Issuu on Google+

FORUM  CALENDAR  SPORTS

 Battle brewing at Beachland ElementaryPage 3

20 26 33

TO ADVERTISE CALL MARTINE FECTEAU 772.696.2004 MARK SCHUMANN 772.696.5233

Inside

T H U R S D A Y



A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2



V O L .

2 ,

I S S U E

1

Let freedom sing Children raise their voices at the Concert for World Peace at Community ChurchPage 12

Magnificent motor cars The Vero Road Rally Magnifique brings out racing royalty for a good causePage 14

STAFF PHOTO

Hundreds of children were on hand to celebrate the 53rd Vero Beach Recreation Department Easter Egg Hunt held on the beach last Saturday.

Fun at the Forum An irreverent look at the Roman Empire in ‘A Funny Thing Happened‘Page 27


ot

r. R

ichard Hu

We strive for Excellence while creating and maintaining your smile

2275 20th Street Vero Beach, FL 32960

(772) 562-9025

Sports Dentistry, In-House Laboratory, Aesthetic Dentistry, Dentures

Aesthetic Dentistry and Extreme Makeovers, Dentures and Partials, Dental Implants, Extractions, Same day Porcelain Crowns and Fillings

Dentistry for the WHOLE family!

D

Dental Implants, Same day Porcelain Crowns and Fillings, Sports Dentistry, In-House Laboratory, Aesthetic Dentistry and Extreme Makeovers

Dental Implants, Extractions, Same day Porcelain Crowns and Fillings

You’re not just helping one... You’re touching 58,000 lives in Indian River County. COMPREHENSIVE. RESPONSIBLE. ACCOUNTABLE. When you choose to support United Way, you do not have to decide between helping children, families, seniors, or individuals in crisis. We hold ourselves and our partner agencies to the higest standards of accountability, making the best use of all the community’s resources.

USE YOUR POWERS FOR GOOD. LIVE UNITED. GIVE TODAY. 772-567-8900

GIVE TODAY! www.unitedwayirc.org


gCQTH dO8=

3

!

oMN\HU\N e\NYXJIu k#v#u o#v#

dTP pM\NNTYXIu k#v#

A (:-8) %&85>@&) ,. 5!& yPXJTZ\N xM\JY :$ #&8<-5:=:".

A (:-8) %&85>@&) ,. 5!& yPXJTZ\N xM\JY :$ #&8<-5:=:".

A sXQQMEu yPXJTZ\N *+-)&<. :$ #&8<-5:=:".

A /:=4;5-8. *66:+>-5& 78:$&66:8' 0;>2&86>5. :$ 9>-<>

A ?&==:1' *<&8>+-; 3:+>&5. $:8 9:!6 348"&8.

A sXQQMEu yPXJTZ\N *+-)&<. :$ #&8<-5:=:".

A ?&==:1' *<&8>+-; 3:+>&5. $:8 #&8<-5:=:">+ 348"&8.

A ?&==:1' *<&8>+-; 3:+>&5. $:8 9:!6 348"&8.

eX[\IHT\N **9#}OO#%*/!

bXJM xX\ZU **9#**O#**O9 EEE#dwvXJP\HMQMVC#ZMP

sMJH hTXJZX **9#/(/#(/(/

N E W S W E E K L Y

hJMHXZH HUX qX\QHU MW ^MGJ eRTN ETHU fXVGQ\J tD\PI [C \ )%&"$ '#"!(*#$ vXJP\HMQMVTIH

B E A C H

CONTINUES ON PAGE 4

V E R O

said Principal Carol Wilson. “Cars are lined up outside of the school and buses cannot enter and leave the property.” Students are allowed to ride the bus if they live more than two miles away from the school. However, with a major road like A1A, many parents think it unsafe for students to walk to school, increasing the number of students who arrive by car. The number of students attending Beachland has grown along with the population of Indian River County over the last 50 years. The school was originally built for students living on the barrier island, but over the years Country Club Estates, Gifford, the Fingers, and the Palms have been added to Bea-

!

the pick-up area on the east side of the school. All students would use a new entrance that winds through the hardwood hammock. The current bus loading area would be relocated to the current pick-up area on Mockingbird Drive. Buses would enter the school from a new driveway just north of the current entrance. According to Andreas Daehnick, certified arborist with Intreage LLC, only 21 hardwood trees out of the 2,795 trees in the 25 acre site would be affected. Nineteen of those trees are unsound and need to be removed. The plan includes the addition of 18 live oaks and 8 foxtail palm trees to offset the trees that need to be removed. “This is an issue of student safety,”

2 0 1 2

Beachland Elementary School, hidden in a beautiful canopy of trees at the northeast end of the Barber Bridge, has become the focus of residents’ ire over a proposed plan to alleviate traffic congestion at the school. At issue are 21 oak trees that planners say would need to be cut down to allow for a new entrance to the school that has increased in student population since being built over 50 years ago. That increase has led to traffic backups on Indian River Drive, Beachland Boulevard and Mockingbird Drive as parents drop-off and pick-up their children from school. For many local residents the so-

lution is not to cut down trees that are part of one of the few remaining maritime oak hammocks, but to put tighter limits on the number of students that attend Beachland, one of the top schools in Indian River County. Traffic congestion at Beachland is not a new topic. Creating a larger school bus loading area and relocating and increasing the size of the school entrance with a larger student pick-up area was initially broached in the school district’s 2007 five-year capital plan. However, each time plans are discussed to make these adjustments, residents living near the barrier island school adamantly voice opposition to the school board’s solution. The current proposal eliminates

5 ,

BY STEPHANIE LABAFF VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A P R I L

Residents irate over proposed traffic changes at Beachland


4

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

LOCAL NEWS

STAFF PHOTO

Traffic congestion at Beachland Elementary as parents arrive to drop off and pick up their children has been a subject of concern dating back to 2007.

BEACHLAND FROM PAGE 3

chland’s roll call of students. The current enrollment is at 600 and is slated in the future to reach 750 students. With the potential for the student population to increase, the current traffic issues would also be exacerbated.

Last week nearly 100 residents turned out for the community meeting at Beachland, hosted by the Indian River County School District. The community’s response to the proposed traffic plan was a resounding “no.” The two most prevalent concerns voiced were the impact the project would

have on the fragile ecosystem in the hardwood hammock and the high number of students attending the elementary school. Since the meeting, Phyllis Frey has been busy collecting signatures and enlisting the aid of other residents “to insure the protection and preservation of the woodland.” Her plan involves having the Indian River Land Trust designate the area as a nature preserve in perpetuity. Frey was instrumental in saving MacWilliam Park from the proposed boathouse construction, which was recently denied by the Vero Beach City Council. Lise Bowles, a Date Palm resident, has even set up a Facebook page to help get the word out. She has posted a photograph of a bobcat that wandered out of the oak hammock and into her backyard, which borders the wooded area under discussion. Beachland alumnus Vicki DeGroat has sent two children through the school and will have another attending in the near future. “The school has gotten too big. If we reduced the number of students to a more manageable size, there wouldn’t be a traffic issue. Too many students are receiving waivers from out of zone as it is,” she said. Former Beachland PTA board member Kim Willson stated, “My children had a great experience at

Beachland; it is a beautiful, spiritual school. I love the trees, but people need to be more concerned about the children. No elementary school should have that many students.” Florida currently leads the nation with the highest enrollment level per school according to a 2009 report published by the Florida Department of Education. Many suggestions were given at the meeting to avoid disturbing the hardwood hammock and keep child safety at the forefront. The main focus was to reduce school enrollment and out of zone waivers, but it was also suggested to have parents park under the Barber Bridge and walk their children across Indian River Drive. However, that solution would block the emergency vehicles from leaving the fire station and could create a different set of safety issues. Facilities Cooridinator Susan Olson told parents “we hear your concerns and will look into other possibilities. The school is overcrowded and undersized. We have traffic conflicts. We need to plan for future expansion and safety.” Olson has since met with Principal Wilson and Vero Beach Public Works Director Monte Falls. They reviewed other options but would not reveal what was discussed until after presenting their findings to the School Board.


5 ! A P R I L 5 , 2 0 1 2 !

Zs]o_n_cd] kcfo jd ]ko fcc_jdl^ 0O"!u!!! ~ /)}#")9 a\HXJWJMNH LMMQ UMPX : [M\H YMZR rTNNC kTHZUXQQ **9#}9%#}}""

sZo^cfo _j[o_ [joZ^y fo__j]] j^gsdp 0"||u|!! ~ wGIHMP [GTQH XDXZGHTFX UMPX MN #(( \ZJX h\GQ sJMPP\NN }9%#"|%#!%%%

k\]qkjd^cd j^gsdp cqosdn_cd] qcdpc 0(||u!!! % 6+7+#;< -2! A;;7' 9 4@(&' ,351 4$ =+7*>& 2!70;02 oXWW kTHZUXQQ **9#}"|#|}}"

rcs]o_^ p_osf kcfoy 0"O!u!!! ~ gGXXN$I wMFX })9)9# eHXLI HM TNQXH : MZX\N nTHHC h\JJ **9#|*|#!((*

cqosdja\o | dm k\]qkjd^cd j^gsdp 0"9!u!!! ~ }[J 4 YXNu 9#" [\ rMJVXMGI MZX\N FTXEI x# xMCY **9#9%(#*%"()rMGR\IMF **9#9%(#*%9(

ro_f\ps qg\r|[o_c rosqk 0"/"u!!! ~ xX\GHTWGQ q\PTQHMN ZMGJHC\JY UMPX vX[MJ\U lCMN **9~}9%~%**"

s]_j\f|d k\]qkjd^cd j^gsdp 0//|u!!! % ?;7#&;04 ;)&+<$7;<2 .7( A8 9" );7<&78 k\JC a\NBXJ **9#}"|#|*!(

]ko fcc_jdl^- [o_c rosqk 0/"!u!!! ~ eMQ\J UHY LMMQ UMPX MN %)94 \ZJX MW [X\GHC hTZRXHH **9#(/}#99//)jCIHJMP **9#""|#%%/O

qs^]sZsX qc[o|[o_c rosqk 0/}"u!!! ~ t\IH MW y%y TN \N MZX\N HM JTFXJ NXTVU[MJUMMY n\HUC jCIHJMP **9#""|#%%/O

FlColdwellBanker.com nK9O cNNKQO= ]C ^O?9O XC: btfi xtywq +-856-5% &"9(# D#'G wLJp ik )D

**9~"(*~%%O%

btfi xtywq 206-5% $3#,8#)0 &"9(# @&9' wLJp ~D~

**9~9}%~/OO!

o9O?68LO?O XC: ZTD; ]C rO

j# qcdwqpjeij 206-5% $3#,8#)0 &"9(# @GG+ qp wLJp ~D~

**9~/(/~*!!*

xftbyfv -h\J\YTIX' 206-5% $3#,8#)0 &"9(# '*' 48"/! 7,#5.#1 25%8-6-5/8(

}9%~|"%~}}!!

etxyedpyj +-856-5% &"9(# D9G# ipkp wLJ

**9~"O|~****

N E W S W E E K L Y

[o_c rosqk cqosdn_cd] 0(O"u!!! ~ x\NR MENXY MZX\NWJMNH UMPX ETHU LJTF\HX YMZR q\HHXJ **9#*((#"O|")kGQQXJ **9#|%}#%"|(

B E A C H

[o_c rosqk j^gsdp kcfo 0*||u|!! % /2&:4 $7;= 2!& *&+)!' =+#<@B)&<2 @4>+<( !;=& eU\JMN aTNTNVXJ **9#*%}#/(!9

V E R O

^c\]k jdpjsgsd]jq _j[o_n_cd] 0%u%!!u!!! ~ hJTPX pNYT\Q\NHTZ QMZ\HTMN MN \ #* \ZJX QMH lTNY\ wMQXP\N }9%#"/}#(!}}


2 0 1 2

!

6

LOCAL NEWS

City responds to FPL’s offer to purchase utility VERO BEACH -- The city of Vero Beach has returned to Florida Power and Light its draft of a proposal to purchase Vero Electric for $100 million plus other considerations. FPL made its initial offer last May

to buy the city’s electric utility for the $100 million price tag and added in the assumption of pension liabilities for workers, transmission upgrades and paying the city rent of $1 million for five years as it decommissioned the current power plant on Indian River Boulevard

Neurosurgery including minimally invasive and complex spinal surgery

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

BY IAN LOVE

Fabio Roberti, M.D., FAANS

V E R O

Board Certified Neurosurgeon Medical Director, Section of Neurosurgery Board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, Dr. Fabio Roberti specializes in neurosurgery, including minimally invasive and complex spinal surgery.

Fabio Roberti, M.D.

Prior to joining IRMC in spring 2011, Dr. Roberti was assistant professor and co-director of skull base surgery in the Department of Neurological Surgery at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Dr. Roberti earned his medical degree from the University of Modena in Modena, Italy, where he also completed a residency program and served as faculty. He completed both his neurosurgery residency training as well as a fellowship in cranial base surgery and microneurosurgery at George Washington University Medical Center. Dr. Roberti is an active member of many national and international organizations including the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the North American Skull Base Society.

Dr. Roberti specializes in the following areas: • Neurosurgical oncology • Minimally invasive and complex spinal surgery • Neuroendoscopy • Neurotrauma • Radiosurgery • Skull base surgery Medical Associates A subsidiary of Indian River Medical Center

Neurosurgery & Spine Surgery

Most insurance accepted. Now accepting new patients. Call 772.563.4741 to schedule an appointment. 1. 040 37th Place, Suite 201 | Vero Beach, FL | 772.563.4741

The Right Care Right Here

bringing the total package to about $135 million. In the city’s response, crafted by its transactional attorneys with input from city officials, it did not increase the $100 million price tag despite an appraisal from its own consultants that the utility could be worth as much as $184.9 million. “What I have said all along is that the sale price is not the issue,” said City Manager Jim O’Connor. “What is important at the end of the day is how much cash you have after you wheel and deal the power supply contracts we have, after you start paying rent on the power plant and all those ancillary items we have. I have always looked at the selling price as just one of multiple factors that add or depreciate from the system.” The power contracts that the city is on the hook to pay to the Orlando Utility Commission and the Florida Municipal Power Authority still remain as the major hurdles that must be settled before serious negotiations can begin on selling the rest of the system. Those contracts the city has committed to pay as part of earlier deals it made to purchase wholesale power to provide city and county customers have been estimated to be as much as $12 million a year over at least the next five years. The problem the city is facing is that there are a limited number of buyers who might be interested in making a deal. Further adding to the problem is that the state of Florida is experiencing an energy glut and those old deals are not as attractive as current market prices from other sources. Both FPL and city officials have said they should know within the next six months if it will be possible to strike a deal for those contracts and if a sale can go forward.

In the meantime, O’Connor said it is prudent to keep the purchase agreement negotiations ongoing as it could take months of back and forth between the two parties to reach terms on those outstanding issues. “Once we have those power contracts settled we need to be ready to go,” O’Connor said. “Just the definition of terms is critical and we have something like 190 of those to go through.” The key change the city made in its counter proposal to FPL was to remove a $4 million penalty if either party walked away from the table without striking a deal. “We thought that was just too high and brought it down to zero,” O’Connor said. The city has also asked FPL to justify the $100 million price tag it has put on Vero Electric. To date the only documentation the city has received on that point has been a PowerPoint presentation by FPL. “Our transactional attorney has asked that they justify the price before a final deal is made,” said Councilman Richard Winger. “We want to know how they came up with that and if it should be more.” The response also removed up to $15 million in warranties FPL was asking if assets turned out not to be worth what the city claimed. “Our position was that you have had enough time to figure that out on your own,” Winger said. The other major addition the city put into the document it sent to FPL was to begin to lay out how employees would be handled. The document included who FPL would hire, how the pension would be handled, how vacation and sick pay would be paid and how unfunded medical costs would be managed.


A P R I L 5 , 2 0 1 2

Now from the mid $600s! (includes lot)

!

Uncompromising Quality At An Unheard-of Value.

7

! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

The best new home value on Vero’s barrier island. • Financially sound new ownership

• Homes by Palm Coast Development; Vero Beach’s premiere design builder • 10-Year structural warranty and easy custom design/build process • One of the last ‘new home’ communities on Vero���s Barrier Island • Gated community located on A1A, walk to the Ocean

• 2 Clubhouses - 2 pools, tennis, fitness center, and 4 guest suites • Planned marina

Better built, Better value, Better lifestyle.

7777 North A1A, Vero Beach, FL 32963 | RiverClubVB.com | 772.231.3818 The on-site sales office is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and by appointment.


8

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

LOCAL NEWS

Council may implement 25 mile per hour speed limit in city FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- The Vero Beach City Council on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to make the speed limit on residential streets 25 miles per hour. Council will hold a public hearing and could take a final vote at its next meeting on April 17. The speed limit would not apply to county, state or federal roads such as State Road A1A, U.S. 1 and other major arteries in the city. However, City Manager Jim O’Connor said he is looking at trying to reduce the speed limit of State Road 60 going through the downtown area. State law sets the maximum speed limit for residential

streets at 30 mph, but municipalities are allowed to set lower limits. City Attorney Wayne Coment said that Fort Pierce already has the 25 mph limit along its residential streets. Many communities within the city have already petitioned the city for the 25 mph limit. The lower limit was earlier approved in areas throughout the barrier island portion of the city. Various mainland neighborhoods have also asked for the lower speed limit, and by imposing the speed limit citywide, it will save the city the cost of polling each of the neighborhoods, noted O’Connor. Also at the meeting Council will continue to look at creat-

ing a tax increment financing district in the downtown area between the railroad tracks and 20th Avenue. City Attorney Coment said a draft ordinance could be ready for council review by the first meeting in May. Councilman Jay Kramer has been discussing the idea of the economic development zone with downtown businessmen for some time. Under the proposal, tax revenue generated above the amount produced in the base year would go into the fund. For instance, if in the base year $1 million was produced from taxes in the district, but in the next year an increase in

property values produced an additional $10,000 in tax revenue, then the $10,000 would go to the fund. Coment noted that the district’s creation would not increase any property owners’ taxes within the zone. Property values have been falling lately, so it might take some time before any substantial amount is generated for use in the proposed district. Unlike a Community Redevelopment Area, only city tax revenue will be affected, although Kramer said there has been discussion with county officials about allowing increases in county tax revenue to be captured by the district as well.

Applications now being accepted for Summer 2012. • Impressive 18-Hole, Championship Golf Course • Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary • A Blend of Vibrant Sporting, Social & Dining Activities

Call 567-3320 and ask for Jacki to learn about Summer Membership opportunities. 800 30th Street • Vero Beach, FL 32960 • www.vbcountryclub.com


9

LOCAL NEWS

Make this Mother’s Day special by giving her a gift that shows your love.

Board Certified • Over 20 years of Dermatology Experience • Private Practice Miami • Voluntary Professor, Dermatology University of Miami • Cleveland Clinic of Florida

Dr. Ben D. Emerson & The Emerson Center for Oral Health is pleased to offer your Mom a Smile Makeover! Whether she needs a Total Smile Makeover including crowns, veneers or dental implants or to establish and maintain her periodontal health...we provide it, and at a special Mother’s Day rate.

American Academy of Dermatology • American Society of Dermatologic Surgery American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery

General

• Facial Rejuvenation • Acne, Rosacea • Botox • Eczema • Restylane • Problems of the • Collagen skin, hair & nails • Lasers Surgical • Sclerotherapy • Skin Cancer • Peels • Skin Care Call for an Appointment

... Trust your skin to a Dermatologist

Mother’s Day Luncheon May 10th · 11 a.m to 1 p.m.

Limited seating ~ Please R.S.V.P.

(772) 569-9700

$)(#"&' %('!(# $%

562-SKIN (7546) 787 37th Street, Suite E-250, Vero Beach

To learn more, please attend our

for ol~s wz~sjw

3730 7th Terrace, Suite 301, Vero Beach TCN2688683

www.emersonddsmd.com

Offering the latest advancements in oral health, state of the art periodontics & implant dentistry for over 25 years

N E W S W E E K L Y

Larry Landsman, M.D., P.A.

B E A C H

a Smile

V E R O

The Perfect Gift For Mom...

Cosmetic, Surgical & General Detection & Treatment of Skin Cancer

Cosmetic

meters’ data to control people’s lives. “Smart meters are, by definition, surveillance devices,” Vero Beach resident Phyllis Frey said. “My biggest concern with the smart meters is privacy. If there is a chip, I guarantee you it will be turned on at some point,” said Commissioner Bob Solari. Others who came to the podium claimed smart meters have caused electric bills to jump in other locales after electric utilities monitored peak hours of energy consumption and charged more when demand was highest. Garner said smart meters, once activated in 2013, will only be able to show the amount of electricity a customer is using — not the particular appliances being used.

!

DERMATOLOGY

Company spokesman Bryan Garner said use of the meters will end monthly visits by meter readers, reduce power outages and allow customers check their electric use online. The company started distributing the meters last fall in Martin County and now is doing so in Indian River in an effort to add nearly 258,000 Treasure Coast customers to the grid. Utilities across Florida and the U.S. are changing to this new technology as part of a governmentsubsidized effort aimed to develop a more energy-efficient electric grid. Among the concerns speakers raised were radio frequencies aggravating neurological problems and fears of the government using the

2 0 1 2

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -The Indian River County Board of Commissioners conducted two hours of debate on Tuesday over health and privacy concerns from customers against the use of “smart meters” by Florida Power and Light. The dozen speakers persuaded the County Commission by a 4-0 vote to call for opt-out clauses once the utility starts activating “smart meters” in people’s homes. “You should be able to choose whether you want to opt out of these meters or not,” commission Chairman Gary Wheeler said. “You should at least have that choice because you have no other options.” Unlike most businesses, he said, FPL has a monopoly. Its customers

can’t just switch to another power company if they don’t want the new technology. The vote instructed County Attorney Alan Polackwich to draft a resolution asking the Florida Public Service Commission to order FPL to develop a mechanism for residents to reject smart meters. However, Polackwich informed the commissioners they can’t order FPL to do anything. All they can do is register their support or opposition. “You have no legal authority to mandate or regulate FPL on this matter,” he said. Only the PSC has that power, he said, and that panel has already embraced smart meters. FPL started installing the new digital electric meters in October.

5 ,

FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A P R I L

Unfortunately commissioners have ‘no legal authority to mandate or regulate FPL on this matter’

!

County wants FPL to let customers opt out of ‘smart meters’


10 !

Vero Beach’s pension predicament growing larger In response to a recent report by the city’s pension consultant, Rocky Joyner of the Segal Company, Councilwoman Tracy Carroll observed that the city’s current contribution to its general employee retirement plan now equals the total revenue the city raises each year in property taxes - just over $4 million. Of the $4.1 million the city will pay into its general employee pension fund in the current budget year, $3,187615 is required to at least gradually close the gap in

what the city now has in pension fund assets compared to what is required to meet its obligations to existing and future retirees. Despite the fact that taxpayers are being assessed several million dollars a year to shore up the city’s pension fund, the unfunded pension obligation continues to grow. The city’s annual contribution to the pension fund is up from $3 million to $4 million since 2006. Still, the unfunded liability in the plan has more than doubled during that time from $15,541,839 to

City of Vero Beach Employee Retirement Plan 5,000,000

Affordable Full Service Animal Hospital 4,000,000

MEET PIA PIA

We’ve been through so much together. From routine well visits to emergencies – Florida Veterinary League’s award-winning, experienced and compassionate team of veterinary professionals are here to help your pet in times of sickness and in good health.

Bring This Ad to Receive a FREE Toenail Trim. (772) 567-3070 1360 US Highway 1, Vero Beach (Across from Crispers & 12th Street Publix)

1,000,000

0

$2,866,308

2,000,000

$2,588,917

As seen recently on Ch. 5 News, Pia Pia is a Dogs For Life Certified Hearing & Service Dog trained to sense owner’s moods and contact emergency responders

$2,254,128

Client & Owner, Jim & Dawn Taylor

$2,656,451

3,000,000

$3,008,235

1 SPAY, 13 VACCINES, 22 DOSES OF FLEA & HEARTWORM PREVENTION, POPPED PATELLA (KNEE CAP) UN-POPPED (SURGICALLY)

$3,347,010

Service Dog and Man’s Best Friend

$4,115,761

Employer Contributions Up From $1,472,200 in 2002 to $4,115,761 in 2011

$2,020,280

A P R I L ! N E W S W E E K L Y B E A C H V E R O

Just as the federal government is running budget deficits and accumulating debt, the nation’s cities and counties have racked up by some estimates $1 trillion in unfunded pension obligations. Many cities and counties, and even some states, are systematically and knowingly underfunding pension plans, either by making generous deals with employee unions, or by using unrealistically high assumptions for investment returns. For example, last year Vero Beach’s general employee pension fund (which is separate from its plan for police officers) had a 1.6 percent return on investments

compared to an assumed return of 7.75 percent. Actuarially, the fund grew just .32 percent. Set against growing obligations, the plan fell another $4.1 million behind and currently has $33 million in unfunded obligations. While California may be ground zero for the mounting crisis in unfunded government pensions, there are more than a few culprits in Florida, including Vero Beach. While the total bill Vero Beach is passing along to future taxpayers is small compared to MiamiDade, Jacksonville and other big counties and cities, in relative terms the percentages are not far off. Vero Beach is squarely in the middle of the pension predicament picture.

$4,050,000

BY MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

$1,472,200

5 ,

NEWS ANALYSIS

2 0 1 2

LOCAL NEWS

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011


11

LOCAL NEWS

(up from 14.88% to 22.06% of payroll)

Unfunded Liability $33,666,164. As a percentage of payroll, the city’s contribution to the pension fund is now 21.8 percent compared to just 14.88 percent in 2002. Despite the fact that the city’s payments to the pension fund have more than doubled in real dollars over the past 11 years, the city’s unfunded pension liability continues to grow. Even more concerning to some is the city’s slow and steady march toward the tipping point where it will have more retirees drawing benefits than active workers paying into the fund. Currently 281 retirees and beneficiaries are receiving $4.8 million in benefits. Additionally, 88 former city employees are entitled to, but are not yet receiving benefits. These 369

UP 117% retirees and vested former employees are at least partially funded through investment returns and contributions made by and on behalf of 405 current city workers. If and when the city sells its power system to Florida Power and Light, its employee count will drop by at least 100, leaving the retirement plan with more beneficiaries than active employees. This, some suggest, is a recipe for a pension fund crisis not unlike the ones facing some of Florida’s major municipalities. Particularly since the pension fund has some $33 million less in assets than is necessary to meet future obligations, a decline in the city’s work force means taxpayers are going to have to shoulder still more of the burden of bringing the fund into balance.

Choose from our selection:

N E W S W E E K L Y

2006 vs. 2011

Enhance the link, they’ll love you for it!

B E A C H

UP 48%

V E R O

Contributions as a Percentage of Payroll

UP 180%

!

Annual Contributions to Retirement Plan

and Grandparents are Grandchildren’s link to the past.

SIEMENS • STARKEY PHONAK • OTICON RESOUND • REXTON UNITRON ALL MAJOR BRANDS

Save On Starkey Starkey is the sister company of Audibel™

2 0 1 2

G

. ure.. G t e r r A a u n n F d e r paren child To The k t d n i ’ s L n a r

5 ,

UP 39%

City Salaries

A P R I L

2002 vs. 2011

!

“WE BRING PEOPLE BACK TO THEIR FAMILIES” “BACK TO THEIR LIVES”

GimNo Ev micks

er!

Best Hearing Aids at the Best Price$ Guaranteed! 2NOWHEAR@GMAIL.COM

FREE Hearing Screening

“Where honest service & technology come together.”

Call today! 772-978-9880 2110 5th Ave., Vero Beach (just off Miracle Mile, on west side of Golf Roundup)

OPEN: Monday - Friday • 9AM-4PM

FREE Hearing Screening

“I’ve been wearing hearing aids for over 30 years, and I know what they can and can’t do! You will always get it straight from me.” JAMES CESIRO/OWNER Board Certified • State Licensed

A Hearing Aid Will Not Restore Normal Hearing, Nor Will It Prevent Further Hearing Loss. The Patient And Any Other Person Responsible For Payment Has A Right To Refuse To Pay, Cancel Payment, Or Be Reimbursed For Payment For Any Other Service, Examination, Or Treatment That Is Performed As A Result Of And Within 72 Hours Of Responding To The Advertisement For The Free, Discounted Fee, Or Reduced Fee Service Or Treatment.

TCN2688701


COMMUNITY NEWS

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

12

=I $H 6 : ,- -IK *# ") $L AI /( KK IK #H +

V E R O

STAFF PHOTO

The Atlantic Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chorale and the Atlantic Schola Cantorum and Orchestra took part in the Concert for World Peace March 30th at the Community Church of Vero Beach.

F 5&(.7E?A (&A7E87:0 F @.8&: A? A6B+EA" (&A7E87:0 3E7! A&3 'E?C.8& 9C68 F ;:.C #=) , D91 7&878 F =?A%86:"E*.C >&:E?(?A7.C 7!&:.>0 F #E"E7.C 2%:.08 0!#*# $,&* %++,3.'/#.' 3( % 4"-14) .,' % '*#%'/#.'2

/& .**&>7 B?87 EA86:.A*& .A( !.4& >.0B&A7 >C.A8<

5EI *%-$IH %-D(666

!-HH-&( -L) %(-F+

=I6 :-IK") 86 AIKK#H. 9I6 4&:?(&A7.C@@$-!?7B.EC<*?B

3J3B >J0: 102<<0 M /<25 A<C?:. ;8 3>'BJ

77>@77G@444J


13

COMMUNITY NEWS

! A P R I L

City Easter egg hunt another big success

5 , B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

to o d c h il d r e n k over

icto

e

N u rs G r a v i ty

L e t us

redraw your lines

.

Trust the husband & wife team Advanced credentials. Beautiful results.

PLASTIC SURGERY & MEDISPA

V E R O

of p a

as d br lp dde a can he ri

STAFF PHOTOS

even V

!

Not

Sick

2 0 1 2

The City of Vero Beach Recreation Department hosted its 53rd annual Easter egg hunt on the beach in front of Mulliganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last Saturday. Hundreds of children, friends and family were on hand for the event. Volunteers prepared over 3,000 eggs that were collected by children ages infant to 9.

Andrea Hass, MD 6)'&4 32&".-24 %(0"0',+),)1/ %(0"0',+.7 #,'$".7 5!&12)* Brian Hass, MD 6)'&4 32&".-24 #,'$".7 5!&12)*

.=DE >?CH$A "H< I<C:EA* 1<> "H< GH!3> ?4:E >H 6=:E $=>? >?E# HC $=>?H<> AH#E HD >?E#( )C( +C=4! 74AA ?4A ?E6FEG >?H<A4!GA HD F4>=E!>A $=>? 1CE4A> 4<B#E!>4>=H!* 6=D>A HC CEG<I>=H!A( .E> ?=# ?E6F "H< I?4!BE "H<C I<C:EA((( AH "H< 6H:E >?E#&

Call 561-624-7777 today for a cosmetic consultation. 2/'5 @9, +6:G(* 8<=>E 5-' % @46# +E4I? 94CGE!A* ;. 00/5' $$$(?4AAF64A>=IA<CBEC"(IH#


14

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

COMMUNITY NEWS

V E R O

B E A C H

The Vero Road Rally Magnifique to benefit the Sun Up Center featured 27 vehicles taking part in the rally which covered 40 miles from from Vero Beach to Sebastian.

STAFF PHOTOS Boaters and water enthusiasts were treated to a beautiful weekend to check Emergency, transportation, construction, agricultural and large equipment out all the latest product lines at the Vero Beach Spring Boat Show at Riverside vehicles were all part of the show at the Touch a Truck festival held at the fair- Park. grounds on Saturday.

Applications for a Limited Number of Summer Golf Memberships are Now Available to a World Class Vero Beach Private Golf Club

INDIAN RIVER CLUB

Superior Auto Service Family Owned and Operated “Old Fashioned Service” Imports & Domestics Superior Auto Service employs ASE Master Mechanics to provide diagnostic and repair services on all American, European & Asian vehicles. We install premium and original equipment parts only!

Family - $1,000 · Individual - $800 · May 15 through October 15, 2012 Contact Christine Papke at 772.770.0757 or visit www.indianriverclub.com

We Specialize in Mechanical Restoration of Classic Cars, including: Mercedes Benz Rolls Royce Muscle Cars

Owner Bill Marion, a certified ASE Master Mechanic, has been repairing vehicles in Vero Beach since 1987 at the same location.

1212 23rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32960 (772) 569-1410 www.verobeach.com


15

FEATURE

A P R I L

If an animal is adoptable it will always have a home

!

Humane Society continues care for unwanted animals

5 , 2 0 1 2 ! V E R O B E A C H

BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Every year, about 7,000 dogs, cats and other animals – both domesticated and wild -- are surrendered to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County. The organization provides food, shelter and medical care to the animals, as well as exerts great effort to match them with their rightful owners or a new adopted home. While the local situation does not compare to the 50,000 animals that are surrendered to the Humane Society in Miami, for instance, it could be much better if there were more stringent local spay and neuter laws. “Two unsterilized cats and their offspring can produce 420,000 cats over a seven year period,” said Janet Winikoff, the Humane Society’s director of education. Since 1953, the Humane Society has provided a vital service to the community by extending care to animals that are unwanted, abused

or found roaming the streets unattended. In Indian River County, both dogs and cats are required by law to be on a leash when outside. Animal Control officers help ensure public safety – and the safety of the animals – when they apprehend animals on the loose. On average, the Humane Society takes in between 30 and 50 animals a day, with the facility housing 200 to 300 animals at any given time As a donation-based nonprofit, “the Humane Society contracts with the county to care for animals brought in from within its borders,” said Chalmers Morse, the executive director since 2009. Morse, who was a volunteer with the organization since 2000, served as president of the board of directors for three years before assuming his position at the helm. Located on 38 acres at 6230 77th Street, the Humane Society has CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Volunteer Ruth Wingate socializing with a cat at the shelter.

Phone system at a Mega Bank. Êb?O== ( NC? oDMHK=Lƒ

Êb?O== + NC? QLOQIKDMƒ

Phone system at Marine Bank.

Erika Wright

Michelle Griffin

Denise Finizio

When you’re tired of pressing buttons and deciphering options to get to a live person, call Marine Bank & Trust Co. A real person will be happy to answer your phone call.

Live Local. Buy Local. Bank Local.

fOGRO? npjq

iM ESW oFO[MX{

cD ;LO fTKDHTDP`

!"( rOTQLHTDP rH9Pm [O?C rOTQL- ng +<*%+ ""<|<+(|%%((

(#!B \m^m ( [O?C rOTQL- ng +<*%B ""<|""z|%"(+

888mGT?KDORTDITDP;?:=;mQCG

N E W S W E E K L Y

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Humane Society volunteer Sherry Shively gives Boo a hug.


16

HUMANE SOCIETY FROM PAGE 15

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

FEATURE

V E R O

The original Humane Society building was opened in 1952 on Commerce Avenue near what is now the Kmart building.

HUMANE SOCIETY FROM PAGE 15

two buildings on the property with 48,000 square feet of air conditioned space. Each month, the Humane Society bills the county for the animals surrendered to the shelter at a rate of $75 per animal. “That amounts to about 13 percent of the entire $2.5 million budget,” said Morse, detailing the cost of food, medical care and a myriad of programs to meet the needs of the community.

The Humane Society is “an open admission shelter; no animal is ever turned away,” said Winikoff. As such, the Humane Society takes in domesticated and wild animals, which for the most part are transported to wildlife refuges across the state, as well as livestock. “There is a national standard that determines if an animal is adoptable or unadoptable,” said Ilka Daniel, the organization’s director of animal protective services. If an animal demonstrates behaviors that are compatible with hu-

mans, and is in good physical health, it is “an adoptable animal that will never be euthanized, no matter how long it has been at the shelter,” said Daniel. Healthy animals that are socially adjusted do not get euthanized. Ever. On the other hand, animals that are not adoptable – those with “severe behavioral and medical conditions, we euthanize,” said Daniel. “We cannot risk allowing an aggressive or diseased animal to go out into the community.” The goal of the Humane Society is

to reduce the overall number of surrendered animals not through euthanasia, but rather through adoption and sterilization. About a year ago, the Humane Society presented a proposal to the Board of County Commissioners outlining how to implement sterilization incentive programs. “Animals not sterilized are three and-a-half times more likely to bite,” said Daniel. Communities that have implemented price differentials for regCONTINUED ON PAGE 18

LET ME RENT YOUR PROPERTIES! All Phases of Dentistry

SUSAN BELMONT POWELL REALTOR® Rental Specialist

1225 US Highway 1 (next to Publix and Steinmart)

DAVID WALSH &ASSOC!

Vero Beach, FL 32960

REAL ESTATE Julie A. Cromer, mer, DDS

800 20th Place, Suite 5, Vero Beach, FL 32960 · Office (772)234-3450 · verorents.com

772 - 5 62 - 5 0 51

John S . Cairns, DDS

www.cromerandcairnsdental.com


17

A P R I L 5 , 2 0 1 2

READ THE PRESS JOURNAL

!

GAIN PERSPECTIVE

! V E R O B E A C H

Seven days a week the Press Journal’s experienced team of reporters and editors offer a comprehensive and balanced report of the news of Vero Beach and Indian River County.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Many of the members of the Press Journal news team, including editorial page editor Larry Reisman, have been covering local news for decades. Every member of the Press Journal’s team of reporters and editors is invested in the community. Reisman, a 27-year Press Journal veteran, is currently president of the Indian River Soccer Association, and has coached youth sports for 25 years.

“A responsible newspaper is the conscience of its community. We’re not here to control the agenda, but to insure people play by the rules, and to hold them accountable when they don’t. We report the stories and offer the commentary that can help lead to a better community.” Editorial Page Editor, Larry Reisman

FOR CONVENIENT HOME DELIVERY CALL (866) 707-6397 Subscribe today and receive a $10 gift card to Publix, Walgreens or the Village Beach Market This offer is for non-subscribers who have not received home delivery within the last 30 days.


V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

! A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

18

FEATURE

HUMANE SOCIETY FROM PAGE 16

istration of sterilized pets and unsterilized pets have been successful in reducing the number of surrendered animals. Moreover, the Humane Society recommended the commission implement anti-tethering ordinances. An unsterilized dog tethered on a chain will inevitably try to escape to protect its territory. “It’s instinct,” said Daniel. “Tethering conditions a dog to be violent, and that makes it unadoptable.” She claims that by establishing incentives to sterilize and by making it illegal to tether, the number of biting incidents can be reduced 10 percent in the first year. Unfortunately, the county commissioners never responded to the organization’s initiatives. John King, director of emergency services for the county and who ultimately oversees the county’s animal control department, says the proposal for a tethering ordinance was too broad. “If you have a no-tethering law in place, does that makes leashes illegal?” asked King, expressing concern that “if people can’t tether their animals, they’ll just leave them in a kennel all day.” For years, the Humane Society and the county have worked closely together to educate people about safety and responsible pet ownership. And anyways, said King, “who would enforce it? If we were writing citations for everyone who tethered their dog, I would need more people.” The five animal control officers currently employed by the county “are kept busy handling one complaint after another about nuisance animals,” said King. In the meantime, the Humane Society opened its veterinary wellness center to the public in January, offering vaccinations, physical exams and sterilization procedures at discounted rates. “If something is wrong with the animal, we send it to another veterinarian in the county,” said Winikoff, explaining that they rotate from a list of all registered vets. “The wellness center is strictly for assessing wellness.” The organization previously conducted vaccination clinics once a quarter and would administer some 200 injections in one day or over a weekend. “That takes a lot of coordination,” said Morse about the strain and stress on his staff. Now, with regular clinic hours, “we are spaying and neuter-

Rachael Powell and Devon Rymer at the Humane Society with the family’s newly adopted dog, Lola.

ing more animals than ever.” In addition, for the past two years a food bank program has enabled pet owners who have lost their jobs or who are dealing with reduced incomes to obtain food for their animals at no cost. “The program has helped keep over 2,000 animals in their homes,” said Morse, pointing out that the facility is versatile enough to accommodate any number of incoming animals. Sixty years ago, the Humane Society was located on Commerce Avenue by the railroad tracks, behind Kmart. In 1978, the organization purchased a piece of property by the airport. The plan was to renovate the original building and construct a second edifice, but as work was being done on the existing structure, the land was condemned. “It turned out, the building was on a Navy landfill from World War II,” said Morse. Bolstered by an active board of directors, currently led by President Fritz Spitzmiller, and an enthusiastic corps of about 750 volunteers, the organization raised about $8 million to build the current facility. The cost of adopting animals from the Humane

Society varies, depending on the size, age and breed of the animal. Included is the amount it costs to sterilize the animal. Senior citizens who adopt a pet in its senior years can do at a flat rate of $50. And, sometimes there are special adoption events for cats that have been at the shelter over a year. The local cat population is three times that of the local dog population. To help meet the annual budget, the Humane Society operates two thrift shops located at 4445 20th Street in Vero and 441 Sebastian Boulevard in Sebastian. Several fund raisers are also planned throughout the year, including the major event, Cause for Paws held at the Vero Beach Museum of Art this past weekend. Recently, a partnership among the Humane Society, the local chapter of the Red Cross, animal control and the school district established a pet-friendly emergency shelter at Liberty Magnet School. During the 2004 hurricane season when the county was hit by back-to-back hurricanes, there were no emergency shelters that accommodated pets, forcing pet owners to remain in their home at considerable peril, or to relinquish their pets for boarding at the Humane Society. “Now, registered pets and their owners will be able to stay at the shelter together,” said Morse. When that is not possible, the Humane Society has volunteers who foster care pets for limited time periods. The organization also has a strong community outreach component, helping to educate people about responsible pet ownership and dog obedience. Free seminars provide information such as the pet trust seminar on April 10 from 10 to 11 a.m. Speakers will include Vero Beach attorney Jennifer Peshke, who will discuss legal assurances that companion animals receive proper care after the death of their caretaker. Tim Swift, the director of development for the Humane Society, will explain state pet trust laws and the Humane Society’s Pet Guardian program, which gives pet owners an opportunity to put their wishes in writing about the extended care of their pet. The seminar is open to the public and refreshments will be served. For more information, please call 388-3331 ext. 26 or visit online at www.hsvb.org.


2 0 1 2

! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

by whether or not they perform Kegel exercises. Kegel exercises are named for the doctor who coined the term, which describes a deliberate contraction of the pelvic floor muscles to keep them toned and in shape. “When these muscles are strong enough, you begin to engage other muscles that help lift the ligaments,” said Lorraine. “The exercise feels kind of like you’re sucking in your stomach and zipping up tight pants, using muscles deep inside your core.” Lorraine agrees with Zipper about the trauma incurred by the pelvic floor during childbirth. “When the pelvic nerves are stretched 13 percent, they can spontaneously recover,” said Lorraine. “But, even an easy childbirth that lasts four hours with no major straining results in 33 percent stretching of the nerve, which is beyond injury. The nerves will not spontaneously recover, and it is only a possibility with treatment. And that’s an easy childbirth.” Other factors that predispose a woman to suffer pelvic floor dysfunction are hysterectomy, obesity, and pelvic trauma from accidents. In addition to the therapies described above, Zipper’s assessment may require surgical procedures to rejuvenate specific pelvic areas, as well as help gain control of the sphincter muscle. “We take a holistic approach to women’s pelvic floor health,” said Zipper. “The majority of cases are treated without surgery.” Zipper Urogynecology Associates. 880 37th Place, Ste. 104, (321) 674-2114, www.ZipperUrogyn.com.

5 ,

VERO BEACH -- Zipper Urogynecology Associates, a woman’s health practice based in Melbourne, opened a second office in Vero Beach last month after determining about 20 percent of its patients had been coming from Indian River and St. Lucie counties. Dr. Ralph Zipper, an urogynecologist who received his training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Hospital, treats women for pelvic organ prolapse, incontinence and other gynecological problems using a variety of STAFF PHOTO therapies, most of them nonsurgiZipper Urogynecology Associates opened just a month ago on 37th cal. Place. Staff includes, Dr. Sherri Lorraine, senior physician assistant Although Zipper has been in Jennifer Lange and Dr. Ralph Zipper. practice for 15 years, the field of urogynecology is relatively the organs – bladder, rectum, uter- discomfort,” said Zipper, who has unknown and the private issues us, intestine and vagina – can ac- trained more than 1,000 urologists shrouded in embarrassment are tually protrude, causing pain and and gynecologists in the treatment only beginning to be spoken incontinence. of stress incontinence. about in public. There are curDamage to the pelvic floor in Last year, Dr. James Raders, anrently no other urogynecologists women happens most commonly other urogynecologist, joined Zipin Vero. during childbirth, but also from per’s practice, bringing with him “Urogynecology is a sub-special- repetitive lifting, chronic disease 20 years of treating conditions rety of gynecology that deals with a and surgery. lated to pelvic organ prolapse and very narrow spectrum of symp“We are the number one center urinary incontinence. toms that include women with in the world for interstim therapy,” “Dr. Raders was voted the best bladder problems and pelvic organ said Zipper, referring to the im- physician for women two years in problems,” Zipper said. plant that he uses for bladder in- a row in Minneapolis,” said Zipper. About 10 percent of women continence that works “the same Also on staff are Sherri Lorraine, in the U.S. seek medical help for way a pacemaker works for your a physical therapist with a dual pelvic floor dysfunction, said Zip- heart.” doctorate degree in her field and per, with as many as 25 percent of Known as a leader in non-drug Jennifer Lange, the senior physiwomen just living with the symp- based therapy for overactive blad- cian assistant. toms of inadequate pelvic fitness. der disease, Zipper is the inventor “Physical therapy is not a new The pelvic floor consists of the of painless laser therapy which is concept, but it is new to urogymuscles, ligaments, nerves and currently in clinical trials for over- necology,” said Lorraine, who is connective tissue that helps sup- active bladders. a board certified women’s health port and control many of the The therapy entails laser treat- specialist, meaning she only treats body’s organs, keeping them firmly ments over a two week period, women. in place against the pull of gravity. with each treatment lasting seven Lorraine said the number one When the support structure is minutes. problem facing women in their stressed, weakened and stretched, “There is no pain, no burning, no pelvic floor health is determined

A P R I L

LISA RYMER

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

!

kOTH;L Women’s health: an in-depth look at a private matter

19


!

20

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

Community Forum EDITORIAL

Vero’s pension plan: trying to sustain the unsustainable Imagine receiving a bill for services rendered many years ago by someone you don’t know for the benefit of someone else you don’t know. It’s not much of a stretch to suggest that this is what happens when the city’s taxpayers are told they must pay an additional $3 million a year into the city’s pension fund for the next 14 years to make up for an unfunded liability that has grown to $33 million. The reasons why Vero Beach, like many other cities and counties, is in a pension predicament are several. First, negotiators have regularly awarded exceedingly generous defined pension benefits, while using unrealistically high assumptions for investment returns. Second, there has been a general and pervasive unwillingness on the part of leaders to face the harsh reality of the nonsustainability of taxpayer funded defined benefits pension plans for government employees. After trying to deal with budget issues nearly as severe and sys-

temic as those of Greece, former California Governor Arnold Swartzenegger said, “California simply cannot solve its budget problems without addressing government employee compensation and benefits.” The award winning body builder and actor turned politician could just have easily have been speaking about Vero Beach as the state of California. Certainly the private sector has seen a dramatic shift from pension plans that guarantee employees a certain percentage of their salaries. Typically, government pension plans are based on formulas that factor in length of service and the average of some specified number of the years of an employee’s highest earnings. Unlike government, most businesses today offer employees defined contribution plans. These plans more accurately identify the company’s obligation to employees. In contrast, defined benefits plans such as the one Vero Beach offers its employees, create an un-

determined, uncontainable, and ultimately unsustainable obligation on future taxpayers to fulfill commitments made decades earlier. Anyone interested in learning more about options for municipal pension reform will find instruc-

EDITORIAL

School Board needs to put on its listening ears While the Indian River County School Board is obligated to taxpayers to operate each school as efficiently as possibly, it has an additional responsibility to be a good neighbor. You might think that at some point during the 18 months when school board employees and consultants were developing plans to improve ingress and egress at Beachland Elementary School they would have reached out to the city and to the affected neigh-

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing well by doing good.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

tive a report written by Florida State University professor Randall G. Holcombe for the James Madison Institute, a Tallahassee based think tank. Holcombe’s article, “Protecting Florida’s Cities through Pension Reform” can be found at jamesmadison.org.

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

borhood for input. That did not happen. In fact, city officials described themselves at “blindsided” when plans were rolled out recently to alter the Beachland site to both improve existing traffic flow and position the school to accommodate increased enrollment from 600 to 750. If the school board is listening to the residents in the neighborhood of Beachland Elementary, it is receiving a clear message the woodlands around the school are important and should not be disturbed; at least not without more consultation. The school board might have the authority to proceed without seeking more input from concerned stakeholders, including the city and residents living near the school. But to march ahead without making the effort to listen with an open mind to alternatives would be inconsiderate and irresponsible.


21

COMMUNITY FORUM

a member of the Jewish people.  Just as I turn the earlier version in a different way, I can see a powerful humility in these words as well.  Adam, the first human, was clay gathered by God and given the divine breath of life.  Even as there is something eternal and higher in Adam and his descendants there is also some of the earthly, imperfect in us.  We do make mistakes.  We are finite.  While we may have visions of the ideal and be able taste Shalom, we have to work at it and heal our brokenness.  Even in prayer when we look for the best in our world and ourselves, we can also be empowered by looking for perspectives that illuminate our struggles and rough edges.

! V E R O

B E A C H

The power of compassion can create magic RYMER REASON LISA RYMER

When I went back to school and got my master’s degree in business administration, I specialized in marketing with a focus on nonprofit organizations. The books all say the best way to raise funds for a worthy cause is to engage the populace, make it the most fun group to be a member of, and host events that meet the various needs donors seek to satisfy. There is no other local organization that has achieved this as swiftly, completely and with such grace as the Hibiscus Children’s Center. From the moment the organization germinated in Jenson Beach, a heartfelt response by a group of women to the tragic death of a young boy, a momentum of com-

passion began to gain force, growing in numbers, changing legislation, bursting forth in full bloom with a multimillion dollar village here in Vero LISA RYMER Beach for the children to call home. What kind of divine alchemy have the women of Hibiscus tapped into where they can turn the most horrific incident into an entire community built on love, safety and healing? Compassion is a powerful emotion, where a person empathizes with another’s suffering and is compelled to not only share the pain, but do something to make it stop. And when that compassion, expressed through action, is received

by an open heart, the magic that happens is really extraordinary. Studies have shown that people who practice kindness produce 100 percent more DHEA, a hormone that counteracts the aging process, and they produce 23 percent less cortisol, called “the stress hormone,” which wreaks havoc on our bodies. I mean come on, just look at the women in Hibiscus. Beautiful. Stylish. Feminine. Strong. Passionate. Nurturing. Determined. Puhlease. You know they got some secret ingredient going on. What’s the common denominator? Compassion. The thing about compassion, and it’s the most important part actually, is that both parties, the giver and the receiver, must be willing to participate. If the person who is suffering is not

willing to share the burden with the one expressing compassion, the magic doesn’t happen. The world doesn’t get changed. And we continue to pump cortisol through our veins. But in a child, even one who has been hurt, the heart is still open. April is Child Abuse Awareness Month, bringing into focus some of the problems, programs and preventions that are currently underway at a local level, as well as at a national level. Child abuse is a widespread problem that is passed from one generation to the next, where scars are deep and victims become abusers. Unless it stops. And that will take a little bit of magic. The kind that comes from a compelling desire to help and an open heart willing to receive. It’s a powerful combination.

N E W S W E E K L Y

vails.” This is where the pessimism and dark humor slips in. If I read this payer with that meaning in mind, I am thanking God for the right/responsibility to wrestle/struggle with God. I am actually praising God for the opportunity, like Abraham before the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, to be in conflict and argue with the Divine.  In modern Jewish life there are often non Jews who are present at our worship.  Since it did not make sense for them to praise God for being Jewish, I have offered an alternative to this text: Thank you God for making me human/Adam.  Given that the prayer is offered in Hebrew, during Jewish worship, I feel that while being inclusive of others it is a powerful declaration of my choice to live my life and identify as

2 0 1 2

urgy an alternative that I often use.  In the daily liturgy there is a list of morning blessings/everyday miracles.  Near the beginning of this list is a prayer declarRABBI ing: Thank God MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ for making me a Jew.  With these words, She’asani yisrael , one is thanking God for a chance to pray in Hebrew or powerful/fun/interesting holidays or eating matzah balls with religious fervor. This is the optimistic, fun stuff in Jewish religion and culture.  There is another layer in the wording. The word Yisrael, literally means “one who wrestles with beings divine and human and pre-

5 ,

Many of us have heard the folk wisdom of looking at the cup half full versus half empty.  There is also a Rabbinic saying that we have to have one piece of paper which declares: I am but dust and ash, while we have another piece which reminds us that “the whole world was created for my sake.”  Humility and ego vie constantly for our attention. When we say blessings we tend to be optimistic.  We don’t usually pray for gloom and doom, for things to not turn out well.  Either we feel blessed and want to be appreciative or things are not going well and we are offering prayer seeking improvement. One day, I had a strange thought as I started to parse out prayer from morning lit-

A P R I L

BY RABBI MICHAEL BIRNHOLZ

!

Praying from the pessimistic point of view


^CQKTH u gKNO=;6HO American Cancer Society celebrates a beautiful night BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Will & Tatiana Dyer, Tony Donadio, Lynn Hall and R.J. McMillan

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

22

Scott & Molly Hurley, Emmett & Margaret Anne Evans and Andrew & Andrea Molloy

Chip & Jennifer Watson and Laura & Rick Hurley

More than 200 guests showed up to raise money and share stories for the American Cancer Society gala “Belle Notte” at the Quail Valley River Club. The glittering event was more than just a successful party that raised $134,000 to support the programs of the American Cancer Society.   It was also a time when many felt comfortable sharing their personal cancer experiences. Wesley Davis said he and his wife, Tonya, go to any function which supports the effort to find a cure because both of them had lost loved ones to cancer.   “Whenever you hear the word ‘cancer,’ you feel it inside you,” said Davis.   Dr. Rob Callery has lost every member of his family to the disease. Because of that, attending the event and being the current ACS Chairman has a more personal relevance to his life and fuels his need to help. “The ACS means hope to me,” said Dr. Callery.  “I have seen my family all pass away but I have also seen many success stories too. More Nobel prize winners are in the field of cancer research than anything else.” Co-chair Julie Norris is a fiveyear survivor of breast cancer.  “I think everyone in this room has been affected by cancer in some way,” she told guests. Money raised from the gala will fund patient services, education programs and cancer research.   To reach your local organization, call 772-562-2272.


23

SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

! A P R I L 5 , 2 0 1 2 ! V E R O B E A C H

Going North? Kay Brown, Cathie Callery, Dr. Rob Callery and Cindy O’Dare

Follow the Newsweekly online each week at verobeachnewsweekly.com It’s convenient and it’s free!

Scott & Mitzi Owens with Nancy & Bill Curtis

N E W S W E E K L Y

Seated: Dr. Hugh & AnnMarie McCrystal, Bob McCabe and Alma Lee Loy Standing: Ellie McCabe, Dr. Michaela Scott, Tonya & Wesley Davis


2 0 1 2

!

24

SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

Humane Society Cause for Paws party held at Vero Beach Museum BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Sweet puppy faces with tails wagging greeted guests on the walkway to the Humane Society’s Cause for Paws event held at the Vero Beach Museum of Art. The event was held in the Museum’s enclosed Atrium and was a resounding success. The venue added to the ele-

gance of the gala and the items available for auction were definitely upscale and in demand. Bonnie Spitzmiller and Sheila Marshall were this year’s cochairs. Guests nibbled on hors d’oeuvres and sipped wine by the fountain as they mulled over their optimum bids. A new feature of the event was an electronic hand-held bidding device which made

one group comment that it was more like playing a game than actually spending real dollars. However, for the Humane Society the money was very real and much needed. “If all of our patrons see the loving care the staff gives to each animal as they came in,” said Fritz Spitzmiller, “then we know they will be generous.

We hope to bring in excess of $200,000 from this event to covering operating expenses and programs.” Maria Whittle said the animals gave so much to people that they were worth it. “Pets help your outlook on life and deserve love,” she said. “They teach us not to take the small things in life so seriously with just one wag of their tail.”

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Jean Gray, Kitty Sutro, Sarah Shropshire and Jean Shropshire

Maria Ramirez & Echo, Janet Winikoff & Coco, Tonya Martinez & Joey and Anselmo Aponte & Tater

Seth Milliken, Wheatie Gibb, Annie Milliken, Bob Gibb and Fritz Spitzmiller.

STAFF PHOTOS


SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

25

! A P R I L

Service Directory

5 ,

##7( =< ':' 8'#)6 / 8!'+)6 (-%" &2

!

1*#, $>A% D'2" F3= , E%8 . E6"'4 0>;C>58*

V E R O

2$&!$0 /($$3 )-%'$

?5)1 $!5;)!& B@98;5)8>; /5A+.G8@%99#5-)>A).98<@%8

B E A C H

Marlene Evans Putnam finds a friend in Coco

2 0 1 2

7) ).".+

>@ 5#+0,) 4&++7#+ *)3&1$.

Lynn Zanotti is greeted by Echo outside the gala as husband Allan Zanotti looks on

N E W S W E E K L Y

Emergency Service 7 Days AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING Sales 路 Service 路 Repair

Co-Chairs for Cause for Paws 2012 Bonnie Spitzmiller and Sheila Marshall

Certified Technicians 路 Maintenance Agreements Indoor Air Quality We Service All Makes & Modelss NO

(772) 778-4026

OVERTIME FEES!

845 7th Ave. #6, Vero Beach, FL 32960 960 www.alanac.com Licensed & Insured. Lic. #CAC1814730

wltyjtf : qtyldqptf oced rid tyeptf@

pSGG [< \BOS5 mB> r pGNSCN> = jNSG:KJN> \BFB>>B7

(4$"/+"#6 ,/+)-"#6 1"-*45"#6 2./#"#

Colby & Michelle Servos with Rebecca & Brad Emmons

"";l;!"l%##; %%%34//.&'*4&"!-"+*.-'*4./3$.0


26

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

Community Calendar ! Love of Literacy Luncheon

EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market

With Martyn Lewis “the Walter Cronkite of the BBC,” Vero Beach Country Club, 11:30-1:30, $50. 772-778-2223.

From 3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772480-8353.

! Indian River Neighborhood Assoc.

EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association’s

Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-532-2455.

Luncheon honoring retiring County Commissioner Gary Wheeler, CJ Cannons, Vero Beach Airport. $15. 772-794-4762.

FIRST FRIDAY ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll

APRIL 13 ! An evening with Marc Kaufman

Art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-2991234.

The Washington Post editor, at Harbor Branch Johnson Education Center, 7 pm, autographs and book signing, $10/$15. 772-242-2559.

THROUGH APRIL 30 ! Sculpting Nature

! Salvation Army Benefit Dinner

30 large scale art pieces in McKee FILE PHOTO Botanical Gardens, 350 S US1, $5Jake Owen will perform his Hometown Benefit Concert April 7 at the Citrus $9, 772-794-0601. APRIL 5 ! “Wine, Women and Charm”

To benefit the Homeless Family Center, Mandarin Restaurant,  398 21st St., 6-10 pm, music, shopping & Asian cuisine, $25$30. 772-567-5537 x326. APRIL 7 ! Jake Owen

Hometown Benefit Concert, VBHS Citrus Bowl, 8 pm, for tickets call 866-333-7623. Call 561394-9190 for more information. ! “Find Your Fashion” Event

Vero Beach Outlets, 9 am-2 pm, Children’s Home Society accepting donations for chances for $5,000 prize trip noon-2 pm. 772770-6097. ! Traditional Chinese Mo Ku

Brushwork Demo by Marcy VonKohorn, free, 11 am-2 pm, Darby Fine Art, 1902 14th Ave., THURSDAY, APRIL 5

Bowl. The concert had been scheduled as part of Mardy’s Tennis & Jake’s Music Fest last December, but was postponed due to rain.

proceeds of demo art sales go to VBAC Scholarship Fund. 772480-0491. ! Oceanside Business Association

Free Beach Concert Series, Ocean Dr., 5:30-8:30 pm, live band, food, refreshments, family fun. 772532-7983. ! HabiTrot to Higher Education 5K

South Beach Park, 5K and a children’s Bunny Hop.  HabiTrot $20$25, Bunny Hop $10, supports Habitat’s scholarship fund. 772562-9860 x209. APRIL 8 ! Easter at McKee Botanical Garden

Noon-2 pm brunch at The Cafe, Easter Bunny visit, $5 children, $9 adults. 772-794-0601. ! Navy League Dinner

5:45 p.m. Heritage Center, 2140

FRIDAY, APRIL 6

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

Oak Harbor Clubhouse, speaker will be Major League’s Jim Kaat, cocktails at 5 pm. 9780265 x104. ! Fairy Festival

14th Ave., $28, all welcome, speaker Frank Partell author of modern naval fiction. 772-231-6101.

At McKee Botanical Garden, 350 US1, maypole dance, fairy houses, children’s activities and costume contest, free-$9, 11 am-2 pm. 772794-0601.

APRIL 11 ! Taste of Vero

! Gymnastic Registration

By Oceanside Business Association, 5-8 pm, over 350 tastings by local restaurants paired with shops along Ocean Dr., $35/$65. 772-321-7952. ! Homeless Family Center

Spring Luncheon, Bent Pine Golf Club, speaker Lauren Chapin from “Father Knows Best,” $50.  772567-5537 x326. APRIL 12 ! “Big Composer, Little Pieces”

Chamber Concert, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 7 pm, $10$12. 772-564-5537.

SUNDAY, APRIL 8

For Recreation Dept., Leisure Square, 3705 16th St., 8 am. 772770-6500. APRIL 15 ! Art in the Park

Vero Beach Art Club members’ exhibition, Humiston Park, free. 3000 Ocean Dr. 772-231-0303. APRIL 16 ! Newsboys Concert

7 pm, VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., $20/$35 in advance, $5 more at door. iTickets.com. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

MONDAY, APRIL9

TUESDAY, APRIL 10

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11

87O 66O

85O 65O

80O 65O

80O 63O

79O 63O

81O 64O

81O 65O

Winds: SW 5 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: W 12 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: NNE 13 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: NE 19 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: ENE 15 mph Chance of Rain 10%

Winds: S 10 mph Chance of Rain 0%

Winds: SE 10 mph Chance of Rain 10%


27 !

Arts | Entertainment

• Do you enjoy great musicals performed by Broadway actors? • Isn’t it amazing you are within 15 minutes of a Broadway experience for nearly half the cost? • Do you enjoy side-splitting laughter

oU^ T] }QTb_LbJ>P \Q^bO^PO ]bQ`^P* ~ yNUUJ j[ZU\ wbSS^U^_ TU O[^ gbJ OT O[^ yTQNV ZP WZ\[O* ]bPO)Sb`^_* LZOOJ* ZQQ^M^Q^UO bU_ TU^ T] O[^ ]NUUZ^PO VN) PZ`bWP ^M^Q LQZOO^Up y^bONQZU\ b PO^WWbQ `bPO* ZU`WN_ZU\ {bUb kUJ_^Q 5rbK }ZbWJPOT`X% bU_ lTU gZPZUPXZ 5yQbUI sZ^aXZU_% ]QTV j[^ nQT_N`^QP L[T Q^ONQU ZU O[^ QTW^P T] nP^N_TWNP bU_ rbQ`NP sJ`NPp

rNPZ` • sJQZ`P aJ kO^S[^U kTU_[^ZV }TTX aJ }NQO k[^M^WTM^ • sbQQJ x^WabQO

PHOTO SUPPLIED

“A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” will be performed at the Riverside Theatre from April 12 - May 6.

oS^UP ~SQZW D9 nQ^P^UOZU\ kSTUPTQ

kSQZU\wZWW kNZO^P aJ rbQQZTOO

**9#9}%#(||! if fpbtfepvtdqtydft#wik }9"! fpbtfepvt hyfn vfpbtu btfi xtywq

N E W S W E E K L Y

a>BO9PJCL r>:J<:JP oJ>NP:B>, rGGNC ol pB>CNGG

B E A C H

CONTINUES ON PAGE 28

V E R O

hJMYGZTNV xTV wTHC dUX\HJX WMJ \ rJX\H eP\QQ dMEN@

that come at the audience at nearly super-sonic speed, the slapstick Forum is not for the faint of heart or for those who take a while to “get it,” but the musical is pure fun and perhaps would have been more accurately billed as “Outrageous Things Happened on the Way to the Forum.” Inspired by the farcical works of ancient Roman playwright Plautus, the rollicking comedy tells the story of a slave named Pseudolus (whose name means “faker”). Played by Dana Snyder who returns to Riverside after his memorable performance as Max Bialystock in last season’s production of

!

Sondheim, is a bawdy farce, full of folly and fun. The show was a Tony Award-winning smash on Broadway following its 1962 opening starring Zero Mostel as well as during its 1972 revival starring Phil Silvers and a 1996 second revival with Nathan Lane in the lead role. The musical comedy plays on the Riverside Theatre stark Stage from April 12 through May 6 and is sponsored by Marriott Springhill Suites and the theatre’s generous Patron Producers. With its large cast and a crazily convoluted plot that involves mistaken identities, love and lust, puns and double-entendre lines

2 0 1 2

You know it bodes well for a comedy musical when only two days into rehearsal a meeting with

two cast members cracks you up. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, written by Bert Shevelove and Larry Gelbart with music and lyrics by Stephen

5 ,

BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A P R I L

Mayhem and mirth set for Riverside Theatre


28

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

RIVERSIDE THEATRE FROM PAGE 27

The Producers, Pseudolus wants to gain his freedom and hopes to do so by helping his young master Hero (Skyler Adams) win the love of a virgin named Philia (Lauren Zakrin) who lives in a house of some repute next door. Standing in the way are Hero’s parents Senex (Stephen Berger), a henpecked Roman wed to the shrewish Domina (Karen Murphy) and Marcus Lycus (Ron Wisniski), the “purveyor of courtesans” living next door who has already promised Philia to Miles Gloriosus, a bombastic Roman army officer. Caught in the middle of the high jinks is Hysterium (Patrick Richwood), Senex’s chief house slave whose name rather aptly describes his hysterical nature. Other cast members include Chet Carlin as Erronius; Caitlin

McGinty as Gymnasia; Jarid Faubel as Miles Gloriosus; and Judy Cornell, Jessica Bircann, Bethany Flora, Nikko Kimzin, Xander Chauncey and Ryan Dietz. The technical crew includes Ken Clifton (musical director); Ray Klausen (scenic designer); Randal Parsons (assistant scenic designer); Eric Haugen (lighting designer); Maytte Martinez (assistant lighting designer) Craig Beyrooti (sound designer) and Kyle Atkins (stage manager). Theatre, TV and screen veterans Berger and Richwood took a break from their rehearsal schedule to speak with Vero Beach Newsweekly about the show. Berger, a Philadelphia native whose credits include Broadway stints in The Pajama Game, Into the Woods, the Dinner Party, True West, Laughter on the 23rd and more, has played on some of the

nation’s most prestigious stages including his role as Marcus Lycus in last spring’s production of Forum at the renowned Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn, NJ. Coincidentally, the role of Domina in that production was played by Beth McVey who just starred as Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn in the Riverside production of The Music Man. Richwood, a native of “beautiful downtown Burbank,” was raised by parents who met on a stage in San Francisco. At age 12, Richwood was “blown away” by a performance by French mime Marcel Marceau and went on to a career on stage and in film. He is perhaps best recognized as Dennis, the elevator operator in the film Pretty Woman which starred Julia Roberts and Richard Gere. Other film credits include Beaches and Armageddon. Both actors spoke in superlatives when describing the talents of the show’s director/choreographer James Brennan. “Brennan is himself an extremely accomplished Broadway comedian who has had huge roles. Having him as a director is confidence-producing for us,” Richwood said. “Jimmy has played (the lead role) Pseudolus twice. He comes with just great stuff,” Berger said. That sense about what “works” and what doesn’t is paramount to actors, both agreed. “Every actor is secretly a director in their (own) head. And his (Brennan’s) direction is always right,” Richwood said. “The best directors are ones really, really committed to telling the story and each role in the show is like steps of stones across a body of water to get you there.” “There is always a form of collaboration and mutual trust and respect with him. When I knew Jimmy was directing the show, I said I want to be in this produc-

tion. He’s amazingly supportive,” Berger added. The fun and funniness of Forum provide a unique opportunity for actors, Berger and Richwood said. “Every line is funny. It’s what I love about this show. And then another line is coming and this is all growing right in front of your eyes,” Richwood said. Berger noted that traditionally, the character of Pseudolus and those who have played him, have been given unusual leeway in expanding the role. “Pseudolus is allowed to drive off course and just go and even ad lib,” Berger said. Such unfettered freedom in a role is contagious to other cast members who develop a sense of cohesive timing and response to the rollicking fun. “We’re not doing Ibsen,” Richwood said with an impish smile of delight. “You take that spontaneous combustion and Jimmy takes things to where they need to be to keep that bubble up in the air and not stop the story. There’s a rhythm.” “That’s the thing only live theatre can do,” agreed Berger. “The story goes at break-neck speed.” So why should theatergoers go see it? The actors didn’t hesitate to answer. “It works. It never fails for a good reason – it’s well-crafted, an audience pleaser and it really, really does its job,” Richwood said. “People know there in the midst of something real. It’s a party.” “Funny, funny, funny,” Berger added. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum performs at Riverside Theatre located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach from April 12 – May 6. Tickets are $36-70. Tickets may be purchased by calling the box office at (772) 231-6990 or online at www.riversidetheatre.com.


29 !

ALL

A P R I L 5 ,

Covering of Vero Beach

2 0 1 2 ! V E R O B E A C H

The neighborhoods that make up our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t settle for just a fraction of the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper from cover to cover.

T H U R S D A Y

Inside !

D E C E M B E R

How a city electric sale might impact yo

City of Ve

ro Beach

Electric Cu

stomer

2 0 1 1

Savings On El

Home w ith taxabl e value of $2 occupied 50,000 year roun using $3 d ,000 per year in electr ic Home w ith taxabl e value of $5 occupied 00,000 year roun using $3 d ,500 per year in electr ic

!

ectric (1)

1 ,

I S S U E

Property Ta

600

verobeachnewsweekly.com

ach loves its

u

x Increase

(2)

Traveling th

e

Artists from acr Art Trail studios to vis oss Indian River County itors !Page open their 27

$

375

700

$

750

500

$

1,500 Kicking of

$

1,200

$

1,500

Revelers comef the holidays ceremony at out for the annual tre Royal Palm Po e lig inte!Page hting 12

$

10,000

-0-

(1) Based on 20 pe rcent rate may vary. differential between (2) Proper the City of ty tax adju Vero Beac stment ba per cent h and Flo which is th se rida Powe e midpoin d on portion of ta Council as r & Light, xe t of projec a likely sc actual fig tions and s collected by City enario. ures based on of Vero Be figures Ci ty Manag ach and on an incre See stor y er Jim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Co ase of 75 on page 6. nnor pres ented to

!Vero Be

3 6

$

$

Business w value of ith taxable $1 using $6 ,000,000 ,000 per year in electr ic

V O L .

$

Home w ith taxabl e value of $1 occupied million 6 and usin months g $2,500 per year in el ectric

Non-profi t using $5 agencies 0,000 pe r year in el ectric

8 ,

Christmas P arade !Page

10

The Nutcra

Swing time ve cker renewed the Anne Mo rsion of the holiday cla rton Theatre ssi !Page 29 c coming to ! FORU M ! CALE 17 TO ADVE N DA R RTISE CA LL ! ENTE RTAINMEN 26 MARTINE FECTEA U 772.696 T 29 MARK .2004 SC HUMANN

772.696.52 33

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Because no community is an island


V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

30

ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

Treepile paintings on Entertainment Calendar display at Vero Museum COMMUNITY CHURCH OF VERO BEACH

Community Concert Series 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 April 15: Brevard Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 pm, $50 April 17: Chanticleer, 7:30 pm, $35/$15 students May 20: Spring Sing and Ring, Atlantic Children’s’ Chorale & Bell Ringers, 4 pm, suggested $15/$5

SUNRISE THEATRE

EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org April 19: Carrie Sue Ayvar, Florida Humanities Series, Free April 21: SoulFege, Jazz, benefits Academy for the Performing Arts music scholarship, 7 pm, $5-$15 April 29: “Forever Kitten”, A Father Knows Best Remembrance by Lauren Chapin, 5 pm, $25/$30.

RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Stark Main Stage:   April 12-May 6: A Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the Forum, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57-$73 April 9: Distinguished Lecture Series, Charlie Cook of the Cook Report, 4 & 6 pm, $65-$75 Second Stage: April 19-26: Bridge and Tunnel, 2 pm & 8 pm, $40 Comedy Zone: April 13-14: Johnny Millwater and Jodi White, 7 pm & 9:30 pm, $15 Children’s Theatre: Through April 15: Rapunzel and Me, the Muzical, 3/23, 7:30 pm, 3/24, 3/25, 4/1, 4/14 & 4/15, 1:30 pm, $10-$16 April 13-15: School House Rock, Ages 4 +, $5-$16

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Various Locations

321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org April 21: Rodgers & Hammerstein at the Movies, Trinity Episcopal Church, 7 pm, 2365 Pine Ave, $20

116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com April 13: Jimmy Thackery & The Drivers, 8 pm (Black Box), $30 April 18: International Dance Sensation, “Burn the Floor,” 7 pm, $55/$49 April 21: One Night of Queen, 8 pm, $45/$39 May 6: Ziggy Marley, Wild and Free Tour, 7 pm, $39

VERO BEACH CHORAL SOCIETY Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 772-494-5011 VeroBeachChoralSociety.org April 13 & 15: Songs of Spring, Concert & Art Debut, Men’s Ensemble Chorus with Music Inspired Art, $20 ($5/$10).  Reception & Concert on 13th at 7:30 pm; Concert on 15th at 3 pm, art on exhibition in Great Hall after concert.  Art auction April 27 at Northern Trust.  

PHOTO SUPPLIED

VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 3001 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-0707 April 21: Children’s Art Festival, 10-3 pm, music, art activities, free admission May 3: Warm Nights–Cool Music, Concert in the Park, Hard Bop Jazz with James Archer, $10

VERO BEACH OPERA verobeachopera.org 772-569-6993 Box Office:  772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org April 7: Live at the Met: Massenet’s Manon, noon, Majestic Theatre, $20-$25 April 14: Live at the Met: Verdi’s La Traviata, 1 pm, Majestic Theatre, $20-$25

SPONSORED BY '2*!

) 1 # # - $ ' $ + 12 2 ) -

/"(&,.0".%"( (",)#+. %$!.-#&#*' '*)#*'

Six Speakers · October-April

1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

Tom Nakashima at his desk in front of one of his treepile paintings. The free-of-charge showing of his work is on display at the Vero Beach Museum of Art through June 3 FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Tom Nakashima’s exhibition at the Vero Beach Museum of Art, “Cycle of Change: Tom Nakashima’s Treepile paintings,” has been fascinating patrons to the free-of-charge showing since opening in mid-February. The works are produced using the artist’s signature technique combining painting and collage. Nakashima’s technique is demonstrated in a video presentation that is also on view in the gallery along with his art. Nakashima spent 21 years making art in the urban environment of Washington, D.C. before deciding to move to rural Virginia. There he happened upon the gigantic pile of tree trunks and limbs that inspired him to create his first

treepile painting “Stewart’s Sticks” (on view in the exhibition). In these paintings, Nakashima brings out the power of natural forms to take on metaphorical meaning and become something beyond their usual meanings in everyday experience. He creates an almost magical fusion of subtle colors and textures with twisted, tangled, and knotted forms. The resulting art, like the artist himself, seems to combine the Western landscape tradition with an Eastern approach to natural subjects that seems almost religious. The resulting works of art are imaginative, technically accomplished, and beautifully symbolic. The show will run though June 3, 2012 at the museum’s Schumann Gallery.


pKDKDM

31 ! 5 ,

BY MARK JOSEPH

2 0 1 2

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

! V E R O B E A C H STAFF PHOTO

infused with habanera and jalapeño peppers and actually carried an advisory of “Hot” and “21 and over please.” Unfortunately, what was delivered was a plate of wings that were not so hot. The buffalo wings were very dry and aside from the sauce that did not have quite the heat as described, the only saving grace was the side order of ranch dressing and celery sticks, for an up-charge of seventy-five cents. With specialty burgers making up the majority of the items offered on the menu, some at our table had already chosen their favorite sandwich from the list while others decided on burgers with more interesting names and toppings. One interesting choice was the Mac and Cheese Burger with homemade macaroni and cheese. The burger was cooked as ordered and came with a generous scoop of house-made mac and cheese piled on top of an equally generous portion of ground beef. The burger was exceptional, but the fries were average and nothing special. I chose the Aussie Roo, which was a burger topped with an over-easy egg, roasted beet root, pineapple, bacon, lettuce and tomato and some-

thing called chili mayo. Even in finer restaurants it’s not always easy to get a burger cooked rare, however mine arrived cooked exactly as I requested. The burger was juicy and the fried egg, smoked bacon, pineapple and side of seasoned mixed vegetables gave this sandwich a brunchlike feel. Yet another burger selection at the table was the Big Blue, topped with bacon, lettuce and tomato and, of course, blue cheese. This burger was also cooked properly with fresh ground beef and included more than a fair amount of blue cheese crumbles. Two in our party opted for healthier choices; one ordered the Caesar salad with tenderloin and another companion ordered the fresh salmon with mixed vegetables. The grilled salmon was a simple presentation, small in portion yet big on flavor. The fish was freshly grilled, moist and tender and the size reflected the lunch price which was only $12. The vegetable medley was a mix of squash and zucchini, sautéed together with oil and spices and though not outstanding, the veggies compleCONTINUES ON PAGE 32

N E W S W E E K L Y

A group of friends and I were hungry and thirsty for a burger and a brew and we knew just where to go in Vero Beach. As you can probably guess from the name, BrewGrrs is a play on words of brew and burger and if you’ve not yet visited, the restaurant offers a large selection of both draft and bottled beer, many with interesting names and flavors. Opened just 16 months ago, BrewGrrs is the brainchild of Robert H. Cobun, an experienced restaurateur who, at only 24, opened his first restaurant in South Florida. BrewGrrs specializes in draft beer and burgers and we were told that in two weeks a brand new menu will be offered that will include even more interesting sandwiches and burgers. The restaurant is located on the corner of Indian River Boulevard and 21St street, in the old Modernage Furniture building, now known as Modern One. With its picnic table seating and multiple flat screen TV’s, BrewGrrs is purposely non-pretentious and completely casual. The bar offers several daily specialty draft beers and on the afternoon we visited, we were tempted by a Double Chocolate and a Holy Mackerel draft. The names and descriptions sounded interesting, so we opted for one of each. The Holy Mackerel draft beer was a brew with a dark golden color, bold flavor and not a hint of bitterness. The Double Chocolate draft was a dark, rich beer with a thick, foamy head and as the name implies there was a distinct flavor that reminded us of the delicious confections found in gourmet chocolate shops. Both brews were just the ticket for the burgers that were soon to follow. Lunch at a restaurant that specializes in a large variety of draft beers and sports playing on all screens almost immediately conjures up images of hot spicy chicken wings, so it was not surprising to find them at the top of BrewGrrs appetizers list. The Humongo Wingrrs were described as spiced-up Buffalo wings with a shot of vodka,

A P R I L

BrewGrrs, the place on the Boulevard for burgers and brew


DINING

!

32

Now Open for Dinner

N E W S W E E K L Y

CAFE

Lemon Tree – Love it!

great breakfast, great lunch, great dinner

Enjoy your favorites, including Cannelloni, homemade crepes filled with freshly ground veal, sausage and spinach, topped with tomato and Bechamel cream sauce, Antipasto Misto, Chicken Alfredo, Gnocchi Bolognese, Eggplant Rollatini, Shrimp Parmigiana, Bruschetta, Veal Parmigiana, Pizzas, Pasta, Subs, Burgers, Salads, Fried Calamari, Wings and much more

Friendly, clean, excellent food and service. Beer and Wine. Homemade soups and desserts. Children’s menu available.

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

Cuisines of Vero

Breakfast: Mon.-Sat. 7 am - 11 am Lunch: Mon.-Sat. 11 am - 2:30 pm Sunday Breakfast: 7:30 am - noon Dinner: 5 pm - ’til close

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sun 4-9pm Eat In, Take Out, Beachside Delivery • 231-9311

3125 OCEAN DRIVE, VERO BEACH | 772.231.0858 WWW.LEMONTREEVERO.COM

1006 Easter Lily Lane (next to Humiston Park off Ocean Dr. in Vero’s Beach)

The Hunt Is Over... Easter Brunch Is Here! Ocean Drive

V E R O

B E A C H

TCN2685177

Springtime Cravings Cookies- Shop before they hop! Waffle Cone Wednesday- Buy One, Get One FREE!

Hop on in!

• Breakfast • Lunch • Lite Dinner • Dessert

3244 Ocean Drive | Vero Beach | 32963 costadeste.com | 772.410.0100 Facebook.com/Costadestebeachresort

BREWGRRS FROM PAGE 31

mented the fish nicely. The Caesar salad included crisp romaine leaves that were fresher than expected and tossed with dressing and croutons. It was the classic garden variety and since this was to be a main entree, the option to add beef tenderloin was chosen for $4 more. The slices of beef were tender and together with the salad, it was a full meal that satisfied a fairly large appetite. After a huge lunch we passed up the sweets, however the sinful sounding Fried Snickers and Fried

$32.95* Adults $14.95* Children * prices do not include tax or gratuity

Hostess Snack Cakes sounded like a reason to return, if only for dessert. If a good hamburger and a strong brew sound tempting to you, then visit BrewGrrs, where burgers and brew are done just right. Dinner for five before tip: $80.00

BrewGrrs Restaurant with liquor, beer and wine, children’s menu 390 21st Street, Unit 104 Vero Beach, FL 32960 772-226-5700 Hours: 7 days. 11:30 a.m. till close. Most major credit cards accepted

TCN2683893

Sunday April 8th 10a - 2p Indoor & Outdoor Seating 7 days 6:30am-10pm

Visit our online catalog at

www.cravingscookies.com

3149 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach 231-0208

jta ^tyfu jta vypl^ vtyle yjv tbtjde kMNY\C eEXXH eH\JH5 0" ZUXW$I ZUMTZX YXIIXJHI dGXIY\C q\QW MWW \QQ [MHHQXI MW ETNX LJTZXY 0%!! MJ QXII aXYNXIY\C aTNX vMEN aXYNXIY\C5 \QQ UMGIX ETNX VQ\II LMGJI 0" \QQ Y\C dUGJIY\C dUTJIHC dUGJIY\C5 XDHXNYXY q\LLC qMGJ YJTNRI GNHTQ (5}!LP sJTY\C kJ# kMHMEN wGJHTI qTQQ LQ\CTNV \H *LP TN HUX wM[\QH lMGNVX e\HGJY\C 0( xQMMYC k\JCI YGJTNV [JGNZU eGNY\C xMHHMPQXII kTPMI\I \H [JGNZU WMJ 09!

eXJFTNV xJX\RW\IHu lGNZUu vTNNXJu q\LLC qMGJ \NY aXXRXNY xJGNZU jXE q\LLC qMGJ HTPXu /5}!~(LP@@

}"!! iZX\N vJTFX bXJM xX\ZUu sl }9|(} **9#/(|#%!(!


hzwv|szk yol k~sz/ C )@@ 3&!B+@&7 !.3& :&+&B3&( . #=>*7 A?<=:6 B>7<&+6B=> .>( !.3& . +=>(B6B=> :&<=:6; C 25%(.0 =: 8'555%?B@& 9=1&:6:.B> /.::.>60 => ?=76 3&!B+@&7; C $=>7B">?&>6 <:=":.? .3.B@.-@&;

/& 1=4@(>*6 7&@@ 0=4 .>06!B>" 1& 1=4@( >=6 (:B3& =4:7&@3&7,

'&#)@+D@

hZ^L `NQQ^UO ZUM^UOTQJ bO LLLp_TUPZVSTQOp`TV

N E W S W E E K L Y

qog oyyzlvqx nlz)ogqz{ hzwv|szk/

B E A C H

jor physical gains in the off-season are rising senior offensive lineman Chris Flaig and rising senior quarterback Jack Tonner. “Chris has been going to combines and has worked really hard in the off-season,” Motta said. “He

V E R O

to do it are very fortunate, and I wish I could figure out a way to get it done,” Motta said. “It is very difficult, though, unless you have guys who are exclusive to football. Here, I couldn’t see it happening.” Spring practice starts May 1 for St. Edward’s, which will lead up to a home game against Archbishop Notre Dame on Thursday, May 24. Before that happens, the Pirates have a lot of work to accomplish. “We would like to improve everywhere over last season,” Motta said. “We hope to really work hard in the off-season to build up core strength, but we haven’t been able to get there. With only 24 players, we must find a way to stay healthy.” Two players who have made ma-

!

Quarterback Jack Toner took over the signal calling for the Pirates when Anderson Proctor was hurt last year and has worked hard in the offseason said Coach Bill Motta.

2 0 1 2

FILE PHOTO

5 ,

VERO BEACH -- Spring football at St. Edward’s will be just as important as it is for every other high school team in Florida. The Pirates, who are coming off a 2-7 2011 campaign, will use their time to establish continuity within the program, bring new players up to speed, and push returning personnel to become the new leaders. While some programs on the Treasure Coast are participating in seven-on-seven recreation football leagues, though, St. Edward’s football elected not to participate. With so many of the team’s two-dozen players participating in spring sports, accommodating for recreation football league would have potentially shaken up the rosters of sports like lacrosse and baseball. With just 24 players on his roster, the absence of even a few of his skill players would leave the Pirates, well, without much skill. Third-year head coach Bill Motta, who works out with his team before school three times per week, says “the team hasn’t done much of anything football-wise in the off-season” as a result. “We were invited to get into a seven-on-seven league with Vero Beach, but most of my skill players play lacrosse,” Motta said. “They are trying to keep exclusive to lacrosse during the spring, and that didn’t leave us much room in the way of fielding a team for seven-on-seven. It would have been counterproductive to bring the wrong kids there and play everyone out of position. “(Schools) with the opportunity

just pulled down his first scholarship offer (Florida International University) and there are several more who are close to offering him. He’s one of the top ten longsnappers in the country. People who tell kids not to come to St. Edward’s because they won’t get recruited by Division I college football programs are flat wrong. “Jack Tonner has put a lot of extra work and conditioning in on the weight lifting team outside of football,” Motta added. “Hopefully Anderson (Proctor) will be back with us at quarterback and healthy next season, but Jack has really made some great strides since filling in at quarterback last year while Anderson was hurt.” Two other important players for Motta headed into the fall are senior wide receiver Devon Kahle and rising sophomore running back Daryl Norwood. “Devon Kahle has slipped into a leadership role for us, and he’s remained dedicated to football in spite of doing so many other things off the field,” Motta said. “Daryl has to step up and fill Cortez’s (Brown) shoes and take most of the carries on offense, while moving to strong safety on defense.”

A P R I L

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

!

Sports St. Ed’s football to use spring to get stronger, better

33


2 0 1 2

!

34

SPORTS

Fighting Indians prepare for Miami Northwestern this spring BY MICHAEL BIELECKI

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Over the past several years, failing to schedule quality regular season opponents was a major criticism of the Vero Beach High School football program. Aside from Palm Bay over the last several years and Fort Pierce Central this past season, the Fighting Indians fed on a steady diet of non-playoff teams during the regular season. Further, Vero Beach hadn’t played a spring game against another school in several years before 2011’s 45-21 drubbing of New Smyrna Beach. The Red and White Game had become a great tradition, but the program needed more than just and inter-squad scrimmage to end the spring. Vero Beach High School athletic director and football coach Lenny Jankowski has gone a step further this spring by scheduling Miami Northwestern for this year’s spring game on May 19. Both ESPN and FOX affiliates have shown interest in covering the spring game, but according to Jankowski neither have committed to covering as of press time. “Miami Northwestern is a national power with great athletes,” Jankowski said.  “They are talking about bringing 2000 people up for the game, and it will be a nice event for everyone. This spring game will be a great way to cap off the spring and a transition into 7-on-7 competition for summer.” Northwestern, 7-3 in 2011, failed to make the playoffs last year in what is perhaps the best football district in the state of Florida. The Bulls went 62-8 over the previous five years and won the 2007 ESPN High School National Championship. Eight seniors from that team went to University of Miami on football scholarship. To put that in perspective, Vero Beach High school has sent four scholarship players to the University of Miami over the past three decades. Playing high-profile football programs like Northwestern is something Jankowski feels will benefit players. “The whole month of May is a neat deal for our players because they get to practice in front of college coaches,” Jankowski said.  The Fighting Indians graduated its top two defensive players, defensive end Dwayne Hoilett and safety Charles Ivory, who will play at Miami and Northern Illinois respectively this fall. On offense,

PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

Vero Beach will play powerhouse Miami Northwestern in their spring practice game on May 19.

Vero Beach returns just three starters and loses record-setting quarterback Nick Madden, and top receivers Charlie Miller (Northern Illinois), Rakeem Marcelle (Brown), and Jeremy Bell to graduation. “If you rewound this story from a year ago, the guys who had varsity experience were on the offense,” Jankowski said. “This year the reverse is true.  When you talk about defense, and when you can say your strength lies in your secondary, you have a chance to have a pretty good year.  We have three returning starters in the secondary this year in Will Dawkins (five interceptions), Dravious Wright (second-team all-state), and Sean Paul (first-team all-area).  At linebacker, we have a bunch of guys who have a bunch of starts there with Cole Ripple and Josh Gallo.  On the defensive line we have a bunch of guys who rotated and logged a bunch of time there who will be competing for jobs throughout the spring.” With Mike Watkins taking the head coaching position at John Carroll this year, Jankowski stepped into the role of offensive coordinator having to

rebuild his offensive personnel just one year after installing his spread offense.  “Going into spring we’ve lost eight starters and our offensive coordinator -- that is a lot to replace,” Jankowski said.  “You hate to lose a player or a coach, but when you have good people in place, it makes that transition less difficult. We still have some key guys in place, though.  I’m excited to have (offensive linemen) Connor Moore and Scott Bacon returning and I think (wide receiver) Nate Pryor will do great things for us this year.  Even though (running back) Jason Pierre (5.3 yards per carry) wasn’t a starter and Will Dawkins only played safety last year, we know both of them will be major cogs in our offense.” Jankowski looked to the basketball team again this year to replenish a receiving corps that lost four Fighting Indians to graduation. Last year’s converted receivers, Jeremy Bell and Miller, led the team in receptions and receiving yards respectively. High-flying forwards Jamario Lambert and Javonte Bagley, fresh off a state final four basketball appearance, give Jankowski two 6-foot-3 receivers.


35

Lucille J. Ougheltree Lucille J. Ougheltree died March 21, 2012, in Vero Beach. She was born in Davenport, Iowa, and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from Mountain Lakes, N.J. Before retirement, she was a judicial secretary for the State of New Jersey. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Charles Edward Ougheltree of Crystal Lake, Ill., Stephen W. Ougheltree of Vero Beach and Robert F. Ougheltree of Ridgewood, N.J.; sister, Irene Beil of Vero Beach; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of one’s choice. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Mary Jane Shurtluff Mary Jane Shurtluff, 91, died March 19, 2012, in Orlando. She was born in Akron, Ohio, coming to Vero Beach 25 years ago from New York. She worked for Reuben H. Donnelley, was a former member of the Republican Club and attended St. Helen’s Catholic Church. Survivors include her son, John Shurtluff of Vero Beach; half-sister, Eileen Tallman of New Jersey; four grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society (St. Lucie), 3375 20th St., Suite 100, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. haisleyfuneralhome.com.

Robert Edward Rice Robert Edward Rice, 78, died March 19, 2012, in Vero Beach. He was born in New Orleans, La., and moved to Vero Beach 15 years ago. Before retirement, he was the district manager of the New England Life Group Buffalo office. He began his career in Philadelphia with Connecticut General in the employee benefit field and moved to Springfield, Mass., and then Buffalo as the district manager of those group offices. He was a former member of the Saturn Club in Buffalo and the Buffalo Yacht Club. He was a graduate of Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. Survivors include his wife of 43 years, Suzanne Donaldson Rice; son, Robert E. Rice Jr. of Hillsborough, Calif.;

Juanita Brown Juanita Brown, 102, died March 25, 2012, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Birch River, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach for 58 years, coming from Weston, W.Va. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Glenville State College, Glenville, W.Va. During World War II, she worked as an assistant cryptanalyst for the U.S. government. After the war she started her career as a schoolteacher in Indian River County where she taught for 28 years. She was a member of First Baptist Church, Vero Beach. She was a member of the National Teacher’s Association, Delta Kappa Gamma, the 4-H All Stars and AARP. Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church,

! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

Stephen Nagy Stephen Nagy, 86, died March 21, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Chicago, and lived in Vero Beach for 29 years, coming from Illinois. He served in the Navy as a navigator during World War II. Before retirement, he taught print shop, wood shop and photography for Reavis High School in Burbank, Ill. Survivors include his daughter, Cynthia Schneider of Park Ridge, Ill.; sons, Richard of Evergreen Park, Ill., and Jeffrey of Vero Beach; sisters, Irene and Charlene; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memo-

daughter, Elizabeth Rice Conron; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice of Vero Beach, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

2 0 1 2

Clara Knight Clara B. Knight, 83, died March 20, 2012, at her home. She was born in Vero Beach and was a resident until 1982. She retired in 2000 after serving as secretary for the personnel office at Mars Hill College for more than 13 years. Previously she had been secretary/ treasurer for Edward Knight Inc. She was a secretary for Forest Park Baptist Church. Survivors include her husband of 65 years, Edward Knight of Mars Hill; daughters, Pamela Denmark and Paula Baker, both of Vero Beach, and Penelope “Penny” Knight of Mars Hill; son, Perry Knight of Vero Beach; sister, Tommie Holland of Zuni, Va.; eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her sisters, Alice Lunsford and Bessie Harris. Memorial contributions may be made to CarePartners Hospice, PO Box 25338, Asheville, NC 28813.

rial contributions may be made to the Jean Nagy Memorial Fund at the Vero Beach Art Club, 3001 Riverside Park Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32963. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

5 ,

Bruce Bryant Bruce Bryant, 86, died March 23, 2012, at Vero Beach Hospice House. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., coming to Fort Pierce in 1987 from Seaford, N.Y. He was a Navy veteran of World War II. Before retirement, he produced and published specification manuals for the Sperry-Rand Corp. in Great Neck, N.Y., for 35 years. He was a volunteer grant researcher for Harbor Branch Research for eight years and a volunteer mediator for the 19th Judicial District Business vs. Customer in Fort Pierce. He attended Lakewood Park Methodist Church. He played baseball for Columbia University and won the baseball championship in 1944. Survivors include his wife, Margaret Ann Bryant of Fort Pierce; daughter, Karen Markin of Merrick, N.Y.; stepson, William E. Mauser of Commack, N.Y.; stepson, Dr. Peter J. Mauser of Morris Township, N.J.; stepdaughter, Elizabeth Scoones of Clinton, N.Y.; stepdaughter, Mary Susan Jones of Gloucester, Mass.; brother, Vance Bryant of Clifton, Park, N.Y.; and nine grandchildren. Memorial

contributions may be made to the Sunshine Physical Therapy Clinic, 1705 17th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

A P R I L

Paula Joan Griffith Paula Joan Griffith, 79, died March 22, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. She was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Fort Pierce for 15 years, coming from Vero Highlands. Before retirement, she worked for the Board of Jewish Education in Washington, D.C. for 35 years. Survivors include her son, Walter Griffith of Fort Pierce; six grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 3582, 513 Georgia Ave., Fort Pierce, FL 34950. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

!

Obituaries


36

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

2 0 1 2

!

OBITUARIES 2206 16th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Ralph J. “Jupe” Merrick Ralph J. “Jupe” Merrick, 92, died March 26, 2012, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Corydon, Iowa, and lived in Vero Beach for 27 years, coming from Downers Grove, Ill. He worked in the insurance industry. He was a Marine Corps veteran, World War II, stationed at Vero Beach from 1944 to ‘45. He graduated from Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. He was a life member of Masonic Lodge. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Betty Merrick of Vero Beach; son, Jeff Merrick of Vero Beach; daughter, Jill Merrick of Wilmington, N.C.; and two grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Dr. Robert Merrick and Carlos Merrick; and sister, Kathleen Campbell. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Gilbert R.H. Kennedy Gilbert R.H. Kennedy, 76, died March 25, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in St. Louis, Mo., and moved to the Treasure Coast 15 years ago, coming from Houston. Before retirement, he worked as a venture capitalist and then became an environmentalist. He was the former board member of New Horizons and a member of the Marine Resources Council. Survivors include his son, Dr. Gilbert Kennedy of Jacksonville; daughter, Dr. Sarah Blain Kennedy of Vero Beach; brother, John B. Kennedy of Corpus Christi, Texas, and Ellen D. Kennedy of Houston; and four grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Caroline Kennedy. Memorial contributions may be made to Michael James Olkowski Marine Resource Council, 3275 Dixie Highway N.E., Palm Bay, FL Michael James Olkowski, 65, 32905. A guestbook is available at died March 23, 2012, at home. He www.coxgiffordseawinds.com. was born in Greenpoint, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, Rev. Dr. Robert J. Lamont coming from Portland, Ore. He The Rev. Dr. Robert J. Lamont, was a printer in the Air Force for 92, died March 26, 2012, at Palm 20 years, retiring as a teacher and Garden of Vero Beach. He was tech sergeant for the Joint Armed born in Philadelphia and lived Services in 1985. He served in the at Indian River Estates in Vero Air Force during the Vietnam War. Beach for 22 years, coming from He was of the Roman Catholic Bryn Mawr, Pa. He served for 10 faith. Survivors include his daughyears on the board of ACTS Life- ter, Tammy Olkowski of Vero Retirement Communities Inc., Beach; brother, Robert Olkowski which owns Indian River Estates. of Port Jefferson Station, N.Y.; sisSurvivors include his wife of 69 ter, Christina Scigowski of Comyears, Edna Lamont; son, Rob- mack, N.Y.; three grandchildren; ert J. Lamont Jr.; daughters, Edna and two great-grandchildren. A Karen Shuter and Joanne Marie guestbook is available at www. Hathorn, all of Vero Beach; sis- strunkfuneralhome.com. ters, Doris Weikel of Perkasie, Pa. Kevin James Schmitz and Eleanor Latham of Lansdale, Pa.; one grandchild; and one stepKevin James Schmitz, 56, died grandchild. A guestbook is avail- March 20, 2012. He was born in able at www.aycock-hillcrest.com. Monroe, Mich., and lived in Vero

Beach for five years, coming from Jackson, Mich. He worked for H.J. Schmitz and Sons in Michigan; was a self-employed truck owner and driver owning JK Leasing in Saline, Mich., and working with Best Block Co. in Warren, Mich. He was a member of St. Mary Church, Monroe, Mich. Survivors include his parents, James G. and Joan T. Schmitz of Monroe, Mich.; sisters, Marilyn Prucka of Monroe, Mich., and Nancy Nemec of Ida, Mich.; and brother, Eric Schmitz of Amanda, Ohio. He was preceded in death by his brother, Gary M. Schmitz; maternal grandparents, Vallie and Alice Dussia; and paternal grandparents, Harold and Martha Schmitz. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Vincent de Paul Society, 5480 85th St., Wabasso, FL 32967. A guestbook is available at www.seawindsfh.com.

Jesse B. Shurns Sr. Jesse B. Shurns Sr., 60, died March 24, 2012, in Lake Worth. He was born in Reform, Ala., and lived in Gifford for 50 years. He was retired from the agricultural industry. Survivors include sons, Jesse B. Shurns Jr. of Tampa and Jeffery Brink of Vero Beach; daughters, Sabrina Shurns of Atlanta, Wanda Bowles and Jessica Shurns, both of Goldsboro, N.C., Jacquline Pierce and Thaila Agnew, both of Vero Beach, and Stephanie Shurns of Pittsburgh; sisters, Betty Jean Perry of Dallas, Gracie Lee Shurns of Vero Beach and Josephine Shurns of Harrisburg, Pa.; 20 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Becker and is survived by her sister, Marion Becker, of New Berlin, NY. She was a legal secretary in Vero Beach for many years. In her youth she was a skater and she loved music and dance. Online condolences may be sent at www. cox giffordseawin ds.com.

Joseph Michael Vartain Joseph Michael Vartain, 87, died March 24, 2012, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Astoria, Queens, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach the past 20 years, coming from Merrick, N.Y. He served in the Army in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. He was a member of the Garden City Country Club in New York and Dodger Pines Country Club. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Claire Vartain; and his four children, Ellen VaVak of Vero Beach, Michael of Palo Alto, Calif., Mary Cordes of Dallas and Richard of Bowie, Md.; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice House Foundation, 110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

G. Sharon Williams G. Sharon Williams, 71, died March 18, 2012, at her home. She was born in Chicago and was a local resident for 13 years, coming from her birthplace. She was employed as an engineer in the construction industry. Survivors include her sons, Kenneth R. Williams of Bourbonnais, Ill., Daniel Williams of East Hazelhurst, Ill., and Donald B. Williams of ValGrace Trinkino paraiso, Ind.; sisters, Jane RuzGrace Trinkino, 88, passed away icka and Artlene Hendricks, both peacefully at Atlantic Healthcare of Fort Pierce; six grandchildren; Center, Vero Beach, on March and three great-grandchildren. 23, 2012. She was born in Coop- A guestbook is available at www. erstown, NY, to Willis and Ethel coxgiffordseawinds.com.


37 !

HOME OF THE WEEK

A P R I L

5 , 2 0 1 2

Enjoy modern architecture with country appeal

! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

This 3-bedroom, 3 ½-bath home is located on prime Vero Beach real estate in the golf community of Country Club Pointe. The home borders a canal that allows access to the Indian River Intracoastal including a dock with a built-in hoist large enough to accommodate a 27-foot boat. Built by Chris Hall of Highland Homes, the structure consists of cement block with hardy plank and vertical stone detailing that offers soft contemporary architecture with country appeal. Country Club Pointe is within walking distance of Vero Beach

Golf Club which sports an 18hole, par-72 golf course, and offers casual as well as elegant dining. This is a ‘must-see’ property designed for those who appreciate an up-to-date approach to life in a relaxed atmosphere. Price is $565,000. Contact Coldwell Banker Paradise Ed Schlitt Realtors Associate, Patricia Golden, for more information. Her direct phone number is 772-559-8565. Email her at patriciapsg@aol.com. To search hundreds of listings, visit Coldwell Banker Paradise Ed Schlitt Realtors at www.flColdwellBanker.com.

STAFF PHOTOS


38 2 0 1 2

!

Real Estate

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

A P R I L

5 ,

Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – March 22-March 28

Address 4600 Hwy. A1A, #311 9425 Frangipani Dr. 1700 Ocean Dr., #103 2191 Via Fuentes 1150 Reef Rd.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

150 Island Sanctuary Shores 9/9/11 $820,000 3/27/12 $750,000 Norris & Company Susan Hart Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE Cheryl Michel

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4101 Ocean Dr., Ph C Ocean Shores Condo 12/9/11 $689,000 3/23/12 $600,000 Seaside Realty of Vero Beach Mac Thompson Seaside Realty of Vero Beach Mac Thompson

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

700 Beach Rd. John’s Island 10/18/11 $419,900 3/22/12 $405,000 Every Florida Home Warren Cleveland NMLS NMLS MLS

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1150 Reef Rd., #26 Sabal Reef Condo 10/28/11 $395,000 3/26/12 $385,000 Norris & Company Jim Haigney Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Tripp Hernandez

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1350 Riverside Ln. Island Club Riverside 8/26/11 $349,000 3/28/12 $332,500 RE/MAX Classic Bill Carroll Weichert, REALTORS Hallmark-VB Kathy Lemmons

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

600 Riomar Dr., #8 Bayou Condo 11/23/11 $350,000 3/23/12 $325,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Elizabeth Sorensen Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Joan Cook

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: Subdivision List Date Caledon Shores Condo 4/23/10 Oceanaire Heights 12/3/11 Sea Cove 7/12/11 River Mews Condo 8/27/09 Sabal Reef Condo 10/7/11

716 Hibiscus Ln. Orange Park Estates 2/20/12 $325,000 3/28/12 $317,500 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Christine Hughes David Walsh & Associates RE Opey Angelone List Price Sell Date Sell Price $325,000 3/28/12 $275,000 $265,000 3/22/12 $245,000 $259,000 3/22/12 $239,000 $250,000 3/26/12 $237,500 $250,000 3/23/12 $191,700

Address: 1420 Treasure Cove Ln. Subdivision: Treasure Cove List Date: 1/25/12 List Price: $335,000 Sell Date: 3/27/12 Sell Price: $310,000 Listing Broker: Palm Pointe Realty Listing Agent: Dale Perron Selling Broker: Vero Beach Realty Selling Agent: Priscilla Myers Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Connie Cederholm Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Karen Smith North Beach Realty, Inc./Harriet Yemm Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Lori Davis Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Michelle Kantzler Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Elizabeth Sorensen The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Judy Hargarten Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Kim Cybulski Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Nancy Freiheit

Mainland Real Estate Sales – March 22-March 28 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

Address 703 Easy St. S

Subdivision Collier Creek

6575 36th Pl. Oak Chase 1/9/12 $299,000 3/23/12 $290,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Michelle Kantzler Seaside Realty of Vero Beach Mac Thompson

6555 35th Ln. Address: Oak Chase Subdivision: 1/20/12 List Date: $259,000 List Price: 3/22/12 Sell Date: $254,000 Sell Price: Listing Broker: RE/MAX Classic Kelly Fischer Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Craig Von Kohorn Selling Agent: List Date List Price Sell Date 11/18/11 $234,900 3/22/12

Sell Price $229,500

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2410 Lake Ibis Ln. Falcon Trace 10/31/11 $285,000 3/22/12 $275,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty Becky Stirrat NMLS NMLS MLS

525 Joy Haven Dr. Address: Sebastian Highlands Subdivision: 11/15/11 List Date: $260,000 List Price: 3/22/12 Sell Date: $232,000 Sell Price: Listing Broker: Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt SEB Louise Muller Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt SEB Jackie Hatter Selling Agent: Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc./Chanda Mundy Billero & Billero Properties/Diana Burklew


SHOP OCEANSIDE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ OUR CUSTOMERS HAVE ENJOYED 20% DISCOUNT FOR 30 YEARS HANLONS SHOES & CLOTHING

3343 CARDINAL DRIVE VERO BEACH, FL 32963 772 231 2334

The Finest Things Are Still Made By Hand...

One At A Time GARY DULAC GOLDSMITH, INC.

Shoe Salon and Boutique

Veroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only Goldsmith www.dulacgold.com

822 Beachland Blvd., Vero Beach, FL 32963 ¡ 772.234.3344

SHOP OCEANSIDE ON

VEROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

BEACH

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ For advertising information email Martine Fecteau at martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com or call 772-696-2004



   

Saturday April 7th

Every guest will receive an egg containing a discount of

 

10% - 50%

3385 Ocean Drive Vero Beach

which may be used on selections chosen* at the party!

*No discounts on previous purchases, special orders back orders, or items which have been held. One discount per person, one person per discount.


PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT PIERCE, FL PERMIT NO. 173

A P R I L

!:s7!3s



w/ Automatic Cord Rewind

5 , 2 0 1 2  F R E E

Expert Advice + The Best Price

WWW*ETSON0OWER"UYCOMsTH3TREET 6ERO"EACHs  

Vero Beach NEWSWEEKLY 1801 U.S. 1 Vero Beach, FL 32960

T H U R S D A Y

COMFORT CLEAN UPRIGHT VACUUM

****************ECRWSS*****

Local Postal Customer

Rese JetsonPrve online at: owerBu y.com


Vero Beach News Weekly