.

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- The 17th Annual Relay for Life of Indian River County met and exceeded its goal of $83,000 Saturday morning at the Citrus Bowl, as 50 teams and several sponsors collaborated to raise over $90,000 for the fight against cancer. “Our 2012 Relay Committee was absolutely amazing and everyone covered their responsibilities wonderfully,” said event chair Bridget Grall. “Our activities chairs made sure everyone was busy through the night, and they really kept everyone going. I would also like to thank Theresa Woodson, Terri Lott, and Cindi Corvin of the American Cancer Society for all of their help.” Some 3,000 people turned out for the all-night event -- which

ran from 6 p.m. Friday to 10 a.m. Saturday -- where they enjoyed events and exhibitions all in the name of helping fight cancer. “Indian River County really came out of the event, and there were so many people who made it amazing,” Grall said. “The support we received from the community and our sponsors was incredible. It is hard to find someone today who has not been touched by cancer, and there are American Cancer Society events throughout the year which help raise awareness, it’s not just our event.” Event sponsors were Children’s Cancer Cooperative, Coastal Radiation Oncology, Wells Fargo, Vero Radiology, Dr. Michaela Scott, and Indian River Medical Center. The two track marker sponsors were Center State Bank and Vero Gastroenterology.


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John’s Island Foundation awards $493,665 to local service agencies

1225 US Highway 1 (next to Publix and Steinmart)

Vero Beach, FL 32960 The Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. verobeachnewsweekly.com

To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

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The neighborhoods that make up our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent. Get all the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper.

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The John’s Island Foundation has awarded $493,665 in grants to 22 local non-profit agencies in Indian River County for its 2011-2012 fiscal year. The 22 agencies that will receive grants for capital projects ranging from $4,100 to $50,000 are: Abilities Resource Center; Catholic Charities – Samaritan Center; Dasie Bridgewater Hope Center; Education Foundation; Every Dream Has A Price; Gifford Youth Activity Center; Guardians For New Futures; Harvest Food and Outreach Center; Homeless Family Center; Indian River County Volunteer Ambulance Squad; Mental Health Association; Plumbago Volunteer Services; Restoration Ministries; SafeSpace; St. Vincent DePaul Society; Substance Awareness Council; Sun Up of Indian River; The Learning Alliance; The Mental Health Collaborative; The Source; Treasure Coast Community Health; Treasure Coast Food Bank. “We are thankful for the continued support of our fellow John’s Island community members,” said board president Daniel E. Somers. “Their generosity has enabled us to provide funds to non-profit organizations who serve the neediest of our community.” The Foundation seeks to make grants to agencies whose programs are primarily directed toward supporting basic human needs such as food, shelter, assistance with disabilities/health issues and safety from abuse. “Through a thorough vetting process led by dedicated John’s Island PHOTO BY BRIAN PEPPER volunteers, we have been able to fund essential capital needs,” Somers added. “Since its inception 13 years ago, The John’s Island Foundation Country music star Jake Owen and Lacey Buchanan were married at sunrise on has provided close to 300 grants totaling more than $6.9 million to local Monday on the beach in front of the Vero Beach Hotel & Spa. non-profit agencies in the community.” nearly $52,000 in donations and sponsorships. Dr. Tremml will have ownership of the trophy until such time it travels Dr. Tremml named top Dancing to a future dance competitor who surpasses his dollar amount raised. with Vero’s Stars fund raiser Overall Dancing with Vero’s Stars raised $210,000 for the Healthy Start VERO BEACH -- Dr. Glenn Tremml, Emergency Department Physi- Coalition an Indian River County non-profit that provides pregnancy cian at IRMC, was named top fundraiser for Dancing With Vero’s Stars, and postpartum services that support a healthier future for moms, babies and the whole family. For more information on next year’s event raising nearly $52K in donations and sponsorships. Tremml and partner Karren Walter, finished as second runner-up in and how to become involved, call Executive Director Rebecca Russellthe dance competition, but he earned top fundraiser honors by raising Gootee at 772-563-9118.


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Women’s Refuge a ‘spiritual boot camp’ Biblically-based program helps women rebuild their lives LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Like many women, local resident Cheryl Wood thought she could handle her domestic problems alone. For 26 years, the married mother of four, who home schooled her children in Indian River County, was emotionally abused, belittled and routinely insulted by her husband. There were occasions when she was actually physically prevented from going to church. But when Wood’s daughter experienced her own psychological issues, the concerned mother sent her for counseling to the Women’s Refuge of Vero Beach. “When I saw her healing, I knew I needed it too,” said Wood about her introduction to the biblically based counseling services the Women’s Refuge offers. The organization, located on a three-building lot at 1850 Lemon Avenue, down the street from the Vero Beach Police Station, was established in 1997 by Donna Lee Robart, a psychiatric registered nurse and the organization’s current executive director. With 20 years experience dealing with mentally ill and emotionally anguished patients, Robart’s success as a nurse in helping people restore, renew and transform their lives drew heavily from her training as a biblical counselor. After extensive missionary work here and abroad, Robart and her first husband ran a home for teenagers in Clover, S.C. for five years, helping 70 children get their lives turned around and intimately engaged in their spiritual development according to scripture. Several years after her husband’s

elor’s and a master’s degree in counseling, specializing in marriage and family therapy. “I have a joy in my life,” said Wood, who for the past six years has been a counselor at the Women’s Refuge, where last year alone the organization provided 2,400 hours of counseling to women. “We are a spiritual boot camp,” said Karen Schaefer, the residential program director and another graduate of the program. “We help women who for some reason have experienced trauma, depression, abuse, relationship problems, and STAFF PHOTO co-dependency.” Assistant Director Cheryl Wood, right, visits with Woman’s Refuge resident The biggest groups, she said, are Mary Kathryn Preble. the victims of sexual abuse and Structured programs take place those who deal with codependency. death, she met and married her current husband, Ted Robart, with in the late afternoons, evenings Graduates from the program whom she moved to Vero Beach and weekends, with residents al- span the globe, including Korea, heeding a call to open a sanctuary ternating responsibility for prepa- Hong Kong, New Zealand, Ausration of the evening meals. for women in Florida. tralia, United Kingdom, Sweden, Women dealing with substance South Africa throughout South “We are not a shelter for battered women or a drug and alco- abuse issues must successfully America, and across the U.S. hol rehabilitation program,” said complete a six-month residential “They are abused women, misWood, although the program does rehabilitation program before be- sionaries and pastors’ wives who are ing eligible for admission to the burnt out, CEOs who are depressed,” serve those populations as well. Named for the six cities of refuge Women’s Refuge. said Schaefer, illustrating the range In addition to the residential pro- of women who are in need of some(Numbers 35:6-8), where innocent people could seek asylum in the gram, the refuge offers daily sup- thing more; something deeper than Old Testament, the Women’s Ref- port groups, some of which are they are currently getting from famuge provides women with the skills open to the public, as well as outpa- ily, church and community. and scaffolding to build a satisfying tient counseling services, with payOne graduate of the program life filled with godly relationships. ment proffered on a donation basis. was a nurse who had been brutally The Women’s Refuge can acRobart’s counseling program raped and was unable to get past commodate eight residents in the lasts anywhere from two weeks the trauma of the experience. Acmain house, with four separate to two years, depending on a cording to Schaefer, she benefitted apartments for graduates, visitors woman’s needs, “level of wound- from a one month stay at the refuge. and staff. edness,” reading of the literature, “They learn to develop their perThe day begins at 5:30 a.m., de- and a commitment to starting her sonal relationship with Jesus,” said votions at 6 a.m., walking/exercise own ministry. Schaefer. from 7 to 7:30 a.m., followed by As an outpatient, who attended The organization started with a breakfast. Residents are expected counseling sessions, Wood spent bible study group of nine people, to maintain part-time jobs or to two years in the program. Now who had a vision for a woman’s refattend school, while also contrib- single, she returned to school uge. Armed with seed money from where she earned both a bach- a garage sale and missionary suputing to household chores.


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said, she planned to attend the program for two weeks. Now, her husband of two years supports her decision to extend her stay for a full nine months. Since arriving at the Women’s Refuge, Butcher has learned how to plan meals, balance a budget and cook. Her husband is a frequent visitor on the weekends and volunteers around the house providing assistance as needed. Butcher draws a triangle on a white board in the residents’ living room, putting the husband and wife on opposite corners at the bottom of the triangle, and God at the top. “My marriage is growing,” she said. “See how the husband and wife as they get closer to God, they get closer to each other.” For more information, please call the Women’s Refuge at 772770-4424.

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located at 1625 10th Avenue, has recently merged with the organization’s resale furniture shop in the same plaza behind Kmart. Currently, a 23-year-old woman from North Carolina, Kathryn Preble, who has been living at the refuge for six months, is making arrangements to extend her stay to two years, enabling her to complete the internship program. Preble was going through “a really rough time in my life, I was in a bad relationship, physically abusive, and I didn’t know who I was or what I was doing,” she said. Now, she maintains a job while satisfying the program’s requirements, which have helped her “feel worthy of much greater things,” she said. Another current resident, Tabitha Butcher, 27, has lived at the refuge for three months. After experiencing a “melt down,” she

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year mental, emotional and spiritual journey as a resident, completing the internship program developed by Robart and she is certified as an addiction professional. “I never left,” said Schaefer, who has been working in various capacities over the past eight years as a counselor, public relations director, and her current role as program director. “Our program helps women get rid of coping mechanisms that no longer serve them,” said Schaefer, who points out that “most coping mechanisms are established by age eight.” The refuge has sprung off-shoots programs and there are now similar women’s refuges in Colombia, South Africa and a sanctuary for women getting out of jail in St. Augustine, Florida called Refuge Ranch. For the second year, the organization is hosting a Leadership Conference August 13 – 18, “to train people who have their own ministry to start their own refuge,” said Schaefer. The cost is $350. The refuge also hosts monthly luncheons to introduce the program’s tenets and principles -- as well as the board of directors, medical and legal partners, and the residents themselves -- to concerned citizens and potential donors. This summer, there are also two weekend retreats offered to women July 19-21 and July 26-28. The cost for these “tune-ups,” as Schaefer calls them, is $75. The organization receives no government funding, but meets its $225,000 annual budget in part through the $600/month for room and board each resident pays, with some scholarships available, as well as funding from grants, annual fundraisers and a physician’s symposium, which has connected the cause with a steady influx of new supporters. As another stream of revenue, the Women’s Refuge Resale Shop,

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port from Robart’s church in Charlotte, N.C., Robart and her band of warriors leased a building on State Road 60 and 9th Avenue – two clapboard houses right before U.S 1. As the organization established lasting relationships with area churches and ministries, demand for the counseling services increased and the refuge flourished. In 2001, the organization purchased the land on Lemon Avenue, transporting a donated house from 6th Avenue onto the property, which now serves as the administrative building, and eventually constructed two new buildings in 2004 and 2005 to house the residents and various programs. Program participants must sign a contract that prohibits the use of alcohol, tobacco, caffeine and sugar, and commits participants to regular church attendance, chores and full involvement in the program’s curriculum. “They receive accountability, counseling, books, tapes, CDs, and programs supplemented with materials to help stabilize participants and help them get to know the Lord better,” said Schaefer. Schaefer, a teacher for 22 years in Ohio, was the third person in her family to avail herself of the healing potential at the Women’s Refuge. Growing up with a sexually abusive father, Schaefer, who has never been married and has no children, said she had repressed the memories until her sister, Paula Bogart, now a counselor at the Women’s Refuge, sought help and became one of the program’s first residents. After that, Schaefer’s 81-yearold mother lived at the refuge for six months. “Then it was my turn,” said Schaefer, admitting her lifelong coping mechanisms intended to cover up the pain no longer worked. “God is so good, he let it catch up to me.” In 2002, Schaefer began a two


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Community Forum

Getting the questions right When reporters jump to conclusions important questions go unanswered, leaving readers misguided or misinformed BY MARK SCHUMANN

Indian River Sheriff ’s Captain Don Smith was accused in a local weekly newspaper recently of “altering and falsifying” documents, a violation of Florida law. Wanting to better understand how the records in question were compiled and presented to the press, I met at some length with Smith, Captain Jeff Luther, and Chief Deputy Bud Spencer. In the report appearing on page three of this issue we have attempted to put the story in question into broader perspective. Captain Smith did provide a second set of documents with additional information regarding coverage of patrol zones, but he did so with full transparency, providing a written explanation accompanying the records. This hardly constitutes altering documents. What was less transparent about all this was relevant information about two sheriff ’s sergeants quot-

ed in the weekly’s stories. They are contributors to the campaign of Lieutenant Bill McMullen, who is challenging Sheriff Deryl Loar in the August 14 primary. As supporters of McMullen, could these deputies have a motive in attempting to discredit Sheriff Loar’s administration? I don’t

ficers as being available for patrol when they were actually in training or on vacation. Even now, as of May 8, the Sheriff ’s Office “Speed Shift” scheduling program shows Sergeant Pat White working on patrol two days in February when he was, in fact, training. Records of Sergeant Al-

The reality is there are many good and honest people working in government. When their explanations don’t immediately add up, when the dots don’t connect at first, there are sometimes plausible explanations. know for certain the answer to that question, but as a journalist I am skeptical enough to wonder. At the very least it is a question worth asking, and one the reader should be alerted to for full disclosure. The second allegation made against Captain Smith was that he falsified records by listing two of-

bert Iovino’s vacation time were entered in the payroll system, but not the scheduling program. Because the scheduling program is used simply as a planning tool, changes made after the fact are not updated in the program. Could the Sheriff ’s Office reduce confusion by improving the

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

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To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

way it tracks schedules? Possibly. There is hardly enough evidence, though, to justify publically accusing Captain Smith of falsifying records, a criminal offense. Sergeants White and Iovino seem well aware how the scheduling program is used. After speaking with both deputies, I am doubtful either of them seriously believes Captain Smith attempted to alter the public record. Beyond simply reporting what official spokespersons are paid to say, it is the job of journalists to dig deeper, looking for the facts politicians, government officials and business leaders would prefer to hide from the public. Officials have their motives, even mixed-motives, and so they often hide the truth. Any good reporter knows the most helpful nutritional supplement is a generous, daily dose of skepticism. Smith told me that in offering an CONTINUES ON PAGE 17

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.


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COMMUNITY FORUM

attract and hold an audience. When one major news network was established in the mid-1980s, it adopted and has incessantly repeated the motto “fair and balanced.” The more I hear that claim repeated, the more I am reminded of the line from Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet. “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” Rather than hearing readers ask, “Where did you get that story?” I would much prefer to be told our reporting seems fair, our stories balanced. But that is not a claim I would make for myself, or for the paper. It is an assessment that belongs to the reader.

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ence share. The result has been the emergence of “infotainment.” The unfortunate result of embracing “amazement” as a strategy is that some reporting has become more entertaining than informative. Often stories are sensational and titillating, sure to be the subject of cocktail party chatter, but off the mark, and sometimes even destructive. Just as reporters are wise to question the motives of their sources, consumers of news, especially in this age of “infotainment” and “gotcha” journalism, would do well to remember that a motive of some in the media is simply to

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ing statements and bald-faced lies have to be careful not to assume everyone is out to dupe them. The reality is there are many good and honest people working in government. When their explanations don’t immediately add up, when the dots don’t connect at first, there are sometimes plausible explanations. Getting at them though, requires patience, persistence and the discipline to avoid jumping to conclusions. With the ascension of the Internet and the fracturing of television audiences, both the print and broadcast media are under great pressure to preserve readership and audi-

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West, McCarthy made accusations based on inconclusive or questionable evidence and exaggerated the threat they posed. Many people lost their jobs and careers, some went to jail. All of this was later declared illegal and trial verdicts overturned. McCarthy was eventually designated a nut job, even though the Soviet communist threat (backed by a nuclear arsenal) was real. Today, there is no real communist threat, so claiming one exists qualifies Rep. West as a more certifiable nut job. Of course, he isn’t the only nut job. President Obama has been labeled both a communist and a Nazi, which can only be possible in the Twilight Zone. But then, most politics these days seem to exist in the Twilight Zone. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

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explanation to one reporter, she accused him of lying. I couldn’t begin to count the number of times I suspected a source wasn’t being truthful or forthcoming, but I don’t remember ever telling one of them I thought he or she was lying. This case raises questions about what makes for responsible investigative journalism. It has been said the danger of being especially good with a hammer is that you tend to see everything as a nail. In much the same way, investigative reporters who are trained and conditioned to look for mislead-

Allies after World War I. Hitler also supported private industrial development so Germany could recapture the glory of its past. In a way, he was a capitalist. (Hitler is also credited with the idea of Volkswagen, a car for the people.) The one trait both systems had in common was their intolerance for dissent, but on a scale never before seen in human history. The Soviet Union was responsible for between 50 to 60 million deaths, most under its most ruthless dictator, Josef Stalin. China under Chairman Mao, saw 25 to 30 million of its citizens become victims of the “Cultural Revolution.” Hitler takes the ruthlessness prize though – in just twelve short years he was responsible for 42 million deaths (including everyone who died in World War II, which he started). Getting back to Allen West, his unsubstantiated accusation of Democrats as card carrying communists revives memories of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s similar accusations back in the 1950s. Like

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called themselves communist, but were actually dictatorships ruled by an elite class of bureaucrats who centralized and planned all aspects of life. The Soviet Union MILT THOMAS disappeared in 1991, replaced by more traditional dictatorships. Red China continues to exist thanks to its affair with capitalism, but it is still a dictatorship ruled by a fractious group of corrupt bureaucrats. So much for Karl Marx. Nazism, on the other hand, is as far right as the scale goes. It was also created by one man, Adolph Hitler, who failed in art school and blamed the Jews for his and all Germany’s misfortunes. He then wrote Mein Kampf. Whereas Marx saw no state, Hitler saw a German state that was destined to rule the world. This was in reaction to the suffocating punishment imposed on Germany by the

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Don’t blame me for asking this question. Those terms had been consigned to the history books until Rep. Allen West accused Democrats of being card carrying communists and others have claimed President Obama is a communist and a Nazi. Unfortunately, the people using those terms haven’t cracked a history book lately, so here’s a brief explanation: First of all, both ideologies have come and gone from the world stage (except for communist China, which now seems to be like the red for decor more than ideology). Basically, communism is as far left as the scale goes. It was created by one man, Karl Marx, who called for an end to capitalism and free enterprise in a society without class or state, where everyone was equal and no one owned property or had dominion over another. I assume Marx couldn’t find a job and wrote The Communist Manifesto as therapy. In reality, Soviet Russia and Red China

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Name calling cuts short reasoned debate


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Social | Lifestyle

Clear skies, soft breezes for May Pops at Windsor BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

It was a perfect day for over 600 music lovers at May Pops to support the Indian River Medical Center Foundation. Music performed by the Brevard Symphony Orchestra and soloist Christiane Noll was well received by the outdoor crowd which sunned themselves at various spots on the Windsor polo field. A VIP tent was fully stocked with a gourmet luncheon fit for kings and queens, which had been prepared by the Quail Valley Club. Guests sipped champagne and dined on Austrian artisan finger sandwiches, chilled New York strip loin along with tables full of tasty morsels and an amazing array of sweet treats as they waited for the concert to begin. Brightly festive sponsor tents lined up in front of the stage as the general admission audience was able to lounge on the grass listening to the music which floated on soft ocean breezes to the crowd. “The weather is just great,” said Eagle level volunteer John Pitta. “You could not have a better venue than this either, Windsor is just amazing.” May Pops has become an annual end-of-season favorite to enjoy one last day of outdoor socialization before many return north for the summer. “Over the last 23 years it has become a community tradition,” said IRMC Foundation’s Julia Keenan, “and we are so grateful for everyone involved. It’s the culminating activity of the season and a great way to say thank you to our supporters.”

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE TASCON

Music lovers gathered on the Windsor polo field to listen to the Brevard Symphony at the Indian River Medical Center May Pops event.

Front row: Karen & Sabin Abell and John & Julie Douglas and Back row: Debbie Alexander, Susie Sumner, Douglas Alexander Warren Sumner


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Andrea Mignano, Glenn & Emily Tremml, Kevin Given, Sherry & David Brown

Jan Donlan with Dick and Helen Post

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Doug, Keri & Casey Bruce with Cheri Schumann Randy Rolf, Joann Phillips, Ellen Kowalyk, Sandy Roth and George Phillips QUALITY RESORT WEAR 3143 Ocean Drive Vero Beach

772-231-0244 (Next to Cravings) Enjoy our outdoors patio!

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C.B. “Jack” Rogers Jr. Chairman of the Indian River Medical Center Foundation

Conductor of the Brevard Symphony Orchestra Christopher Confessore and soloist Christiane Noll

Everybody’s reading the Newsweekly ! t c a p m I n a t a nate to be Wh enter was fortu come every C e p o H er at el gew

Roselyn & Ralph Evans with Betty Cates and Nick Oancea

The Dasie Brid er’s recent issue. While we w the Center pap that featured in this ews out about the fine work Hope Thrift n e ie th as D effort to get as felt in the ew customers ediate effect w does, the imm are definitely up and many n ns is article. Store. Donatio response to th in re o st e th d have visite ntastic. nse has been fa o sp re r meaningful e th rt o In sh spaper for thei ne’s help ew n is th k an yo to th We would like munity. We feel that it is ever m co r u o interest in mmunity. that creates a co rs, Gratefully you

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sombrero. St. Francis Manor offers 98 apartments and usually has a short waiting list to live there. Their rents only cover 80 percent of the operating expenses. Over 200 people bought tickets to supplement the non-profit independent living residence. Organizers expected to raise $20,000 from the event.

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vicious,” laughed Buddy Potter, who was knee deep in the bidding. “You get to play at private golf courses that you would not normally have access to.” Dottie Kraig has lived at St Francis since 1987 and acted as Grand Marshall for the day. “This is such a great place to be,” said Dottie smiling widely, alternating between wearing her crown and a

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Guests enjoyed margaritas, Mexican beer and traditional Mexican cuisine as they danced and enjoyed the lakeside Cinco de Mayo charity event to support St. Francis Manor. Residents were in full attendance along with their friends, family and supporters who came

to bid on some amazing auction items and sample the food. “A lot of our residents volunteered today,” said board member Kim Gibson. “They love to participate in all the many social events.” Inside the activity room, the bidding became fierce at the golf auction table which offered 18 holes of golf at local private clubs. “The golf auction gets mean and

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St. Francis Manor celebrates Cinco de Mayo

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Kenny Cobb with Casey, Jackie & Leslie Steil and Alex Simons

Board members, Linda Colontrelle, Bill Conroy, Erin Clinton, Bill Zorc, Kim Gibson, Louis Schact and Linda Johnson

Anthony Dzielski celebrates with Dottie Kraig, a long-time resident at the Lizzett Chavez and Sergio Cabriales entertain the crowd with a colorful Manor. Mexican dance.


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Community Calendar EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

VBHS Performing Arts Center, $10/$5. 772-567-6600.

From 3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772480-8353.

! Space Coast Symphony

“Of Birds and Fairytales,” a Mother’s Day weekend concert, 3 pm, Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1850 6th Ave., $10. 855-252-7276.

EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association’s

Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-532-2455.

MAY 13 ! Water Lily Celebration

FIRST FRIDAY ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll

At McKee Botanical Gardens to celebrate Mother’s Day, noon-5 pm, plus lily photo contest, demos. 772-794-0601.

Art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-2991234.

MAY 14 ! Big Brothers Big Sisters

THROUGH MAY 6 ! Riverside Theatre

A Funny Thing Happened On the STAFF PHOTO Way to the Forum, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57-$73. 772-231-6990. If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

MAY 10-20 ! Bell, Book & Candle

Vero Beach Theatre Guild, 2020 San Juan Ave., 2 pm, 7 pm & 8 pm, $20-$22. 772-562-8300. MAY 10 ! Mom’s Nite Out

Indian River Mall, entertainment, fashion & raffle, 6-8 pm, free, food & refreshments with suggested $5 donation benefits Hibiscus Children’s Center. 772-770-9404.

! VBHS Chorus

! Alma Lee Loy Bridge Dedication

“Around the World in 80 Songs… or Less!” Concert, 7:30 pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., $10-$12. 772-564-5537.

10 am, at the Vero Beach Power Plant, parking at Power Plant & Citrus Bank, Commissioner Willard Siebert & Debbie Mayfield presentation. 772-778-5077.

MAY 11-12 ! Starry Messenger

! Pioneer Dinner

! Plein Air Workshop

St. Edward’s School Waxlax Performing Arts Center, 11th play & stargazing at 7 pm, May 12th play at 2 pm & 7 pm, $5-$10. 772-231-5192.

McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 US1, 9 am-4 pm, $45-$50. 772794-0601.

MAY 12 ! Stamp Out Hunger

MAY 11 ! American Red Cross

Hurricane Hangar Party, Sun Aviation at Vero Beach Airport, 5-10 pm, free admission, vendors, music, food. 772-562-2549. THURSDAY, MAY 10

By Postal Letter Carriers, canned goods and non-perishables, 10 am-5 pm. 954-436-4451. ! Mother-Daughter Tea

At the Community Center, 2266 14th Ave., $20 pair, Tickets in advance. 772-770-3775.

FRIDAY, MAY 11

SATURDAY, MAY 12

Heritage Center, 2140 14th Ave., dinner to honor the Loy and Guy families, 6 pm, $50. 772-770-2263. ! Sherlock Bones

To benefit Humane Society, 11 am, scavenger hunt, BBQ, awards, $10/$25. 772-567-2044. ! City/County Golf Tournament

Sandridge Golf Club, 5300 73rd St., 8 am registration, $40. 772226-1732.

Hawk’s Nest Golf Tournament, 18 holes, lunch and reception, 11:00 am registration, $165. 772-770-6000. MAY 15 ! Student Art Show

Indian River Charter High School, 6055 College Ln., opening reception with live jazz, 4:30-7 pm. 772567-6600. MAY 16 ! Tourism Luncheon

Indian River Chamber of Commerce, Riverside Theatre, noon. Speaker from Visit Florida on current tourism market in Florida. 772-567-3491. MAY 17 ! Scottish Society

“Flowers of the Forest,” noon, $20, Vero Beach Yacht Club, 3601 Rio Vista Blvd. 772-563-0341. ! Songs and Dances

! End of Year Dance Show

Spring Concert, 7 pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., $10-$12. 772-564-5537.

Emily Slawsky will join Indian River Charter High School, 7 pm,

To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SUNDAY, MAY 13

MONDAY, MAY 14

TUESDAY, MAY 15

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16

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Winds: SW 8 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: NE 11 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: E 16 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: ESE 14 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: SE 10 mph Chance of Rain 60%

Winds: SE 10 mph Chance of Rain 60%

Winds: SE 10 mph Chance of Rain 60%


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Arts | Entertainment

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Janvier Miller stands in front of her acrylic paintings in her oceanfront home and studio. BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Janvier Miller and her husband Gustaf are both recognized around the country as noteworthy American talents. Janvier works using acrylic paints on large scale canvases that inhabit every space in their home and studio which isn’t occupied by Gustaf ’s sculptures. She is currently represented at

the Meghan Candler Gallery, but her résumé is long, including owning two of her own galleries and winning accolades at highly prestigious exhibitions. The Millers split their time between New England and Florida and have lived in the same eclectic oceanside home for the last 27 years though it has just been sold. Janvier’s life has been an inter-

esting journey which has been fulfilled by both encircling love and an extremely satisfying career as an artist. “It has been a wonderful partnership which we both enjoy,” said Janvier of her spouse. “He is the best art critic I have and I trust his judgment completely.” They met in an art history class at Syracuse University and will celebrate their 50th anniversary

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

this year. Both are highly successful and work comfortably in tandem. “I love to paint and do my pottery in the morning and he works at night so it is perfect.” Janvier transitions easily from a commercial artist to one who paints because she has an instinctual desire to create. Her paintings alternate between realism and bold abstract impresCONTINUES ON PAGE 24


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Some of the pottery pieces of Janvier Miller which she creates when not painting.

JANVIER MILLER FROM PAGE 23

sionism. The body of her work is painted as progressive pieces which depict the move from easily definable objects to more conceptual impressions although she still creates stunning individual scenes as well. In a series of paintings she begins the first piece filled with objects she finds interesting such as multiples of birds, boxes or even a beloved “gall,” an insect-made pod which she had mounted and appears in many of her pieces As she moves to her second and even third canvas in the series, the objects are less structured and relate more to her own personal vision. “It is more about a visual connection,” she explains, “breaking apart the different elements in a more linear way.” “When I was in Cape Cod dur-

ing the summers, I used to paint what was sellable in my gallery, sailboats, fences, and still life’s,” said Janvier. “But over time my painting has evolved. Now I create things that are dear to my heart.” Because of the Millers’ impending move to their new riverfront home, the items around her current space are filling her canvases right now. Their outdoor shower, the garden shed and the view of her ocean are being captured in acrylic paint in preparation for leaving it behind. “We will have views of sunsets instead of sunrises there,” she said smiling, “we are looking forward to having new subject matter.” Janvier says she loves to work between canvases simultaneously and is usually painting three pieces at a time. Moving between one canvas to another, she will

“Prints and Mags” in acrylic by Janvier Miller.

begin one piece and then turn it to the wall so it does not distract her while working on the next one. Each painting takes about a month and when completed she lets it rest a while before she shows it. “I have to think about it a while before I consider it finished and do not want other people’s comments to influence me.” Like many artists, Janvier also works in other mediums such as pottery although she rarely sells these pieces commercially. “My paintings are all for sale, but the pottery I tend to keep or give to my friends.” Joe Ellis at the Vero Beach Museum of Art describes Miller this way, “Jan is just so vivacious and down to earth,” he says “she is exactly what you see.” Janvier likes that description and was happy to know that was how some viewed her.

Her art, especially the pottery, is similar to that description as well. The finished canvases are designed to be experienced and are not in the least pretentious or complicated. She connects with the viewer using nature and the world around us to relate her joyous vision of life as she lives it. “I like to incorporate newspapers and bits of things in the painting to show a sense of clutter and a current and active life.” Janvier is an easygoing, adaptable soul and doesn’t seem to sweat the small stuff. Her art is highly sought after and next to her husband and family, is the most vital part of her happiness. “Art brings joy in my life and I miss it if I don’t do it every day.” For Janvier, art is simply about doing what she loves to do. To view Janvier’s work, visit GustafMiller.com.


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“Bell, Book and Candle” runs from May 10-20 at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild. Performances are Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. For more information, call 562-8300.

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up the quirkiness factor in his character, depicted by Jack Lemon in the movie. Van Druten’s play provides a saucy combination of sex appeal and comedic levity in a season filled with its share of American drama and tragedy.

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In a sizzling finale to the 20112012 season, a spellbinding production of “Bell, Book and Candle” rounds out a year of American playwrights at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild. In honor of the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, the guild focused this year’s productions on iconic American pieces that define the artistry, risk and insight of its writers as they explore society, culture and the human condition. The 1958 film “Bell, Book and Candle” was made famous by a star-studded cast, including Jimmy Stewart in his final role as a romantic lead and sultry Kim Novak as a beguiling witch who trades her magical powers for true love. The play, though, offers its own charms. Written by John Van Druten, this magical story was produced on Broadway in 1950 and starred Rex Harrison and his wife Lilli Palmer along with a coven of witches in New York’s Greenwich Village to represent a growing counter-culture movement in the city. Indeed, there are parallels drawn between the beautiful young witch, Gillian, and her mixture of supernatural and “straight” friends, family and acquaintances and the hit television show “Bewitched,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha Stevens. However, director Pat Kroger says the inspiration for the TV show was the 1942 film, “I Married a Witch.” Kroger studied theater arts at Ohio University and later earned a graduate degree at the University of Southern California in act-

ing. She sits on the Guild’s board with Larry Thompson, cast as author Sydney Redlitch in the play, and she was on the committee that chose the all-American theme this year. “This play is a lot of fun, because there are spells and other quirky things going on, but also because most of the characters change a lot during the course of events,” said Kroger. The title of the play is derived from the process excommunication by the church for things such as practicing witchcraft, which in many traditions begin with the phrase “ring the bell, open the book, light the candle.” Ironically, in the case of Gillian, who is a witch, it is she who is excommunicated for falling in love with a human. Gillian is played by the beautiful Alexis Riley, a returning actress to the Guild stage who is also a local audiologist. Her love interest, Shep Henderson, is portrayed by the immensely talented James Anthony Davis, in his third major role this season. There are incantations, comedic spells, a cast of colorful characters and a cat named Pyewacket, who assists Gillian in casting her love potion over Davis’ character. A newcomer to the stage is Isabelle Garrett, who plays Queenie, Gillian’s protective aunt who is also endowed with supernatural powers. “When Isabelle walked into the audition, she looked exactly how I saw the character in my head,” said Kroger. Anthony Aruffo, who plays Nicky, is also a newcomer to the Guild. A 24-year-old graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Kroger encouraged him to amp

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LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Dining

Landmark Ocean Grill has stood the test of time MARK JOSEPH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Driving over the Barber Bridge and headed towards the sea, my destination this evening was to enjoy a leisurely dinner with a close friend, while taking in the magnificent view of the Atlantic Ocean. Perhaps no better place to capture this experience is the Ocean Grill, a Vero Beach landmark located on the barrier island, with roots as deep as the pioneers who helped to build this seaside community many years ago. As I walked into the lobby of this storied establishment I could smell freshly cooked seafood and since the dining rooms were already full, I assumed there would be a wait. To my surprise the hostess seated me almost immediately and even paused to ask the name of my friend so that she could direct her to my table once she ar-

rived. I was seated at a table near the huge windows that afford the million dollar view of the ocean and from my vantage point, I had a nice panoramic view of Vero’s most beautiful beach. My friend arrived with an appetite as large as mine and when we noticed the stone crab on the list of appetizers and realized the season would soon be ending, we decided to begin our meal by sharing the cold shellfish platter, which included stone crab claws, jumbo shrimp and blue crab fingers. The crab and shrimp appetizer arrived in short order along with a loaf of the Ocean Grill’s famous fresh baked bread. The crab claws were fresh, sweet and succulent and not to be outdone, the blue crab fingers and the huge jumbo shrimp were just as tender and delicious. Steeped in local lore, the Ocean Grill has for decades been a destination for both tourists and long-time loyal customers. The gift shop sells everything from the typical to the unusual and

throughout the entire restaurant, elaborate ironwork and weathered wood add to the character of this historic old girl. The bar, with its equally stunning view, is quite popular with the locals and perhaps no other single dining establishment in the area offers more history than this famous seaside eatery. Aside from fresh seafood, the Grill also offers steaks, chops and even roast duckling; but make no mistake, folks come here for seafood and many locals and longtime returning guests often know their favorites, even before walking through the doors. The list of specials this evening included diver-shot cobia and though the density and texture of this elusive fish can often be dry due to overcooking, after hearing our server’s description of the preparation, I decided to give the cobia a shot as well. The cobia was broiled, served with Asian style vegetables and enhanced with a rich teriyaki sauce. The fish was dense as expected, but still pleasantly moist. The size of the fillet was rather small and did not warrant it being so pricey; however the flavor of the dish was very good. In keeping with her shellfish theme, my dinner companion chose the scampi maison, which was a basic shrimp scampi. The broiled shrimp was served in a light garlic butter sauce with plenty of tender prawns. The nofrills presentation was as simple as scampi gets: shrimp, in a casserole dish with garlic butter and garnished with chopped parsley. Most of the entrees included a choice of two vegetables and

the most popular side dish by far is the creamed spinach and for good reason. It is perhaps the best on the island. Throughout the evening our dining experience was enhanced by attentive service from knowledgeable staff, some whom have been with the Grill for many years. As we were finishing our meals we caught the site of a server carrying a huge dessert tray. Already stuffed, we groaned at the thought of more food; yet when the tray of tempting treats arrived, we decided to try the lightest dessert offered, the almond praline basket, which was a “waffle” shell, filled with two flavors of Haagen-Dazs raspberry sorbet, fresh berries and cream. The dessert was delicious and took our taste buds to a new level. Before driving away that evening, I stopped to marvel at the weathered building, perched at the edge of the ocean like a lighthouse that for years has been shining the way for hungry travelers near and far. I realized this old salty dog is more than a seafood house. Like Waldo Sexton, the Ocean Grill is a legend. Dinner before tip $98.00.

Ocean Grill Restaurant with full bar 1050 Sexton Plaza, Vero Beach Phone: 772-231-5409 Lunch: Monday - Saturday, 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Dinner: Sunday - Friday 5:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m.; Saturday 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Reservations accepted for parties of five or larger Most major credit cards.


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Cuisines of Vero

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Lemon Tree – Love it! great breakfast, great lunch

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Billy Livings more than deserving of Hall of Fame induction BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Billy Livings sat across the table from me at a McDonald’s in Dadeville, Ala., not long before his death, looked me dead in the eye and said, “I don’t need a hall of fame to tell me I was a good coach.” The Vero Beach High School coaching legend was right. His combined 314-108-4 record over a 38-year career showed he was one of the best Florida high school football coaches of all-time. When he retired, he had more wins than any public high school coach in Florida history. “I’ll be really grateful if it happens someday, but I don’t expect it,” he said. “I didn’t serve on rules committees and things like that, and that is what will probably keep me out of Florida’s high school hall of fame.” The Vero Beach icon was inducted into the FHSAA Hall of Fame April 29, and in a sense, it was against the odds. It wasn’t because Billy Livings wasn’t worthy of being selected as a football coach (or as an athletic director, for that matter), it was because members outside of the state’s football community felt he didn’t do enough for the sport outside of Indian River County. He was elected into Alabama’s High School Hall of fame in 2007 with a 103-22-4 record. Should there have ever been a question that Livings deserved to be in the FHSAA Hall of Fame? The man won a state title in both Alabama and Florida at the highest level of competition and compiled 211 wins in Florida over 26 years. He took the Fighting Indians to the state semi-finals seven times (1980-82, 1991, 1993-94, and 1998) But why should there even be a question if that was enough? “I don’t follow the hall of fame stuff much, but there is no question that Billy Livings belongs there,” St. Edward’s football coach Bill Motta said. “Billy’s network reached out nationally, and people across the country knew Vero Beach High School because of him. He was on a Riddell speaking circuit which had him giving speeches to other coaches around

STAFF PHOTO

Vero Beach High School football legend Billy Livings was inducted into the Florida High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame on April 29, 2012.

the country, and in coaching circles Billy was well known by the most respected college and high school coaches.” The on-field magic Livings produced through his first three years, when his team won the FHSAA 4A Championship in 1981 and made it to the FHSAA semi-finals in 1980 and 1982, lives on today. There were crowds pushing 10,000 strong throughout his first two decades at Vero Beach. And that legacy lives on. When the Fighting Indians open their regular season with Sebastian River, the Citrus Bowl will again approach those numbers. For those who can’t wait for September to come, Miami Northwestern will travel three hours by bus into town for the spring game and they are bringing 2,000 of their own fans. No high school football venue in Florida

is electric like Billy Livings Field, week after week and year after year. “Seeing his name on the field of the Citrus Bowl is a tribute to his hard work and the difference he’s made in the lives of the thousands of student athletes he coached,” said Vero Beach High School football coach and athletic director Lenny Jankowski. ““I know that I am certainly appreciative of all he did. I’m very proud and humble to enjoy all of the hard work he put into the program to make Vero Beach football what it is today. I don’t know of a single person who’s done more, in my mind, for Vero Beach athletics, and you can extend that into the community.” Billy’s legacy will always live on in Vero Beach, but it is nice to know that it will live on throughout Florida with his induction into the FHSAA Hall of Fame.


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VBHS girls’ lacrosse claim 7th state title

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- A state championship for Vero Beach High School girls’ lacrosse is all but a foregone conclusion under coach Shannon Dean, even if he doesn’t take it for granted. Having led his team to its seventh straight Florida High School Athletic Association title, the tenth-year coach knows the importance of focusing in on that exact goal. “Winning the state title is our primary goal at the beginning of every year,” Dean said. “Getting that state championship hardware is something that we, as a team, want more than anything else at the end of every season.” In beating Bishop Moore 22-6 for the FHSAA title last Saturday, Vero Beach completed its rout of in-state competition. Currently ranked No. 19 in the country, the Indians finished the season with a 21-2 record which featured a 4-2 record against teams rated in the top 50 (at some point during the season) nationally by LAX Power.

Their 15-5 loss against topranked McDonough School (Md.) and their heartbreaking 15-14 overtime loss to No. 16 Sacred Heart Academy (N.Y.) were balanced by victories over perennial powers like No. 9 St. Stephen St. Agnes (Va.), Archbishop Carroll (Pa.), Milton (Ga.) and Upper Dublin (Pa.) Vero Beach graduates five seniors headed to play Division I lacrosse after the season, but Dean’s machine is showing no signs of slowing down. In spite of losing one of the best offensive players in the country in Mackenzie Smith (66 goals, 53 assists) and one of the nation’s best defenders in Olivia Long (55 draw controls, 32 groundballs), The Indians will simply reload from its vast pool of talent in 2013. With three players from the class of 2013 and one from 2014 already committed to Division I colleges (so far), the Indians will be the overwhelming favorites to win their eighth straight state title in 2013.

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The Vero Beach High School girls’ lacrosse team cruised to its seventh straight state championship with a 22-6 victory over Bishop Moore in Port St. Lucie.


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Obituaries Eleanor Theresa Ochylski Eleanor Theresa Ochylski, 81, died April 16, 2012 at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband Edward Ochylski, Jr. of Vero Beach; her seven children, Edward Ochylski III of Mayer, AZ, Mary Catherine Ochylski of Denver, CO, Gaby Klein of Scottsdale, Ariz., Daniel Ochylski (Peggy) of West Des Moines, Iowa, Juliana Summers (Bill) of Seattle and Vero Beach, Jessie Stark (Tim) of Parkland and Kelly Ann Butler of Centennial, Colo.; 21 grandchildren and and five great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to: Catholic Relief Services, 95 Cypress Avenue, West Palm Beach, FL 33415 or Catholicreliefservices.org in memory of Mrs. Eleanor Ochylski. An online guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome. com.

Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

James Russell Carter III James Russell Carter III, 49, died April 14, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Sebring and lived in Indian River County since 1963, coming from Okeechobee. He worked for Fellsmere Farms Ranch Division. He was a member of the Airboat Association and the Fellsmere Rodeo Club. Survivors include his wife, Debbie Carter of Libby, Mont.; sons, James “Rusty” Carter of Montana and Dustin Carter of Vero Beach; mother and stepfather, Elaine and Dale Ruehman of Roseland and Tomsboro, Ga.; brother, John Carter of Fellsmere; and sister, Deborah Schloesser of Fellsmere. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/ Hospice House at 1110 35th Lane,

Charles H. Meisinger Charles H. Meisinger, 90 died April 22, 2012 in Vero Beach. He was born in Waterbury, Conn., and lived in Guilford, Conn., before moving to Vero Beach 25 years ago. He worked for the Southern New England Telephone Co. as superintendent of buildings, and a member of the Telephone Pioneers. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the Army Air Corp. He was a member of the Community Church of Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 50 years Mary Alice Meisinger of Vero Beach, son Gary Meisinger (Amy), two grandsons all of Connecticut, his brother Vernon Meisinger of Holbrook, Mass., and William Meisinger of Vero Beach, as well as beloved

Thomas Charles Fay Thomas Charles Fay, 90, died April 23, 2012, at his home. He was born in Philadelphia and lived in Vero Beach for 48 years, coming from New Jersey. Before retirement, he was a salesman for Jack’s Cookies and Archway Cookies. He served in the Army as a medic during World War II in the European Theater. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Elks, Moose Lodge and the American Legion. Survivors include his wife of 69 years, Esther; daughter, Janet Maiese of Washington Township, N.J.; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice House at 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

nephews and niece. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach or the Faulkner’s Light Brigade, P.O. Box 444, Guildford, CT.

Robert Daniel Watson Sr. Robert Daniel Watson Sr., 74, died April 22, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Madisonville, Tenn., and had been a resident of Vero Beach since 1956, coming from Tennessee. He owned and operated his own pool service company. He was of the Pentecostal Faith; and was very active with the Little League for many years. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Imogene of Vero Beach; son, Robert D. Watson Jr. of Vero Beach; daughters, Denise Rose and Rhonda Smith, both of Vero Beach; sister, Rosa Harding of Fort Pierce; brothers, Ray Jailes of North Carolina, Larry Walker and Allen Morris, both of Georgia; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com. Raymond Habert Raymond Habert, 81, died April 25, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Jersey City, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 1993, coming from Point Pleasant, N.J. He served in the Air Force as a senior weather observer. He served overseas in Erding, Germany, and received the German Occupation Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. Survivors include his daughters, Mary Ellen Cartwright and Tricia Habert, both of Point Pleasant, N.J., and Judith Ann Habert of Atlanta; son, Thomas Habert of Brick, N.J.; sister, Patricia Hennesey of Toms River, N.J.; nine grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memo-

rial contributions may be made to the American Association of Kidney Patients, 2701 North Rocky Point Drive, Suite 150, Tampa, FL 33637. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Gerard A. Boisvert Gerard A. Boisvert, 79, died April 19, 2012, at Palm Gardens of Vero Beach. He was born in Golfstown, N.H., and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from New Hampshire. Prior to retirement, he worked as a maintenance man for the New Hampshire school systems, and also was a security guard at Piper Aircraft in Vero Beach. He was a lifetime member of the DAU of the Saint Vincent DePaul Society and was a member of St. Sebastian Catholic Church. Survivors include his son, Michael Boisvert of Golfstown, N.H.; daughter, Jeanne Chickering of Bedford, N.H.; and one grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. Daniel James Kalo Daniel James Kalo, 64, died April 22, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Lorain, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for eight years, coming from Fremont, Ohio. He served in the Marine Corps and received the Purple Heart, National Defense Service Medal, and Vietnam Service Medal prior his discharge in 1969. Upon moving to Vero Beach in 2004, he took a teaching position at the Alternative Center with Indian River Schools, teaching social studies to troubled and at-risk youth. He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 36 years, Valerie J. Kalo of Vero Beach; son, Daniel L. Kalo of Wa-


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Larry Larsen Larry W. Larsen, 64, died April 23, 2012, at his home. He was born in Shreveport, La., and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Port St. Lucie. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War, receiving the National Defense Service Medal; the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal; Vietnam Service Medal with two bronze service stars; and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. He was an independent truck driver for 25 years. Survivors include his wife of 18 years, Leisa; daughter, Yvette Miller of Brenham, Texas; stepsons, Jeff Fitzwater of Duluth, Minn., and Michael Fitzwater and Larry W. Smith, both of Vero Beach; stepdaughters, Tara Norton of Fort Pierce and Krystal Skala of Lakewood Park; brother James H. Larsen of Kingwood, Texas; sister, Helen K. Kuss of Savannah, Ga.; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Lung Association of South Florida, 2020 South Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Americo Giorgio Americo Giorgio, 86, died April 27, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Newark, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from Whippany, N.J. He was a professional truck driver. He was a member of the Navy Armed Guard of Fellsmere. Survivors include his sons, PeVertice Irene Davidson ter M. Giorgio of Rockledge, and Vertice Irene Davidson, 94, died Kenneth R. and David W. Giorgio, April 29, 2012, at Indian River both of Vero Beach; sister, GerMedical Center. She was born in mania Iversen of California; 11 Mayfield, Ky., and lived in Vero grandchildren; and seven greatBeach for 21 years, coming from grandchildren. A guestbook is Wayne, Mich. She retired from available at www.lowtherfuneralBurroughs Corp., where she man- home.com. ufactured adding machines and Elwood Harrison programmable ledgers. Survivors include her son, William DavidElwood P. “E.P.” Harrison, 83, son of Sebastian; one grandchild; died April 25, 2012, in Gallipolis, and four great-grandchildren. A Ohio. He was born in Charlesguestbook is available at www. ton, W.Va., lived in Gallipolis and seawindfh.com. wintered in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife, Betty Roush of John Llewellyn Williams Gallipolis; daughter, Jeanne HarJohn Llewellyn Williams, 68, rison of Middle River, Md.; son, died April 25, 2012, at Indian Riv- Michael Harrison of Johnstown, er Medical Center. He was born N.Y.; and five grandchildren. in Fort Knox, Ky., and lived in Cynthia Marie Mccullough Peter Jomides Vero Beach since July 2011, comCynthia Marie Mccullough, 48, ing from Peachtree City, Ga. He Peter Jomides, 89, died March died April 10, 2012, at Indian Riv- served in the Air Force. Prior to 22, 2012, at Palm Garden of Vero er Medical Center in Vero Beach. retirement, he worked as a ramp Beach. He was born in Boston and

lived in Vero Beach for 26 years, coming from Revere, Mass. He served in the Merchant Marines during World War II. He was a member, co-founder and former vice president of the Merchant Marines of Indian River County. He attended Asbury United Methodist Church in Vero Beach. He was a 32nd Degree Mason, a member of the Shriners and the Oddfellows. Survivors include his wife of 25 years, Jessie Jomides of Vero Beach; brother, George Jomides of Roxbury, Mass.; sister, Bertha Pacetti of Norwood, Mass. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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Geraldine M. Schaufelberger Geraldine M. Schaufelberger, 92, died April 23, 2012, at Florida Baptist Retirement Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Rochester, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 11 years, coming from Ocala. She was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, James Schaufelberger of Salida, Colo. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

manager for Eastern Airlines for 25 years. He was a member of the Asbury United Methodist Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Elizabeth “Betty”; son, John Williams of Stuttgart, Germany; daughter LeAnne Singleton of Vero Beach; brother, David Williams of Lexington, Ky.; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Association of Indian River County at 2300 5th Ave., Suite 150, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Larry W. Larsen Larry W. Larsen, 64, died April 23, 2012, at his home. He was born in Shreveport, La., and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Port St. Lucie. He was an Army veteran of the Vietnam War. He received the National Defense Service Medal, the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with two bronze service stars and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. He worked as an independent truck driver for 25 years. Survivors include his wife of 18 years, Leisa; daughter, Yvette Miller of Brenham, Texas; step-sons, Jeff Fitzwater of Duluth, Minn., and Michael Fitzwater and Larry W. Smith of Vero Beach; stepdaughters, Tara Norton of Fort Pierce and Krystal Skala of Lakewood Park; brother, James H. Larsen of Kingwood, Texas; sister, Helen K. Kuss of Savannah, Ga.; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Lung Association of South Florida, 2020 S. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

She was born in Dearborn, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Pompano Beach. She was a shift manager at CVS. Survivors include her daughter, Tiffany Mccullough; son, Daniel Michael Mccullough; brothers, Larry Michael Mccullough, David Alan Mccullough and John Raymond Mccullough; and one grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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terville, Ohio; daughter, Natalie J. Kalo of Orlando; brother, David Kalo of Diamondhead, Mich.; sisters, Linda Kotowski of Avon Lake, Ohio, Phyllis Minor and Arlene Sprouse, both of Lorain, Norma Crnko of Sheffield Lake, Ohio, and Wanda Ducsak of Las Vegas, Nev.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Honor Flight of Northwest Ohio, P.O. Box 23018, Toledo, OH 43623; (www.honorflight.org). A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.


HOME OF THE WEEK

River Club unveils newest furnished model, Runaway Bay

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Runaway Bay is the newest model home to be put on display by Palm Coast Development at the River Club, one of the last new home developments still available on the barrier island. The 2,700 square foot fully furnished and air conditioned home features an open floor plan with marble floors and beautiful millwork. Protected with impact glass and hurricane shutters, the double-hurricane protected windows and doors open to a breathtaking rear yard with pool. Inside is an open hearth kitchen and granite tops and all the detailing associated with Palm Coast finish work. The furnishings were designed by Decors by Jacqueline. “Every home we build is a one-of-a-kind custom designed home for our clients,” said Robert McNally, President of Palm Coast. “Our ability to provide home designs and co-

ordinate it with our in-house interior skills is unprecedented in our marketplace and greatly eases the process of creating a very special home for family and friends.” The Runaway Bay model is part of the Cottage Series of homes developed by Palm Coast Development. The homes in the six-model series start at just $595,000. These homes provide a number of single family plan ideas in a setting of an established community featuring 19 acres of lakes, two beautiful clubhouses, fitness center and beach crossing. Broker Peter Orrick noted: “The turnout was triple what we expected at the soft opening. We were slightly overwhelmed and very pleased. I think all agree the Cottage Series of homes featuring the Palm Coast generous finishes and design details provide clientele with a new home, custom designed, with the latest

structural code updates at a remarkable value.” Orrick also said he has seen an increase in interest in the River Club’s attractive offerings of a new custom designed home. “I think the market is beginning to realize the real advantages of new product versus the hidden cost burdens of 10-20 year old re-sales,” he said. “In terms of structural integrity, wind code compliance, insurability, and our ten year structural warranty there is no comparison. And the fact that our clients custom design exactly what they want for no architectural costs, the advantages of new become very clear.” The Runaway Bay model is priced at $820,000, including pool. The model is open for inspection Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Call broker Peter Orrick at 772 4806370 to learn more.


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Address 102 Hidden Oak Ln. 220 Estuary Dr. 900 Cove Point Pl. 2 Sea Colony Dr. W 190 Bermuda Bay Ln. 13060 Hwy. A1A 2620 Cardinal Dr. 10 Mariner Beach Ln. 855 Live Oak Ln. 2134 Autumn Ln. 646 Cypress Rd. 1185 Bounty Blvd. 1700 Ocean Dr., #U-506 1795 Orchid Island Cr. N 3825 Mockingbird Dr. 940 Turtle Cove Ln., #312 1418 Coral Ave. 2135 Windward Way, #306 1275 Winding Oaks Cr. E, #705 1961 Shell Ln. 4890 Bethel Creek Dr., #3

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

106 Ocean Way Seagrove 1/1/12 $2,649,000 5/1/12 $2,375,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Hope Brovont Norris & Company Nancy Jones

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

607 Tulip Ln. Pelican Cove 11/11/11 $2,500,000 4/30/12 $1,900,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Matilde Sorensen Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Matilde Sorensen

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

520 Feather Palm Dr. Palm Island Plantation 3/5/11 $2,000,000 5/1/12 $1,700,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Nancy Freiheit Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Nancy Hardy & Sally Lurie

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

111 Sandpointe Dr. W Sandpointe 1/15/11 $1,300,000 4/27/12 $1,230,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Karen Lloyd Phoenix Acquisitions, Inc. Elaine Amy

Subdivision Bermuda Bay The Estuary River Club Sea Colony Bermuda Bay Ambersand Beach The Village Mariner Village Floralton Beach Seasons Vero Beach Estates Castaway Cove Sea Cove Sea Oaks Vero Beach Beachwalk Ocean Corp. Harbor Inn Sea Oaks Summerplace Bethel Creek Townhouses

List Date 10/1/09 10/26/11 11/24/11 12/10/11 2/15/11 3/23/12 7/14/08 8/11/11 8/31/11 12/11/11 1/4/12 2/20/12 2/1/11 6/1/11 1/10/12 1/2/12 1/1/12 10/22/10 10/1/11 6/27/11 3/31/12

List Price $1,250,000 $949,000 $1,100,000 $759,000 $725,000 $685,000 $560,000 $515,000 $439,000 $429,000 $399,900 $400,000 $384,900 $355,000 $374,900 $325,000 $290,000 $249,000 $199,000 $249,000 $159,000

Sell Date 4/26/12 4/26/12 4/27/12 5/1/12 5/2/12 4/26/12 4/30/12 5/1/12 5/1/12 4/30/12 4/27/12 4/30/12 4/30/12 5/1/12 4/30/12 4/30/12 4/27/12 5/1/12 4/30/12 4/27/12 5/1/12

Sell Price $1,100,000 $910,000 $900,000 $740,000 $675,000 $530,000 $510,000 $440,000 $405,000 $399,500 $382,000 $375,000 $350,000 $341,000 $325,000 $320,000 $265,000 $190,000 $168,000 $160,000 $150,000

Listing Broker/Agent Premier Estate Properties/Kay Brown Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Sally Woods Norris & Company/Sherry Brown Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Sam Robbins Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Joe Kovaleski Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt SEB/Jackie Hatter Norris & Company/Susan Hart Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Grier McFarland Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Barbara McCarthy Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Sally Woods Billero & Billero - Beach Offc./June Herington Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Steven Zeuner Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Rita Curry Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Charlotte Terry Norris & Company/Becky Rossway Custom Real Estate Services/Lauren Connolly Shamrock Real Estate Corp/Christine McLaughlin The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Terri McConnell Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Darrow Jackson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Rlty./Janyne Kenworthy Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes

Selling Broker/Agent Norris & Company/Gena Grove Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Nancy Hardy & Sally Lurie Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sam Robbins Premier Estate Properties/Kay Brown Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt SEB/Louise Muller Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sally Woods Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Linda Riley Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB/Maxine Hazen Seaside Realty of Vero Beach/Gail Monty Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Helena Pickett Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt ISL/Ken Fraser Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Rita Curry Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Tripp Hernandez Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen Pelican Island Properties, LLC/Candy McGrath Shamrock Real Estate Corp/Christine McLaughlin The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Terri McConnell North Beach Realty, Inc./Susie Wilson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Rlty./Janyne Kenworthy Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Christine Hughes

Mainland Real Estate Sales – April 26-April 2 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Address 4830 Lafayette Place 935 25th Street 1571 53rd Ave. 5204 Harbor Village Dr. E 6490 36th Ln. 2635 Tropical Ave. 3300 74th Ln. 1310 Scarlet Oak Cr. 1437 St. David’s Ln. 5165 Topaz Ln. SW 194 Chello Ave. 4219 Diamond Sq. 655 23rd Ave. 430 22nd Ave. SW

Subdivision Old Savannah Royal Park Sundowners Harbor Links Oak Chase Royal Park Copeland’s Landing Oaks of Vero St. David’s GH Diamond Lake Collier Creek Diamond Court Village Laurel Point The Preserve

List Date 12/20/11 11/28/11 1/5/10 11/14/11 6/17/11 1/23/12 9/12/11 2/2/12 2/22/11 3/1/12 3/7/12 4/30/12 11/21/11 7/27/11

5155 St. Andrews Island Dr. St. Andrews Island GH 2/2/11 $750,000 4/27/12 $567,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Vance Brinkerhoff Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Barbara Martino-Sliva List Price $399,000 $399,000 $385,000 $375,000 $309,900 $325,000 $270,000 $258,990 $275,000 $239,900 $253,900 $230,000 $239,900 $215,000

Sell Date 4/27/12 4/30/12 5/1/12 4/30/12 4/26/12 4/30/12 5/1/12 5/1/12 4/27/12 5/1/12 4/27/12 4/30/12 4/27/12 4/27/12

Sell Price $377,500 $370,000 $355,000 $335,000 $287,000 $284,000 $260,000 $258,000 $245,000 $235,000 $232,000 $230,000 $225,000 $215,000

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Listing Broker/Agent Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Rlty./Kimberly Hardin Norris & Company/Jane Schwiering Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Mara McAuliffe Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Sally Baskin Real Living All Florida Realty/Andrew Selogy Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Ann Darling Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Hope Brovont RE/MAX Classic/Kelly Fischer Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Stacey Clawson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Rlty./Kimmie Lamm RE/MAX Crown Realty/Ronnie Preuss NON MLS/NMLS AGENT Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Tom Daly Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Scott Reynolds

1850 Cobia Dr. Tarpon Island Club 2/23/12 $515,000 5/1/12 $450,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Joseph Schlitt Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Peggy Brown

Selling Broker/Agent Norris & Company/Mark Seeberg Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Ann Darling Premier Estate Properties/Kay Brown Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Stacey Clawson Real Living All Florida Realty/Renee McConnell Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sam Robbins Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty/Roger Fox Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Scott Reynolds Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Joan Chesley Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Vance Brinkerhoff NON MLS/NMLS AGENT Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sam Robbins Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Bobbie Holt Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Scott Reynolds


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