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he said. “Based on the information provided to me, it sounds like a one-off thing.” Both Luther and Touchberry did say that the crime does re-affirm both departments public relation efforts to make sure citizens keep their cars and homes locked at all times. “It is an ongoing problem we have that people are not locking their cars,” Luther said. “We call that a crime of opportunity. People need to remember to lock their cars and their homes as well. It is something that we want to constantly remind the public about. You have to remember that inside their cars are their garage door openers and if he gets a hold of that the criminal can have easy access to the house.”

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only one that I know of in that beat this year,” he said. “There was one in 2011 in that same beat. I was floored when you asked about a stolen car because we haven’t had too much trouble there at all.” Luther noted that the incident in 2011 was solved quickly when, based on the information he had received, it turned out it was a family member who had taken the vehicle and not told the owner. Vero Beach spokesman Keith Touchberry said that in the city’s service area he has not seen an increase in crimes of that nature as well. “The Moorings is in the county, but is by the city’s border on the south and we have not seen anything like an increase in auto thefts,”

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asked if I had put it in the garage,” Duncan said. “I told her no, there was no room in there and I couldn’t. It was just gone.” Duncan immediately called the Sheriff ’s Department to file a report that the 2010 red RX 350 Lexus SUV had been stolen. “The officer was surprised to see a car stolen from The Moorings area, he said it was very rare,” Duncan said. Sheriff ’s office spokesman Jeff Luther confirmed the officer’s position, noting that this was the first such case in that area this year. In fact, there was only one reported car theft in the south barrier island all of last year and there were extenuating circumstances involved with that case. “We’ve had that one and that is the

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -It was a rude awakening for new Moorings homeowners Jim Duncan and Pixie Hoey this past Tuesday when they found out the Lexus SUV owned by Duncan had been stolen. The couple had just moved from the Island Club to the Moorings and unfortunately left their car unlocked overnight. “The car was parked in the driveway right smack in front of the front door,” Duncan said. There were no valuables in the car, Duncan said, except for a box of papers. “I put the trash out a little after 10 p.m. and around 6:45 a.m. Pixie came in and said the car was gone and

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FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Local News Couple new to Moorings have SUV stolen from driveway

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County, City drop idea of a unified water-sewer system BY BARBARA YORESH AND MARK SCHUMANN VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

“Regionalization” is one of those government-speak words with a definition that leaves most lay people scratching their heads. As it applies to a bid by Indian River County to buy the City of Vero Beach waterutility system, it is also a plan on hold for now. The notion to consolidate essential services under a larger governmental umbrella serving a region is hardly new. But when a municipality considers an overture from a county to take over something like a utility, a governmental and economic tug of war can result regarding who gets control over a valuable commodity. In a consolidated/regionalized operation, each of the municipalities and other entities could receive some long-term benefit from the value of

the customer base they bring to the system. The “profits” from the system might be shared proportionately to the revenue and/or customer base each entity represents to the system. When County Commissioner Bob Solari and County Utility Director Eric Olson speak of “regionalization,” what they say they have in mind is the county taking over the city’s system. They envision and have proposed an outright purchase of the city water and sewer infrastructure, along with the right to serve its nearly 25,000 customers. In the early 1990s the county took over the City of Sebastian’s water and sewer system. County customers living in Sebastian now pay county utility rates, a six percent tax to Sebastian, plus a 10 percent equalization charge assessed by the county. According to Olson, the monthly equalization charge assessed to Se-

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bastian customers is comparable to a six percent charge paid by other county customers. Last April, the County Commission voted to offer Vero Beach about $24 million for its water-sewer utility debt as well as spend an additional $28 million to connect the city and county systems and to dismantle the city’s sewer treatment plant located on the Indian River Lagoon at the 17th Street Bridge. They city’s system was recently appraised for just under $100 million. On April 7, 2011, the County Commission also sent a letter to Vero Beach City Council regarding the county’s 30-year water and waste water franchise agreements with the city dating from March 1987. The letter served as notice to the city that county commissioners had “voted not to renew the franchises” and council “should consider this letter formal notice that the county will not renew the water or waste water franchises when they expire on March 4, 2017. In addition to the franchise agreement, the city and county also signed a territorial agreement spelling out what areas of the county the city would agree to serve without also requiring annexation. Given the county’s recent efforts to reclaim the south barrier island as a service area, some in the city wonder if the city would have been better off requiring annexation in exchange for agreeing to extend water, sewer and electrical services beyond the existing city limits. If the south barrier island were a part of the city, they argue, residents there wouldn’t be paying a franchise fee to the county, and would see themselves as having a voice in city government. Because the territorial agreement between the city and the county has no expiration date, and because there are state laws preventing counties from encroaching on existing municipal service areas, the county, according to Solari, is prepared to appeal to

the state Legislature. At a recent meeting of the South Barrier Island Property Owners Association, Solari explained that the reason the county has scheduled a referendum asking south barrier island residents whether they would prefer to be served by the city or the county is to strengthen the case the county it planning to make to the Legislature. The Indian River Shores Town Council on Feb. 20 voted in favor of retaining utilities services from Vero Beach despite a bid by the county to win that business when the present franchise agreement expires in 2016. In the newly struck deal between The Shores and the city, lower rates based on county levels were agreed upon. In a letter to Shores officials from then County Commission Chairman Solari, he stated the board “did want to reiterate its belief that regionalization of our water, waste water and reuse systems is the best path forward for all the residents of Indian River County.” Solari predicted that the city’s rates would soar over the next decade, a statement which was disputed by city officials who have reduced utility operating expenses and have sought other ways to optimize the system for greater efficiency and economy. Eleven months later on March 6, County Commissioners voted to withdraw their offer to buy the city’s water and sewer system following the city’s failure to respond.

Utilities consolidation worth discussion Though the idea of a single regional utility to serve the entire county has appealed to Solari, a city resident who has championed regionalization, he does not share the view of municipal leaders who have suggested that the county and cities unite to form a utility authority. Solari is focused on developing a county-wide system owned and opCONTINUES ON PAGE 6


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WATER-SEWER FROM PAGE 4

erated by the county. “I am not interested in another layer of bureaucracy,” Solari said. Vero Beach City Manager Jim O’Connor likes the idea of a regional utility commission. “I personally like the utility authority concept. It gives representation to everyone and gives oversight on a regional concept of how we can build

the most efficient system,” O’Connor said last week. O’Connor said having an “overall game plan” for the region would need to consider not only the assets of the utility system itself but how to maximize system capacity while addressing rates which take into account differing water consumption patterns by customers. Sebastian City Manager Al Minner has also expressed interest in con-

tinuing a discussion about a utility authority. Vero Beach Councilman Jay Kramer has an open mind regarding a utility authority, but also some reservations. “If the county (utility) were doing well, they’d not seek regionalization. Somebody needs a bailout and I know when someone is doing poorly in business, they seek a partner to plug a financial hole,” Kramer said. “I don’t have a problem with a utility

authority but it could become a case of who subsidizes who – a profitable (utility) company now in partnership with one that’s not profitable and it then minimizes profits.”

Regionalization considered for years County Utilities Director Erik Olson noted that the process to considCONTINUES ON PAGE 8

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WATER-SEWER FROM PAGE 6

er utility system consolidation with the city began about five years ago with discussions about the wastewater treatment plant at 17th Street as well as the city’s electric plant. About two years ago, Olson said, a “summit” meeting of sorts was conducted at the Richardson Center and attended by representatives from the county, City of Vero Beach, the Town of Indian River Shores and Fellsmere to “talk about regionalization.” “Realistically, it developed a life of its own as the discussion of the (Vero Beach) electric plant was beginning to get a loud voice of ‘what to do’ and the water utilities became a rider to that issue,” Olson said. “The committee was intent to hire a consultant to work with them on a general basis and look at options.” Olson, a member of the committee, said the group met for several months and even identified a preferred consultant: Jerry Hartman of

GAI Consultants, Inc. of Orlando. “But we didn’t come to a consensus or hire him and the committee ultimately disbanded. The city then hired GAI,” Olson said. According to Olson, the county’s desire was to buy Vero Beach’s utility outright – much like the deal that was struck in 2006 between Palm Beach County and the Village of Royal Palm Beach in which the Village’s water and sewer utility was sold to the county for $70 million in a deal facilitated by GAI Consultants. Olson said that when the county made its $24 million offer for Vero Beach’s utility, “we had a different perception of its value.” “We assumed the infrastructure in town belonged to the city. The county would pay off the debt on the utility, demolish the (treatment) plant on the river, install infrastructure to connect everything to the county and start from square one,” Olson said. While he had praise for the city’s utility’s staff and operation, Ol-

son also noted that the city “is constrained geographically and costs begin to rise and the customer base doesn’t increase with it.” O’Connor noted that he hoped “we’d be able to build capacity for our service area” which includes unincorporated portions of the county.

Widely disparate valuations for city’s system So with so much support to at least explore the regionalization concept, why, then, did it reach a dead end? A partial reason – which some city leaders have said was the most compelling – is the disparity in the county’s offer for the city’s water-sewer versus its valuation by a consultant. A draft report issued to the city last August by GAI Consultants placed the value of the city’s water utility at $100.9 million. County officials balked at the price although O’Connor noted that the report was comprehensive and used several different methods standard in the utilities industry to come up with a valuation. County Administrator Joe Baird and County Budget Director Jason Brown were critical of GAI’s report, alleging it was inaccurate and overvalued the city’s system which generates about $17 million annually. Opinions differed on “fair market price.” GAI Consultants’ appraisal report noted the city would take a loss on the utility if it were sold for less than $77 million. According to the consultant’s optimization report regarding ways to make the utility operate more efficiently, no rate increases were needed through 2016. Further complicating matters has been a climate of wariness and distrust between city and county leaders. “By innuendo, some people think we want to tear apart the city brickby-brick,” Solari said.

Can a phoenix rise from the ashes? A willingness by county leaders to revisit the issue coupled with utility preferences by residents of the south

barrier island’s unincorporated area may bring regionalization of watersewer utilities back to center stage before the end of the year. Olson said that a referendum in November for residents of the south barrier island will “ask whether they want to be served by the county or city. I think there’s a general perception that the long term is with the county.” Until 2017, Olson said, the city has the rights to serve that area based on a franchise agreement. Yet much of the actual laying of water and sewer lines was done not by the city, but by developers of such projects as The Moorings, Olson said. Those lines tied in to the city’s lines. “If the city elects to contest the south barrier island (opting to receive service) with the county utility, it could go to court. The south barrier island is ‘gravy revenue’ for the city and if the city loses that, they’d have to look at their utility budget,” Olson said. “The dilemma the city is facing is it was the only game in town for utilities but those were the conditions of 40 to 50 years ago and it’s a different process and mechanism now.” If the south barrier island customers provide the city a “gravy revenue,” O’Connor is unclear what Olson meant since rates to that area are subject a 10 percent surcharge commonly applied by municipalities on a statewide basis. “They’re paying a 10 percent surcharge to the county because they are out of the city (limits),” O’Connor said. That money goes directly into county coffers. Before being sold to Palm Beach County, the Village of Royal Palm Beach water-sewer utility charged its unincorporated area customers the same 10 percent surcharge. Councilman Kramer points to the county’s existing over-capacity and questions who would ultimately be rescuing who if the county took over the city’s system. Kramer’s view is that because the county has built a system that far exceeds demand it needs the city’s customer base to balCONTINUES ON PAGE 9


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ance its utility books without “playing games with depreciating expenses.” Vero Beach Utility Director Rob Bolton agrees with Olson’s assessment of the south barrier island customers as being generally higher volume users. He points out, though, and his counterpart agrees, the county’s rate structure is designed to be “punitive” to higher volume users. Bolton, Kramer and others in the city have suggested that the county’s willingness to spend a minimum of $3 million to bore under the Indian River Lagoon in order to connect its system to the south barrier island is an indication that the county wants the “gravy” for itself. O’Connor said that the utility lines to the south barrier island area are “dedicated and deeded to the city” but if south barrier island utility customers decided they preferred to be served by the county, “we could work out with the county to sell lines that

have been maintained by the city.” “If a county rate structure is what they’re (south barrier island utility customers) after, we’re willing to discuss it,” O’Connor added. Olson said the issue of regionalization “has been put on hold and there is no impetus on the part of the city or county to push it.” Yet some believe the issue is far from dead. “I believe it will come back because it’s the absolutely rational, right thing to do,” Solari said. “I want consolidation because I think it’s best for the city and I live in the city. My belief and it’s shared by staff is if the city does a financial analysis and see what position we’re in, we’d be happy to sit down with them.” O’Connor echoed that willingness. “We’d be willing to participate in a meeting with all parties. It takes more than just the county or city – it’s all customers with vested interests. “I don’t think it’s an option to put this in mothballs,” O’Connor said.

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City water customers using an average of less than 2,000 gallons per month would pay less as customers of the county. Because the county would assess a 6 percent fee, and because the county’s rate structure is “punitive” for high volume water users, households using an average of 4,000 gallons or more per month make out better on city rates. The county charges customers living in the municipalities it serves a 6 percent fee which goes into its general fund.

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11.25 13.45 15.65 18.07 20.49 22.91 25.33 29.18 33.03 36.88 40.73 44.58

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14.43 15.26 16.09 16.92 17.75 20.53 23.31 26.09 28.87 31.65 34.43 37.21

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LOCAL NEWS

Are we doing all we can to protect the lagoon? Fertilizer ordinance important but not final solution

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More than half of all home owners apply more fertilizer than necessary to maintain healthy lawns. The excess nutrients are eventually washed into the Indian River Lagoon, seriously harming the fragile ecosystem. LISA RYMER

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY – The science is clear that the fertilizers we use to keep our lawns luscious and green are killing the Indian River Lagoon. What is also becoming increasingly clear is that beyond educating the public to the hazards these chemicals present to our ecosystem there is little the government can do to contain the contamination. Storm water runoff containing high levels of the fertilizer compounds phosphorus and nitrogen is one of the worst causes of pollution in the lagoon. Not only that, but the fertilizer

companies are virtually writing legislation in Tallahassee exempting themselves from being held to a quantifiable standard to protect our waterways. In fact, the only thing that’s going to save the river is basically what we’re doing right now: purchasing land for conservation, developing natural mitigation systems, applying more science and enacting laws restricting the use of fertilizer. Even if those laws are not enforceable. “It’s a process of public education,” said George Jones, the head of the Indian Riverkeeper, a nonprofit organization charged with advocating


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of conservation groups, for refusing to assign a numeric nutrient criterion to measure water contamination. “With all the programs in effect to clean up the waterways, the lagoon continues to deteriorate,” said Jones. Instead, “Florida is one of the few states in the country that relies on narrative standards to assess water quality,” said Jones, describing the difficulty in holding various industries accountable to an ambiguous verbal standard. “It’s like going 30 miles per hour in a 25-mile-per-hour zone. If there’s a numeric criterion attached, then you know you broke the law. But, a narrative standard allows you to say ‘it would be nice for you to slow down,’” said Jones. Moreover, “conservation groups can’t afford to pay for lobbyists up in Tallahassee,” Jones said. Now the state EPA in this pro-business environment in Tallahassee is being forced to assign numeric nutri-

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removed,” Jones said, estimating that the cost of dredging is $700 per pound of pollution. After spending 34 years with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, where he retired as regional director for state parks, Jones assumed the position as riverkeeper in 2004. He agrees with former citrus farmers, Mark Tripson, and County Commissioner Bob Solari that retailers in communities along the lagoon need to carry a slow release fertilizer with low amounts of phosphorus and fixed amounts of nitrogen. “The citrus farmers have been customizing their fertilizer for years,” said Solari, who would “like to see Lowe’s and Home Depot carry customized fertilizer by the end of the year.” Jones doesn’t seem too optimistic. His former employer, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, is being sued by the Florida Wildlife Federation and a consortium

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“But the fertilizer companies, which are not based in Florida, are not terribly conscious of runoff,” says Jones, explaining that “with our soil and conditions, we don’t need much phosphorus or heavy concentrations of nitrogen.” Nitrogen and phosphorus can cause toxic algae blooms in the river, which spans 156 miles from Ponce Inlet to Jupiter Inlet. The economic value of the lagoon to the region is estimated at about $1 billion. The middle basin of the lagoon, about a 10-mile stretch which travels the length of Indian River County and into St. Lucie County, is under Jones’ jurisdiction. That portion of the lagoon does not have any outlet to the ocean, which is how the lagoon flushes itself out. In addition to the pollution pockets, sediment has built up over the years on the river bottom that is sickening the dolphin population. “It’s a lot cheaper to not put it in then to pay to have the sediment

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for and protecting the lagoon against pollution. The Florida cities with the best results from fertilizer ordinances such as the one Vero Beach recently enacted, “don’t have enforcing capabilities,” said Jones. Vero’s new law restricts fertilizer use near water and when it rains, as well as strengthens existing laws against grass cuttings blown into the canals. However, the law does not take into account a plan for enforcement. A presentation in January by the Ocean Research and Conservation Association to the city council prompted the vote. Using funds from a partial Impact 100 grant, the group took water samples between the 17th Street and Merrill Barber Bridges and made a map illustrating high concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in areas around Miracle Mile, where rain washes contaminants into the lagoon from lawns, roads and parking lots.


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Rowing Club still searching for boathouse site BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- After being rebuffed by the City Council for land to build a boathouse at MacWilliam Park, the Indian River Rowing Club will continue to search for a suitable plot on the Intercoastal Waterway. The club’s 80 members currently row on the C54 Canal in Fellsmere, but want a central Vero Beach location for its younger rowers who aren’t able to conveniently get to and from practice at the remote location. “A community boathouse has to be well-positioned for the users,” said boathouse committee chairman Shotsi Lajoie. “That is why we were looking at the city-owned land, and we looked at several different locations between. Being close to the Barber Bridge, it would have been easy for the kids to get there after school.”

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Officials with the Indian River Rowing Club say they will continue to search for a suitable, centrally located site for their proposed boathouse. Lajoie cited the need for any future site to have roads and electricity, something undeveloped land doesn’t always offer. In spite of the vote against the site, and the vocal objections of some who oppose building the boathouse in MacWilliam Park, Lajoie remains optimistic about obtaining a site in the near future. “All over the country, cities donate land to build these kinds of facilities,” Lajoie said. “The project is far from dead, and if anything, all of the attention has brought people who support us out of the woodwork. We are deeply committed to making this happen.” The proposal the City Council turned down had been approved by the city’s Marine Commission, but rejected by the Recreation Commission, which also had oversight on the project.

Without a location in place, the club has to complete site plans for the proposed $3 million, two-story building. Some of the public comment against building at the MacWilliam Park site focused on giving away public land for a private, though nonprofit, enterprise. Others were concerned about losing some of the land for what has become an off-leash dog park. Still others worried that the boathouse would cause unsafe congestion for the adjacent City Marina, as well as for vessels passing through on the Intercoastal Waterway. “I think it’s an atrocious place to try and put a fleet of 60-foot boats,” said Vero Isles resident Vic Demattia, who has decades of nautical and boat building experience in the United States and South Africa. “In a regatta they could draw 100 boats, and it would

shut down both the marina as well as the waterway. It is difficult to imagine the intrusion on other boats the boathouse would cause along this part of the waterway for the City Marina, Grand Harbor, Quail Valley, or really anywhere they are harboring boats.” Demattia supports the concept of a boathouse, and he has offered his assistance in helping them find a suitable location to build. He was “flabbergasted” when they refused his help on the matter. “They don’t want to stay at the Motel 6, they want to stay at the Marriott,” he said. “I would be willing to help them find a place and I’ve already helped establish a committee to find the Youth Sailing Foundation a place,” added Demattia. “The best place is south of the Wabasso Causeway as far as I can tell.”

FERTILIZER

the river. But unless there are quantifiable standards and more science, we may never know the whole story about the lagoon’s source of pollution. “If everyone stopped putting fertilizer on their lawns, it won’t fix the river,” says Jones, whose organization is working on expanding the pollution map begun by the Ocean Research and Conservation Association that inspired Vero’s fertilizer ordinance. In addition to the sediment build

up, there are outside influences, such as mercury contamination that could be the result of rain clouds originating in Europe, said Jones. And, there is a level of antagonism toward environmental regulation during a sluggish economy. “Just last week, the Legislature removed inspection requirements on septic tanks,” said Jones, explaining that septic tanks that are not in optimal condition leech pollutants such as the e-coli bacteria into the waterways.

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ent criteria that “provides even less protection for the waterways,” said Jones. Although conservation groups like the Indian River Land Trust is limited in its role as advocate, the Indian Riverkeeper is bound by no such restrictions. “People like to point the finger at big ag,” said Jones, indicating citrus and other agricultural crops in the past have been blamed for polluting


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THE STORY BEYOND OUR

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THE POWER OF TWO:

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When you combine the readership of the Press Journal and our weekly publication, the Vero Beach Newsweekly, your advertising message has unparalleled reach among the people who live, work and shop within the Greater Vero Beach community. Simply put, we reach more adults than any other print combination.

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• Nine out of ten adults residing both in Indian River County and zip code 32963 read the Indian River Press Journal either in print or online each week. • The number of Indian River County adults reading the Press Journal, in print or online each week, grew by 3% (or 2,400 more adults) since last year. • The Vero Beach Newsweekly reaches every home on the barrier island, plus communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, Vero Beach Country Club, Indian River Country Club, Pointe West and Bent Pine. Source: Scarborough Research, 2011.

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Despite rain, artists and crowds come out for Under the Oaks Fine Art & Crafts show Though the weather wasn’t perfect there was enough sunshine over the weekend for artists to bring out their wares for the Under the Oaks art festival. The show is an annual event put on by the Vero Beach Art Club for the last 61 years and is their premiere event of the season. This event is considered one of the largest on the Treasure Coast and has the reputation for being one of the top 200 shows in the nation. Artists come from as far away as Israel and Canada and across the United States.

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• Lectures at 4pm & 6pm • Reception with speaker between lectures

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Bill to name bridge after Alma Lee Loy reaches the desk of Gov. Rick Scott TALLAHASSEE -- All that is needed to name 17th Street Bridge after Alma Lee Loy is the signature of Gov. Rick Scott. A proposal by Rep. Debbie Mayfield to rename the Vero Beach bridge after the former Indian River County commissioner passed the House last week. The Senate cleared the same bill the week before. House Bill 7309 is a 19-page proposal stuffed with many other new names for Florida roads and bridges and would bring a two-year bridge renaming effort by Mayfield to a close. The new name is set to become effective on July 1. “To say that I’m overwhelmed would in no way measure the gratefulness I have for all the people who worked on this bill,” Loy said recently. As an Indian River County commissioner, the 17th Street Bridge was a pet project for Loy. She spearheaded the effort to build the new bridge from Indian River Boulevard across the Indian River Lagoon to State Road A1A. The bridge cost $9.4 million to install in 1979. The retired businesswoman also is a philanthropist and Hospital Board member who has put more than 50 years of service into the community.


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VERO BEACH -- McKee Botanical Garden has recently started providing Guide by Cell, a cell phone-based audio tour for visitors. Guide by Cell offers visitors an opportunity to learn the history behind 11 of McKee’s most historic sites via their cell phones to dial in and access informative, pre-recorded messages. The sites are designated with signs throughout the garden, and upon admission, visitors receive step-by-step information on how to participate in the tour. The messages explain the significance of McKee landmarks such as the Cypress Stump, the Stone Bridge and the Royal Palm Grove. McKee Botanical Garden is located at 350 U.S. 1 in Vero Beach.

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McKee Botanical Garden offering tours by cell phone

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Bringing baseball back to Dodgertown

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Green was the color of the day for the Elk’s Club third St. Patrick’s Day parade this past weekend. Over 50 groups marched in the parade with Rhett Palmer serving as grand marshal. After the event, traditional corned beef and cabbage was served at the club.

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Elk’s Club brings out the Irish for annual parade

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Businessman James Coffey named Entrepreneur of Year by IR State College

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Vero Beach — Vero Beach businessman James W. Coffey received the Indian River State College 2012 Dan K. Richardson Entrepreneurship Program’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award this week. Coffey, 85, still goes to work several times a week in his third career as a real estate developer, but it’s his dedication to customer service that has remained steady throughout his career. “I was astonished,” said Coffey, when he learned of the award. “I’ve been here since 1946 but I really didn’t think I had done anything special that made me worthy of it.” The award recognizes entrepreneurial spirit and exceptional business achievement and is a central element of the Dan K. Richardson Entrepreneurship Program. The program was established by the IRSC Foundation and 13 other founding members to promote awareness and appreciation of the free enterprise system. Coffey moved to Vero Beach after World War II to launch a farming career with his father. In 1955, he entered the petroleum business, operating 23 service stations in the county that employed 175 people. He was president of the Earman Oil Co. in Vero Beach, and a spokesman for the national petroleum marketing industry. Under his management, the Courtesy House service station on Miracle Mile in Vero Beach was recognized by Time magazine as the world’s first “outof-this-world” service station. Coffey also operated the Courtesy House truck stop in Vero Beach, which was a comprehensive training program for all Union Oil truck stops throughout the United States.


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The hearing program was initiated in 1995, “when a few physicians asked the auxiliary if it would be possible to start a hearing test program for newborns, before it was ever mandated by the state of Florida,” said Stewart. The auxiliary purchased the equipment for the hospital’s program.

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Over the past 60 years, the Indian River Medical Center Auxiliary has supported the efforts of the hospital by providing more than 100,000 volunteer hours annually and a total of about $4 million to assist the hospital in its growth. At its diamond anniversary celebration last week, a characteristically modest affair in the hospital cafeteria, government officials brushed elbows with a corps of pink clad ladies and their male counterparts who comprise the 500-member organization. The Auxiliary was started in 1952 by Lucy Auxier and Sis Johnson at the recommendation of hospital founder, Garnett Radin. “There are 30 areas in the hospital that the auxiliary staffs,” said executive director, Mary Jane Stewart, including the information desks, transport of patients within the medical center, the gift shop and the maternity ward, where the Stork Club volunteers perform mandatory hearing tests on newborns. The Stork Club program was recently recognized by the Florida Department of Health’s Newborn Screening Program with a $900 check to help pay for supplies. The hearing test costs $10 per baby. Screening newborns for hearing loss became a state requirement in 2000 as a way of identifying and providing hearing aids when necessary to infants as young as one month old, to help in their development.

The Stork Club volunteers also visit new mothers, hand out parenting information and take photos of the newborns, the proceeds of which go into the auxiliary’s coffers. Pat Hahn, chairperson of the Stork Club, has been a volunteer at the hospital for 17 years, putting in between 50 and 70 hours a month. “When I saw a photo of the volunteers cuddling the babies, I knew that’s what I wanted to do when I retire,” Hahn said. In addition, the auxiliary raises funds for hospital programs through the gift shop, which has only one paid employee, and the thrift shop, which is owned by the organization and STAFF PHOTOS clears about $60,000 a year. Mayor Pilar Turner was one of the many dignitaries on hand to help the Indian “The Tree of Lights celebration, River Medical Center Auxiliary celebrate its 60 years of service. where people purchase lights for the Christmas tree in memory or honor of a loved one, helps support women’s health programs,” said Stewart. Although the auxiliary’s primary focus is helping to staff the hospital and serve its patients, the organization’s financial contributions are an ongoing source of support to the hospital. The auxiliary raises a yearly average of $100,000 through its events, which have helped cover the cost of renovating the hospital front lobby ($220,000), purchasing patient room furniture to match new hospital beds ($330,000), purchasing wheel chairs, stethoscopes, blanket warmers for the cancer center, and contributing $500,000 to the construction of the new emergency room. To be considered active, volunteers are required to donate 75 hours each year to the auxiliary. During the school year, there are about 40 teenage volunteers, between the ages of 15 and 18. During the summer, that number climbs to 100. Although it began as an all female

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organization, men were welcomed aboard in the mid 1960s. Now, 30 percent of the corps is male. “Imagine if someone came in the front door and we sent them to the wrong room,” said Jim Gosselin, who has volunteered for ten years at the hospital and maintains the auxiliary’s policy manuals so the volunteers have the most updated information at their fingertips at all times. Current auxiliary president, Barbara “Babs” Lyons, who just finished her second year as president, volunteers in the gift shop, while her husband, Terry Lyons, drives an outdoor transport cart. Anne Michael, who addressed the gathering, was 25 years old in 1952 and the new bride of citrus farmer Joe W. Michael when she was “approached to become the auxiliary’s first president,” she said. Alma Lee Loy amassed 500 volunteer hours at the hospital after college, between her job as a society editor for the Vero Beach Journal, “wearing bobby sox and saddle oxfords,” and opening her own business. Also among the guests were County Commissioner Joe Flescher, Vero Beach Mayor Pilar Turner, and Sandi Harpring, who spoke for State Representative Debbie Mayfield. In expressing appreciation for the auxiliary, Jan Donlan, executive director of the medical center’s foundation, told the group, “I really don’t believe we could run the hospital without you.”

One of the many services the auxiliary provides is hearing tests for newborns.

Covering

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Because no community is an island The neighborhoods that make up our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent. Get all the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper.

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To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


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Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com

I very much appreciated your Community Forum column on Feb. 16, as Mr. Schumann holds those wishing to sell the City’s electrical system, up to the light. Before the last city council election, I personally telephoned the “light bulb lady,” Tracy Carroll, to discourage her and her interests in selling out the electrical system. I received little consideration from her on my thoughts discouraging the sale. Mr. Schumann has it exactly correct, how badly is the City going to miss those electric system income dollars? . . . . Very badly I am afraid. If the City sells the system, they have eliminated their power to neCarrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor

Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com) Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

gotiate for the best rates. I have seen this very thing happen here in Illinois, and some towns are now paying as much as 50 percent above the norm because they sold their distribution lines etc. The distribution system is the important element, not the power generating plant. If the Council is going to sell the electrical system, then force the buyer to to pay a premium price; better yet, keep it and hunt up more competitive power sellers. I love your town, and have been hanging around down thee as a property owner for some 30 years. Preston Mathews Fairfield, Illinois

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Vero Electric

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Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

walk away from that obligation than a homeowner would be to stop making their mortgage payments. “The war will continue.” Please! This isn’t a war, and it’s not about whether the directors of FMPA are good guys or bad guys. This is about the market, and given the current over supply of electricity in Florida, even if the FMPA is as helpful as it possibly can be, there appears little chance a willing buyer stepping forward any time soon to assume Vero Beach obligations to the FMPA.

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Offering explanations that were exceedingly simplistic, Heran made it sound as if all it would take for Vero Beach to be free of its FMPA commitments would be for the agency’s board of directors to say “Be gone.” What Heran didn’t explain is that through its membership in FMPA Vero Beach knowingly and willingly assumed bond obligations and commitments to buy power. The city’s share of FMPA’s debt obligation is approximately $1 million a month, and the city is no freer to

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Attending a recent meeting of the South Beach Property Owners Association, I couldn’t help but wonder how relations between the city and county deteriorated to the point where a county commissioner would publically accuse the city of exercising tyranny over its utility customers. Commissioner Bob Solari likened the city’s relationship with its south barrier island customers to King George’s subjugation of the American colonies. Ironically, at the same time he pledged to “recapture” county customers now served by the city. “Set our people free,” Solari said. Well, to put this in some historical perspective, the city never captured the south barrier island, so the area can hardly be recaptured. Reclaimed maybe, but not “recaptured.” In the mid 1980’s, long before the county was able to provide water and sewer service to the south barrier island, it came to the city for help. Without requiring annexation in exchange, as many other cities have done, Vero Beach agreed to extend water and sewer service south of the city limits. Now that the county owns its own over-built water and sewer system it wants to reclaim, or “recapture,” the

south barrier island, and is even willing to spend a minimum of $3 million to directional bore under the Indian River Lagoon in order to repatriate the residents living there. “The county is going to do all it can so that when the franchise ends in 2017 we are serving you,” Solari told the crowd. By “do all we can,” Solari was probably referring to the county’s willingness to appeal to the state Legislature to set aside laws which prevent counties from “recapturing” utility service areas they once turned over to municipalities, areas they themselves were either unwilling or unable to serve. While this can all be made to sound like a noble cause, south barrier island residents might do well to pay attention to Solari’s choice of words. “Recaptured!” Hmmm. There are, after all, two ways of becoming discontent. Not getting what you want is one. Getting what you want is another. Utility activist Glenn Heran then reported on the “progress” in the city’s negotiations with Florida Power & Light. Continuing the military metaphor, Heran promised that if the Florida Municipal Power Agency doesn’t help Vero Beach get out of its contractual obligations to the power consortium “the war will continue.”

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Here’s to our Jim Coffey, who is living the American dream BY MILT THOMAS

Local businessman Jim Coffey was honored this week by Indian River State College as the 2012 Dan K. Richardson Entrepreneurship Program’s “Entrepreneur of the Year.” Many people know Jim and his accomplishments since coming to Vero Beach in 1946, but to understand the true meaning of living the American dream, you need to know about Jim before he came to Vero. Jim Coffey was born in 1926 in a dusty Georgia community that no longer exists. His parents, in fact all his family, were sharecroppers, a form of tenant farming that also no longer exists. For those who might not be familiar with the term, it was comparable to serfdom of the Dark Ages. After the Civil War, people too poor to own land worked on farms that were often former plantations. And they were treated like the former slaves who worked those plantations.

Sharecroppers were given shacks to live in and paid half of whatever they earned back to the landowner. They were not paid in cash as we know it, but in “pewter,” coins minted by MILT THOMAS the landowner. Pewter was legal tender only in local businesses, which were also owned by the same landowners. It was a form of bondage from which no one could escape if they wanted to feed their families. Just before Jim’s eighth birthday, well into the Great Depression, his father left the family and moved to Florida. Jim, along with his younger sister and mother, were kicked off the land, because without a man to work the farm, they had no standing with the landowner.

After wandering from farm to farm looking for a place to live, Jim Coffey finally convinced one landlord that he could do a man’s job. So, starting at the age of eight, Jim worked a muledrawn plow up to 16 hours a day. He only attended school between fall harvest and spring planting. This is the life he led until graduating from high school. By then, we were in the middle of World War II, so he served in the Pacific theater, including the occupation of Japan afterward. Jim returned home, but was determined not to live the rest of his life as a sharecropper. So, he moved to Florida and joined his father, who by now was a fairly successful tomato farmer. His farming career ended though after a major crop failure. This is where his business career began. Jim started out as a gas station attendant, then manager, then owner. No one worked harder than Jim Coffey and he treated customers with all

the respect and diligence he was never shown by the landowners of his childhood. As his career evolved, he joined Earman Oil Company, gradually becoming an owner, then began developing real estate. Although he rose from gas station attendant to successful developer, he owes his realization of the American dream to a childhood experience that no child should have to endure. Sharecropping ended by the 1950s because of mechanized farming. Tenant farmers moved to cities or up north, the shacks they lived in were plowed under and a cruel way of life disappeared from the American landscape. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/ author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

Litter is not a little matter, it lessens our corner of paradise BY REV. SCOTT ALEXANDER

One of the interesting things that results from my biking extensively through our community each day is that I notice little things along the roadside which many motorists miss. This is most often a joyful distinction, in that I often see wonderful subtleties of nature that you can only notice when you are “up close and personal” on a bike. As I bike at relatively slow speeds, I notice the interplay of sky and tree and cloud. Small delicate flowers – of so many different shapes and hues -- are one thing I constantly marvel at along the lush roads of Indian River County. And I constantly see an abundance of interesting animal life – birds soaring overhead or resting on the telephone wires or in the underbrush, snakes lazily sunning themselves, determined turtles moving slowly about, busy squirrels and rabbits

darting here and there. But I also sadly see the abundance of trash and garbage which citizens of our area thoughtlessly toss from their vehicles. REVEREND As I ride along our SCOTT ALEXANDER naturally beautiful roadways, my heart sinks when I see the many cans, and bottles, fast food wrappers, banana and orange peels, empty cigarette packs, and even the occasional broken-open bags of household garbage with rotting food, used diapers, and paper packaging spilling out. I haven’t lived here on the Treasure Coast long enough to say if this community problem of ours is getting worse, but I can say that those who litter are truly reducing the quality of

life and environment we all share. I have never quite understood what creates in people the disregard for others and the environment which leads to littering. I came from a family in Wisconsin that never littered. Not only were my parents ardent naturalists, they also taught my three brothers and me a diligent respect for the needs and rights of other life. Somehow, people who regularly and thoughtlessly litter have lost their sense of connectedness to and responsibility for the well-being not only of their neighbors, but of all of creation. I am not quite sure how to effectively address this scourge of littering in our community. Surely enforcement of monetary fines against those caught littering could help a bit, but most litterers cannot and will not be held to account in this way. And I am not sure that earnest newspaper

columns like this one will have any positive effect on those who have been rudely littering our roadsides for decades. Maybe our hope for a cleaner, more respectful world rests with our children, who can be taught – as I was – not to litter. I hope that in our homes, our schools, and in our religious congregations we will all regularly communicate to our young people the importance of their respecting and maintaining the purity of our natural environment. It may seem like a small thing to some, but to me it could make a huge difference in the quality of life we share. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.


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Dr. Glenn Tremml and Karren Walter sign autographs on the red carpet

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Charlotte Terry is helped out of the limo and led onto the red carpet by Charter High’s director Michael Naffziger

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VERO BEACH -- With all the glitz and glamour of a Hollywood premiere, Dancing with Vero’s Stars took the stage at Saint Edward’s Waxlax stage of the Performing Arts to find out who would win the coveted “Mirrored Ball.” At the end of the glittering affair the dance team of Charlotte Terry and her partner Roger O’Brien had collected enough donations and points on the judges scorecard to be declared the winners of the five-month long event. “I told them they needed to do a recount,” said Terry, “it was totally unexpected.” Stretch limos by Diamond Limousine brought dancers to the Red Carpet as paparazzi and young stage

door groupies begged for autographs dressed in 50’s finery, compliments of the Charter High School’s Theatrical Department. Friends enthusiastically waved placards of their favorite “Star” dancing team as they were led to the microphone and bright lights to be interviewed by last year’s winner, Bobby Guttridge. When Terry was asked before the show if she was nervous, she responded, “I have had two children by natural childbirth, and this is nothing!” she laughed. “Plus my mother and husband said I could not dance, so I have something to prove.” After enjoying their moment in the spotlight, where they divulged tidbits

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on their strategy and the designer of their dress attire, they were whisked off backstage to transform into glittering dance stars. Guests were treated to a gala cocktail reception as the anticipation built before the performance. “What a fun night this is,” said guest Donna Iseli, “and I love supporting Healthy Start which is such an important cause like Healthy Start.” Co-chairs Joseph Robinson and Brenda Lloyd welcomed the audience and the year’s celebrity judges, Director Mark Wygonik, Melbourne Ballroom’s Lance Sexton and Lauren Chapin, the young star who played “Kitten” of Father Knows Best. Emcees Hamp Elliot and Dana Daniels of radio station 93.7 The Breeze kept the mood light and fun as they introduced each team. Stars and their professional dance partners included Carl Fetzer and Joseph Robinson and Brenda Lloyd welcome the audience Emcees for the night, the Breeze’s Dana Daniels and Hamp Danielle Zimmerman; Laura Gutto the competition Elliott tridge and Tom Isola; Stacey Miller and Robert Scott; Mark Rodolico and Sandra Redfield; Joey Schlitt and Beth Shestack; Susanne Sweeney and Barry Trammell; Charlotte Terry and Roger O’Brien; Glenn Tremml and Karren Walter; and last but not least, Buck Vocelle and Amy Trammell. As newly learned tangos, salsas, waltzes and even a lindy hop were danced, audience members applauded each dip, twirl and lift. One special standout number by Stacey Miller and Robert Scott earned two perfect scores from the judges for their smooth and silky bolero which had Lauren Chapin thrilled. Winning points were accumulated over the five months by one point being earned by each dollar donated plus the judge’s scores. Indian River Healthy Start Coalition was the benefactor which raised over two hundred thousand dollars and sold out the night’s performance at 800 tickets. “The real winner here is the working mothers and the children which is what this event is all about and why we work so hard,” Terry said. Melissa Shine fans line up and show their support at the red carpet stroll


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Toby & Tuny Hill, Kim & Clark Beckett and Chris Hill

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Opera on the River raises money to benefit CASTLE BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Each year Marilyn and Kurt Wallach open their spacious Grand Harbor estate, Palacio del Rio, for an elegant benefit known as Opera on the River.   Guests were treated to solo performances by opera divas Karen Adair and Janet Rabe-Meyer

as part of the program. Guests were invited to enjoy cocktails by the river while live jazz played in the pavilion before moving into the elegantly appointed main event.   Attendees came out to support this annual event which raised over $10,000 for CASTLE, an organization which teaches par-

ents childcare education to prevent abuse and neglect.   “We built this home with these kinds of events in mind,” said hostess Marilyn Wallach, “so we could open our home to important causes.”   As to the question why opera? Marilyn Wallach responded, “Kurt has always loved opera since he was a ‘curtain puller’ in Cleveland and he introduced it to me.   Not all people enjoy the full experience of a lengthy opera, but here they are able to

experience it in an intimate surrounding.” “It is a wonderful thing for people to experience opera up close,” said Rabe-Meyers. Approximately 90 guests enjoyed selections by Verdi and Puccini and a duet of an aria from Carmen sans microphone.   “We are our own amplifiers,” said Rabe-Myers with a smile. CASTLE is a United Way partner organization and is supported by the area Children’s Services Councils.

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Marilyn Wallach, Laurie Billowith, Shira Mitchell and Kurt Wallach

Mezzo soprano Karen Adair begins her performance

Bob & Mary Miller, Theresa May and Mark Giers

Jerry DiBartolomeo, Merry Pat & Michael Dillman, Joe DeRoss, David Rieger, Barbara DiBartolomeo, Allen Osteen and Dani Lee


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Guests cheer for the opera divas

RE-ELECT

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Community Calendar EVERY FRIDAY ! Farmer’s Market 3-6 pm, downtown Vero, corner 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353. EVERY SATURDAY ! Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Ocean Dr. & Dahlia Ln. 772-532-2455. FIRST FRIDAY ! Downtown Gallery Art Stroll Art galleries and businesses open house receptions. Free. 772-299-1234. EVERY SUNDAY THROUGH APR 1 ! Vero Beach Polo Polo Grounds Field, 12th St. between 74th & 82nd Aves., 2 pm, $10+ per car. 772-778-222. THROUGH APR 30 ! Sculpting Nature 30 large scale art pieces in McKee Botanical Gardens, 350 S US1, $5-$9, 772-794-0601. MARCH 9-18 ! Firefighters’ Fair Indian River County Fairgrounds, 7955 58th Ave. Go to firefightersfair. org for all pricing and schedules. MARCH 16 ! Spring Fest Vero Beach Community Center, 2266 14th Ave., the David Light Band, 11:30 am-2 pm, $7. 772-770-6517. ! “West Side Story” Screening at Majestic Theatre to benefit Gifford Youth Activity Center, 4:30 pm, $10, gift basket raffle. 772794-1005. MARCH 17 ! Bridges to Life Walk, 9 am registration, 1 to 5 miles, Riverside Park, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., Benefit for Care Net Pregnancy Center. 772-569-7939. ! Pelican Island Wildlife Festival Paddle Wild for Wildlife, 12 pm regTHURSDAY, MAR. 15

STAFF PHOTO

Workers prepare for another day at the Indian River County Firefighter’s Fair which runs through Sunday. If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@ gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. istration, 2 pm human powered craft race to benefit the Pelican Island Society, Riverview Park, Sebastian. 772202-0220. ! “Shrek Forever After” Movie at Pointe West, 1999 Pointe West Dr., (wear green and get a prize), free, 7 pm.  772-794-9912. MARCH 18 ! Open House & lecture “Security and Living Without Fear” by Christian Science Lecturer, Suzanne Riedel at First Church of Christ, Scientist, 1602  23rd St. at 16th Ave. MARCH 19 ! Have a Heart Bridge Tournament For Dogs for Life, Oak Harbor Clubhouse, 4755 South Harbor Dr., 11 am, $75 includes bridge & lunch. 772567-8969. ! ORCA Science Café Majestic Theatre, 940 14th Ln., 10

FRIDAY, MAR. 16

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$120, tickets online at www.jlir.org. 772-234-5770. ! SafeSpace’s Gala Fundraiser “Every Woman is My Sister,” Grand Harbor, 4945 Club Terr., speaker Dr. Stephanie Haridopolis, $125. 772223-2399. ! Goby Gest 10 am-4 pm, Sebastian River State Park, Fellsmere, educational booths, marine-life, food & refreshments. 321-750-4361. MARCH 24-25 ! Garden Club Flower Show Garden Center, 2526 17th Ave., Sat 2-6, Sun 12-4, free. 772-563-3598. MARCH 25 ! Art in the Park Vero Beach Art Club members’ exhibition, Humiston Park, free. 3000 Ocean Dr., 772-231-0303. MARCH 25-26 ! VBHS Concert Symphonic & Jazz Bands, Annual Red, White & Blue Concerts, $6-$12, Mar 25, 2 & 7 pm and Mar 26 at 7 pm in the VBHS Performing Arts Center. 772-564-5537. MARCH 26 ! Dancing Under the Stars 2 Royal Palm Pointe, 6:30-9 pm, Recreation Dept. annual dance, $1 per person. 772-231-4787. MARCH 28 ! “Governors’ Own” 13th Army Band of the Florida National Guard with the VBHS Band, 7 pm in the VBHS Performing Arts Center, 1707 16th St., free. 772-564-5497. ! American Cancer Society Gala Belle Notte, “A Beautiful Night to Celebrate Life” 6:30-9 pm Quail Valley River Club, 2345 Hwy. A1A. 772562-2272.

am, free to $10, “Poisoned Waters” film & talk. 772-770-0774. MARCH 22 ! “Angels Help Our Kids Take Flight” Boys & Girls Club cocktail reception and dinner, Sun Aviation Hangar, 3350 Cherokee Dr., 6 pm, $275.  772299-7449. MARCH 23 ! Physicians Symposium & Luncheon Women’s Refuge, Quail Valley River Club, 2345 Hwy. A1A, noon, $90. 772-770-4424. MARCH 24 ! “A Change of Art” Vero Beach Museum of Art, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., exhibits, FunShop youth art workshop, members/free, nonmembers/$2, 1-3 pm. 772-231-0707. ! Jr. League “Tour of Homes,” 10 am-4 pm, 5 homes, $35 or 4 for To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SUNDAY, MAR. 18

MONDAY, MAR. 19

TUESDAY, MAR. 20

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 21

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“But there’s also a lot of fun to be found in the play,” Shaw added, to which, Bickell agreed. “Their crankiness can be terribly funny. I saw the Cronyns do the play and to watch the two of them together…the way they’d needle each other and yet you’d see this tremendous affection,” Bickell said. While Weller Martin lost a wife and three children to a divorce in his younger life as well as business and financial setbacks that have left him virtually penniless, Fonsia Dorsey was married only four years, had a son and never married again. “She was glad to see him (her husband) go and has been bit-

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Ross Bickell plays Weller Martin and Margery Shaw plays Fonsia Dorsey in ‘The Gin Game’ now on stage at the Riverside Theatre.

Directed by Riverside Theatre Producing Artistic Director Allen Cornell – who also designed the sets – The Gin Game stars stage veterans Ross Bickell and Margery Shaw who spoke about the play and their characters with Vero Beach Newsweekly after a day of rehearsals. Bickell, in the role of former businessman Weller Martin, notes his character “cannot bear to lose” the gin games because “he’s been losing something all his life.” Fonsia Dorsey, a once brieflymarried mother of a chronically absent son, is similarly without visitors and “fibs” about the reasons for that, according to Shaw. “The sense of aloneness is irreparable,” Bickell said.

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Getting old is not for sissies. Entering Act III of one’s life is fraught with the challenges of diminished physical (and sometimes mental) abilities, loss of loved ones and a tendency to focus on the memories of what was rather than what will still be. But for all of that, the “golden years” also offer respite from the grind of working life and an opportunity to look deeper into oneself. D.L. Coburn’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play The Gin Game, which performs March 15 – 25 on the Waxlax Stage of Riverside Theatre, is a tragicomedy featuring two elderly residents of a nursing home who engage in a conversational retrospective of their lives while engaged in games of gin rummy.

And as is the case with most lives, Weller Martin and Fonsia Dorsey have unresolved issues and emotional “baggage” which they’ve been toting around for quite a while which ultimately leads to competitive battles as each attempts to win a card game. Being a “winner,” if only for a hand of cards, can mean so much when one has lost so much. And so a card game becomes a metaphor for their lives and if the elderly pair seems quite alone without visitors at the nursing home, it’s a sad situation not without reason, as the audience will learn. The play, which performed on Broadway starring Hume Cronyn and his real-life wife Jessica Tandy and directed by Mike Nichols, garnered rave reviews and has since been revived for the stage and television.

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ter toward men ever since and that comes out and is directed at Weller,” Shaw said. “Yet at the end, maybe Fonsia has a little epiphany… or maybe not.” Bickell noted that there is nothing in Weller’s situation to make him change because “it’s always somebody else’s fault.” His chronic gin rummy losses become stand-ins for his life’s losses and Weller’s anger and frustration erupt with the spewing of cussing aimed at Fonsia. “They’re perfect archetypes,” Shaw said with a smile. Although Bickell’s character isn’t always likeable, he likes Weller. “I found something boundlessly exhilarating in performing it. The play doesn’t end at the end and by that time we, as actors, have shared something with the audi-

ence,’ Bickell said. “You feel that you’ve all gone on a journey together and have had a willingness to say, ‘let’s share.’” Similarly, Shaw likes Fonsia, who lets Weller win a hand. But like Weller, she, too, has experienced deep losses as a result of the way in which she led her life. “I love her, oh, yes. She’s done it (life) all wrong but I get why she got it all wrong.” Shaw said. Do they “get it right” before it’s too late? Can a person well along in years finally look inward with truth and clear vision? Can each of us learn from this cautionary tale? Sit down for a gin game and find out. The Gin Game performs March 15-25 on the Waxlax Stage at Riverside Theatre located at 3250 Riverside Park Drive in Vero Beach. Tickets are $40 and may be purchased by calling the box office at (772) 231-6990 or online at www. riversidetheatre.com.

Victoria Wyeth to give lecture at Vero Beach Musuem of Art VERO BEACH -- Victoria Wyeth will give the fourth and final lecture of the Vero Beach Museum of Art’s 2012 International Lecture Series on March 26. Wyeth, the granddaughter of artist Andrew Wyeth, will give two presentations one at 4 p.m. and a second at 6 p.m. A light wine reception with an opportunity to meet the speaker bridges the two presentations and takes place at 5 p.m. In her talk she will explore the subject matter, technique and inside stories surrounding the major works of her late grandfather, Andrew Wyeth. She will cover from his first watercolor at age 6 to his final tempera painted on Benner Island, Maine in 2009. Born in 1917 and trained by his father, artist N.C. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth became one the best known artists of the 20th century. His realist and regional style stood in sharp contrast to the changing fashions of art movements of his day. Tickets for each lecture are $65 for the general public; $55 for museum members and may be pur-

VICTORIA WYETH

chased at the Vero Beach Museum of Art, by phone at (772) 231-0707, or online registration at www.verobeachmuseum.org.

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art, music, culture, economics and human ingenuity. The ship was 1,000 feet long, 11 stories high and comprised of 46,000 tons of steel. On board, was a Marconi telegraph system that up until recently had only been used for shipto-shore communication. Now, as technology was progressing, the telegraph had been introduced as a form of ship-to-ship communication. As it turns out, another ship, the Californian, was only ten miles away when the Titanic sunk. Had it received the S.O.S. signal, all 2,200 passengers might have been saved; but, the telegraph operator on the Californian had gone to bed for the night. Andrew Blizman, a noble addition to the musical performance, plays the telegraph operator, Harold Bride. Kate Murphey (Collette Lavoie Loo, who also plays the scandalously young wife of John Astor, Madeleine), Kate Mullins (Kari Rogers), and Kate McGowan (Robyn Thompson), -“it’s not fate, “it’s Irish” – make beautiful music together on stage. Add the high notes from Glynis Sherman, as Ida Straus, wife of Macy’s founder Isidor Straus, and the delicious baritone of Donna Roberts Mitchell, as Mrs. Etches, senior steward, and suddenly the audience realizes the richness of this tapestry.

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ble spirit, and the privileged – who engage the audience at a deeply personal level. In the competent hands of director Denise Lee, the actors’ exuberance, panache and stellar voices come together in a splendid harmony unexpected in community theater. J. Bruce Ismay, the egotistical, gregarious and ultimately selfish owner of the ship, is played skillfully by John Toohey, who also was the musical director and deserves credit for helping to choose the rich and lively variety of musical voices that carries the production. As Ismay, his desire to impress, conquer and crush the competition creates a unique opportunity to look at hierarchies in western society, the greed and corruption, as he demands ever greater speed. After a maritime career without incident, Captain E.J. Smith (Dennis Love), on his final voyage before retirement, believed he was invincible. He ignored the many iceberg warnings and charged full steam ahead, and at the end he went down with the ship, while Ismay escaped with his life. While there’s no shortage of love, longing and lust, the production provides a closer look at an interesting juncture in history, placing the Titanic in a precise context of science,

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PHOTO SUPPLIED

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One hundred years ago, the mighty ship Titanic struck an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland, and sunk, sending 1,500 people to their death in the icy water. “Titanic: The Musical,” which opened at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild Thursday, tells the story about what happened in a masterful production that is both operatic and highly dramatic. The story comes to life with lavish period costuming and a large cast of 39 actors who just beam with talent and innocence, not yet knowing their fate. A most poignant scene is when John David Panula, playing a tourist from Poughkeepsie arrives at the pier in England, having missed the boat. “The story of my whole damned life,” he cries as he stomps off. Many of the passengers were Irish immigrants in the third-class deck below, going to the new world to find a better life. They were never told the boat was sinking. The second-class passengers were mostly Americans moving up in stature, with industry on the rise and their future – limitless, traveling on the largest moving vehicle in the world. Among the first-class passengers were many well known millionaires, including Benjamin Guggenheim, John Astor and a founder of Macy’s department store, all who perished on the Titanic. There were simply not enough lifeboats for all the passengers on board, not by a long shot. Written by Peter Stone and scored by Maury Yeston, the show opened on Broadway in 1997 to much skepticism about its potential for success, documenting one of the worst disasters in history. The play so resonated with audiences, however, it became an instant hit and won a Tony for best musical. The legendary disaster is retold through archetypal characters – the leader, the romantic, the indomita-

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Robin Volsky, playing Frederick Barrett, who stokes the coal keeping the steam engine running, is a force to be reckoned with. Andre Schofield, as the lookout, is sublime. Delightful performances also by Alice Beane (Robin Ecklord Spalin), who definitely has the lion’s share of comedic lines in the play, and her husband Edgar Beane (Panula) add depth to the archetypes.

VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

M A R C H

Batten down the hatches, the Titanic comes to town


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Covering of Vero Beach Because no community is an island The neighborhoods that make up our greater community continue to become more, not less connected and interdependent. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t settle for just a fraction of the news you need. Read the Newsweekly, your community weekly newspaper from cover to cover.

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772.696.52 33

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


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ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

VERO BEACH -- The Vero Beach Museum of Art is presenting free of charge the exhibition Stephen Knapp: Lightpaintings through May 20. The exhibition, installed in the Museum’s Stark Gallery, showcases five of Knapp’s colorful and unique works of art. Knapp creates his lightpaintings by using special glass treated with metallic coatings that act as a selective prism, separating light into different frequencies of the spectrum. He considers these an extension of his long-

term interests as an artist. “I have been fascinated with light all my life,” Knapp said recently, “both for what it can do and for the effect it has on us.” After pursuing a successful career as a fine art photographer, he began experimenting with ways of reflecting light on various surfaces and refracting light into hues of great purity. The exhibition is open Monday through Saturday from 10 am to 4:30 pm; and Sundays from 1 pm to 4:30 pm.

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N E W S W E E K L Y

Stephen Knapp assembling one of his unique lightpaintings (consisting of light, glass, and stainless steel) for an exhibition.

VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Ave verobeachtheatreguild.com Mar 15-Apr 1:  Titanic the Musical, 2, 7 & 8 pm

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VERO BEACH THEATRE GO-ROUND 772-252-9341 Elk’s Lodge 1350 26th Street Mar 18: Disco Divas, 4:30 pm cocktails, 6 pm dinner & show, $45

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SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Mar 15: Michael Flatley, Lord of the Dance, 7 pm, $55/$49 Mar 16: 50 Years of Doo Wop, 8 pm, $75/$49/$39

VERO BEACH OPERA verobeachopera.org 772-569-6993 Box Office:  772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Mar 18: VBHS Performing Arts Center, Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, 7 pm Mar 31: VBO Scholarship Student Piano Recital, Community Church, 1901 23rd Street, 1 pm

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SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Various Locations 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org Mar 17: French Classics, Trinity Episcopal Church, 7 pm, 2365 Pine Avenue, 7 pm, $20 Mar 23: Verdi’s Requiem, Trinity Episcopal Church, 7 pm, 2365 Pine Avenue, 7 pm, $20

3001 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-0707 Mar 15: Warm Nights Cool Music, Live Jazz in outdoor sculpture garden, 5-7 pm, $10 Mar 21: TC Jazz Society, “A Tribute to Benny Goodman” by Terry Myers 18 pc Orchestra, 7:30 pm, $50 Mar 25: Atlantic Classical Orchestra # 3, 4-6 pm, $30/$40 Mar 26: International Lecture Series, Andrew Wyeth Then and Now, Victoria Wyeth, 4 & 6 pm, $55/$65

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VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART

RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Stark Main Stage: Feb 23-Mar 25: The Music Man, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $57-$73 Second Stage: Mar 15-25: The Gin Game, 2 pm, 7:30 & 8 pm, $40 Comedy Zone: Mar 30-31: Tim Statum and TBA, 7 pm & 9:30 pm, $15 Children’s Theatre: Mar 23-Apr 15: Rapunzel and Me, the Muzical, 3/23, 7:30 pm, 3/24, 3/25, 4/1, 4/14 & 4/14 1:30 pm, $10-$16

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EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Mar 22: Seth Bramson “The Florida East Coast Railway, Speedway To Sunshine,” 7 pm, free Mar 24: American Novelist Edwidge Danticat, 4 pm, $25-$50 Mar 31: Bob Woodward, Celebrated Speakers Series, 4 & 7 pm, $65

Mar 16-18: Sister’s Easter Catechism “Will My Bunny Go to Heaven?,” 3, 7 & 8 pm, $35 Mar 18: An Evening with Tony Bennett, 7 pm, $125/$95 Mar 20: Bob Newhart, 7 pm, $65/$55 Mar 21: Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt, 8 pm, $59/$49 Mar 22: Brian Culbertson & David Benoit: Piano2Piano, 7 pm, $39/$35 Mar 23: An Evening with Debbie Reynolds, 8 pm, $49/$45 Mar 24: Britishmania, Beatles Tribute, 8 pm, $45/$39 Mar 25: National Touring Company of The Color Purple, 7 pm, $60/$50 Mar 28: Neil Sedaka, 7 pm, $69/$59 Mar 31: Kevin Costner and Modern West, 8 pm, $49/$39

M A R C H

COMMUNITY CHURCH OF VERO BEACH

Community Concert Series 1901 23rd Street 772-778-1070 Mar 30: Concert for World Peace: John Rutter’s “Mass of the Children,” 7:30 pm, $25/$10

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Museum to display Entertainment Calendar Knapp’s Lightpaintings


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Sports

Patriots softball team is off to solid start

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -Master’s Academy softball is carrying the torch for the school’s upstart athletic program, starting the season 5-2 and as their district’s defending champions. As the program with most complete athletic facilities on campus, the softball team is looking to add another “district champion” sign to their outfield fence’s growing collection. The team is young with slugging center fielder McKayla Elam, the lone senior on Coach Shawn Ramirez’s talented squad. Elam, a switch-hitter, hit three inside-thepark home runs against Brevard HEAT earlier this season, ending the game with four hits and nine RBIs. “The funny thing is, McKayla hit the first two home runs right-handed,” Ramirez said. “But the third one -- a grand slam -- she hit lefthanded. She loves her some softball.” Stephanie Jones and Leighann Thompson, the starting first and third basemen respectively, are juniors. “After the three upper classmen, the rest of the lineup consists of sophomores and freshmen,��� athletic director Charles Brown said.

“That’s a product of us building our program through the middle school on up. As an athletic director, that makes me excited.” Ramirez said the program’s youth is both its strength and weakness. “Being so young, sometimes I think the big name teams like John Carroll and the Fort Pierce teams get into our head,” Ramirez said, referring to his team’s 17-2 loss to the Rams at the beginning of the season. “But I think we’ve calmed down now that they’ve seen we can play with those teams. They play ball the same as we do, and I think we’ve calmed down now that our players know we can play with bigger schools like that. Nobody likes to lose, but I think we’ve learned from our losses.” “The next two years I only lose three players, and I have five freshmen coming up next year,” Ramirez added. “The future is looking very good for us.” Sophomore pitchers Sierra Ramirez and Andi Sempsrott have given the Patriots strong outings all season, as the team’s ace pitchers. “I don’t classify either of one of my pitchers as number one or a two,” Ramirez said. “Andi started the first game and they have alternated ever since. Once the playoffs come, I’m going to see who is hot,

put the ball in their hands, and see where it goes. But for districts, I might just keep the same rotation just because it has worked so well for us so far this year.” Ramirez, who has a handful of double-digit strikeout performances pitching has also been one of the team’s leading hitters.

“In our district, our softball program has been a step above the other teams so far, and we are looking forward to continuing that,” Brown said. “In looking at both last year’s team and this year, this year’s team has more talent. I think this team can go a little bit further in the playoffs than they did last year.”

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The Master’s Academy softball team is off to a 5-2 start this season and looking to defend its district title.


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SPORTS

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The Vero Beach High School baseball team is on a four-game winning streak and improved its record to 7-3. been shutting opposing teams down as the team’s closer. “Jared Huff and Delaney Wilson each have an ERA under 1.50, and they are throwing the ball really well,” said starting catcher, junior Jordyn Cruz. “Our ace is Alex Dermody, he’s throwing okay, but I know he will throw better once he is 100 percent. My job has been real easy with all of our pitchers throwing strikes.” It isn’t just the pitching that has stepped up, the team has received a heavy dose of offense while building up its record. Senior left fielder Kellen Cooney and junior shortstop Chris

Kazen have made their practice time count this season, putting in extra hitting and conditioning en route to giving the Indians two legitimate top of the order hitters. Cooney, with his outstanding speed on the base paths, is a threat to steal every time he gets on base. He has three doubles, two triples and home run. Kazen, who’s been starting on varsity since he was a freshman, has bounced back from 2-for-11 start to show more of the promise he showed his first two seasons. “It isn’t a real surprise to me that Kellen has played so well -- he had a great

pre-season,” Kazen said. “He’s looking like one of the best hitters on the team. I came out with high expectations and put way too much pressure on myself. The past few games I’ve put together a few hits, so it looks like all the extra work and conditioning that I’ve done has begun to pay off.” Cruz says it is only a matter of time before the entire top of the order starts producing. “With Kellen and Chris getting on base, and with (senior left fielder) Austin Todd and me driving them in,” Cruz said. “We’re going to be really tough when it is all said and done this season.”

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VERO BEACH -- A year ago at this time the Vero Beach High School baseball team was struggling to get to .500 and struggling to produce runs. How much can change in a year? The Fighting Indians are riding a four-game winning streak -- the team’s longest since April 2010 -- and by all accounts, they are just getting started. The mix of experienced upperclassmen and upstart underclassmen has combined to push the team to a 7-3 record, and they have their eye on the district title that eluded last year’s 15-13 team. “We’re playing a very good team in W.T. Dwyer twice coming up, and that will be a good test for our team,” said junior pitcher Alex Dermody. “We have Centennial coming up along with Treasure Coast, and that will kind of show us where we are at within our district.” Dermody, 1-1, went into the season as the ace and most experienced varsity pitcher after loss of top pitchers Eric Enrico and Will Ore to graduation. With Dermody fighting a back injury, sophomore starting pitchers Delaney Wilson (3-0) and Jared Huff (3-1) have showed they are more than capable of logging big innings. Rounding out this unexpectedly deep pitching staff is senior transfer Thomas Stirrat (John Carroll), who has

M A R C H

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Dining Quilted Giraffe: good food overall with a limited menu

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BY MARK JOSEPH

Heading out of town for the evening and with dinner time soon at hand, we thought of the Quilted Giraffe for two reasons; we had never dined there and it was located in the direction we were traveling. Pulling into the parking lot we noticed the restaurant’s landmark, a tall multicolored giraffe that stands watch over the outside of the building where it’s served as a quirky landmark to this roadside restaurant on south US 1 for over 13 years. There is also a smaller quilted giraffe in the rear parking lot as well. Aside from their whimsical mascot looming near the doorway, the outside of the building is plain and practically unnoticeable from busy US 1. However, after walking inside, it quickly becomes apparent the Giraffe is trying its best to be pretentiously formal. The dining room of the Quilted Giraffe could have easily been a large room in my grandmother’s home; with its elegant antique accents including vintage lamp shades and large print drapes, the restaurant’s formal, yet outdated decor may be characteristically charming, however the stains on the carpet were not. For starters we decided to select two appetizers to share between the three of us: the pan seared crab cake with fresh herbs remoulade and the southwest cilantro grilled shrimp. The pan seared crab cake appetizer was a single crab cake on a small bed of greens. The crab cake was far too predictable in appearance and flavor to be memorable. The grilled southwestern shrimp -- the more favorite of the two -came with a portion of five pieces.

The shrimp had a deep smoky grilled flavor and was properly cooked but would have been much better with a side sauce. It was not distinctive enough to order again. In addition to our appetizers, two of us chose the soup of the day which was sirloin chowder. Opulent in texture and flavor, this thick soup was an epicurean delight. The chowder’s stew-like consistency was most likely brought about by a slow simmering process with a very beefy flavor and with just the right spices. The sirloin chowder was indeed delightful. The menu included a list of several entree choices and though sufficient, the selections were limited. Included with the regular menu items was the catch of the day, mahi-mahi beurre blanc, chicken breast rollatini and a surf and turf. The surf and turf was a simple flank steak with grilled prawns. The flank steak was not only cooked rare as ordered, the meat was so tender that a steak knife was not required. The flank steak was every bit as flavorful as it was tender and the best of its kind that we could remember. The grilled shrimp were good, but the plain presentation did not stand up to the quality of the steak. The chicken breast rollatini was a boneless chicken breast, stuffed with a generous filling that consisted of spin-

ach, Fontina cheese, country ham and finished in a mushroom sherry sauce. The thick breast of chicken was perfectly cooked and surprisingly moist and even large enough to share. It was so good, not even grandma could have made better stuffed chicken than this. One of the most confusing things about the evening was the way in which the vegetables and/or side dishes were described. Most entree selections included a choice of soup or salad, a vegetable, and potatoes or couscous. The side dishes were all listed at the bottom of the menu, but at a quick glance, it was difficult to decipher which were included with each entree. When we asked the waiter to clarify, his response was even stranger by replying - “Don’t worry, you’re going to get both.” The problem is that I really did not want the potatoes, but rather the couscous that was listed as the other side choice. However, before I could interject, the waiter had already moved on to my dinner companions with the same urgency. My mahi-mahi served in beurre blanc sauce was nothing special, only a small piece of pan-seared fish that lacked seasoning. The dish arrived with even less impressive mashed potatoes and the vegetable of the day was small serving of sautéed Brussels sprouts. I found myself wishing I had interrupted the waiter long enough

to ask for the couscous instead of the potatoes, as I had originally intended. The dessert menu was perhaps the weakest link of this entire evening. The chocolate sundae was nothing more, than a scoop of ice cream, chocolate syrup squeezed from a bottle and the addition of a request for whipped cream that mysteriously showed up on the guest check as an extra charge; a surprise that is never a pleasant one. The second person in our party chose cheesecake, which was a simple slice with whipped cream on either side, however this time no additional charge for whipped cream. It was good cheesecake; your standard garden variety. Finally and again the least impressive of the three desserts was the apple pie. The waiter also informed me no vanilla ice cream was available for pie a la mode, but he did said he would have the pie heated. After such a disappointing entree I was hoping for a nice flakey crust with tender spiced apples, but this was not the case. What was brought to me was a lukewarm slice of pie with a thin, doughy almost soggy crust and a filling that tasted straight out of a can. It was very disappointing. Our dinner experience that evening was not completely disappointing since most of the food was very good and since the limited menu seems to stay the same, we’ll know which favorite items to choose when dining there again next time. Dinner for three before tip: $100

The Quilted Giraffe 500 South US 1, Vero Beach, FL 32963 772-978-4242 Hours: Dinner only, Tuesday through Sunday from 4:30 p.m. Reservations suggested. Most major credit cards.


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Cuisines of Vero

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Now Open for Dinner

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Lemon Tree – Love it!

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great breakfast, great lunch, great dinner


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Obituaries William John ‘Bill’ Frey William John “Bill” Frey died Feb. 29 after a brief battle with pulmonary fibrosis. He became an early franchisee of Burger King and owned and operated restaurants in the Boston area for many years. He met the love of his life, Barbara “Bunny” Hendrick, at the University of Miami. They were married in New York in 1967, and their daughter Melissa was born two years later. Bill was a deeply dedicated family man and gave tirelessly of himself to St. Augustine Episcopal Church in Vero Beach; and the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach. He was instrumental in forming and fostering the Celebrated Speaker Series at the Emerson Center of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach. He is survived by: his wife Bunny; his daughter Melissa and son-in-law Craig Mazin of La Canada Flintridge, Calif.; his grandchildren Jack and Jessica. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the following organizations: St. Augustine Episcopal Church (475 43rd Avenue, Vero Beach, FL 32968), Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach (1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach, FL 32960) or El Hogar Ministries, Inc. (70 Church Street, Winchester, MA 01890).

Irene E. Poderis Irene E. Poderis, 78, died Feb. 29, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center. She was a winter resident of Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Schenectady, N.Y. Before retirement, she was a secretary for the Mohonasen School District in New York. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Anthony Poderis; and daughters, Susan Masto of Schenectady, Carolyn Champouillon of Hillsborough, N.J., and Sharon Caruso of Latham, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach & Indian River County, Attn: Connie Cotherman, Asst. Development Director, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Herbert M. Bergen Jr. Herbert M. Bergen Jr., 87, died Feb. 4, 2012, at his home. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul’s Church, 664 Azalea Lane, Suite C, Vero Beach, FL 32963. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Charlotte Marie Boyle Charlotte Marie Boyle, 85, died March 6, 2012, at Rosewood Manor in Vero Beach. She was born in Elizabeth City, N.C., and lived in Vero Beach for eight years, coming from St. Augustine. She was of the Catholic faith. Before her retirement, she was the manager of a flower shop in Nebraska. She was a master gardener with the state of Florida. Survivors include her daughters, Kathy Myers of Fort Pierce and Mary Susan McGuire of Arcadia; four grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Wilma S. Clemons Wilma S. Clemons, 81, died March 4, 2012, at VNA Hospice House. She was born in Chattaroy, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach since 1954, coming from Charleston, W.Va. She was a seamstress for 20 years with Wodtkes’ Department Store. Survivors include her daughter, Margaret Maxwell Wilson of Vero Beach; three grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and one greatgreat-grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Lee James Jackson Lee James Jackson, 75, died Feb. 28, 2012, in Vero Beach. He was born in Millen, Ga., and lived in Indian River County for more than 60 years. Survivors include his wife, Clara Russ Jackson of Vero Beach; brothers, Robert Jackson, Thomas Jackson and David Jackson, all of Vero Beach, Moses Jackson of Miami, and Edward Jackson of Millen; sisters, Ollie Jackson of Palatka, and Dorothy Morgan and Mentoria Ross, both of Vero Beach, and Ollie Mae Mosley and Eva Stevens, both of Millen.

Patricia Sue Langbehn-Nelson Patricia Sue Langbehn-Nelson, 76, died March 5, 2012, at the VNA/Hospice House. She was born in Okmulgee, Okla., and lived in Vero Beach for 55 years, coming from Oklahoma. She was owner/operator of Langbehn’s Bakery. She was a parishioner at St. Helen Catholic Church. She was one of the original founders of the St. Helen Madames, and was a member of the Catholic Women’s Society. She served on the board of St. Francis Manor in Vero Beach for 30 years, as well as social director and volunteer. She was a member of the Red Hat Society and the Ovarian Cancer Support Group. Survivors include her daughters, Sharon Langbehn Noriega of Vero Beach, Leonissa Langbehn-Dean of North Conway, N.H., Cynthia Langbehn Gruber of Vero Beach and Georgenna Langbehn Biganzoli of Ocala; son, Wayne Langbehn of Pompano Beach; stepchildren, Brenda Williams, Soozi Schuble, Charlie Bill Nelson and Jani Young; four grandchildren; one great-grandchild; 12 step-grandchildren; and 13 stepgreat grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Francis Manor, 1750 20th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Mary Harriett Nicholls Mary Harriett Leggett Nicholls, 99, died March 6, 2012, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Charleston, Miss., and lived in Vero Beach, coming from Michigan. She worked for J.L. Hudsons Deptartment Store, now Macys for many years. She belonged to First United Methodist Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her son, James W. Nicholls; daughter, Suzanne Cote Gault; three grandchildren; two step grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and four stepgreat grandchildren. Burial will be in Glen Eden Cemetery in Livonia, Mich. next to her husband.

Gladys ‘Sunny’ Nottage Gladys “Sunny” Nottage, 92, died March 1 2012, at Streamway Villa in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. She was born in London, England, and lived at Vista Royale in Vero Beach for 40 years, and also in Cobourg, Ontario, Canada. She lived through the bombing of London during World War II. She worked as a waitress and housekeeper in the hospitality industry. Survivors include her sons, Colin and Chris; sister, Violet: eight grandchildren; and 13 greatgrandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.MacCoubrey.com.

Arsenio M. Porras Boyd W. Mayo Jr. Boyd W. Mayo Jr., 90, died March 4, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Fitzgerald, Ga., and lived in Vero Beach for six years, coming from Miami. He served in the Army during World War II and the Korean War. He retired from the Southern Bell Telephone Company in Miami as an accountant after 49 years. Survivors include his wife of more than 60 years, Betty Mayo; son, Michael Mayo of Chatham, N.J.; daughters, Janet Kahler of Lake Wales and Martha Magnuson of Foster City, Calif.; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Arsenio M. Porras, 69, died Sunday, March 4, 2012, at his home. He was a resident of Indian River County for many years. Survivors include his wife, Virginia Cordero of Vero Beach; son, Gustavo Porras of Vero Beach; daughter, Aliuchi Porras of Vero Beach; sisters, Digna Porras of Miami and Joaquina Porras of Fort Myers; four grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren.

Vera E. Powell Vera E. Powell, 94, died March 3, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Valley, Neb., and lived in Vero Beach for 63 years, coming from Mount Clemons, Mich. She was a member of King’s


37

OBITUARIES

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Janet Marie Capak Janet Marie Capak, 65, died Feb. 8, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Warren, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach. She was a licensed practical nurse and retired

Daniel James Creswell Daniel James Creswell, 83, died March 9, 2012, at the VNA Hospice House. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., coming to Vero Beach 30 years ago from Staten Island, N.Y. Before retirement, he was a seaman for offshore oil tankers for 20 years. He served in the Coast Guard. He was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church. Survivors include his daughters, Patricia Brokaw of Vero Beach and Carolyn Birmingham of Fort Pierce; and one grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

John Ryland Hinrichs John Ryland Hinrichs, Ph.D., 82, of Vero Beach and New Canaan, Conn., died March 7, 2012 at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach He was a graduate of McDonogh School in Baltimore and received an A.B. from Johns Hopkins University, where he was a member of Delta Phi fraternity. He received an M.S. from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in Industrial Psychology from Cornell University. He is survived by his wife Peggy. Memorial contributions to support

Elizabeth Frances Jackson, 98, died March 8, 2012, at her home in Winter Beach. She was a lifetime resident of Winter Beach. She worked as a citrus fruit packer in Indian River County and was a clerk at the local A&P Grocery Store as a partner in the family citrus business. She was a member of the First Baptist Church of Winter Beach. Survivors include her son, Dewey Walker of Vero Beach; daughters, Lena Walker of LaPlace, La., and Janet Anderson of Winter Beach; sisters, Ruby McCully and Edith Pippin, both of Vero Beach; six grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome.com.

Eileen Veronica Jehle Eileen Veronica Anderson Jehle, 92, died March 6, 2012, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 2008, coming from Massapequa Park, N.Y. She served in the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Army Auxiliary Corps, and was a member of the American Legion. She was of the Catholic faith. Before retirement, she was the secretary to the CEO of the Bankers Trust Company. Survivors include her son, Bruce Jehle of Vero Beach; daughter, Diane Jehle of Hollywood; and two grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Joe Lockridge Joe Lockridge, 62, died March 1, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Tiptonville, Tenn., and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years. He worked as a supervisor in the agriculture industry. Survivors include his daughters, Josephine of Vero Beach, Valarie of Tampa, and Yalonda and Marilyn, both of Dade City; and 11 grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Dorothy Campagna, 84, died Feb. 9, 2012, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in New York City, and lived in Vero Beach for 21 years, coming from Miami. Survivors include her grandson, Ethan Denniston of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to SunTrust Bank, c/o: Ethan Denniston at any SunTrust bank location. Arrangements are by All County Funeral Home & Crematory.

Josephine B. Chiarantona, 73, died March 9, 2012, at her home. She was born in Glendale, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 2005, coming from Auburn, Maine. Before retirement, she was a representative for 20 years in the insurance industry. She was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach and an active volunteer. Survivors include her son, Richard Chiarantona of Vero Beach; daughter, Jeanne Bonelli of Kings Park, N.Y.; sister, Diane Litterer of Long Island, N.Y.; brother, Frank Litterer of Rhode Island; and nine grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, 7550 26th St., Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

B E A C H

Dorothy Campagna

Elizabeth Frances Jackson Josephine B. Chiarantona

V E R O

Doris Sipes died March 4, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She born was in Charleston, S.C., and lived in Vero Beach for 44 years, coming from North Carolina. She had a career in fashion in New York and in 1987 she started Drapery Gallery Interiors and pursued her career as an interior decorator. She was devoted in her faith as a Christian. Survivors includes her husband, Eldon Bruce Sipes; daughters, Linda Sipes and Gail Tripp, both of Vero Beach, and Katherine Hunt of North Carolina; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Indian River Volunteer Ambulance Squad, P. O. Box 2240, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guest book is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Angie Ree Bell, 34, died March 3, 2012, at VNA Hospice House. She was born in Durham, N.C., and lived in Vero Beach for seven years, coming from Kissimmee. She recently was baptized into the Christian faith. Survivors include her son, Terrence D. Bell of Jasper; parents, Louise Bell of Gifford and Charles Bell Sr. of Fort Pierce; and brothers, Charles Bell Jr. and Jerry Bell, both of Fort Pierce. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice House, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

brain tumor research may be made to The Jackson Laboratory, 600 Main St., Bar Harbor, ME 04609.

!

Doris Sipes

Angie Ree Bell

from the Youngstown Hospital Association. Survivors include her brother, Gerald T. Capak; and sister, Marilyn C. Catterson, both of Vero Beach.

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Jimmie F. Sapper, 89, died March 5, 2012, at The Place, Vero Beach. She was born in Escanaba, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for seven years, coming from Atlanta. She was a Navy veteran. Following her service in the Navy, she continued her service to the country as a civilian at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. She was a graduate of Northwestern University with a degree in journalism. She was a member of the Eastern Star and Daughters of the Nile. Survivors include her daughters, Faith Sapper, Roberta Reba and Leilani Parr, all of Vero Beach; and one grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.aycockhillcrest.com.

Wilf L. Wood, 89, died Feb. 26, 2012, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in New York City and was a local resident for 25 years, coming from Cromwell, Conn. He was employed as a claims manager for the Hartford Insurance Co. Survivors include his wife of 66 years, Gloria Wood of Vero Beach; daughter, Marcia Wood Reitz of Fort Wayne, Ind.; sons, Wilf L. Wood Jr. of Vero Beach and Anthony J. Wood of Portland, Conn.; and one grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

1 5 ,

Jimmie F. Sapper

Wilf L. Wood

M A R C H

Baptist Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Richard Fiedler of North Hutchinson Island, Karl Hayes Whittington of Tallahassee and Thomas M. Whittington of Vero Beach; daughters, Joyce Stubbs of Graham, N.C., and Ann Powell of Vero Beach; sister, Ruby Warren of Corona, Calif.; 14 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.


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Real Estate

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M A R C H

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – March 1-March 7

Address 4601 Hwy. A1A, #409 5400 Hwy. A1A, #G29 4410 Hwy. A1A, #105

Subdivision Riverwalk Vista del Mar Ocean Club

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

716 Tides Rd. Silver Shores 1/6/12 $480,000 3/2/12 $440,000 Sheridan Network.com Cliff Glansen Norris & Company Bob Faller

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

118 Cache Cay Dr. Cache Cay 11/11/11 $398,000 3/2/12 $380,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Carolyn Lange Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE Rita Curry

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

965 Island Club Sq. Island Club of Vero 8/29/11 $349,000 3/5/12 $324,000 Norris & Company Debbie Bell Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Realty Janyne Kenworthy

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1890 Sandpiper Rd. E Summerplace 4/29/10 $299,000 3/2/12 $275,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl Realty Janyne Kenworthy Coville Getz & Co, LLC Karen Coville

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2135 Periwinkle Dr. Moorings 4/6/10 $299,900 3/1/12 $240,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Pat Zangre Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Carl Sciara Selling Broker/Agent Starfish Real Estate - Vero/Lois Sferra Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Helen Ederer Non MLS/NMLS AGENT

Address: 600 Riomar Dr., #15 Subdivision: Bayou Condo List Date: 8/4/08 List Price: $260,000 Sell Date: 3/6/12 Sell Price: $255,000 Listing Broker: Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Listing Agent: Matilde Sorensen Selling Broker: DiMarzo Realty, Inc. Selling Agent: Jim DiMarzo List Date List Price Sell Date Sell Price 3/3/11 $169,000 3/2/12 $160,000 8/18/11 $179,000 3/5/12 $130,000 6/21/11 $97,000 3/1/12 $91,000

Listing Broker/Agent Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Pat Zangre Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Larry Larson Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB/Sharon Noblet-Wininger

Mainland Real Estate Sales – March 1-March 7

Address 5265 Topaz Ln. SW 116 Harbor Point Dr.

Subdivision Diamond Lake Harbor Point

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

7654 Village Sq. S Pointe West South Village 12/29/11 $339,000 3/2/12 $325,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Scott Reynolds BREC Properties, Inc. George Nagy

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4700 Hamilton Ct. Hamilton Island at Oak Harbor 3/15/11 $295,000 3/7/12 $265,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Matilde Sorensen Real Estate Results Beth Binkley-Murphy

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2600 Heron Bay Ln. Falcon Trace 3/10/11 $269,000 3/6/12 $260,000 ML Executive Realty Inc. Monette Lesme Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. Debbie de Montigny

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

2405 Little Eagle Ln. Falcon Trace 10/12/11 $279,000 3/5/12 $250,000 Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Vance Brinkerhoff Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Vance Brinkerhoff

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent: List Date 11/14/11 11/1/11

1759 Belmont Cir. SW Millstone Landing 10/22/11 $235,000 3/2/12 $240,000 Real Living All Florida Realty Bob Lewis Vero Realty LLC Margot Sadler List Price Sell Date $285,000 3/1/12 $259,000 3/5/12

No Photo Available

Sell Price $231,000 $220,000

Address: 6525 114th Ln. Subdivision: Rousseau Rivershores List Date: 2/23/11 List Price: $285,000 Sell Date: 3/1/12 Sell Price: $240,000 Listing Broker: RE/MAX Riverside Listing Agent: Becky Boncek Selling Broker: RE/MAX Crown Realty Selling Agent: Laura Petersen Listing Broker/Agent Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Bobbie Holt Peters, Carlton & Mugford RE/Bevin Mugford RE/MAX Crown Realty/Ronnie Preuss RE/MAX Crown Realty/John King Jr.


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