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Jake returns As promised Jake Owen plays at his alma mater and fills the bleachers at the Citrus Bowl Page 15

Finding common ground Merger of ARC and Sun Up means new vision, new opportunities for mentally challenged Page 3

STAFF PHOTO

Police Chief David Currey (right) with Lieutenant Kevin Martin and Captain Brian Conway.

Meet Vero’s new police chief

 David Currey asked to do more with less Page 18

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who will head up the new entity. “We thought we could be most effective by doing it this way.” ARC operated with a $2 million budget and ran four group homes in Indian River County. The agency also ran a sheltered workshop with adult clients -- some with severe disabilities -- to develop social and life skills to gain their own level of independence and in some cases paid work. Sun Up owned a 10-acre campus on Fifth Street Southwest and concentrated on early intervention from new-born to 6 years old.

V E R O B E A C H STAFF PHOTO

Dominick Staffieri and Tom Edgeworth work on a project at the ARC.

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- After years of work in the community to provide services to help those with developmental disabilities, the Abilities Resource Center and Sun Up have joined forces to provide a single agency that will serve clients from infancy to old age. “We started talking some time ago and what we had in mind was to put together one organization that will provide a full range of services to the developmentally disabled,” said Chuck Bradley former executive director of ARC

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Two organizations with similar mission to support developmentally disabled now have common goal

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gCQTH dO8= ARC, Sun Up merger a clearer path to helping clients

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STAFF PHOTO

Chuck Bradley looks on as Melissa Rodgers helps Lynn Fenzau and Isiah Stewart with their project.

ARC, SUN UP FROM PAGE 3

The agency also provided services in the form of life skills classes to adult students and had the longterm goal of building an on-site residential facility. Since there was some overlap of services there was confusion in the philanthropic community about the distinctions of the two agencies; now as single organization, there is a single message about the mission of Sun Up ARC. “By uniting I think we are clarifying for the donors that we are one agency,” said Dennis Bartholomew, former executive director of Sun

Up who will serve as developmental director. “Before when I would go out to talk to people I would always hear, how are you different from ARC? Chuck Bradley would hear the same thing. Now we are not different, it is one agency providing the spectrum of services and we are able to cover every service from newborns to seniors.” The ARC as we know it today was established 30 years ago. Before that there were few services available to help families with children with special needs to gain independence as they grew into adulthood and wanted to gain their own sense of independ-

ence when the day came in which their parents could no longer able to serve as their caretakers. A group with children in similar situations formed the Vocational Sheltered Workshop in 1975. At the time, the ARC (called then the Association of Retarded Citizens) was in existence, but it served only infants. By 1982 those two groups realized their similar goals and the Vocational Sheltered Workshop folded into the ARC. Over time, ARC’s focus and funding became centered on older children and adults leaving a void for parents of infants with special needs.

Thus Sun Up was established in 1994 and has grown over time to provide services for infants as well as training for adults at its facilities. Sun Up operates on a budget of about $275,000 raised mostly from private donations, fundraisers and other charitable organizations. But with two organizations serving the same type of client and at times competing for the same donations, it became clear that the two agencies needed to merge. “We feel as one agency we are stronger and can go to the community with the united message CONTINUES ON PAGE 6


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ARC, SUN UP FROM PAGE 4

that we are one organization,” said Mary Beth Villar, who will serve as chairman of the new board. “Now we can say we are working for the same goal.” Bradley and Bartholomew have been talking about the merger going back three years and made a presentation to both boards, which voted unanimously for combining the agencies. The official merger took place March 31, but initially there will not be significant changes in how the two organizations have operated. The long term goal for the former directors is to use the Sun Up cam-

Residents upset over proposal easing barrier island height restrictions

cussion of how money will be spent is premature. However, one of Sun Up’s long term goals had long been to begin to build out on its acreage to provide long-term housing. VERO BEACH -- In a workshop The new agency provides serv- held recently to consider a proices to about 180 clients, but it has posed ordinance relaxing zoning been estimated that there could regulations in Central Beach, the be 3,300 people in Indian River County with a wide range of developmental disabilities. “Between ARC, Sun Up, Goodwill and the school district, I think Beachland Blvd. we can account for about 1,200 of those people,” Bartholomew said. “The rest of them have fallen through the cracks somehow. That is where I think the benefit

CONTINUES ON PAGE 13

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of this comes from. For over 37 years ARC has been in existence providing services in the county. Sun Up has been in the county for 18 years. We have provided different things and we do it a little bit differently. “But I think that is where the beauty of the merger comes in. By putting the two agencies together we are going to have everything for every person. It will range from everything from early intervention for little children all the way up to services for seniors, plus everybody in between.” The new group will hold its first joint fundraiser, the Spring Swing golf tournament at Sandridge golf course on April 14. Call (772) 5626854, ext. 215, for more information, to register to play, or to be a sponsor.

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developmental director of Sun Up ARC. pus to build a residential facility that will expand residential opportunities and programs for those with developmental disabilities. ARC has raised about $700,000 toward a $3.25 million capital campaign to tear down one of its buildings in favor of a new facility. The campaign may now focus on expanding residential opportunities as well as facility improvements. “Our original capital campaign was for $3.25 million and that won’t change,” said Reese Brackins who served as chairman of the ARC Board of Directors. “Hopefully we can raise the $3.25 million, but I think the board may direct some of the money into a different avenue than we had originally planned.” Brackins stressed that the new board has not met yet so any dis-

Planning and Zoning Commission heard from a number of residents concerned with the ordinance’s

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“But I think that is where the beauty of the merger comes in. By putting the two agencies together we are going to have everything for every person. It will range from everything from early intervention for little children all the way up to services for seniors, plus everybody in between.” – Dennis Bartholomew

in Card

VV E ERROO BBE EAAC CHH NNE EWWS SWWE EE EK KL LY Y !! A AP PR RI LI L 1 52 ,,

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LOCAL NEWS

2 Story Building Limit 3 Story Building Limit Flamevine

A proposed ordinance under consideration by the Planning and Zoning Board would depart from the Vision Plan and Master Plan for Central Beach by creating an additional layer of zoning for the area. The new rules would allow for buildings of up to two and three stories on the east and west sides of Ocean Drive and Cardinal Drive.


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County worker’s pension plan in better shape than city employees But without close scrutiny increased taxpayer contributions could be on the horizon

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BY STEPHANIE LABAFF VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

While City of Vero Beach employees are part of a pension plan that is seriously underfunded, county workers are part of a state system that county budget director Jason Brown says “is a very healthy fund.” However, there are signs that the state pension fund could be in trouble in the coming years if officials do not continue to take steps to keep the plan on that healthy footing. County workers are part of the statewide Florida Retirement System which is currently 86 percent funded, meaning it is 14 percent short of having the assets it needs to fully fund the plan. The city, on the other hand, is 67 percent funded, a shortfall that will have to be shored up through taxpayer contributions in the coming years. “This is a very healthy fund,” County Budget Director Jason Brown said of the state plan. “The state manages the FRS and

it is in a good position.” All county and state employee pensions fall under the FRS fund. A Pew Center study shows Florida operates the fourth largest pension plan in the country behind the California public employees, California state teachers and New York State. The city is beginning to look for ways to make up the deficit created as a result of the stock market crash and record-low interest rates. The hard fact city leaders are facing is they don’t have nearly enough money to pay their coming pension obligations. In the past, most government pension plans were defined-benefit plans. This type of pension plan guarantees the annual payment upon retirement based on years of service and rate of pay. Ninety percent of all state and local government workers are currently covered by a definedbenefit plan. However, to manage costs many governments, including the state of Florida, are starting new em-

ployees on defined-contribution plans such as 401(k)s. With this type of plan, the beneficiary only receives what was contributed plus any interest accrued. Private corporations, under federal law, must start putting money into their pension plans once the value of the plan’s assets dips below 80 percent of its liabilities. There is no law directing the governance of state and local plans. Despite the rosier outlook for county workers, Indian River County employees are not entirely in the clear. A report by the National Institute on Retirement Security indicated that most public retirement plans won’t be in trouble for 30 years, but noted state and local governments need to make adjustments in plan provisions and new contributions now in order to avoid future fund shortages. The most common method to address the shortfalls created by the recent crisis in the financial market is the step Florida Gov. Rick Scott took last year of increasing employee contributions to 3 percent and reducing benefits for new employees. The alternative to increasing employee contributions is to increase taxpayer contributions into the fund. In Florida, county and state employees paid into their pension funds until 1974 when, because the state coffers were so flush with cash, a law was passed putting an end to employee contributions. Since that time all pension funding has been taken care of by the state.

City of Vero Beach employees never enjoyed that luxury, having always paid into their pension fund, which incurred a mandatory worker contribution increase from a rate of 2.25 percent to 3.25 percent last year. The employee contribution changes proposed by the Florida Legislature will bring the state system more in line with private retirement plans and the current Vero Beach plan. “It is reasonable to expect county employees to contribute to their own pension fund,” said Brown. According to Beth Weatherstone, president of the Indian River County Education Association, “The FRS is a good program. The aspect we are concerned with is the bill that Gov. Scott signed that requires all FRS participants to pay 3 percent of their salary into the pension fund. Most educators made the choice to take the lower paying jobs as public employees because of the good pension program that was offered by the state. It’s not fair to change the rules on us now.” The Florida Education Association has filed a lawsuit on behalf of its 556,296 employees claiming that the pension changes are unconstitutional and violate the teachers’ contracts. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford ruled the legislation adopted last year was unconstitutional. Florida lawmakers have vowed to make changes to the mandatory payment plan in hopes of having Judge Fulford’s ruling overturned. Gov. Scott claimed at the time CONTINUES ON PAGE 9


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BY STEPHANIE LABAFF VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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of his proposal to require employee pension contributions, “If we did nothing, every household in Florida would have to contribute more than $800 of their hardearned money every year for the next thirty years, just to meet our pension obligations for state and local government retirees.” Scott originally proposed a 5 percent pay-in by county and state employees to help bridge the gap. But in order to get the bill passed, he compromised with the Legislature and signed the law enacting the 3 percent employee contribution.

Solutions do exist that can prevent the next generation from bearing this financial burden of underfunded pensions. Shifting all new employees into defined contribution plans, increasing taxes and decreasing employee benefits are at the top of the list of possibilities being considered. A few years ago the FRS had a surplus, but that has since been depleted as a result of the recent financial crisis. Without continued scrutiny on the part of lawmakers in monitoring the plan, taxpayers could be called upon in coming years to bail out the state pension fund as well.

them, how much will traffic increase on Mockingbird Drive and Date Palm Road during pick-up and drop-off times; where will parents and visitors park when going to school and can one small drive handle the traffic for a school of 600 students?

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PENSION FROM PAGE 8

Wilson, as well as the architects and engineers involved in the project after that meeting to look for an alternative to the original plan. While the new proposal saves the trees and alleviates traffic congestion on Indian River Drive, it may raise other concerns. Among

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VERO BEACH – After a public outcry against a proposed revamping of the Beachland Elementary School pick-up and bus loading area, school district officials have come up with a new plan they say will save money, trees targeted for removal and alleviate the daily traffic congestion. The new plan will be presented at a public meeting scheduled for April 25 at 7 p.m. at Beachland Elementary. According to a notice put out by the school district, the revised plan will “spend fewer taxpayer dollars, save all of the existing trees and resolve the existing safety and traffic concerns.” If the plan is approved, the current 2nd to 5th grade pick-up area located on the west side of the school will now serve as the bus loading area and all students will be dropped off and picked up using the Mockingbird entrance.

Cars will line up going north on Mockingbird Drive and along Date Palm Road. The bus pickup, according to the proposal, would be located in Sharks Cove (the existing grades 2 to 5 student pickup) and the current Mockingbird bus pickup drive entrance will be closed off. The new plan is expected to alleviates traffic backups on Indian River Drive and allow for buses to safely pull onto the campus during drop-off and pick-up. The first traffic proposal was presented at a March 27 meeting at Beachland that generated an outcry against the destruction of the hardwood hammock that lies next to the school. The original plan required the removal of 21 trees, but residents were concerned about the displacement of native birds and animals. Facilities coordinator Susan Olson met with school board officials, Beachland Principal Carol

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Boys and Girls Club changing lives one child at a time LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- On any given afternoon in Indian River County, about 500 school age children are dropped off at Boys and Girls Clubs in Vero Beach, Sebastian and Fellsmere. The clubs are an affordable alternative to after school care, providing homework supervision, recreation and programs that help build character and prepare club members for a lifetime of community involvement. In the span of 11 years, the local Boys and Girls Club has grown from a classroom at Thompson Elementary into an organization that serves a total throughout the year of 1,500 area students, ages six to 18, in three state of the art facilities. “Our goal was to make sure that every child in the county had access to a Boys and Girls Club,” said Executive Director Elizabeth Thomason, explaining that about half the youth who attend are from single family homes, with 75 percent of them on the free or reduced school meal program. Thomason, who had previously been the organization’s marketing director, took over the club leadership when former President and CEO Ronnie Hewett was stricken with pancreatic cancer. Hewett passed away last August after a 40-year-career with the Boys and Girls Club, six of which were spent locally helping to raise capital to build the club’s facilities. “We have a very strong board when it comes to fundraising,” said Thomason of the 17-member board of directors, crediting board President Jay McNamara for much of the organization’s success. “He’s the heart and soul of this organization,” she said. “His philosophy is we’re a business that also hap-

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Elizabeth Thomason with Charity

pens to be a nonprofit.” McNamara, a John’s Island resident who has been involved with the local club almost since its inception, has been president of the board for eight years. He has been so instrumental in helping to guide the organization through two aggressive fundraising campaigns which raised $6 million that the board decided to name the brand new Vero Beach facility the “Jay McNamara Club.” “Everything starts with the board,” said McNamara, a former Marine who retired as chairman of McCann-Erickson, a global advertising agency based in New York. Among his board members are Edwin Mellett, retired president of Coca-Cola, North America; Sam Difeo, retired president of Penske Automotive Group; Donald Shropshire, retired founding executive of Lexmark International; and Roger Lynch, retired managing director of Goldman Sachs. “We develop strategies and plans how to grow the organization, how to raise the money to achieve that

growth and we set the long term goals.” McNamara became involved with the organization because of its history, which traces back to Hartford, Conn. during the Civil War. “The first clubhouses opened during the Lincoln administration,” said McNamara. “Dad was off at war and we needed something to get the kids off the streets, keep them out of trouble.” Now, there are approximately 4,000 clubs across the U.S., its territories and its military bases. “The last survey conducted by the national organization asked former club members about the principal benefit from attending the Boys and Girls Club. Fifty nine percent said, ‘it saved my life,’” said McNamara. Through its programs and mentoring relationships, the clubs work to decrease drug abuse, juvenile crime and instances of teenage pregnancy while increasing school attendance, grade point averages and job readiness. “The Sebastian police chief says that the Boys and Girls Club saved

her life,” said McNamara about the opening of the Sebastian club in 2006. The building is owned by the club, but the land on which it sits belongs to the city. “The county and the various municipalities saw a need in the community that we were providing,” said McNamara, explaining that the three local clubs have 50-year leases on the land at a rate of one dollar a year. The organization used the Sebastian club to showcase for potential donors the organization’s accomplishments in order to raise $6 million for the construction of two more facilities. In 2010, the Fellsmere club opened its doors in the newly renovated historic schoolhouse that it now shares with the city. Also in 2010, the organization moved out of its rental facility on 27th Avenue Southwest, where it had been located since 2001, and into a new 13,500 square-foot structure on 17th Avenue adjacent to the Vero Beach Recreation Department. Because it is centrally located, the administrative offices are at the Vero Beach club. More than 50 volunteers, including board of director members Sheila Mills, Jean Oglethorpe and Virginia Powers help tutor students in their schoolwork, math and reading. Volunteers also lead special programs, such as a recent etiquette class coordinated by the organization’s Society of Angels. “The kids loved it because it gave them exposure to new things and the volunteers made it fun,” said Thomason. “The kids really respond to small group activities with a mentor or a volunteer; they receive more attention and so the impact is greater.” The cost of attending the club is


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Can Cancer Ever Be Cured?

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Coastal Radiation Oncology

Dashondra, Noah, Tamicha

which strives to enrich the lives of club members through service and volunteering. The efforts put forth by club members during the year are recognized by the organization through the Youth of the Year award, the highest achievement in the Boys and Girls Club. Nominees are judged on service to home and family, moral character, community service, school leadership and service, academic performance, service to the Boys & Girls Club, life goals, two written essays and public speaking ability. In February, Noah Bogard, 14, a freshman at Sebastian River High School, was named Youth of the Year for his community service in the Keystone Club. Bogard will compete for a $10,000 scholarship if he is one of five regional winners. The national winner receives an additional $50,000. And in a fairly recent development, Bogard is eligible to apply for a full-tuition scholarship through a partnership between the Boys and Girls Club and Marquette University in Michigan. “We have the chance to change people’s lives,” said McNamara. “The younger they are, the greater the

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$30 per month per student, or $50 a month for two or more from the same family. Scholarship opportunities are also available. On weekdays, the youth arrive by school bus and have a snack provided by the school district. They also recite the pledge of allegiance and the Boys and Girls Club code. All three clubs are fully equipped with computers and other technology to provide students with the tools for academic achievement. The programs are developed at a national level and adapted for each community, so “programs in Dubuque, Iowa; Oakland, California and Vero Beach, Florida are similar,” said McNamara. There are art programs, physical fitness activities and opportunities to have fun with foosball, billiards and other games. The clubs stay open until 6:30 pm. “In some ways, staff members become surrogate families; that’s the level of bonding happening with the kids,” said Thomason. “This is not a babysitting service. We reinforce what they learn in school and teach them about being good citizens.” The club also operates a teen community service outreach program, called the Youth Volunteer Corps,

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 12


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(left to right) Brisely, Lizbeth, Mariana

Elizabeth Thomason, Executive Director, with Jay McNamara, Board President

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

hired by the organization during the summer. With an annual budget of $1.3 million, the Boys and Girls Club held steady during this economy due to the dedication of the board and the generosity of the community, said Thomason. “Membership fees only cover about eight percent of the budget, with donors being the largest source of funding at 30 percent,” said Thomason, pointing out that the club carries no debt because of the board’s prudent management. Grants are another source of funding, both from government agencies and private organizations, such as the John’s Island Community Ser-

FROM PAGE 11

chance to redirect them.” On its website, the organization has gathered data indicating the positive influence of the Boys and Girls Club on its members. Between 80 and 90 percent of attending youth complete their homework every day, improve or maintain their grades and improve or maintain their conduct. The organization also hosts weekend programming and a 10-week summer camp, which serves about 850 youth for 11 hours a day. The cost of the camp is $500 per child, consisting mostly of recreation, field trips and arts and crafts. About 40 part-time employees are

Partnering with Christian Families

To Prepare Students for Life

Camile and Christopher

vice League, Children’s Services Advisory Council, Quail Valley Charities and the United Way. Moreover, two fundraising events, a golf tournament and a gala dinner help to meet the organization’s financial needs. This year, said McNamara, “the board filed an application with federal and state governments to form a foundation as an ongoing way to raise more money for the club.” If approved, the foundation can help structure the finances so the organization will be able to operate in perpetuity. “The kids are here year round; the donors are not,” said McNamara, emphasizing the impact of the com-

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munity. Next year, the organization is planning to implement an employment program, starting with preparing for the job interview. Another program that is being discussed is a task force for manhood, which focuses on good decision making in males. “This is not just something nice to do in your free time,” he said. “We’re affecting the child, the sibling and the mothers, who have peace of mind that their children are safe. A lot of ripples go out into society because of the Boys and Girls Club.” For more information about the organization, call 299-7449 or visit them online at www.BGCIRC.org.

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The recommendation will be passed to the City Council which will make the final determination on outsourcing the testing or keeping the work within the Water and Sewer Department. She also said the testing is mandated by the state and federal government to insure the purity of the water. The outsourcing of the lab tests came out of an optimization study presented by GAI Consulting. GAI estimated that, including the outsourcing of the lab testing, the number of workers in the Water and Sewer Department could be reduced by 21 people over a 12-year period as new systems are put online.

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VERO BEACH -- The City of Vero Beach Utilities Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to have the city outsource laboratory testing of its water, which is currently being conducted within the Water and Sewer Department. The commission voted to accept the bid of Flowers Chemical Laboratories, which is based in Altamonte Springs, but which also has a facility in Port St. Lucie. Utilities Commission member Jane Burton said it was estimated that the city could save $250,000 to $350,000 by outsourcing the lab testing. The city currently employs six workers to conduct the water lab tests.

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City Utilities Commissions recommends outsourcing of water lab services

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departure from the Master Plan. Ital Veron and George Christopher, both participants in development of the city’s Vision Plan and Master Plan, were among a number of speakers who told the board they didn’t want to see the Master Plan set aside. “This (ordinance) is an affront to the many hours of community input and the $200,000 spent on the Vision Plan,” Veron said. In addition to allowing taller buildings west of Ocean Drive and east of Cardinal Drive than is presently called for in the Master Plan, the commercial overlay district would also relax parking requirements and reduce open space by allowing for a greater floor area to lot size ratio. Planning Director Tim Mc-

Garry explained the purpose of the commercial overlay district is to encourage more mixeduse development in the Central Beach area than would be allowed for in the Master Plan. That plan calls for buildings to be no more than two stories west of Ocean Drive and west of Cardinal Drive. In the area where a third story would be allowed, it would have to be built for residential or hotel use. According to McGarry, both uses are not practical when built on a second floor over a restaurant. Allowing for a third floor will encourage more residential development in the area, he said. The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold another workshop on the proposed commercial overlay district in May.

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Flights available for Ford Trimotor at Vero Beach Airport April 16-18 VERO BEACH -- A 1929 Ford Trimotor airplane will be at the Vero Beach Airport April 16-18, courtesy of the Environmental Aircraft Association Chapter 99. The EAA´s Ford Trimotor is touring the country raising awareness about the group and giving people a chance to get a feel for what air travel in 1929 was like. Interested parties can take a 15-minute flight at Vero Beach Municipal Airport for $80. Reserve your seat by calling 1-877-952-5395.

McKee to offer summer camp for children in July and August VERO BEACH — McKee Botanical Garden will conduct a summer PHOTO BY SAM WOLFE camp for children ages 5 to 9 in two weekly sessions, July 23 to 27 and Hometown hero Jake Owen played to a packed house at the Citrus Bowl last Aug. 6 to 10 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Saturday night. During the show he proposed to his girlfriend Lacey Buchanan. Campers will enjoy a variety of crafts and activities with an emphasis She said yes. on nature and the outdoors. Cost is $200 per week and includes lunch, snacks and activities. The piano scholarships are funded by contributions from individual For more information or to register, call (772) 794-0601. donors. To make a tax deductible donation to the fund, send a check payable to “Vero Beach Opera, Inc.” with “piano scholarship” in the memo field, and mail to Vero Beach Opera; P. O. Box 6912; Vero Beach, Applications for Vero Beach Opera’s FL 32961. piano scholarship due by May 1 A copy of the application with submission instructions can be downloaded from Vero Beach Opera’s website at www.VeroBeachOpera. VERO BEACH — Applications for the 2012-2013 Vero Beach Opera org., or requested by phone at (772) 569-6993. piano scholarship program will be accepted through May 1, 2012. Any student under the age of 18, or older but actively enrolled in a Jim Kaat to speak at Salvation college music study program, is eligible to apply. An audition will be Army benefit dinner April 14 required as a final step in the process, and scholarships will be awarded by June 1. Study with Dr. Jose Daniel Flores will begin shortly thereafter and will VERO BEACH — Jim Kaat, former major league pitcher and New be customized to the scholarship recipient’s abilities and goals. York Yankees announcer, will be the keynote speaker at the Salvation

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COMMUNITY NEWS

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United Way accepting applications for incubation center opening

V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

VERO BEACH -- Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization, has announced the Fourth Annual Treasure Coast Walk Now for Autism Speaks fundraising and awareness event will take place on April 21 at Riverside Park. All event proceeds will support Autism Speaks’ work, both locally and nationally, to increase awareness about the growing autism health crisis, fund innovative autism research and family services and advocate for the needs of individuals with autism and their families on the Treasure Coast and beyond. Autism spectrum disorder is now diagnosed in one in every 110 children, including one in every 70 boys, making it the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the United States. For more information about the 2012 Treasure Coast Walk Now for Autism Speaks, visit www.walknowforautismspeaks. org/treasurecoast or contact elizabeth.boyd@autismspeaks.org.

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Autism Speaks fundraising walk to be held at Riverside Park

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VERO BEACH -- With the recent “graduation” of Big Sisters Big Brothers from the Robert F. and Eleonora W. McCabe Foundation Non Profit Incubation Center, United Way is accepting applications for its next tenant. The qualifying organization will receive a free or sliding scale reduced rate office space, completely furnished, with computer, desks, bookcases and free wi-fi. Tenants are obliged to acquire their own telephone service. Organizations wishing to be considered need to be an established 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization with a presence in Indian River County. Organizations wishing to apply can send a letter of intent detailing their current programs, their board of directors, their plans for expansion or growth, and why they would be a good candidate for the Incubation Center to Michael Kint, United Way Incubation Center; 1836 14th Ave.; Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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Army of Indian River County benefit dinner on April 14. The event will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Oak Harbor Clubhouse. No tickets are sold for this event, but reservations are going fast. The Salvation Army will ask for a donation at the end of the event which will be matched. For more information or to make a contribution to The Salvation Army of IRC benefit dinner, send an email to John_Corapi@uss.salvationarmy.org or mail your matching contribution to The Salvation Army of IRC; PO Box 2864; Vero Beach, Fl 32961. To RSVP, call (772) 978-0265 x104.


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Vero’s new police chief pledges service, fiscal care BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Vero Beach Police Chief David Currey came to a fork in the road and took it. The recently appointed chief took his career path to one of criminal justice rather than teaching and coaching physical education. And now Currey has come to another junction as he must decide how to lead his department of 52 sworn officers through challenging budgetary times. Currey, 47, a 22-year veteran of the department since his hiring as a patrolman, was sworn in April 3 as police chief and is immediately scrutinizing his department’s $7 million budget for ways to pare

expenses without negatively impacting the levels of service city residents have come to expect and depend upon. Less than one week after being officially sworn in as Vero Beach Police Chief, Currey met with Vero Beach Newsweekly to recap his career to date and discuss his department’s commitment to the city and its residents. When one enters the police department building, a plaque in the lobby lists the “official police department values:” integrity, service, loyalty and education. It is this mantra to which Currey and his officers pledge themselves no matter how difficult the task. According to Currey, nearly all Police chief David Currey was sworn in on April 3.

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of his officers hold associates or bachelor’s degrees and a few, like him, hold graduate degrees. With a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and a master’s degree in public administration as well as serving in many ranks and roles within Vero’s police department, Currey is perhaps ideally suited to be “top cop” and realistically meet the need for fiscal conservatism while at the same time, make sure city residents’ public safety needs are met. To that end, Currey said that while his own former post as deputy chief won’t be refilled, the department doesn’t plan to cut uniformed personnel, but will likely need to restructure the department’s organizational chart by demoting half of the presently held lieutenant positions and corresponding salaries downward in what would have a ripple effect on other officers

currently in the ranks of sergeant and corporal. “We’ve never had to reduce the rank of officers to the best of my knowledge and I’ve worked with all these officers for many years,” Currey said. “We understand the shortcomings on our budget but it’s not an easy thing to do to reduce rank and salary.” According to Currey’s present plan, three of his present six lieutenants are slated to be reduced to the rank of sergeant. There are currently seven sergeants and four corporals who will also be affected by rank reductions, he said. The demotions would follow the most recent budget cut-backs by the city but Currey said it would not reduce manpower. “In October, everyone working for the city making $70,000 a year (or more) took at 4.62 percent reduction,” Currey said. CONTINUES ON PAGE 17


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Currey, who has been on the Vero police force 22 years, has worked with or supervised all divisions within the department.

CHIEF CURREY FROM PAGE 16

“The restructuring within our ranks will save money but we’ll still have the same amount of officers on the road.” Police pledge to retain high service levels For Currey, actions speak louder than words and the departments’ commitment and pride in providing high-quality and responsive service to its

residents is more than lip service. “We pride ourselves on the level of service to the community but we don’t just say it, it’s what we do. We have a good clearance rate for crime and we respond to everything,” Currey said. Unlike many municipal police departments, Vero Beach police officers respond to all EMS/paramedic calls, Currey noted.

“Our response time is under five minutes for the average call. We pride ourselves on that and we can back it up,” Currey said. Shortly after becoming interim police chief after last November’s resignation by former Police Chief Don Dappen, Currey and his officers found themselves investigating two shocking city homicides within one week. Within six days of the commission of those homicides,

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STAFF PHOTO

STAFF PHOTO

police had made arrests in the cases. The path which ultimately led to his police chief ’s desk in the second story corner office of the city police headquarters was not unlike the yellow-bricked one used by Dorothy on her way to the Emerald City: it was, as the Beatles once sang, “the long and winding road that leads to your door.” Born in Baltimore and raised in CONTINUES ON PAGE 18


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CHIEF CURREY FROM PAGE 17

the Egg Harbor Township area of southern coastal New Jersey’s Atlantic County, Currey was a student athlete who played quarterback and who wanted to major in physical education and coach football. But it was an intra-squad basketball game injury to his knee that ended his sports goals and which led to an alternate career path. “I always had an interest in law enforcement and then I tore out my knee playing basketball,” Currey said. Stockton State College in Pomona, NJ had a criminal justice degreed program and Currey enrolled. “In the summer of 1986, I took a police job in Ocean City (NJ) where they walk the boardwalks

and do all foot patrols. “My mother and sisters moved to Vero Beach in the mid 1980s and I decided to come to the warm weather to start my law enforcement career. This position in Vero was my first real job. (And) I stayed.” Currey said with a broad smile.

up through the ranks to become a detective sergeant in 1995; a road patrol lieutenant in 1998; a captain in 2001; deputy chief in 2005 and interim chief last November. In March, City Manager Jim O’Connor appointed Currey as permanent police chief, citing

“David has fulfilled what my expectations of a police chief are both from the police work side and the budgetary side.” - City Manager Jim O’Connor Helping him “stay” was the fact that he met his wife Melanie in Vero Beach and the couple are raising three beautiful and sports involved children here. Currey came to Vero Beach in August 1989 and was hired by the city in 1990 as a patrolman. He steadily and regularly moved

his confidence in Currey’s ability and willingness to get the job (and budget) done. “David has fulfilled what my expectations of a police chief are both from the police work side and the budgetary side. He has taken ownership of it and he will work through the difficult

solutions to problems. It will be painful but it will get done,” O’Connor said this week. During his 22-year career with the city, Currey has worked within and/or supervised all the department’s divisions and now as chief will continue to oversee the department’s detective division. When asked if he regretted the injury which ended his competitive sports aspirations and a career as a phys-ed teacher, Currey did not hesitate to answer. “I’m very fortunate to be here right now. This ended up better than the other and I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I met my wife here. “As far as this position – I’m honored to be chief here. It was a dream of mine. I took a fork in the road and dreams do come true,” Currey said.


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Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

predicament as the man who had a fox by the ears. He could not figure out how to let go of it without getting hurt. City leaders are trying to find a way to let go of an electric system that is bolstering city spending and holding down taxes, but is at the same time costing its 32,000 customers an estimated $20 million a year in high electric rates. The $6 million advantage to the city set against the $20 million cost to its customers can hardly be justified. Still, simply criticizing the city for its dependence on transfers from its electric operations to pay for general fund expenses does nothing to move anyone closer to a solution. The city is hardly helped by those who offer simplistic solutions, such as “just let go.” And the public is not aided in more fully understanding the issues when arguments for or against a sale are put forward without acknowledging the many complexities to be worked through. CONTINUES ON PAGE 20 Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

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made it their life’s mission to divest the city of its utilities make a compelling case for selling the electric system to FPL, but they do so with a selective use of the facts. They seem unwilling to acknowledge the minefield the city must negotiate if it is to get out of the electric business without also landing on the verge of bankruptcy. In his guest column in last Saturday’s Press Journal, Vitunac explained well the almost insurmountable obstacles the city faces in selling its electric system, including contractual obligations with the Florida Municipal Power Agency and the Orlando Utility Commission that will very likely cost a minimum of $50 million to settle. During the darkest days of his presidency, Abraham Lincoln often told the story of a man who wanted a fox. The fellow finally caught a fox and was last seen holding it by the ears yelling, “Somebody come help me let go of this thing!” Vero Beach is in much the same

B E A C H

earned at competitive rates with a government’s ability to generate an operating “margin” by charging whatever it wants. Currently the city’s electric rates are at least 20 percent higher than FPL – a differential that will likely continue to grow. Suggesting that Vero Electric earns a modest 5 percent margin without also explaining it has to set its rates some $20 million over FPL in order to be “profitable” isn’t exactly putting forth a case built on fiery logic. Last year, not wanting to further increasing rates, Vero Electric drew $7 million from its reserve fund to subsidize operations. In essence, the city’s electric system lost $7 million last year, despite the fact that it charged its customers $20 million more than they would have paid as customers of FPL. Opponents of the sale conveniently avoid acknowledging this huge drain on the local economy. On the other side of the argument, some who have apparently

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In a scene from the move “Gettysburg,” Confederate General George Pickett dismisses the theory of evolution by challenging any of his colleagues to step forward who would dare claim General Robert E. Lee was descended from an ape. General Lou Armistead responds, “George, all science trembles before the searing heat of your fiery logic.” I am sometimes reminded of this exchange between Pickett and Armistead when I hear partisan arguments in favor or in opposition to a sale of the city’s electric system. For example, former City Attorney Charles Vitunac recently argued the city should end its effort to find a way to sell the electric system, but he did so without acknowledging the estimated $20 million a year rate differential between the Vero Electric and Florida Power & Light. Vitunac went on to suggest that Vero Electric is operating at a modest five percent “margin,” or profit. He is confusing a profit

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MARK SCHUMANN

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Negotiating the power sale: time takes time


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COMMUNITY FORUM

A few things to get off my chest this spring

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BY MILT THOMAS

In the middle of my annual spring cleaning ritual, I decided to throw out some things that have been cluttering my mind as well. First of all, while most attention seems to be focused on the haves versus the have nots this political season, there is the ongoing battle between generations. For people of the “senior” generation, the argument seems to be over how society has declined since their day. They reflect sadly that back then people were more respectful, less self-centered, more lawabiding and more religious. They see the younger generation today as less respectful, more self-centered and immoral. Here is where I think the problem lies. The older folks didn’t worry about what they did not know. Most crime and corruption on the part of politicians and public officials were only

POWER SALE FROM PAGE 19

The proverbial elephant in the room, of course, is the public’s addiction to a city property tax rate half that of many Florida cities. No one seems willing to have a serious discussion about how a $4 million increase in taxes might be a reasonable trade off for some $8 million in electric savings. And that savings is just for the 13,000 customers of Vero Electric within the city limits. The city’s 20,000 customers outside the city limits stand to gain $12 million a year by switching to FPL. While the legal cost of negotiating with the OUC, the FMPA and FLP continues to mount and is likely to top $500,000, it would

exposed behind closed doors, never to the public. The same with sexual and financial abuse by religious leaders. Family secrets were always kept within the MILT THOMAS family and rarely even discussed there, things like children born out of wedlock, drinking problems and sexual orientation. Yes, there were rumors, but today rumors have been replaced with television exposés followed by rehab, reality shows and family conferences. Yes, bad behavior has always existed regardless of the generation. The difference is today everyone knows because of 700 cable stations, the National Enquirer and the internet. I’m tired of hearing that the movie John Carter was a nuclear meltdown. But as a writer, it is

easy for me to understand why it failed so miserably at the box office. Special effects are really visual adjectives, used to add color to cinematic storytelling just as written adjectives add color to novels. But a book full of descriptive adjectives without accompanying nouns, pronouns, verbs and more importantly, plot, will not sell, nor will it be interesting. So, it was easy to predict that John Carter would fail. However, Mr. Carter is not alone. Remember Waterworld, the most expensive flop of its day? And then the movie that was the most expensive flop ever (in 2012 dollars), Cleopatra. Yes, even Liz Taylor’s décolletage couldn’t save that one. Locally, I can understand people being upset when they must give up or pay extra for the privilege of having their trash picked up by their back door. We are always upset when our rights

or privileges are taken away by “big” government, no matter how petty they may be. But look at it this way – rolling your trash cans the extra 30 or 40 feet is good for your health. So, in that way, the change could actually save lives. So, instead of complaining, we should be thankful that our local government has our best interests at heart. While we’re at it, I don’t know what all the fuss is about the Vero Beach City Council deciding to impose a 25 mph speed limit on residential streets. It is apparently already in effect on main roads and highways. At least I seem to drive behind people who think so. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/author with a 20year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

be nothing short of foolish to not continue making every effort to find a way for the city to let go of the electric system. The city cannot forever justify over-charging 32,0000 electric customers some $20 million a year just so it can transfer $6 million to its general fund. It also does not make sense to continue masking the real cost of operating the city by reaching into the electric system cookie jar every year. And, without leaning on the electric system for transfers to the general fund, the city simply cannot long survive on a property tax rate just half that of comparable cities. Solutions will come from working creatively to resolve the

city’s contract issues with OUC and FMPA. In tandem with these efforts, the city needs to figure out how to cut expenses and raise revenues. Anyone wanting to be a part of the solution, rather than a part of the problem, can support city leaders in their effort to identify any and every reasonable opportunity to cut expenses. As Councilman Richard Winger has frequently observed, if the city is to have any chance of making the numbers work it must insist FPL pay a fair price for the electric system. That number may prove to be something more than FPL’s initial offer of $100 million. Though FPL cannot be expect-

ed to pay whatever it would take to get the city out of debt and off the hook with FMPA and OUC, it may well make business sense for the city and FPL to settle on some number between FPL¹s initial offer and the system¹s appraised value of closer to $180 million. Finally, rather than dismissing an increase in the city’s tax rate as unreasonable, it’s time for leaders to be honest with the public about the tax rate the city needs to assess in order to be able to provide services the public demands. Working through these issues will take time. Prematurely calling for the city to abandon this effort is ultimately not in anyone’s best interest.


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the death penalty serves the greater good -- either in terms of social progress or the valuing and preservation of human life and dignity. All of this is by way of my saying that if David Lee Gore is soon executed by our state government, I will be much sadder on that day than certain. Sad that our society is capable of producing such depraved and despicable individual and sad that so many people are certain that he must be killed for justice, human worth and society to be served. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

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the moral argument that a civilized society has the right and obligation to protect – through punishment and example – the decency and goodness of the whole social order. But I am also significantly persuaded by the moral and theological argument – which my own religious faith makes – that all human beings have a divine nature and potential within them, even when they have fallen from that birthright. As is the case with all the persistent moral controversies which divide our society, the death penalty involves competing moral principles, and on-the-ground facts, that make it difficult for thoughtful and concerned citizens to come to swift and sure judgments. At the present time, I am not personally sure that

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fate of David Lee Gore, the Treasure Coast’s most notorious and heinous serial murderer, who is facing execution. If there was ever a “poster child” for society’s REVEREND harshest punish- SCOTT ALEXANDER ment, it would be this unremorseful criminal. Back in the 1970’s, Gore and his Cousin Fred Waterfield hunted, raped and murdered young women, strictly for their own twisted pleasure. They have subsequently failed to show any remorse. Still, as social policy, I don’t think the case for the death penalty has been entirely or convincingly made. Yes, I am significantly persuaded by

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Decades ago, I graduated from a wonderful and academicallydemanding university where I was taught to be skeptical of sure and absolutist conclusions of any sort. With all the great intellectual and moral questions of the day, our professors encouraged us to be keenly critical and discerning, and insisted that before we settled on any personal conclusions that we weigh all facts and considerations in the light of both reason and principle. In the decades since, I have always been grateful for this rigorous education, even though the demands of this approach often make for rather tortured decision-making. Such is the case for me now, as I consider the death penalty, and the

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What is the right punishment for David Lee Gore?


^CQKTH u gKNO=;6HO Sport fishermen come out for Coastal Conservation raffle BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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President of the Indian River Coastal Conservation Association Lange Sykes with Carolyn Lange, Leslie & Mike Swan

Sebastian Blackman and John Brenner with the raffle ladies, Nicki Guest and Laura Schooley

The Coastal Conservation Association raffled off aquatic-themed artwork, vacations and fishing gear at The Moorings Club to support its goal of balancing the rights of fishermen with the need to protect the environment. The club’s beautiful riverfront setting was the perfect backdrop to the annual sport fisherman’s auction and raffle. Lange Sykes is the current Treasure Coast chapter president and said his passion for the water stems from “growing up having access in Indian River to the best fishing, diving and water recreational activities in the world.” “I could see the decline of the river’s and ocean’s ecology,” said Sykes, “and I decided to take a proactive call to duty to do my part. The CCA is the voter voice on hot button issues which affect the saltwater angler.” “If it wasn’t for the Association’s magazines and emails,” said member and attorney Brian Conelly, “many of us would not know what was going on to directly affect our rights out on the water.  The CCA advocates a balance between government regulation and the sport fishermen’s rights which is why we live here in the first place.” Attendees were asked to bid on auction items and buy chances on everything from fishing poles to an excursion to Africa valued at approximately $10,000. Approximately 150 guests were bidding furiously on items with major angler appeal. Guest Will Collins was throwing his tickets in the bucket for a clear commode seat with fly fishing hooks. “I got one last year and it needs updating,” he laughed as he bid contrary to the wishes of his girlfriend, Ashleigh Whitfield. Country music filled the room adding to the backyard picnic atmosphere with an upscale twist as bidders chowed down on lobster corn dogs, tasty barbecue and tuna rolls. “I am very happy with the turnout,” said Sykes.  The event raised over $60,000 for the Association.


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To advertise call

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Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233

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Help Keep the Beach Beautiful and Safe for Everyone to Enjoy.

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Doug & Jodi Eiseinger with Todd Marchant

In honor of

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Earth Day are hosting a On The Beach Behind Waldo’s Restaurant Danielle Albertson, Frank Hinzman and Dru & Rick Smith

Come and join us. It’s a great way to meet new people while helping the environment. 10 AM – 11 AM – Beach Clean Up 11 AM – Noon – Lunch d Noon – 4 PM – Live music by St. John’s Wood Charity Bar available with Budweiser products and voodoo punch. ALL proceeds from the bar go to Mother Ocean

50/50 raffle To learn more, volunteer or donate, visit MotherOcean.org. Marvin Simer, Suzy Block and Tom Collins

TCN2691803


SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

Fans of fashion come out for Wine, Women and Charm

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Crystal Lemley, Monica Smiley, Lara Fiorelli and Nicole Dugan BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Karen Diegl and Cindy Schiefer

It was all about fabulous food, the latest clothes and fashionable accessories offered by local businesses at the Wine, Women and Charm benefit for the Homeless Family Center. Charm Magazine hosted the benefit at The Mandarin Restaurant owned by Winncy and Joey Schlitt. “We were happy to open our restaurant for the event to support the Homeless Family Center,” said Joey Schlitt. The main dining room offered a cozy atmosphere enhanced by elegant floral displays provided by Lara Fiorelli of Lara’s Theme as guests let their hair down and relaxed as they shopped. Hosted by Charm, a women’s oriented magazine which celebrates today’s trends

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

and the topics about which women are most passionate, the event offered wonderful raffle chances throughout the evening. The night also featured a stylish fashion show by Labels and Pamper of the Treasure Coast offering lovely summer attire and unique accessories. In addition to nibbling on an assortment of Asian inspired hors d’oeuvres, guests were treated to a sexy Salsa dance by Swingsations’ Shari and Joe Tessier.   After an exhilarating exhibition, they took the ladies, including our Mayor Pilar Turner, through the steps of a high energy Salsa. “I am just excited to come here after a long day of work and unwind,” said Jane Coyle, “as we support the Homeless Family Center.”


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Regina Hawkins and Dee Shelton of Hibiscus Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center

Angela Stakikas, Tanja McGuire, Julia Carter and Kristen Dayton

Reetu Haave and Alyssa McKenzie

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Shari & Joe Tessier of Swingsations 14th Avenue Dance Studio teach Salsa dancing to the attendees


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Community Calendar $5 more at door. iTickets.com.

EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

APRIL 17 ! Pinnacle Award Breakfast

3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353.

5th Annual, Honoring J. Vincent Boyle, Quail Valley River Club, 8-9:30 am, no charge, by Estate Planning Council. 772-978-5574.

EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association’s

Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-5322455.

APRIL 21 ! Heli-Drop Ball Bash & BBQ

For Youth Guidance, Vero Beach Sports Village, 3901 26th St., 4:3010 pm, $25. 772-770-5040.

FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll

Art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-2991234.

! Titanic Memories Luncheon

History & fashion, 11 pm, Oak Harbor Country Club, 4755 S. Harbor Dr., benefits Divine Mercy Catholic Radio, $50. 866-650-7717.

THROUGH APRIL 30 ! Sculpting Nature

30 large scale art pieces in McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 S US1, $5$9, 772-794-0601. APRIL 12 ! Love of Literacy Luncheon

STAFF PHOTO

This 1929 Ford Trimotor airplane will be at the Vero Beach Airport April 16-18. To take a 15-minute flight call 1-877-952-5395.

With Martyn Lewis “the Walter Cronkite of the BBC”, Vero Beach Country Club, 11:30-1:30, $50. 772-778-2223.

Harbor Branch Johnson Education Center, 7 pm, autographs and book signing, $10/$15. 772-242-2559.

contest, free-$9, 11 am-2 pm. 772794-0601.

! Miss Hibiscus Pageant

! Navy League Dinner

Heritage Center, 7 pm. 772-4808353.

Recreation Dept., Leisure Square, 3705 16th St., 8 am. 772-770-6500.

5:45 p.m. Heritage Center, 2140 14th Ave., $28 pp. Guests welcome, speaker Frank Partell author of modern naval fiction. 772-231-6101. ! Indian River Neighborhood Assoc.

Luncheon honoring retiring County Commissioner Gary Wheeler, CJ Cannons, Vero Beach Airport. $15. 772-794-4762. ! “Big Composer, Little Pieces”

Chamber Concert, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 7 pm, $10$12. 772-564-5537. APRIL 13 ! An evening with Marc Kaufman

The Washington Post editor, at THURSDAY, APRIL 12

APRIL 14 ! Hibiscus Festival

Downtown Main Street (14th Ave.), 9 am-8:30 pm, live music, fine art show, vendors, food & activities to benefit MSVB & Heritage Inc. 772-480-8353. ! Salvation Army Benefit Dinner

Oak Harbor Clubhouse, speaker will be Major League’s Jim Kaat, cocktails at 5 pm. 978-0265 x104. ! Fairy Festival

McKee Botanical Garden, 350 US1, maypole dance, fairy houses, children’s activities and costume

FRIDAY, APRIL13

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

! Gymnastic Registration

APRIL 22 ! Floridays: Tales Told Under the Sun

By Janie Hoover, Hallstrom House, 2 pm, $15/$20 by the Historical Society. 772-778-3435. ! Concert Pianist Janice Weber

First Presbyterian Church, 520 Royal Palm Blvd., 7 pm, $20 suggested donation. 772-562-9088. APRIL 28 ! Children’s Art Festival

APRIL 15 ! Art in the Park

Vero Beach Art Club members’ exhibition, Humiston Park, free. 3000 Ocean Dr. 772-231-0303.

Vero Beach Museum of Art, 10 am-3 pm, free celebration, children’s arts, activities, performances. 772-231-0707.

! VBHS Orchestra

! Charity Shoot

Performs Mozart’s Symphony #41, “Jupiter” and Mendelssohn’s Symphony #4, “Italian.” VBHS Performing Arts Center, free, 7 pm. 772-234-6713.

Windsor’s Gun Club, 3125 Windsor Blvd., to benefit Education Foundation, $15, includes lunch, shells, clays, etc. 772-564-0034. ! Kenny Beers Band

APRIL 16 ! Newsboys Concert

Free Christian music concert at Vero Christian Church, 3250 Oslo Rd., from 4-6 pm. 772-567-1368.

7 pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., $20/$35 in advance,

To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15

MONDAY, APRIL 16

TUESDAY, APRIL 17

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18

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The Atlantic Classical Orchestra enjoying its mission to reaching out to children in need

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Professional orchestra inspires student musicians

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BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Atlantic Classical Orchestra, an ensemble of 35 international musicians that performs concerts in Vero Beach and Stuart, now has a whole new fan base. For the past two seasons, the ACO, established in 1991, has extended an open invitation to orchestra students from Vero Beach High School to attend concerts, lectures and even opportunities to dine with the musicians. About 30 students have attended free concerts at the Waxlax Center for the Performing Arts at Saint Edward’s School, where the ACO performs about once a month during season. The following night, the orchestra performs at the Lyric Theatre in Stuart. “Before the performance, Conductor Stewart Robinson talks about the music, about the composer… so when you hear the con-

cert, you have this history,” said Jill Douglas, a Vero Beach resident whose 17-year-old daughter, Lauren Douglas, is first chair violin in the high school orchestra. Douglas and her daughter, who has been playing violin for more than half her life, attended an ACO concert for the first time last year. “Both of us came out from the concert in absolute awe. We couldn’t believe we had this quality of music just down the street,” said Douglas, explaining she reached out to ACO Executive Director, Matthew Stover, about discount tickets for the students. Little did Douglas realize that the $55 cost for regularly priced tickets is only $5 for students. Nonetheless, the ACO made an even sweeter offer. “Part of our mission is to provide opportunities to underserved populations, such as children,” said Stover, who came on board last April after accomplishing record ticket sales for CONTINUES ON PAGE 28

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PHOTOS BY LISA RYMER

Delaney Mcmann, Donnella Aldrich, Noah Lanier, Matt Stott (VBHSO Director), Marissa Rollins, Vincent Marroquin, Lauren Douglas, Jacob Heglund, Hannah Binford, Sawyer Hendrix, Cooper Hendrix, Sam Miller, Steven Coll, Chloé Bain , members of the Vero Beach High School orchestra attend a concert by the Atlantic Classical Orchestra.


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ACO FROM PAGE 27

an orchestra in Jackson, Tennessee. “The push of an orchestra should be ‘How do we make important ourselves in the community?’ We are beginning by providing enhanced opportunities for high school kids.” The ACO, which is actually based in Fort Pierce, is supported by a foundation of fundraising friends in Indian River County, as well as in Stuart. The orchestra developed organically from a single all-Mozart program performed at the Vero Beach Museum of Art’s Leonhardt Auditorium in 1991. Conducted by local resident and professional conductor, Andrew McMullan, the ensemble grew into a full blown professional orchestra with an ever-increasing artistic quality. In contrast to the Indian River Symphonic Association, which partners with the Brevard County Orchestra in bringing musical performances to the Community Church in Vero Beach, the ACO has its own resident orchestra. The musicians, many of whom also play for other musical companies, come from across the globe, with a large number originating from Eastern Europe, Central America and South America.

Phil Horrocks, Patton Horrocks, Marissa Rollins, Ian Maksim (ACO), Lauren Douglas, Hannah Binford, Sam Miller , ochestra students from Vero Beach High School attend a pre-lecture and concert by the Atlantic Classical Orchestra at the Waxlax Center for the Performing Arts.

For instance, Aura Trevino, the company’s principal bassoonist, commutes from Venezuela to perform with the ACO. Violinist Sha Zhang hails from China. And Russian Ian Maskin, principal cellist, has performed with Sting, Gloria Estefan, Andrea Bocelli and Snoop Dogg. Orchestra conductor, Stewart Robertson, who in the past has been nominated for a Grammy Award, brings to the area artistic leadership of world renowned musical organizations, such as Glimmerglass Opera, Royal Scottish National Opera, the Florida Grand Opera, and orchestras such as the BBC Scottish Symphony, Nether-

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lands Symphony, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, and others. “The students come out from a concert so inspired,” said Douglas. “We are so fortunate to have such good music a town so small.” Last year, about ten high school students attended two concerts. This year, an average of 12 students attended each performance and even some of the parents got involved by volunteering in the ticket office and helping usher. “I promoted it on Facebook,” said Douglas, a professional photographer whose other two children, Corbin, 9, and Aubrey, 10, play classical guitar and piano, respectively. Because many of the orchestra students come from singleparent or low income families, Douglas picks the youth up from school after orchestra rehearsal on a Thursday evening and brings them to her house for a monthly pre-concert supper club. “They get to get dressed up in concert attire,” said Douglas, who talks about music as being a lifestyle. Lauren Douglas plans on continuing studying music in college and eventually making a career of her passion. “I wouldn’t necessarily say I want to be part of an orchestra professionally,” said the high school junior who

has also been studying piano for the past three years. “I love classical music, but I like other styles too.” Douglas performs every Saturday at the Farmer’s Market Oceanside with guitarist, Trevor Klutz, a senior at Vero Beach High School who also plays the violin in the school’s orchestra. Sophomore Alex Barker, another violinist in the orchestra, recently joined their group, Elle and the Rootabega Boys. Two weeks ago, the students were invited to join the ACO musicians for dinner in the Saint Ed’s cafeteria. After meeting Arthur Grossman, a 90-year-old violinist with the ACO who performed on Broadway with Julie Andrews in “The Sound of Music,” senior Vincent Marroquin, 18, a cellist, had a change of heart. “I’ve completely reconsidered my college plan,” said Marroquin, who has received numerous scholarships and will be attending the University of Central Florida in the fall to study to become a music educator. “It gives them hope that their passion can become a fulfilling career with longevity,” said Douglas. “Maybe, one day we’ll see some of these kids on the Waxlax stage in ten or 15 years.” For information about the 20122013 season, call (772)460-0850 or visit them online at www.acomusic.org.


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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

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Riverside Theatre Review

Florida Stories with Latino Sabor (Flavor) Carrie Sue Ayvar, a descendant of Eastern European Jews, grew up in Pittsburgh and Mexico surrounded by family stories. Combining her childhood stories with those she gathered from both locations, Ayvar has developed an impressive repertoire of bilingual, cultural, folk and historical tales.

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tertaining and can be a real rollercoaster ride, but a fun ride.” Directed by Allen Cornell, producing artistic director of Riverside Theatre who also designed the set, Bridge & Tunnel’s production team includes Marc Dodon (costume design); Michael Bell (lighting design); Craig Beyrooti (sound design) and Bob Miller Jr. (stage manager). Bridge & Tunnel performs April 19-29 on the Waxlax Second Stage at Riverside Theatre located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. Tickets are $40 and may be purchased by calling the box office at (772) 231-6990 or by visiting online at www.riversidetheatre.com.

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city (Manhattan) via bridges and tunnels. Many of them are immigrants,” Stephens said. Because the play involves portraying 14 diverse character parts, Stephens said she was initially daunted by the prospect of taking on a one-woman show. “I was terrified to audition for the show although I had heard about it and Sarah (Jones) and the show being on Broadway. I thought how could I do it, but people kept encouraging me and I’m honored to be the first person to do it after Broadway,” Stephens said. Although she has yet to meet the show’s creator, Stephens said “Sarah and I are Facebook friends and she’s aware I’ve done the show and has acknowledged me. It would be great to meet her.” Stephens characterized the play as “timeless” because America is a nation of immigrants. “And because of that, I find the anti-immigrant sentiment that’s flourishing now to be curious. I think its fear-based angst. The show takes the nebulous entity of ‘immigrant’ to that of real people with a story to tell,” Stephens said. “This play humanizes these people – people who want a better life like everybody.” Through her portrayal of 14 male and female characters, Stephens conveys those lives and multiculturalism as well as the dreams and hopes which continues to bring immigrants to America. “After about 80 minutes, they are no longer strangers; they have become people you can care about and its story resonates,” Stephens said. “It’s a wonderful piece of theatre that’s funny, en-

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The title of Bridge & Tunnel, an Obie and Tony Award-winning play written and originally performed by Sarah Jones, references a less than flattering term for working class commuters of certain ethnic and racial makeup coming into Manhattan from New York City’s outer boroughs of Queens, the Bronx, Brooklyn and Staten Island. Think Snooki and “The Situation,” those Jersey Shore Guidette and Guido stereotypes or perhaps swarthy-skinned, turbaned Sikhs, veiled Islamic women in burkas or dreadlocked Rastas. You know, those people, the ones not like us; the ones with funny accents and weirdo religions or even more outrageous attire for whom Park or Madison avenues are likely to be where they work in menial jobs as janitors, cleaning women or convenience store clerks. And although it is true that Manhattan, like the rest of America, is and always has been a “melting pot” do we really want to associate with this motley assortment of humanity? Yes, we do. This brilliantly and humanely crafted one-woman play starring award-winning actress Karen Stephens takes us on an insightful and enlightening multi-cultural/ racial journey which ultimately reveals that for all our differences, we are the same: human beings seeking life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Performing on the Waxlax Second Stage at Riverside Theatre from April 19-29 and presented by the theatre’s Patron Sponsors,

Bridge & Tunnel offers 14 different characters of varying age, ethnicity and gender who reveal what America and Americans are truly about despite increasing real-life anti-immigrant sentiment. Taking to the stage during an open-mike poetry reading for immigrants at a joint in “beautiful South Queens,” the characters of Bridge & Tunnel reveal through humor and pathos their struggles to become part of the fabric of America which has been traditionally woven with threads of many different colors and types. Prior to commencing rehearsals for the show, Karen Stephens shared with the Vero Beach Newsweekly some thoughts about the show and her many roles within it. Stephens, who grew up in South Florida and graduated from the University of Florida with a fine arts degree in theatre, performed the southeastern premiere of Bridge & Tunnel at Sarasota’s Florida Studio Theatre and again at the Fort Lauderdale Women’s Theatre Project. She received a Carbonell award nomination and was named the 2011 Best Actress by the Broward-Palm Beach New Times for those efforts. She also starred in a one-woman show Loquacious & Bodacious, the Life and Times of Zora Neale Hurston and most recently appeared as Lorraine Hansberry in The Women’s Theatre Project’s Chitterling Heights. When asked about the show’s title, Stephens confirmed that its meaning is tied to commuting metro New Yorkers. “New York (City) is such a melting pot and people move about and commute in and out of the

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Bridge & Tunnel: lessons from those not like us


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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

Painter Regina Stark follows her dreams “I believe in the work, the message, I know the feeling that is put into it.” BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The fear of being a starving artist keeps many talented people in rank and file jobs. So when Regina Stark, a painter, opened an art gallery last year, she knew she was taking a risk. “It is not an easy path to follow, but it runs through my veins,” says Stark, 58, owner of Regina Stark Gallery at 1110 Old Dixie Highway. Stark paints every day. Her pieces are impressionistic acrylics on canvas, capturing ethereal images of mermaids, angels and other divinely inspired forms. She also works in watercolor and teaches abstract art and multi-media composition at the Vero Beach Museum of Art. In fact, it was the museum that was the deciding factor in Stark moving to Vero Beach two anda-half years ago from New York, where she had been a decorative painter for 20 years with clients on Park Avenue and in the Hamptons. “I began painting at age three,” said the Long Island native, whose father was a fine artist and taught her the fundamentals. “He taught me how to see with an artist’s eye,” she said. She studied with master artists and attended some college in New York, but raising a family took priority. When her children were older, she began to paint again and her talent became well known among interior decorators. “I came to Vero to get off the treadmill,” said Stark. “There had to be an easier place to live where I could paint more.” But, it was difficult breaking into the local art market, both because Stark was a newcomer and had no established relationships, and also she did not incorporate Florida’s landscape into her creations.

STAFF PHOTO

Regina Stark’s art captures ethereal images of mermaids, angels and other divinely inspired forms.

“I don’t paint palm trees, at least not often” said Stark, who produces pieces for her gallery, as well as commissioned pieces, often from a photograph. She discovered there actually is

a local market for her style of art when Karen Fulchini, who coowns Baci Trattoria on 14th Avenue, hung Stark’s canvases on the wall and they began to sell. The Friday night Gallery Stroll

in downtown Vero Beach has provided yet another opportunity for Stark to meet local art aficionados. Again, Fulchini graciously allowed her to set up an exhibit in the restaurant, where belinis and


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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

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COMMUNITY CHURCH OF VERO BEACH

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY

Community Concert Series 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 Apr 15: Brevard Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 pm, $50 Apr 17: Chanticleer, 7:30 pm, $35/$15 students May 20: Spring Sing and Ring, Atlantic Childrens’ Chorale & Bell Ringers, 4 pm, suggested $15/$5

Various Locations 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org Apr 21: Rodgers & Hammerstein at the Movies, Trinity Episcopal Church, 7 pm, 2365 Pine Avenue, 7 pm, $20

Second Stage: Apr 19-26: Bridge and Tunnel, 2 pm & 8 pm, $40 Comedy Zone: Apr 13-14: Johnny Millwater and Jodi White, 7 pm & 9:30 pm, $15 Children’s Theatre: Mar 23-Apr 15: Rapunzel and Me, the Muzical, 3/23, 7:30 pm, 3/24, 3/25, 4/1, 4/14 & 4/14 1:30 pm, $10-$16 Apr 13-15: School House Rock, Ages 4 +, $5-$16

VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 3001 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-0707 Apr 21: Children’s Art Festival, 10-3 pm, music, art activities, free admission May 3: Warm Nights--Cool Music, Concert in the Park, Hard Bop Jazz with James Archer, $10

VERO BEACH OPERA verobeachopera.org 772-569-6993 Box Office: 772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Apr 14: Live at the Met: Verdi’s La Traviata, 1 pm, Majestic Theatre, $20-$25

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Six Speakers · October-April

1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

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Stark Main Stage: Apr 12-May 6: A Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the Forum, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57-$73 Apr 9: Distinguished Lecture Series, Charlie Cook of the Cook Report, 4 & 6 pm, $65-$75

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RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com

VERO BEACH CHORAL SOCIETY Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 772-494-5011 VeroBeachChoralSociety.org Apr 13 & 15: Songs of Spring, Concert & Art Debut, Men’s Ensemble Chorus with Music Inspired Art, $20 ($5/$10). Reception and concert on 13th at 7:30 pm; Concert on 15th at 3 pm, art on exhibition in Great Hall after concert.  Art auction Apr 27 at Northern Trust.  

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EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Apr 19: Carrie Sue Ayvar, Florida Humanities Series, Free Apr 21: SoulFege, Jazz, benefits Academy for the Performing Arts music scholarship, 7 pm, $5-$15 Apr 29: “Forever Kitten”, A Father Knows Best Remembrance by Lauren Chapin, 5 pm, $25/$30.

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SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Apr 13: Jimmy Thackery & The Drivers, 8 pm (Black Box), $30 Apr 18: International Dance Sensation, “Burn the Floor,” 7 pm, $55/$49 Apr 21: One Night of Queen, 8 pm, $45/$39 May 6: Ziggy Marley, Wild and Free Tour, 7 pm, $39

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Entertainment Calendar

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a yoga practice, which she also teaches at the museum. This “opens me up so the creative energy flows through me like a stream of consciousness,” she said. Beautiful things certainly do come through Stark, whose body of work is eclectic, sensual, feminine yet bold. Sometimes, she includes writing in the paintings, words that she feels the painting speaking. “Abstract painting is feeling work. You start with a blank canvas, no preconceived notion; a blank mind. Then you take the colors and move them across the canvas, it’s very visceral, turning color into form,” she explained. These days, Stark opts for water based paints over oil based paints because of the toxicity, which can impact health. While she favors watercolors, most of her work is done in acrylics. “I work in layering; acrylics dry fast so they’re a better medium,” she said. Stark encourages people to seek out creative outlets to give voice to parts of themselves that they may have yet to discover. “There is a creative spark inside all of us that needs to be ignited. Your creativity makes you come alive, so others can experience you,” she said. Regina Stark Gallery 978-1697.

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homemade muffins were served, while Stark sold giclees of her original canvases. “I finally opened my own gallery because I knew I had to stand on my own. I believe in the work, the message, I know the feeling that is put into it. And if I can do this in New York, I can do it here,” she said. The gallery, which is open by appointment only, affords Stark a private studio to paint, a space to teach classes, and an exhibit hall to show her work and the work of her students. Using email and direct mailings to communicate with fans of her work, Stark hosts a gallery show every other month. “The gallery shows have been the most effective, because you get people to come in the gallery and see your work, and maybe they’ll buy something.” She teaches both private and group art classes, charging modest rates to encourage more people to try their hand at artistic expression. Stark also helps art students prepare college portfolios. Stark’s own artistic process is deeply personal and demonstrates the association between her creative life and her spiritual life. Each day, she begins with a period of meditation followed by


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Maison Martinique: French meets the Caribbean at South Beach BY MARK JOSEPH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Having received good news, we were in a celebratory mood and immediately thought of one of the prettiest and romantic spots in Vero, Maison Martinique in South Beach. Driving into the parking lot of this exquisite property it looks more like a large Spanish villa hidden away on a Mediterranean island. Surrounded by lush tropical plants and tall greenery, Maison Martinique is located in the Caribbean Court Hotel, at 1601 S. Ocean Drive, in a prestigious, secluded area of Vero’s South Beach. Considered as a getaway destination, this elegantly appointed boutique hotel houses a restaurant with a menu that’s French inspired with a Caribbean theme. It was an early Tuesday evening so fortunately we had our choice of seating in one of several beautiful dining rooms or out by the garden patio and pool area. We chose a nice comfy booth in the hallway For appetizers we chose the soft-shell crab and shrimp curry and chose to pair them both with a nice glass of house Cabernet. While enjoying our wine and bread, we were able to see the beautiful dining rooms of Maison Martinique. Bathed in dark salmon and rich, dark woods with a Caribbean theme, the sophisticated and luxurious feel of the restaurant seem to transport us back to an era when women wore long gloves and gentleman sported tailored suits.

When the appetizers arrived, we could not have been more pleased. The soft-shell crab was a treat and this beautifully prepared creature arrived steaming hot to perfection. Swimming in a buttery garlic sauce, this deliciously crisp crustacean was fresh and tender and the highlight of the entire meal. The crab was so good I would have easily chosen this as a main course. The shrimp curry prawns were generous in size and portion and each shrimp was cooked just until tender. The curry sauce was thick and rich with a lively flavor but still tame enough for most palates. We chose to enhance our meals with a soup and a salad and knowing that fresh beets with goat

cheese has always been a favorite here, the beet salad continued to live up to its reputation. Sweet chunks of beets on crisp greens and highlighted by chunks of really good goat cheese made for a great salad. The soup was asparagus vichyssoise -- a cold soup with fresh asparagus. For a warm evening the soup proved to be cooling, refreshing and delicious. The list of entrees for the evening included several choices of fresh fish and we ordered the striped sea bass stuffed with crabmeat and the tuna au poivre. With steak au poivre being a long time favorite and having never experienced this dish done with fresh tuna, the choice was a no-brainer. The tuna was prepared with a cool red center and a delicious

crust. The sweet creamy sauce in contrast to the peppercorns was the perfect complement to this wonderful sushi grade tuna. Accompanying this dish were four small sides of veggies, including sweet fresh carrots, tender asparagus spears and a small steamed potato. The side dishes were carefully cooked and thoroughly enjoyed. The striped sea bass stuffed with crabmeat was similar to stuffed flounder, both in appearance and texture. The bass was so fresh that it could have easily come from the ocean, located just across the street from this beautiful restaurant and hotel. Moist fillets of fish encased in sweet, succulent crabmeat, this dish was finished in an equally delicate beurre blanc sauce. The sea bass also included the same wonderful side dishes.


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DINING

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Dinner and wine for two before tip: $270

Masion Martinique at the Caribbean Court Hotel Fine dining with full bar and wine 1601 S. Ocean Drive, Vero Beach FL 32963 772 231-7299

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Cuisines of Vero Simple, Savory & Seaside

Lemon Tree – Love it!

Offering a menu directly sourced from local farmers, fisherman and artisanal purveyors.

great breakfast, great lunch, great dinner Friendly, clean, excellent food and service. Beer and Wine. Homemade soups and desserts. Children’s menu available.

Weekly Sunday Brunch January 8th 9:30am – 3:00pm Only $24.95* per person

Breakfast: Mon.-Sat. 7 am - 11 am Lunch: Mon.-Sat. 11 am - 2:30 pm Sunday Breakfast: 7:30 am - noon Dinner: 5 pm - ’til close 3125 OCEAN DRIVE, VERO BEACH | 772.231.0858 WWW.LEMONTREEVERO.COM

Weekly 3 course Prex-Fixe Sunday - Thursday 5:30pm - 7:00pm Only $21.95* per person

3244 Ocean Drive | Vero Beach | 32963 HOTEL DIRECT: 772.562-9919 | The WAVE Kitchen & Bar: 772.410.0100 | SPA: 772.410.0100 costadeste.com | Facebook.com/Costadestebeachresort * prices do not include tax or gratuity

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Sunday Traditions and Weekdays Specials

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Proper attire requested Most major credit cards Reservations suggested

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Hours: Tuesday thru Saturday, 6 p.m. till close

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erous assortment of wonderfully aged, imported cheeses and fresh fruit and served with a traditional port wine. Though too full to finish after a huge meal, I sadly had to leave some of the delicious cheese morsels on my plate. A fantastic meal from start to finish in a beautiful, romantic atmosphere was the perfect way for us to celebrate this evening and Maison Martinique at the Caribbean Court Hotel was exactly the way we wanted to enjoy this very special occasion.

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almond waffle was sweet, rich cream, fresh berries and a wonderful raspberry sauce. Perhaps the best word to describe this fabulous dessert is spectacular! The three tier almond crisp will definitely appear of my list of best desserts of Vero. Our champagne choice was a bubbly rose and since I was in the mood for something different than the usual sweets, I chose the assorted cheese tray with Stilton, Manchego, and house boursin cheese. The cheese tray was a gen-

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Though quite full, yet still in a celebratory mood, we decided to top off the evening’s festivities with two dessert selections and since we were celebrating, champagne was in order. The signature dessert of Maison Martinique is the three-tier almond crisp, with crème Chantilly, fresh berries and raspberry coulis. The confection consisted of a tall stack of paper thin, incredibly delicate waffle-like sheets of almond, lightly fried to a beautiful golden brown. Tucked in between each


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^AC?;= St. Ed’s, Master’s Academy to play at Holman Stadium BY MIKE BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH – The St. Edward’s (12-5) and Master’s Academy (10-3) baseball teams will meet for the first time at Holman stadium April 16 at 7 p.m. Both teams are eying berths in the state playoffs in what should be a playoff-type atmosphere. The Pirates, behind the leadership of fifth-year head coach Jim Peters, are anchored by college pitching prospects senior Jared Jillson (4-1, 0.46 earned run average), junior Wes Walton (3-0, 1.53 ERA), and junior Anderson Proctor (1-2, 1.05 ERA). Proctor, a 6-foot-4, 220-pound right-hander, will take the hill against the Patriots when the two teams square off at Holman StaPHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI dium. St. Edward’s second baseman Zach Taylor and his teammates recently posted Master’s Academy second-year an easy 11-1 home victory over Orlando Christian Prep. head coach and athletic director Charles Brown is familiar with it was at John Carroll,” Brown portunity get in touch with his said. “He stacks up nicely with inner-fan, and appreciate the hisProctor. Brown, a former pitching pros- most Division-I prospects, and tory of the former spring training pect with the New York Yankees, has prototypical size for a start- home of the Las Angeles Dodgers. “It’s pretty amazing to be able has worked with the St. Edward’s ing pitcher. By the time Anderson pitcher in the off-season and sees graduates, he’ll be throwing 93 to to throw off the same mound that Sandy Koufax once did,” Proctor 94 miles per hour. true talent in him. For Proctor, the game as an op- said. “The first time I saw him pitch For someone known for his pitching, Proctor has been tearing it up at the plate to the tune of a .442 batting average with four home runs. Senior Jay Schulte leads the team with a .460 average and 17 runs batted in, Walton is hitting a robust .361 and junior Billy Egnezzo is batting .347. Master’s Academy, in just its second year of fielding a varsity baseball team, brings a very young team into Holman Stadium to face

St. Edwards. “We have no seniors and only two juniors on the team,” Brown said. “We have three sophomores, five freshmen, three eighth-graders and a seventh-grader on our team. We still start some of these seventh- and eighth-grade players. I feel we can go and compete against the other schools. Every game we’ve played, we’ve been in. Sometimes our inexperience kind of pops up, and we’ve lost close games late because of it. As a coach all of it is very exciting.” One of his juniors, starting center fielder Ville Ewar, is in just his second year playing baseball. “Ville is learning as he goes, and it is good to be coaching a raw athlete like him,” Brown said. “Everything he does it is natural, we can take that and mold him by showing him fundamentals. His defense is already great, and his hitting is really coming along. The sky is the limit for a kid like that.” Behind the pitching of Austin Dean pitching and Mason Smith, the Patriots have been showing well against much bigger schools. Smith, in fact, threw a two-hit shutout against Fort Pierce Westwood a few weeks back. Dean and Smith also pace their team’s offense, with Jacob Fowler, Michael Dean and Jeffery Stabe providing additional offensive firepower. “I’m very proud of the boys, and they’ve done everything I’ve asked them to,” Brown said.” “We have a chance, even being this young, of winning our district next year.”


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SPORTS

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

forts with the Salvation Army and also his philanthropic experiences VERO BEACH -- The Salvation over the years. Kaat, 73, enjoyed as much sucArmy of Indian River County’s annual benefit dinner at Oak Har- cess in the broadcast booth after bor on April 14 will have a decid- retiring as a player he has won edly ‘baseball’ feel to it this year. seven Emmy Awards for his work Former Major Leaguer Jim Kaat as an announcer. He is one of 29 baseball players headlines the 5 to 8 p.m. event, where he will be the featured to have played in four different decades, and is the only player to speaker. Executive Director John Cora- have played during seven presipi was able to get Kaat, who in a dential administrations. The left25-year career posted a 283-237 hander’s 16 consecutive Gold record with a 3.45 earned run av- Gloves were a record when he reerage, to donate his time for the tired in 1983. “We don’t sell tickets to the dindinner. “It was my job to get another ner, as it is open to the public,” speaker, and that is a job that is al- Corapi said. “Since Jim is donatways easier said than done,” Cora- ing his time, the Alumni Associapi said. “We discussed who we tion is bringing in baseball memowanted, and we decided on trying rabilia for our silent auction. The to get an athlete. I knew Jim Kaat event will definitely have a little lived in Stuart, and that we were baseball flair to it.” Vero Beach resident and former basically in his back yard. I contacted the MLB alumni associa- MLB umpire Dutch Rennert, who tion, and through them he said he called a number of Kaat’s games, would speak at our benefit dinner said he would attend the event last week and that has snowballed with no charge.” Two anonymous donors have through Vero Beach’s baseball pledged $10,000, and they will community. “The dinner is set up to help match any donations totaling up to $20,000 before or the night of sustain our programs through the summer time, because once the dinner. “If people come to the dinner to summer hits, our donations drop donate, now is the great time to do off drastically,” Corapi said. “It it because their donation will be will go toward the expenses of matched,” Corapi said, whose goal our summer day camp program, for the dinner is $50,000.  “If they which helps people who can’t afdon’t make it to the dinner, they ford to send their kids to camp can just earmark it to the dinner.  during the summer.  Money will If they are out of town, they can also go to our mobile feeding promail a donation to our post office gram‚ which goes to homebound individuals, and also our social box and it will be matched.” Light hors d’oeuvres and cock- services program to help prevent tails will begin the event, which homelessness.  The mission of the benefit dinwill be held at the clubhouse in Oak Harbor. A surf and turf din- ner is about sustaining people ner will follow, with Kaat speaking through the year and helping get on his 50 years in baseball, his ef- them through summertime with-

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Jim Kaat to speak at Salvation Army benefit dinner VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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out us getting into our trust money.” For more information about this event or to make a contribution to The Salvation Army of Indian River County benefit dinner, send

an email to John_Corapi@uss. salvationarmy.org, or mail matching contribution to the Salvation Army of IRC, P.O. Box 2864, Vero Beach, FL 32961. To RSVP call 978-0265 ext. 104.

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Jim Kaat is one of 29 baseball players to have played in four different decades.


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Obituaries Edward Michael Bacon Jr. Edward Michael Bacon Jr., 81, died March 27, 2012, in Greenwich, Conn. He was born in New York City, moved to Greenwich in 1946 and also lived in Vero Beach. He worked for more than 40 years on Wall Street. His last 20 years were spent as a partner at Kidder-Peabody and as a floor partner on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. He was a lector at St. Michael the Archangel in Greenwich and Holy Cross Church in Vero Beach. He was a member of the Bent Pine Golf Club in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Isabelle; brother, Jack; sister, Missy Ahrens; sons, E. Michael III and Thomas H., both of Greenwich; daughters, Cary Winslow of Far Hills, N.J., and Beth Bacon of Brooklyn, N.Y.; and 12 grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Inner-City Scholarship Fund, 1011 First Ave., Suite 1400, New York, NY 10022. A guestbook is available at www. leopgallaghergreenwich.com. William James “Jim” Haeger William “Jim” James Haeger, 68, died March 27, 2012, at VNA Hospice House. He was born in Milwaukee, moved to Gainesville at age 3, then lived in Homestead, Sanibel Island and moved to Vero Beach in 1953. He worked in the plant nursery business and grew poinsettias at Christmas time for local churches and flower shops. He was a veteran of the Army, having served from 1964 to 1967. He graduated from Vero Beach High School in 1961 and attended Indian River State College. He was an active member of the Community Church of Vero Beach and spent many years volunteering in the sound booth each Sunday. He was a member of the Model T Club and Indian River An-

tique Car Club. Survivors include his wife of 17 years, Karen ReamsHaeger of Vero Beach; sons, James T. Haeger and Jeffrey Haeger, both of Orlando; stepson, Calvin Reams of Vero Beach; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Community Church Music Department, 1901 23rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32968. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Mary Ann Hallauer Mary Ann Hallauer, 84, died March 28, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Dennison, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from Toledo, Ohio. She was a pioneer in public health dental hygiene. Survivors include her husband of 65 years, Dr. J. Miller Hallauer of Vero Beach; daughter, Pat Hallauer of Montreal; son, George Hallauer of DeKalb, Ill.; sister, Joan Jacobs of Bloomington, Ind.; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Services: Arrangements are by Cox-GiffordSeawinds Funeral Home in Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. Eugene William Kelly Eugene William Kelly, 92, died March 27, 2012, at Consulate Health Care of Vero Beach. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from White Haven, Pa. He was employed by Franklin National European Bank, New York office, for 35 years, retiring as vice president. He served in the Army Air Forces during World War II. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion and Knights of

Columbus-3rd Degree. Survivors include his sister, Henrietta Pruszynski of Sebastian. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Neil Joseph Aronne Neil Joseph Aronne, 79, died March 28, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in New York City and lived in Vero Beach since 1982, coming from Rhode Island. Before retirement, he worked as a teacher for more than 35 years in Bristol, R.I. He served in the Army during the Korean War. He was a parishioner at St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach, where he taught CCD classes and served as an usher. He also was a member of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Bristol. He volunteered at local soup kitchens in Vero Beach and Bristol. He was a longtime member of the Vero Beach Codgers Softball club. Survivors include his sons, David and Tim; daughters, Jane and Beth; sister, Theresa; wife, Sandra Spoto; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to support local soup kitchens to the St. Helen Catholic Church Outreach Center, P.O. Box 2927, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. John L. Bratcher John L. Bratcher, 64, died March 25, 2012, in Vero Beach. He was a lifetime resident of Vero Beach. Survivors include his son, Michael Hunter of Vero Beach; daughters, Brandy Siles of Derry, N.H., and Julie Torres of Waterbury, Conn.; and five grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Olga Cumming Olga Cumming, 90, died March 29, 2012, in Vero Beach. She was born in Irvington, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 11 years, coming from Washington’s Crossing, Pa. She worked for many years at Sandoz Pharmaceuticals as executive assistant to the chief executive of the U.S. company. She was a member of the Vero Beach Country Club and an avid scratch golfer, winning numerous senior tournaments, and was a longtime member of Old York Road Country Club, Abington, Pa. She volunteered with Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach, and tutoring children in the public school system. Survivors include sons, John Cumming of Washington, D.C., and Robert Cumming of Yardley, Pa.; daughter, Barbara Cumming Tiesi of Tewksbury, N.J.; sister, Estelle Gilbert of Ponte Vedra; and six grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com. Franklin Dunning Franklin Whittier Dunning, 83, died March 24, 2012, at his home in Vero Beach. He was born in Amsterdam, N.Y., and was a winter resident of Vero Beach since 1979 and lived year-round for nine years, coming from Ithaca, N.Y., and Painesville, Ohio. He was a senior executive with Cleveland Crane and Engineering, later known as Shepard Niles, for 50 years before his retirement in 1999. He was a member and former president of the Materials Handling Institute and a member of GYRO International. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Judy Dunning of Vero Beach; sons, John Franklin Dunning of Needham, Mass., and Bradley Paul Dunning


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OBITUARIES

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Herman D. Beck Hermann D. Beck, 87, died April 3, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Freiberg, Germany, and moved to Vero Beach in 1987 from Los Angeles. Survivors include his sister, Maika Wuessloek of Germany. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ursula Margot Beck, in 2009. Services: No services are scheduled. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

V E R O

Dr. Robert Ball Dr. Robert Ball, 99, died April 3, 2012, at home. He was born in Elyria, Ohio, and moved to Vero Beach 10 years ago, coming from Okemos, Mich. He served in the Army. Prior to his retirement, he was a limnologist and the director of the Institute of Water Research at Michigan State University. Survivors include his wife of 70 years, Betty Ball of Vero Beach; daughters, Bunny Anderson of Okemos and Sue Stair of Fort Pierce; four grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice House, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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Violet E. Woofter Violet E. Woofter, 89, died March 30, 2012, at Atlantic Health Care Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Clendenin, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach for 46 years, coming from Cleveland. She was a graduate of Clendenin High School in Clendenin and Bliss Business College in Columbus, Ohio. She was a legal secretary, working for law firms in Ohio, West Virginia and Mary-

Roland G. ‘Gil’ Guilbault Roland G. “Gil” Guilbault, 77, died April 6, 2012, at his home in Indian River Shores. He was born in Providence, R.I., and moved to Vero Beach 12 years ago from Washington, D.C. After graduating from the University of Montreal, he attended Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I., and was commissioned an ensign in May 1959. For the next 34 years, he served in the Navy, retiring as a rear admiral in 1994. He commanded a battle force from the aircraft carrier USS Eisenhower CVN-69; commanded Cruiser-Destroyer Group 12 out of Mayport; commanding officer of the first Aegis cruiser, USS Ticonderoga CG-47; commanded the USS Tattnall DDG-19; and was on the commissioning crew of the nuclear-powered destroyer USS Bainbridge DLGN-25, which saw action off Vietnam. He obtained a master’s degree in computer systems from George Washington University, graduated from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and attended the Naval Post Graduate School. His last tour of duty was served in the Pentagon as deputy director of Space and Electronic Warfare, overseeing the changing information warfare needs and operational requirements. He volunteered his experience to the Treasure Coast Council of the Navy League, where he served as president for three years; Gifford Youth Activity Center board of directors and the Homeless Family Center of Indian River County. He

was one of the founding members of the Indian River County Democratic Executive Council. He also was a member of the Armed Forces Communication and Electronic Association, and the Military Officers Association of America. He was a member of the Vero Beach Yacht Club. Survivors include his wife, Huguette; sons, Marc and Paul; daughter, Michelle; stepsons, Lance Thomson and Kim Davis; brother, Raymond; and 12 grandchildren. Interment will be at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com

2 0 1 2

Gilbert Rothwell Harris Kennedy Gilbert Rothwell Harris Kennedy, 76, of Vero Beach Florida, passed away Sunday March 25, 2012, from complications associated with pneumonia. He was married in Norman, Okla., to Caroline McDermott for 44 years until her death in 2002. He is survived by daughter Blain Kennedy and son Gilbert Kennedy, and siblings Ellen Kennedy and John Kennedy, and four loving grandchildren. He started his working career at Morgan Stanley in New York City and moved on to numerous other venture capital endeavors in the medical, computing and most notably petroleom industry founding Plains Resourc-

Darwin Smith Darwin Smith, 83, died March 31, 2012, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Hazard, Ky., and lived in Vero Beach since 1979, coming from Whitesburg, Ky. He was a member of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Veterans of Vero and the Eagles all of Vero Beach. He served in the Army during the Korean conflict. Before retirement, he was the owner and operator of Baker Maytag Co. for many years in Whitesburg. Survivors include his two stepdaughters, Susie Day-McGuigan of Venice and Beverly Day Bolling of Spotsylvania, Va.; sisters, Freda Brown of Orlando and Hilda Smith of Winter Haven; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

land. She was a member of the Vero Beach Country Club, where she was an avid golfer. Survivors include her husband of 67 years, Darrell Woofter of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

1 2 ,

Virginia Hendrickson Virginia Hendrickson, 81, died March 29, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Baltimore and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from Philadelphia. She was an homemaker. She attended St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church. Survivors include her daughter, Kathleen Hendrickson of Sebastian; sons, Joseph Hendrickson of Englewood, David Hendrickson of Tampa and Richard Hendrickson of Marmora; six grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice House, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at coxgiffordseawinds.com.

es. In his later years he was chiefly concerned with environmental issues and sustainable aquaculture farming. Memorial Contributions may be made to Marine Resource Council, 3275 Dixie Highway Northeast, Palm Bay, FL 32905. Online condolences may be sent through www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

A P R I L

of Hobe Sound; daughter, Jenny Dunning of Watertown, Mass.; sister, Florence Dunning Savage of Laurens, N.Y.; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.


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Real Estate

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N E W S W E E K L Y

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – March 29-April 4

Address 1830 Cayman Rd. E 436 Fiddlewood Rd. 1911 Mooringline Dr., #D 1700 Ocean Dr. 2115 Via Fuentes 2175 Seminole Shores Ln. 1491 Smugglers Cove 1480 Ocean Dr., #2 D 1538 Sabal Ct. 1815 Mooringline Dr., 3H 600 Riomar Dr., #12 5151 Hwy. A1A, #104 5601 Hwy. A1A, #308-S 109 Park Shores Cir., W #39 5100 Hwy. A1A, #72H

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

3515 Savannah Pl. N Windsor 11/28/11 $2,485,000 3/29/12 $2,200,000 Windsor Properties Betsy Hanley Windsor Properties Betsy Hanley

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1253 Island Club Sq. W Island Club Riverside 3/17/11 $820,000 3/30/12 $815,000 Norris & Company Susan Hart Prudential Sterling Properties Rae McCabe

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1830 Sandpointe Ln. E Sandpointe 8/31/11 $719,000 3/29/12 $650,000 Norris & Company Jane Schwiering Norris & Company Bob Faller

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

826 Banyan Rd. Vero Beach Estates 2/6/12 $595,000 4/3/12 $565,000 Shamrock Real Estate Corp. Christine McLaughlin Vero Beachside Sales-Rentals Al Benkert

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2063 Autumn Ln. Seasons 4/26/11 $619,000 4/2/12 $555,000 Norris & Company Jane Schwiering Norris & Company Jane Schwiering

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1070 Reef Rd., #205 Galleons Condo 5/4/10 $450,000 4/2/12 $425,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Erika Ross The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Erika Ross

Subdivision Summerplace Veromar Pointes Sea Cove River Mews Condo Seminole Shores Smugglers Cove South Cove Condo Sea Oaks Harbour Side West Bayou Condo Vera Cruz Condo Robles del Mar Park Shores Pebble Beach Villas

List Date 1/24/09 8/3/11 10/16/11 1/14/12 8/17/11 1/26/12 9/1/11 2/21/11 2/14/12 11/5/10 9/5/11 8/23/11 2/8/12 9/5/11 11/16/11

List Price $469,500 $475,000 $415,000 $399,000 $399,900 $359,000 $359,000 $339,000 $199,900 $198,000 $175,000 $200,000 $169,000 $175,000 $168,000

Sell Date 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/29/12 4/3/12 3/29/12 3/30/12 4/2/12 3/30/12 3/29/12 3/30/12 4/2/12 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/30/12

Sell Price $412,000 $395,000 $375,000 $365,000 $357,500 $345,000 $330,000 $300,000 $179,000 $170,000 $165,000 $165,000 $159,500 $159,000 $146,500

Listing Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Beverly DeShay Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Jane Johnson Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Joan Chesley Norris & Company/Debbie Bell Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Lange Sykes Norris & Company/Debbie Bell Seaside Realty of Vero Beach/Mac Thompson Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty/Fran Smyrk The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Daina Bertrand Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen Cliff Norris Real Estate/Cliff Jr Norris Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty/David Ashcroft

Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Christine Hughes BREC Properties, Inc./George Nagy The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Stephanie Elliott The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Terri McConnell Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Sharon Raphaeli Real Living All Florida Realty/Christopher Young Norris & Company/Bob Faller Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty/Fran Smyrk The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Daina Bertrand Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Christine Hughes Daley & Company Real Estate/Sally Daley NMLS/NMLS AGENT Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Bob Dion Vero Coastal Homes/Allan Grieve

Mainland Real Estate Sales – March 29-April 4 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Address 1639 Victoria Cir. 13680 87th St. 6566 35th Pl. 1320 Village Sq. S 105 Harbor Point Dr. 5245 Sapphire Ln. SW 2365 Little Eagle Ln. SW 4195 12th St. SW 1045 33rd Ave. SW

Subdivision Victoria Island GH Homewood Addition Oak Chase Pointe West South Village Harbour Point Diamond Lake Falcon Trace Shady Oaks Grovenor Estates

List Date 1/2/12 8/24/11 3/17/11 1/9/12 7/6/11 12/7/11 10/8/10 1/2/12 8/9/10

13380 Old Dixie Hwy. N Other 2/1/12 $499,000 4/4/12 $475,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty Roger Fox RE/MAX Riverside Becky Boncek List Price $349,000 $299,900 $288,000 $295,000 $299,000 $257,600 $265,000 $249,000 $219,000

Sell Date 4/3/12 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/29/12 3/31/12 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/30/12 3/30/12

Sell Price $320,000 $290,000 $288,000 $285,000 $277,000 $260,000 $258,000 $235,000 $216,000

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Listing Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Stacey Clawson RE/MAX Crown Realty/Sean Prescott Laurel Agency, Inc./Dennis Larner Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Megan Raasveldt Pelican Island Properties LLC/Henry Madsen RE/MAX Classic/Bill Carroll Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./George Prescott Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Deborah Lyon Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB/Malissa Bellavigna

6400 Lily Ln. Victoria Plantation 10/7/11 $399,900 3/29/12 $395,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Scott Reynolds Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Don Frederick

Selling Broker/Agent Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Joan Chesley Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Joseph Schlitt Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Suzanne Leffew Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Megan Raasveldt Beneduce Realty, Inc./Arlene Velasco NMLS/NMLS AGENT Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Suzanne Leffew Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Deborah Lyon Real Living All Florida Realty/Lesa Talbott-Darnell


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Vero Beach News Weekly Issue 54

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